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Sample records for elicit unique gene

  1. Photo-Elicitation and Visual Semiotics: A Unique Methodology for Studying Inclusion for Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockall, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The methodology in this paper discusses the use of photographs as an elicitation strategy that can reveal the thinking processes of participants in a qualitatively rich manner. Photo-elicitation techniques combined with a Piercian semiotic perspective offer a unique method for creating a frame of action for later participant analysis. Illustrative…

  2. Expression of three topologically distinct membrane proteins elicits unique stress response pathways in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Teresa M.; Jordan, Rick; Lyons-Weiler, James; Adelman, Joshua L.; Needham, Patrick G.; Kleyman, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Misfolded membrane proteins are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are subject to ER-associated degradation, which clears the secretory pathway of potentially toxic species. While the transcriptional response to environmental stressors has been extensively studied, limited data exist describing the cellular response to misfolded membrane proteins. To this end, we expressed and then compared the transcriptional profiles elicited by the synthesis of three ER retained, misfolded ion channels: The α-subunit of the epithelial sodium channel, ENaC, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, CFTR, and an inwardly rectifying potassium channel, Kir2.1, which vary in their mass, membrane topologies, and quaternary structures. To examine transcriptional profiles in a null background, the proteins were expressed in yeast, which was previously used to examine the degradation requirements for each substrate. Surprisingly, the proteins failed to induce a canonical unfolded protein response or heat shock response, although messages encoding several cytosolic and ER lumenal protein folding factors rose when αENaC or CFTR was expressed. In contrast, the levels of these genes were unaltered by Kir2.1 expression; instead, the yeast iron regulon was activated. Nevertheless, a significant number of genes that respond to various environmental stressors were upregulated by all three substrates, and compared with previous microarray data we deduced the existence of a group of genes that reflect a novel misfolded membrane protein response. These data indicate that aberrant proteins in the ER elicit profound yet unique cellular responses. PMID:25759377

  3. Basic Taste Stimuli Elicit Unique Responses in Facial Skin Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Kashima, Hideaki; Hayashi, Naoyuki

    2011-01-01

    Facial expression changes characteristically with the emotions induced by basic tastes in humans. We tested the hypothesis that the five basic tastes also elicit unique responses in facial skin blood flow. Facial skin blood flow was measured using laser speckle flowgraphy in 16 healthy subjects before and during the application of basic taste stimuli in the oral cavity for 20 s. The skin blood flow in the eyelid increased in response to sweet and umami taste stimuli, while that in the nose decreased in response to a bitter stimulus. There was a significant correlation between the subjective hedonic scores accompanying these taste stimuli and the above changes in skin blood flow. These results demonstrate that sweet, umami, and bitter tastes induce unique changes in facial skin blood flow that reflect subjective hedonic scores. PMID:22145032

  4. CYP1B1: a unique gene with unique characteristics.

    PubMed

    Faiq, Muneeb A; Dada, Rima; Sharma, Reetika; Saluja, Daman; Dada, Tanuj

    2014-01-01

    CYP1B1, a recently described dioxin inducible oxidoreductase, is a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily involved in the metabolism of estradiol, retinol, benzo[a]pyrene, tamoxifen, melatonin, sterols etc. It plays important roles in numerous physiological processes and is expressed at mRNA level in many tissues and anatomical compartments. CYP1B1 has been implicated in scores of disorders. Analyses of the recent studies suggest that CYP1B1 can serve as a universal/ideal cancer marker and a candidate gene for predictive diagnosis. There is plethora of literature available about certain aspects of CYP1B1 that have not been interpreted, discussed and philosophized upon. The present analysis examines CYP1B1 as a peculiar gene with certain distinctive characteristics like the uniqueness in its chromosomal location, gene structure and organization, involvement in developmentally important disorders, tissue specific, not only expression, but splicing, potential as a universal cancer marker due to its involvement in key aspects of cellular metabolism, use in diagnosis and predictive diagnosis of various diseases and the importance and function of CYP1B1 mRNA in addition to the regular translation. Also CYP1B1 is very difficult to express in heterologous expression systems, thereby, halting its functional studies. Here we review and analyze these exceptional and startling characteristics of CYP1B1 with inputs from our own experiences in order to get a better insight into its molecular biology in health and disease. This may help to further understand the etiopathomechanistic aspects of CYP1B1 mediated diseases paving way for better research strategies and improved clinical management. PMID:25658124

  5. Metabolic Reprogramming of Pancreatic Cancer Mediated by CDK4/6 Inhibition Elicits Unique Vulnerabilities.

    PubMed

    Franco, Jorge; Balaji, Uthra; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K; Knudsen, Erik S

    2016-02-01

    Due to loss of p16ink4a in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA), pharmacological suppression of CDK4/6 could represent a potent target for treatment. In PDA models, CDK4/6 inhibition had a variable effect on cell cycle but yielded accumulation of ATP and mitochondria. Pharmacological CDK4/6 inhibitors induce cyclin D1 protein levels; however, RB activation was required and sufficient for mitochondrial accumulation. CDK4/6 inhibition stimulated glycolytic and oxidative metabolism and was associated with an increase in mTORC1 activity. MTOR and MEK inhibitors potently cooperate with CDK4/6 inhibition in eliciting cell-cycle exit. However, MTOR inhibition fully suppressed metabolism and yielded apoptosis and suppression of tumor growth in xenograft models. The metabolic state mediated by CDK4/6 inhibition increases mitochondrial number and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Concordantly, the suppression of ROS scavenging or BCL2 antagonists cooperated with CDK4/6 inhibition. Together, these data define the impact of therapeutics on PDA metabolism and provide strategies for converting cytostatic response to tumor cell killing. PMID:26804906

  6. Comparison of Bacillus monooxygenase genes for unique fatty acid production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reviews Bacillus genes encoding monooxygenase enzymes producing unique fatty acid metabolites. Specifically, it examines standard monooxygenase electron transfer schemes and related domain structures of these fused domain enzymes on route to understanding the observed oxygenase activiti...

  7. DRUMS: a human disease related unique gene mutation search engine.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xingnan; Wen, Jingran; Xu, Ye; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2011-10-01

    With the completion of the human genome project and the development of new methods for gene variant detection, the integration of mutation data and its phenotypic consequences has become more important than ever. Among all available resources, locus-specific databases (LSDBs) curate one or more specific genes' mutation data along with high-quality phenotypes. Although some genotype-phenotype data from LSDB have been integrated into central databases little effort has been made to integrate all these data by a search engine approach. In this work, we have developed disease related unique gene mutation search engine (DRUMS), a search engine for human disease related unique gene mutation as a convenient tool for biologists or physicians to retrieve gene variant and related phenotype information. Gene variant and phenotype information were stored in a gene-centred relational database. Moreover, the relationships between mutations and diseases were indexed by the uniform resource identifier from LSDB, or another central database. By querying DRUMS, users can access the most popular mutation databases under one interface. DRUMS could be treated as a domain specific search engine. By using web crawling, indexing, and searching technologies, it provides a competitively efficient interface for searching and retrieving mutation data and their relationships to diseases. The present system is freely accessible at http://www.scbit.org/glif/new/drums/index.html. PMID:21913285

  8. Shared and unique mutational gene co-occurrences in cancers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junqi; Zhao, Di; Fan, Ruitai

    2015-10-01

    Cancers are often associated with mutations in multiple genes; thus, studying the distributions of genes that harbor cancer-promoting mutations in cancer samples and their co-occurrences could provide insights into cancer diagnostics and treatment. Using data from the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC), we found that mutated genes in cancer samples followed a power-law distribution. For instance, a few genes were mutated in a large number of samples (designated as high-frequent genes), while a large number of genes were only mutated in a few samples. This power-law distribution can be found in samples of all cancer types as well as individual cancers. In samples where two or more mutated genes are found, the high-frequent genes, i.e., those that were frequently mutated, often did not co-occur with other genes, while the other genes often tended to co-occur. Co-occurrences of mutated genes were often unique to a certain cancer; however, some co-occurrences were shared by multiple cancer types. Our results revealed distinct patterns of high-frequent genes and those that were less-frequently mutated in the cancer samples in co-occurring and anti-co-occurring networks. Our results indicated that distinct treatment strategies should be adopted for cancer patients with known high-frequent gene mutations and those without. The latter might be better treated with a combination of drugs targeting multiple genes. Our results also suggested that possible cross-cancer treatments, i.e., the use of the same drug combinations, may treat cancers of different histological origins. PMID:26315265

  9. Unique marine derived cyanobacterial biosynthetic genes for chemical diversity.

    PubMed

    Kleigrewe, Karin; Gerwick, Lena; Sherman, David H; Gerwick, William H

    2016-02-01

    Cyanobacteria are a prolific source of structurally unique and biologically active natural products that derive from intriguing biochemical pathways. Advancements in genome sequencing have accelerated the identification of unique modular biosynthetic gene clusters in cyanobacteria and reveal a wealth of unusual enzymatic reactions involved in their construction. This article examines several interesting mechanistic transformations involved in cyanobacterial secondary metabolite biosynthesis with a particular focus on marine derived modular polyketide synthases (PKS), nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) and combinations thereof to form hybrid natural products. Further, we focus on the cyanobacterial genus Moorea and the co-evolution of its enzyme cassettes that create metabolic diversity. Progress in the development of heterologous expression systems for cyanobacterial gene clusters along with chemoenzymatic synthesis makes it possible to create new analogs. Additionally, phylum-wide genome sequencing projects have enhanced the discovery rate of new natural products and their distinctive enzymatic reactions. Summarizing, cyanobacterial biosynthetic gene clusters encode for a large toolbox of novel enzymes that catalyze unique chemical reactions, some of which may be useful in synthetic biology. PMID:26758451

  10. No Association between Oxytocin Receptor (OXTR) Gene Polymorphisms and Experimentally Elicited Social Preferences

    PubMed Central

    Apicella, Coren L.; Cesarini, David; Johannesson, Magnus; Dawes, Christopher T.; Lichtenstein, Paul; Wallace, Björn; Beauchamp, Jonathan; Westberg, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Background Oxytocin (OXT) has been implicated in a suite of complex social behaviors including observed choices in economic laboratory experiments. However, actual studies of associations between oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene variants and experimentally elicited social preferences are rare. Methodology/Principal Findings We test hypotheses of associations between social preferences, as measured by behavior in two economic games, and 9 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the OXTR gene in a sample of Swedish twins (n = 684). Two standard economic games, the dictator game and the trust game, both involving real monetary consequences, were used to elicit such preferences. After correction for multiple hypothesis testing, we found no significant associations between any of the 9 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and behavior in either of the games. Conclusion We were unable to replicate the most significant association reported in previous research between the amount donated in a dictator game and an OXTR genetic variant. PMID:20585395

  11. Metabolic re-programming of pancreatic cancer mediated by CDK4/6 inhibition elicits unique vulnerabilities

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Jorge; Balaji, Uthra; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K.; Knudsen, Erik S.

    2016-01-01

    Due to loss of p16ink4a in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA), pharmacological suppression of CDK4/6 could represent a potent target for treatment. In PDA models CDK4/6 inhibition had variable effect on cell cycle, but yielded accumulation of ATP and mitochondria. Pharmacological CDK4/6 inhibitors induce cyclin D1 protein levels; however, RB activation was required and sufficient for mitochondrial accumulation. CDK4/6 inhibition stimulated glycolytic and oxidative metabolism and was associated with an increase in mTORC1 activity. MTOR and MEK inhibitors potently cooperate with CDK4/6 inhibition in eliciting cell cycle exit. However, MTOR inhibition fully suppressed metabolism and yielded apoptosis and suppression of tumor growth. The metabolic state mediated by CDK4/6 inhibition increases mitochondrial number and ROS. Concordantly, the suppression of ROS scavenging or BCL2-antagonists cooperated with CDK4/6 inhibition. Together, these data define the impact of therapeutics on PDA metabolism and provide strategies for converting cytostatic response to tumor cell killing. PMID:26804906

  12. SMART: unique splitting-while-merging framework for gene clustering.

    PubMed

    Fa, Rui; Roberts, David J; Nandi, Asoke K

    2014-01-01

    Successful clustering algorithms are highly dependent on parameter settings. The clustering performance degrades significantly unless parameters are properly set, and yet, it is difficult to set these parameters a priori. To address this issue, in this paper, we propose a unique splitting-while-merging clustering framework, named "splitting merging awareness tactics" (SMART), which does not require any a priori knowledge of either the number of clusters or even the possible range of this number. Unlike existing self-splitting algorithms, which over-cluster the dataset to a large number of clusters and then merge some similar clusters, our framework has the ability to split and merge clusters automatically during the process and produces the the most reliable clustering results, by intrinsically integrating many clustering techniques and tasks. The SMART framework is implemented with two distinct clustering paradigms in two algorithms: competitive learning and finite mixture model. Nevertheless, within the proposed SMART framework, many other algorithms can be derived for different clustering paradigms. The minimum message length algorithm is integrated into the framework as the clustering selection criterion. The usefulness of the SMART framework and its algorithms is tested in demonstration datasets and simulated gene expression datasets. Moreover, two real microarray gene expression datasets are studied using this approach. Based on the performance of many metrics, all numerical results show that SMART is superior to compared existing self-splitting algorithms and traditional algorithms. Three main properties of the proposed SMART framework are summarized as: (1) needing no parameters dependent on the respective dataset or a priori knowledge about the datasets, (2) extendible to many different applications, (3) offering superior performance compared with counterpart algorithms. PMID:24714159

  13. Distinct patterns of gene and protein expression elicited by organophosphorus pesticides in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, John A; Szilagyi, Maria; Gehman, Elizabeth; Dennis, William E; Jackson, David A

    2009-01-01

    Background The wide use of organophosphorus (OP) pesticides makes them an important public health concern. Persistent effects of exposure and the mechanism of neuronal degeneration are continuing issues in OP toxicology. To elucidate early steps in the mechanisms of OP toxicity, we studied alterations in global gene and protein expression in Caenorhabditis elegans exposed to OPs using microarrays and mass spectrometry. We tested two structurally distinct OPs (dichlorvos and fenamiphos) and employed a mechanistically different third neurotoxicant, mefloquine, as an out-group for analysis. Treatment levels used concentrations of chemical sufficient to prevent the development of 10%, 50% or 90% of mid-vulval L4 larvae into early gravid adults (EGA) at 24 h after exposure in a defined, bacteria-free medium. Results After 8 h of exposure, the expression of 87 genes responded specifically to OP treatment. The abundance of 34 proteins also changed in OP-exposed worms. Many of the genes and proteins affected by the OPs are expressed in neuronal and muscle tissues and are involved in lipid metabolism, cell adhesion, apoptosis/cell death, and detoxification. Twenty-two genes were differentially affected by the two OPs; a large proportion of these genes encode cytochrome P450s, UDP-glucuronosyl/UDP-glucosyltransferases, or P-glycoproteins. The abundance of transcripts and the proteins they encode were well correlated. Conclusion Exposure to OPs elicits a pattern of changes in gene expression in exposed worms distinct from that of the unrelated neurotoxicant, mefloquine. The functional roles and the tissue location of the genes and proteins whose expression is modulated in response to exposure is consistent with the known effects of OPs, including damage to muscle due to persistent hypercontraction, neuronal cell death, and phase I and phase II detoxification. Further, the two different OPs evoked distinguishable changes in gene expression; about half the differences are in

  14. Comparative Analysis of AhR-Mediated TCDD-Elicited Gene Expression in Human Liver Adult Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suntae; Dere, Edward; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Zacharewski, Timothy R.

    2009-01-01

    Time course and dose-response studies were conducted in HL1-1 cells, a human liver cell line with stem cell–like characteristics, to assess the differential gene expression elicited by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) compared with other established models. Cells were treated with 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, or 100nM TCDD or dimethyl sulfoxide vehicle control for 12 h for the dose-response study, or with 10nM TCDD or vehicle for 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, or 48 h for the time course study. Elicited changes were monitored using a human cDNA microarray with 6995 represented genes. Empirical Bayes analysis identified 144 genes differentially expressed at one or more time points following treatment. Most genes exhibited dose-dependent responses including CYP1A1, CYP1B1, ALDH1A3, and SLC7A5 genes. Comparative analysis of HL1-1 differential gene expression to human HepG2 data identified 74 genes with comparable temporal expression profiles including 12 putative primary responses. HL1-1–specific changes were related to lipid metabolism and immune responses, consistent with effects elicited in vivo. Furthermore, comparative analysis of HL1-1 cells with mouse Hepa1c1c7 hepatoma cell lines and C57BL/6 hepatic tissue identified 18 and 32 commonly regulated orthologous genes, respectively, with functions associated with signal transduction, transcriptional regulation, metabolism and transport. Although some common pathways are affected, the results suggest that TCDD elicits species- and model-specific gene expression profiles. PMID:19684285

  15. Biphasic gene expression changes elicited by Phakopsora pachyrhizi in soybean correlates with fungal penetration and haustoria formation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inoculation of soybean plants with Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the causal organism of Asian soybean rust, elicits a biphasic response characterized by a burst of differential gene expression in the first 12 h. A quiescent period occurs from 24 to 48 h after inoculation in which P. pachyrhizi continues t...

  16. Cyclic lipopeptides from Bacillus subtilis ABS-S14 elicit defense-related gene expression in citrus fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of cyclic lipopeptides obtained from B. subtilis ABS-S14 on eliciting defense-related gene transcription and activity of defense-related enzymes glucanase (GLU), chitinase (CHI), peroxidase (POX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) in Citrus sinensis cv. Valencia fruit were determined. The maximum level ...

  17. Embryonic Atrazine Exposure Elicits Alterations in Genes Associated with Neuroendocrine Function in Adult Male Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Wirbisky, Sara E; Sepúlveda, Maria S; Weber, Gregory J; Jannasch, Amber S; Horzmann, Katharine A; Freeman, Jennifer L

    2016-09-01

    The developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) hypothesis states that exposure to environmental stressors early in life can elicit genome and epigenome changes resulting in an increased susceptibility of a disease state during adulthood. Atrazine, a common agricultural herbicide used throughout the Midwestern United States, frequently contaminates potable water supplies and is a suspected endocrine disrupting chemical. In our previous studies, zebrafish was exposed to 0, 0.3, 3, or 30 parts per billion (μg/l) atrazine through embryogenesis, rinsed, and allowed to mature to adulthood. A decrease in spawning was observed with morphological alterations in offspring. In addition, adult females displayed an increase in ovarian progesterone and follicular atresia, alterations in levels of a serotonin metabolite and serotonin turnover in brain tissue, and transcriptome changes in brain and ovarian tissue supporting neuroendocrine alterations. As reproductive dysfunction is also influenced by males, this study assessed testes histology, hormone levels, and transcriptomic profiles of testes and brain tissue in the adult males. The embryonic atrazine exposure resulted in no alterations in body or testes weight, gonadosomatic index, testes histology, or levels of 11-ketotestosterone or testosterone. To further investigate potential alterations, transcriptomic profiles of adult male testes and brain tissue was completed. This analysis demonstrated alterations in genes associated with abnormal cell and neuronal growth and morphology; molecular transport, quantity, and production of steroid hormones; and neurotransmission with an emphasis on the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axes. Overall, this data indicate future studies should focus on additional neuroendocrine endpoints to determine potential functional impairments. PMID:27413107

  18. Cyclic Lipopeptides from Bacillus subtilis ABS–S14 Elicit Defense-Related Gene Expression in Citrus Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Waewthongrak, Waewruedee; Leelasuphakul, Wichitra; McCollum, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Effects of cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) obtained from Bacillus subtilis ABS-S14 on eliciting defense-related gene transcription and activity of defense-related enzymes; glucanase (GLU), chitinase (CHI), peroxidase (POX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) in Citrus sinensis cv. Valencia fruit were determined. The maximum level of GLU transcripts induced in fruit treated with fengycin was significantly greatest among treatments at 48 h. Surfactin enhanced the LOX and POX transcripts. In parallel, corresponding enzyme activities were correlated with changes in gene expression observed in fruit inoculated with Penicillium digitatum following treatment with individual CLPs. Synergistic effects of fengycin and iturin A, fengycin and surfactin were shown in gene transcript of GLU and CHI, respectively, and surfactin induced POX and LOX gene expression of citrus flavedo without pathogen infection. These results suggest that fengycin and surfactin act as elicitors of defense-related gene expression in “Valencia” fruit following infection. PMID:25329301

  19. Cyclic LIPopeptides from Bacillus subtilis ABS-S14 elicit defense-related gene expression in citrus fruit.

    PubMed

    Waewthongrak, Waewruedee; Leelasuphakul, Wichitra; McCollum, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Effects of cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) obtained from Bacillus subtilis ABS-S14 on eliciting defense-related gene transcription and activity of defense-related enzymes; glucanase (GLU), chitinase (CHI), peroxidase (POX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) in Citrus sinensis cv. Valencia fruit were determined. The maximum level of GLU transcripts induced in fruit treated with fengycin was significantly greatest among treatments at 48 h. Surfactin enhanced the LOX and POX transcripts. In parallel, corresponding enzyme activities were correlated with changes in gene expression observed in fruit inoculated with Penicillium digitatum following treatment with individual CLPs. Synergistic effects of fengycin and iturin A, fengycin and surfactin were shown in gene transcript of GLU and CHI, respectively, and surfactin induced POX and LOX gene expression of citrus flavedo without pathogen infection. These results suggest that fengycin and surfactin act as elicitors of defense-related gene expression in "Valencia" fruit following infection. PMID:25329301

  20. Wounding tomato fruit elicits ripening-stage specific changes in gene expression and production of volatile compounds

    PubMed Central

    Baldassarre, Valentina; Cabassi, Giovanni; Spadafora, Natasha D.; Aprile, Alessio; Müller, Carsten T.; Rogers, Hilary J.; Ferrante, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Fleshy fruits develop from an unripe organ that needs to be protected from damage to a ripe organ that attracts frugivores for seed dispersal through production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Thus, different responses to wounding damage are predicted. The aim of this study was to discover whether wound-induced changes in the transcriptome and VOC production alter as tomato transitions from unripe to ripe. Transcript changes were analysed 3h post-wounding using microarray analysis in two commercial salad-tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) cultivars: Luna Rossa and AVG, chosen for their high aroma production. This was followed by quantitative PCR on Luna Rossa genes involved in VOC biosynthesis and defence responses. VOCs elicited by wounding at different ripening stages were analysed by solid phase micro extraction and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Approximately 4000 differentially expressed genes were identified in the cultivar AVG and 2500 in Luna Rossa. In both cultivars the majority of genes were up-regulated and the most affected pathways were metabolism of terpenes, carotenoids, and lipids. Defence-related genes were mostly up-regulated in immature stages of development, whereas expression of genes related to VOCs changed at riper stages. More than 40 VOCs were detected and profiles changed with ripening stage. Thus, both transcriptome and VOC profiles elicited by wounding depend on stage of ripening, indicating a shift from defence to attraction. PMID:25614658

  1. Ultraviolet Radiation-Elicited Enhancement of Isoflavonoid Accumulation, Biosynthetic Gene Expression, and Antioxidant Activity in Astragalus membranaceus Hairy Root Cultures.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiao; Gai, Qing-Yan; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Gu, Cheng-Bo; Fu, Yu-Jie; Ma, Wei

    2015-09-23

    In this work, Astragalus membranaceus hairy root cultures (AMHRCs) were exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV-A, UV-B, and UV-C) for promoting isoflavonoid accumulation. The optimum enhancement for isoflavonoid production was achieved in 34-day-old AMHRCs elicited by 86.4 kJ/m(2) of UV-B. The resulting isoflavonoid yield was 533.54 ± 13.61 μg/g dry weight (DW), which was 2.29-fold higher relative to control (232.93 ± 3.08 μg/g DW). UV-B up-regulated the transcriptional expressions of all investigated genes involved in isoflavonoid biosynthetic pathway. PAL and C4H were found to be two potential key genes that controlled isoflavonoid biosynthesis. Moreover, a significant increase was noted in antioxidant activity of extracts from UV-B-elicited AMHRCs (IC50 values = 0.85 and 1.08 mg/mL) in comparison with control (1.38 and 1.71 mg/mL). Overall, this study offered a feasible elicitation strategy to enhance isoflavonoid accumulation in AMHRCs and also provided a basis for metabolic engineering of isoflavonoid biosynthesis in the future. PMID:26370303

  2. Mucosal candidiasis elicits NF-κB activation, proinflammatory gene expression and localized neutrophilia in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Gratacap, Remi L; Rawls, John F; Wheeler, Robert T

    2013-09-01

    The epithelium performs a balancing act at the interface between an animal and its environment to enable both pathogen killing and tolerance of commensal microorganisms. Candida albicans is a clinically important human commensal that colonizes all human mucosal surfaces, yet is largely prevented from causing mucosal infections in immunocompetent individuals. Despite the importance of understanding host-pathogen interactions at the epithelium, no immunocompetent vertebrate model has been used to visualize these dynamics non-invasively. Here we demonstrate important similarities between swimbladder candidiasis in the transparent zebrafish and mucosal infection at the mammalian epithelium. Specifically, in the zebrafish swimmbladder infection model, we show dimorphic fungal growth, both localized and tissue-wide epithelial NF-κB activation, induction of NF-κB -dependent proinflammatory genes, and strong neutrophilia. Consistent with density-dependence models of host response based primarily on tissue culture experiments, we show that only high-level infection provokes widespread activation of NF-κB in epithelial cells and induction of proinflammatory genes. Similar to what has been found using in vitro mammalian models, we find that epithelial NF-κB activation can occur at a distance from the immediate site of contact with epithelial cells. Taking advantage of the ability to non-invasively image infection and host signaling at high resolution, we also report that epithelial NF-κB activation is diminished when phagocytes control the infection. This is the first system to model host response to mucosal infection in the juvenile zebrafish, and offers unique opportunities to investigate the tripartite interactions of C. albicans, epithelium and immune cells in an intact host. PMID:23720235

  3. Comparative Analysis of Temporal and Dose-Dependent TCDD-Elicited Gene Expression in Human, Mouse, and Rat Primary Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zacharewski, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)–elicited time- and dose-dependent differential gene expression was compared in human, mouse, and rat primary hepatocytes. Comprehensive time course (10 nM TCDD or dimethyl sulfoxide vehicle control for 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48h) studies identified 495, 2305, and 711 differentially expressed orthologous genes in human, mouse, and rat hepatocytes, respectively. However, only 16 orthologs were differentially expressed across all three species, with the majority of orthologs exhibiting species-specific expression (399 human, 2097 mouse, and 533 rat), consistent with species-specific expression reported in other in vitro and in vivo comparative studies. TCDD also elicited the dose-dependent induction of 397 human, 100 mouse, and 443 rat genes at 12h and 615 human, 426 mouse, and 314 rat genes at 24h. Comparable EC50 values were obtained for AhR battery genes including Cyp1a1 (0.1 nM human, 0.05 nM mouse, 0.08 nM rat at 24h) and Tiparp (0.97 nM human, 0.63 nM mouse, 0.14 nM rat at 12h). Overrepresented functions and pathways included amino acid metabolism in humans, immune response in mice, and energy homeostasis in rats. Differentially expressed genes functionally associated with lipid transport, processing, and metabolism were overrepresented in all three species but exhibited species-specific expression consistent with the induction of hepatic steatosis in mice but not in rats following a single oral gavage of TCDD. Furthermore, human primary hepatocytes showed lipid accumulation following 48h of treatment with TCDD, suggesting that AhR-mediated steatosis in mice more closely resembles human hepatic fat accumulation compared with that in rats. Collectively, these results suggest that species-specific gene expression profiles mediate the species-specific effects of TCDD despite the conservation of the AhR and its signaling mechanism. PMID:23418086

  4. Transcriptomic sequencing reveals a set of unique genes activated by butyrate-induced histone modification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes induced by butyrate in the bovine epithelial cell using deep RNA-sequencing technology (RNA-seq), a set of unique gen...

  5. GENOMIC ORGANIZATION OF THE SP22 GENE AND A UNIQUE PATTERN OF EXPRESSION IN SPERMATOGENIC CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    GENOMIC ORGANIZATION OF THE SP22 GENE AND A UNIQUE PATTERN OF EXPRESSION IN SPERMATOGENIC CELLS.
    JE Welch*, RR Barbee*, JD Suarez*, NL Roberts*, and GR Klinefelter. Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
    Our laboratory has rep...

  6. Transcriptomic Sequencing Reveals a Set of Unique Genes Activated by Butyrate-Induced Histone Modification.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong-Jun; Li, Robert W; Baldwin, Ransom L; Blomberg, Le Ann; Wu, Sitao; Li, Weizhong

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes in the bovine epithelial cells using RNA sequencing technology, a set of unique genes that are activated only after butyrate treatment were revealed. A complementary bioinformatics analysis of the functional category, pathway, and integrated network, using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, indicated that these genes activated by butyrate treatment are related to major cellular functions, including cell morphological changes, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Our results offered insight into the butyrate-induced transcriptomic changes and will accelerate our discerning of the molecular fundamentals of epigenomic regulation. PMID:26819550

  7. Transcriptomic Sequencing Reveals a Set of Unique Genes Activated by Butyrate-Induced Histone Modification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cong-Jun; Li, Robert W.; Baldwin, Ransom L.; Blomberg, Le Ann; Wu, Sitao; Li, Weizhong

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes in the bovine epithelial cells using RNA sequencing technology, a set of unique genes that are activated only after butyrate treatment were revealed. A complementary bioinformatics analysis of the functional category, pathway, and integrated network, using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, indicated that these genes activated by butyrate treatment are related to major cellular functions, including cell morphological changes, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Our results offered insight into the butyrate-induced transcriptomic changes and will accelerate our discerning of the molecular fundamentals of epigenomic regulation. PMID:26819550

  8. Uniquely Regulated Proteinase Inhibitor I Gene in a Wild Tomato Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Wingate, Vincent P. M.; Ryan, Clarence A.

    1991-01-01

    A uniquely regulated proteinase inhibitor I gene was isolated from the wild tomato species Lycopersicon peruvianum (L.) Mill. (LA 107) and characterized. The inhibitor gene is wound-inducible in leaves and is expressed in unripe fruit during development. The gene (λ clone 1) is present on a 15.5 kilobase pair Sal 1-SalI genomic DNA fragment. Southern blot analysis of L. peruvianum genomic DNA shows only one strongly hybridizing DNA fragment to probes derived from λ clone 1. S1 nuclease protection experiments and Northern analyses confirm that this gene is both wound-inducible in leaves and developmentally regulated in young unripe fruit. These observations are supported by comparisons of the 5′-flanking DNA sequences of the L. peruvianum inhibitor I gene with known elicitor responsive cis-acting sequences. The transcriptional regulation of the λ clone 1 inhibitor I gene in leaves of wounded plants and in developing unripe fruit indicates that the gene contains unique complex regulating elements. These elements respond to both environmental and developmental tissue-specific signals that can regulate proteinase inhibitor synthesis to protect the tissues of this wild species of tomato against predators and pathogens. ImagesFigure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:16668426

  9. Putative and unique gene sequence utilization for the design of species specific probes as modeled by Lactobacillus plantarum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concept of utilizing putative and unique gene sequences for the design of species specific probes was tested. The abundance profile of assigned functions within the Lactobacillus plantarum genome was used for the identification of the putative and unique gene sequence, csh. The targeted gene (cs...

  10. Mitogenomic sequences and evidence from unique gene rearrangements corroborate evolutionary relationships of myctophiformes (Neoteleostei)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A skewed assemblage of two epi-, meso- and bathypelagic fish families makes up the order Myctophiformes – the blackchins Neoscopelidae and the lanternfishes Myctophidae. The six rare neoscopelids show few morphological specializations whereas the divergent myctophids have evolved into about 250 species, of which many show massive abundances and wide distributions. In fact, Myctophidae is by far the most abundant fish family in the world, with plausible estimates of more than half of the oceans combined fish biomass. Myctophids possess a unique communication system of species-specific photophore patterns and traditional intrafamilial classification has been established to reflect arrangements of photophores. Myctophids present the most diverse array of larval body forms found in fishes although this attribute has both corroborated and confounded phylogenetic hypotheses based on adult morphology. No molecular phylogeny is available for Myctophiformes, despite their importance within all ocean trophic cycles, open-ocean speciation and as an important part of neoteleost divergence. This study attempts to resolve major myctophiform phylogenies from both mitogenomic sequences and corroborating evidence in the form of unique mitochondrial gene order rearrangements. Results Mitogenomic evidence from DNA sequences and unique gene orders are highly congruent concerning phylogenetic resolution on several myctophiform classification levels, corroborating evidence from osteology, larval ontogeny and photophore patterns, although the lack of larval morphological characters within the subfamily Lampanyctinae stands out. Neoscopelidae is resolved as the sister family to myctophids with Solivomer arenidens positioned as a sister taxon to the remaining neoscopelids. The enigmatic Notolychnus valdiviae is placed as a sister taxon to all other myctophids and exhibits an unusual second copy of the tRNA-Met gene – a gene order rearrangement reminiscent of that found in

  11. Eliciting specific humoral immunity from a plasmid DNA encoding infectious bursal disease virus polyprotein gene fused with avian influenza virus hemagglutinin gene.

    PubMed

    Mosley, Yung-Yi C; Hsieh, Ming Kun; Wu, Ching Ching; Lin, Tsang Long

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccine coding for infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) polyprotein gene and that for avian influenza virus (AIV) hemagglutinin (HA) gene have been shown to induce immunity and provide protection against the respective disease. The present study was carried out to determine whether an IBDV polyprotein gene-based DNA fused with AIV HA gene could trigger immune response to both IBDV and AIV. After transfection, VP2 and HA were detected in the cytoplasm and at cell membrane, respectively, by immunofluorescent antibody double staining method, suggesting the fusion strategy did not affect the location of protein expression. VP4 cleavage between VP2 and HA was confirmed by Western blot, indicating the fusion strategy did not affect VP4 function in transfected cells. After vaccination in chickens, the DNA construct VP24-HA/pcDNA induced ELISA and virus neutralizing antibodies against VP2 and hemagglutination inhibition antibody against the HA subtype. The results indicated that a single plasmid construct carrying IBDV VP243 gene-based DNA fused with AIV HA gene can elicit specific antibody responses to both IBDV and AIV by DNA vaccination. PMID:25445883

  12. The Unique Biosynthetic Route from Lupinus β-Conglutin Gene to Blad

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Sara; Freitas, Regina; Rajasekhar, Baru T.; Teixeira, Artur R.; Ferreira, Ricardo B.

    2010-01-01

    Background During seed germination, β-conglutin undergoes a major cycle of limited proteolysis in which many of its constituent subunits are processed into a 20 kDa polypeptide termed blad. Blad is the main component of a glycooligomer, accumulating exclusively in the cotyledons of Lupinus species, between days 4 and 12 after the onset of germination. Principal Findings The sequence of the gene encoding β-conglutin precursor (1791 nucleotides) is reported. This gene, which shares 44 to 57% similarity and 20 to 37% identity with other vicilin-like protein genes, includes several features in common with these globulins, but also specific hallmarks. Most notable is the presence of an ubiquitin interacting motif (UIM), which possibly links the unique catabolic route of β-conglutin to the ubiquitin/proteasome proteolytic pathway. Significance Blad forms through a unique route from and is a stable intermediary product of its precursor, β-conglutin, the major Lupinus seed storage protein. It is composed of 173 amino acid residues, is encoded by an intron-containing, internal fragment of the gene that codes for β-conglutin precursor (nucleotides 394 to 913) and exhibits an isoelectric point of 9.6 and a molecular mass of 20,404.85 Da. Consistent with its role as a storage protein, blad contains an extremely high proportion of the nitrogen-rich amino acids. PMID:20066045

  13. COUP-TF gene: a structure unique for the steroid/thyroid receptor superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, H H; Wang, L H; Tsai, S; O'Malley, B W; Tsai, M J

    1990-01-01

    Two different genomic genes for the COUP-transcription factor, COUP-TF I and COUP-TF II, have been isolated from a human cosmid genomic library using a [32P]-labeled cDNA probe. Data obtained from Southern blot analysis of these cosmid clones indicated that two closely related genes exist in the human genome and have a similar genomic organization. The genes are similar in the hormone and DNA binding domains but diverge from one another in the N-terminal region. Using DNA sequencing and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques we have determined that the structure of COUP-TF I consists only of three exons and two introns. Surprisingly, both zinc fingers (i.e., F1 and F2) are located in the first exon. Therefore, COUP-TF I is unique among the members of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily which have been described to date. Images PMID:2263450

  14. ATP Released by Electrical Stimuli Elicits Calcium Transients and Gene Expression in Skeletal Muscle*

    PubMed Central

    Buvinic, Sonja; Almarza, Gonzalo; Bustamante, Mario; Casas, Mariana; López, Javiera; Riquelme, Manuel; Sáez, Juan Carlos; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    ATP released from cells is known to activate plasma membrane P2X (ionotropic) or P2Y (metabotropic) receptors. In skeletal muscle cells, depolarizing stimuli induce both a fast calcium signal associated with contraction and a slow signal that regulates gene expression. Here we show that nucleotides released to the extracellular medium by electrical stimulation are partly involved in the fast component and are largely responsible for the slow signals. In rat skeletal myotubes, a tetanic stimulus (45 Hz, 400 1-ms pulses) rapidly increased extracellular levels of ATP, ADP, and AMP after 15 s to 3 min. Exogenous ATP induced an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration, with an EC50 value of 7.8 ± 3.1 μm. Exogenous ADP, UTP, and UDP also promoted calcium transients. Both fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanic stimulation were inhibited by either 100 μm suramin or 2 units/ml apyrase. Apyrase also reduced fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanus (45 Hz, 400 0.3-ms pulses) in isolated mouse adult skeletal fibers. A likely candidate for the ATP release pathway is the pannexin-1 hemichannel; its blockers inhibited both calcium transients and ATP release. The dihydropyridine receptor co-precipitated with both the P2Y2 receptor and pannexin-1. As reported previously for electrical stimulation, 500 μm ATP significantly increased mRNA expression for both c-fos and interleukin 6. Our results suggest that nucleotides released during skeletal muscle activity through pannexin-1 hemichannels act through P2X and P2Y receptors to modulate both Ca2+ homeostasis and muscle physiology. PMID:19822518

  15. A parthenogenesis gene of apomict origin elicits embryo formation from unfertilized eggs in a sexual plant.

    PubMed

    Conner, Joann A; Mookkan, Muruganantham; Huo, Heqiang; Chae, Keun; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2015-09-01

    Apomixis is a naturally occurring mode of asexual reproduction in flowering plants that results in seed formation without the involvement of meiosis or fertilization of the egg. Seeds formed on an apomictic plant contain offspring genetically identical to the maternal plant. Apomixis has significant potential for preserving hybrid vigor from one generation to the next in highly productive crop plant genotypes. Apomictic Pennisetum/Cenchrus species, members of the Poaceae (grass) family, reproduce by apospory. Apospory is characterized by apomeiosis, the formation of unreduced embryo sacs derived from nucellar cells of the ovary and, by parthenogenesis, the development of the unreduced egg into an embryo without fertilization. In Pennisetum squamulatum (L.) R.Br., apospory segregates as a single dominant locus, the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR). In this study, we demonstrate that the PsASGR-BABY BOOM-like (PsASGR-BBML) gene is expressed in egg cells before fertilization and can induce parthenogenesis and the production of haploid offspring in transgenic sexual pearl millet. A reduction of PsASGR-BBML expression in apomictic F1 RNAi transgenic plants results in fewer visible parthenogenetic embryos and a reduction of embryo cell number compared with controls. Our results endorse a key role for PsASGR-BBML in parthenogenesis and a newly discovered role for a member of the BBM-like clade of APETALA 2 transcription factors. Induction of parthenogenesis by PsASGR-BBML will be valuable for installing parthenogenesis to synthesize apomixis in crops and will have further application for haploid induction to rapidly obtain homozygous lines for breeding. PMID:26305939

  16. A parthenogenesis gene of apomict origin elicits embryo formation from unfertilized eggs in a sexual plant

    PubMed Central

    Conner, Joann A.; Mookkan, Muruganantham; Huo, Heqiang; Chae, Keun; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    Apomixis is a naturally occurring mode of asexual reproduction in flowering plants that results in seed formation without the involvement of meiosis or fertilization of the egg. Seeds formed on an apomictic plant contain offspring genetically identical to the maternal plant. Apomixis has significant potential for preserving hybrid vigor from one generation to the next in highly productive crop plant genotypes. Apomictic Pennisetum/Cenchrus species, members of the Poaceae (grass) family, reproduce by apospory. Apospory is characterized by apomeiosis, the formation of unreduced embryo sacs derived from nucellar cells of the ovary and, by parthenogenesis, the development of the unreduced egg into an embryo without fertilization. In Pennisetum squamulatum (L.) R.Br., apospory segregates as a single dominant locus, the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR). In this study, we demonstrate that the PsASGR-BABY BOOM-like (PsASGR-BBML) gene is expressed in egg cells before fertilization and can induce parthenogenesis and the production of haploid offspring in transgenic sexual pearl millet. A reduction of PsASGR-BBML expression in apomictic F1 RNAi transgenic plants results in fewer visible parthenogenetic embryos and a reduction of embryo cell number compared with controls. Our results endorse a key role for PsASGR-BBML in parthenogenesis and a newly discovered role for a member of the BBM-like clade of APETALA 2 transcription factors. Induction of parthenogenesis by PsASGR-BBML will be valuable for installing parthenogenesis to synthesize apomixis in crops and will have further application for haploid induction to rapidly obtain homozygous lines for breeding. PMID:26305939

  17. Uncoupled defense gene expression and antimicrobial alkaloid accumulation in elicited opium poppy cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Facchini, P J; Johnson, A G; Poupart, J; de Luca, V

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) cell cultures with autoclaved mycelial homogenates of Botrytis sp. resulted in the accumulation of sanguinarine. Elicitor treatment also caused a rapid and transient induction in the activity of tyrosine/dopa decarboxylase (TYDC, EC 4.1.1.25), which catalyzes the conversion of L-tyrosine and L-dopa to tyramine and dopamine, respectively, the first steps in sanguinarine biosynthesis. TYDC genes were differentially expressed in response to elicitor treatment. TYDC1-like mRNA levels were induced rapidly but declined to near baseline levels within 5 h. In contrast, TYDC2-like transcript levels increased more slowly but were sustained for an extended period. Induction of TYDC mRNAs preceded that of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL, EC 4.3.1.5) mRNAs. An elicitor preparation from Pythium aphanidermatum was less effective in the induction of TYDC mRNA levels and alkaloid accumulation; however, both elicitors equally induced accumulation of PAL transcripts. In contrast, treatment with methyl jasmonate resulted in an induction of TYDC but not PAL mRNAs. The calmodulin antagonist N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide and the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine partially blocked the fungal elicitor-induced accumulation of sanguinarine. However, only staurosporine and okadaic acid, an inhibitor of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, blocked the induction of TYDC1-like transcript levels, but they did not block the induction of TYDC2-like or PAL transcript levels. These data suggest that activation mechanisms for PAL, TYDC, and some later sanguinarine biosynthetic enzymes are uncoupled. PMID:8754678

  18. Differential expression of olfactory genes in the southern house mosquito and insights into unique odorant receptor gene isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Walter S.; Choo, Young-Moo; Xu, Pingxi; da Silva, Cherre S. B.; Ueira-Vieira, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, has one of the most acute and eclectic olfactory systems of all mosquito species hitherto studied. Here, we used Illumina sequencing to identify olfactory genes expressed predominantly in antenna, mosquito’s main olfactory organ. Less than 50% of the trimmed reads generated by high-quality libraries aligned to a transcript, but approximately 70% of them aligned to the genome. Differential expression analysis, which was validated by quantitative real-time PCR on a subset of genes, showed that approximately half of the 48 odorant-binding protein genes were enriched in antennae, with the other half being predominantly expressed in legs. Similar patterns were observed with chemosensory proteins, “plus-C” odorant-binding proteins, and sensory neuron membrane proteins. Transcripts for as many as 43 ionotropic receptors were enriched in female antennae, thus making the ionotropic receptor family the largest of antennae-rich olfactory genes, second only to odorant receptor (OR) genes. As many as 177 OR genes have been identified, including 36 unique transcripts. The unique OR genes differed from previously annotated ORs in internal sequences, splice variants, and extended N or C terminus. One of the previously unknown transcripts was validated by cloning and functional expression. When challenged with a large panel of physiologically relevant compounds, CquiOR95b responded in a dose-dependent manner to ethyl 2-phenylacteate, which was demonstrated to repel Culex mosquitoes, and secondarily to citronellal, a known insect repellent. This transcriptome study led to identification of key molecular components and a repellent for the southern house mosquito. PMID:24167245

  19. Differences in TCDD-elicited gene expression profiles in human HepG2, mouse Hepa1c1c7 and rat H4IIE hepatoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is an environmental contaminant that elicits a broad spectrum of toxic effects in a species-specific manner. Current risk assessment practices routinely extrapolate results from in vivo and in vitro rodent models to assess human risk. In order to further investigate the species-specific responses elicited by TCDD, temporal gene expression responses in human HepG2, mouse Hepa1c1c7 and rat H4IIE cells were compared. Results Microarray analysis identified a core set of conserved gene expression responses across species consistent with the role of AhR in mediating adaptive metabolic responses. However, significant species-specific as well as species-divergent responses were identified. Computational analysis of the regulatory regions of species-specific and -divergent responses suggests that dioxin response elements (DREs) are involved. These results are consistent with in vivo rat vs. mouse species-specific differential gene expression, and more comprehensive comparative DRE searches. Conclusions Comparative analysis of human HepG2, mouse Hepa1c1c7 and rat H4IIE TCDD-elicited gene expression responses is consistent with in vivo rat-mouse comparative gene expression studies, and more comprehensive comparative DRE searches, suggesting that AhR-mediated gene expression is species-specific. PMID:21496263

  20. A unique wheat disease resistance-like gene governs effector-triggered susceptibility to necrotrophic pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Faris, Justin D.; Zhang, Zengcui; Lu, Huangjun; Lu, Shunwen; Reddy, Leela; Cloutier, Sylvie; Fellers, John P.; Meinhardt, Steven W.; Rasmussen, Jack B.; Xu, Steven S.; Oliver, Richard P.; Simons, Kristin J.; Friesen, Timothy L.

    2010-01-01

    Plant disease resistance is often conferred by genes with nucleotide binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) or serine/threonine protein kinase (S/TPK) domains. Much less is known about mechanisms of susceptibility, particularly to necrotrophic fungal pathogens. The pathogens that cause the diseases tan spot and Stagonospora nodorum blotch on wheat produce effectors (host-selective toxins) that induce susceptibility in wheat lines harboring corresponding toxin sensitivity genes. The effector ToxA is produced by both pathogens, and sensitivity to ToxA is governed by the Tsn1 gene on wheat chromosome arm 5BL. Here, we report the cloning of Tsn1, which was found to have disease resistance gene-like features, including S/TPK and NBS-LRR domains. Mutagenesis revealed that all three domains are required for ToxA sensitivity, and hence disease susceptibility. Tsn1 is unique to ToxA-sensitive genotypes, and insensitive genotypes are null. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis indicated that Tsn1 arose in the B-genome diploid progenitor of polyploid wheat through a gene-fusion event that gave rise to its unique structure. Although Tsn1 is necessary to mediate ToxA recognition, yeast two-hybrid experiments suggested that the Tsn1 protein does not interact directly with ToxA. Tsn1 transcription is tightly regulated by the circadian clock and light, providing further evidence that Tsn1-ToxA interactions are associated with photosynthesis pathways. This work suggests that these necrotrophic pathogens may thrive by subverting the resistance mechanisms acquired by plants to combat other pathogens. PMID:20624958

  1. Gene deleted live attenuated Leishmania vaccine candidates against visceral leishmaniasis elicit pro-inflammatory cytokines response in human PBMCs.

    PubMed

    Avishek, Kumar; Kaushal, Himanshu; Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Dey, Ranadhir; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Ramesh, V; Negi, Narender Singh; Dubey, Uma S; Nakhasi, Hira L; Salotra, Poonam

    2016-01-01

    Currently no effective vaccine is available for human visceral leishmaniasis(VL) caused by Leishmania donovani. Previously, we showed that centrin1 and p27gene deleted live attenuated Leishmania parasites (LdCen1(-/-) and Ldp27(-/-)) are safe, immunogenic and protective in animal models. Here, to assess the correlates of protection, we evaluated immune responses induced by LdCen1(-/-) and Ldp27(-/-) in human blood samples obtained from healthy, healed VL (HVL), post kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis(PKDL) and VL subjects. Both parasites infected human macrophages, as effectively as the wild type parasites. Further, LdCen1(-/-) and Ldp27(-/-) strongly stimulated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including, IL-12, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-17 in the PBMCs obtained from individuals with a prior exposure to Leishmania (HVL and PKDL). There was no significant stimulation of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10). Induction of Th1 biased immune responses was supported by a remarkable increase in IFN-γ secreting CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and IL-17 secreting CD4(+) cells in PBMCs from HVL cases with no increase in IL-10 secreting T cells. Hence, LdCen1(-/-) and Ldp27(-/-) are promising as live vaccine candidates against VL since they elicit strong protective immune response in human PBMCs from HVL, similar to the wild type parasite infection, mimicking a naturally acquired protection following cure. PMID:27624408

  2. Unique gene program of rat small resistance mesenteric arteries as revealed by deep RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Reho, John J; Shetty, Amol; Dippold, Rachael P; Mahurkar, Anup; Fisher, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    Deep sequencing of RNA samples from rat small mesenteric arteries (MA) and aorta (AO) identified common and unique features of their gene programs. ∼5% of mRNAs were quantitatively differentially expressed in MA versus AO. Unique transcriptional control in MA smooth muscle is suggested by the selective or enriched expression of transcription factors Nkx2-3, HAND2, and Tcf21 (Capsulin). Enrichment in AO of PPAR transcription factors and their target genes of mitochondrial function, lipid metabolism, and oxidative phosphorylation is consistent with slow (oxidative) tonic smooth muscle. In contrast MA was enriched in contractile and calcium channel mRNAs suggestive of components of fast (glycolytic) phasic smooth muscle. Myosin phosphatase regulatory subunit paralogs Mypt1 and p85 were expressed at similar levels, while smooth muscle MLCK was the only such kinase expressed, suggesting functional redundancy of the former but not the latter in accordance with mouse knockout studies. With regard to vaso-regulatory signals, purinergic receptors P2rx1 and P2rx5 were reciprocally expressed in MA versus AO, while the olfactory receptor Olr59 was enriched in MA. Alox15, which generates the EDHF HPETE, was enriched in MA while eNOS was equally expressed, consistent with the greater role of EDHF in the smaller arteries. mRNAs that were not expressed at a level consistent with impugned function include skeletal myogenic factors, IKK2, nonmuscle myosin, and Gnb3. This screening analysis of gene expression in the small mesenteric resistance arteries suggests testable hypotheses regarding unique aspects of small artery function in the regional control of blood flow. PMID:26156969

  3. UniqTag: Content-Derived Unique and Stable Identifiers for Gene Annotation

    PubMed Central

    Jackman, Shaun D.; Bohlmann, Joerg; Birol, İnanç

    2015-01-01

    When working on an ongoing genome sequencing and assembly project, it is rather inconvenient when gene identifiers change from one build of the assembly to the next. The gene labelling system described here, UniqTag, addresses this common challenge. UniqTag assigns a unique identifier to each gene that is a representative k-mer, a string of length k, selected from the sequence of that gene. Unlike serial numbers, these identifiers are stable between different assemblies and annotations of the same data without requiring that previous annotations be lifted over by sequence alignment. We assign UniqTag identifiers to ten builds of the Ensembl human genome spanning eight years to demonstrate this stability. The implementation of UniqTag in Ruby and an R package are available at https://github.com/sjackman/uniqtag sjackman/uniqtag. The R package is also available from CRAN: install.packages ("uniqtag"). Supplementary material and code to reproduce it is available at https://github.com/sjackman/uniqtag-paper. PMID:26020645

  4. A Unique Mutation in a MYB Gene Cosegregates with the Nectarine Phenotype in Peach

    PubMed Central

    Dondini, Luca; Pacheco, Igor; Dettori, Maria Teresa; Gazza, Laura; Scalabrin, Simone; Strozzi, Francesco; Tartarini, Stefano; Bassi, Daniele; Verde, Ignazio; Rossini, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Nectarines play a key role in peach industry; the fuzzless skin has implications for consumer acceptance. The peach/nectarine (G/g) trait was described as monogenic and previously mapped on chromosome 5. Here, the position of the G locus was delimited within a 1.1 cM interval (635 kb) based on linkage analysis of an F2 progeny from the cross ‘Contender’ (C, peach) x ‘Ambra’ (A, nectarine). Careful inspection of the genes annotated in the corresponding genomic sequence (Peach v1.0), coupled with variant discovery, led to the identification of MYB gene PpeMYB25 as a candidate for trichome formation on fruit skin. Analysis of genomic re-sequencing data from five peach/nectarine accessions pointed to the insertion of a LTR retroelement in exon 3 of the PpeMYB25 gene as the cause of the recessive glabrous phenotype. A functional marker (indelG) developed on the LTR insertion cosegregated with the trait in the CxA F2 progeny and was validated on a broad panel of genotypes, including all known putative donors of the nectarine trait. This marker was shown to efficiently discriminate between peach and nectarine plants, indicating that a unique mutational event gave rise to the nectarine trait and providing a useful diagnostic tool for early seedling selection in peach breeding programs. PMID:24595269

  5. Unique expression patterns of multiple key genes associated with the evolution of mammalian flight

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Dai, Mengyao; Wang, Yao; Cooper, Kimberly L.; Zhu, Tengteng; Dong, Dong; Zhang, Junpeng; Zhang, Shuyi

    2014-01-01

    Bats are the only mammals capable of true flight. Critical adaptations for flight include a pair of dramatically elongated hands with broad wing membranes. To study the molecular mechanisms of bat wing evolution, we perform genomewide mRNA sequencing and in situ hybridization for embryonic bat limbs. We identify seven key genes that display unique expression patterns in embryonic bat wings and feet, compared with mouse fore- and hindlimbs. The expression of all 5′HoxD genes (Hoxd9–13) and Tbx3, six known crucial transcription factors for limb and digit development, is extremely high and prolonged in the elongating wing area. The expression of Fam5c, a tumour suppressor, in bat limbs is bat-specific and significantly high in all short digit regions (the thumb and foot digits). These results suggest multiple genetic changes occurred independently during the evolution of bat wings to elongate the hand digits, promote membrane growth and keep other digits short. Our findings also indicate that the evolution of limb morphology depends on the complex integration of multiple gene regulatory networks and biological processes that control digit formation and identity, chondrogenesis, and interdigital regression or retention. PMID:24695426

  6. Deciphering a unique biotin scavenging pathway with redundant genes in the probiotic bacterium Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huimin; Wang, Qingjing; Fisher, Derek J; Cai, Mingzhu; Chakravartty, Vandana; Ye, Huiyan; Li, Ping; Solbiati, Jose O; Feng, Youjun

    2016-01-01

    Biotin protein ligase (BPL) is widespread in the three domains of the life. The paradigm BPL is the Escherichia coli BirA protein, which also functions as a repressor for the biotin biosynthesis pathway. Here we report that Lactococcus lactis possesses two different orthologues of birA (birA1_LL and birA2_LL). Unlike the scenario in E. coli, L. lactis appears to be auxotrophic for biotin in that it lacks a full biotin biosynthesis pathway. In contrast, it retains two biotin transporter-encoding genes (bioY1_LL and bioY2_LL), suggesting the use of a scavenging strategy to obtain biotin from the environment. The in vivo function of the two L. lactis birA genes was judged by their abilities to complement the conditional lethal E. coli birA mutant. Thin-layer chromatography and mass spectroscopy assays demonstrated that these two recombinant BirA proteins catalyze the biotinylation reaction of the acceptor biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), through the expected biotinoyl-AMP intermediate. Gel shift assays were used to characterize bioY1_LL and BirA1_LL. We also determined the ability to uptake (3)H-biotin by L. lactis. Taken together, our results deciphered a unique biotin scavenging pathway with redundant genes present in the probiotic bacterium L. lactis. PMID:27161258

  7. Deciphering a unique biotin scavenging pathway with redundant genes in the probiotic bacterium Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huimin; Wang, Qingjing; Fisher, Derek J.; Cai, Mingzhu; Chakravartty, Vandana; Ye, Huiyan; Li, Ping; Solbiati, Jose O.; Feng, Youjun

    2016-01-01

    Biotin protein ligase (BPL) is widespread in the three domains of the life. The paradigm BPL is the Escherichia coli BirA protein, which also functions as a repressor for the biotin biosynthesis pathway. Here we report that Lactococcus lactis possesses two different orthologues of birA (birA1_LL and birA2_LL). Unlike the scenario in E. coli, L. lactis appears to be auxotrophic for biotin in that it lacks a full biotin biosynthesis pathway. In contrast, it retains two biotin transporter-encoding genes (bioY1_LL and bioY2_LL), suggesting the use of a scavenging strategy to obtain biotin from the environment. The in vivo function of the two L. lactis birA genes was judged by their abilities to complement the conditional lethal E. coli birA mutant. Thin-layer chromatography and mass spectroscopy assays demonstrated that these two recombinant BirA proteins catalyze the biotinylation reaction of the acceptor biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), through the expected biotinoyl-AMP intermediate. Gel shift assays were used to characterize bioY1_LL and BirA1_LL. We also determined the ability to uptake 3H-biotin by L. lactis. Taken together, our results deciphered a unique biotin scavenging pathway with redundant genes present in the probiotic bacterium L. lactis. PMID:27161258

  8. The Unique hmuY Gene Sequence as a Specific Marker of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Mackiewicz, Paweł; Radwan-Oczko, Małgorzata; Kantorowicz, Małgorzata; Chomyszyn-Gajewska, Maria; Frąszczak, Magdalena; Bielecki, Marcin; Olczak, Mariusz; Olczak, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major etiological agent of chronic periodontitis, acquires heme from host hemoproteins using the HmuY hemophore. The aim of this study was to develop a specific P. gingivalis marker based on a hmuY gene sequence. Subgingival samples were collected from 66 patients with chronic periodontitis and 40 healthy subjects and the entire hmuY gene was analyzed in positive samples. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that both the amino acid sequence of the HmuY protein and the nucleotide sequence of the hmuY gene are unique among P. gingivalis strains/isolates and show low identity to sequences found in other species (below 50 and 56%, respectively). In agreement with these findings, a set of hmuY gene-based primers and standard/real-time PCR with SYBR Green chemistry allowed us to specifically detect P. gingivalis in patients with chronic periodontitis (77.3%) and healthy subjects (20%), the latter possessing lower number of P. gingivalis cells and total bacterial cells. Isolates from healthy subjects possess the hmuY gene-based nucleotide sequence pattern occurring in W83/W50/A7436 (n = 4), 381/ATCC 33277 (n = 3) or TDC60 (n = 1) strains, whereas those from patients typically have TDC60 (n = 21), W83/W50/A7436 (n = 17) and 381/ATCC 33277 (n = 13) strains. We observed a significant correlation between periodontal index of risk of infectiousness (PIRI) and the presence/absence of P. gingivalis (regardless of the hmuY gene-based sequence pattern of the isolate identified [r = 0.43; P = 0.0002] and considering particular isolate pattern [r = 0.38; P = 0.0012]). In conclusion, we demonstrated that the hmuY gene sequence or its fragments may be used as one of the molecular markers of P. gingivalis. PMID:23844074

  9. Unique antigenic gene expression at different developmental stages of Trichinella pseudospiralis.

    PubMed

    Wu, X P; Liu, X L; Wang, X L; Blaga, R; Fu, B Q; Liu, P; Bai, X; Wang, Z J; Rosenthal, B M; Shi, H N; Sandrine, L; Vallee, I; Boireau, P; Wang, F; Zhou, X N; Zhao, Y; Liu, M Y

    2013-05-20

    Parasite-induced and parasite-regulated larval capsule formation and host immunosuppression are two major characteristics that are unique in Trichinella spp. infections, but the molecule(s) and mechanism(s) that mediate these processes remain largely unknown. Trichinella pseudospiralis and Trichinella spiralis, are obviously different with respect to these two characteristics. A comparative study of these two species, in particular their antigen expression profiles at different developmental stages (the main molecules involved in the cross-talk or interaction between each parasite and its host), may help us better understand the parasite molecules and mechanisms involved. Here, we constructed cDNA libraries from T. pseudospiralis adults (Ad), newborn larvae (NBL) and muscle larvae (ML) mRNA and screened them with pig anti-T. pseudospiralis serum collected 26, 32 and 60 days post-infection (p.i.). The most abundant antigens were found to vary among life-cycle stages. Pyroglutamy peptidase 1-like and 6-phosphogluconolactonase-like genes predominated in the Ad stage and a serine protease (SS2-1-like gene) predominated in NBL similar to that observed in T. spiralis. Muscle larvae expressed proteasome activator complex subunit 3-like and 21 kDa excretory/secretory protein-like genes. This study indicated that parasites of two species may utilise different molecules and mechanisms for larvae capsule formation and host immunosuppression during their infections. Proteins of antigenic genes identified in this study may be also good candidates for diagnosis, treatment or vaccination for T. pseudospiralis infection, and also for the differential diagnosis of two species' infections. PMID:23433603

  10. A Unique Plasmodium falciparum K13 Gene Mutation in Northwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Bayih, Abebe Genetu; Getnet, Gebeyaw; Alemu, Abebe; Getie, Sisay; Mohon, Abu Naser; Pillai, Dylan R

    2016-01-01

    Artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is the first line to treat uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria worldwide. Artemisinin treatment failures are on the rise in southeast Asia. Delayed parasite clearance after ACT is associated with mutations of the P. falciparum kelch 13 gene. Patients (N = 148) in five districts of northwest Ethiopia were enrolled in a 28-day ACT trial. We identified a unique kelch 13 mutation (R622I) in 3/125 (2.4%) samples. The three isolates with R622I were from Negade-Bahir and Aykel districts close to the Ethiopia-Sudan border. One of three patients with the mutant strain was parasitemic at day 3; however, all patients cleared parasites by day 28. Correlation between kelch 13 mutations and parasite clearance was not possible due to the low frequency of mutations in this study. PMID:26483118

  11. MANIPULATION OF MAREK'S DISEASE VIRUS GENOME TO STUDY THE ROLE OF UNIQUE GENES IN REPLICATION AND TRANSFORMATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A very virulent strain of Marek's disease virus (MDV) was previously rescued from five overlapping cosmid DNA fragments. To study the utility of these overlapping cosmid clones, unique MDV genes were knocked out. The gene deletion mutants were shown to grow with similar kinetics as parental virus. U...

  12. A Unique Gene Regulatory Network Resets the Human Germline Epigenome for Development.

    PubMed

    Tang, Walfred W C; Dietmann, Sabine; Irie, Naoko; Leitch, Harry G; Floros, Vasileios I; Bradshaw, Charles R; Hackett, Jamie A; Chinnery, Patrick F; Surani, M Azim

    2015-06-01

    Resetting of the epigenome in human primordial germ cells (hPGCs) is critical for development. We show that the transcriptional program of hPGCs is distinct from that in mice, with co-expression of somatic specifiers and naive pluripotency genes TFCP2L1 and KLF4. This unique gene regulatory network, established by SOX17 and BLIMP1, drives comprehensive germline DNA demethylation by repressing DNA methylation pathways and activating TET-mediated hydroxymethylation. Base-resolution methylome analysis reveals progressive DNA demethylation to basal levels in week 5-7 in vivo hPGCs. Concurrently, hPGCs undergo chromatin reorganization, X reactivation, and imprint erasure. Despite global hypomethylation, evolutionarily young and potentially hazardous retroelements, like SVA, remain methylated. Remarkably, some loci associated with metabolic and neurological disorders are also resistant to DNA demethylation, revealing potential for transgenerational epigenetic inheritance that may have phenotypic consequences. We provide comprehensive insight on early human germline transcriptional network and epigenetic reprogramming that subsequently impacts human development and disease. PMID:26046444

  13. Identification of Unique Gene Expression Profile in Children with Regressive Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Ileocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Stephen J.; Fortunato, John; Gonzalez, Lenny G.; Krigsman, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms are common in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and are often associated with mucosal inflammatory infiltrates of the small and large intestine. Although distinct histologic and immunohistochemical properties of this inflammatory infiltrate have been previously described in this ASDGI group, molecular characterization of these lesions has not been reported. In this study we utilize transcriptome profiling of gastrointestinal mucosal biopsy tissue from ASDGI children and three non-ASD control groups (Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and histologically normal) in an effort to determine if there is a gene expression profile unique to the ASDGI group. Comparison of differentially expressed transcripts between the groups demonstrated that non-pathologic (normal) tissue segregated almost completely from inflamed tissue in all cases. Gene expression profiles in intestinal biopsy tissue from patients with Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and ASDGI, while having significant overlap with each other, also showed distinctive features for each group. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ASDGI children have a gastrointestinal mucosal molecular profile that overlaps significantly with known inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), yet has distinctive features that further supports the presence of an ASD-associated IBD variant, or, alternatively, a prodromal phase of typical inflammatory bowel disease. Although we report qPCR confirmation of representative differentially expressed transcripts determined initially by microarray, these findings may be considered preliminary to the extent that they require further confirmation in a validation cohort. PMID:23520485

  14. Complete genome sequence of Brachyspira intermedia reveals unique genomic features in Brachyspira species and phage-mediated horizontal gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Brachyspira spp. colonize the intestines of some mammalian and avian species and show different degrees of enteropathogenicity. Brachyspira intermedia can cause production losses in chickens and strain PWS/AT now becomes the fourth genome to be completed in the genus Brachyspira. Results 15 classes of unique and shared genes were analyzed in B. intermedia, B. murdochii, B. hyodysenteriae and B. pilosicoli. The largest number of unique genes was found in B. intermedia and B. murdochii. This indicates the presence of larger pan-genomes. In general, hypothetical protein annotations are overrepresented among the unique genes. A 3.2 kb plasmid was found in B. intermedia strain PWS/AT. The plasmid was also present in the B. murdochii strain but not in nine other Brachyspira isolates. Within the Brachyspira genomes, genes had been translocated and also frequently switched between leading and lagging strands, a process that can be followed by different AT-skews in the third positions of synonymous codons. We also found evidence that bacteriophages were being remodeled and genes incorporated into them. Conclusions The accessory gene pool shapes species-specific traits. It is also influenced by reductive genome evolution and horizontal gene transfer. Gene-transfer events can cross both species and genus boundaries and bacteriophages appear to play an important role in this process. A mechanism for horizontal gene transfer appears to be gene translocations leading to remodeling of bacteriophages in combination with broad tropism. PMID:21816042

  15. The complete mitochondrial genome of Meloidogyne graminicola (Tylenchina): a unique gene arrangement and its phylogenetic implications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Longhua; Zhuo, Kan; Lin, Borong; Wang, Honghong; Liao, Jinling

    2014-01-01

    Meloidogyne graminicola is one of the most economically important plant parasitic-nematodes (PPNs). In the present study, we determined the complete mitochondrial (mt) DNA genome sequence of this plant pathogen. Compared with other PPNs genera, this genome (19,589 bp) is only slightly smaller than that of Pratylenchus vulnus (21,656 bp). The nucleotide composition of the whole mtDNA sequence of M. graminicola is significantly biased toward A and T, with T being the most favored nucleotide and C being the least favored. The A+T content of the entire genome is 83.51%. The mt genome of M. graminicola contains 36 genes (lacking atp8) that are transcribed in the same direction. The gene arrangement of the mt genome of M. graminicola is unique. A total of 21 out of 22 tRNAs possess a DHU loop only, while tRNASer(AGN) lacks a DHU loop. The two large noncoding regions (2,031 bp and 5,063 bp) are disrupted by tRNASer(UCN). Phylogenetic analysis based on concatenated amino acid sequences of 12 protein-coding genes support the monophylies of the three orders Rhabditida, Mermithida and Trichinellida, the suborder Rhabditina and the three infraorders Spiruromorpha, Oxyuridomorpha and Ascaridomorpha, but do not support the monophylies of the two suborders Spirurina and Tylenchina, and the three infraorders Rhabditomorpha, Panagrolaimomorpha and Tylenchomorpha. The four Tylenchomorpha species including M. graminicola, P. vulnus, H. glycines and R. similis from the superfamily Tylenchoidea are placed within a well-supported monophyletic clade, but far from the other two Tylenchomorpha species B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus of Aphelenchoidea. In the clade of Tylenchoidea, M. graminicola is sister to P. vulnus, and H. glycines is sister to R. similis, which suggests root-knot nematodes has a closer relationship to Pratylenchidae nematodes than to cyst nematodes. PMID:24892428

  16. Unique mutation portraits and frequent COL2A1 gene alteration in chondrosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Totoki, Yasushi; Yoshida, Akihiko; Hosoda, Fumie; Nakamura, Hiromi; Hama, Natsuko; Ogura, Koichi; Yoshida, Aki; Fujiwara, Tomohiro; Arai, Yasuhito; Toguchida, Junya; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Miyano, Satoru; Kawai, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most frequent malignant bone tumor. However, the etiological background of chondrosarcomagenesis remains largely unknown, along with details on molecular alterations and potential therapeutic targets. Massively parallel paired-end sequencing of whole genomes of 10 primary chondrosarcomas revealed that the process of accumulation of somatic mutations is homogeneous irrespective of the pathological subtype or the presence of IDH1 mutations, is unique among a range of cancer types, and shares significant commonalities with that of prostate cancer. Clusters of structural alterations localized within a single chromosome were observed in four cases. Combined with targeted resequencing of additional cartilaginous tumor cohorts, we identified somatic alterations of the COL2A1 gene, which encodes an essential extracellular matrix protein in chondroskeletal development, in 19.3% of chondrosarcoma and 31.7% of enchondroma cases. Epigenetic regulators (IDH1 and YEATS2) and an activin/BMP signal component (ACVR2A) were recurrently altered. Furthermore, a novel FN1-ACVR2A fusion transcript was observed in both chondrosarcoma and osteochondromatosis cases. With the characteristic accumulative process of somatic changes as a background, molecular defects in chondrogenesis and aberrant epigenetic control are primarily causative of both benign and malignant cartilaginous tumors. PMID:25024164

  17. Protective Immunity Elicited by a Divalent DNA Vaccine Encoding Both the L7/L12 and Omp16 Genes of Brucella abortus in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Deyan; Ni, Bing; Li, Peng; Shi, Wei; Zhang, Songle; Han, Yue; Mao, Liwei; He, Yangdong; Wu, Yuzhang; Wang, Xiliang

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the immunogenicity and the protective efficacy of a divalent fusion DNA vaccine encoding both the Brucella abortus L7/L12 protein (ribosomal protein) and Omp16 protein (outer membrane lipoprotein), designated pcDNA3.1-L7/L12-Omp16. Intramuscular injection of this divalent DNA vaccine into BALB/c mice elicited markedly both humoral and cellular immune responses. The specific antibodies exhibited a dominance of immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a) over IgG1. In addition, the dual-gene DNA vaccine elicited a strong T-cell proliferative response and induced a large amount of gamma interferon-producing T cells upon restimulation in vitro with recombinant fusion protein L7/L12-Omp16, suggesting the induction of a typical T-helper-1-dominated immune response in vivo. This divalent DNA vaccine could also induce a significant level of protection against challenge with the virulent strain B. abortus 544 in BALB/c mice. Furthermore, the protection level induced by the divalent DNA vaccine was significantly higher than that induced by the univalent DNA vaccines pcDNA3.1-L7/L12 or pcDNA3.1-Omp16. Taken together, the results of this study verify for the first time that the Omp16 gene can be a candidate target for a DNA vaccine against brucellosis. Additionally, a divalent genetic vaccine based on the L7/L12 and Omp16 genes can elicit a stronger cellular immune response and better immunoprotection than the relevant univalent vaccines can. PMID:16622210

  18. Potato spindle tuber viroid strains of different pathogenicity induces and suppresses expression of common and unique genes in infected tomato.

    PubMed

    Itaya, Asuka; Matsuda, Yoshie; Gonzales, Robert A; Nelson, Richard S; Ding, Biao

    2002-10-01

    Viroids are the smallest plant pathogens. These RNAs do not encode proteins and are not encapsidated, and yet they can replicate autonomously, move systemically, and cause diseases in infected plants. Notably, strains of a viroid with subtle differences in nucleotide sequences can cause dramatically different symptoms in infected plants. These features make viroids unique probes to investigate the role of a pathogenic RNA genome in triggering host responses. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of the differential gene expression patterns of tomato plants at various stages of infection by a mild and severe strain of Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd). We also compared tomato gene expression altered by the PSTVd strains with that altered by Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Our analyses revealed that the two PSTVd strains altered expression of both common and unique tomato genes. These genes encode products involved in defense/stress response, cell wall structure, chloroplast function, protein metabolism, and other diverse functions. Five genes have unknown functions. Four genes are novel. The expression of some but not all of these genes was also altered by TMV infection. Our results indicate that viroids, although structurally simple, can trigger complex host responses. Further characterization of viroid-altered gene expression in a host plant should help understand viroid pathogenicity and, potentially, the mechanisms of RNA-mediated regulation of plant gene expression. PMID:12437296

  19. Comparison of TCDD-elicited genome-wide hepatic gene expression in Sprague–Dawley rats and C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Nault, Rance; Kim, Suntae; Zacharewski, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    Although the structure and function of the AhR are conserved, emerging evidence suggests that downstream effects are species-specific. In this study, rat hepatic gene expression data from the DrugMatrix database (National Toxicology Program) were compared to mouse hepatic whole-genome gene expression data following treatment with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). For the DrugMatrix study, male Sprague–Dawley rats were gavaged daily with 20 μg/kg TCDD for 1, 3 and 5 days, while female C57BL/6 ovariectomized mice were examined 1, 3 and 7 days after a single oral gavage of 30 μg/kg TCDD. A total of 649 rat and 1386 mouse genes (|fold change|≥1.5, P1(t)≥0.99) were differentially expressed following treatment. HomoloGene identified 11,708 orthologs represented across the rat Affymetrix 230 2.0 GeneChip (12,310 total orthologs), and the mouse 4×44K v.1 Agilent oligonucleotide array (17,578 total orthologs). Comparative analysis found 563 and 922 orthologs differentially expressed in response to TCDD in the rat and mouse, respectively, with 70 responses associated with immune function and lipid metabolism in common to both. Moreover, QRTPCR analysis of Ceacam1, showed divergent expression (induced in rat; repressed in mouse) functionally consistent with TCDD-elicited hepatic steatosis in the mouse but not the rat. Functional analysis identified orthologs involved in nucleotide binding and acetyltransferase activity in rat, while mouse-specific responses were associated with steroid, phospholipid, fatty acid, and carbohydrate metabolism. These results provide further evidence that TCDD elicits species-specific regulation of distinct gene networks, and outlines considerations for future comparisons of publicly available microarray datasets. PMID:23238561

  20. Identification of unique cis-element pattern on simulated microgravity treated Arabidopsis by in silico and gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, Hyuncheol; Choi, Yongsang; Lee, Taek-Kyun; Yeo, Up-Dong; Han, Kyeongsik; Auh, Chungkyun; Lee, Sukchan

    2012-08-01

    Arabidopsis gene expression microarray (44 K) was used to detect genes highly induced under simulated microgravity stress (SMS). Ten SMS-inducible genes were selected from the microarray data and these 10 genes were found to be abundantly expressed in 3-week-old plants. Nine out of the 10 SMS-inducible genes were also expressed in response to the three abiotic stresses of drought, touch, and wounding in 3-week-old Arabidopsis plants respectively. However, WRKY46 was elevated only in response to SMS. Six other WRKY genes did not respond to SMS. To clarify the characteristics of the genes expressed at high levels in response to SMS, 20 cis-elements in the promoters of the 40 selected genes including the 10 SMS-inducible genes, the 6 WRKY genes, and abiotic stress-inducible genes were analyzed and their spatial positions on each promoter were determined. Four cis-elements (M/T-G-T-P from MYB1AT or TATABOX5, GT1CONSENSUS, TATABOX5, and POLASIG1) showed a unique spatial arrangement in most SMS-inducible genes including WRKY46. Therefore the M/T-G-T-P cis-element patterns identified in the promoter of WRKY46 may play important roles in regulating gene expression in response to SMS. The presences of the cis-element patterns suggest that the order or spatial positioning of certain groups of cis-elements is more important than the existence or numbers of specific cis-elements. Taken together, our data indicate that WRKY46 is a novel SMS inducible transcription factor and the unique spatial arrangement of cis-elements shown in WRKY46 promoter may play an important role for its response to SMS.

  1. Genome-Wide Identification of Genes Probably Relevant to the Uniqueness of Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis) and Its Cultivars.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yan; Jing, Wang; Youxiang, Zhou; Mingming, Zhao; Yan, Gong; Hua, Ding; Lijun, Peng; Dingjin, Hu

    2015-01-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis) is a popular beverage all over the world and a number of studies have focused on the genetic uniqueness of tea and its cultivars. However, molecular mechanisms underlying these phenomena are largely undefined. In this report, based on expression data available from public databases, we performed a series of analyses to identify genes probably relevant to the uniqueness of C. sinensis and two of its cultivars (LJ43 and ZH2). Evolutionary analyses showed that the evolutionary rates of genes involved in the pathways were not significantly different among C. sinensis, C. oleifera, and C. azalea. Interestingly, a number of gene families, including genes involved in the pathways synthesizing iconic secondary metabolites of tea plant, were significantly upregulated, expressed in C. sinensis (LJ43) when compared to C. azalea, and this may partially explain its higher content of flavonoid, theanine, and caffeine. Further investigation showed that nonsynonymous mutations may partially contribute to the differences between the two cultivars of C. sinensis, such as the chlorina and higher contents of amino acids in ZH2. Genes identified as candidates are probably relevant to the uniqueness of C. sinensis and its cultivars should be good candidates for subsequent functional analyses and marker-assisted breeding. PMID:26543846

  2. Genome-Wide Identification of Genes Probably Relevant to the Uniqueness of Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis) and Its Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yan; Jing, Wang; Youxiang, Zhou; Mingming, Zhao; Yan, Gong; Hua, Ding; Lijun, Peng; Dingjin, Hu

    2015-01-01

    Tea (Camellia sinensis) is a popular beverage all over the world and a number of studies have focused on the genetic uniqueness of tea and its cultivars. However, molecular mechanisms underlying these phenomena are largely undefined. In this report, based on expression data available from public databases, we performed a series of analyses to identify genes probably relevant to the uniqueness of C. sinensis and two of its cultivars (LJ43 and ZH2). Evolutionary analyses showed that the evolutionary rates of genes involved in the pathways were not significantly different among C. sinensis, C. oleifera, and C. azalea. Interestingly, a number of gene families, including genes involved in the pathways synthesizing iconic secondary metabolites of tea plant, were significantly upregulated, expressed in C. sinensis (LJ43) when compared to C. azalea, and this may partially explain its higher content of flavonoid, theanine, and caffeine. Further investigation showed that nonsynonymous mutations may partially contribute to the differences between the two cultivars of C. sinensis, such as the chlorina and higher contents of amino acids in ZH2. Genes identified as candidates are probably relevant to the uniqueness of C. sinensis and its cultivars should be good candidates for subsequent functional analyses and marker-assisted breeding. PMID:26543846

  3. A Unique Virulence Gene Occupies a Principal Position in Immune Evasion by the Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Heinberg, Adina R.; Wele, Mamadou; Chen, Qijun; Deitsch, Kirk W.

    2015-01-01

    Mutually exclusive gene expression, whereby only one member of a multi-gene family is selected for activation, is used by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum to escape the human immune system and perpetuate long-term, chronic infections. A family of genes called var encodes the chief antigenic and virulence determinant of P. falciparum malaria. var genes are transcribed in a mutually exclusive manner, with switching between active genes resulting in antigenic variation. While recent work has shed considerable light on the epigenetic basis for var gene activation and silencing, how switching is controlled remains a mystery. In particular, switching seems not to be random, but instead appears to be coordinated to result in timely activation of individual genes leading to sequential waves of antigenically distinct parasite populations. The molecular basis for this apparent coordination is unknown. Here we show that var2csa, an unusual and highly conserved var gene, occupies a unique position within the var gene switching hierarchy. Induction of switching through the destabilization of var specific chromatin using both genetic and chemical methods repeatedly led to the rapid and exclusive activation of var2csa. Additional experiments demonstrated that these represent “true” switching events and not simply de-silencing of the var2csa promoter, and that activation is limited to the unique locus on chromosome 12. Combined with translational repression of var2csa transcripts, frequent “default” switching to this locus and detection of var2csa untranslated transcripts in non-pregnant individuals, these data suggest that var2csa could play a central role in coordinating switching, fulfilling a prediction made by mathematical models derived from population switching patterns. These studies provide the first insights into the mechanisms by which var gene switching is coordinated as well as an example of how a pharmacological agent can disrupt antigenic variation

  4. Chronic exposures to low and high concentrations of ibuprofen elicit different gene response patterns in a euryhaline fish.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Ken M; Brander, Susanne M; Britton, Monica T; Fangue, Nann A; Connon, Richard E

    2015-11-01

    Ibuprofen is one of the most commonly detected pharmaceuticals in wastewater effluent; however, the effects of ibuprofen on aquatic organisms are poorly understood. This study presents the transcriptome-wide response of the inland silverside, Menidia beryllina, to chronic exposure to ibuprofen. At the lowest exposure concentration (0.0115 mg/L), we detected a downregulation of many genes involved in skeletal development, aerobic respiration, and immune function. At the highest exposure concentration (1.15 mg/L), we detected increased expression of regulatory genes in the arachidonic acid metabolism pathway and several immune genes involved in an inflammatory response. Additionally, there was differential expression of genes involved in oxidative stress responses and a downregulation of genes involved in osmoregulation. This study provides useful information for monitoring the effects of this common wastewater effluent contaminant in the environment and for the generation of biomarkers of exposure to ibuprofen that may be transferable to other fish species. PMID:25731088

  5. Comparison of TCDD-elicited genome-wide hepatic gene expression in Sprague–Dawley rats and C57BL/6 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nault, Rance; Kim, Suntae; Zacharewski, Timothy R.

    2013-03-01

    Although the structure and function of the AhR are conserved, emerging evidence suggests that downstream effects are species-specific. In this study, rat hepatic gene expression data from the DrugMatrix database (National Toxicology Program) were compared to mouse hepatic whole-genome gene expression data following treatment with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). For the DrugMatrix study, male Sprague–Dawley rats were gavaged daily with 20 μg/kg TCDD for 1, 3 and 5 days, while female C57BL/6 ovariectomized mice were examined 1, 3 and 7 days after a single oral gavage of 30 μg/kg TCDD. A total of 649 rat and 1386 mouse genes (|fold change| ≥ 1.5, P1(t) ≥ 0.99) were differentially expressed following treatment. HomoloGene identified 11,708 orthologs represented across the rat Affymetrix 230 2.0 GeneChip (12,310 total orthologs), and the mouse 4 × 44K v.1 Agilent oligonucleotide array (17,578 total orthologs). Comparative analysis found 563 and 922 orthologs differentially expressed in response to TCDD in the rat and mouse, respectively, with 70 responses associated with immune function and lipid metabolism in common to both. Moreover, QRTPCR analysis of Ceacam1, showed divergent expression (induced in rat; repressed in mouse) functionally consistent with TCDD-elicited hepatic steatosis in the mouse but not the rat. Functional analysis identified orthologs involved in nucleotide binding and acetyltransferase activity in rat, while mouse-specific responses were associated with steroid, phospholipid, fatty acid, and carbohydrate metabolism. These results provide further evidence that TCDD elicits species-specific regulation of distinct gene networks, and outlines considerations for future comparisons of publicly available microarray datasets. - Highlights: ► We performed a whole-genome comparison of TCDD-regulated genes in mice and rats. ► Previous species comparisons were extended using data from the DrugMatrix database. ► Less than 15% of TCDD

  6. Unique Genomic Arrangements in an Invasive Serotype M23 Strain of Streptococcus pyogenes Identify Genes That Induce Hypervirulence

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yunjuan; Liang, Zhong; Booyjzsen, Claire; Mayfield, Jeffrey A.; Li, Yang; Lee, Shaun W.; Ploplis, Victoria A.; Song, Hui

    2014-01-01

    The first genome sequence of a group A Streptococcus pyogenes serotype M23 (emm23) strain (M23ND), isolated from an invasive human infection, has been completed. The genome of this opacity factor-negative (SOF−) strain is composed of a circular chromosome of 1,846,477 bp. Gene profiling showed that this strain contained six phage-encoded and 24 chromosomally inherited well-known virulence factors, as well as 11 pseudogenes. The bacterium has acquired four large prophage elements, ΦM23ND.1 to ΦM23ND.4, harboring genes encoding streptococcal superantigen (ssa), streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxins (speC, speH, and speI), and DNases (spd1 and spd3), with phage integrase genes being present at one flank of each phage insertion, suggesting that the phages were integrated by horizontal gene transfer. Comparative analyses revealed unique large-scale genomic rearrangements that result in genomic rearrangements that differ from those of previously sequenced GAS strains. These rearrangements resulted in an imbalanced genomic architecture and translocations of chromosomal virulence genes. The covS sensor in M23ND was identified as a pseudogene, resulting in the attenuation of speB function and increased expression of the genes for the chromosomal virulence factors multiple-gene activator (mga), M protein (emm23), C5a peptidase (scpA), fibronectin-binding proteins (sfbI and fbp54), streptolysin O (slo), hyaluronic acid capsule (hasA), streptokinase (ska), and DNases (spd and spd3), which were verified by PCR. These genes are responsible for facilitating host epithelial cell binding and and/or immune evasion, thus further contributing to the virulence of M23ND. In conclusion, strain M23ND has become highly pathogenic as the result of a combination of multiple genetic factors, particularly gene composition and mutations, prophage integrations, unique genomic rearrangements, and regulated expression of critical virulence factors. PMID:25225265

  7. Unique genomic arrangements in an invasive serotype M23 strain of Streptococcus pyogenes identify genes that induce hypervirulence.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yunjuan; Liang, Zhong; Booyjzsen, Claire; Mayfield, Jeffrey A; Li, Yang; Lee, Shaun W; Ploplis, Victoria A; Song, Hui; Castellino, Francis J

    2014-12-01

    The first genome sequence of a group A Streptococcus pyogenes serotype M23 (emm23) strain (M23ND), isolated from an invasive human infection, has been completed. The genome of this opacity factor-negative (SOF(-)) strain is composed of a circular chromosome of 1,846,477 bp. Gene profiling showed that this strain contained six phage-encoded and 24 chromosomally inherited well-known virulence factors, as well as 11 pseudogenes. The bacterium has acquired four large prophage elements, ΦM23ND.1 to ΦM23ND.4, harboring genes encoding streptococcal superantigen (ssa), streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxins (speC, speH, and speI), and DNases (spd1 and spd3), with phage integrase genes being present at one flank of each phage insertion, suggesting that the phages were integrated by horizontal gene transfer. Comparative analyses revealed unique large-scale genomic rearrangements that result in genomic rearrangements that differ from those of previously sequenced GAS strains. These rearrangements resulted in an imbalanced genomic architecture and translocations of chromosomal virulence genes. The covS sensor in M23ND was identified as a pseudogene, resulting in the attenuation of speB function and increased expression of the genes for the chromosomal virulence factors multiple-gene activator (mga), M protein (emm23), C5a peptidase (scpA), fibronectin-binding proteins (sfbI and fbp54), streptolysin O (slo), hyaluronic acid capsule (hasA), streptokinase (ska), and DNases (spd and spd3), which were verified by PCR. These genes are responsible for facilitating host epithelial cell binding and and/or immune evasion, thus further contributing to the virulence of M23ND. In conclusion, strain M23ND has become highly pathogenic as the result of a combination of multiple genetic factors, particularly gene composition and mutations, prophage integrations, unique genomic rearrangements, and regulated expression of critical virulence factors. PMID:25225265

  8. Genomic Characterization of the LEED..PEEDs, a Gene Family Unique to the Medicago Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Diana I.; Silverstein, Kevin A. T.; Young, Nevin D.

    2014-01-01

    The LEED..PEED (LP) gene family in Medicago truncatula (A17) is composed of 13 genes coding small putatively secreted peptides with one to two conserved domains of negatively charged residues. This family is not present in the genomes of Glycine max, Lotus japonicus, or the IRLC species Cicer arietinum. LP genes were also not detected in a Trifolium pratense draft genome or Pisum sativum nodule transcriptome, which were sequenced de novo in this study, suggesting that the LP gene family arose within the past 25 million years. M. truncatula accession HM056 has 13 LP genes with high similarity to those in A17, whereas M. truncatula ssp. tricycla (R108) and M. sativa have 11 and 10 LP gene copies, respectively. In M. truncatula A17, 12 LP genes are located on chromosome 7 within a 93-kb window, whereas one LP gene copy is located on chromosome 4. A phylogenetic analysis of the gene family is consistent with most gene duplications occurring prior to Medicago speciation events, mainly through local tandem duplications and one distant duplication across chromosomes. Synteny comparisons between R108 and A17 confirm that gene order is conserved between the two subspecies, although a further duplication occurred solely in A17. In M. truncatula A17, all 13 LPs are exclusively transcribed in nodules and absent from other plant tissues, including roots, leaves, flowers, seeds, seed shells, and pods. The recent expansion of LP genes in Medicago spp. and their timing and location of expression suggest a novel function in nodulation, possibly as an aftermath of the evolution of bacteroid terminal differentiation or potentially associated with rhizobial–host specificity. PMID:25155275

  9. A unique nucleosome arrangement, maintained actively by chromatin remodelers facilitates transcription of yeast tRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background RNA polymerase (pol) III transcribes a unique class of genes with intra-genic promoters and high transcriptional activity. The major contributors to the pol III transcriptome, tRNAs genes are found scattered on all chromosomes of yeast. A prototype tDNA of <150 bp length, is generally considered nucleosome-free while some pol III-transcribed genes have been shown to have nucleosome-positioning properties. Results Using high resolution ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq methods, we found several unique features associated with nucleosome profiles on all tRNA genes of budding yeast, not seen on nucleosome-dense counterparts in fission yeast and resting human CD4+ T cells. The nucleosome-free region (NFR) on all but three yeast tDNAs is found bordered by an upstream (US) nucleosome strongly positioned at −140 bp position and a downstream (DS) nucleosome at variable positions with respect to the gene terminator. Perturbation in this nucleosomal arrangement interferes with the tRNA production. Three different chromatin remodelers generate and maintain the NFR by targeting different gene regions. Isw1 localizes to the gene body and makes it nucleosome-depleted, Isw2 maintains periodicity in the upstream nucleosomal array, while RSC targets the downstream nucleosome. Direct communication of pol III with RSC serves as a stress-sensory mechanism for these genes. In its absence, the downstream nucleosome moves towards the gene terminator. Levels of tRNAs from different families are found to vary considerably as different pol III levels are seen even on isogenes within a family. Pol III levels show negative correlation with the nucleosome occupancies on different genes. Conclusions Budding yeast tRNA genes maintain an open chromatin structure, which is not due to sequence-directed nucleosome positioning or high transcription activity of genes. Unlike 5′ NFR on pol II-transcribed genes, the tDNA NFR, which facilitates tDNA transcription, results from action of chromatin

  10. Gene-to-metabolite network for biosynthesis of lignans in MeJA-elicited Isatis indigotica hairy root cultures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruibing; Li, Qing; Tan, Hexin; Chen, Junfeng; Xiao, Ying; Ma, Ruifang; Gao, Shouhong; Zerbe, Philipp; Chen, Wansheng; Zhang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Root and leaf tissue of Isatis indigotica shows notable anti-viral efficacy, and are widely used as “Banlangen” and “Daqingye” in traditional Chinese medicine. The plants' pharmacological activity is attributed to phenylpropanoids, especially a group of lignan metabolites. However, the biosynthesis of lignans in I. indigotica remains opaque. This study describes the discovery and analysis of biosynthetic genes and AP2/ERF-type transcription factors involved in lignan biosynthesis in I. indigotica. MeJA treatment revealed differential expression of three genes involved in phenylpropanoid backbone biosynthesis (IiPAL, IiC4H, Ii4CL), five genes involved in lignan biosynthesis (IiCAD, IiC3H, IiCCR, IiDIR, and IiPLR), and 112 putative AP2/ERF transcription factors. In addition, four intermediates of lariciresinol biosynthesis were found to be induced. Based on these results, a canonical correlation analysis using Pearson's correlation coefficient was performed to construct gene-to-metabolite networks and identify putative key genes and rate-limiting reactions in lignan biosynthesis. Over-expression of IiC3H, identified as a key pathway gene, was used for metabolic engineering of I. indigotica hairy roots, and resulted in an increase in lariciresinol production. These findings illustrate the utility of canonical correlation analysis for the discovery and metabolic engineering of key metabolic genes in plants. PMID:26579184

  11. Mitochondrial DNA mutation-elicited oxidative stress, oxidative damage, and altered gene expression in cultured cells of patients with MERRF syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shi-Bei; Ma, Yi-Shing; Wu, Yu-Ting; Chen, Yin-Chiu; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2010-06-01

    Myoclonic epilepsy and ragged-red fibers (MERRF) syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by myoclonus, muscle weakness, cerebellar ataxia, heart conduction block, and dementia. It has been documented that 80-90% of the patients with MERRF syndrome are caused by the A8344G mutation in the tRNA(Lys) gene of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We and other investigators have reported that the mtDNA mutation results in not only inefficient generation of adenosine triphosphate but also increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured cells harboring A8344G mutation of mtDNA. In addition, we found an imbalance in the gene expression of antioxidant enzymes in the skin fibroblasts of MERRF patients. The mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity levels of manganese-superoxide dismutase were increased, but those of Cu,Zn-SOD, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase did not show significant changes. Recently, we showed that the excess ROS could damage voltage-dependent anion channel, prohibitin, Lon protease, and aconitase in the MERRF cells. Moreover, there was a dramatic increase in the gene expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase 1, which may contribute to the cytoskeleton remodeling involved in the weakness and atrophy of muscle commonly seen in MERRF patients. Taken together, we suggest that mtDNA mutation-elicited oxidative stress, oxidative damage, and altered gene expression are involved in the pathogenesis and progression of MERRF syndrome. PMID:20411357

  12. Non-additive hepatic gene expression elicited by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) co-treatment in C57BL/6 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kopec, Anna K.; D'Souza, Michelle L.; Mets, Bryan D.; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Reese, Sarah E.; Archer, Kellie J.; Potter, Dave; Tashiro, Colleen; Sharratt, Bonnie; Harkema, Jack R.; Zacharewski, Timothy R.

    2011-10-15

    Interactions between environmental contaminants can lead to non-additive effects that may affect the toxicity and risk assessment of a mixture. Comprehensive time course and dose-response studies with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), non-dioxin-like 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) and their mixture were performed in immature, ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice. Mice were gavaged once with 30 {mu}g/kg TCDD, 300 mg/kg PCB153, a mixture of 30 {mu}g/kg TCDD with 300 mg/kg PCB153 (MIX) or sesame oil vehicle for 4,12, 24,72 or 168 h. In the 24 h dose-response study, animals were gavaged with TCDD (0.3,1, 3, 6, 10, 15, 30, 45 {mu}g/kg), PCB153 (3,10, 30, 60, 100, 150, 300, 450 mg/kg), MIX (0.3 + 3, 1 + 10, 3 + 30, 6 + 60, 10 + 100, 15 + 150, 30 + 300, 45 {mu}g/kg TCDD + 450 mg/kg PCB153, respectively) or vehicle. All three treatments significantly increased relative liver weights (RLW), with MIX eliciting significantly greater increases compared to TCDD and PCB153 alone. Histologically, MIX induced hepatocellular hypertrophy, vacuolization, inflammation, hyperplasia and necrosis, a combination of TCDD and PCB153 responses. Complementary lipid analyses identified significant increases in hepatic triglycerides in MIX and TCDD samples, while PCB153 had no effect on lipids. Hepatic PCB153 levels were also significantly increased with TCDD co-treatment. Microarray analysis identified 167 TCDD, 185 PCB153 and 388 MIX unique differentially expressed genes. Statistical modeling of quantitative real-time PCR analysis of Pla2g12a, Serpinb6a, Nqo1, Srxn1, and Dysf verified non-additive expression following MIX treatment compared to TCDD and PCB153 alone. In summary, TCDD and PCB153 co-treatment elicited specific non-additive gene expression effects that are consistent with RLW increases, histopathology, and hepatic lipid accumulation. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > MIX (TCDD:PCB153 at 1:10,000 ratio) exposure leads to non-additive gene expression

  13. The unique pseudanthium of Actinodium (Myrtaceae) - morphological reinvestigation and possible regulation by CYCLOIDEA-like genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genes encoding TCP transcription factors, such as CYCLOIDEA-like (CYC-like) genes, are well known actors in the control of plant morphological development, particularly regarding the control of floral symmetry. Despite recent understanding that these genes play a role in establishing the architecture of inflorescences in the sunflower family (Asteraceae), where hundreds of finely organized flowers are arranged to mimic an individual flower, little is known about their function in the development of flower-like inflorescences across diverse phylogenetic groups. Here, we studied the head-like pseudanthium of the Australian swamp daisy Actinodium cunninghamii Schau. (Myrtaceae, the myrtle family), which consists of a cluster of fertile flowers surrounded by showy ray-shaped structures, to fully characterize its inflorescence development and to test whether CYC-like genes may participate in the control of its daisy-like flowering structures. Results We used standard morphological and anatomical methods to analyze Actinodium inflorescence development. Furthermore, we isolated Actinodium CYC-like genes using degenerate PCR primers, and studied the expression patterns of these genes using quantitative RT-PCR. We found that the ray-shaped elements of Actinodium are not single flowers but instead branched short-shoots occasionally bearing flowers. We found differential expression of CYC-like genes across the pseudanthium of Actinodium, correlating with the showiness and branching pattern of the ray structures. Conclusions The Actinodium inflorescence represents a novel type of pseudanthium with proximal branches mimicking ray flowers. Expression patterns of CYC-like genes are suggestive of participation in the control of pseudanthium development, in a manner analogous to the distantly related Asteraceae. As such, flowering plants appear to have recruited CYC-like genes for heteromorphic inflorescence development at least twice during their evolutionary history

  14. Unique antigenic gene expression at different developmental stages of Trichinella pseudospiralis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Parasite-induced and parasite-regulated larval capsule formation and host immunosuppression are two major characteristics that are unique in Trichinella spp. infections, but the molecule(s) and mechanism(s) that mediate these processes remain largely unknown. Trichinella pseudospiralis and Trichinel...

  15. Characterization of LORF11, a unique gene common to the three Marek's disease virus serotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA sequence data of the GA and Md5 strains of Marek's disease virus (MDV) revealed a large open reading frame (LORF11) located in the unique long region of MDV genome comprising 2711 nucleotides in length encoding a protein of 903 amino acids. Sequence comparison between MDV serotypes revealed tha...

  16. TCDD and a Putative Endogenous AhR Ligand, ITE, Elicit the Same Immediate Changes in Gene Expression in Mouse Lung Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Ellen C.; Welle, Stephen L.; Gasiewicz, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-dependent transcription factor, mediates toxicity of several classes of xenobiotics and also has important physiological roles in differentiation, reproduction, and immunity, although the endogenous ligand(s) mediating these functions is/are as yet unidentified. One candidate endogenous ligand, 2-(1′H-indolo-3′-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE), is a potent AhR agonist in vitro, activates the murine AhR in vivo, but does not induce toxicity. We hypothesized that ITE and the toxic ligand, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), may modify transcription of different sets of genes to account for their different toxicity. To test this hypothesis, primary mouse lung fibroblasts were exposed to 0.5μM ITE, 0.2nM TCDD, or vehicle for 4 h, and total gene expression was evaluated using microarrays. After this short-term and low-dose treatment, several hundred genes were changed significantly, and the response to ITE and TCDD was remarkably similar, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Induced gene sets included the expected battery of AhR-dependent xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, as well as several sets that reflect the inflammatory role of lung fibroblasts. Real time quantitative RT-qPCR assay of several selected genes confirmed these microarray data and further suggested that there may be kinetic differences in expression between ligands. These data suggest that ITE and TCDD elicit an analogous change in AhR conformation such that the initial transcription response is the same. Furthermore, if the difference in toxicity between TCDD and ITE is mediated by differences in gene expression, then it is likely that secondary changes enabled by the persistent TCDD, but not by the shorter lived ITE, are responsible. PMID:19933214

  17. Unique role for translation initiation factor 3 in the light color regulation of photosynthetic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gutu, Andrian; Nesbit, April D; Alverson, Andrew J; Palmer, Jeffrey D; Kehoe, David M

    2013-10-01

    Light-harvesting antennae are critical for collecting energy from sunlight and providing it to photosynthetic reaction centers. Their abundance and composition are tightly regulated to maintain efficient photosynthesis in changing light conditions. Many cyanobacteria alter their light-harvesting antennae in response to changes in ambient light-color conditions through the process of chromatic acclimation. The control of green light induction (Cgi) pathway is a light-color-sensing system that controls the expression of photosynthetic genes during chromatic acclimation, and while some evidence suggests that it operates via transcription attenuation, the components of this pathway have not been identified. We provide evidence that translation initiation factor 3 (IF3), an essential component of the prokaryotic translation initiation machinery that binds the 30S subunit and blocks premature association with the 50S subunit, is part of the control of green light induction pathway. Light regulation of gene expression has not been previously described for any translation initiation factor. Surprisingly, deletion of the IF3-encoding gene infCa was not lethal in the filamentous cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon, and its genome was found to contain a second, redundant, highly divergent infC gene which, when deleted, had no effect on photosynthetic gene expression. Either gene could complement an Escherichia coli infC mutant and thus both encode bona fide IF3s. Analysis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genome databases established that multiple infC genes are present in the genomes of diverse groups of bacteria and land plants, most of which do not undergo chromatic acclimation. This suggests that IF3 may have repeatedly evolved important roles in the regulation of gene expression in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. PMID:24048028

  18. Gene Expression Profiles of Sporadic Canine Hemangiosarcoma Are Uniquely Associated with Breed

    PubMed Central

    Tamburini, Beth A.; Trapp, Susan; Phang, Tzu Lip; Schappa, Jill T.; Hunter, Lawrence E.; Modiano, Jaime F.

    2009-01-01

    The role an individual's genetic background plays on phenotype and biological behavior of sporadic tumors remains incompletely understood. We showed previously that lymphomas from Golden Retrievers harbor defined, recurrent chromosomal aberrations that occur less frequently in lymphomas from other dog breeds, suggesting spontaneous canine tumors provide suitable models to define how heritable traits influence cancer genotypes. Here, we report a complementary approach using gene expression profiling in a naturally occurring endothelial sarcoma of dogs (hemangiosarcoma). Naturally occurring hemangiosarcomas of Golden Retrievers clustered separately from those of non-Golden Retrievers, with contributions from transcription factors, survival factors, and from pro-inflammatory and angiogenic genes, and which were exclusively present in hemangiosarcoma and not in other tumors or normal cells (i.e., they were not due simply to variation in these genes among breeds). Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 1 (VEGFR1) was among genes preferentially enriched within known pathways derived from gene set enrichment analysis when characterizing tumors from Golden Retrievers versus other breeds. Heightened VEGFR1 expression in these tumors also was apparent at the protein level and targeted inhibition of VEGFR1 increased proliferation of hemangiosarcoma cells derived from tumors of Golden Retrievers, but not from other breeds. Our results suggest heritable factors mold gene expression phenotypes, and consequently biological behavior in sporadic, naturally occurring tumors. PMID:19461996

  19. H2S exposure elicits differential expression of candidate genes in fish adapted to sulfidic and non-sulfidic environments.

    PubMed

    Tobler, Michael; Henpita, Chathurika; Bassett, Brandon; Kelley, Joanna L; Shaw, Jennifer H

    2014-09-01

    Disentangling the effects of plasticity, genetic variation, and their interactions on organismal responses to environmental stressors is a key objective in ecological physiology. We quantified the expression of five candidate genes in response to hydrogen sulfide (H2S) exposure in fish (Poecilia mexicana, Poeciliidae) from a naturally sulfide-rich environment as well as an ancestral, non-sulfidic population to test for constitutive and environmentally dependent population differences in gene expression patterns. Common garden raised individuals that had never encountered environmental H2S during their lifetime were subjected to short or long term H2S exposure treatments or respective non-sulfidic controls. The expression of genes involved in responses to H2S toxicity (cytochrome c oxidase, vascular endothelial growth factor, and cytochrome P450-2J6), H2S detoxification (sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase), and endogenous H2S production (cystathionine γ lyase) was determined in both gill and liver tissues by real time PCR. The results indicated complex changes in expression patterns that--depending on the gene--not only differed between organs and populations, but also on the type of H2S exposure. Populations differences, both constitutive and H2S exposure dependent (i.e., plastic), in gene expression were particularly evident for sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase, vascular endothelial growth factor, and to a lesser degree for cytochrome P450-2J6. Our study uncovered putatively adaptive modifications in gene regulation that parallel previously documented adaptive changes in phenotypic traits. PMID:24813672

  20. Activation of dimeric ABA receptors elicits guard cell closure, ABA-regulated gene expression, and drought tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Masanori; Peterson, Francis C.; Defries, Andrew; Park, Sang-Youl; Endo, Akira; Nambara, Eiji; Volkman, Brian F.; Cutler, Sean R.

    2013-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an essential molecule in plant abiotic stress responses. It binds to soluble pyrabactin resistance1/PYR1-like/regulatory component of ABA receptor receptors and stabilizes them in a conformation that inhibits clade A type II C protein phosphatases; this leads to downstream SnRK2 kinase activation and numerous cellular outputs. We previously described the synthetic naphthalene sulfonamide ABA agonist pyrabactin, which activates seed ABA responses but fails to trigger substantial responses in vegetative tissues in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we describe quinabactin, a sulfonamide ABA agonist that preferentially activates dimeric ABA receptors and possesses ABA-like potency in vivo. In Arabidopsis, the transcriptional responses induced by quinabactin are highly correlated with those induced by ABA treatments. Quinabactin treatments elicit guard cell closure, suppress water loss, and promote drought tolerance in adult Arabidopsis and soybean plants. The effects of quinabactin are sufficiently similar to those of ABA that it is able to rescue multiple phenotypes observed in the ABA-deficient mutant aba2. Genetic analyses show that quinabactin’s effects in vegetative tissues are primarily mediated by dimeric ABA receptors. A PYL2-quinabactin-HAB1 X-ray crystal structure solved at 1.98-Å resolution shows that quinabactin forms a hydrogen bond with the receptor/PP2C “lock” hydrogen bond network, a structural feature absent in pyrabactin-receptor/PP2C complexes. Our results demonstrate that ABA receptors can be chemically controlled to enable plant protection against water stress and define the dimeric receptors as key targets for chemical modulation of vegetative ABA responses. PMID:23818638

  1. Amygdala nuclei critical for emotional learning exhibit unique gene expression patterns ✩

    PubMed Central

    Partin, Alexander C.; Hosek, Matthew P.; Luong, Jonathan A.; Lella, Srihari K.; Sharma, Sachein A.R.; Ploski, Jonathan E.

    2014-01-01

    The amygdala is a heterogeneous, medial temporal lobe structure that has been implicated in the formation, expression and extinction of emotional memories. This structure is composed of numerous nuclei that vary in cytoarchitectonics and neural connections. In particular the Lateral nucleus of the Amygdala (LA), Central nucleus of the Amygdala (CeA), and the Basal (B) nucleus contribute an essential role to emotional learning. However, to date it is still unclear to what extent these nuclei differ at the molecular level. Therefore we have performed whole genome gene expression analysis on these nuclei to gain a better understanding of the molecular differences and similarities among these nuclei. Specifically the LA, CeA and B nuclei were laser microdissected from the rat brain, and total RNA was isolated from these nuclei and subjected to RNA amplification. Amplified RNA was analyzed by whole genome microarray analysis which revealed that 129 genes are differentially expressed among these nuclei. Notably gene expression patterns differed between the CeA nucleus and the LA and B nuclei. However gene expression differences were not considerably different between the LA and B nuclei. Secondary confirmation of numerous genes was performed by in situ hybridization to validate the microarray findings, which also revealed that for many genes, expression differences among these nuclei were consistent with the embryological origins of these nuclei. Knowing the stable gene expression differences among these nuclei will provide novel avenues of investigation into how these nuclei contribute to emotional arousal and emotional learning, and potentially offer new genetic targets to manipulate emotional learning and memory. PMID:23831498

  2. Unique Loss of the PYHIN Gene Family in Bats Amongst Mammals: Implications for Inflammasome Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Matae; Cui, Jie; Irving, Aaron T.; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Recent genomic analysis of two bat species (Pteropus alecto and Myotis davidii) revealed the absence of the PYHIN gene family. This family is recognized as important immune sensors of intracellular self and foreign DNA and activators of the inflammasome and/or interferon pathways. Further assessment of a wider range of bat genomes was necessary to determine if this is a universal pattern for this large mammalian group. Here we expanded genomic analysis of this gene family to include ten bat species. We confirmed the complete loss of this gene family, with only a truncated AIM2 remaining in one species (Pteronotus parnellii). Divergence of the PYHIN gene loci between the bat lineages infers different loss-of-function histories during bat evolution. While all other major groups of placental mammals have at least one gene member, only bats have lost the entire family. This removal of inflammasome DNA sensors may indicate an important adaptation that is flight-induced and related, at least in part, to pathogen-host co-existence. PMID:26906452

  3. Does AL amyloidosis have a unique genomic profile? Gene expression profiling meta-analysis and literature overview.

    PubMed

    Kryukov, Fedor; Kryukova, Elena; Brozova, Lucie; Kufova, Zuzana; Filipova, Jana; Growkova, Katerina; Sevcikova, Tereza; Jarkovsky, Jiri; Hajek, Roman

    2016-10-15

    Immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis (ALA) is a plasma cell dyscrasia characterized by deposition of amyloid fibrils in various organs and tissues. The current paper is devoted to clarify if ALA has a unique gene expression profile and to its pathogenetic argumentation. The meta-analysis of ALA patients vs. healthy donors, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, smoldering and multiple myeloma patients' cohorts have revealed molecular signature of ALA consists of 256 genes representing mostly ribosomal proteins and immunoglobulin regions. This signature appears pathogenetically supported and elucidates for the first time the role of ribosome dysfunction in ALA. In summary of our findings with literature overview, we hypothesize that ALA development is associated not only with changes in genes, coding amyloidogenic protein itself, but with post-transcriptional disbalance as well. Based on our data analysis in ALA, ribosome machinery is impaired and the affected link mainly involves translational initiation, elongation and co-translational protein folding. PMID:27288311

  4. Disruption of diapause induction by TALEN-based gene mutagenesis in relation to a unique neuropeptide signaling pathway in Bombyx.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Kunihiro; Takasu, Yoko; Kunii, Masayo; Tsuchiya, Ryoma; Mukaida, Moeka; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Sezutsu, Hideki; Ichida Takahama, Masatoshi; Mizoguchi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The insect neuropeptide family FXPRLa, which carries the Phe-Xaa-Pro-Arg-Leu-NH2 sequence at the C-terminus, is involved in many physiological processes. Although ligand-receptor interactions in FXPRLa signaling have been examined using in vitro assays, the correlation between these interactions and in vivo physiological function is unclear. Diapause in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, is thought to be elicited by diapause hormone (DH, an FXPRLa) signaling, which consists of interactions between DH and DH receptor (DHR). Here, we performed transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-based mutagenesis of the Bombyx DH-PBAN and DHR genes and isolated the null mutants of these genes in a bivoltine strain. All mutant silkworms were fully viable and showed no abnormalities in the developmental timing of ecdysis or metamorphosis. However, female adults oviposited non-diapause eggs despite diapause-inducing temperature and photoperiod conditions. Therefore, we conclude that DH signaling is essential for diapause induction and consists of highly sensitive and specific interactions between DH and DHR selected during ligand-receptor coevolution in Bombyx mori. PMID:26497859

  5. Disruption of diapause induction by TALEN-based gene mutagenesis in relation to a unique neuropeptide signaling pathway in Bombyx

    PubMed Central

    Shiomi, Kunihiro; Takasu, Yoko; Kunii, Masayo; Tsuchiya, Ryoma; Mukaida, Moeka; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Sezutsu, Hideki; Ichida Takahama, Masatoshi; Mizoguchi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The insect neuropeptide family FXPRLa, which carries the Phe-Xaa-Pro-Arg-Leu-NH2 sequence at the C-terminus, is involved in many physiological processes. Although ligand–receptor interactions in FXPRLa signaling have been examined using in vitro assays, the correlation between these interactions and in vivo physiological function is unclear. Diapause in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, is thought to be elicited by diapause hormone (DH, an FXPRLa) signaling, which consists of interactions between DH and DH receptor (DHR). Here, we performed transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-based mutagenesis of the Bombyx DH-PBAN and DHR genes and isolated the null mutants of these genes in a bivoltine strain. All mutant silkworms were fully viable and showed no abnormalities in the developmental timing of ecdysis or metamorphosis. However, female adults oviposited non-diapause eggs despite diapause-inducing temperature and photoperiod conditions. Therefore, we conclude that DH signaling is essential for diapause induction and consists of highly sensitive and specific interactions between DH and DHR selected during ligand–receptor coevolution in Bombyx mori. PMID:26497859

  6. Identification of Genes Uniquely Expressed in the Germ-Line Tissues of the Jewel Wasp Nasonia vitripennis

    PubMed Central

    Ferree, Patrick M.; Fang, Christopher; Mastrodimos, Mariah; Hay, Bruce A.; Amrhein, Henry; Akbari, Omar S.

    2015-01-01

    The jewel wasp Nasonia vitripennis is a rising model organism for the study of haplo-diploid reproduction characteristic of hymenopteran insects, which include all wasps, bees, and ants. We performed transcriptional profiling of the ovary, the female soma, and the male soma of N. vitripennis to complement a previously existing transcriptome of the wasp testis. These data were deposited into an open-access genome browser for visualization of transcripts relative to their gene models. We used these data to identify the assemblies of genes uniquely expressed in the germ-line tissues. We found that 156 protein-coding genes are expressed exclusively in the wasp testis compared with only 22 in the ovary. Of the testis-specific genes, eight are candidates for male-specific DNA packaging proteins known as protamines. We found very similar expression patterns of centrosome associated genes in the testis and ovary, arguing that de novo centrosome formation, a key process for development of unfertilized eggs into males, likely does not rely on large-scale transcriptional differences between these tissues. In contrast, a number of meiosis-related genes show a bias toward testis-specific expression, despite the lack of true meiosis in N. vitripennis males. These patterns may reflect an unexpected complexity of male gamete production in the haploid males of this organism. Broadly, these data add to the growing number of genomic and genetic tools available in N. vitripennis for addressing important biological questions in this rising insect model organism. PMID:26464360

  7. Complete mitochondrial genome of Tubulipora flabellaris (Bryozoa: Stenolaemata): the first representative from the class Stenolaemata with unique gene order.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming'an; Shen, Xin; Liu, Huilian; Liu, Xixing; Wu, Zhigang; Liu, Bin

    2011-09-01

    Mitochondrial genomes play a significant role in the reconstruction of phylogenetic relationships within metazoans. There are still many controversies concerning the phylogenetic position of the phylum Bryozoa. In this research, we have finished the complete mitochondrial genome of one bryozoan (Tubulipora flabellaris), which is the first representative from the class Stenolaemata. The complete mitochondrial genome of T. flabellaris is 13,763bp in length and contains 36 genes, which lacks the atp8 gene in contrast to the typical metazoan mitochondrial genomes. Gene arrangement comparisons indicate that the mitochondrial genome of T. flabellaris has unique gene order when compared with other metazoans. The four known bryozoans complete mitochondrial genomes also have very different gene arrangements, indicates that bryozoan mitochondrial genomes have experienced drastic rearrangements. To investigate the phylogenetic relationship of Bryozoa, phylogenetic analyses based on amino acid sequences of 11 protein coding genes (excluding atp6 and atp8) from 26 metazoan complete mitochondrial genomes were made utilizing Maximum Likelihood (ML) and Bayesian methods, respectively. The results indicate the monopoly of Lophotrochozoa and a close relationship between Chaetognatha and Bryozoa. However, more evidences are needed to clarify the relationship between two groups. Lophophorate appeared to be polyphyletic according to our analyses. Meanwhile, neither analysis supports close relationship between Branchiopod and Phoronida. Four bryozoans form a clade and the relationship among them is T. flabellaris+(F. hispida+(B. neritina+W. subtorquata)), which is in coincidence with traditional classification system. PMID:21867967

  8. Sphingosine 1-phosphate elicits RhoA-dependent proliferation and MRTF-A mediated gene induction in CPCs.

    PubMed

    Castaldi, Alessandra; Chesini, Gino P; Taylor, Amy E; Sussman, Mark A; Brown, Joan Heller; Purcell, Nicole H

    2016-08-01

    Although c-kit(+) cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) are currently used in clinical trials there remain considerable gaps in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying their proliferation and differentiation. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) play an important role in regulating these processes in mammalian cell types thus we assessed GPCR mRNA expression in c-kit(+) cells isolated from adult mouse hearts. Our data provide the first comprehensive overview of the distribution of this fundamental class of cardiac receptors in CPCs and reveal notable distinctions from that of adult cardiomyocytes. We focused on GPCRs that couple to RhoA activation in particular those for sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). The S1P2 and S1P3 receptors are the most abundant S1P receptor subtypes in mouse and human CPCs while cardiomyocytes express predominantly S1P1 receptors. Treatment of CPCs with S1P, as with thrombin and serum, increased proliferation through a pathway requiring RhoA signaling, as evidenced by significant attenuation when Rho was inhibited by treatment with C3 toxin. Further analysis demonstrated that both S1P- and serum-induced proliferation are regulated through the S1P2 and S1P3 receptor subtypes which couple to Gα12/13 to elicit RhoA activation. The transcriptional co-activator MRTF-A was activated by S1P as assessed by its nuclear accumulation and induction of a RhoA/MRTF-A luciferase reporter. In addition S1P treatment increased expression of cardiac lineage markers Mef2C and GATA4 and the smooth muscle marker GATA6 through activation of MRTF-A. In conclusion, we delineate an S1P-regulated signaling pathway in CPCs that introduces the possibility of targeting S1P2/3 receptors, Gα12/13 or RhoA to influence the proliferation and commitment of c-kit(+) CPCs and improve the response of the myocardium following injury. PMID:27094722

  9. Characterization of the Tunicamycin Gene Cluster Unveiling Unique Steps Involved in its Biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tunicamycin, a potent reversible translocase I inhibitor, is produced by several Actinomycetes species. The tunicamycin structure is highly unusual, and contains an 11-carbon dialdose sugar and an aß-1,1-glycosidic linkage. Here we report the identification of a gene cluster essential for tunicamy...

  10. A Unique Wheat Disease Resistance-like Gene Governs Effector-Induced Susceptibility to Necrotrophic pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant disease resistance is often conferred by genes with nucleotide binding site and leucine-rich repeat NBS-LRR) or serine/threonine protein kinase (S/TPK) domains. Much less is known about mechanisms of susceptibility, particularly to necrotrophic fungal pathogens. The pathogens that cause the di...

  11. Characterization of Tusc5, a Unique Adipocyte Gene Co-Expressed in Peripheral Somatosensory Neurons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tumor suppressor candidate 5 (Tusc5, GenBank nomenclature) is a cold-repressed gene encoding a member of the CD225 domain-containing family, identified through analysis of transcripts differentially-expressed in brown adipose tissue (BAT) with changes in ambient temperature. Tusc5 mRNA was found to ...

  12. Unique gene expression profile in osteoarthritis synovium compared with cartilage: analysis of publicly accessible microarray datasets.

    PubMed

    Park, Robin; Ji, Jong Dae

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify a gene expression signature in osteoarthritis (OA) synovium and genomic pathways likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of OA. Four publicly accessible microarray studies from synovium of OA patients were integrated, and a transcriptomic and network-based meta-analysis was performed. Based on pathways according to the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, functional enrichment analysis was performed. Meta-analysis results of OA synovium were compared to two previously published studies of OA cartilage to determine the relative number of common and specific DEGs of the cartilage and synovium. According to our meta-analysis, a total of 1350 genes were found to be differentially expressed in the synovium of OA patients as compared to that of healthy controls. Pathway analysis found 41 significant pathways in the total DEGs, and 22 and 16 pathways in the upregulated and downregulated DEGs, respectively. Cell adhesion molecules and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction were the most significant pathway in the upregulated and downregulated DEGs, respectively. Comparison of meta-analysis results of OA synovium with results of two previous studies of OA cartilage identified 85 common genes and 1632 cartilage-specific DEGs and 1265 synovium-specific DEGs in the first study; and 142 common genes, and 856 cartilage-specific DEGs and 1208 synovium-specific DEGs in the second study. Our results show a small overlap between the DEGs of the synovium compared to DEGs of the cartilage, suggesting different pathogenic mechanisms that are specific to the synovium. PMID:26942917

  13. Integration of Genome-Wide Computation DRE Search, AhR ChIP-chip and Gene Expression Analyses of TCDD-Elicited Responses in the Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor (TF) that mediates responses to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Integration of TCDD-induced genome-wide AhR enrichment, differential gene expression and computational dioxin response element (DRE) analyses further elucidate the hepatic AhR regulatory network. Results Global ChIP-chip and gene expression analyses were performed on hepatic tissue from immature ovariectomized mice orally gavaged with 30 μg/kg TCDD. ChIP-chip analysis identified 14,446 and 974 AhR enriched regions (1% false discovery rate) at 2 and 24 hrs, respectively. Enrichment density was greatest in the proximal promoter, and more specifically, within ± 1.5 kb of a transcriptional start site (TSS). AhR enrichment also occurred distal to a TSS (e.g. intergenic DNA and 3' UTR), extending the potential gene expression regulatory roles of the AhR. Although TF binding site analyses identified over-represented DRE sequences within enriched regions, approximately 50% of all AhR enriched regions lacked a DRE core (5'-GCGTG-3'). Microarray analysis identified 1,896 number of TCDD-responsive genes (|fold change| ≥ 1.5, P1(t) > 0.999). Integrating this gene expression data with our ChIP-chip and DRE analyses only identified 625 differentially expressed genes that involved an AhR interaction at a DRE. Functional annotation analysis of differentially regulated genes associated with AhR enrichment identified overrepresented processes related to fatty acid and lipid metabolism and transport, and xenobiotic metabolism, which are consistent with TCDD-elicited steatosis in the mouse liver. Conclusions Details of the AhR regulatory network have been expanded to include AhR-DNA interactions within intragenic and intergenic genomic regions. Moreover, the AhR can interact with DNA independent of a DRE core suggesting there are alternative mechanisms of AhR-mediated gene regulation. PMID:21762485

  14. Genes That Are Uniquely Stress Regulated in Salt Overly Sensitive (sos) Mutants1

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zhizhong; Koiwa, Hisashi; Cushman, Mary Ann; Ray, Anamika; Bufford, Davi; Kore-eda, Shin; Matsumoto, Tracie K.; Zhu, Jianhua; Cushman, John C.; Bressan, Ray A.; Hasegawa, Paul M.

    2001-01-01

    Repetitive rounds of differential subtraction screening, followed by nucleotide sequence determination and northern-blot analysis, identified 84 salt-regulated (160 mm NaCl for 4 h) genes in Arabidopsis wild-type (Col-0 gl1) seedlings. Probes corresponding to these 84 genes and ACP1, RD22BP1, MYB2, STZ, and PAL were included in an analysis of salt responsive gene expression profiles in gl1 and the salt-hypersensitive mutant sos3. Six of 89 genes were expressed differentially in wild-type and sos3 seedlings; steady-state mRNA abundance of five genes (AD06C08/unknown, AD05E05/vegetative storage protein 2 [VSP2], AD05B11/S-adenosyl-l-Met:salicylic acid carboxyl methyltransferase [SAMT], AD03D05/cold regulated 6.6/inducible2 [COR6.6/KIN2], and salt tolerance zinc finger [STZ]) was induced and the abundance of one gene (AD05C10/circadian rhythm-RNA binding1 [CCR1]) was reduced in wild-type plants after salt treatment. The expression of CCR1, SAMT, COR6.6/KIN2, and STZ was higher in sos3 than in wild type, and VSP2 and AD06C08/unknown was lower in the mutant. Salt-induced expression of VSP2 in sos1 was similar to wild type, and AD06C08/unknown, CCR1, SAMT, COR6.6/KIN2, and STZ were similar to sos3. VSP2 is regulated presumably by SOS2/3 independent of SOS1, whereas the expression of the others is SOS1 dependent. AD06C08/unknown and VSP2 are postulated to be effectors of salt tolerance whereas CCR1, SAMT, COR6.6/KIN2, and STZ are determinants that must be negatively regulated during salt adaptation. The pivotal function of the SOS signal pathway to mediate ion homeostasis and salt tolerance implicates AD06C08/unknown, VSP2, SAMT, 6.6/KIN2, STZ, and CCR1 as determinates that are involved in salt adaptation. PMID:11351099

  15. A unique mosaic Turner syndrome patient with androgen receptor gene derived marker chromosome.

    PubMed

    Kalkan, Rasime; Özdağ, Nermin; Bundak, Rüveyde; Çirakoğlu, Ayşe; Serakinci, Nedime

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Turner syndrome are generally characterized by having short stature with no secondary sexual characteristics. Some abnormalities, such as webbed neck, renal malformations (>50%) and cardiac defects (10%) are less common. The intelligence of these patients is considered normal. Non-mosaic monosomy X is observed in approximately 45% of postnatal patients with Turner syndrome and the rest of the patients have structural abnormalities or mosaicism involving 46,X,i(Xq), 45,X/46,XX, 45,X and other variants. The phenotype of 45,X/46,X,+mar individuals varies by the genetic continent and degree of the mosaicism. The gene content of the marker chromosome is the most important when correlating the phenotype with the genotype. Here we present an 11-year-old female who was referred for evaluation of her short stature and learning disabilities. Conventional cytogenetic investigation showed a mosaic 45,X/46,X,+mar karyotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that the marker chromosome originated from the X chromosome within the androgen receptor (AR) and X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) genes. Therefore, it is possible that aberrant activation of the marker chromosome, compromising the AR and XIST genes, may modify the Turner syndrome phenotype. PMID:26744914

  16. Methylation of PLCD1 and adenovirus-mediated PLCD1 overexpression elicits a gene therapy effect on human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Haixi; Wang, Na; Zhao, Lijuan; Li, Shuman; Li, Qianqian; Chen, Ling; Luo, Xinrong; Qiu, Zhu; Li, Lili; Ren, Guosheng; Xu, Yongzhu; Zhou, Xiangyang; Xiang, Tingxiu

    2015-03-15

    Our previous study showed that PLCD1 significantly decreases cell proliferation and affects cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells. In the present study, we aimed to investigate its functional and molecular mechanisms, and whether or not can become a new target for gene therapies. We found reduced PLCD1 protein expression in breast tumor tissues compared with paired surgical margin tissues. PLCD1 promoter CpG methylation was detected in 55 of 96 (57%) primary breast tumors, but not in surgical-margin tissues and normal breast tissues. Ectopic expression of PLCD1 inhibited breast tumor cell proliferation in vivo by inducing apoptosis and suppressed tumor cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins including RhoA and phospho-cofilin. Furthermore, we found that PLCD1 induced p53 accumulation, increased p27 and p21 protein levels, and cleaved PARP. Finally, we constructed an adenoviral vector expressing PLCD1 (AdH5-PLCD1), which exhibited strong cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells. Our findings provide insights into the development of PLCD1 gene therapies for breast cancer and perhaps, other human cancers. - Highlights: • PLCD1 is downregulated via hypermethylation in breast cancer. • PLCD1 suppressed cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins. • Adenovirus AdHu5-PLCD1 may be a novel therapeutic option for breast cancer.

  17. Dendritic cells transduced with wild-type p53 gene elicit potent anti-tumour immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, T; Chada, S; Stipanov, M; Nadaf, S; Ciernik, F I; Gabrilovich, D I; Carbone, D P

    1999-01-01

    In this study we have tested the concept of using wild-type p53 gene for immunotherapy of cancer. Dendritic cells (DC) were transduced with a human wild-type p53 containing recombinant adenovirus (Ad-p53). About a half of DC transduced with this virus expressed p53 protein by FACS analysis 48 h after infection. Mice immunized twice with Ad-p53 DC developed substantial cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses against tumour cells expressing wild-type and different mutant human and murine p53 genes. Very low CTL responses were observed against target cells infected with control adenovirus (Ad-c). Immunization with Ad-p53 provided complete tumour protection in 85% of mice challenged with tumour cells expressing human mutant p53 and in 72.7% of mice challenged with tumour cells with murine mutant p53. Treatment with Ad-p53-transduced DC significantly slowed the growth of established tumours. Thus, DC transduced with wild-type p53 may be a promising new tool for the immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:10444254

  18. Characterization of a cancer/testis (CT) antigen gene family capable of eliciting humoral response in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Parmigiani, Raphael B.; Bettoni, Fabiana; Vibranovski, Maria D.; Lopes, Marilene H.; Martins, Waleska K.; Cunha, Isabela W.; Soares, Fernando A.; Simpson, Andrew J. G.; de Souza, Sandro J.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2006-01-01

    Cancer/testis (CT) antigens are immunogenic proteins expressed in normal gametogenic tissues and in different types of tumors. CT antigens are promising candidates for cancer immunotherapy, and the identification of novel CT antigens is a prerequisite for the development of cancer vaccines. We have identified a CT antigen, named CTSP-1, with partial similarity to the breast differentiation antigen NY-BR-1. CTSP-1 presents several splicing and polyadenylation variants and has a very restricted expression pattern among normal tissues. CTSP-1 is exclusively expressed in normal testis and is aberrantly expressed in 47.6% (10 of 21) of tumor cell lines and in 44.4% (75 of 169) of tumors from different histological types. The highest percentages of positive expression were observed in melanomas (59.0%) followed by prostate (58.0%) and lung (57.0%) tumors. CTSP-1 is part of a highly conserved gene family, and members of this family also have a restricted expression pattern and similar protein structure. Antibodies against members of this gene family were detected in 10% (14 of 141) of plasma samples from patients with a wide spectrum of tumors. The highest percentages of antibody response were observed in patients with prostate (20.8%), thyroid (20.0%), and breast (16.6%) tumors. Because of its very restricted expression pattern in normal tissues and immunogenicity in different types of tumors, CTSP-1 should be considered a promising candidate for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:17114284

  19. Methionine elicits H2O2 generation and defense gene expression in grapevine and reduces Plasmopara viticola infection.

    PubMed

    Boubakri, Hatem; Wahab, Mohamed Ali; Chong, Julie; Gertz, Claude; Gandoura, Samia; Mliki, Ahmed; Bertsch, Christophe; Soustre-Gacougnolle, Isabelle

    2013-12-15

    Methionine (Met) is a nutritionally essential sulfur-containing amino acid (SAA) known for its preponderant role as initiator in protein synthesis. However, other functions for Met in plants are not well described. The implication of this SAA in oxidative stress tolerance has been recently reported, however the mode of action of Met is still poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the elicitor activity of Met in grapevine as well as its effect on Plasmopara viticola resistance. The results show that Met induces hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation, a key element in plant defense signaling, and upregulates the expression of a battery of defense-related genes. Transcript levels of these genes were not further modulated by P. viticola inoculation of Met-pretreated plants, suggesting an elicitor role rather than a priming role for Met in grapevine. Met treatment also reduces P. viticola development in grapevine plants grown under glasshouse controlled-conditions. Fungitoxicity assays revealed that Met possesses a moderate antifungal activity compared with cysteine (Cys), another SAA known for its toxic effect to a large spectrum of fungi. PMID:23859561

  20. The Complete Mitochondrial Genome and Novel Gene Arrangement of the Unique-Headed Bug Stenopirates sp. (Hemiptera: Enicocephalidae)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hu; Liu, Hui; Shi, Aimin; Štys, Pavel; Zhou, Xuguo; Cai, Wanzhi

    2012-01-01

    Many of true bugs are important insect pests to cultivated crops and some are important vectors of human diseases, but few cladistic analyses have addressed relationships among the seven infraorders of Heteroptera. The Enicocephalomorpha and Nepomorpha are consider the basal groups of Heteroptera, but the basal-most lineage remains unresolved. Here we report the mitochondrial genome of the unique-headed bug Stenopirates sp., the first mitochondrial genome sequenced from Enicocephalomorpha. The Stenopirates sp. mitochondrial genome is a typical circular DNA molecule of 15, 384 bp in length, and contains 37 genes and a large non-coding fragment. The gene order differs substantially from other known insect mitochondrial genomes, with rearrangements of both tRNA genes and protein-coding genes. The overall AT content (82.5%) of Stenopirates sp. is the highest among all the known heteropteran mitochondrial genomes. The strand bias is consistent with other true bugs with negative GC-skew and positive AT-skew for the J-strand. The heteropteran mitochondrial atp8 exhibits the highest evolutionary rate, whereas cox1 appears to have the lowest rate. Furthermore, a negative correlation was observed between the variation of nucleotide substitutions and the GC content of each protein-coding gene. A microsatellite was identified in the putative control region. Finally, phylogenetic reconstruction suggests that Enicocephalomorpha is the sister group to all the remaining Heteroptera. PMID:22235294

  1. RNA-Seq reveals common and unique PXR- and CAR-target gene signatures in the mouse liver transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Cui, Julia Yue; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2016-09-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) are well-known xenobiotic-sensing nuclear receptors with overlapping functions. However, there lacks a quantitative characterization to distinguish between the PXR and CAR target genes and signaling pathways in the liver. The present study performed a transcriptomic comparison of the PXR- and CAR-targets using RNA-Seq in livers of adult wild-type mice that were treated with the prototypical PXR ligand PCN (200mg/kg, i.p. once daily for 4days in corn oil) or the prototypical CAR ligand TCPOBOP (3mg/kg, i.p., once daily for 4days in corn oil). At the given doses, TCPOBOP differentially regulated many more genes (2125) than PCN (212), and 147 of the same genes were differentially regulated by both chemicals. As expected, the top pathways differentially regulated by both PCN and TCPOBOP were involved in xenobiotic metabolism, and they also up-regulated genes involved in retinoid metabolism, but down-regulated genes involved in inflammation and iron homeostasis. Regarding unique pathways, PXR activation appeared to overlap with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling, whereas CAR activation appeared to overlap with the farnesoid X receptor signaling, acute-phase response, and mitochondrial dysfunction. The mRNAs of differentially regulated drug-processing genes (DPGs) partitioned into three patterns, namely TCPOBOP-induced, PCN-induced, as well as TCPOBOP-suppressed gene clusters. The cumulative mRNAs of the differentially regulated DPGs, phase-I and -II enzymes, as well as efflux transporters were all up-regulated by both PCN and TCPOBOPOP, whereas the cumulative mRNAs of the uptake transporters were down-regulated only by TCPOBOP. The absolute mRNA abundance in control and receptor-activated conditions was examined in each DPG category to predict the contribution of specific DPG genes in the PXR/CAR-mediated pharmacokinetic responses. The preferable differential regulation by TCPOBOP in the

  2. Unique and redundant functional domains of APETALA1 and CAULIFLOWER, two recently duplicated Arabidopsis thaliana floral MADS-box genes.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R; García-Ponce, Berenice; Garay-Arroyo, Adriana

    2006-01-01

    APETALA1 (AP1) and CAULIFLOWER (CAL) are closely related MADS box genes that are partially redundant during Arabidopsis thaliana floral meristem determination. AP1 is able to fully substitute for CAL functions, but not vice versa, and AP1 has unique sepal and petal identity specification functions. In this study, the unique and redundant functions of these two genes has been mapped to the four protein domains that characterize type-II MADS-domain proteins by expressing all 15 chimeric combinations of AP1 and CAL cDNA regions under control of the AP1 promoter in ap1-1 loss-of-function plants. The "in vivo" function of these chimeric genes was analysed in Arabidopsis plants by expressing the chimeras. Rescue of flower meristem and sepal/petal identities was scored in single and multiple insert homozygous transgenic lines. Using these chimeric lines, it was found that distinct residues of the AP1 K domain not shared by the same CAL domain are necessary and sufficient for complete recovery of floral meristem identity, in the context of the CAL protein sequence, while both AP1 COOH and K domains are indispensable for complete rescue of sepal identity. By contrast, either one of these two AP1 domains is necessary and sufficient for complete petal identity recovery. It was also found that there were positive and negative synergies among protein domains and their combinations, and that multiple-insert lines showed relatively better rescue than equivalent single-insert lines. Finally, several lines had flowers with extra sepals and petals suggesting that chimeric proteins yield abnormal transcriptional complexes that may alter the expression or regulation of genes that control floral organ number under normal conditions. PMID:16893974

  3. Unique CCT repeats mediate transcription of the TWIST1 gene in mesenchymal cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkuma, Mizue; Funato, Noriko; Higashihori, Norihisa; Murakami, Masanori; Ohyama, Kimie; Nakamura, Masataka . E-mail: naka.gene@cmn.tmd.ac.jp

    2007-01-26

    TWIST1, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, plays critical roles in embryo development, cancer metastasis and mesenchymal progenitor differentiation. Little is known about transcriptional regulation of TWIST1 expression. Here we identified DNA sequences responsible for TWIST1 expression in mesenchymal lineage cell lines. Reporter assays with TWIST1 promoter mutants defined the -102 to -74 sequences that are essential for TWIST1 expression in human and mouse mesenchymal cell lines. Tandem repeats of CCT, but not putative CREB and NF-{kappa}B sites in the sequences substantially supported activity of the TWIST1 promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that the DNA sequences with the CCT repeats formed complexes with nuclear factors, containing, at least, Sp1 and Sp3. These results suggest critical implication of the CCT repeats in association with Sp1 and Sp3 factors in sustaining expression of the TWIST1 gene in mesenchymal cells.

  4. Administration of HPV DNA vaccine via electroporation elicits the strongest CD8+ T cell immune responses compared to intramuscular injection and intradermal gene gun delivery.

    PubMed

    Best, Simon R; Peng, Shiwen; Juang, Chi-Mou; Hung, Chien-Fu; Hannaman, Drew; Saunders, John R; Wu, T-C; Pai, Sara I

    2009-09-01

    DNA vaccines are an attractive approach to eliciting antigen-specific immunity. Intracellular targeting of tumor antigens through its linkage to immunostimulatory molecules such as calreticulin (CRT) can improve antigen processing and presentation through the MHC class I pathway and increase cytotoxic CD8+ T cell production. However, even with these enhancements, the efficacy of such immunotherapeutic strategies is dependent on the identification of an effective route and method of DNA administration. Electroporation and gene gun-mediated particle delivery are leading methods of DNA vaccine delivery that can generate protective and therapeutic levels of immune responses in experimental models. In this study, we perform a head-to-head comparison of three methods of vaccination--conventional intramuscular injection, electroporation-mediated intramuscular delivery, and epidermal gene gun-mediated particle delivery--in the ability to generate antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses as well as anti-tumor immune responses against an HPV-16 E7 expressing tumor cell line using the pNGVL4a-CRT/E7(detox) DNA vaccine. Vaccination via electroporation generated the highest number of E7-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, which correlated to improved outcomes in the treatment of growing tumors. In addition, we demonstrate that electroporation results in significantly higher levels of circulating protein compared to gene gun or intramuscular vaccination, which likely enhances calreticulin's role as a local tumor anti-angiogenesis agent. We conclude that electroporation is a promising method for delivery of HPV DNA vaccines and should be considered for DNA vaccine delivery in human clinical trials. PMID:19622402

  5. MCPIP1 Selectively Destabilizes Transcripts Associated with an Antiapoptotic Gene Expression Program in Breast Cancer Cells That Can Elicit Complete Tumor Regression.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wenbao; Ning, Huan; Gu, Ling; Peng, Hui; Wang, Qinghong; Hou, Rong; Fu, Mingui; Hoft, Daniel F; Liu, Jianguo

    2016-03-15

    The ability of cancer cells to evade apoptosis is dictated by a shift in the balance between proapoptotic and antiapoptotic gene expression programs. Monocyte chemotactic protein-induced protein 1 (MCPIP1) is a zinc-finger RNA binding protein with important roles in mediating inflammatory responses. Overexpression of MCPIP1 in different cancer cell types has been implicated in eliciting an antitumor response, but a direct role of MCPIP1 in apoptosis has not been established. In this study, we demonstrate that MCPIP1 functions as a potent tumor suppressor that induces apoptosis of breast tumor cells by selectively enhancing mRNA decay of antiapoptotic gene transcripts, including Bcl2L1, Bcl2A1, RelB, Birc3, and Bcl3. Mechanistically, MCPIP1 physically interacted with a stem-loop structure in the 3' untranslated region of these transcripts through its PIN domain, causing mRNA destabilization. Furthermore, we found that MCPIP1 expression was repressed in breast tumor cells, and overexpression of MCPIP1 induced apoptosis, whereas its depletion enhanced cancer cell proliferation. Moreover, MCPIP1 induction in vivo resulted in complete regression of established tumors and a significant reduction in metastatic disease. Notably, low MCPIP1 expression in tumor samples from breast cancer patients was strongly associated with poor survival over 13 years of follow-up. Collectively, our results highlight that MCPIP1 is a new tumor suppressor in breast cancer that induces cell death by tipping the balance in favor of proapoptotic gene expression. Cancer Res; 76(6); 1429-40. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26833120

  6. Divergent evolution of part of the involucrin gene in the hominoids: Unique intragenic duplications in the gorilla and human

    SciTech Connect

    Teumer, J.; Green, H. )

    1989-02-01

    The gene for involucrin, an epidermal protein, has been remodeled in the higher primates. Most of the coding region of the human gene consists of a modern segment of repeats derived from a 10-codon sequence present in the ancestral segment of the gene. The modern segment can be divided into early, middle, and late regions. The authors report here the nucleotide sequence of three alleles of the gorilla involucrin gene. Each possesses a modern segment homologous to that of the human and consisting of 10-codon repeats. The early and middle regions are similar to the corresponding regions of the human allele and are nearly identical among the different gorilla alleles. The late region consists of recent duplications whose pattern is unique in each of the gorilla alleles and in the human allele. The early region is located in what is now the 3{prime} third of the modern segment, and the late, polymorphic region is located in what is now the 5{prime} third. Therefore, as the modern segment expanded during evolution, its 3{prime} end became stabilized, and continuing duplications became confined to its 5{prime} end. The expansion of the involucrin coding region, which began long before the separation of the gorilla and human, has continued in both species after their separation.

  7. The Unique 16S rRNA Genes of Piezophiles Reflect both Phylogeny and Adaptation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lauro, Federico M.; Chastain, Roger A.; Blankenship, Lesley E.; Yayanos, A. Aristides; Bartlett, Douglas H.

    2007-01-01

    In the ocean's most extreme depths, pressures of 70 to 110 megapascals prevent the growth of all but the most hyperpiezophilic (pressure-loving) organisms. The physiological adaptations required for growth under these conditions are considered to be substantial. Efforts to determine specific adaptations permitting growth at extreme pressures have thus far focused on relatively few γ-proteobacteria, in part due to the technical difficulties of obtaining piezophilic bacteria in pure culture. Here, we present the molecular phylogenies of several new piezophiles of widely differing geographic origins. Included are results from an analysis of the first deep-trench bacterial isolates recovered from the southern hemisphere (9.9-km depth) and of the first gram-positive piezophilic strains. These new data allowed both phylogenetic and structural 16S rRNA comparisons among deep-ocean trench piezophiles and closely related strains not adapted to high pressure. Our results suggest that (i) the Circumpolar Deep Water acts as repository for hyperpiezophiles and drives their dissemination to deep trenches in the Pacific Ocean and (ii) the occurrence of elongated helices in the 16S rRNA genes increases with the extent of adaptation to growth at elevated pressure. These helix changes are believed to improve ribosome function under deep-sea conditions. PMID:17158629

  8. Phosphorylation of galectin-3 contributes to malignant transformation of human epithelial cells via modulation of unique sets of genes.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, Nachman; Sun, Yun Jie; Price, Janet E; Ramdas, Latha; Schober, Wendy; Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Byrd, James C; Raz, Avraham; Bresalier, Robert S

    2005-12-01

    Galectin-3 is a multifunctional beta-galactoside-binding protein implicated in apoptosis, malignant transformation, and tumor progression. The mechanisms by which galectin-3 contributes to malignant progression are not fully understood. In this study, we found that the introduction of wild-type galectin-3 into nontumorigenic, galectin-3-null BT549 human breast epithelial cells conferred tumorigenicity and metastatic potential in nude mice, and that galectin-3 expressed by the cells was phosphorylated. In contrast, BT549 cells expressing galectin-3 incapable of being phosphorylated (Ser6-->Glu Ser6-->Ala) were nontumorigenic. A microarray analysis of 10,000 human genes, comparing BT549 transfectants expressing wild-type and those expressing phosphomutant galectin-3, identified 188 genes that were differentially expressed (>2.5-fold). Genes affected by introduction of wild-type phosphorylated but not phosphomutant galectin-3 included those involved in oxidative stress, a novel noncaspase lysosomal apoptotic pathway, cell cycle regulation, transcriptional activation, cytoskeleton remodeling, cell adhesion, and tumor invasion. The reliability of the microarray data was validated by real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and by Western blot analysis, and clinical relevance was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR screening of a panel of matched pairs of breast tumors. Differentially regulated genes in breast cancers that are also predicted to be associated with phospho-galectin-3 in transformed BT549 cells include C-type lectin 2, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 5, cathepsins L2, and cyclin D1. These data show the functional diversity of galectin-3 and suggest that phosphorylation of the protein is necessary for regulation (directly or indirectly) of unique sets of genes that play a role in malignant transformation. PMID:16322222

  9. Analysis of schizophrenia-related genes and electrophysiological measures reveals ZNF804A association with amplitude of P300b elicited by novel sounds

    PubMed Central

    del Re, E C; Bergen, S E; Mesholam-Gately, R I; Niznikiewicz, M A; Goldstein, J M; Woo, T U; Shenton, M E; Seidman, L J; McCarley, R W; Petryshen, T L

    2014-01-01

    Several genes have recently been identified as risk factors for schizophrenia (SZ) by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), including ZNF804A which is thought to function in transcriptional regulation. However, the downstream pathophysiological changes that these genes confer remain to be elucidated. In 143 subjects (68 clinical high risk, first episode or chronic cases; 75 controls), we examined the association between 21 genetic markers previously identified by SZ GWAS or associated with putative intermediate phenotypes of SZ against three event-related potential (ERP) measures: mismatch negativity (MMN), amplitude of P300 during an auditory oddball task, and P300 amplitude during an auditory novelty oddball task. Controlling for age and sex, significant genetic association surpassing Bonferroni correction was detected between ZNF804A marker rs1344706 and P300 amplitude elicited by novel sounds (beta=4.38, P=1.03 × 10−4), which is thought to index orienting of attention to unexpected, salient stimuli. Subsequent analyses revealed that the association was driven by the control subjects (beta=6.35, P=9.08 × 10−5), and that the risk allele was correlated with higher novel P300b amplitude, in contrast to the significantly lower amplitude observed in cases compared to controls. Novel P300b amplitude was significantly correlated with a neurocognitive measure of auditory attention under interference conditions, suggesting a relationship between novel P300b amplitude and higher-order attentional processes. Our results suggest pleiotropic effects of ZNF804A on risk for SZ and neural mechanisms that are indexed by the novel P300b ERP component. PMID:24424392

  10. The optimized capsid gene of porcine circovirus type 2 expressed in yeast forms virus-like particles and elicits antibody responses in mice fed with recombinant yeast extracts.

    PubMed

    Bucarey, Sergio A; Noriega, Jorge; Reyes, Paulina; Tapia, Cecilia; Sáenz, Leonardo; Zuñiga, Alejandro; Tobar, Jaime A

    2009-09-25

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2)-associated diseases are considered to be the biggest problem for the worldwide swine industry. The PCV2 capsid protein (Cap) is an important antigen for development of vaccines. At present, most anti-PCV2 vaccines are produced as injectable formulations. Although effective, these vaccines have certain drawbacks, including stress with concomitant immunosuppresion, and involve laborious and time-consuming procedures. In this study, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used as a vehicle to deliver PCV2 antigen in a preliminary attempt to develop an oral vaccine, and its immunogenic potential in mice was tested after oral gavage-mediated delivery. The cap gene with a yeast-optimized codon usage sequence (opt-cap) was chemically synthesized and cloned into Escherichia coli/Saccharomyces cerevisiae shuttle vector, pYES2, under the control of the Gal1 promoter. Intracellular expression of the Cap protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis and its antigenic properties were compared with those of baculovirus/insect cell-produced Cap protein derived from the native PCV2 cap gene. It was further demonstrated by electron micrography that the yeast-derived PCV2 Cap protein self-assembles into virus-like particles (VLPs) that are morphologically and antigenically similar to insect cell-derived VLPs. Feeding raw yeast extract containing Cap protein to mice elicited both serum- and fecal-specific antibodies against the antigen. These results show that it is feasible to use S. cerevisiae as a safe and simple system to produce PCV2 virus-like particles, and that oral yeast-mediated antigen delivery is an alternative strategy to efficiently induce anti-PCV2 antibodies in a mouse model, which is worthy of further investigation in swine. PMID:19664739

  11. Unique conditionally replication competent bipartite adenoviruses-cancer terminator viruses (CTV): efficacious reagents for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Devanand; Su, Zao-Zhong; Fisher, Paul B

    2006-07-01

    The frequent resistance of aggressive cancers to currently available therapies, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy, mandates development of targeted, nontoxic and more efficacious treatment protocols. Conditionally replication competent adenoviruses (CRCAs) that induce oncolysis by cancer-specific replication are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. However, a single modality approach may not be sufficient to completely eradicate cancer in a patient, because most cancers arise from abnormalities in multiple genetic and signal transduction pathways. The promoter region of rodent progression elevated gene-3 (PEG-3), cloned and characterized in our laboratory, embodies the unique property of increased activity in a broad range of tumor cells, both rodent and human, when compared to normal counterparts. Bipartite adenoviruses were engineered to express the E1A gene, necessary for viral replication, under control of the PEG-3 promoter (PEG-Prom) and simultaneously express a second transgene in the E3 region that encodes an apoptosis-inducing and immunomodulatory cytokine, either immune interferon (IFN-gamma) or melanoma differentiation associated gene-7/interleukin-24 (mda-7/IL-24). These conditionally replication competent bipartite adenoviruses, referred to as cancer terminator viruses (CTVs), facilitated cancer-selective adenovirus replication, robust transgene expression and apoptosis induction with complete eradication of both primary and distant (metastatic) human cancers xenotransplanted in athymic nude mice. These findings suggest that CTVs might prove efficacious for the therapy of primary and advanced neoplastic diseases. PMID:16861924

  12. Comparisons of differential gene expression elicited by TCDD, PCB126, βNF, or ICZ in mouse hepatoma Hepa1c1c7 cells and C57BL/6 mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Nault, Rance; Forgacs, Agnes L; Dere, Edward; Zacharewski, Timothy R

    2013-10-23

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a promiscuous receptor activated by structurally diverse synthetic and natural compounds. AhR activation may lead to ligand-specific changes in gene expression despite similarities in mode of action. Therefore, differential gene expression elicited by four structurally diverse, high affinity AhR ligands (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD; 10nM, 30 μg/kg), 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126; 100nM, 300μg/kg), β-naphthoflavone (βNF; 10 μM, 90 mg/kg), and indolo[3,2-b]carbazole (ICZ; 1μM)) in mouse Hepa1c1c7 hepatoma cells and C57BL/6 mouse liver samples were compared. A total of 288, 183, 119, and 131 Hepa1c1c7 genes were differentially expressed (|fold-change|≥ 1.5, P1(t)≥ 0.9999) by TCDD, βNF, PCB126, and ICZ, respectively. Only ∼35% were differentially expressed by all 4 ligands in Hepa1c1c7 cells. In vivo, 661, 479, and 265 hepatic genes were differentially expressed following treatment with TCDD, βNF, and PCB126, respectively. Similar to Hepa1c1c7 cells, ≤ 34% of gene expression changes were common across all ligands. Principal components analysis identified time-dependent gene expression divergence. Comparisons of ligand-elicited expression between Hepa1c1c7 cells and mouse liver identified only 11 common gene expression changes across all ligands. Although metabolism may explain some ligand-specific gene expression changes, PCB126, βNF, and ICZ also elicited divergent expression compared to TCDD, suggestive of selective AhR modulation. PMID:23994337

  13. Comparisons of differential gene expression elicited by TCDD, PCB126, βNF, or ICZ in mouse hepatoma Hepa1c1c7 cells and C57BL/6 mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Nault, Rance; Forgacs, Agnes L.; Dere, Edward; Zacharewski, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a promiscuous receptor activated by structurally diverse synthetic and natural compounds. AhR activation may lead to ligand-specific changes in gene expression despite similarities in mode of action. Therefore, differential gene expression elicited by four structurally diverse, high affinity AhR ligands (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD; 10 nM, 30 µg/kg), 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126; 100 nM, 300 µg/kg), β-naphthoflavone (βNF; 10 µM, 90 mg/kg), and indolo[3,2-b]carbazole (ICZ; 1 µM)) in mouse Hepa1c1c7 hepatoma cells and C57BL/6 mouse liver samples were compared. A total of 288, 183, 119, and 131 Hepa1c1c7 genes were differentially expressed (|fold-change| ≥ 1.5, P1(t) ≥ 0.9999) by TCDD, βNF, PCB126, and ICZ, respectively. Only ~35% were differentially expressed by all 4 ligands in Hepa1c1c7 cells. In vivo, 661, 479, and 265 hepatic genes were differentially expressed following treatment with TCDD, βNF, and PCB126, respectively. Similar to Hepa1c1c7 cells, ≤34% of gene expression changes were common across all ligands. Principal components analysis identified time-dependent gene expression divergence. Comparisons of ligand-elicited expression between Hepa1c1c7 cells and mouse liver identified only 11 common gene expression changes across all ligands. Although metabolism may explain some ligand-specific gene expression changes, PCB126, βNF, and ICZ also elicited divergent expression compared to TCDD, suggestive of selective AhR modulation. PMID:23994337

  14. Each Sensory Nerve Arising From the Geniculate Ganglion Expresses a Unique Fingerprint of Neurotrophin and Neurotrophin Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Farbman, Albert I.; Guagliardo, Nick; Sollars, Suzanne I.; Hill, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Neurons in the geniculate ganglion, like those in other sensory ganglia, are dependent on neurotrophins for survival. Most geniculate ganglion neurons innervate taste buds in two regions of the tongue and two regions of the palate; the rest are cutaneous nerves to the skin of the ear. We investigated the expression of four neurotrophins, nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin 3 (NT-3), and NT-4, and five neurotrophin receptors, trkA, trkB, trkC, p75, and truncated trkB (Trn-B) in single sensory neurons of the adult rat geniculate ganglion associated with the five innervation fields. For fungiform papillae, a glass pipette containing biotinylated dextran was placed over the target papilla and the tracer was iontophoresed into the target papilla. For the other target fields, Fluoro-Gold was microinjected. After 3 days, geniculate ganglia were harvested, sectioned, and treated histochemically (for biotinylated dextran) or immunohistochemically (for Fluoro-Gold) to reveal the neurons containing the tracer. Single labeled neurons were harvested from the slides and subjected to RNA amplification and RT-PCR to reveal the neurotrophin or neurotrophin receptor genes that were expressed. Neurons projecting from the geniculate ganglion to each of the five target fields had a unique expression profile of neurotrophin and neurotrophic receptor genes. Several individual neurons expressed more than one neurotrophin receptor or more than one neurotrophin gene. Although BDNF is significantly expressed in taste buds, its primary high affinity receptor, trkB, was not prominently expressed in the neurons. The results are consistent with the interpretation that at least some, perhaps most, of the trophic influence on the sensory neurons is derived from the neuronal somata, and the trophic effect is paracrine or autocrine, rather than target derived. The BDNF in the taste bud may also act in a paracrine or autocrine manner on the trkB expressed

  15. Ludic Elicitation: Using Games for Knowledge Elicitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge elicitation from human beings is important for many fields, such as decision support systems, risk communication, and customer preference studying. Traditional approaches include observations, questionnaires, structured and semi-structured interviews, and group discussions. Many publications have been studying different techniques for a…

  16. Secretory Phospholipase A2-IIa is a Target Gene of the HER/HER2-Elicited Pathway and a Potential Plasma Biomarker for Poor Prognosis of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oleksowicz, Leslie; Liu, Yin; Bracken, R. Bruce; Gaitonde, Krishnanath; Burke, Barbara; Succop, Paul; Levin, Linda; Dong, Zhongyun; Lu, Shan

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Our previous study showed that prostate cancer cells overexpress and secrete secretory phospholipases A2 group IIa (sPLA2-IIa) and plasma sPLA2-IIa was elevated in prostate cancer patients. The current study further explored the underlying mechanism of sPLA2-IIa overexpression and the potential role of sPLA2-IIa as a prostate cancer biomarker. METHODS Plasma and tissue specimens from prostate cancer patients were analyzed for sPLA2-IIa levels. Regulation of sPLA2-IIa expression by Heregulin-α was determined by western blot and reporter assay. RESULTS We found that Heregulin-α enhanced expression of the sPLA2-IIa gene via the HER2/HER3-elicited pathway. The EGFR/HER2 dual inhibitor Lapatinib and the NF-kB inhibitor Bortezomib inhibited sPLA2-IIa expression induced by Heregulin-α. Heregulin-α upregulated expression of the sPLA2-IIa gene at the transcriptional level. We further confirmed that plasma sPLA2-IIa secreted by mouse bearing human prostate cancer xenografts reached detectable plasma concentrations. A Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis of patient plasma specimens revealed that high levels of plasma sPLA2-IIa, with the optimum cutoff value of 2.0 ng/ml, were significantly associated with high Gleason score (8~10) relative to intermediate Gleason score (6~7) prostate cancers and advanced relative to indolent cancers. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.73 and 0.74, respectively. CONCLUSION We found that Heregulin-α, in addition to EGF, contributes to sPLA2-IIa overexpression in prostate cancer cells. Our findings support the notion that high levels of plasma sPLA2-IIa may serve as a poor prognostic biomarker capable of distinguishing aggressive from indolent prostate cancers, which may improve decision making and optimize patient management. PMID:22127954

  17. Induction of a Unique Isoform of the NCOA7 Oxidation Resistance Gene by Interferon β-1b

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lijian; Croze, Ed; Yamaguchi, Ken D.; Tran, Tiffany; Reder, Anthony T.; Litvak, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that interferon (IFN)-β-1b induces an alternative-start transcript containing the C-terminal TLDc domain of nuclear receptor coactivator protein 7 (NCOA7), a member of the OXR family of oxidation resistance proteins. IFN-β-1b induces NCOA7-AS (alternative start) expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from healthy individuals and multiple sclerosis patients and human fetal brain cells, astrocytoma, neuroblastoma, and fibrosarcoma cells. NCOA7-AS is a previously undocumented IFN-β-inducible gene that contains only the last 5 exons of full-length NCOA7 plus a unique first exon (exon 10a) that is not found in longer forms of NCOA7. This exon encodes a domain closely related to an important class of bacterial aldo-keto oxido-reductase proteins that play a critical role in regulating redox activity. We demonstrate that NCOA7-AS is induced by IFN and LPS, but not by oxidative stress and exhibits, independently, oxidation resistance activity. We further demonstrate that induction of NCOA7-AS by IFN is dependent on IFN-receptor activation, the Janus kinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway, and a canonical IFN-stimulated response element regulatory sequence upstream of exon 10a. We describe a new role for IFN-βs involving a mechanism of action that leads to an increase in resistance to inflammation-mediated oxidative stress. PMID:25330068

  18. Induction of a unique isoform of the NCOA7 oxidation resistance gene by interferon β-1b.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lijian; Croze, Ed; Yamaguchi, Ken D; Tran, Tiffany; Reder, Anthony T; Litvak, Vladimir; Volkert, Michael R

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate that interferon (IFN)-β-1b induces an alternative-start transcript containing the C-terminal TLDc domain of nuclear receptor coactivator protein 7 (NCOA7), a member of the OXR family of oxidation resistance proteins. IFN-β-1b induces NCOA7-AS (alternative start) expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from healthy individuals and multiple sclerosis patients and human fetal brain cells, astrocytoma, neuroblastoma, and fibrosarcoma cells. NCOA7-AS is a previously undocumented IFN-β-inducible gene that contains only the last 5 exons of full-length NCOA7 plus a unique first exon (exon 10a) that is not found in longer forms of NCOA7. This exon encodes a domain closely related to an important class of bacterial aldo-keto oxido-reductase proteins that play a critical role in regulating redox activity. We demonstrate that NCOA7-AS is induced by IFN and LPS, but not by oxidative stress and exhibits, independently, oxidation resistance activity. We further demonstrate that induction of NCOA7-AS by IFN is dependent on IFN-receptor activation, the Janus kinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway, and a canonical IFN-stimulated response element regulatory sequence upstream of exon 10a. We describe a new role for IFN-βs involving a mechanism of action that leads to an increase in resistance to inflammation-mediated oxidative stress. PMID:25330068

  19. Phasic dopamine neuron activity elicits unique mesofrontal plasticity in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Mastwal, Surjeet; Ye, Yizhou; Ren, Ming; Jimenez, Dennisse V; Martinowich, Keri; Gerfen, Charles R; Wang, Kuan Hong

    2014-07-16

    The mesofrontal dopaminergic circuit, which connects the midbrain motivation center to the cortical executive center, is engaged in control of motivated behaviors. In addition, deficiencies in this circuit are associated with adolescent-onset psychiatric disorders in humans. Developmental studies suggest that the mesofrontal circuit exhibits a protracted maturation through adolescence. However, whether the structure and function of this circuit are modifiable by activity in dopaminergic neurons during adolescence remains unknown. Using optogenetic stimulation and in vivo two-photon imaging in adolescent mice, we found that phasic, but not tonic, dopamine neuron activity induces the formation of mesofrontal axonal boutons. In contrast, in adult mice, the effect of phasic activity diminishes. Furthermore, our results showed that dopaminergic and glutamatergic transmission regulate this axonal plasticity in adolescence and inhibition of dopamine D2-type receptors restores this plasticity in adulthood. Finally, we found that phasic activation of dopamine neurons also induces greater changes in mesofrontal circuit activity and psychomotor response in adolescent mice than in adult mice. Together, our findings demonstrate that the structure and function of the mesofrontal circuit are modifiable by phasic activity in dopaminergic neurons during adolescence and suggest that the greater plasticity in adolescence may facilitate activity-dependent strengthening of dopaminergic input and improvement in behavioral control. PMID:25031392

  20. CGUG: in silico proteome and genome parsing tool for the determination of "core" and unique genes in the analysis of genomes up to ca. 1.9 Mb

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, Padmanabhan; King, John F; Seto, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Background Viruses and small-genome bacteria (~2 megabases and smaller) comprise a considerable population in the biosphere and are of interest to many researchers. These genomes are now sequenced at an unprecedented rate and require complementary computational tools to analyze. "CoreGenesUniqueGenes" (CGUG) is an in silico genome data mining tool that determines a "core" set of genes from two to five organisms with genomes in this size range. Core and unique genes may reflect similar niches and needs, and may be used in classifying organisms. Findings CGUG is available at as a web-based on-the-fly tool that performs iterative BLASTP analyses using a reference genome and up to four query genomes to provide a table of genes common to these genomes. The result is an in silico display of genomes and their proteomes, allowing for further analysis. CGUG can be used for "genome annotation by homology", as demonstrated with Chlamydophila and Francisella genomes. Conclusion CGUG is used to reanalyze the ICTV-based classifications of bacteriophages, to reconfirm long-standing relationships and to explore new classifications. These genomes have been problematic in the past, due largely to horizontal gene transfers. CGUG is validated as a tool for reannotating small genome bacteria using more up-to-date annotations by similarity or homology. These serve as an entry point for wet-bench experiments to confirm the functions of these "hypothetical" and "unknown" proteins. PMID:19706165

  1. Identification and functional analysis of light-responsive unique or paralogous gene family members in rice using a near genomic gene microarray

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using a NSF45K-gene-microarray, we performed expression-profiling experiments on 2-week-old light- and dark-grown rice leaf tissue to identify mutants of light-responsive genes. We identified 356 genes that were at least 8-fold light induced genes at FDR of 1.00E-06. Then, we screened rice T-DNA i...

  2. Regulation of glutathione S-transferase Ya subunit gene expression: identification of a unique xenobiotic-responsive element controlling inducible expression by planar aromatic compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Rushmore, T H; King, R G; Paulson, K E; Pickett, C B

    1990-01-01

    We have identified a region in the 5' flanking sequence of the glutathione S-transferase (RX:glutathione R-transferase, EC 2.5.1.18) Ya subunit gene that contains a unique xenobiotic-responsive element (XRE). The regulatory region spans nucleotides -722 to -682 of the 5' flanking sequence and is responsible for part of the basal level as well as inducible expression of the Ya subunit gene by planar aromatic compounds such as beta-naphthoflavone (beta-NF) and 3-methyl-cholanthrene. The DNA sequence of this region (beta-NF-responsive element) is distinct from the DNA sequence of the XRE found in the cytochrome P-450 IA1 gene. In addition to the region containing the beta-NF-responsive element, two other regulatory regions of the Ya subunit gene have been identified. One region spans nucleotides -867 to -857 and has a DNA sequence with identity to the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 recognition motif found in several liver-specific genes. The second region spans nucleotides -908 to -899 and contains a DNA sequence with identity to the XRE found in the cytochrome P-450 IA1 gene. The XRE sequence also contributes to part of the responsiveness of the Ya subunit gene to planar aromatic compounds. Our data suggest that regulation of gene expression by planar aromatic compounds can be mediated by a DNA sequence that is distinct from the XRE sequence. Images PMID:2160079

  3. Analysis of a new cluster of genes involved in the synthesis of the unique volatile organic compound sodorifen of Serratia plymuthica 4Rx13.

    PubMed

    Domik, Dajana; Magnus, Nancy; Piechulla, Birgit

    2016-07-01

    The rhizobacterium Serratia plymuthica 4Rx13 emits the novel and unique volatile sodorifen (C16H26), which has a polymethylated bicyclic structure. Transcriptome analysis revealed that gene SOD_c20750 (annotated as terpene cyclase) is involved in the biosynthesis of sodorifen. Here we show that this gene is located in a small cluster of four genes (SOD_c20750 - SOD_c20780), and the analysis of the knockout mutants demonstrated that SOD_c20760 (annotated as methyltransferase) and SOD_c20780 (annotated as isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) isomerase) are needed for the biosynthesis of sodorifen, while a sodorifen-negative phenotype was not achieved with the SOD_c20770 (annotated as deoxy-xylulose-5-phosphate (DOXP) synthase) mutant. Altogether, the function of this new gene cluster was assigned to the biosynthesis of this structurally unusual volatile compound sodorifen. PMID:27231241

  4. Hepatic transcriptome analysis of hepatitis C virus infection in chimpanzees defines unique gene expression patterns associated with viral clearance.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Santosh; Havert, Michael B; Calderón, Gloria M; Thomson, Michael; Jacobson, Christian; Kastner, Daniel; Liang, T Jake

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus infection leads to a high rate of chronicity. Mechanisms of viral clearance and persistence are still poorly understood. In this study, hepatic gene expression analysis was performed to identify any molecular signature associated with the outcome of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in chimpanzees. Acutely HCV-infected chimpanzees with self-limited infection or progression to chronicity were studied. Interferon stimulated genes were induced irrespective of the outcome of infection. Early induction of a set of genes associated with cell proliferation and immune activation was associated with subsequent viral clearance. Specifically, two of the genes: interleukin binding factor 3 (ILF3) and cytotoxic granule-associated RNA binding protein (TIA1), associated with robust T-cell response, were highly induced early in chimpanzees with self-limited infection. Up-regulation of genes associated with CD8+ T cell response was evident only during the clearance phase of the acute self-limited infection. The induction of these genes may represent an initial response of cellular injury and proliferation that successfully translates to a "danger signal" leading to induction of adaptive immunity to control viral infection. This primary difference in hepatic gene expression between self-limited and chronic infections supports the concept that successful activation of HCV-specific T-cell response is critical in clearance of acute HCV infection. PMID:18927617

  5. Unique morphological changes in plant pathogenic phytoplasma-infected petunia flowers are related to transcriptional regulation of floral homeotic genes in an organ-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Himeno, Misako; Neriya, Yutaro; Minato, Nami; Miura, Chihiro; Sugawara, Kyoko; Ishii, Yoshiko; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Kakizawa, Shigeyuki; Oshima, Kenro; Namba, Shigetou

    2011-09-01

    Abnormal flowers are often induced by infection of certain plant pathogens, e.g. phytoplasma, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these malformations have remained poorly understood. Here, we show that infection with OY-W phytoplasma (Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris, onion yellows phytoplasma strain, line OY-W) affects the expression of the floral homeotic genes of petunia plants in an organ-specific manner. Upon infection with OY-W phytoplasma, floral morphological changes, including conversion to leaf-like structures, were observed in sepals, petals and pistils, but not in stamens. As the expression levels of homeotic genes differ greatly between floral organs, we examined the expression levels of homeotic genes in each floral organ infected by OY-W phytoplasma, compared with healthy plants. The expression levels of several homeotic genes required for organ development, such as PFG, PhGLO1 and FBP7, were significantly downregulated by the phytoplasma infection in floral organs, except the stamens, suggesting that the unique morphological changes caused by the phytoplasma infection might result from the significant decrease in expression of some crucial homeotic genes. Moreover, the expression levels of TER, ALF and DOT genes, which are known to participate in floral meristem identity, were significantly downregulated in the phytoplasma-infected petunia meristems, implying that phytoplasma would affect an upstream signaling pathway of floral meristem identity. Our results suggest that phytoplasma infection may have complex effects on floral development, resulting in the unique phenotypes that were clearly distinct from the mutant flower phenotypes produced by the knock-out or the overexpression of certain homeotic genes. PMID:21605209

  6. Unique Gene-Silencing and Structural Properties of 2;#8242;-Fluoro-Modified siRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Manoharan, Muthiah; Akinc, Akin; Pandey, Rajendra K.; Qin, June; Hadwiger, Philipp; John, Matthias; Mills, Kathy; Charisse, Klaus; Maier, Martin A.; Nechev, Lubomir; Greene, Emily M.; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Rozners, Eriks; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G.; Egli, Martin

    2015-10-15

    With little or no negative impact on the activity of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), regardless of the number of modifications or the positions within the strand, the 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro (2'-F) modification is unique. Furthermore, the 2'-F-modified siRNA (see crystal structure) was thermodynamically more stable and more nuclease-resistant than the parent siRNA, and produced no immunostimulatory response.

  7. The Arabidopsis Zinc Finger-Homeodomain Genes Encode Proteins with Unique Biochemical Properties That Are Coordinately Expressed during Floral Development1

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Queenie K.-G.; Irish, Vivian F.

    2006-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains approximately 100 homeobox genes, many of which have been shown to play critical roles in various developmental processes. Here we characterize the zinc finger-homeodomain (ZF-HD) subfamily of homeobox genes, consisting of 14 members in Arabidopsis. We demonstrate that the HDs of the ZF-HD proteins share some similarities with other known HDs in Arabidopsis, but they contain distinct features that cluster them as a unique class of plant HD-containing proteins. We have carried out mutational analyses to show that the noncanonical residues present in the HDs of this family of proteins are important for function. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid matrix analyses of the ZF-HD proteins reveal that these proteins both homo- and heterodimerize, which may contribute to greater selectivity in DNA binding. These assays also show that most of these proteins do not contain an intrinsic activation domain, suggesting that interactions with other factors are required for transcriptional activation. We also show that the family members are all expressed predominantly or exclusively in floral tissue, indicating a likely regulatory role during floral development. Furthermore, we have identified loss-of-function mutations for six of these genes that individually show no obvious phenotype, supporting the idea that the encoded proteins have common roles in floral development. Based on these results, we propose the ZF-HD gene family encodes a group of transcriptional regulators with unique biochemical activities that play overlapping regulatory roles in Arabidopsis floral development. PMID:16428600

  8. Juvenile-onset Sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis with a Frameshift FUS Gene Mutation Presenting Unique Neuroradiological Findings and Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Hirayanagi, Kimitoshi; Sato, Masayuki; Furuta, Natsumi; Makioka, Kouki; Ikeda, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old Japanese woman developed anterocollis, weakness of the proximal arms, and subsequent cognitive impairment. A neurological examination revealed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) without a family history. Systemic muscle atrophy progressed rapidly. Cerebral MRI clearly exhibited high signal intensities along the bilateral pyramidal tracts. An analysis of the FUS gene revealed a heterozygous two-base pair deletion, c.1507-1508delAG (p.G504WfsX515). A subset of juvenile-onset familial/sporadic ALS cases with FUS gene mutations reportedly demonstrates mental retardation or learning difficulty. Our study emphasizes the importance of conducting a FUS gene analysis in juvenile-onset ALS cases, even when no family occurrence is confirmed. PMID:26984092

  9. Genetic analysis of a novel human adenovirus with a serologically unique hexon and a recombinant fiber gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Elizabeth B; Ferreyra, Leonardo; Fischer, Stephen L; Pavan, Jorge V; Nates, Silvia V; Hudson, Nolan Ryan; Tirado, Damaris; Dyer, David W; Chodosh, James; Seto, Donald; Jones, Morris S

    2011-01-01

    In February of 1996 a human adenovirus (formerly known as Ad-Cor-96-487) was isolated from the stool of an AIDS patient who presented with severe chronic diarrhea. To characterize this apparently novel pathogen of potential public health significance, the complete genome of this adenovirus was sequenced to elucidate its origin. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analyses of this genome demonstrate that this virus, heretofore referred to as HAdV-D58, contains a novel hexon gene as well as a recombinant fiber gene. In addition, serological analysis demonstrated that HAdV-D58 has a different neutralization profile than all previously characterized HAdVs. Bootscan analysis of the HAdV-D58 fiber gene strongly suggests one recombination event. PMID:21915339

  10. Unique patterns of gene expression changes in liver after treatment of mice for 2 weeks with different known carcinogens and non-carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Iida, Mari; Anna, Colleen H; Holliday, Wanda M; Collins, Jennifer B; Cunningham, Michael L; Sills, Robert C; Devereux, Theodora R

    2005-03-01

    Previously we demonstrated that the mouse liver tumor response to the non-genotoxic carcinogens oxazepam and Wyeth-14,643 involved more differences than similarities in changes in early gene expression. In this study we used quantitative real-time PCR and oligonucleotide microarray analysis to identify genes that were up- or down-regulated in mouse liver early after treatment with different known carcinogens, including oxazepam (125 and 2500 p.p.m.), o-nitrotoluene (1250 and 5000 p.p.m.) and methyleugenol (75 mg/kg/day), or the non-carcinogens p-nitrotoluene (5000 p.p.m.), eugenol (75 mg/kg/day) and acetaminophen (6000 p.p.m.). Starting at 6 weeks of age, mice were treated with the different compounds for 2 weeks in the diet, at which time the livers were collected. First, expression of 12 genes found previously to be altered in liver after 2 weeks treatment with oxazepam and/or Wyeth-14,643 was examined in livers from the various chemical treatment groups. These gene expression changes were confirmed for the livers from the oxazepam-treated mice in the present study, but were not good early markers for all the carcinogens in this study. In addition, expression of 20 842 genes was assessed by oligonucleotide microarray [n = 4 livers/group, 2 hybridizations/liver (with fluor reversals)] and the results were analyzed using the Rosetta Resolver System and GeneSpring software. The analyses revealed that several cancer-related genes, including Fhit, Wwox, Tsc-22 and Gadd45b, were induced or repressed in unique patterns for specific carcinogens and not altered by the non-carcinogens. The data indicate that even if the tumor response, including molecular alterations, is similar, such as for oxazepam and methyleugenol, early gene expression changes appear to be carcinogen specific and seem to involve apoptosis and cell cycle-related genes. PMID:15618236

  11. Infectious Laryngotracheitis Herpesvirus Expresses a Related Pair of Unique Nuclear Proteins Which Are Encoded by Split Genes Located at the Right End of the UL Genome Region

    PubMed Central

    Ziemann, Katharina; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.; Fuchs, Walter

    1998-01-01

    Avian infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) possesses an alphaherpesvirus type D DNA genome of ca. 155 kbp. Completion of our previous sequence analyses (W. Fuchs and T. C. Mettenleiter, J. Gen. Virol. 77:2221–2229, 1996) of the right end of the unique long (UL) genome region revealed the presence of two adjacent, presumably ILTV-specific genes, which were named UL0 and UL[−1] because of their location upstream of the conserved UL1 (glycoprotein L) gene. Transcriptional analyses showed that both genes are abundantly expressed during the late phase of the viral replication cycle and that both mRNAs are spliced by the removal of short introns close to their 5′ ends. Furthermore, the deduced gene products exhibit a moderate but significant homology of 28% to each other. The newly identified ILTV genes encode proteins of 63 kDa (UL0) and 73 kDa (UL[−1]), which both are predominantly localized in the nuclei of virus infected chicken cells. In summary, our results indicate that duplication of a spliced ILTV-specific gene encoding a nuclear protein has occurred during evolution of ILTV. PMID:9658136

  12. Complete genome and gene expression analyses of Asaia bogorensis reveal unique responses to culture with mammalian cells as a potential opportunistic human pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Mikihiko; Higashiura, Norie; Hayasaki, Kimie; Okamoto, Naruhei; Takami, Akiko; Hirakawa, Hideki; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Azuma, Yoshinao

    2015-01-01

    Asaia bogorensis, a member of acetic acid bacteria (AAB), is an aerobic bacterium isolated from flowers and fruits, as well as an opportunistic pathogen that causes human peritonitis and bacteraemia. Here, we determined the complete genomic sequence of the As. bogorensis type strain NBRC 16594, and conducted comparative analyses of gene expression under different conditions of co-culture with mammalian cells and standard AAB culture. The genome of As. bogorensis contained 2,758 protein-coding genes within a circular chromosome of 3,198,265 bp. There were two complete operons encoding cytochrome bo3-type ubiquinol terminal oxidases: cyoABCD-1 and cyoABCD-2. The cyoABCD-1 operon was phylogenetically common to AAB genomes, whereas the cyoABCD-2 operon belonged to a lineage distinctive from the cyoABCD-1 operon. Interestingly, cyoABCD-1 was less expressed under co-culture conditions than under the AAB culture conditions, whereas the converse was true for cyoABCD-2. Asaia bogorensis shared pathogenesis-related genes with another pathogenic AAB, Granulibacter bethesdensis, including a gene coding pathogen-specific large bacterial adhesin and additional genes for the inhibition of oxidation and antibiotic resistance. Expression alteration of the respiratory chain and unique hypothetical genes may be key traits that enable the bacterium to survive under the co-culture conditions. PMID:26358298

  13. [Two recombinant adenovirus vaccine candidates containing neuraminidase Gene of H5N1 influenza virus (A/Anhui/1/2005) elicited effective cell-mediated immunity in mice].

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Zhang, Xiao-Guang; Chen, Hong; Li, Kui-Biao; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Zhang, Ke; Yang, Liang; Xu, Hong; Shu, Yue-Long; Tan, Wen-Jie; Zeng, Yi

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study is to develop the recombinant adenovirus vaccine (rAdV) candidates containing neuraminidase (NA) gene of H5N1 influenza virus and test in BALB/c mice the effect of cell-mediated immunity. In this study, two kind of NA gene (WtNA gene, the wild type; Mod. NA gene, the codon-modified type) derived from H5N1 influenza virus (A/Anhui/1/2005) were cloned and inserted respectively into plasmid of adenovirus vector, then the rAdV vaccines candidates (rAdV-WtNA and rAdV-Mod. NA) were developed and purified, followed by immunization intramuscularly (10(9) TCID50 per dose, double injection at 0 and 4th week) in BALB/c mice, the effect of cell-mediated immunity were analysed at 5th week. Results indicated that: (i) NA protein expression was detected in two rAdV vaccines candidates by Western blotting; (ii) the rAdV-Mod. NA vaccine could elicit more robust NA specific cell-mediated immunity in mice than that of rAdV-WtNA vaccine (P = 0. 016) by IFN-gamma ELIspot assay. These findings suggested rAdV-Mod. NA vaccine was a potential vaccine candidate against H5N1 influenza and worthy of further investigation. PMID:19954107

  14. Intraperitoneal Administration of a Tumor-Associated Antigen SART3, CD40L, and GM-CSF Gene-Loaded Polyplex Micelle Elicits a Vaccine Effect in Mouse Tumor Models

    PubMed Central

    Furugaki, Kouichi; Cui, Lin; Kunisawa, Yumi; Osada, Kensuke; Shinkai, Kentaro; Tanaka, Masao; Kataoka, Kazunori; Nakano, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Polyplex micelles have demonstrated biocompatibility and achieve efficient gene transfection in vivo. Here, we investigated a polyplex micelle encapsulating genes encoding the tumor-associated antigen squamous cell carcinoma antigen recognized by T cells-3 (SART3), adjuvant CD40L, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as a DNA vaccine platform in mouse tumor models with different types of major histocompatibility antigen complex (MHC). Intraperitoneally administrated polyplex micelles were predominantly found in the lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Compared with mock controls, the triple gene vaccine significantly prolonged the survival of mice harboring peritoneal dissemination of CT26 colorectal cancer cells, of which long-term surviving mice showed complete rejection when re-challenged with CT26 tumors. Moreover, the DNA vaccine inhibited the growth and metastasis of subcutaneous CT26 and Lewis lung tumors in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, respectively, which represent different MHC haplotypes. The DNA vaccine highly stimulated both cytotoxic T lymphocyte and natural killer cell activities, and increased the infiltration of CD11c+ DCs and CD4+/CD8a+ T cells into tumors. Depletion of CD4+ or CD8a+ T cells by neutralizing antibodies deteriorated the anti-tumor efficacy of the DNA vaccine. In conclusion, a SART3/CD40L+GM-CSF gene-loaded polyplex micelle can be applied as a novel vaccine platform to elicit tumor rejection immunity regardless of the recipient MHC haplotype. PMID:25013909

  15. Unique Gene Expression Profile of the Proliferating Xenopus Tadpole Tail Blastema Cells Deciphered by RNA-Sequencing Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tsujioka, Hiroshi; Kunieda, Takekazu; Katou, Yuki; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Kubo, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    Organ regenerative ability depends on the animal species and the developmental stage. The molecular bases for variable organ regenerative ability, however, remain unknown. Previous studies have identified genes preferentially expressed in the blastema tissues in various animals, but transcriptome analysis of the isolated proliferating blastema cells has not yet been reported. In the present study, we used RNA-sequencing analysis to analyze the gene expression profile of isolated proliferating blastema cells of regenerating Xenopus laevis tadpole tails. We used flow cytometry to isolate proliferating cells, and non-proliferating blastema cells, from regenerating tadpole tails as well as proliferating tail bud cells from tail bud embryos, the latter two of which were used as control cells, based on their DNA content. Among the 28 candidate genes identified by RNA-sequencing analysis, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction identified 10 genes whose expression was enriched in regenerating tadpole tails compared with non-regenerating tadpole tails or tails from the tail bud embryos. Among them, whole mount in situ hybridization revealed that chromosome segregation 1-like and interleukin 11 were expressed in the broad area of the tail blastema, while brevican, lysyl oxidase, and keratin 18 were mainly expressed in the notochord bud in regenerating tails. We further combined whole mount in situ hybridization with immunohistochemistry for the incorporated 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine to confirm that keratin 18 and interleukin 11 were expressed in the proliferating tail blastema cells. Based on the proposed functions of their homologs in other animal species, these genes might have roles in the extracellular matrix formation in the notochord bud (brevican and lysyl oxidase), cell proliferation (chromosome segregation 1-like and keratin 18), and in the maintenance of the differentiation ability of proliferating blastema cells (interleukin 11) in regenerating

  16. Penetration of the Stigma and Style Elicits a Novel Transcriptome in Pollen Tubes, Pointing to Genes Critical for Growth in a Pistil

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yuan; Leydon, Alexander R.; Manziello, Ann; Pandey, Ritu; Mount, David; Denic, Stojan; Vasic, Bane; Johnson, Mark A.; Palanivelu, Ravishankar

    2009-01-01

    Pollen tubes extend through pistil tissues and are guided to ovules where they release sperm for fertilization. Although pollen tubes can germinate and elongate in a synthetic medium, their trajectory is random and their growth rates are slower compared to growth in pistil tissues. Furthermore, interaction with the pistil renders pollen tubes competent to respond to guidance cues secreted by specialized cells within the ovule. The molecular basis for this potentiation of the pollen tube by the pistil remains uncharacterized. Using microarray analysis in Arabidopsis, we show that pollen tubes that have grown through stigma and style tissues of a pistil have a distinct gene expression profile and express a substantially larger fraction of the Arabidopsis genome than pollen grains or pollen tubes grown in vitro. Genes involved in signal transduction, transcription, and pollen tube growth are overrepresented in the subset of the Arabidopsis genome that is enriched in pistil-interacted pollen tubes, suggesting the possibility of a regulatory network that orchestrates gene expression as pollen tubes migrate through the pistil. Reverse genetic analysis of genes induced during pollen tube growth identified seven that had not previously been implicated in pollen tube growth. Two genes are required for pollen tube navigation through the pistil, and five genes are required for optimal pollen tube elongation in vitro. Our studies form the foundation for functional genomic analysis of the interactions between the pollen tube and the pistil, which is an excellent system for elucidation of novel modes of cell–cell interaction. PMID:19714218

  17. The complete mitochondrial genomes of three parasitic nematodes of birds: a unique gene order and insights into nematode phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Analyses of mitochondrial (mt) genome sequences in recent years challenge the current working hypothesis of Nematoda phylogeny proposed from morphology, ecology and nuclear small subunit rRNA gene sequences, and raise the need to sequence additional mt genomes for a broad range of nematode lineages. Results We sequenced the complete mt genomes of three Ascaridia species (family Ascaridiidae) that infest chickens, pigeons and parrots, respectively. These three Ascaridia species have an identical arrangement of mt genes to each other but differ substantially from other nematodes. Phylogenetic analyses of the mt genome sequences of the Ascaridia species, together with 62 other nematode species, support the monophylies of seven high-level taxa of the phylum Nematoda: 1) the subclass Dorylaimia; 2) the orders Rhabditida, Trichinellida and Mermithida; 3) the suborder Rhabditina; and 4) the infraorders Spiruromorpha and Oxyuridomorpha. Analyses of mt genome sequences, however, reject the monophylies of the suborders Spirurina and Tylenchina, and the infraorders Rhabditomorpha, Panagrolaimomorpha and Tylenchomorpha. Monophyly of the infraorder Ascaridomorpha varies depending on the methods of phylogenetic analysis. The Ascaridomorpha was more closely related to the infraorders Rhabditomorpha and Diplogasteromorpha (suborder Rhabditina) than they were to the other two infraorders of the Spirurina: Oxyuridorpha and Spiruromorpha. The closer relationship among Ascaridomorpha, Rhabditomorpha and Diplogasteromorpha was also supported by a shared common pattern of mitochondrial gene arrangement. Conclusions Analyses of mitochondrial genome sequences and gene arrangement has provided novel insights into the phylogenetic relationships among several major lineages of nematodes. Many lineages of nematodes, however, are underrepresented or not represented in these analyses. Expanding taxon sampling is necessary for future phylogenetic studies of nematodes with mt genome

  18. Transitions from mono- to co- to tri-culture uniquely affect gene expression in breast cancer, stromal, and immune compartments.

    PubMed

    Regier, Mary C; Maccoux, Lindsey J; Weinberger, Emma M; Regehr, Keil J; Berry, Scott M; Beebe, David J; Alarid, Elaine T

    2016-08-01

    Heterotypic interactions in cancer microenvironments play important roles in disease initiation, progression, and spread. Co-culture is the predominant approach used in dissecting paracrine interactions between tumor and stromal cells, but functional results from simple co-cultures frequently fail to correlate to in vivo conditions. Though complex heterotypic in vitro models have improved functional relevance, there is little systematic knowledge of how multi-culture parameters influence this recapitulation. We therefore have employed a more iterative approach to investigate the influence of increasing model complexity; increased heterotypic complexity specifically. Here we describe how the compartmentalized and microscale elements of our multi-culture device allowed us to obtain gene expression data from one cell type at a time in a heterotypic culture where cells communicated through paracrine interactions. With our device we generated a large dataset comprised of cell type specific gene-expression patterns for cultures of increasing complexity (three cell types in mono-, co-, or tri-culture) not readily accessible in other systems. Principal component analysis indicated that gene expression was changed in co-culture but was often more strongly altered in tri-culture as compared to mono-culture. Our analysis revealed that cell type identity and the complexity around it (mono-, co-, or tri-culture) influence gene regulation. We also observed evidence of complementary regulation between cell types in the same heterotypic culture. Here we demonstrate the utility of our platform in providing insight into how tumor and stromal cells respond to microenvironments of varying complexities highlighting the expanding importance of heterotypic cultures that go beyond conventional co-culture. PMID:27432323

  19. Regulation of the HMOX1 gene by the transcription factor AP-2δ with unique DNA binding site.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liyun; Zhao, Yuxia; Gu, Shaohua; Mao, Yumin; Ji, Chaoneng; Xin, Xiujuan

    2014-07-01

    AP-2 transcription factors are important sequence-specific DNA-binding regulators that are expressed in the neural crest and other tissues during mammalian development. The human AP-2 family of transcription factors consists of five members, AP-2α, -β, -γ, -δ and -ε, which have an important role in the regulation of gene expression during development and in the differentiation of multiple organs and tissues. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanism by which AP-2δ mediates heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene expression. It was identified that the human AP-2δ protein exhibited weak binding to a suboptimal AP-2 sequence, 5'-GCCN3GGC-3', to which all other AP-2 proteins bind in vitro, providing the first example of DNA target specificity amongst the AP-2 family. AP-2δ protein bound to an optimized AP-2 consensus DNA sequence, 5'-GCCTGAGGC-3', in vitro and transactivated gene expression in eukaryotic cells. The transactivation domain of Ap-2δ differs notably from those in the other AP-2 proteins as it lacks the PY motif (XPPXY) and several other conserved residues that are important for the transcriptional activity of AP-2 proteins, yet it functions as an equally strong activator. PMID:24789576

  20. The novel BORIS + CTCF gene family is uniquely involved in the epigenetics of normal biology and cancer.

    PubMed

    Klenova, Elena M; Morse, Herbert C; Ohlsson, Rolf; Lobanenkov, Victor V

    2002-10-01

    CTCF is a ubiquitous 11 zinc finger (ZF) protein with highly versatile functions: in addition to transcriptional silencing or activating in a context-dependent fashion, it organizes epigenetically controlled chromatin insulators that regulate imprinted genes in soma. Recently, we have identified a CTCF paralogue, termed BORIS for Brother of the Regulator of Imprinted Sites, that is expressed only in the testis. BORIS has the same exons encoding the 11 ZF domain as mammalian CTCF genes, and hence interacts with similar cis elements, but encodes amino and carboxy termini distinct from those in CTCF. Normally, CTCF and BORIS are expressed in a mutually exclusive pattern that correlates with re-setting of methylation marks during male germ cell differentiation. The antagonistic features of these two gene siblings are underscored by showing that while CTCF overexpression blocks cell proliferation, expression of BORIS in normally BORIS-negative cells promotes cell growth which can lead to transformation. The suggestion that BORIS directs epigenetic reprogramming at CTCF target sites impinges on the observations that human BORIS is not only abnormally activated in a wide range of human cancers, but also maps to the cancer-associated amplification region at 20q13. The sibling rivalry occasioned by aberrant expression of BORIS in cancer may interfere with normal functions of CTCF including growth suppression, and contribute to epigenetic dysregulation which is a common feature in human cancer. PMID:12191639

  1. Unique C-terminal region of Hap3 is required for methanol-regulated gene expression in the methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii.

    PubMed

    Oda, Saori; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Nitta, Nobuhisa; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    The Hap complex of the methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii was found to be required for methanol-regulated gene expression. In this study, we performed functional characterization of CbHap3p, one of the Hap complex components in C. boidinii. Sequence alignment of Hap3 proteins revealed the presence of a unique extended C-terminal region, which is not present in Hap3p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScHap3p), but is found in Hap3p proteins of methylotrophic yeasts. Deletion of the C-terminal region of CbHap3p (Δ256-292 or Δ107-237) diminished activation of methanol-regulated genes and abolished the ability to grow on methanol, but did not affect nuclear localization or DNA-binding ability. However, deletion of the N-terminal region of CbHap3p (Δ1-20) led to not only a growth defect on methanol and a decreased level of methanol-regulated gene expression, but also impaired nuclear localization and binding to methanol-regulated gene promoters. We also revealed that CbHap3p could complement the growth defect of the Schap3Δ strain on glycerol, although ScHap3p could not complement the growth defect of a Cbhap3Δ strain on methanol. We conclude that the unique C-terminal region of CbHap3p contributes to maximum activation of methanol-regulated genes, whilst the N-terminal region is required for nuclear localization and binding to DNA. PMID:26963751

  2. Mucosal vaccination with a codon-optimized hemagglutinin gene expressed by attenuated Salmonella elicits a protective immune response in chickens against highly pathogenic avian influenza

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the protection of two attenuated Salmonella enteria serovar typhimurium strains expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) gene from a highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 (A/whooper swan/Mongolia/3/2005), under control of the anaerobically inducible nir15 p...

  3. Exposure to Paper Mill Effluent at a Site in North Central Florida Elicits Molecular-Level Changes in Gene Expression Indicative of Progesterone and Androgen Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Brockmeier, Erica K.; Jayasinghe, B. Sumith; Pine, William E.; Wilkinson, Krystan A.; Denslow, Nancy D.

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are chemicals that negatively impact endocrine system function, with effluent from paper mills one example of this class of chemicals. In Florida, female Eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) have been observed with male secondary sexual characteristics at three paper mill-impacted sites, indicative of EDC exposure, and are still found at one site on the Fenholloway River. The potential impacts that paper mill effluent exposure has on the G. holbrooki endocrine system and the stream ecosystem are unknown. The objective of this study was to use gene expression analysis to determine if exposure to an androgen receptor agonist was occurring and to couple this analysis with in vitro assays to evaluate the presence of androgen and progesterone receptor active chemicals in the Fenholloway River. Focused gene expression analyses of masculinized G. holbrooki from downstream of the Fenholloway River paper mill were indicative of androgen exposure, while genes related to reproduction indicated potential progesterone exposure. Hepatic microarray analysis revealed an increase in the expression of metabolic genes in Fenholloway River fish, with similarities in genes and biological processes compared to G. holbrooki exposed to androgens. Water samples collected downstream of the paper mill and at a reference site indicated that progesterone and androgen receptor active chemicals were present at both sites, which corroborates previous chemical analyses. Results indicate that G. holbrooki downstream of the Fenholloway River paper mill are impacted by a mixture of both androgens and progesterones. This research provides data on the mechanisms of how paper mill effluents in Florida are acting as endocrine disruptors. PMID:25198161

  4. Exposure to paper mill effluent at a site in North Central Florida elicits molecular-level changes in gene expression indicative of progesterone and androgen exposure.

    PubMed

    Brockmeier, Erica K; Jayasinghe, B Sumith; Pine, William E; Wilkinson, Krystan A; Denslow, Nancy D

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) are chemicals that negatively impact endocrine system function, with effluent from paper mills one example of this class of chemicals. In Florida, female Eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) have been observed with male secondary sexual characteristics at three paper mill-impacted sites, indicative of EDC exposure, and are still found at one site on the Fenholloway River. The potential impacts that paper mill effluent exposure has on the G. holbrooki endocrine system and the stream ecosystem are unknown. The objective of this study was to use gene expression analysis to determine if exposure to an androgen receptor agonist was occurring and to couple this analysis with in vitro assays to evaluate the presence of androgen and progesterone receptor active chemicals in the Fenholloway River. Focused gene expression analyses of masculinized G. holbrooki from downstream of the Fenholloway River paper mill were indicative of androgen exposure, while genes related to reproduction indicated potential progesterone exposure. Hepatic microarray analysis revealed an increase in the expression of metabolic genes in Fenholloway River fish, with similarities in genes and biological processes compared to G. holbrooki exposed to androgens. Water samples collected downstream of the paper mill and at a reference site indicated that progesterone and androgen receptor active chemicals were present at both sites, which corroborates previous chemical analyses. Results indicate that G. holbrooki downstream of the Fenholloway River paper mill are impacted by a mixture of both androgens and progesterones. This research provides data on the mechanisms of how paper mill effluents in Florida are acting as endocrine disruptors. PMID:25198161

  5. Unique structure and regulation of the nematode detoxification gene regulator, SKN-1: implications to understanding and controlling drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Choe, Keith P; Leung, Chi K; Miyamoto, Michael M

    2012-08-01

    Nematodes parasitize an alarming number of people and agricultural animals globally and cause debilitating morbidity and mortality. Anthelmintics have been the primary tools used to control parasitic nematodes for the past several decades, but drug resistance is becoming a major obstacle. Xenobiotic detoxification pathways defend against drugs and other foreign chemicals in diverse organisms, and evidence is accumulating that they play a role in mediating resistance to anthelmintics in nematodes. Related antioxidation pathways may also provide filarial parasites with protection against host free-radical-mediated immune responses. Upstream regulatory pathways have received almost no attention in nematode parasites, despite their potential to coregulate multiple detoxification and antioxidation genes. The nuclear eurythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) transcription factor mediates inducible detoxification and antioxidation defenses in mammals, and recent studies have demonstrated that it promotes multidrug resistance in some human tumors. Recent studies in the free-living model nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, have defined the homologous transcription factor, SKN-1, as a master regulator of detoxification and antioxidation genes. Despite similar functions, SKN-1 and NRF2 have important differences in structure and regulatory pathways. Protein alignment and phylogenetic analyses indicate that these differences are shared among many nematodes, making SKN-1 a candidate for specifically targeting nematode detoxification and antioxidation. PMID:22656429

  6. Beyond the chromosome: the prevalence of unique extra-chromosomal bacteriophages with integrated virulence genes in pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Utter, Bryan; Deutsch, Douglas R; Schuch, Raymond; Winer, Benjamin Y; Verratti, Kathleen; Bishop-Lilly, Kim; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga; Fischetti, Vincent A

    2014-01-01

    In Staphylococcus aureus, the disease impact of chromosomally integrated prophages on virulence is well described. However, the existence of extra-chromosomal prophages, both plasmidial and episomal, remains obscure. Despite the recent explosion in bacterial and bacteriophage genomic sequencing, studies have failed to specifically focus on extra-chromosomal elements. We selectively enriched and sequenced extra-chromosomal DNA from S. aureus isolates using Roche-454 technology and uncovered evidence for the widespread distribution of multiple extra-chromosomal prophages (ExPΦs) throughout both antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant strains. We completely sequenced one such element comprised of a 43.8 kbp, circular ExPΦ (designated ФBU01) from a vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA) strain. Assembly and annotation of ФBU01 revealed a number of putative virulence determinants encoded within a bacteriophage immune evasion cluster (IEC). Our identification of several potential ExPΦs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) also revealed numerous putative virulence factors and antibiotic resistance genes. We describe here a previously unidentified level of genetic diversity of stealth extra-chromosomal elements in S. aureus, including phages with a larger presence outside the chromosome that likely play a prominent role in pathogenesis and strain diversity driven by horizontal gene transfer (HGT). PMID:24963913

  7. The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1: Unique tissue-specific functions revealed by selective gene knockout studies

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Anna P.; Van Duyn, Lauren B.; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E.; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2008-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein (originally called LRP, but now referred to as LRP1) is a large endocytic receptor that is widely expressed in several tissues. LRP1 is a member of the LDL receptor family that plays diverse roles in various biological processes including lipoprotein metabolism, degradation of proteases, activation of lysosomal enzymes and cellular entry of bacterial toxins and viruses. Deletion of the LRP1 gene leads to lethality in mice, revealing a critical, but as of yet, undefined role in development. Tissue-specific gene deletion studies reveal an important contribution of LRP1 in the vasculature, central nervous system, in macrophages and in adipocytes. Three important properties of LRP1 dictate its diverse role in physiology: first, its ability to recognize more than thirty distinct ligands; second, its ability to bind a large number of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins via determinants located on its cytoplasmic domain in a phosphorylation-specific manner; and third, its ability to associate with and modulate the activity of other transmembrane receptors such as integrins and receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:18626063

  8. Potent monoclonal antibodies against Clostridium difficile toxin A elicited by DNA immunization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhua; Jin, Ke; Xiao, Yanling; Cheng, Ying; Huang, Zuhu; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that DNA immunization is effective in eliciting antigen-specific antibody responses against a wide range of infectious disease targets. The polyclonal antibodies elicited by DNA vaccination exhibit high sensitivity to conformational epitopes and high avidity. However, there have been limited reports in literature on the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) by DNA immunization. Here, by using Clostridium difficile (C. diff) toxin A as a model antigen, we demonstrated that DNA immunization was effective in producing a panel of mAb that are protective against toxin A challenge and can also be used as sensitive reagents to detect toxin A from various testing samples. The immunoglobulin (Ig) gene usage for such mAb was also investigated. Further studies should be conducted to fully establish DNA immunization as a unique platform to produce mAb in various hosts. PMID:23851482

  9. Potent monoclonal antibodies against Clostridium difficile toxin A elicited by DNA immunization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunhua; Jin, Ke; Xiao, Yanling; Cheng, Ying; Huang, Zuhu; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that DNA immunization is effective in eliciting antigen-specific antibody responses against a wide range of infectious disease targets. The polyclonal antibodies elicited by DNA vaccination exhibit high sensitivity to conformational epitopes and high avidity. However, there have been limited reports in literature on the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) by DNA immunization. Here, by using Clostridium difficile (C. diff) toxin A as a model antigen, we demonstrated that DNA immunization was effective in producing a panel of mAb that are protective against toxin A challenge and can also be used as sensitive reagents to detect toxin A from various testing samples. The immunoglobulin (Ig) gene usage for such mAb was also investigated. Further studies should be conducted to fully establish DNA immunization as a unique platform to produce mAb in various hosts. PMID:23851482

  10. A unique horizontal gene transfer event has provided the octocoral mitochondrial genome with an active mismatch repair gene that has potential for an unusual self-contained function

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial genome of the Octocorallia has several characteristics atypical for metazoans, including a novel gene suggested to function in DNA repair. This mtMutS gene is favored for octocoral molecular systematics, due to its high information content. Several hypotheses concerning the origins of mtMutS have been proposed, and remain equivocal, although current weight of support is for a horizontal gene transfer from either an epsilonproteobacterium or a large DNA virus. Here we present new and compelling evidence on the evolutionary origin of mtMutS, and provide the very first data on its activity, functional capacity and stability within the octocoral mitochondrial genome. Results The mtMutS gene has the expected conserved amino acids, protein domains and predicted tertiary protein structure. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that mtMutS is not a member of the MSH family and therefore not of eukaryotic origin. MtMutS clusters closely with representatives of the MutS7 lineage; further support for this relationship derives from the sharing of a C-terminal endonuclease domain that confers a self-contained mismatch repair function. Gene expression analyses confirm that mtMutS is actively transcribed in octocorals. Rates of mitochondrial gene evolution in mtMutS-containing octocorals are lower than in their hexacoral sister-group, which lacks the gene, although paradoxically the mtMutS gene itself has higher rates of mutation than other octocoral mitochondrial genes. Conclusions The octocoral mtMutS gene is active and codes for a protein with all the necessary components for DNA mismatch repair. A lower rate of mitochondrial evolution, and the presence of a nicking endonuclease domain, both indirectly support a theory of self-sufficient DNA mismatch repair within the octocoral mitochondrion. The ancestral affinity of mtMutS to non-eukaryotic MutS7 provides compelling support for an origin by horizontal gene transfer. The immediate vector of transmission

  11. Use of a unique gene sequence as a probe to enumerate a strain of Bacteroides ruminicola introduced into the rumen.

    PubMed Central

    Attwood, G T; Lockington, R A; Xue, G P; Brooker, J D

    1988-01-01

    Cloned fragments of genomic DNA from the ruminal anaerobe Bacteroides ruminicola subsp. brevis B14 were isolated and used as hybridization probes to identify closely related bacterial species. One DNA fragment unique to strain B14 was tested to determine its sensitivity in detecting homologous sequences among total ruminal microbial DNA. In a DNA titration experiment, the probe was capable of detecting strain B14 sequences in vitro down to 0.1% of the total bacterial DNA present in a hybridization assay. There was no detectable signal for total ruminal bacterial DNA. The specificity of this DNA fragment was exploited to enumerate strain B14 in a fresh mixed suspension of ruminal bacteria in vitro and after inoculation of the strain into the rumen. In vitro strain B14 had a half-life of 9 h. However, following inoculation into the rumen there was a very rapid loss of the strain to below the detectable limit within 3 h. The half-life was less than 30 min. This loss was not due to ruminal dilution or to bacteriophage attack but was possibly the result of a specific bacteriocinlike activity present in the rumen and detectable in fresh ruminal fluid. Images PMID:3355138

  12. A duck reovirus variant with a unique deletion in the sigma C gene exhibiting high pathogenicity in Pekin ducklings.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xianjin; Wang, Dan; Ning, Kang; Liang, Te; Wang, Minghang; Jiang, Meng; Zhang, Dabing

    2016-04-01

    A novel strain of duck reovirus (DRV) associated with a high mortality in Pekin ducklings in China, 2013, was isolated and characterized. This strain (designated as HN5d) grew well in Vero cells and produced marked cytopathic effects. HN5d contains 10 dsRNA genome segments, a typical feature of avian orthoreovirus. Following cloning, sequencing, and sequence analysis of the genome segments, a unique deletion of 18 amino acids was found in the sigma C protein of HN5d when compared with that of the recent Chinese waterfowl reoviruses (e.g., DRV 091). Phylogenetic analysis of cDNA amplicons of segments encoding for the outer capsid proteins revealed that HN5d is a novel genotype 2 waterfowl reovirus isolate. Inoculation of Pekin ducklings with HN5d resulted in splenic necrosis, a typical feature of "Duck spleen necrosis disease" (DSND) discovered in China in 2006. Unlike the typical DSND, HN5d produced severer hemorrhagic and/or necrotic lesions in livers of experimentally infected ducklings. 20-30% of death was observed during the first 7 day in the experimentally exposed birds. These findings suggest that HN5d is a novel duck reovirus isolate with severer pathogenicity in Pekin ducklings. PMID:26829009

  13. A unique open reading frame within the comX gene of Streptococcus mutans regulates genetic competence and oxidative stress tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Kaspar, Justin; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Palmer, Sara R.; Choi, Sang Chul; Stanhope, Michael J.; Burne, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans displays complex regulation of genetic competence, with ComX controlling late competence gene transcription. The rcrRPQ operon has been shown to link oxidative stress tolerance, (p)ppGpp metabolism and competence in S. mutans. Importantly, an rcrR polar (ΔrcrR-P) mutant is hyper-transformable, but an rcrR non-polar (ΔrcrR-NP) mutant cannot be transformed. Transcriptome comparisons of the rcrR mutants using RNA-Seq and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed little expression in the 5′ region of comX in ΔrcrR-NP, but high level expression in the 3′ region. Northern blotting with comX probes revealed two distinct transcripts in the ΔrcrR-P and ΔrcrR-NP strains, and 5′ Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends mapped the 5′ terminus of the shorter transcript to nt +140 of the comX structural gene, where a unique 69-aa open reading frame, termed XrpA, was encoded in a different reading frame than ComX. Two single-nucleotide substitution mutants (comX::T162C; comX::T210A) were introduced to disrupt XrpA without affecting the sequence of ComX. When the mutations were in the ΔrcrR-NP genetic background, ComX production and transformation were restored. Overexpression of xrpA led to impaired growth in aerobic conditions and decreased transformability. These results reveal an unprecedented mechanism for competence regulation and stress tolerance by a gene product encoded within the comX gene that appears unique to S. mutans. PMID:25620525

  14. 3-Methylcholanthrene elicits DNA adduct formation in the CYP1A1 promoter region and attenuates reporter gene expression in rat H4IIE cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moorthy, Bhagavatula . E-mail: bmoorthy@bcm.tmc.edu; Muthiah, Kathirvel; Fazili, Inayat S.; Kondraganti, Sudha R.; Wang Lihua; Couroucli, Xanthi I.; Jiang Weiwu

    2007-03-23

    Cytochrome CYP1A (CYP1A) enzymes catalyze bioactivation of 3-methylcholanthrene (MC) to genotoxic metabolites. Here, we tested the hypothesis that CYP1A2 catalyzes formation of MC-DNA adducts that are preferentially formed in the promoter region of CYP1A1, resulting in modulation of CYP1A1 gene expression. MC bound covalently to plasmid DNA (50 {mu}g) containing human CYP1A1 promoter (pGL3-1A1), when incubated with wild-type (WT) liver microsomes (2 mg) and NAPPH 37 {sup o}C for 2 h, giving rise to 9 adducts, as determined by {sup 32}P-postlabeling. Eighty percent of adducts was located in the promoter region. Transient transfection of the adducted plasmids into rat hepatoma (H4IIE) cells for 16 h, followed by MC (1 {mu}M) treatment for 24 h inhibited reporter (luciferase) gene expression by 75%, compared to unadducted controls. Our results suggest that CYP1A2 plays a key role in sequence-specific MC-DNA adduct formation in the CYP1A1 promoter region, leading to attenuation of CYP1A1 gene expression.

  15. Role of Topoisomerases in Pediatric High Grade Osteosarcomas: TOP2A Gene Is One of the Unique Molecular Biomarkers of Chemoresponse

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Aurelia; Lasthaus, Christelle; Guerin, Eric; Marcellin, Luc; Pencreach, Erwan; Gaub, Marie-Pierre; Guenot, Dominique; Entz-Werle, Natacha

    2013-01-01

    Currently, the treatment of pediatric high-grade osteosarcomas systematically includes one topoisomerase IIα inhibitor. This chemotherapy is usually adapted to the response to the neo-adjuvant therapy after surgery. The current and unique marker of chemoresponsiveness is the percentage of viable residual cells in the surgical resection. This late patient management marker has to be evaluated earlier in the therapeutic history of the patients on initial biopsy. Therefore, new biomarkers, especially those involved in the topoisomerase IIα inhibitor response might be good candidates. Therefore, our study was designed to target TOP1, TOP2A and TOP2B genes in 105 fresh-frozen diagnostic biopsies by allelotyping and real-time quantitative PCR. Our analyses in those pediatric osteosarcomas, homogeneously treated, highlighted the frequent involvement of topo-isomerase genes. The main and most important observation was the statistical link between the presence of TOP2A amplification and the good response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. Compared to adult cancers, the 17q21 amplicon, including TOP2A and ERBB2 genes, seems to be differentially implicated in the osteosarcoma chemoresponsiveness. Surprisingly, there is no ERBB2 gene co-amplification and the patients harboring TOP2A amplification tend to show a worse survival, so TOP2A analyses remain a preliminary, but a good molecular approach for the evaluation at diagnosis of pediatric osteosarcoma chemoresponsiveness. PMID:24216996

  16. Mutant Thyroid Hormone Receptors (TRs) Isolated from Distinct Cancer Types Display Distinct Target Gene Specificities: a Unique Regulatory Repertoire Associated with Two Renal Clear Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Meghan D.; Chan, Ivan H.

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are hormone-regulated transcription factors that regulate a diverse array of biological activities, including metabolism, homeostasis, and development. TRs also serve as tumor suppressors, and aberrant TR function (via mutation, deletion, or altered expression) is associated with a spectrum of both neoplastic and endocrine diseases. A particularly high frequency of TR mutations has been reported in renal clear cell carcinoma (RCCC) and in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We have shown that HCC-TR mutants regulate only a fraction of the genes targeted by wild-type TRs but have gained the ability to regulate other, unique, targets. We have suggested that this altered gene recognition may contribute to the neoplastic phenotype. Here, to determine the generality of this phenomenon, we examined a distinct set of TR mutants associated with RCCC. We report that two different TR mutants, isolated from independent RCCC tumors, possess greatly expanded target gene specificities that extensively overlap one another, but only minimally overlap that of the wild-type TRs, or those of two HCC-TR mutants. Many of the genes targeted by either or both RCCC-TR mutants have been previously implicated in RCCC and include a series of metallothioneins, solute carriers, and genes involved in glycolysis and energy metabolism. We propose as a hypothesis that TR mutations from RCCC and HCC may play tissue-specific roles in carcinogenesis, and that the divergent target gene recognition patterns of TR mutants isolated from the two different types of tumors may arise from different selective pressures during development of RCCC vs. HCC. PMID:21622534

  17. Comparative Genomics Uncovers Unique Gene Turnover and Evolutionary Rates in a Gene Family Involved in the Detection of Insect Cuticular Pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Oliva, Montserrat; Almeida, Francisca C.; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Rozas, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Chemoreception is an essential process for the survival and reproduction of animals. Many of the proteins responsible for recognizing and transmitting chemical stimuli in insects are encoded by genes that are members of moderately sized multigene families. The members of the CheB family are specialized in gustatory-mediated detection of long-chain hydrocarbon pheromones in Drosophila melanogaster and play a central role in triggering and modulating mating behavior in this species. Here, we present a comprehensive comparative genomic analysis of the CheB family across 12 species of the Drosophila genus. We have identified a total of 102 new CheB genes in the genomes of these species, including a functionally divergent member previously uncharacterized in D. melanogaster. We found that, despite its relatively small repertory size, the CheB family has undergone multiple gain and loss events and various episodes of diversifying selection during the divergence of the surveyed species. Present estimates of gene turnover and coding sequence substitution rates show that this family is evolving faster than any known Drosophila chemosensory family. To date, only other insect gustatory-related genes among these families had shown evolutionary dynamics close to those observed in CheBs. Our findings reveal the high adaptive potential of molecular components of the gustatory system in insects and anticipate a key role of genes involved in this sensory modality in species adaptation and diversification.

  18. The c.429_452 duplication of the ARX gene: a unique developmental-model of limb kinetic apraxia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The c.429_452dup24 of the ARX gene is a rare genetic anomaly, leading to X-Linked Intellectual Disability without brain malformation. While in certain cases c.429_452dup24 has been associated with specific clinical patterns such as Partington syndrome, the consequence of this mutation has been also often classified as “non-specific Intellectual Disability”. The present work aims at a more precise description of the clinical features linked to the c.429_452dup24 mutation. Methods We clinically reviewed all affected patients identified in France over a five-year period, i.e. 27 patients from 12 different families. Detailed cognitive, behavioural, and motor evaluation, as well as standardized videotaped assessments of oro-lingual and gestural praxis, were performed. In a sub-group of 13 ARX patients, kinematic and MRI studies were further accomplished to better characterize the motor impairment prevalent in the ARX patients group. To ensure that data were specific to the ARX gene mutation and did not result from low-cognitive functioning per se, a group of 27 age- and IQ-matched Down syndrome patients served as control. Results Neuropsychological and motor assessment indicated that the c.429_452dup24 mutation constitutes a recognizable clinical syndrome: ARX patients exhibiting Intellectual Disability, without primary motor impairment, but with a very specific upper limb distal motor apraxia associated with a pathognomonic hand-grip. Patients affected with the so-called Partington syndrome, which involves major hand dystonia and orolingual apraxia, exhibit the most severe symptoms of the disorder. The particular “reach and grip” impairment which was observed in all ARX patients, but not in Down syndrome patients, was further characterized by the kinematic data: (i) loss of preference for the index finger when gripping an object, (ii) major impairment of fourth finger deftness, and (iii) a lack of pronation movements. This lack of distal movement

  19. A unique point mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene (FGFR3) defines a new craniosynostosis syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Muenke, M.; Gripp, K.W.; McDonald-McGinn, D.M.

    1997-03-01

    The underlying basis of many forms of syndromic craniosynostosis has been defined on a molecular level. However, many patients with familial or sporadic craniosynostosis do not have the classical findings of those craniosynostosis syndromes. Here we present 61 individuals from 20 unrelated families where coronal synostosis is due to an amino acid substitution (Pro250Arg) that results from a single point mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene on chromosome 4p. In this instance, a new clinical syndrome is being defined on the basis of the molecular finding. In addition to the skull findings, some patients had abnormalities on radiographs of hands and feet, including thimble-like middle phalanges, coned epiphyses, and carpal and tarsal fusions. Brachydactyly was seen in some cases; none had clinically significant syndactyly or deviation of the great toe. Sensorineural hearing loss was present in some, and developmental delay was seen in a minority. While the radiological findings of hands and feet can be very helpful in diagnosing this syndrome, it is not in all cases clearly distinguishable on a clinical basis from other craniosynostosis syndromes. Therefore, this mutation should be tested for in patients with coronal synostosis. 54 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. The P0 gene of Sugarcane yellow leaf virus encodes an RNA silencing suppressor with unique activities

    SciTech Connect

    Mangwende, Tichaona Wang Mingli Borth, Wayne Hu, John Moore, Paul H. Mirkov, T. Erik Albert, Henrik H.

    2009-02-05

    The Sugarcane yellow leaf virus (SCYLV) P0, a member of the highly heterologous proteins of poleroviruses, is a suppressor of posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) and has additional activities not seen in other P0 proteins. The P0 protein in previously tested poleroviruses (Beet western yellows virus and Cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus), suppresses local, but not systemic, PTGS induced by both sense GFP and inverted repeat GF using its F-box-like domain to mediate destabilization of the Argonaute1 protein. We now report that the SCYLV P0 protein not only suppressed local PTGS induced by sense GFP and inverted repeat GF in Nicotiana benthamiana, but also triggered a dosage dependent cell death phenotype in infiltrated leaves and suppressed systemic sense GFP-PTGS. Deletion of the first 15 N-terminal amino acid residues of SCYLV P0 abolished suppression of both local and systemic PTGS and the induction of cell death. In contrast, only systemic PTGS and cell death were lost when the 15 C-terminal amino acid residues were deleted. We conclude that the 15 C-terminal amino acid residue region of SCYLV P0 is necessary for suppressing systemic PTGS and inducing cell death, but is not required for suppression of local PTGS.

  1. Digenic inheritance of mutations in the coproporphyrinogen oxidase and protoporphyrinogen oxidase genes in a unique type of porphyria.

    PubMed

    van Tuyll van Serooskerken, Anne Moniek; de Rooij, Felix W; Edixhoven, Annie; Bladergroen, Reno S; Baron, Jens M; Joussen, Sylvia; Merk, Hans F; Steijlen, Peter M; Poblete-Gutiérrez, Pamela; te Velde, Kornelis; Wilson, J H Paul; Koole, Rita H; van Geel, Michel; Frank, Jorge

    2011-11-01

    The simultaneous dysfunction of two enzymes within the heme biosynthetic pathway in a single patient is rare. Not more than 15 cases have been reported. A woman with a transient episode of severe photosensitivity showed a biochemical porphyrin profile suggestive of hereditary coproporphyria (HCP), whereas some of her relatives had a profile that was suggestive of variegate porphyria (VP). HCP and VP result from a partial enzymatic deficiency of coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPOX) and protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPOX), respectively. DNA analysis in the index patient revealed mutations in both the CPOX and PPOX genes, designated as c.557-15C>G and c.1289dupT, respectively. The CPOX mutation leads to a cryptic splice site resulting in retention of 14 nucleotides from intron 1 in the mRNA transcript. Both mutations encode null alleles and were associated with nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Given the digenic inheritance of these null mutations, coupled with the fact that both HCP and VP can manifest with life-threatening acute neurovisceral attacks, the unusual aspect of this case is a relatively mild clinical phenotype restricted to dermal photosensitivity. PMID:21734717

  2. Lipid exposure elicits differential responses in gene expression and DNA methylation in primary human skeletal muscle cells from severely obese women.

    PubMed

    Maples, Jill M; Brault, Jeffrey J; Shewchuk, Brian M; Witczak, Carol A; Zou, Kai; Rowland, Naomi; Hubal, Monica J; Weber, Todd M; Houmard, Joseph A

    2015-05-01

    The skeletal muscle of obese individuals exhibits an impaired ability to increase the expression of genes linked with fatty acid oxidation (FAO) upon lipid exposure. The present study determined if this response could be attributed to differential DNA methylation signatures. RNA and DNA were isolated from primary human skeletal muscle cells (HSkMC) from lean and severely obese women following lipid incubation. mRNA expression and DNA methylation were quantified for genes that globally regulate FAO [PPARγ coactivator (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), nuclear respiratory factors (NRFs)]. With lipid oversupply, increases in NRF-1, NRF-2, PPARα, and PPARδ expression were dampened in skeletal muscle from severely obese compared with lean women. The expression of genes downstream of the PPARs and NRFs also exhibited a pattern of not increasing as robustly upon lipid exposure with obesity. Increases in CpG methylation near the transcription start site with lipid oversupply were positively related to PPARδ expression; increases in methylation with lipid were depressed in HSkMC from severely obese women. With severe obesity, there is an impaired ability to upregulate global transcriptional regulators of FAO in response to lipid exposure. Transient changes in DNA methylation patterns and differences in the methylation signature with severe obesity may play a role in the transcriptional regulation of PPARδ in response to lipid. The persistence of differential responses to lipid in HSkMC derived from lean and obese subjects supports the possibility of stable epigenetic programming of skeletal muscle cells by the respective environments. PMID:25670728

  3. Stress-activated Dendritic Cells (DC) Induce Dual Interleukin (IL)-15- and IL1β-mediated Pathways, Which May Elicit CD4+ Memory T Cells and Interferon (IFN)-stimulated Genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yufei; Lavender, Paul; Watson, Julie; Arno, Matthew; Lehner, Thomas

    2015-06-19

    The prevailing evidence suggests that immunological memory does not require antigenic re-stimulation but is maintained by low level tonic stimulation. We examined the hypothesis that stress agents contribute to tonic cellular activation and maintain immunological memory. Stimulation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) with stress agents elicits reactive oxygen species and HSP70. NFκB is activated, which up-regulates membrane-associated (ma) IL-15, caspase-1 and IL-1β. Co-culture of stress-treated DC with mononuclear cells activates IL-15 and IL-1β receptors on CD4(+) T cells, eliciting CD40L, proliferation, and up-regulation of CD45RO(+) memory T cells. The transcription factors Tbet(high) and RORγt are up-regulated, whereas FoxP3 is down-regulated, resulting in enhanced Th1 and Th17 expression and the corresponding cytokines. The interaction between maIL-15 expressed by DC and IL-15R on CD4(+) T cells results in one pathway and the corresponding cells expressing IL-1β and IL1βR as a second pathway. Importantly, inhibition studies with IL-15 antibodies and IL-1βR inhibitor suggest that both pathways may be required for optimum CD4(+) CD45RO(+) memory T cell expression. Type 1 IFN expression in splenic CD11c DC of stress-treated mice demonstrated a significant increase of IFN-α in CD11c CD317(+) and CD8α(+) DC. Analysis of RNA in human CD4(+) memory T cells showed up-regulation of type 1 IFN-stimulated genes and inhibition with histone methyltransferase inhibitor. We suggest the paradigm that stress-induced tonic stimulation might be responsible for the robust persistence of the immune response in vaccination and that epigenetic changes are involved in maintaining CD4(+) T cell memory. PMID:25907558

  4. Stress-activated Dendritic Cells (DC) Induce Dual Interleukin (IL)-15- and IL1β-mediated Pathways, Which May Elicit CD4+ Memory T Cells and Interferon (IFN)-stimulated Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yufei; Lavender, Paul; Watson, Julie; Arno, Matthew; Lehner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The prevailing evidence suggests that immunological memory does not require antigenic re-stimulation but is maintained by low level tonic stimulation. We examined the hypothesis that stress agents contribute to tonic cellular activation and maintain immunological memory. Stimulation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) with stress agents elicits reactive oxygen species and HSP70. NFκB is activated, which up-regulates membrane-associated (ma) IL-15, caspase-1 and IL-1β. Co-culture of stress-treated DC with mononuclear cells activates IL-15 and IL-1β receptors on CD4+ T cells, eliciting CD40L, proliferation, and up-regulation of CD45RO+ memory T cells. The transcription factors Tbethigh and RORγt are up-regulated, whereas FoxP3 is down-regulated, resulting in enhanced Th1 and Th17 expression and the corresponding cytokines. The interaction between maIL-15 expressed by DC and IL-15R on CD4+ T cells results in one pathway and the corresponding cells expressing IL-1β and IL1βR as a second pathway. Importantly, inhibition studies with IL-15 antibodies and IL-1βR inhibitor suggest that both pathways may be required for optimum CD4+ CD45RO+ memory T cell expression. Type 1 IFN expression in splenic CD11c DC of stress-treated mice demonstrated a significant increase of IFN-α in CD11c CD317+ and CD8α+ DC. Analysis of RNA in human CD4+ memory T cells showed up-regulation of type 1 IFN-stimulated genes and inhibition with histone methyltransferase inhibitor. We suggest the paradigm that stress-induced tonic stimulation might be responsible for the robust persistence of the immune response in vaccination and that epigenetic changes are involved in maintaining CD4+ T cell memory. PMID:25907558

  5. Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis Induces a Unique Pulmonary Inflammatory Response: Role of Bacterial Gene Expression in Temporal Regulation of Host Defense Responses

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Kathie-Anne; Olsufka, Rachael; Kuestner, Rolf E.; Cho, Ji Hoon; Li, Hong; Zornetzer, Gregory A.; Wang, Kai; Skerrett, Shawn J.; Ozinsky, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary exposure to Francisella tularensis is associated with severe lung pathology and a high mortality rate. The lack of induction of classical inflammatory mediators, including IL1-β and TNF-α, during early infection has led to the suggestion that F. tularensis evades detection by host innate immune surveillance and/or actively suppresses inflammation. To gain more insight into the host response to Francisella infection during the acute stage, transcriptomic analysis was performed on lung tissue from mice exposed to virulent (Francisella tularensis ssp tularensis SchuS4). Despite an extensive transcriptional response in the lungs of animals as early as 4 hrs post-exposure, Francisella tularensis was associated with an almost complete lack of induction of immune-related genes during the initial 24 hrs post-exposure. This broad subversion of innate immune responses was particularly evident when compared to the pulmonary inflammatory response induced by other lethal (Yersinia pestis) and non-lethal (Legionella pneumophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) pulmonary infections. However, the unique induction of a subset of inflammation-related genes suggests a role for dysregulation of lymphocyte function and anti-inflammatory pathways in the extreme virulence of Francisella. Subsequent activation of a classical inflammatory response 48 hrs post-exposure was associated with altered abundance of Francisella-specific transcripts, including those associated with bacterial surface components. In summary, virulent Francisella induces a unique pulmonary inflammatory response characterized by temporal regulation of innate immune pathways correlating with altered bacterial gene expression patterns. This study represents the first simultaneous measurement of both host and Francisella transcriptome changes that occur during in vivo infection and identifies potential bacterial virulence factors responsible for regulation of host inflammatory pathways. PMID:23690939

  6. Exclusive Association of p53 Mutation with Super-High Methylation of Tumor Suppressor Genes in the p53 Pathway in a Unique Gastric Cancer Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ema, Akira; Katada, Natsuya; Kikuchi, Shiro; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Background A comprehensive search for DNA methylated genes identified candidate tumor suppressor genes that have been proven to be involved in the apoptotic process of the p53 pathway. In this study, we investigated p53 mutation in relation to such epigenetic alteration in primary gastric cancer. Methods The methylation profiles of the 3 genes: PGP9.5, NMDAR2B, and CCNA1, which are involved in the p53 tumor suppressor pathway in combination with p53 mutation were examined in 163 primary gastric cancers. The effect of epigenetic reversion in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs on apoptosis was also assessed according to the tumor p53 mutation status. Results p53 gene mutations were found in 44 primary gastric tumors (27%), and super-high methylation of any of the 3 genes was only found in cases with wild type p53. Higher p53 pathway aberration was found in cases with male gender (p = 0.003), intestinal type (p = 0.005), and non-infiltrating type (p = 0.001). The p53 pathway aberration group exhibited less recurrence in lymph nodes, distant organs, and peritoneum than the p53 non-aberration group. In the NUGC4 gastric cancer cell line (p53 wild type), epigenetic treatment augmented apoptosis by chemotherapeutic drugs, partially through p53 transcription activity. On the other hand, in the KATO III cancer cell line (p53 mutant), epigenetic treatment alone induced robust apoptosis, with no trans-activation of p53. Conclusion In gastric cancer, p53 relevant and non-relevant pathways exist, and tumors with either pathway type exhibited unique clinical features. Epigenetic treatments can induce apoptosis partially through p53 activation, however their apoptotic effects may be explained largely by mechanism other than through p53 pathways. PMID:26447864

  7. Intranasal application of vasopressin fails to elicit changes in brain immediate early gene expression, neural activity and behavioral performance of rats

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Mike; Tobin, Vicky A.; Callahan, Michael F.; Papadaki, Eirini; Becker, Axel; Engelmann, Mario; Leng, Gareth

    2013-01-01

    Intranasal administration has been widely used to investigate effects of the neuropeptides vasopressin and oxytocin on human behaviors and neurological disorders, but exactly what happens when these neuropeptides are administered intranasally is far from clear. In particular, it is not clear whether a physiological significant amount of peptide enters the brain to account for the observed effects. Here, we investigated whether intranasal administration of vasopressin and oxytocin to rats induces expression of the immediate-early gene product Fos in brain areas that are sensitive to centrally administered peptide, whether it alters neuronal activity in the way that centrally administered peptide does, and whether it affects behavior in ways expected from studies of centrally administered peptide. We found that, whereas intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of very low doses of vasopressin or oxytocin increased Fos expression in several distinct brain regions, intranasal administration of large doses of the peptides had no significant effect. In contrast to the effects of vasopressin applied topically to the main olfactory bulb, we saw no changes in the electrical activity of olfactory bulb mitral cells after intranasal vasopressin administration. In addition, vasopressin given intranasally had no significant effects on social recognition or short-term recognition memory. Finally, intranasal infusions of vasopressin had no significant effects on the parameters monitored on the elevated plus maze, a rodent model of anxiety. Our data in rats suggest that, after intranasal administration, significant amounts of vasopressin and oxytocin do not reach areas in the brain at levels sufficient to change immediate early gene expression, neural activity or behavior in the ways described for central administration of the peptides. PMID:23656518

  8. Non-additive hepatic gene expression elicited by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and 2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) co-treatment in C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Kopec, Anna K.; Souza, Michelle L. D.; Mets, Bryan D.; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Reese, Sarah E.; Archer, Kellie J.; Potter, Dave; Tashiro, Colleen; Sharratt, Bonnie; Harkema, Jack R.; Zacharewski, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between environmental contaminants can lead to non-additive effects that may affect the toxicity and risk assessment of a mixture. Comprehensive time course and dose-response studies with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), non-dioxin-like 2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) and their mixture were performed in immature, ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice. Mice were gavaged once with 30 μg/kg TCDD, 300 mg/kg PCB153, a mixture of 30 μg/kg TCDD with 300 mg/kg PCB153 (MIX) or sesame oil vehicle for 4,12, 24,72 or 168 h. In the 24 h dose-response study, animals were gavaged with TCDD (0.3,1, 3, 6, 10, 15, 30, 45 μg/kg), PCB153 (3,10, 30, 60, 100, 150, 300, 450 mg/kg), MIX (0.3+3, 1+10, 3+30, 6+60, 10+100, 15+150, 30+300, 45 μg/kg TCDD+450 mg/kg PCB153, respectively) or vehicle. All three treatments significantly increased relative liver weights (RLW), with MIX eliciting significantly greater increases compared to TCDD and PCB153 alone. Histologically, MIX induced hepatocellular hypertrophy, vacuolization, inflammation, hyperplasia and necrosis, a combination of TCDD and PCB153 responses. Complementary lipid analyses identified significant increases in hepatic triglycerides in MIX and TCDD samples, while PCB153 had no effect on lipids. Hepatic PCB153 levels were also significantly increased with TCDD co-treatment. Microarray analysis identified 167 TCDD, 185 PCB153 and 388 MIX unique differentially expressed genes. Statistical modeling of quantitative real-time PCR analysis of Pla2g12a, Serpinb6a, Nqo1, Srxn1, and Dysf verified non-additive expression following MIX treatment compared to TCDD and PCB153 alone. In summary, TCDD and PCB153 co-treatment elicited specific non-additive gene expression effects that are consistent with RLW increases, histopathology, and hepatic lipid accumulation. PMID:21851831

  9. Elevated breast cancer risk in irradiated BALB/c mice associates with unique functional polymorphism of the Prkdc (DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit) gene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Y.; Okayasu, R.; Weil, M. M.; Silver, A.; McCarthy, M.; Zabriskie, R.; Long, S.; Cox, R.; Ullrich, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    Female BALB/c mice are unusually radiosensitive and more susceptible than C57BL/6 and other tested inbred mice to ionizing radiation (IR)-induced mammary tumors. This breast cancer susceptibility is correlated with elevated susceptibility for mammary cell transformation and genomic instability following irradiation. In this study, we report the identification of two BALB/c strain-specific polymorphisms in the coding region of Prkdc, the gene encoding the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit, which is known to be involved in DNA double-stranded break repair and post-IR signal transduction. First, we identified an A --> G transition at base 11530 resulting in a Met --> Val conversion at codon 3844 (M3844V) in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase domain upstream of the scid mutation (Y4046X). Second, we identified a C --> T transition at base 6418 resulting in an Arg --> Cys conversion at codon 2140 (R2140C) downstream of the putative leucine zipper domain. This unique PrkdcBALB variant gene is shown to be associated with decreased DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit activity and with increased susceptibility to IR-induced genomic instability in primary mammary epithelial cells. The data provide the first evidence that naturally arising allelic variation in a mouse DNA damage response gene may associate with IR response and breast cancer risk.

  10. Unique gene alterations are induced in FACS-purified Fos-positive neurons activated during cue-induced relapse to heroin seeking

    PubMed Central

    Fanous, Sanya; Guez-Barber, Danielle H; Goldart, Evan M; Schrama, Regina; Theberge, Florence RM; Shaham, Yavin; Hope, Bruce T

    2012-01-01

    Cue-induced heroin seeking after prolonged withdrawal is associated with neuronal activation and altered gene expression in prefrontal cortex (PFC). However, these previous studies assessed gene expression in all neurons regardless of their activity state during heroin seeking. Using Fos as a marker of neural activity, we describe distinct molecular alterations induced in activated versus non-activated neurons during cue-induced heroin seeking after prolonged withdrawal. We trained rats to self-administer heroin for 10 days (6-h/day) and assessed cue-induced heroin seeking in extinction tests after 14 or 30 days. We used fluorescent-activated cell-sorting (FACS) to purify Fos-positive and Fos-negative neurons from PFC 90 min after extinction testing. Flow cytometry showed that Fos-immunoreactivity was increased in less than 10% of sparsely distributed PFC neurons. mRNA levels of the immediate early genes fosB, arc, egr1, and egr2, as well as npy and map2k6, were increased in Fos-positive, but not Fos-negative, neurons. In support of these findings, double-label immunohistochemistry indicated substantial co-expression of NPY- and Arc-immunoreactivity in Fos-positive neurons. Our data indicate that cue-induced relapse to heroin seeking after prolonged withdrawal induces unique molecular alterations within activated PFC neurons that are distinct from those observed in the surrounding majority of non-activated neurons. PMID:23113797

  11. Unconsciously elicited perceptual prior

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Raymond; Baria, Alexis T.; Flounders, Matthew W.; He, Biyu J.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence over the past decade suggests that vision is not simply a passive, feed-forward process in which cortical areas relay progressively more abstract information to those higher up in the visual hierarchy, but rather an inferential process with top-down processes actively guiding and shaping perception. However, one major question that persists is whether such processes can be influenced by unconsciously perceived stimuli. Recent psychophysics and neuroimaging studies have revealed that while consciously perceived stimuli elicit stronger responses in higher visual and frontoparietal areas than those that fail to reach conscious awareness, the latter can still drive high-level brain and behavioral responses. We investigated whether unconscious processing of a masked natural image could facilitate subsequent conscious recognition of its degraded counterpart (a black-and-white “Mooney” image) presented many seconds later. We found that this is indeed the case, suggesting that conscious vision may be influenced by priors established by unconscious processing of a fleeting image.

  12. Andrographis paniculata elicits anti-invasion activities by suppressing TM4SF3 gene expression and by anoikis-sensitization in esophageal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Lee, Julia Kin-Ming; Li, Lin; Chan, Kar-Man; Wong, Eric Chun-Wai; Chan, Judy Yuet-Wah; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Lui, Vivian Wai Yan; Chiu, Philip Wai-Yan; Lau, Clara Bik-San

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is the sixth most common cancer in male causing death worldwide. It is usually diagnosed at advanced stage with high postoperative recurrence and systemic metastasis, which leads to poor prognosis. The potential inhibitory effect of herbal medicines on metastasis of esophageal cancer has drawn researchers’ great attention. In the present study, the anti-invasion activities of Andrographis paniculata (AP) have been evaluated in two esophageal cancer cell lines, EC-109 and KYSE-520, as well as human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1). The anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities of AP were also evaluated in human esophageal xenograft-bearing mouse models. Our results demonstrated for the first time that aqueous extract of AP inhibited the motility and invasion of esophageal cancer cells, which is the initial step of metastasis, without cytotoxicity. Anoikis resistance has also been reversed in AP-treated cancer cells. Besides, the expression of metastasis-related gene TM4SF3 in EC-109 cells was significantly decreased in AP extract-treated cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, the anti-tumor and anti-metastatic efficacies in subcutaneous and intraperitoneal esophageal xenograft-bearing mice were demonstrated after oral administration of AP aqueous extract for 3 weeks. Last but not least, the active component, isoandrographolide, responsible for the anti-migratory activity was firstly revealed here. In conclusion, the AP aqueous extract exerted inhibitory activities on the migration and anoikis resistance of esophageal cancer cells EC-109 and KYSE-520, as well as suppressed the proliferation and motility of endothelial cells. Combining the mentioned effects may account for the anti-tumor and anti-metastasis effects of AP aqueous extract in xenograft-bearing mice. The findings in the present study further enhance the understanding of the therapeutic mechanisms of the herb AP, which may lead to clinical applications. PMID

  13. Live Attenuated Leishmania donovani p27 Gene Knockout Parasites Are Non-pathogenic and Elicit Long Term Protective Immunity in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Ranadhir; Dagur, Pradeep K.; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; McCoy, J. Philip; Salotra, Poonam; Duncan, Robert; Nakhasi, Hira L.

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide and there are no vaccines available against this disease. Previously, we had shown that the amastigote specific protein p27 (Ldp27) is a component of an active cytochrome c oxidase complex in L. donovani and upon deletion of its gene the parasite had reduced virulence in vivo. In this study, we have shown that Ldp27−/− parasites do not survive beyond 20 weeks in BALB/c mice, hence are safe as an immunogen. Upon virulent challenge, 12 weeks post-immunized mice showed significantly lower parasite burden in liver and spleen. When mice were challenged 20 weeks post immunization, there was still a significant reduction in parasite burden suggesting long term protection by Ldp27−/− immunization. Immunization with Ldp27−/− induced both pro- and anti- inflammatory cytokine responses and activated splenocytes for enhanced leishmaniacidal activity in association with NO production. Protection in both short and long term immunized mice after challenge with the wild type parasite correlated with the stimulation of multifunctional Th1 type CD4 and CD8 T cells. Adoptive transfer of T cells from long term immunized mice conferred protection against virulent challenge in naïve recipient mice suggesting involvement of memory T cell response in the protection against Leishmania infection. Immunization of mice with Ldp27−/− also demonstrated cross-protection against the Leishmania major and Leishmania braziliensis infection. Our data show that genetically modified live attenuated Ldp27−/− parasites are safe, induce protective immunity even in the absence of parasites and can provide protection against homologous and heterologous Leishmania species. PMID:23338240

  14. Andrographis paniculata elicits anti-invasion activities by suppressing TM4SF3 gene expression and by anoikis-sensitization in esophageal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Lee, Julia Kin-Ming; Li, Lin; Chan, Kar-Man; Wong, Eric Chun-Wai; Chan, Judy Yuet-Wah; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Lui, Vivian Wai Yan; Chiu, Philip Wai-Yan; Lau, Clara Bik-San

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is the sixth most common cancer in male causing death worldwide. It is usually diagnosed at advanced stage with high postoperative recurrence and systemic metastasis, which leads to poor prognosis. The potential inhibitory effect of herbal medicines on metastasis of esophageal cancer has drawn researchers' great attention. In the present study, the anti-invasion activities of Andrographis paniculata (AP) have been evaluated in two esophageal cancer cell lines, EC-109 and KYSE-520, as well as human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1). The anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities of AP were also evaluated in human esophageal xenograft-bearing mouse models. Our results demonstrated for the first time that aqueous extract of AP inhibited the motility and invasion of esophageal cancer cells, which is the initial step of metastasis, without cytotoxicity. Anoikis resistance has also been reversed in AP-treated cancer cells. Besides, the expression of metastasis-related gene TM4SF3 in EC-109 cells was significantly decreased in AP extract-treated cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, the anti-tumor and anti-metastatic efficacies in subcutaneous and intraperitoneal esophageal xenograft-bearing mice were demonstrated after oral administration of AP aqueous extract for 3 weeks. Last but not least, the active component, isoandrographolide, responsible for the anti-migratory activity was firstly revealed here. In conclusion, the AP aqueous extract exerted inhibitory activities on the migration and anoikis resistance of esophageal cancer cells EC-109 and KYSE-520, as well as suppressed the proliferation and motility of endothelial cells. Combining the mentioned effects may account for the anti-tumor and anti-metastasis effects of AP aqueous extract in xenograft-bearing mice. The findings in the present study further enhance the understanding of the therapeutic mechanisms of the herb AP, which may lead to clinical applications. PMID

  15. Unique AGG Interruption in the CGG Repeats of the FMR1 Gene Exclusively Found in Asians Linked to a Specific SNP Haplotype

    PubMed Central

    Limprasert, Pornprot; Thanakitgosate, Janpen; Jaruthamsophon, Kanoot; Sripo, Thanya

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited intellectual disability. It is caused by the occurrence of more than 200 pure CGG repeats in the FMR1 gene. Normal individuals have 6–54 CGG repeats with two or more stabilizing AGG interruptions occurring once every 9- or 10-CGG-repeat blocks in various populations. However, the unique (CGG)6AGG pattern, designated as 6A, has been exclusively reported in Asians. To examine the genetic background of AGG interruptions in the CGG repeats of the FMR1 gene, we studied 8 SNPs near the CGG repeats in 176 unrelated Thai males with 19–56 CGG repeats. Of these 176 samples, we identified AGG interruption patterns from 95 samples using direct DNA sequencing. We found that the common CGG repeat groups (29, 30, and 36) were associated with 3 common haplotypes, GCGGATAA (Hap A), TTCATCGC (Hap C), and GCCGTTAA (Hap B), respectively. The configurations of 9A9A9, 10A9A9, and 9A9A6A9 were commonly found in chromosomes with 29, 30, and 36 CGG repeats, respectively. Almost all chromosomes with Hap B (22/23) carried at least one 6A pattern, suggesting that the 6A pattern is linked to Hap B and may have originally occurred in the ancestors of Asian populations. PMID:27042357

  16. Gene delivery nanocarriers of bioactive glass with unique potential to load BMP2 plasmid DNA and to internalize into mesenchymal stem cells for osteogenesis and bone regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae-Hyun; Singh, Rajendra K.; Kang, Min Sil; Kim, Joong-Hyun; Kim, Hae-Won

    2016-04-01

    The recent development of bioactive glasses with nanoscale morphologies has spurred their specific applications in bone regeneration, for example as drug and gene delivery carriers. Bone engineering with stem cells genetically modified with this unique class of nanocarriers thus holds great promise in this avenue. Here we report the potential of the bioactive glass nanoparticle (BGN) system for the gene delivery of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) targeting bone. The composition of 15% Ca-added silica, proven to be bone-bioactive, was formulated into surface aminated mesoporous nanospheres with enlarged pore sizes, to effectively load and deliver bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) plasmid DNA. The enlarged mesopores were highly effective in loading BMP2-pDNA with an efficiency as high as 3.5 wt% (pDNA w.r.t. BGN), a level more than twice than for small-sized mesopores. The BGN nanocarriers released the genetic molecules in a highly sustained manner (for as long as 2 weeks). The BMP2-pDNA/BGN complexes were effectively internalized to rat MSCs with a cell uptake level of ~73%, and the majority of cells were transfected to express the BMP2 protein. Subsequent osteogenesis of the transfected MSCs was demonstrated by the expression of bone-related genes, including bone sialoprotein, osteopontin, and osteocalcin. The MSCs transfected with BMP2-pDNA/BGN were locally delivered inside a collagen gel to the target calvarium defects. The results showed significantly improved bone regeneration, as evidenced by the micro-computed tomographic, histomorphometric and immunohistochemical analyses. This study supports the excellent capacity of the BGN system as a pDNA-delivery nanocarrier in MSCs, and the engineered system, BMP2-pDNA/BGN with MSCs, may be considered a new promising candidate to advance the therapeutic potential of stem cells through genetic modification, targeting bone defects and diseases.The recent development of bioactive glasses with nanoscale morphologies has

  17. Gene delivery nanocarriers of bioactive glass with unique potential to load BMP2 plasmid DNA and to internalize into mesenchymal stem cells for osteogenesis and bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hyun; Singh, Rajendra K; Kang, Min Sil; Kim, Joong-Hyun; Kim, Hae-Won

    2016-04-14

    The recent development of bioactive glasses with nanoscale morphologies has spurred their specific applications in bone regeneration, for example as drug and gene delivery carriers. Bone engineering with stem cells genetically modified with this unique class of nanocarriers thus holds great promise in this avenue. Here we report the potential of the bioactive glass nanoparticle (BGN) system for the gene delivery of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) targeting bone. The composition of 15% Ca-added silica, proven to be bone-bioactive, was formulated into surface aminated mesoporous nanospheres with enlarged pore sizes, to effectively load and deliver bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) plasmid DNA. The enlarged mesopores were highly effective in loading BMP2-pDNA with an efficiency as high as 3.5 wt% (pDNA w.r.t. BGN), a level more than twice than for small-sized mesopores. The BGN nanocarriers released the genetic molecules in a highly sustained manner (for as long as 2 weeks). The BMP2-pDNA/BGN complexes were effectively internalized to rat MSCs with a cell uptake level of ∼73%, and the majority of cells were transfected to express the BMP2 protein. Subsequent osteogenesis of the transfected MSCs was demonstrated by the expression of bone-related genes, including bone sialoprotein, osteopontin, and osteocalcin. The MSCs transfected with BMP2-pDNA/BGN were locally delivered inside a collagen gel to the target calvarium defects. The results showed significantly improved bone regeneration, as evidenced by the micro-computed tomographic, histomorphometric and immunohistochemical analyses. This study supports the excellent capacity of the BGN system as a pDNA-delivery nanocarrier in MSCs, and the engineered system, BMP2-pDNA/BGN with MSCs, may be considered a new promising candidate to advance the therapeutic potential of stem cells through genetic modification, targeting bone defects and diseases. PMID:27035682

  18. Gene expression analysis of early stage endometrial cancers reveals unique transcripts associated with grade and histology but not depth of invasion.

    PubMed

    Risinger, John I; Allard, Jay; Chandran, Uma; Day, Roger; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V R; Miller, Caela; Zahn, Christopher; Oliver, Julie; Litzi, Tracy; Marcus, Charlotte; Dubil, Elizabeth; Byrd, Kevin; Cassablanca, Yovanni; Becich, Michael; Berchuck, Andrew; Darcy, Kathleen M; Hamilton, Chad A; Conrads, Thomas P; Maxwell, G Larry

    2013-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy in the United States but it remains poorly understood at the molecular level. This investigation was conducted to specifically assess whether gene expression changes underlie the clinical and pathologic factors traditionally used for determining treatment regimens in women with stage I endometrial cancer. These include the effect of tumor grade, depth of myometrial invasion and histotype. We utilized oligonucleotide microarrays to assess the transcript expression profile in epithelial glandular cells laser microdissected from 79 endometrioid and 12 serous stage I endometrial cancers with a heterogeneous distribution of grade and depth of myometrial invasion, along with 12 normal post-menopausal endometrial samples. Unsupervised multidimensional scaling analyses revealed that serous and endometrioid stage I cancers have similar transcript expression patterns when compared to normal controls where 900 transcripts were identified to be differentially expressed by at least fourfold (univariate t-test, p < 0.001) between the cancers and normal endometrium. This analysis also identified transcript expression differences between serous and endometrioid cancers and tumor grade, but no apparent differences were identified as a function of depth of myometrial invasion. Four genes were validated by quantitative PCR on an independent set of cancer and normal endometrium samples. These findings indicate that unique gene expression profiles are associated with histologic type and grade, but not myometrial invasion among early stage endometrial cancers. These data provide a comprehensive perspective on the molecular alterations associated with stage I endometrial cancer, particularly those subtypes that have the worst prognosis. PMID:23785665

  19. The same unique mutation in the arylsulfatase A gene causes late infantile metachromatic leukodystrophy in the Navajo and Western Eskimo populations

    SciTech Connect

    Pastor-Soler, N.M.; Hu, D.; Schertz, E.

    1994-09-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal disorder caused by defective catabolism of sulfatide, an important sphingolipid in myelin. Late infantile (LI), juvenile and adult patients with MLD are found throughout the world. Mutational analysis of the ARSA gene in patients with MLD has resulted in the identification of about 30 mutations. Recently we identified a mutation in the ARSA gene that was present in all Navajo Indian patients tested with LIMLD. All of the patients were homozygous for the G to A change at position 1 of intron 4 which causes aberrant splicing and a low level of ARSA mRNA. This mutation had not been found in any non-Navajo population. However, recently we were sent samples from two Alaskan Eskimo siblings with LIMLD. Sequencing of amplified genomic DNA showed that the affected siblings were homozygous for the above mutation. A simple DNA-based test will permit accurate patient and carrier identification in both the Eskimo and Navajo populations. Many studies have focused on the migrations of the Amerindian, Athapaskan and Eskimo from eastern Asia to the new world and the intermingling of these peoples. While it is clear that Na-Dene speaking Navajo split from other Athapaskan tribes and migrated from western Canada and Alaska to the southwest area of the United States, a direct genetic connection between the Western Eskimo and the Navajo has not been made. The presence of the same unique mutation causing a fatal inherited disease in both populations may point to interaction between these peoples prior to the migration of the Navajos south about 1000 years ago.

  20. Differential overexpression of three mdr gene family members in multidrug-resistant J774.2 mouse cells. Evidence that distinct P-glycoprotein precursors are encoded by unique mdr genes.

    PubMed

    Hsu, S I; Lothstein, L; Horwitz, S B

    1989-07-15

    A hallmark of the multidrug-resistant phenotype is the overproduction of a family of 130-180-kDa integral membrane phosphoglycoproteins collectively called P-glycoprotein. Gene-specific hybridization probes were derived from three classes of mouse P-glycoprotein cDNAs. These probes revealed the differential amplification and/or transcriptional activation of three distinct but closely related mdr genes (mdr1a, mdr1b, and mdr2) in independently selected multidrug-resistant J774.2 mouse cell lines. Overexpression of mdr1a and mdr1b was found to correlate, in general, with the differential overproduction of either a 120- or 125-kDa P-glycoprotein precursor, respectively. This same correlation was observed in a single cell line during the course of stepwise selection for resistance to vinblastine in which a switch in gene expression from mdr1b to mdr1a resulted in a switch from the 125- to 120-kDa P-glycoprotein precursor. These findings suggest that differential overexpression of distinct mdr genes which encode unique P-glycoprotein isoforms is a possible mechanism for generating diversity in the multidrug-resistant phenotype. PMID:2473069

  1. Climate-driven range shifts explain the distribution of extant gene pools and predict future loss of unique lineages in a marine brown alga.

    PubMed

    Assis, J; Serrão, E A; Claro, B; Perrin, C; Pearson, G A

    2014-06-01

    The climate-driven dynamics of species ranges is a critical research question in evolutionary ecology. We ask whether present intraspecific diversity is determined by the imprint of past climate. This is an ongoing debate requiring interdisciplinary examination of population genetic pools and persistence patterns across global ranges. Previously, contrasting inferences and predictions have resulted from distinct genomic coverage and/or geographical information. We aim to describe and explain the causes of geographical contrasts in genetic diversity and their consequences for the future baseline of the global genetic pool, by comparing present geographical distribution of genetic diversity and differentiation with predictive species distribution modelling (SDM) during past extremes, present time and future climate scenarios for a brown alga, Fucus vesiculosus. SDM showed that both atmospheric and oceanic variables shape the global distribution of intertidal species, revealing regions of persistence, extinction and expansion during glacial and postglacial periods. These explained the distribution and structure of present genetic diversity, consisting of differentiated genetic pools with maximal diversity in areas of long-term persistence. Most of the present species range comprises postglacial expansion zones and, in contrast to highly dispersive marine organisms, expansions involved only local fronts, leaving distinct genetic pools at rear edges. Besides unravelling a complex phylogeographical history and showing congruence between genetic diversity and persistent distribution zones, supporting the hypothesis of niche conservatism, range shifts and loss of unique genetic diversity at the rear edge were predicted for future climate scenarios, impoverishing the global gene pool. PMID:24766057

  2. Investigating Oxidative Stress and Inflammatory Responses Elicited by Silver Nanoparticles Using High-Throughput Reporter Genes in HepG2 Cells: Effect of Size, Surface Coating, and Intracellular Uptake

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Silver nanoparticles (Ag NP) have been shown to generate reactive oxygen species; however, the association between physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticles and cellular stress responses elicited by exposure has not been elucidated. Here, we examined three key...

  3. SuperSAGE analysis of the Nicotiana attenuata transcriptome after fatty acid-amino acid elicitation (FAC): identification of early mediators of insect responses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plants trigger and tailor defense responses after perception of the oral secretions (OS) of attacking specialist lepidopteran larvae. Fatty acid-amino acid conjugates (FACs) in the OS of the Manduca sexta larvae are necessary and sufficient to elicit the herbivory-specific responses in Nicotiana attenuata, an annual wild tobacco species. How FACs are perceived and activate signal transduction mechanisms is unknown. Results We used SuperSAGE combined with 454 sequencing to quantify the early transcriptional changes elicited by the FAC N-linolenoyl-glutamic acid (18:3-Glu) and virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) to examine the function of candidate genes in the M. sexta-N. attenuata interaction. The analysis targeted mRNAs encoding regulatory components: rare transcripts with very rapid FAC-elicited kinetics (increases within 60 and declines within 120 min). From 12,744 unique Tag sequences identified (UniTags), 430 and 117 were significantly up- and down-regulated ≥ 2.5-fold, respectively, after 18:3-Glu elicitation compared to wounding. Based on gene ontology classification, more than 25% of the annotated UniTags corresponded to putative regulatory components, including 30 transcriptional regulators and 22 protein kinases. Quantitative PCR analysis was used to analyze the FAC-dependent regulation of a subset of 27 of these UniTags and for most of them a rapid and transient induction was confirmed. Six FAC-regulated genes were functionally characterized by VIGS and two, a putative lipid phosphate phosphatase (LPP) and a protein of unknown function, were identified as important mediators of the M. sexta-N. attenuata interaction. Conclusions The analysis of the early changes in the transcriptome of N. attenuata after FAC elicitation using SuperSAGE/454 has identified regulatory genes involved in insect-specific mediated responses in plants. Moreover, it has provided a foundation for the identification of additional novel regulators associated with this

  4. A Unique Nodavirus with Novel Features: Mosinovirus Expresses Two Subgenomic RNAs, a Capsid Gene of Unknown Origin, and a Suppressor of the Antiviral RNA Interference Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Susan; Zirkel, Florian; Kurth, Andreas; van Cleef, Koen W. R.; Drosten, Christian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Insects are a reservoir for many known and novel viruses. We discovered an unknown virus, tentatively named mosinovirus (MoNV), in mosquitoes from a tropical rainforest region in Côte d'Ivoire. The MoNV genome consists of two segments of positive-sense RNA of 2,972 nucleotides (nt) (RNA 1) and 1,801 nt (RNA 2). Its putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase shares 43% amino acid identity with its closest relative, that of the Pariacoto virus (family Nodaviridae). Unexpectedly, for the putative capsid protein, maximal pairwise identity of 16% to Lake Sinai virus 2, an unclassified virus with a nonsegmented RNA genome, was found. Moreover, MoNV virions are nonenveloped and about 50 nm in diameter, larger than any of the known nodaviruses. Mature MoNV virions contain capsid proteins of ∼56 kDa, which do not seem to be cleaved from a longer precursor. Northern blot analyses revealed that MoNV expresses two subgenomic RNAs of 580 nt (RNA 3) and 292 nt (RNA 4). RNA 4 encodes a viral suppressor of RNA interference (RNAi) that shares its mechanism with the B2 RNAi suppressor protein of other nodaviruses despite lacking recognizable similarity to these proteins. MoNV B2 binds long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and, accordingly, inhibits Dicer-2-mediated processing of dsRNA into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Phylogenetic analyses indicate that MoNV is a novel member of the family Nodaviridae that acquired its capsid gene via reassortment from an unknown, distantly related virus beyond the family level. IMPORTANCE The identification of novel viruses provides important information about virus evolution and diversity. Here, we describe an unknown unique nodavirus in mosquitoes, named mosinovirus (MoNV). MoNV was classified as a nodavirus based on its genome organization and on phylogenetic analyses of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Notably, its capsid gene was acquired from an unknown virus with a distant relationship to nodaviruses. Another remarkable feature of Mo

  5. Cellular homeoproteins, SATB1 and CDP, bind to the unique region between the human cytomegalovirus UL127 and major immediate-early genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee Jialing; Klase, Zachary; Gao Xiaoqi; Caldwell, Jeremy S.; Stinski, Mark F.; Kashanchi, Fatah; Chao, S.-H.

    2007-09-15

    An AT-rich region of the human cytomegalovirus (CMV) genome between the UL127 open reading frame and the major immediate-early (MIE) enhancer is referred to as the unique region (UR). It has been shown that the UR represses activation of transcription from the UL127 promoter and functions as a boundary between the divergent UL127 and MIE genes during human CMV infection [Angulo, A., Kerry, D., Huang, H., Borst, E.M., Razinsky, A., Wu, J., Hobom, U., Messerle, M., Ghazal, P., 2000. Identification of a boundary domain adjacent to the potent human cytomegalovirus enhancer that represses transcription of the divergent UL127 promoter. J. Virol. 74 (6), 2826-2839; Lundquist, C.A., Meier, J.L., Stinski, M.F., 1999. A strong negative transcriptional regulatory region between the human cytomegalovirus UL127 gene and the major immediate-early enhancer. J. Virol. 73 (11), 9039-9052]. A putative forkhead box-like (FOX-like) site, AAATCAATATT, was identified in the UR and found to play a key role in repression of the UL127 promoter in recombinant virus-infected cells [Lashmit, P.E., Lundquist, C.A., Meier, J.L., Stinski, M.F., 2004. Cellular repressor inhibits human cytomegalovirus transcription from the UL127 promoter. J. Virol. 78 (10), 5113-5123]. However, the cellular factors which associate with the UR and FOX-like region remain to be determined. We reported previously that pancreatic-duodenal homeobox factor-1 (PDX1) bound to a 45-bp element located within the UR [Chao, S.H., Harada, J.N., Hyndman, F., Gao, X., Nelson, C.G., Chanda, S.K., Caldwell, J.S., 2004. PDX1, a Cellular Homeoprotein, Binds to and Regulates the Activity of Human Cytomegalovirus Immediate Early Promoter. J. Biol. Chem. 279 (16), 16111-16120]. Here we demonstrate that two additional cellular homeoproteins, special AT-rich sequence binding protein 1 (SATB1) and CCAAT displacement protein (CDP), bind to the human CMV UR in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, CDP is identified as a FOX-like binding protein

  6. Identification and sequence analysis of a new member of the mouse HSP70 gene family and characterization of its unique cellular and developmental pattern of expression in the male germ line.

    PubMed Central

    Zakeri, Z F; Wolgemuth, D J; Hunt, C R

    1988-01-01

    A unique member of the mouse HSP70 gene family has been isolated and characterized with respect to its DNA sequence organization and expression. The gene contains extensive similarity to a heat shock-inducible HSP70 gene within the coding region but diverges in both 3' and 5' nontranslated regions. The gene does not yield transcripts in response to heat shock in mouse L cells. Rather, the gene appears to be activated uniquely in the male germ line. Analysis of RNA from different developmental stages and from enriched populations of spermatogenic cells revealed that this gene is expressed during the prophase stage of meiosis. A transcript different in size from the major heat-inducible mouse transcripts is most abundant in meiotic prophase spermatocytes and decreases in abundance in postmeiotic stages of spermatogenesis. This pattern of expression is distinct from that observed for another member of this gene family, which was previously shown to be expressed abundantly in postmeiotic germ cells. These observations suggest that specific HSP70 gene family members play distinct roles in the differentiation of the germ cell lineage in mammals. Images PMID:3405224

  7. Eliciting expert knowledge in conservation science.

    PubMed

    Martin, Tara G; Burgman, Mark A; Fidler, Fiona; Kuhnert, Petra M; Low-Choy, Samantha; McBride, Marissa; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2012-02-01

    Expert knowledge is used widely in the science and practice of conservation because of the complexity of problems, relative lack of data, and the imminent nature of many conservation decisions. Expert knowledge is substantive information on a particular topic that is not widely known by others. An expert is someone who holds this knowledge and who is often deferred to in its interpretation. We refer to predictions by experts of what may happen in a particular context as expert judgments. In general, an expert-elicitation approach consists of five steps: deciding how information will be used, determining what to elicit, designing the elicitation process, performing the elicitation, and translating the elicited information into quantitative statements that can be used in a model or directly to make decisions. This last step is known as encoding. Some of the considerations in eliciting expert knowledge include determining how to work with multiple experts and how to combine multiple judgments, minimizing bias in the elicited information, and verifying the accuracy of expert information. We highlight structured elicitation techniques that, if adopted, will improve the accuracy and information content of expert judgment and ensure uncertainty is captured accurately. We suggest four aspects of an expert elicitation exercise be examined to determine its comprehensiveness and effectiveness: study design and context, elicitation design, elicitation method, and elicitation output. Just as the reliability of empirical data depends on the rigor with which it was acquired so too does that of expert knowledge. PMID:22280323

  8. Complex expression patterns of lymphocyte-specific genes during the development of cartilaginous fish implicate unique lymphoid tissues in generating an immune repertoire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miracle, A. L.; Anderson, M. K.; Litman, R. T.; Walsh, C. J.; Luer, C. A.; Rothenberg, E. V.; Litman, G. W.

    2001-01-01

    Cartilaginous fish express canonical B and T cell recognition genes, but their lymphoid organs and lymphocyte development have been poorly defined. Here, the expression of Ig, TCR, recombination-activating gene (Rag)-1 and terminal deoxynucleosidase (TdT) genes has been used to identify roles of various lymphoid tissues throughout development in the cartilaginous fish, Raja eglanteria (clearnose skate). In embryogenesis, Ig and TCR genes are sharply up-regulated at 8 weeks of development. At this stage TCR and TdT expression is limited to the thymus; later, TCR gene expression appears in peripheral sites in hatchlings and adults, suggesting that the thymus is a source of T cells as in mammals. B cell gene expression indicates more complex roles for the spleen and two special organs of cartilaginous fish-the Leydig and epigonal (gonad-associated) organs. In the adult, the Leydig organ is the site of the highest IgM and IgX expression. However, the spleen is the first site of IgM expression, while IgX is expressed first in gonad, liver, Leydig and even thymus. Distinctive spatiotemporal patterns of Ig light chain gene expression also are seen. A subset of Ig genes is pre-rearranged in the germline of the cartilaginous fish, making expression possible without rearrangement. To assess whether this allows differential developmental regulation, IgM and IgX heavy chain cDNA sequences from specific tissues and developmental stages have been compared with known germline-joined genomic sequences. Both non-productively rearranged genes and germline-joined genes are transcribed in the embryo and hatchling, but not in the adult.

  9. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals activation of unique gene groups as a consequence of stem cell-parenchymal cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Brian T; Jung, Jangwook P; Ogle, Brenda M

    2016-01-01

    Fusion of donor mesenchymal stem cells with parenchymal cells of the recipient can occur in the brain, liver, intestine and heart following transplantation. The therapeutic benefit or detriment of resultant hybrids is unknown. Here we sought a global view of phenotypic diversification of mesenchymal stem cell-cardiomyocyte hybrids and associated time course. Using single-cell RNA-seq, we found hybrids consistently increase ribosome components and decrease genes associated with the cell cycle suggesting an increase in protein production and decrease in proliferation to accommodate the fused state. But in the case of most other gene groups, hybrids were individually distinct. In fact, though hybrids can express a transcriptome similar to individual fusion partners, approximately one-third acquired distinct expression profiles in a single day. Some hybrids underwent reprogramming, expressing pluripotency and cardiac precursor genes latent in parental cells and associated with developmental and morphogenic gene groups. Other hybrids expressed genes associated with ontologic cancer sets and two hybrids of separate experimental replicates clustered with breast cancer cells, expressing critical oncogenes and lacking tumor suppressor genes. Rapid transcriptional diversification of this type garners consideration in the context of cellular transplantation to damaged tissues, those with viral infection or other microenvironmental conditions that might promote fusion. PMID:26997336

  10. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals activation of unique gene groups as a consequence of stem cell-parenchymal cell fusion

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Brian T.; Jung, Jangwook P.; Ogle, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    Fusion of donor mesenchymal stem cells with parenchymal cells of the recipient can occur in the brain, liver, intestine and heart following transplantation. The therapeutic benefit or detriment of resultant hybrids is unknown. Here we sought a global view of phenotypic diversification of mesenchymal stem cell-cardiomyocyte hybrids and associated time course. Using single-cell RNA-seq, we found hybrids consistently increase ribosome components and decrease genes associated with the cell cycle suggesting an increase in protein production and decrease in proliferation to accommodate the fused state. But in the case of most other gene groups, hybrids were individually distinct. In fact, though hybrids can express a transcriptome similar to individual fusion partners, approximately one-third acquired distinct expression profiles in a single day. Some hybrids underwent reprogramming, expressing pluripotency and cardiac precursor genes latent in parental cells and associated with developmental and morphogenic gene groups. Other hybrids expressed genes associated with ontologic cancer sets and two hybrids of separate experimental replicates clustered with breast cancer cells, expressing critical oncogenes and lacking tumor suppressor genes. Rapid transcriptional diversification of this type garners consideration in the context of cellular transplantation to damaged tissues, those with viral infection or other microenvironmental conditions that might promote fusion. PMID:26997336

  11. Deep Sequencing Reveals Transcriptome Re-Programming of Taxus × media Cells to the Elicitation with Methyl Jasmonate

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Fuliang; Wen, Jian-Fan; Wu, Jianqiang; Wilson, Iain W.; Tang, Qi; Liu, Hongwei; Qiu, Deyou

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant cell culture represents an alternative source for producing high-value secondary metabolites including paclitaxel (Taxol®), which is mainly produced in Taxus and has been widely used in cancer chemotherapy. The phytohormone methyl jasmonate (MeJA) can significantly increase the production of paclitaxel, which is induced in plants as a secondary metabolite possibly in defense against herbivores and pathogens. In cell culture, MeJA also elicits the accumulation of paclitaxel; however, the mechanism is still largely unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings To obtain insight into the global regulation mechanism of MeJA in the steady state of paclitaxel production (7 days after MeJA addition), especially on paclitaxel biosynthesis, we sequenced the transcriptomes of MeJA-treated and untreated Taxus × media cells and obtained ∼ 32.5 M high quality reads, from which 40,348 unique sequences were obtained by de novo assembly. Expression level analysis indicated that a large number of genes were associated with transcriptional regulation, DNA and histone modification, and MeJA signaling network. All the 29 known genes involved in the biosynthesis of terpenoid backbone and paclitaxel were found with 18 genes showing increased transcript abundance following elicitation of MeJA. The significantly up-regulated changes of 9 genes in paclitaxel biosynthesis were validated by qRT-PCR assays. According to the expression changes and the previously proposed enzyme functions, multiple candidates for the unknown steps in paclitaxel biosynthesis were identified. We also found some genes putatively involved in the transport and degradation of paclitaxel. Potential target prediction of miRNAs indicated that miRNAs may play an important role in the gene expression regulation following the elicitation of MeJA. Conclusions/Significance Our results shed new light on the global regulation mechanism by which MeJA regulates the physiology of Taxus cells and is helpful to

  12. Genome Sequencing Reveals Unique Mutations in Characteristic Metabolic Pathways and the Transfer of Virulence Genes between V. mimicus and V. cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanyan; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Zhang, Fanfei; Du, Pengcheng; Wang, Shujing; Chen, Chen; Kan, Biao

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio mimicus, the species most similar to V. cholerae, is a microbe present in the natural environmental and sometimes causes diarrhea and internal infections in humans. It shows similar phenotypes to V. cholerae but differs in some biochemical characteristics. The molecular mechanisms underlying the differences in biochemical metabolism between V. mimicus and V. cholerae are currently unclear. Several V. mimicus isolates have been found that carry cholera toxin genes (ctxAB) and cause cholera-like diarrhea in humans. Here, the genome of the V. mimicus isolate SX-4, which carries an intact CTX element, was sequenced and annotated. Analysis of its genome, together with those of other Vibrio species, revealed extensive differences within the Vibrionaceae. Common mutations in gene clusters involved in three biochemical metabolism pathways that are used for discrimination between V. mimicus and V. cholerae were found in V. mimicus strains. We also constructed detailed genomic structures and evolution maps for the general types of genomic drift associated with pathogenic characters in polysaccharides, CTX elements and toxin co-regulated pilus (TCP) gene clusters. Overall, the whole-genome sequencing of the V. mimicus strain carrying the cholera toxin gene provides detailed information for understanding genomic differences among Vibrio spp. V. mimicus has a large number of diverse gene and nucleotide differences from its nearest neighbor, V. cholerae. The observed mutations in the characteristic metabolism pathways may indicate different adaptations to different niches for these species and may be caused by ancient events in evolution before the divergence of V. cholerae and V. mimicus. Horizontal transfers of virulence-related genes from an uncommon clone of V. cholerae, rather than the seventh pandemic strains, have generated the pathogenic V. mimicus strain carrying cholera toxin genes. PMID:21731695

  13. A unique gene expression signature associated with serotonin 2C receptor RNA editing in the prefrontal cortex and altered in suicide

    PubMed Central

    Di Narzo, Antonio Fabio; Kozlenkov, Alexey; Roussos, Panos; Hao, Ke; Hurd, Yasmin; Lewis, David A.; Sibille, Etienne; Siever, Larry J.; Koonin, Eugene; Dracheva, Stella

    2014-01-01

    Editing of the pre-mRNA for the serotonin receptor 2C (5-HT2CR) by site-specific adenosine deamination (A-to-I pre-mRNA editing) substantially increases the functional plasticity of this key neurotransmitter receptor and is thought to contribute to homeostatic mechanisms in neurons. 5-HT2CR mRNA editing generates up to 24 different receptor isoforms. The extent of editing correlates with 5-HT2CR functional activity: more highly edited isoforms exhibit the least function. Altered 5-HT2CR editing has been reported in postmortem brains of suicide victims. We report a comparative analysis of the connections among 5-HT2CR editing, genome-wide gene expression and DNA methylation in suicide victims, individuals with major depressive disorder and non-psychiatric controls. The results confirm previous findings of an overrepresentation of highly edited mRNA variants (which encode hypoactive 5-HT2CR receptors) in the brains of suicide victims. A large set of genes for which the expression level is associated with editing was detected. This signature set of editing-associated genes is significantly enriched for genes that are involved in synaptic transmission, genes that are preferentially expressed in neurons, and genes whose expression is correlated with the level of DNA methylation. Notably, we report that the link between 5-HT2CR editing and gene expression is disrupted in suicide victims. The results suggest that the postulated homeostatic function of 5-HT2CR editing is dysregulated in individuals who committed suicide. PMID:24781207

  14. Monilophyte mitochondrial rps1 genes carry a unique group II intron that likely originated from an ancient paralog in rpl2.

    PubMed

    Knie, Nils; Grewe, Felix; Knoop, Volker

    2016-09-01

    Intron patterns in plant mitochondrial genomes differ significantly between the major land plant clades. We here report on a new, clade-specific group II intron in the rps1 gene of monilophytes (ferns). This intron, rps1i25g2, is strikingly similar to rpl2i846g2 previously identified in the mitochondrial rpl2 gene of seed plants, ferns, and the lycophyte Phlegmariurus squarrosus Although mitochondrial ribosomal protein genes are frequently subject to endosymbiotic gene transfer among plants, we could retrieve the mitochondrial rps1 gene in a taxonomically wide sampling of 44 monilophyte taxa including basal lineages such as the Ophioglossales, Psilotales, and Marattiales with the only exception being the Equisetales (horsetails). Introns rps1i25g2 and rpl2i846g2 were likewise consistently present with only two exceptions: Intron rps1i25g2 is lost in the genus Ophioglossum and intron rpl2i846g2 is lost in Equisetum bogotense Both intron sequences are moderately affected by RNA editing. The unprecedented primary and secondary structure similarity of rps1i25g2 and rpl2i846g2 suggests an ancient retrotransposition event copying rpl2i846g2 into rps1, for which we suggest a model. Our phylogenetic analysis adding the new rps1 locus to a previous data set is fully congruent with recent insights on monilophyte phylogeny and further supports a sister relationship of Gleicheniales and Hymenophyllales. PMID:27354706

  15. Integration of antimicrobial peptides with gold nanoparticles as unique non-viral vectors for gene delivery to mesenchymal stem cells with antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Peng, Li-Hua; Huang, Yan-Fen; Zhang, Chen-Zhen; Niu, Jie; Chen, Ying; Chu, Yang; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Gao, Jian-Qing; Mao, Zheng-Wei

    2016-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have emerged as attractive non-viral gene vectors. However their application in regenerative medicine is still limited partially due to a lack of an intrinsic capacity to transfect difficult-to-transfect cells such as primary cells or stem cells. In current study, we report the synthesis of antimicrobial peptide conjugated cationic AuNPs (AuNPs@PEP) as highly efficient carriers for gene delivery to stem cells with antibacterial ability. The AuNPs@PEP integrate the advantages of cationic AuNPs and antibacterial peptides: the presence of cationic AuNPs can effectively condense DNA and the antimicrobial peptides are essential for the cellular & nucleus entry enhancement to achieve high transfection efficiency and antibacterial ability. As a result, antimicrobial peptides conjugated AuNPs significantly promoted the gene transfection efficiency in rat mesenchymal stem cells than pristine AuNPs, with a similar extent to those expressed by TAT (a well-known cell-penetrating peptide) modified AuNPs. More interestingly, the combinational system has better antibacterial ability than free antimicrobial peptides in vitro and in vivo, possibly due to the high density of peptides on the surface of AuNPs. Finally we present the concept-proving results that AuPs@PEP can be used as a carrier for in vivo gene activation in tissue regeneration, suggesting its potential as a multifunctional system with both gene delivery and antibacterial abilities in clinic. PMID:27376562

  16. BFIT, a unique acyl-CoA thioesterase induced in thermogenic brown adipose tissue: cloning, organization of the human gene and assessment of a potential link to obesity.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, S H; Chui, C; Schilbach, S L; Yu, X X; Goddard, A D; Grimaldi, J C; Lee, J; Dowd, P; Colman, S; Lewin, D A

    2001-01-01

    We hypothesized that certain proteins encoded by temperature-responsive genes in brown adipose tissue (BAT) contribute to the remarkable metabolic shifts observed in this tissue, thus prompting a differential mRNA expression analysis to identify candidates involved in this process in mouse BAT. An mRNA species corresponding to a novel partial-length gene was found to be induced 2-3-fold above the control following cold exposure (4 degrees C), and repressed approximately 70% by warm acclimation (33 degrees C, 3 weeks) compared with controls (22 degrees C). The gene displayed robust BAT expression (i.e. approximately 7-100-fold higher than other tissues in controls). The full-length murine gene encodes a 594 amino acid ( approximately 67 kDa) open reading frame with significant homology to the human hypothetical acyl-CoA thioesterase KIAA0707. Based on cold-inducibility of the gene and the presence of two acyl-CoA thioesterase domains, we termed the protein brown-fat-inducible thioesterase (BFIT). Subsequent analyses and cloning efforts revealed the presence of a novel splice variant in humans (termed hBFIT2), encoding the orthologue to the murine BAT gene. BFIT was mapped to syntenic regions of chromosomes 1 (human) and 4 (mouse) associated with body fatness and diet-induced obesity, potentially linking a deficit of BFIT activity with exacerbation of these traits. Consistent with this notion, BFIT mRNA was significantly higher ( approximately 1.6-2-fold) in the BAT of obesity-resistant compared with obesity-prone mice fed a high-fat diet, and was 2.5-fold higher in controls compared with ob/ob mice. Its strong, cold-inducible BAT expression in mice suggests that BFIT supports the transition of this tissue towards increased metabolic activity, probably through alteration of intracellular fatty acyl-CoA concentration. PMID:11696000

  17. Envelope gene of the Friend spleen focus-forming virus: deletion and insertions in 3' gp70/p15E-encoding region have resulted in unique features in the primary structure of its protein product.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, L; Scolnick, E; Ruscetti, S

    1983-01-01

    A nucleotide sequence was determined for the envelope (env) gene of the polycythemia-inducing strain of the acute leukemia-inducing Friend spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV) and from this the amino acid sequence of its gene product, gp52, was deduced. All major elements of the gene were found to be related to genes of other retroviruses that code for functional glycoproteins. Although the carboxyl terminus of gp52 is encoded by sequences highly related to sequences in its putative parent, ecotropic Friend murine leukemia virus, the majority of the protein (69%), including the amino terminus, is encoded by dualtropic virus-like sequences. Nucleotide sequence comparisons suggest that the nonecotropic region may be more closely related to the 5' substitution in dualtropic mink cell focus-inducing viruses that it is to the 5' end of xenotropic virus env genes. A large deletion and two unique insertions have been located in the env gene of polycythemia-inducing SFFV and may account for some of the unusual structural characteristics, aberrant processing, and pathogenic properties of gp52. As a consequence of the deletion, amino-terminal gp70 and carboxyl-terminal p15E-encoding sequences are juxtaposed and it appears that translation from the p15E region, 3' to the deletion, continues in the standard reading frame used by other retroviruses. Insertions of six base pairs and one base pair at the very 3' end of the gp52-encoding region results in a SFFV-unique amino acid sequence and a premature termination codon. PMID:6308646

  18. Clustering, haplotype diversity and locations of MIC-3: a unique root-specific defense-related gene family in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MIC-3-related genes of cotton (Gossypium spp.) were identified and shown to have root-specific expression, associated with pathogen defense-related function and specifically increased expression in root-knot nematode (RKN) resistant plants after nematode infection. Here we cloned and sequenced MIC-...

  19. Using expert elicitation to prioritize resource allocation for risk identification for nanosilver.

    PubMed

    Fauss, Emma; Gorman, Michael E; Swami, Nathan

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces a method to identify risks through expert elicitation, using silver nanotechnology as a case study. Unique features of the method include supplying experts with a list of silver nanotechnology products, and conducting the elicitation in an extended interview format that captures the experts' reasoning. The end result is a series of graphical representations of expert thinking from which high-risk scenarios and knowledge gaps can be reliably inferred. This methodology, combined with other approaches to expert elicitation, can help identify knowledge and oversight gaps, and can be used as part of an adaptive management strategy. PMID:20122116

  20. Hydra myc2, a unique pre-bilaterian member of the myc gene family, is activated in cell proliferation and gametogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hartl, Markus; Glasauer, Stella; Valovka, Taras; Breuker, Kathrin; Hobmayer, Bert; Bister, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The myc protooncogene encodes the Myc transcription factor which is the essential part of the Myc–Max network controlling fundamental cellular processes. Deregulation of myc leads to tumorigenesis and is a hallmark of many human cancers. We have recently identified homologs of myc (myc1, myc2) and max in the early diploblastic cnidarian Hydra and have characterized myc1 in detail. Here we show that myc2 is transcriptionally activated in the interstitial stem cell system. Furthermore, in contrast to myc1, myc2 expression is also detectable in proliferating epithelial stem cells throughout the gastric region. myc2 but not myc1 is activated in cycling precursor cells during early oogenesis and spermatogenesis, suggesting that the Hydra Myc2 protein has a possible non-redundant function in cell cycle progression. The Myc2 protein displays the principal design and properties of vertebrate Myc proteins. In complex with Max, Myc2 binds to DNA with similar affinity as Myc1–Max heterodimers. Immunoprecipitation of Hydra chromatin revealed that both Myc1 and Myc2 bind to the enhancer region of CAD, a classical Myc target gene in mammals. Luciferase reporter gene assays showed that Myc1 but not Myc2 transcriptionally activates the CAD promoter. Myc2 has oncogenic potential when tested in primary avian fibroblasts but to a lower degree as compared to Myc1. The identification of an additional myc gene in Cnidaria, a phylum that diverged prior to bilaterians, with characteristic expression patterns in tissue homeostasis and developmental processes suggests that principle functions of myc genes have arisen very early in metazoan evolution. PMID:24771621

  1. Hydra myc2, a unique pre-bilaterian member of the myc gene family, is activated in cell proliferation and gametogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Markus; Glasauer, Stella; Valovka, Taras; Breuker, Kathrin; Hobmayer, Bert; Bister, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The myc protooncogene encodes the Myc transcription factor which is the essential part of the Myc-Max network controlling fundamental cellular processes. Deregulation of myc leads to tumorigenesis and is a hallmark of many human cancers. We have recently identified homologs of myc (myc1, myc2) and max in the early diploblastic cnidarian Hydra and have characterized myc1 in detail. Here we show that myc2 is transcriptionally activated in the interstitial stem cell system. Furthermore, in contrast to myc1, myc2 expression is also detectable in proliferating epithelial stem cells throughout the gastric region. myc2 but not myc1 is activated in cycling precursor cells during early oogenesis and spermatogenesis, suggesting that the Hydra Myc2 protein has a possible non-redundant function in cell cycle progression. The Myc2 protein displays the principal design and properties of vertebrate Myc proteins. In complex with Max, Myc2 binds to DNA with similar affinity as Myc1-Max heterodimers. Immunoprecipitation of Hydra chromatin revealed that both Myc1 and Myc2 bind to the enhancer region of CAD, a classical Myc target gene in mammals. Luciferase reporter gene assays showed that Myc1 but not Myc2 transcriptionally activates the CAD promoter. Myc2 has oncogenic potential when tested in primary avian fibroblasts but to a lower degree as compared to Myc1. The identification of an additional myc gene in Cnidaria, a phylum that diverged prior to bilaterians, with characteristic expression patterns in tissue homeostasis and developmental processes suggests that principle functions of myc genes have arisen very early in metazoan evolution. PMID:24771621

  2. A unique nuclear receptor direct repeat 17 (DR17) is present within the upstream region of Schistosoma mansoni female-specific p14 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Fantappie, Marcelo Rosado Furtado, Daniel Rodrigues; Rumjanek, Franklin David; LoVerde, Philip T.

    2008-07-11

    The eggs produced by sexually mature female Schistosma mansoni are responsible for the pathogenesis of the disease. The eggshell precursor gene p14 is expressed only in the vitelline cells of sexually mature female worms in response to a yet unidentified male stimulus. Herein, we report the identification of a novel nuclear receptor response element in the upstream region of the p14 gene. This element contains the canonical hexameric DNA core motif, 5'-PuGGTCA, composed of an atypically spaced direct repeat (DR17). Schistosome nuclear receptors SmRXR1 and SmNR1 specifically bound to the p14-DR17 element as a heterodimer. SmRXR1, but not SmNR1, bound to the motif as a monomer. Introduction of mutations in the TCA core sequence completely abolished the binding by SmRXR1/SmNR1 heterodimer. This finding supports our hypothesis that the expression of Schistosoma mansonip14 gene is regulated through the nuclear receptor signaling pathway.

  3. Naltrexone at low doses upregulates a unique gene expression not seen with normal doses: Implications for its use in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wai M; Scott, Katherine A; Dennis, Jayne L; Kaminska, Elwira; Levett, Alan J; Dalgleish, Angus G

    2016-08-01

    It has been reported that lower doses of the opioid antagonist naltrexone are able to reduce tumour growth by interfering with cell signalling as well as by modifying the immune system. We have evaluated the gene expression profile of a cancer cell line after treatment with low-dose naltrexone (LDN), and assessed the effect that adapting treatment schedules with LDN may have on enhancing efficacy. LDN had a selective impact on genes involved with cell cycle regulation and immune modulation. Similarly, the pro-apoptotic genes BAD and BIK1 were increased only after LDN. Continuous treatment with LDN had little effect on growth in different cell lines; however, altering the treatment schedule to include a phase of culture in the absence of drug following an initial round of LDN treatment, resulted in enhanced cell killing. Furthermore, cells pre-treated with LDN were more sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of a number of common chemotherapy agents. For example, priming HCT116 with LDN before treatment with oxaliplatin significantly increased cell killing to 49±7.0 vs. 14±2.4% in cultures where priming was not used. Interestingly, priming with NTX before oxaliplatin resulted in just 32±1.8% cell killing. Our data support further the idea that LDN possesses anticancer activity, which can be improved by modifying the treatment schedule. PMID:27279602

  4. Spliced leader RNAs, mitochondrial gene frameshifts and multi-protein phylogeny expand support for the genus Perkinsus as a unique group of alveolates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huan; Campbell, David A; Sturm, Nancy R; Dungan, Christopher F; Lin, Senjie

    2011-01-01

    The genus Perkinsus occupies a precarious phylogenetic position. To gain a better understanding of the relationship between perkinsids, dinoflagellates and other alveolates, we analyzed the nuclear-encoded spliced-leader (SL) RNA and mitochondrial genes, intron prevalence, and multi-protein phylogenies. In contrast to the canonical 22-nt SL found in dinoflagellates (DinoSL), P. marinus has a shorter (21-nt) and a longer (22-nt) SL with slightly different sequences than DinoSL. The major SL RNA transcripts range in size between 80-83 nt in P. marinus, and ∼ 83 nt in P. chesapeaki, significantly larger than the typical ≤ 56-nt dinoflagellate SL RNA. In most of the phylogenetic trees based on 41 predicted protein sequences, P. marinus branched at the base of the dinoflagellate clade that included the ancient taxa Oxyrrhis and Amoebophrya, sister to the clade of apicomplexans, and in some cases clustered with apicomplexans as a sister to the dinoflagellate clade. Of 104 Perkinsus spp. genes examined 69.2% had introns, a higher intron prevalence than in dinoflagellates. Examination of Perkinsus spp. mitochondrial cytochrome B and cytochrome C oxidase subunit I genes and their cDNAs revealed no mRNA editing, but these transcripts can only be translated when frameshifts are introduced at every AGG and CCC codon as if AGGY codes for glycine and CCCCU for proline. These results, along with the presence of the numerous uncharacterized 'marine alveolate group I' and Perkinsus-like lineages separating perkinsids from core dinoflagellates, expand support for the affiliation of the genus Perkinsus with an independent lineage (Perkinsozoa) positioned between the phyla of Apicomplexa and Dinoflagellata. PMID:21629701

  5. Endotoxin elicits ambivalent social behaviors.

    PubMed

    Yee, Jason R; Prendergast, Brian J

    2012-07-01

    The acute phase response to infection is reliably accompanied by decreases in social investigation; however, social behavior is commonly assayed in inescapable environments using unfamiliar social stimuli. In this experiment, male Wistar rats were raised from weaning with 2 familiar, same-sex conspecifics. In adulthood, rats were implanted with radiotelemetry devices that permitted localization in space, and were challenged with LPS treatments (150 μg/kg, i.p.) in a novel, semi-natural arena which afforded the treated (Focal) animal exclusive control of social exposure, and the ability to avoid social interactions. LPS reliably elicited thermoregulatory responses (transient hypothermia and fever) during the scotophase following injection, but did not yield changes in the proportion of time spent engaged in social interactions: both LPS- and saline-treated rats spent approximately 10% of the night with their familiar cagemates. Injection treatments markedly altered the spatial distribution of activity: LPS-treated rats exhibited significant increases in the amount of time spent as far as possible from their cagemates. The data suggest that sickness responses to LPS may give rise to a transient state of social ambivalence-characterized by a persistent motivation to engage in social contact, but also by increased avoidance of social environments. Selective maintenance of social motivation illustrates plasticity in the expression of sickness behaviors and may be adaptive in social species. PMID:22172640

  6. Photosynthetic Genes and Genes Associated with the C4 Trait in Maize Are Characterized by a Unique Class of Highly Regulated Histone Acetylation Peaks on Upstream Promoters1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Perduns, Renke; Horst-Niessen, Ina; Peterhansel, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Histone modifications contribute to gene regulation in eukaryotes. We analyzed genome-wide histone H3 Lysine (Lys) 4 trimethylation and histone H3 Lys 9 acetylation (two modifications typically associated with active genes) in meristematic cells at the base and expanded cells in the blade of the maize (Zea mays) leaf. These data were compared with transcript levels of associated genes. For individual genes, regulations (fold changes) of histone modifications and transcript levels were much better correlated than absolute intensities. When focusing on regulated histone modification sites, we identified highly regulated secondary H3 Lys 9 acetylation peaks on upstream promoters (regulated secondary upstream peaks [R-SUPs]) on 10% of all genes. R-SUPs were more often found on genes that were up-regulated toward the blade than on down-regulated genes and specifically, photosynthetic genes. Among those genes, we identified six genes encoding enzymes of the C4 cycle and a significant enrichment of genes associated with the C4 trait derived from transcriptomic studies. On the DNA level, R-SUPs are frequently associated with ethylene-responsive elements. Based on these data, we suggest coevolution of epigenetic promoter elements during the establishment of C4 photosynthesis. PMID:26111542

  7. Isolation and characterization of BetaM protein encoded by ATP1B4 - a unique member of the Na,K-ATPase {beta}-subunit gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Pestov, Nikolay B.; Zhao, Hao; Basrur, Venkatesha; Modyanov, Nikolai N.

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Structural properties of BetaM and Na,K-ATPase {beta}-subunits are sharply different. {yields} BetaM protein is concentrated in nuclear membrane of skeletal myocytes. {yields} BetaM does not associate with a Na,K-ATPase {alpha}-subunit in skeletal muscle. {yields} Polypeptide chain of the native BetaM is highly sensitive to endogenous proteases. {yields} BetaM in neonatal muscle is a product of alternative splice mRNA variant B. -- Abstract: ATP1B4 genes represent a rare instance of the orthologous gene co-option that radically changed functions of encoded BetaM proteins during vertebrate evolution. In lower vertebrates, this protein is a {beta}-subunit of Na,K-ATPase located in the cell membrane. In placental mammals, BetaM completely lost its ancestral role and through acquisition of two extended Glu-rich clusters into the N-terminal domain gained entirely new properties as a muscle-specific protein of the inner nuclear membrane possessing the ability to regulate gene expression. Strict temporal regulation of BetaM expression, which is the highest in late fetal and early postnatal myocytes, indicates that it plays an essential role in perinatal development. Here we report the first structural characterization of the native eutherian BetaM protein. It should be noted that, in contrast to structurally related Na,K-ATPase {beta}-subunits, the polypeptide chain of BetaM is highly sensitive to endogenous proteases that greatly complicated its isolation. Nevertheless, using a complex of protease inhibitors, a sample of authentic BetaM was isolated from pig neonatal skeletal muscle by a combination of ion-exchange and lectin-affinity chromatography followed by SDS-PAGE. Results of the analysis of the BetaM tryptic digest using MALDI-TOF and ESI-MS/MS mass spectrometry have demonstrated that native BetaM in neonatal skeletal muscle is a product of alternative splice mRNA variant B and comprised of 351 amino acid residues. Isolated BetaM protein was

  8. IL-15 boosts the function and migration of human terminally differentiated CD8+ T cells by inducing a unique gene signature.

    PubMed

    Setoguchi, Ruka

    2016-06-01

    Human CCR7(low)CD45RA(high) effector memory CD8(+) T cells (terminally differentiated TEMRA) are reportedly a functionally compromised population with characteristics of cellular senescence when examined ex vivo Although their frequencies are increased in elderly subjects in association with declined immune competence, however, it remains unclear whether their impaired functions can be reversed so that they contribute to immune responses in vivo Here, I show that, in contrast to TCR stimulation, stimulation of TEMRA with IL-15 induced a unique transcriptional signature, promoted IFN-γ production and cell cycle entry, and reduced chemotaxis toward sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). TEMRA preferentially accumulated in non-lymphoid tissues when transferred into IL-15-treated NOD.SCID.γc-deficient mice compared with non-treated mice. This accumulation was impaired by S1P receptor 1 over-expression. These results suggest that TEMRA act as functional effector T cells in non-lymphoid tissues when IL-15 is abundant and that IL-15 treatment may be beneficial in enhancing vaccine efficacy in elderly people. PMID:26857736

  9. Novel Molecular Pathways Elicited by Mutant FGFR2 May Account for Brain Abnormalities in Apert Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Erika; Fanganiello, Roberto D.; Sunaga, Daniele Y.; Zhou, Xueyan; Holmes, Gregory; Rocha, Katia M.; Alonso, Nivaldo; Matushita, Hamilton; Wang, Yingli; Jabs, Ethylin W.; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2013-01-01

    Apert syndrome (AS), the most severe form craniosynostosis, is characterized by premature fusion of coronal sutures. Approximately 70% of AS patients carry S252W gain-of-function mutation in FGFR2. Besides the cranial phenotype, brain dysmorphologies are present and are not seen in other FGFR2-asociated craniosynostosis, such as Crouzon syndrome (CS). Here, we hypothesized that S252W mutation leads not only to overstimulation of FGFR2 downstream pathway, but likewise induces novel pathological signaling. First, we profiled global gene expression of wild-type and S252W periosteal fibroblasts stimulated with FGF2 to activate FGFR2. The great majority (92%) of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were divergent between each group of cell populations and they were regulated by different transcription factors. We than compared gene expression profiles between AS and CS cell populations and did not observe correlations. Therefore, we show for the first time that S252W mutation in FGFR2 causes a unique cell response to FGF2 stimulation. Since our gene expression results suggested that novel signaling elicited by mutant FGFR2 might be associated with central nervous system (CNS) development and maintenance, we next investigated if DEGs found in AS cells were also altered in the CNS of an AS mouse model. Strikingly, we validated Strc (stereocilin) in newborn Fgfr2S252W/+ mouse brain. Moreover, immunostaining experiments suggest a role for endothelial cells and cerebral vasculature in the establishment of characteristic CNS dysmorphologies in AS that has not been proposed by previous literature. Our approach thus led to the identification of new target genes directly or indirectly associated with FGFR2 which are contributing to the pathophysiology of AS. PMID:23593218

  10. Nucleotide Sequence of the Envelope Gene of Gardner-Arnstein Feline Leukemia Virus B Reveals Unique Sequence Homologies with a Murine Mink Cell Focus-Forming Virus †

    PubMed Central

    Elder, John H.; Mullins, James I.

    1983-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the envelope gene and the adjacent 3′ long terminal repeat (LTR) of Gardner-Arnstein feline leukemia virus of subgroup B (GA-FeLV-B) has been determined. Comparison of the derived amino acid sequence of the gp70-p15E polyprotein to those of several previously reported murine retroviruses revealed striking homologies between GA-FeLV-B gp70 and the gp70 of a Moloney virus-derived mink cell focus-forming virus. These homologies were located within the substituted (presumably xenotropic) portion of the mink cell focus-forming virus envelope gene and comprised amino acid sequences not present in three ecotropic virus gp70s. In addition, areas of insertions and deletions, in general, were the same between GA-FeLV-B and Moloney mink cell focus-forming virus, although the sizes of the insertions and deletions differed. Homologies between GA-FeLV-B and mink cell focus-forming virus gp70s is functionally significant in that they both possess expanded host ranges, a property dictated by gp70. The amino acid sequence of FeLV-B contains 12 Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequences, indicating 12 possible sites of N-linked glycosylation as compared with 7 or 8 for its murine counterparts. Comparison of the 3′ LTR of GA-FeLV-B to AKR and Moloney virus LTRs revealed extensive conservation in several regions including the “CCAAT” and Goldberg-Hogness (TATA) boxes thought to be involved in promotion of transcription and in the repeat region of the LTR. The inverted repeats that flanked the LTR of GA-FeLV-B were identical to the murine inverted repeats, but were one base longer than the latter. The region of U3 corresponding to the approximately 75-nucleotide “enhancer sequence” is present in GA-FeLV-B, but contains deletions relative to AKR and Moloney virus and is not repeated. An interesting pallindrome in the repeat region immediately 3′ to the U3 region was noted in all the LTRs, but was particularly pronounced in GA-FeLV-B. Possible roles for this

  11. Monitoring in Situ Anaerobic Alkylbenzene Biodegradation Based on Mass Spectrometric Detection of Unique Metabolites or Real-Time PCR Detection of a Catabolic Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, H. R.; Kane, S. R.

    2002-12-01

    anaerobic methylbenzene-degrading bacteria in aquifer sediment. The method targets a catabolic gene (bssA) associated with the first step of anaerobic toluene and xylene degradation. The method proved to be sensitive (detection limit ca. 5 gene copies) and had a linear range of > 7 orders of magnitude. In microcosm experiments involving toluene degradation under denitrifying conditions, population trends were generally consistent with observed toluene degradation activity. In the microcosms with the most rapid toluene degradation, numbers of bssA copies increased 100- to 1000-fold over the first four days of incubation, during which time most of the toluene had been consumed. These results were supported by slot blot analyses with unamplified DNA and by cloning and sequencing of putative bssA amplicons.

  12. A novel dendritic cell-targeted lentiviral vector, encoding Ag85A-ESAT6 fusion gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, could elicit potent cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Shakouri, Mehdi; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad; Ghanei, Mostafa; Arashkia, Arash; Etemadzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Azadmanesh, Kayhan

    2016-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), leading to high mortality worldwide. It is well-established that cellular immunity plays a critical role to control Mtb infection. Dendritic Cells (DCs) are potent antigen presenting cells, which play an important role to prime cell-mediated immune responses. In vivo targeting of DCs has been shown to induce both strong cellular immunity and protection against tumor challenges. The aim of the present study was not only to assess the immunizing potential of a novel DC-targeted recombinant lentivirus expressing fusion antigen Ag85A-ESAT6 of Mtb, but also to compare it with a recombinant lentivirus with broad cellular tropism expressing the same antigen in mice. The findings demonstrated that our novel recombinant DC-targeted lentivector was able to successfully transduce and express the fusion antigen Ag85A-E6 in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, a single footpad injection of targeted lentivectors could elicit strong T-helper 1 (Th1) immunity against the above mentioned antigen, as indicated by the specific high-level production of IFN-γ and IL-2 using spleen lymphocytes and lymphoproliferative responses. Despite of these promising results, more attempts are required to elucidate the protective and therapeutic efficacy of this approach in future. PMID:27267270

  13. 187-gene phylogeny of protozoan phylum Amoebozoa reveals a new class (Cutosea) of deep-branching, ultrastructurally unique, enveloped marine Lobosa and clarifies amoeba evolution.

    PubMed

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas; Chao, Ema E; Lewis, Rhodri

    2016-06-01

    Monophyly of protozoan phylum Amoebozoa, and subdivision into subphyla Conosa and Lobosa each with different cytoskeletons, are well established. However early diversification of non-ciliate lobose amoebae (Lobosa) is poorly understood. To clarify it we used recently available transcriptomes to construct a 187-gene amoebozoan tree for 30 species, the most comprehensive yet. This robustly places new genus Atrichosa (formerly lumped with Trichosphaerium) within lobosan class Tubulinea, not Discosea as previously supposed. We identified an earliest diverging lobosan clade comprising marine amoebae armoured by porose scaliform cell-envelopes, here made a novel class Cutosea with two pseudopodially distinct new families. Cutosea comprise Sapocribrum, ATCC PRA-29 misidentified as 'Pessonella', plus from other evidence Squamamoeba. We confirm that Acanthamoeba and ATCC 50982 misidentified as Stereomyxa ramosa are closely related. Discosea have a strongly supported major subclade comprising Thecamoebida plus Glycostylida (suborders Dactylopodina, Stygamoebina; Vannellina) phylogenetically distinct from Centramoebida. Stygamoeba is sister to Dactylopodina. Himatismenida are either sister to Centramoebida or deeper branching. Discosea usually appear holophyletic (rarely paraphyletic). Paramoeba transcriptomes include prokinetoplastid Perkinsela-like endosymbiont sequences. Cunea, misidentified as Mayorella, is closer to Paramoeba than Vexillifera within holophyletic Dactylopodina. Taxon-rich site-heterogeneous rDNA trees confirm cutosan distinctiveness, allow improved conosan taxonomy, and reveal previous dictyostelid tree misrooting. PMID:27001604

  14. Genetic diversity, seasonality and transmission network of human metapneumovirus: identification of a unique sub-lineage of the fusion and attachment genes.

    PubMed

    Chow, Wei Zhen; Chan, Yoke Fun; Oong, Xiang Yong; Ng, Liang Jie; Nor'E, Siti Sarah; Ng, Kim Tien; Chan, Kok Gan; Hanafi, Nik Sherina; Pang, Yong Kek; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Tee, Kok Keng

    2016-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is an important viral respiratory pathogen worldwide. Current knowledge regarding the genetic diversity, seasonality and transmission dynamics of HMPV among adults and children living in tropical climate remains limited. HMPV prevailed at 2.2% (n = 86/3,935) among individuals presented with acute respiratory tract infections in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia between 2012 and 2014. Seasonal peaks were observed during the northeast monsoon season (November-April) and correlated with higher relative humidity and number of rainy days (P < 0.05). Phylogenetic analysis of the fusion and attachment genes identified the co-circulation of three known HMPV sub-lineages, A2b and B1 (30.2% each, 26/86) and B2 (20.9%, 18/86), with genotype shift from sub-lineage B1 to A2b observed in 2013. Interestingly, a previously unrecognized sub-lineage of A2 was identified in 18.6% (16/86) of the population. Using a custom script for network construction based on the TN93 pairwise genetic distance, we identified up to nine HMPV transmission clusters circulating as multiple sub-epidemics. Although no apparent major outbreak was observed, the increased frequency of transmission clusters (dyads) during seasonal peaks suggests the potential roles of transmission clusters in driving the spread of HMPV. Our findings provide essential information for therapeutic research, prevention strategies, and disease outbreak monitoring of HMPV. PMID:27279080

  15. Population Structure and Comparative Genome Hybridization of European Flor Yeast Reveal a Unique Group of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains with Few Gene Duplications in Their Genome

    PubMed Central

    Legras, Jean-Luc; Erny, Claude; Charpentier, Claudine

    2014-01-01

    Wine biological aging is a wine making process used to produce specific beverages in several countries in Europe, including Spain, Italy, France, and Hungary. This process involves the formation of a velum at the surface of the wine. Here, we present the first large scale comparison of all European flor strains involved in this process. We inferred the population structure of these European flor strains from their microsatellite genotype diversity and analyzed their ploidy. We show that almost all of these flor strains belong to the same cluster and are diploid, except for a few Spanish strains. Comparison of the array hybridization profile of six flor strains originating from these four countries, with that of three wine strains did not reveal any large segmental amplification. Nonetheless, some genes, including YKL221W/MCH2 and YKL222C, were amplified in the genome of four out of six flor strains. Finally, we correlated ICR1 ncRNA and FLO11 polymorphisms with flor yeast population structure, and associate the presence of wild type ICR1 and a long Flo11p with thin velum formation in a cluster of Jura strains. These results provide new insight into the diversity of flor yeast and show that combinations of different adaptive changes can lead to an increase of hydrophobicity and affect velum formation. PMID:25272156

  16. A unique intron-containing hsp70 gene induced by heat shock and during sporulation in the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii.

    PubMed

    Stefani, R M; Gomes, S L

    1995-01-11

    We have isolated and characterized cDNA and genomic DNA clones encoding the 70-kDa heat-shock protein (Hsp70) from the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii (Be). Nucleotide (nt) sequence analysis predicts an acidic protein containing 650 amino acids, with a calculated molecular mass of 70.8 kDa. The Be hsp70 gene is induced by heat shock (HS), as well as during sporulation of the fungus, and its coding region is interrupted by a single intron. All the evidence seems to indicate that this is the only hsp70 in Be. S1 nuclease protection assays revealed that splicing of the hsp70 intron is highly thermoresistant; at the lethal temperature of 42 degrees C, only 30% of the hsp70 mRNAs have not been processed. A single transcription start point (tsp), localized about 30 nt downstream from a putative TATA box, was determined both during HS and at normal temperatures. The promoter region presented several NGAAN repeats (where N is any nucleotide) characteristic of HS elements, as well as putative binding sites for ATF, Sp1 and two metal-responsive elements. PMID:7828923

  17. Genetic diversity, seasonality and transmission network of human metapneumovirus: identification of a unique sub-lineage of the fusion and attachment genes

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Wei Zhen; Chan, Yoke Fun; Oong, Xiang Yong; Ng, Liang Jie; Nor’E, Siti Sarah; Ng, Kim Tien; Chan, Kok Gan; Hanafi, Nik Sherina; Pang, Yong Kek; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Tee, Kok Keng

    2016-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is an important viral respiratory pathogen worldwide. Current knowledge regarding the genetic diversity, seasonality and transmission dynamics of HMPV among adults and children living in tropical climate remains limited. HMPV prevailed at 2.2% (n = 86/3,935) among individuals presented with acute respiratory tract infections in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia between 2012 and 2014. Seasonal peaks were observed during the northeast monsoon season (November–April) and correlated with higher relative humidity and number of rainy days (P < 0.05). Phylogenetic analysis of the fusion and attachment genes identified the co-circulation of three known HMPV sub-lineages, A2b and B1 (30.2% each, 26/86) and B2 (20.9%, 18/86), with genotype shift from sub-lineage B1 to A2b observed in 2013. Interestingly, a previously unrecognized sub-lineage of A2 was identified in 18.6% (16/86) of the population. Using a custom script for network construction based on the TN93 pairwise genetic distance, we identified up to nine HMPV transmission clusters circulating as multiple sub-epidemics. Although no apparent major outbreak was observed, the increased frequency of transmission clusters (dyads) during seasonal peaks suggests the potential roles of transmission clusters in driving the spread of HMPV. Our findings provide essential information for therapeutic research, prevention strategies, and disease outbreak monitoring of HMPV. PMID:27279080

  18. Reduced respiratory neural activity elicits phrenic motor facilitation.

    PubMed

    Mahamed, Safraaz; Strey, Kristi A; Mitchell, Gordon S; Baker-Herman, Tracy L

    2011-03-15

    We hypothesized that reduced respiratory neural activity elicits compensatory mechanisms of plasticity that enhance respiratory motor output. In urethane-anesthetized and ventilated rats, we reversibly reduced respiratory neural activity for 25-30 min using: hypocapnia (end tidal CO(2)=30 mmHg), isoflurane (~1%) or high frequency ventilation (HFV; ~100 breaths/min). In all cases, increased phrenic burst amplitude was observed following restoration of respiratory neural activity (hypocapnia: 92±22%; isoflurane: 65±22%; HFV: 54±13% baseline), which was significantly greater than time controls receiving the same surgery, but no interruptions in respiratory neural activity (3±5% baseline, p<0.05). Hypocapnia also elicited transient increases in respiratory burst frequency (9±2 versus 1±1bursts/min, p<0.05). Our results suggest that reduced respiratory neural activity elicits a unique form of plasticity in respiratory motor control which we refer to as inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF). iPMF may prevent catastrophic decreases in respiratory motor output during ventilatory control disorders associated with abnormal respiratory activity. PMID:21167322

  19. Reduced respiratory neural activity elicits phrenic motor facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Mahamed, Safraaz; Strey, Kristi A.; Mitchell, Gordon S.; Baker-Herman, Tracy L.

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesized that reduced respiratory neural activity elicits compensatory mechanisms of plasticity that enhance respiratory motor output. In urethane-anesthetized and ventilated rats, we reversibly reduced respiratory neural activity for 25–30 min using: hypocapnia (end tidal CO2 = 30 mmHg), isoflurane (~ 1%) or high frequency ventilation (HFV; ~100 breaths/min). In all cases, increased phrenic burst amplitude was observed following restoration of respiratory neural activity (hypocapnia: 92 ± 22%; isoflurane: 65 ± 22%; HFV: 54 ± 13% baseline), which was significantly greater than time controls receiving the same surgery, but no interruptions in respiratory neural activity (3 ± 5% baseline, p<0.05). Hypocapnia also elicited transient increases in respiratory burst frequency (9 ± 2 versus 1 ± 1 bursts/min, p<0.05). Our results suggest that reduced respiratory neural activity elicits a unique form of plasticity in respiratory motor control which we refer to as inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF). iPMF may prevent catastrophic decreases in respiratory motor output during ventilatory control disorders associated with abnormal respiratory activity. PMID:21167322

  20. The Raikas - a unique combination of high prevalence of type 1 diabetes susceptibility genes and near zero incidence of the disease.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Deepali K; Kanga, Uma; Kumar, Neeraj; Agrawal, R P; Mourya, Manish; Kalaivani, Mani; Kaur, Tanvir; Mehra, Narinder K

    2014-12-01

    The Raikas, a camel rearing tribal group living in the Thar desert of Rajasthan has been reported with a very low incidence of diabetes. We analysed the frequency distribution of HLA alleles in this community and compared the same with the non-Raika group living in the same geographic location and also that of the healthy North Indian (NI) population. The data revealed an exceptionally high phenotype frequency of HLA-DRB1*03 in this community (53%) as compared to the non-Raika group (27.73%, p=7.9E-05) and the NI population (14.6%, p=7.65E06). Further analysis revealed the occurrence of four major DRB1*03 haplotypes in the Raikas: (i) A*26-B*08-DRB1*03 (AH8.2, 11.76%); (ii) A*24-B*08-DRB1*03 (AH8.3, 8.82%); (iii) A*02-B*08-DRB1*03 (3.78%); (iv) A*01-B*08-DRB1*03 (AH8.1v, 0.84%); all of which occurred with a several fold higher frequency in the Raikas than the other two groups. These haplotypes have been reported to be positively associated with T1D in the NI population. The apparent lack of T1D and/or other autoimmune diseases in the Raikas despite the higher occurrence of known disease associated HLA alleles/haplotypes is intriguing and highlights the quintessential role of the environmental factors, food habits and level of physical activity in the manifestation of T1D. Possible influence of other protection conferring genes located on, as yet undefined chromosomal locations cannot be ruled out. PMID:25312801

  1. A unique gene cluster for the utilization of the mucosal and human milk-associated glycans galacto-N-biose and lacto-N-biose in Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Bidart, Gonzalo N; Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús; Monedero, Vicente; Yebra, María J

    2014-08-01

    The probiotic Lactobacillus casei catabolizes galacto-N-biose (GNB) and lacto-N-biose (LNB) by using a transport system and metabolic routes different from those of Bifidobacterium. L. casei contains a gene cluster, gnbREFGBCDA, involved in the metabolism of GNB, LNB and also N-acetylgalactosamine. Inactivation of gnbC (EIIC) or ptsI (Enzyme I) of the phosphoenolpyruvate : sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) prevented the growth on those three carbohydrates, indicating that they are transported and phosphorylated by the same PTS(Gnb) . Enzyme activities and growth analysis with knockout mutants showed that GnbG (phospho-β-galactosidase) hydrolyses both disaccharides. However, GnbF (N-acetylgalactosamine-6P deacetylase) and GnbE (galactosamine-6P isomerase/deaminase) are involved in GNB but not in LNB fermentation. The utilization of LNB depends on nagA (N-acetylglucosamine-6P deacetylase), showing that the N-acetylhexosamine moieties of GNB and LNB follow different catabolic routes. A lacAB mutant (galactose-6P isomerase) was impaired in GNB and LNB utilization, indicating that their galactose moiety is channelled through the tagatose-6P pathway. Transcriptional analysis showed that the gnb operon is regulated by substrate-specific induction mediated by the transcriptional repressor GnbR, which binds to a 26 bp DNA region containing inverted repeats exhibiting a 2T/2A conserved core. The data represent the first characterization of novel metabolic pathways for human milk oligosaccharides and glycoconjugate structures in Firmicutes. PMID:24942885

  2. Angiosperms Are Unique among Land Plant Lineages in the Occurrence of Key Genes in the RNA-Directed DNA Methylation (RdDM) Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lu; Hatlen, Andrea; Kelly, Laura J.; Becher, Hannes; Wang, Wencai; Kovarik, Ales; Leitch, Ilia J.; Leitch, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    The RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway can be divided into three phases: 1) small interfering RNA biogenesis, 2) de novo methylation, and 3) chromatin modification. To determine the degree of conservation of this pathway we searched for key genes among land plants. We used OrthoMCL and the OrthoMCL Viridiplantae database to analyze proteomes of species in bryophytes, lycophytes, monilophytes, gymnosperms, and angiosperms. We also analyzed small RNA size categories and, in two gymnosperms, cytosine methylation in ribosomal DNA. Six proteins were restricted to angiosperms, these being NRPD4/NRPE4, RDM1, DMS3 (defective in meristem silencing 3), SHH1 (SAWADEE homeodomain homolog 1), KTF1, and SUVR2, although we failed to find the latter three proteins in Fritillaria persica, a species with a giant genome. Small RNAs of 24 nt in length were abundant only in angiosperms. Phylogenetic analyses of Dicer-like (DCL) proteins showed that DCL2 was restricted to seed plants, although it was absent in Gnetum gnemon and Welwitschia mirabilis. The data suggest that phases (1) and (2) of the RdDM pathway, described for model angiosperms, evolved with angiosperms. The absence of some features of RdDM in F. persica may be associated with its large genome. Phase (3) is probably the most conserved part of the pathway across land plants. DCL2, involved in virus defense and interaction with the canonical RdDM pathway to facilitate methylation of CHH, is absent outside seed plants. Its absence in G. gnemon, and W. mirabilis coupled with distinctive patterns of CHH methylation, suggest a secondary loss of DCL2 following the divergence of Gnetales. PMID:26338185

  3. Angiosperms Are Unique among Land Plant Lineages in the Occurrence of Key Genes in the RNA-Directed DNA Methylation (RdDM) Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lu; Hatlen, Andrea; Kelly, Laura J; Becher, Hannes; Wang, Wencai; Kovarik, Ales; Leitch, Ilia J; Leitch, Andrew R

    2015-09-01

    The RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway can be divided into three phases: 1) small interfering RNA biogenesis, 2) de novo methylation, and 3) chromatin modification. To determine the degree of conservation of this pathway we searched for key genes among land plants. We used OrthoMCL and the OrthoMCL Viridiplantae database to analyze proteomes of species in bryophytes, lycophytes, monilophytes, gymnosperms, and angiosperms. We also analyzed small RNA size categories and, in two gymnosperms, cytosine methylation in ribosomal DNA. Six proteins were restricted to angiosperms, these being NRPD4/NRPE4, RDM1, DMS3 (defective in meristem silencing 3), SHH1 (SAWADEE homeodomain homolog 1), KTF1, and SUVR2, although we failed to find the latter three proteins in Fritillaria persica, a species with a giant genome. Small RNAs of 24 nt in length were abundant only in angiosperms. Phylogenetic analyses of Dicer-like (DCL) proteins showed that DCL2 was restricted to seed plants, although it was absent in Gnetum gnemon and Welwitschia mirabilis. The data suggest that phases (1) and (2) of the RdDM pathway, described for model angiosperms, evolved with angiosperms. The absence of some features of RdDM in F. persica may be associated with its large genome. Phase (3) is probably the most conserved part of the pathway across land plants. DCL2, involved in virus defense and interaction with the canonical RdDM pathway to facilitate methylation of CHH, is absent outside seed plants. Its absence in G. gnemon, and W. mirabilis coupled with distinctive patterns of CHH methylation, suggest a secondary loss of DCL2 following the divergence of Gnetales. PMID:26338185

  4. Basic Mechanics of DNA Methylation and the Unique Landscape of the DNA Methylome in Metal-Induced Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brocato, Jason; Costa, Max

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an intricate role in the regulation of gene expression and events that compromise the integrity of the methylome may potentially contribute to disease development. DNA methylation is a reversible and regulatory modification that elicits a cascade of events leading to chromatin condensation and gene silencing. In general, normal cells are characterized by gene-specific hypomethylation and global hypermethylation, while cancer cells portray a reverse profile to this norm. The unique methylome displayed in cancer cells is induced after exposure to carcinogenic metals such as nickel, arsenic, cadmium, and chromium (VI). These metals alter the DNA methylation profile by provoking both hyper- and hypomethylation events. The metal-stimulated deviations to the methylome are possible mechanisms for metal-induced carcinogenesis and may provide potential biomarkers for cancer detection. Development of therapies based on the cancer methylome requires further research including human studies that supply results with larger impact and higher human relevance. PMID:23844698

  5. Mycobacterium avium serovars 2 and 8 infections elicit unique activation of the host macrophage immune responses.

    PubMed

    Cebula, B R; Rocco, J M; Maslow, J N; Irani, V R

    2012-12-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an opportunistic pathogen whose pathogenesis is attributed to its serovar-specific glycopeptidolipid (ssGPL), which varies among its 31 serovars. To determine if the presence and type of ssGPLs contribute to M. avium pathogenesis, we infected murine macrophages (mφs) with two M. avium wild type (wt) serovars (2 and 8) and their serovar-null strains. We examined the influence of ssGPL (presence and type) on cytokine production in non-activated (-IFN-γ) and activated (+IFN-γ) mφs, and the bacterial intra-mφ survival over a 6-day infection process. Serovar-2 infections activated TNF-α production that increased over the 6 day period and was capable of controlling the intra-mφ serovar-2 null strain. In contrast, the serovar-8 infection stimulated a strong pro-inflammatory response, but was incapable of removing the invading pathogen, maybe through IL-10 production. It was clear that the intracellular growth of serovar-null in contrast to the wt M. avium strains was easily controlled. Based on our findings and the undisputed fact that M. avium ssGPL is key to its pathogenesis, we conclude that it is not appropriate to dissect the pathogenesis of one M. avium serovar and apply those findings to other serovars. PMID:22991047

  6. Roles of the Pas1 and Par2 genes in determination of the unique, intermediate susceptibility of BALB/cByJ mice to urethane-induction of lung carcinogenesis: differential effects on tumor multiplicity, size and Kras2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Karasaki, H; Obata, M; Ogawa, K; Lee, G H

    1997-10-01

    The C3H/HeJ (C3H), A/J and BALB/cByJ (BALB) mouse strains are respectively resistant, sensitive and intermediate regarding the induction of lung tumors by urethane. The phenotypic difference between C3H and A/J is largely determined by the Pas1 (Pulmonary adenoma susceptibility 1) gene on chromosome 6, the A/J allele of which dominantly increases the tumor burden. We recently found that BALB mice possess a unique lung tumor resistance gene on chromosome 18, designated Par2 (Pulmonary adenoma resistance 2), which partially, but dominantly suppresses the sensitive phenotype of A/J mice (Oncogene 13: 1599-1604, 1996). It has, however, remained unclear why BALB mice carrying the Par2 gene are significantly more sensitive to urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis than C3H mice that have no dominant lung tumor resistance genes. In the present study, using (C3H x BALB)F1 x C3H backcross mice treated with urethane, we demonstrated that BALB mice possess the disease allele of the Pas1 gene despite their 15-fold more resistance relative to A/J mice (LOD = 22.6). The BALB Par2 allele only significantly reduced the mean lung tumor multiplicity (LOD = 4.4) in the backcross population carrying the BALB allele of Pas1, indicating that the intermediate BALB phenotype may at least in part be the result of interactions between these two dominant genes. While the BALB Pas1 allele increased both the mean multiplicity and size of lung tumors, the BALB Par2 allele affected only the mean tumor multiplicity, implying that they are involved in different stages of multi-step lung carcinogenesis. In addition, we found that 68% of lung tumors from the BALB Pas1-positive backcross mice contained activating point mutations of the Kras2 oncogene, tightly linked to the Pas1 locus, whereas these genetic alterations were absent in tumors from BALB Pas1-negative mice. The Par2 genotype exhibited no effect on this parameter. Since the activating point mutations were observed exclusively in the BALB

  7. Features of a unique intronless cluster of class I small heat shock protein genes in tandem with box C/D snoRNA genes on chromosome 6 in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A class I 17.6 small heat shock protein (Sl17.6 shsp) gene was cloned and used as a probe to screen a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) genomic library. An 8.3-kb genomic fragment was isolated and its DNA sequence determined. Analysis of the genomic fragment identified intronless open reading frames of ...

  8. The higher exercise intensity and the presence of allele I of ACE gene elicit a higher post-exercise blood pressure reduction and nitric oxide release in elderly women: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The absence of the I allele of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene has been associated with higher levels of circulating ACE, lower nitric oxide (NO) release and hypertension. The purposes of this study were to analyze the post-exercise salivary nitrite (NO2-) and blood pressure (BP) responses to different exercise intensities in elderly women divided according to their ACE genotype. Methods Participants (n = 30; II/ID = 20 and DD = 10) underwent three experimental sessions: incremental test - IT (15 watts workload increase/3 min) until exhaustion; 20 min exercise 90% anaerobic threshold (90% AT); and 20 min control session without exercise. Volunteers had their BP and NO2- measured before and after experimental sessions. Results Despite both intensities showed protective effect on preventing the increase of BP during post-exercise recovery compared to control, post-exercise hypotension and increased NO2- release was observed only for carriers of the I allele (p < 0.05). Conclusion Genotypes of the ACE gene may exert a role in post-exercise NO release and BP response. PMID:22136292

  9. GR uniqueness and deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2015-10-01

    In the metric formulation gravitons are described with the parity symmetric S + 2 ⊗ S - 2 representation of Lorentz group. General Relativity is then the unique theory of interacting gravitons with second order field equations. We show that if a chiral S + 3 ⊗ S - representation is used instead, the uniqueness is lost, and there is an infinite-parametric family of theories of interacting gravitons with second order field equations. We use the language of graviton scattering amplitudes, and show how the uniqueness of GR is avoided using simple dimensional analysis. The resulting distinct from GR gravity theories are all parity asymmetric, but share the GR MHV amplitudes. They have new all same helicity graviton scattering amplitudes at every graviton order. The amplitudes with at least one graviton of opposite helicity continue to be determinable by the BCFW recursion.

  10. Humans and uniqueness.

    PubMed

    Schumpe, Birga Mareen; Erb, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    A defining force in the shaping of human identity is a person's need to feel special and different from others. Psychologists term this motivation Need for Uniqueness (NfU). There are manifold ways to establish feelings of uniqueness, e.g., by showing unusual consumption behaviour or by not conforming to majority views. The NfU can be seen as a stable personality trait, that is, individuals differ in their dispositional need to feel unique. The NfU is also influenced by situational factors and social environments. The cultural context is one important social setting shaping the NfU. This article aims to illuminate the NfU from a social psychological perspective. PMID:25942772

  11. Stereoscopy Amplifies Emotions Elicited by Facial Expressions

    PubMed Central

    Kätsyri, Jari; Häkkinen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    Mediated facial expressions do not elicit emotions as strongly as real-life facial expressions, possibly due to the low fidelity of pictorial presentations in typical mediation technologies. In the present study, we investigated the extent to which stereoscopy amplifies emotions elicited by images of neutral, angry, and happy facial expressions. The emotional self-reports of positive and negative valence (which were evaluated separately) and arousal of 40 participants were recorded. The magnitude of perceived depth in the stereoscopic images was manipulated by varying the camera base at 15, 40, 65, 90, and 115 mm. The analyses controlled for participants’ gender, gender match, emotional empathy, and trait alexithymia. The results indicated that stereoscopy significantly amplified the negative valence and arousal elicited by angry expressions at the most natural (65 mm) camera base, whereas stereoscopy amplified the positive valence elicited by happy expressions in both the narrowed and most natural (15–65 mm) base conditions. Overall, the results indicate that stereoscopy amplifies the emotions elicited by mediated emotional facial expressions when the depth geometry is close to natural. The findings highlight the sensitivity of the visual system to depth and its effect on emotions. PMID:27551358

  12. Strategies for Eliciting HIV-1 Inhibitory Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Tomaras, Georgia D.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Major roadblocks persist in the development of vaccines that elicit potent neutralizing antibodies targeting diverse HIV-1 strains, similar to known broadly neutralizing HIV-1 human monoclonal antibodies. Alternatively, other types of anti-HIV-1 envelope antibodies that may not neutralize HIV-1 in traditional neutralization assays but have other anti-HIV-1 activities (hereafter termed HIV-1 inhibitory antibodies) can be elicited by current vaccine strategies, and numerous studies are exploring their roles in preventing HIV-1 acquisition. We review examples of strategies for eliciting potentially protective HIV-1 inhibitory antibodies. Recent Findings Heterologous prime-boost strategies can yield anti-HIV immune responses; although only one (canarypox prime, Env protein boost) has been tested and shown positive results in an efficacy trial (RV144). Although the immune correlates of protection are as yet undefined, the reduced rate of acquisition without a significant effect on initial viral loads or CD4+ T cell counts, have raised the hypothesis of an RV144 vaccine-elicited transient protective B cell response. Summary In light of the RV144 trial, there is a critical need to define the entire functional spectrum of anti-HIV-1 antibodies, how easily each can be elicited, and how effective different types of antibody effector mechanisms can be in prevention of HIV-1 transmission. PMID:20978384

  13. Stereoscopy Amplifies Emotions Elicited by Facial Expressions.

    PubMed

    Hakala, Jussi; Kätsyri, Jari; Häkkinen, Jukka

    2015-12-01

    Mediated facial expressions do not elicit emotions as strongly as real-life facial expressions, possibly due to the low fidelity of pictorial presentations in typical mediation technologies. In the present study, we investigated the extent to which stereoscopy amplifies emotions elicited by images of neutral, angry, and happy facial expressions. The emotional self-reports of positive and negative valence (which were evaluated separately) and arousal of 40 participants were recorded. The magnitude of perceived depth in the stereoscopic images was manipulated by varying the camera base at 15, 40, 65, 90, and 115 mm. The analyses controlled for participants' gender, gender match, emotional empathy, and trait alexithymia. The results indicated that stereoscopy significantly amplified the negative valence and arousal elicited by angry expressions at the most natural (65 mm) camera base, whereas stereoscopy amplified the positive valence elicited by happy expressions in both the narrowed and most natural (15-65 mm) base conditions. Overall, the results indicate that stereoscopy amplifies the emotions elicited by mediated emotional facial expressions when the depth geometry is close to natural. The findings highlight the sensitivity of the visual system to depth and its effect on emotions. PMID:27551358

  14. Rational elicitation of cold-sensitive phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Baliga, Chetana; Majhi, Sandipan; Mondal, Kajari; Bhattacharjee, Antara; VijayRaghavan, K; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2016-05-01

    Cold-sensitive phenotypes have helped us understand macromolecular assembly and biological phenomena, yet few attempts have been made to understand the basis of cold sensitivity or to elicit it by design. We report a method for rational design of cold-sensitive phenotypes. The method involves generation of partial loss-of-function mutants, at either buried or functional sites, coupled with selective overexpression strategies. The only essential input is amino acid sequence, although available structural information can be used as well. The method has been used to elicit cold-sensitive mutants of a variety of proteins, both monomeric and dimeric, and in multiple organisms, namely Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Drosophila melanogaster This simple, yet effective technique of inducing cold sensitivity eliminates the need for complex mutations and provides a plausible molecular mechanism for eliciting cold-sensitive phenotypes. PMID:27091994

  15. Akhenaten, a unique pharaoh.

    PubMed

    Retief, François Pieter; Cilliers, Louise

    2011-09-01

    Akhenaten was a unique pharaoh in more ways than one. He initiated a major socio-religious revolution that had vast consequences for his country, and possessed a strikingly abnormal physiognomy that was of note in his time and has interested historians up to the present era. In this study, we attempt to identify the developmental disorder responsible for his eunuchoid appearance. PMID:21920162

  16. Unique Access to Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goble, Don

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the many learning opportunities that broadcast technology students at Ladue Horton Watkins High School in St. Louis, Missouri, experience because of their unique access to technology and methods of learning. Through scaffolding, stepladder techniques, and trial by fire, students learn to produce multiple television programs,…

  17. Vibrio elicits targeted transcriptional responses from copepod hosts.

    PubMed

    Almada, Amalia A; Tarrant, Ann M

    2016-06-01

    Copepods are abundant crustaceans that harbor diverse bacterial communities, yet the nature of their interactions with microbiota are poorly understood. Here, we report that Vibrio elicits targeted transcriptional responses in the estuarine copepod Eurytemora affinis We pre-treated E. affinis with an antibiotic cocktail and exposed them to either a zooplankton specialist (Vibrio sp. F10 9ZB36) or a free-living species (Vibrio ordalii 12B09) for 24 h. We then identified via RNA-Seq a total of 78 genes that were differentially expressed following Vibrio exposure, including homologs of C-type lectins, chitin-binding proteins and saposins. The response differed between the two Vibrio treatments, with the greatest changes elicited upon inoculation with V. sp. F10 We suggest that these differentially regulated genes play important roles in cuticle integrity, the innate immune response, and general stress response, and that their expression may enable E. affinis to recognize and regulate symbiotic vibrios. We further report that V. sp. F10 culturability is specifically altered upon colonization of E. affinis These findings suggest that rather than acting as passive environmental vectors, copepods discriminately interact with vibrios, which may ultimately impact the abundance and activity of copepod-associated bacteria. PMID:27056917

  18. Eliciting User Requirements Using Appreciative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Carol Kernitzki

    2010-01-01

    Many software development projects fail because they do not meet the needs of users, are over-budget, and abandoned. To address this problem, the user requirements elicitation process was modified based on principles of Appreciative Inquiry. Appreciative Inquiry, commonly used in organizational development, aims to build organizations, processes,…

  19. LinkIT: a ludic elicitation game for eliciting risk perceptions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yan; McGill, William L

    2013-06-01

    The mental models approach, a leading strategy to develop risk communications, involves a time- and labor-intensive interview process and a lengthy questionnaire to elicit group-level risk perceptions. We propose that a similarity ratings approach for structural knowledge elicitation can be adopted to assist the risk mental models approach. The LinkIT game, inspired by games with a purpose (GWAP) technology, is a ludic elicitation tool designed to elicit group understanding of the relations between risk factors in a more enjoyable and productive manner when compared to traditional approaches. That is, consistent with the idea of ludic elicitation, LinkIT was designed to make the elicitation process fun and enjoyable in the hopes of increasing participation and data quality in risk studies. Like the mental models approach, the group mental model obtained via the LinkIT game can hence be generated and represented in a form of influence diagrams. In order to examine the external validity of LinkIT, we conducted a study to compare its performance with respect to a more conventional questionnaire-driven approach. Data analysis results conclude that the two group mental models elicited from the two approaches are similar to an extent. Yet, LinkIT was more productive and enjoyable than the questionnaire. However, participants commented that the current game has some usability concerns. This presentation summarizes the design and evaluation of the LinkIT game and suggests areas for future work. PMID:23078149

  20. A unique mutation in the vitamin D receptor gene in three Japanese patients with vitamin D-dependent rickets type II: utility of single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis for heterozygous carrier detection.

    PubMed Central

    Saijo, T; Ito, M; Takeda, E; Huq, A H; Naito, E; Yokota, I; Sone, T; Pike, J W; Kuroda, Y

    1991-01-01

    Vitamin D-dependent rickets type II is a hereditary disease resulting from a defective vitamin D receptor. In three Japanese patients with vitamin D-dependent rickets type II whose fibroblasts displayed normal cytosol binding and impaired nuclear uptake of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, western, Southern, and northern analyses failed to disclose any abnormalities in vitamin D3 receptor protein and its gene. Exons 2 and 3 of the vitamin D receptor cDNA, which encode the DNA-binding domain consisting of two zinc fingers, were amplified by PCR and sequenced to identify the specific mutations in the vitamin D receptor gene. In the three patients and one normal control a T-to-C transition was found in the putative initiation codon, while this transition was not observed in another normal control. This finding suggested that an original initiation codon was located at positions 10-12 in the human vitamin D receptor cDNA sequence reported previously. In contrast, a unique G-to-A transition at position 140 in exon 3, resulting in substitution of arginine by glutamine at residue 47, was revealed only in these three patients. The arginine at 47 is located between two zinc fingers and is conserved within all steroid hormone receptors. Therefore, it is highly conceivable that this amino acid substitution is responsible for the defect of the vitamin D receptor in the patients. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of amplified DNA confirmed that all patients were homozygous and that parents from one family were heterozygous carriers for this mutation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1652893

  1. Is Life Unique?

    PubMed Central

    Abel, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Is life physicochemically unique? No. Is life unique? Yes. Life manifests innumerable formalisms that cannot be generated or explained by physicodynamics alone. Life pursues thousands of biofunctional goals, not the least of which is staying alive. Neither physicodynamics, nor evolution, pursue goals. Life is largely directed by linear digital programming and by the Prescriptive Information (PI) instantiated particularly into physicodynamically indeterminate nucleotide sequencing. Epigenomic controls only compound the sophistication of these formalisms. Life employs representationalism through the use of symbol systems. Life manifests autonomy, homeostasis far from equilibrium in the harshest of environments, positive and negative feedback mechanisms, prevention and correction of its own errors, and organization of its components into Sustained Functional Systems (SFS). Chance and necessity—heat agitation and the cause-and-effect determinism of nature’s orderliness—cannot spawn formalisms such as mathematics, language, symbol systems, coding, decoding, logic, organization (not to be confused with mere self-ordering), integration of circuits, computational success, and the pursuit of functionality. All of these characteristics of life are formal, not physical. PMID:25382119

  2. Unique Aspects of Herbal Whole System Research

    PubMed Central

    Zick, Suzanna M.; Schwabl, Herbert; Flower, Andrew; Lac, Dip; Chakraborty, Bibhas; Hirschkorn, Kristine

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Whole systems of healthcare offer unique methodological and theoretical challenges for researchers. Herbalism has its own set of methodological and philosophical research issues, which are beyond those presented for whole system research, in general. Methods An International Society for Complementary Medicine Research (ISCMR) workshop was presented on, “Challenges in Herbal Whole Systems Research”. Starting from a definition of herbalism the most important challenges to herbal whole system research (HWSR) were elicited with inputs from both the workshop presenters and the audience. Results Five major challenges unique to herbal whole systems research were identified: (1) Defining herbalists and herbalism; (2) role of natural products industry in herbal research; (3) designing placebos and delivering active herbal treatments as are given by herbalists; (4) researching the herb as a living entity; and (5) designing trials to investigate and develop multi-component herbal therapies. Conclusions To design studies of herbalism requires unique methods and theoretical frameworks. Solutions to these methodological challenges need to be addressed to conduct research that examines herbal systems of medicine versus conducting trials on individual herbs given out of their original therapeutic context. PMID:19272580

  3. Fullerene C60 exposure elicits an oxidative stress response in embryonic zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Usenko, Crystal Y.; Harper, Stacey L.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Due to its unique physicochemical and optical properties, C60 has raised interest in commercialization for a variety of products. While several reports have determined this nanomaterial to act as a powerful antioxidant, many other studies have demonstrated a strong oxidative potential through photoactivation. To directly address the oxidative potential of C60, the effects of light and chemical supplementation and depletion of glutathione (GSH) on C60-induced toxicity were evaluated. Embryonic zebrafish were used as a model organism to examine the potential of C60 to elicit oxidative stress responses. Reduced light during C60 exposure significantly decreased mortality and the incidence of fin malformations and pericardial edema at 200 and 300 ppb C60. Embryos co-exposed to the glutathione precursor, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), also showed reduced mortality and pericardial edema; however, fin malformations were not reduced. Conversely, co-exposure to the GSH synthesis inhibitors, butathionine sulfoximine (BSO) and diethyl maleate (DEM), increased the sensitivity of zebrafish to C60 exposure. Co-exposure of C60 or its hydroxylated derivative, C60(OH)24, with H2O2 resulted in increased mortality along the concentration gradient of H2O2 for both materials. Microarrays were used to examine the effects of C60 on the global gene expression at two time points, 36 and 48 hours post fertilization (hpf). At both life stages there were alterations in the expression of several key stress response genes including glutathione-S-transferase, glutamate cysteine ligase, ferritin, α-tocopherol transport protein and heat shock protein 70. These results support the hypothesis that C60 induces oxidative stress in this model system. PMID:18299140

  4. Fullerene C{sub 60} exposure elicits an oxidative stress response in embryonic zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Usenko, Crystal Y.; Harper, Stacey L.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2008-05-15

    Due to its unique physicochemical and optical properties, C{sub 60} has raised interest in commercialization for a variety of products. While several reports have determined this nanomaterial to act as a powerful antioxidant, many other studies have demonstrated a strong oxidative potential through photoactivation. To directly address the oxidative potential of C{sub 60}, the effects of light and chemical supplementation and depletion of glutathione (GSH) on C{sub 60}-induced toxicity were evaluated. Embryonic zebrafish were used as a model organism to examine the potential of C{sub 60} to elicit oxidative stress responses. Reduced light during C{sub 60} exposure significantly decreased mortality and the incidence of fin malformations and pericardial edema at 200 and 300 ppb C{sub 60}. Embryos co-exposed to the glutathione precursor, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), also showed reduced mortality and pericardial edema; however, fin malformations were not reduced. Conversely, co-exposure to the GSH synthesis inhibitors, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) and diethyl maleate (DEM), increased the sensitivity of zebrafish to C{sub 60} exposure. Co-exposure of C{sub 60} or its hydroxylated derivative, C{sub 60}(OH){sub 24}, with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} resulted in increased mortality along the concentration gradient of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} for both materials. Microarrays were used to examine the effects of C{sub 60} on the global gene expression at two time points, 36 and 48 h post fertilization (hpf). At both life stages there were alterations in the expression of several key stress response genes including glutathione-S-transferase, glutamate cysteine ligase, ferritin, {alpha}-tocopherol transport protein and heat shock protein 70. These results support the hypothesis that C{sub 60} induces oxidative stress in this model system.

  5. Essays on probability elicitation scoring rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firmino, Paulo Renato A.; dos Santos Neto, Ademir B.

    2012-10-01

    In probability elicitation exercises it has been usual to considerer scoring rules (SRs) to measure the performance of experts when inferring about a given unknown, Θ, for which the true value, θ*, is (or will shortly be) known to the experimenter. Mathematically, SRs quantify the discrepancy between f(θ) (the distribution reflecting the expert's uncertainty about Θ) and d(θ), a zero-one indicator function of the observation θ*. Thus, a remarkable characteristic of SRs is to contrast expert's beliefs with the observation θ*. The present work aims at extending SRs concepts and formulas for the cases where Θ is aleatory, highlighting advantages of goodness-of-fit and entropy-like measures. Conceptually, it is argued that besides of evaluating the personal performance of the expert, SRs may also play a role when comparing the elicitation processes adopted to obtain f(θ). Mathematically, it is proposed to replace d(θ) by g(θ), the distribution that model the randomness of Θ, and do also considerer goodness-of-fit and entropylike metrics, leading to SRs that measure the adherence of f(θ) to g(θ). The implications of this alternative perspective are discussed and illustrated by means of case studies based on the simulation of controlled experiments. The usefulness of the proposed approach for evaluating the performance of experts and elicitation processes is investigated.

  6. Autoimmune-associated HLA-B8-DR3 haplotypes in Asian Indians are unique in C4 complement gene copy numbers and HSP-2 1267A/G.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurvinder; Kumar, Neeraj; Szilagyi, Agnes; Blasko, Bernadett; Fust, George; Rajczy, Katalin; Pozsonyi, Eva; Hosso, Adrienn; Petranyi, Gyozo; Tandon, Nikhil; Mehra, Narinder

    2008-09-01

    The classical AH8.1 (HLA-A1-B8-DR3-DQ2) is the most common Caucasian haplotype, associated with several autoimmune diseases, immunologic hyperreactivity and rapid progression to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. However, in Asian Indians, there are multiple unique B8-DR3 haplotypes that are associated with autoimmunity and differ significantly from the common Caucasian AH8.1. The Indian HLA-A1-B8-DR3 is therefore referred to as an AH8.1 variant. The aims of this study were to compare C4A and C4B copy numbers and to identify alleles in HSP70-2 and LTA in these haplotypes. The Indian B8-DR3 haplotypes differ from the Caucasian AH8.1 at C4A and HSP70-2 loci. The Indian B8-DR3 haplotypes have 1 copy each at C4A and C4B, while the Caucasian AH8.1 has 1 copy at C4B but no C4A gene. Moreover, the Indian and Caucasian B8-DR3 haplotypes had HSP70-2 1267 *A, and *G alleles, respectively. By contrast, the LTA 252 *G allele occurred both in the Indian and Caucasian haplotypes. The Indian haplotypes also contained Bf*F and TNF-308*G that were different from the Caucasian equivalents Bf*S and TNF-308*A. These differences and previous studies support the hypothesis that B8-DR3-DQ2 haplotypes in Asian Indian population might have originated independently of Caucasian AH8.1 selectively through recombination and mutations. Because autoimmune disease associations are shared among these otherwise diverse haplotypes, these data strongly suggest that some shared component(s) of all these associated haplotypes may be playing a key role in such associations. PMID:18657583

  7. Small‐molecule elicitation of microbial secondary metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, Robin K.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Microbial natural products continue to be an unparalleled resource for pharmaceutical lead discovery, but the rediscovery rate is high. Bacterial and fungal sequencing studies indicate that the biosynthetic potential of many strains is much greater than that observed by fermentation. Prodding the expression of such silent (cryptic) pathways will allow us to maximize the chemical diversity available from microorganisms. Cryptic metabolic pathways can be accessed in the laboratory using molecular or cultivation‐based approaches. A targeted approach related to cultivation‐based methods is the application of small‐molecule elicitors to specifically affect transcription of secondary metabolite gene clusters. With the isolation of the novel secondary metabolites lunalides A and B, oxylipins, cladochromes F and G, nygerone A, chaetoglobosin‐542, ‐540 and ‐510, sphaerolone, dihydrosphaerolone, mutolide and pestalone, and the enhanced production of known secondary metabolites like penicillin and bacitracin, chemical elicitation is proving to be an effective way to augment natural product libraries. PMID:21375710

  8. Isolated sleep paralysis elicited by sleep interruption.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, T; Miyasita, A; Sasaki, Y; Inugami, M; Fukuda, K

    1992-06-01

    We elicited isolated sleep paralysis (ISP) from normal subjects by a nocturnal sleep interruption schedule. On four experimental nights, 16 subjects had their sleep interrupted for 60 minutes by forced awakening at the time when 40 minutes of nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep had elapsed from the termination of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in the first or third sleep cycle. This schedule produced a sleep onset REM period (SOREMP) after the interruption at a high rate of 71.9%. We succeeded in eliciting six episodes of ISP in the sleep interruptions performed (9.4%). All episodes of ISP except one occurred from SOREMP, indicating a close correlation between ISP and SOREMP. We recorded verbal reports about ISP experiences and recorded the polysomnogram (PSG) during ISP. All of the subjects with ISP experienced inability to move and were simultaneously aware of lying in the laboratory. All but one reported auditory/visual hallucinations and unpleasant emotions. PSG recordings during ISP were characterized by a REM/W stage dissociated state, i.e. abundant alpha electroencephalographs and persistence of muscle atonia shown by the tonic electromyogram. Judging from the PSG recordings, ISP differs from other dissociated states such as lucid dreaming, nocturnal panic attacks and REM sleep behavior disorders. We compare some of the sleep variables between ISP and non-ISP nights. We also discuss the similarities and differences between ISP and sleep paralysis in narcolepsy. PMID:1621022

  9. Eliciting nicotine craving with virtual smoking cues.

    PubMed

    Gamito, Pedro; Oliveira, Jorge; Baptista, André; Morais, Diogo; Lopes, Paulo; Rosa, Pedro; Santos, Nuno; Brito, Rodrigo

    2014-08-01

    Craving is a strong desire to consume that emerges in every case of substance addiction. Previous studies have shown that eliciting craving with an exposure cues protocol can be a useful option for the treatment of nicotine dependence. Thus, the main goal of this study was to develop a virtual platform in order to induce craving in smokers. Fifty-five undergraduate students were randomly assigned to two different virtual environments: high arousal contextual cues and low arousal contextual cues scenarios (17 smokers with low nicotine dependency were excluded). An eye-tracker system was used to evaluate attention toward these cues. Eye fixation on smoking-related cues differed between smokers and nonsmokers, indicating that smokers focused more often on smoking-related cues than nonsmokers. Self-reports of craving are in agreement with these results and suggest a significant increase in craving after exposure to smoking cues. In sum, these data support the use of virtual environments for eliciting craving. PMID:24660864

  10. A unique element resembling a processed pseudogene.

    PubMed

    Robins, A J; Wang, S W; Smith, T F; Wells, J R

    1986-01-01

    We describe a unique DNA element with structural features of a processed pseudogene but with important differences. It is located within an 8.4-kilobase pair region of chicken DNA containing five histone genes, but it is not related to these genes. The presence of terminal repeats, an open reading frame (and stop codon), polyadenylation/processing signal, and a poly(A) rich region about 20 bases 3' to this, together with a lack of 5' promoter motifs all suggest a processed pseudogene. However, no parent gene can be detected in the genome by Southern blotting experiments and, in addition, codon boundary values and mid-base correlations are not consistent with a protein coding region of a eukaryotic gene. The element was detected in DNA from different chickens and in peafowl, but not in quail, pheasant, or turkey. PMID:3941070

  11. [Effect of abiotic elicitation and calcium ions on production of explant cultures of Rheum palmatum L].

    PubMed

    Kasparová, M; Siatka, T; Dusek, J

    2003-09-01

    Elicitation is based on signal (elicitor)-induced expression of genes, which subsequently results in increased synthesis of secondary metabolities in plants and in vitro cultures. Elicitors do not usually influence gene activity directly but by means of transmitters of the signal, which include primarily calcium ions. The paper examined the effect of four concentrations of calcium ions on the production of anthracene derivatives by means of the callus and suspension cultures of Rheum palmatum L. (Polygonaceae), which was elicited by an abiotic elicitor--a 20 microM solution of lead dichloride. The culture was cultivated on a Murashige-Skoog medium with an addition of 10 mg.l-1 of alpha-naphthylacetic acid. It follows from the results that the maximal content of anthracene derivatives, determined by the photometric determination according to PhBs 4, was demonstrated in the suspension culture after 24-hr administration of the elicitor and a 10 mM calcium chloride solution. In comparison with the control and elicited groups, the production was stimulated by 44% and 17%, respectively. After an addition of calcium ions to the elicited callus culture, no positive influence on the production was observed. PMID:14619703

  12. Outer membrane vesicles displaying engineered glycotopes elicit protective antibodies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Linxiao; Valentine, Jenny L; Huang, Chung-Jr; Endicott, Christine E; Moeller, Tyler D; Rasmussen, Jed A; Fletcher, Joshua R; Boll, Joseph M; Rosenthal, Joseph A; Dobruchowska, Justyna; Wang, Zhirui; Heiss, Christian; Azadi, Parastoo; Putnam, David; Trent, M Stephen; Jones, Bradley D; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2016-06-28

    The O-antigen polysaccharide (O-PS) component of lipopolysaccharides on the surface of gram-negative bacteria is both a virulence factor and a B-cell antigen. Antibodies elicited by O-PS often confer protection against infection; therefore, O-PS glycoconjugate vaccines have proven useful against a number of different pathogenic bacteria. However, conventional methods for natural extraction or chemical synthesis of O-PS are technically demanding, inefficient, and expensive. Here, we describe an alternative methodology for producing glycoconjugate vaccines whereby recombinant O-PS biosynthesis is coordinated with vesiculation in laboratory strains of Escherichia coli to yield glycosylated outer membrane vesicles (glycOMVs) decorated with pathogen-mimetic glycotopes. Using this approach, glycOMVs corresponding to eight different pathogenic bacteria were generated. For example, expression of a 17-kb O-PS gene cluster from the highly virulent Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis (type A) strain Schu S4 in hypervesiculating E. coli cells yielded glycOMVs that displayed F. tularensis O-PS. Immunization of BALB/c mice with glycOMVs elicited significant titers of O-PS-specific serum IgG antibodies as well as vaginal and bronchoalveolar IgA antibodies. Importantly, glycOMVs significantly prolonged survival upon subsequent challenge with F. tularensis Schu S4 and provided complete protection against challenge with two different F. tularensis subsp. holarctica (type B) live vaccine strains, thereby demonstrating the vaccine potential of glycOMVs. Given the ease with which recombinant glycotopes can be expressed on OMVs, the strategy described here could be readily adapted for developing vaccines against many other bacterial pathogens. PMID:27274048

  13. Antitumor immune reaction elicited by photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen

    1999-06-01

    This work examines why photodynamic therapy (PDT) is capable of eliciting a strong immune reaction against treated solid tumors. It is postulated that this phenomenon originates from the basic charter of the insult inflicted by the photodynamic treatment, which is dominated by singlet oxygen-mediated oxidative stress. The early event associated with this initial impact, which is of major relevance for the development of immune response, is the generation of photo-oxidative lesions responsible for the activation of cellular signal transduction pathways and consequent induction of stress proteins. Importantly, these lesions, as well as other types of PDT mediated oxidative injury, have a strong pro-inflammatory character. It is suggested that the antitumor immune response is primed and propagated by the PDT-induced inflammatory process. Of critical importance for the immune recognition of treated tumor is the generation of large amounts of cancer cell debris that occurs rapidly following PDT treatment.

  14. Augmenting Usability: Cultural Elicitation in HCI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camara, Souleymane Boundaouda; Oyugi, Cecilia; Abdelnour-Nocera, José; Smith, Andy

    This paper offers context and culture elicitation in an inter-cultural and multi-disciplinary setting of ICT design. Localised usability evaluation (LUE) is augmented with a socio-technical evaluation tool (STEM) as a methodological approach to expose and address issues in a collaborative ICT design within the Village e-Science for Life (VeSeL) project in rural Kenya. The paper argues that designers need to locally identify context and culture in situ and further explicate their implications through the design process and at the global level. Stakeholders' context, culture, decisions, agendas, expectations, disciplines and requirements need to be locally identified and globally evaluated to ensure a fit for purpose solution.

  15. Eliciting consumer preferences for health plans.

    PubMed Central

    Booske, B C; Sainfort, F; Hundt, A S

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine (1) what people say is important to them in choosing a health plan; (2) the effect, if any, that giving health plan information has on what people say is important to them; and (3) the effect of preference elicitation methods on what people say is important. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTINGS: A random sample of 201 Wisconsin state employees who participated in a health plan choice experiment during the 1995 open enrollment period. STUDY DESIGN: We designed a computer system to guide subjects through the review of information about health plan options. The system began by eliciting the stated preferences of the subjects before they viewed the information, at time 0. Subjects were given an opportunity to revise their preference structures first after viewing summary information about four health plans (time 1) and then after viewing more extensive, detailed information about the same options (time 2). At time 2, these individuals were also asked to rate the relative importance of a predefined list of health plan features presented to them. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS: Data were collected on the number of attributes listed at each point in time and the importance weightings assigned to each attribute. In addition, each item on the attribute list was content analyzed. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The provision of information changes the preference structures of individuals. Costs (price) and coverage dominated the attributes cited both before and after looking at health plan information. When presented with information on costs, quality, and how plans work, many of these relatively well educated consumers revised their preference structures; yet coverage and costs remained the primary cited attributes. CONCLUSIONS: Although efforts to provide health plan information should continue, decisions on the information to provide and on making it available are not enough. Individuals need help in understanding, processing, and using the information to construct

  16. A naturally hypersensitive glucocorticoid receptor elicits a compensatory reduction of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis activity early in ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Muráni, Eduard; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Jaeger, Alexandra; Görres, Andreas; Tuchscherer, Armin; Wimmers, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    We comprehensively characterized the effects of a unique natural gain-of-function mutation in the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), GRAla610Val, in domestic pigs to expand current knowledge of the phenotypic consequences of GR hypersensitivity. Cortisol levels were consistently reduced in one-week-old piglets, at weaning and in peripubertal age, probably due to a reduced adrenal capacity to produce glucocorticoids (GC), which was indicated by an adrenocortical thinning in GRAla610Val carriers. Adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) levels were significantly reduced in one-week-old piglets only. Expression analyses in peripubertal age revealed significant downregulation of hypothalamic expression of CRH and AVP, the latter only in females, and upregulation of hepatic expression of SERPINA6, by GRAla610Val Transcriptional repression of proinflammatory genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from GRAla610Val carriers was more sensitive to dexamethasone treatment ex vivo However, no significant effects on growth, body composition, blood chemistry or cell counts were observed under baseline conditions. These results suggest that GRAla610Val-induced GR hypersensitivity elicits a compensatory reduction in endogenous, bioactive glucocorticoid levels via readjustment of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis early in ontogeny to maintain an adequate response, but carriers are more sensitive to exogenous GC. Therefore, GRAla610Val pigs represent a valuable animal model to explore GR-mediated mechanisms of HPA axis regulation and responses to glucocorticoid-based drugs. PMID:27440422

  17. A naturally hypersensitive glucocorticoid receptor elicits a compensatory reduction of hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenal axis activity early in ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Muráni, Eduard; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Jaeger, Alexandra; Görres, Andreas; Tuchscherer, Armin; Wimmers, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    We comprehensively characterized the effects of a unique natural gain-of-function mutation in the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), GRAla610Val, in domestic pigs to expand current knowledge of the phenotypic consequences of GR hypersensitivity. Cortisol levels were consistently reduced in one-week-old piglets, at weaning and in peripubertal age, probably due to a reduced adrenal capacity to produce glucocorticoids (GC), which was indicated by an adrenocortical thinning in GRAla610Val carriers. Adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) levels were significantly reduced in one-week-old piglets only. Expression analyses in peripubertal age revealed significant downregulation of hypothalamic expression of CRH and AVP, the latter only in females, and upregulation of hepatic expression of SERPINA6, by GRAla610Val. Transcriptional repression of proinflammatory genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from GRAla610Val carriers was more sensitive to dexamethasone treatment ex vivo. However, no significant effects on growth, body composition, blood chemistry or cell counts were observed under baseline conditions. These results suggest that GRAla610Val-induced GR hypersensitivity elicits a compensatory reduction in endogenous, bioactive glucocorticoid levels via readjustment of the hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis early in ontogeny to maintain an adequate response, but carriers are more sensitive to exogenous GC. Therefore, GRAla610Val pigs represent a valuable animal model to explore GR-mediated mechanisms of HPA axis regulation and responses to glucocorticoid-based drugs. PMID:27440422

  18. Functional Changes in the Snail Statocyst System Elicited by Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Balaban, Pavel M.; Malyshev, Aleksey Y.; Ierusalimsky, Victor N.; Aseyev, Nikolay; Korshunova, Tania A.; Bravarenko, Natasha I.; Lemak, M. S.; Roshchin, Matvey; Zakharov, Igor S.; Popova, Yekaterina; Boyle, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Background The mollusk statocyst is a mechanosensing organ detecting the animal's orientation with respect to gravity. This system has clear similarities to its vertebrate counterparts: a weight-lending mass, an epithelial layer containing small supporting cells and the large sensory hair cells, and an output eliciting compensatory body reflexes to perturbations. Methodology/Principal Findings In terrestrial gastropod snail we studied the impact of 16- (Foton M-2) and 12-day (Foton M-3) exposure to microgravity in unmanned orbital missions on: (i) the whole animal behavior (Helix lucorum L.), (ii) the statoreceptor responses to tilt in an isolated neural preparation (Helix lucorum L.), and (iii) the differential expression of the Helix pedal peptide (HPep) and the tetrapeptide FMRFamide genes in neural structures (Helix aspersa L.). Experiments were performed 13–42 hours after return to Earth. Latency of body re-orientation to sudden 90° head-down pitch was significantly reduced in postflight snails indicating an enhanced negative gravitaxis response. Statoreceptor responses to tilt in postflight snails were independent of motion direction, in contrast to a directional preference observed in control animals. Positive relation between tilt velocity and firing rate was observed in both control and postflight snails, but the response magnitude was significantly larger in postflight snails indicating an enhanced sensitivity to acceleration. A significant increase in mRNA expression of the gene encoding HPep, a peptide linked to ciliary beating, in statoreceptors was observed in postflight snails; no differential expression of the gene encoding FMRFamide, a possible neurotransmission modulator, was observed. Conclusions/Significance Upregulation of statocyst function in snails following microgravity exposure parallels that observed in vertebrates suggesting fundamental principles underlie gravi-sensing and the organism's ability to adapt to gravity changes. This

  19. Web-based tool for expert elicitation of the variogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Phuong N.; Heuvelink, Gerard B. M.; Gosling, John Paul

    2013-02-01

    The variogram is the keystone of geostatistics. Estimation of the variogram is deficient and difficult when there are no or too few observations available due to budget constraints or physical and temporal obstacles. In such cases, expert knowledge can be an important source of information. Expert knowledge can also fulfil the increasing demand for an a priori variogram in Bayesian geostatistics and spatial sampling optimization. Formal expert elicitation provides a sound scientific basis to reliably and consistently extract knowledge from experts. In this study, we aimed at applying existing statistical expert elicitation techniques to extract the variogram of a regionalized variable that is assumed to have either a multivariate normal or lognormal spatial probability distribution from expert knowledge. To achieve this, we developed an elicitation protocol and implemented it as a web-based tool to facilitate the elicitation of beliefs from multiple experts. Our protocol has two main rounds: elicitation of the marginal probability distribution and elicitation of the variogram. The web-based tool has three main components: a web interface for expert elicitation and feedback; a component for statistical computation and mathematical pooling of multiple experts' knowledge; and a database management component. Results from a test case study show that the protocol is adequate and that the online elicitation tool functions satisfactorily. The web-based tool is free to use and supports scientists to conveniently elicit the variogram of spatial random variables from experts. The source code is available from the journal FTP site under the GNU General Public License.

  20. Expert Elicitation of Population-Level Effects of Disturbance.

    PubMed

    Fleishman, Erica; Burgman, Mark; Runge, Michael C; Schick, Robert S; Kraus, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Expert elicitation is a rigorous method for synthesizing expert knowledge to inform decision making and is reliable and practical when field data are limited. We evaluated the feasibility of applying expert elicitation to estimate population-level effects of disturbance on marine mammals. Diverse experts estimated parameters related to mortality and sublethal injury of North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis). We are now eliciting expert knowledge on the movement of right whales among geographic regions to parameterize a spatial model of health. Expert elicitation complements methods such as simulation models or extrapolations from other species, sometimes with greater accuracy and less uncertainty. PMID:26610972

  1. Insect herbivory elicits genome-wide alternative splicing responses in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Ling, Zhihao; Zhou, Wenwu; Baldwin, Ian T; Xu, Shuqing

    2015-10-01

    Changes in gene expression and alternative splicing (AS) are involved in many responses to abiotic and biotic stresses in eukaryotic organisms. In response to attack and oviposition by insect herbivores, plants elicit rapid changes in gene expression which are essential for the activation of plant defenses; however, the herbivory-induced changes in AS remain unstudied. Using mRNA sequencing, we performed a genome-wide analysis on tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta) feeding-induced AS in both leaves and roots of Nicotiana attenuata. Feeding by M. sexta for 5 h reduced total AS events by 7.3% in leaves but increased them in roots by 8.0% and significantly changed AS patterns in leaves and roots of existing AS genes. Feeding by M. sexta also resulted in increased (in roots) and decreased (in leaves) transcript levels of the serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins that are involved in the AS machinery of plants and induced changes in SR gene expression that were jasmonic acid (JA)-independent in leaves but JA-dependent in roots. Changes in AS and gene expression elicited by M. sexta feeding were regulated independently in both tissues. This study provides genome-wide evidence that insect herbivory induces changes not only in the levels of gene expression but also in their splicing, which might contribute to defense against and/or tolerance of herbivory. PMID:26306554

  2. Exploring Unique Roles for Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Mohiuddin; Boisvert, Charles M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents comments on "Psychological Treatments" by D. H. Barlow. Barlow highlighted unique roles that psychologists can play in mental health service delivery by providing psychological treatments--treatments that psychologists would be uniquely qualified to design and deliver. In support of Barlow's position, the authors draw from…

  3. On the Meaning of Uniqueness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes four questions on the meaning of uniqueness that have contrasting answers in common language versus mathematical language. The investigations stem from a scenario in which students interpreted uniqueness according to a definition from standard English, that is, different from the mathematical meaning, in defining an injective…

  4. A unique exercise facility for simulating orbital extravehicular activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Rebecca C.; Sharer, Peter J.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    A unique exercise facility has been developed and used to simulate orbital extravehicular activity (EVA). The device incorporates an arm ergometer into a mechanism which places the subject in the zero-g neutral body posture. The intent of this configuration is to elicit muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, and thermoregulatory responses similar to those observed during orbital EVA. Experiments done with this facility will help characterize the astronaut's dynamic heat balance during EVA and will eventually lead to the development of an automated thermal control system which would more effectively maintain thermal comfort.

  5. A unique exercise facility for simulating orbital extravehicular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, Rebecca C.; Sharer, Peter J.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1993-01-01

    A unique exercise facility has been developed and used to simulate orbital extravehicular activity (EVA). The device incorporates an arm ergometer into a mechanism which places the subject in the zero-g neutral body posture. The intent of this configuration is to elicit muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, and thermoregulatory responses similar to those observed during orbital EVA. Experiments done with this facility will help characterize the astronaut's dynamic heat balance during EVA and will eventually lead to the development of an automated thermal control system which would more effectively maintain thermal comfort.

  6. Acting green elicits a literal warm glow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taufik, Danny; Bolderdijk, Jan Willem; Steg, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Environmental policies are often based on the assumption that people only act environmentally friendly if some extrinsic reward is implicated, usually money. We argue that people might also be motivated by intrinsic rewards: doing the right thing (such as acting environmentally friendly) elicits psychological rewards in the form of positive feelings, a phenomenon known as warm glow. Given the fact that people's psychological state may affect their thermal state, we expected that this warm glow could express itself quite literally: people who act environmentally friendly may perceive the temperature to be higher. In two studies, we found that people who learned they acted environmentally friendly perceived a higher temperature than people who learned they acted environmentally unfriendly. The underlying psychological mechanism pertains to the self-concept: learning you acted environmentally friendly signals to yourself that you are a good person. Together, our studies show that acting environmentally friendly can be psychologically rewarding, suggesting that appealing to intrinsic rewards can be an alternative way to encourage pro-environmental actions.

  7. Music can elicit a visual motion aftereffect.

    PubMed

    Hedger, Stephen C; Nusbaum, Howard C; Lescop, Olivier; Wallisch, Pascal; Hoeckner, Berthold

    2013-07-01

    Motion aftereffects (MAEs) are thought to result from the adaptation of both subcortical and cortical systems involved in the processing of visual motion. Recently, it has been reported that the implied motion of static images in combination with linguistic descriptions of motion is sufficient to elicit an MAE, although neither factor alone is thought to directly activate visual motion areas in the brain. Given that the monotonic change of musical pitch is widely recognized in music as a metaphor for vertical motion, we investigated whether prolonged exposure to ascending or descending musical scales can also produce a visual motion aftereffect. After listening to ascending or descending musical scales, participants made decisions about the direction of visual motion in random-dot kinematogram stimuli. Metaphoric motion in the musical stimuli did affect the visual direction judgments, in that repeated exposure to rising or falling musical scales shifted participants' sensitivity to visual motion in the opposite direction. The finding that music can induce an MAE suggests that the subjective interpretation of monotonic pitch change as motion may have a perceptual foundation. PMID:23456973

  8. Coxiella burnetii and Leishmania mexicana residing within similar parasitophorous vacuoles elicit disparate host responses

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Jess A.; Valdés, Raquel; Kacharia, Fenil R.; Landfear, Scott M.; Cambronne, Eric D.; Raghavan, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is a bacterium that thrives in an acidic parasitophorous vacuole (PV) derived from lysosomes. Leishmania mexicana, a eukaryote, has also independently evolved to live in a morphologically similar PV. As Coxiella and Leishmania are highly divergent organisms that cause different diseases, we reasoned that their respective infections would likely elicit distinct host responses despite producing phenotypically similar parasite-containing vacuoles. The objective of this study was to investigate, at the molecular level, the macrophage response to each pathogen. Infection of THP-1 (human monocyte/macrophage) cells with Coxiella and Leishmania elicited disparate host responses. At 5 days post-infection, when compared to uninfected cells, 1057 genes were differentially expressed (746 genes up-regulated and 311 genes down-regulated) in C. burnetii infected cells, whereas 698 genes (534 genes up-regulated and 164 genes down-regulated) were differentially expressed in L. mexicana infected cells. Interestingly, of the 1755 differentially expressed genes identified in this study, only 126 genes (~7%) are common to both infections. We also discovered that 1090 genes produced mRNA isoforms at significantly different levels under the two infection conditions, suggesting that alternate proteins encoded by the same gene might have important roles in host response to each infection. Additionally, we detected 257 micro RNAs (miRNAs) that were expressed in THP-1 cells, and identified miRNAs that were specifically expressed during Coxiella or Leishmania infections. Collectively, this study identified host mRNAs and miRNAs that were influenced by Coxiella and/or Leishmania infections, and our data indicate that although their PVs are morphologically similar, Coxiella and Leishmania have evolved different strategies that perturb distinct host processes to create and thrive within their respective intracellular niches. PMID:26300862

  9. Introducing Forum Theatre to Elicit and Advocate Children's Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Nick

    2013-01-01

    Eliciting and advocating the voice of the child remains at the heart of international political agenda and also remains a central role for educational psychologists (EPs). Previous research indicates that EPs tend to use language-based methods for eliciting and advocating views of children. However, these approaches are often limited. Taking a…

  10. Science Teachers' Elicitation Practices: Insights for Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ateh, Comfort M.

    2015-01-01

    In evaluating teachers' instructional decisions during instruction, it is clear that the nature of their elicitation is crucial for student learning. When instructional decisions are informed by information about students' conceptual understanding, significant learning is possible. This article examined the elicitation practices of two high school…

  11. Freeze or Flee? Negative Stimuli Elicit Selective Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estes, Zachary; Verges, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Humans preferentially attend to negative stimuli. A consequence of this automatic vigilance for negative valence is that negative words elicit slower responses than neutral or positive words on a host of cognitive tasks. Some researchers have speculated that negative stimuli elicit a general suppression of motor activity, akin to the freezing…

  12. Elicited Emotions and Cognitive Functioning in Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, Rivka; Klein, Pnina S.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the effects of eliciting positive and negative emotions on various cognitive functions of four- to five-year-old preschool children were examined. Emotions were elicited through presentations of "happy" and "sad" video clips, before the children performed the cognitive tasks. Behavioural (facial expressions) and physiological (heart…

  13. The ancient mammalian KRAB zinc finger gene cluster on human chromosome 8q24.3 illustrates principles of C2H2 zinc finger evolution associated with unique expression profiles in human tissues

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Expansion of multi-C2H2 domain zinc finger (ZNF) genes, including the Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) subfamily, paralleled the evolution of tetrapodes, particularly in mammalian lineages. Advances in their cataloging and characterization suggest that the functions of the KRAB-ZNF gene family contributed to mammalian speciation. Results Here, we characterized the human 8q24.3 ZNF cluster on the genomic, the phylogenetic, the structural and the transcriptome level. Six (ZNF7, ZNF34, ZNF250, ZNF251, ZNF252, ZNF517) of the seven locus members contain exons encoding KRAB domains, one (ZNF16) does not. They form a paralog group in which the encoded KRAB and ZNF protein domains generally share more similarities with each other than with other members of the human ZNF superfamily. The closest relatives with respect to their DNA-binding domain were ZNF7 and ZNF251. The analysis of orthologs in therian mammalian species revealed strong conservation and purifying selection of the KRAB-A and zinc finger domains. These findings underscore structural/functional constraints during evolution. Gene losses in the murine lineage (ZNF16, ZNF34, ZNF252, ZNF517) and potential protein truncations in primates (ZNF252) illustrate ongoing speciation processes. Tissue expression profiling by quantitative real-time PCR showed similar but distinct patterns for all tested ZNF genes with the most prominent expression in fetal brain. Based on accompanying expression signatures in twenty-six other human tissues ZNF34 and ZNF250 revealed the closest expression profiles. Together, the 8q24.3 ZNF genes can be assigned to a cerebellum, a testis or a prostate/thyroid subgroup. These results are consistent with potential functions of the ZNF genes in morphogenesis and differentiation. Promoter regions of the seven 8q24.3 ZNF genes display common characteristics like missing TATA-box, CpG island-association and transcription factor binding site (TFBS) modules. Common TFBS modules partly

  14. Patterns on serpentine shapes elicit visual attention in marmosets (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Wombolt, Jessica R; Caine, Nancy G

    2016-09-01

    Given the prevalence of threatening snakes in the evolutionary history, and modern-day environments of human and nonhuman primates, sensory, and perceptual abilities that allow for quick detection of, and appropriate response to snakes are likely to have evolved. Many studies have demonstrated that primates recognize snakes faster than other stimuli, and it is suggested that the unique serpentine shape is responsible for its quick detection. However, there are many nonthreatening serpentine shapes in the environment (e.g., vines) that are not threatening; therefore, other cues must be used to distinguish threatening from benign serpentine objects. In two experiments, we systematically evaluated how common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) visually attend to specific snake-like features. In the first experiment, we examined if skin pattern is a cue that elicits increased visual inspection of serpentine shapes by measuring the amount of time the marmosets looked into a blind before, during, and after presentation of clay models with and without patterns. The marmosets spent the most time looking at the objects, both serpentine and triangle, that were etched with scales, suggesting that something may be uniquely salient about scales in evoking attention. In contrast, they showed relatively little interest in the unpatterned serpentine and control (a triangle) stimuli. In experiment 2, we replicated and extended the results of experiment 1 by adding additional stimulus conditions. We found that patterns on a serpentine shape generated more inspection than those same patterns on a triangle shape. We were unable to confirm that a scaled pattern is unique in its ability to elicit visual interest; the scaled models elicited similar looking times as line and star patterns. Our data provide a foundation for future research to examine how snakes are detected and identified by primates. Am. J. Primatol. 78:928-936, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27225979

  15. Uniqueness of the momentum map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Chiara; Nest, Ryszard

    2016-08-01

    We give a detailed discussion of existence and uniqueness of the momentum map associated to Poisson Lie actions, which was defined by Lu. We introduce a weaker notion of momentum map, called infinitesimal momentum map, which is defined on one-forms and we analyze its integrability to the Lu's momentum map. Finally, the uniqueness of the Lu's momentum map is studied by describing, explicitly, the tangent space to the space of momentum maps.

  16. Cell signaling pathways elicited by asbestos.

    PubMed Central

    Mossman, B T; Faux, S; Janssen, Y; Jimenez, L A; Timblin, C; Zanella, C; Goldberg, J; Walsh, E; Barchowsky, A; Driscoll, K

    1997-01-01

    In recent years, it has become apparent that minerals can trigger alterations in gene expression by initiating signaling events upstream of gene transactivation. These cascades may be initiated at the cell surface after interaction of minerals with the plasma membrane either through receptorlike mechanisms or integrins. Alternatively, signaling pathways may be stimulated by active oxygen species generated both during phagocytosis of minerals and by redox reactions on the mineral surface. At least two signaling cascades linked to activation of transcription factors, i.e., DNA-binding proteins involved in modulating gene expression and DNA replication, are stimulated after exposure of lung cells to asbestos fibers in vitro. These include nuclear factor kappa B (NF kappa B) and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade important in regulation of the transcription factor, activator protein-1 (AP-1). Both NF kappa B and AP-1 bind to specific DNA sequences within the regulatory or promoter regions of genes that are critical to cell proliferation and inflammation. Unraveling the cell signaling cascades initiated by mineral dusts and pharmacologic inhibition of these events may be important for the control and treatment of mineral-associated occupational diseases. Images Figure 2. B Figure 3. A Figure 3. B PMID:9400710

  17. Elicitation of broadly neutralizing influenza antibodies in animals with previous influenza exposure.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chih-Jen; Yassine, Hadi M; McTamney, Patrick M; Gall, Jason G D; Whittle, James R R; Boyington, Jeffrey C; Nabel, Gary J

    2012-08-15

    The immune system responds to influenza infection by producing neutralizing antibodies to the viral surface protein, hemagglutinin (HA), which regularly changes its antigenic structure. Antibodies that target the highly conserved stem region of HA neutralize diverse influenza viruses and can be elicited through vaccination in animals and humans. Efforts to develop universal influenza vaccines have focused on strategies to elicit such antibodies; however, the concern has been raised that previous influenza immunity may abrogate the induction of such broadly protective antibodies. We show here that prime-boost immunization can induce broadly neutralizing antibody responses in influenza-immune mice and ferrets that were previously infected or vaccinated. HA stem-directed antibodies were elicited in mice primed with a DNA vaccine and boosted with inactivated vaccine from H1N1 A/New Caledonia/20/1999 (1999 NC) HA regardless of preexposure. Similarly, gene-based vaccination with replication-defective adenovirus 28 (rAd28) and 5 (rAd5) vectors encoding 1999 NC HA elicited stem-directed neutralizing antibodies and conferred protection against unmatched 1934 and 2007 H1N1 virus challenge in influenza-immune ferrets. Indeed, previous exposure to certain strains could enhance immunogenicity: The strongest HA stem-directed immune response was observed in ferrets previously infected with a divergent 1934 H1N1 virus. These findings suggest that broadly neutralizing antibodies against the conserved stem region of HA can be elicited through vaccination despite previous influenza exposure, which supports the feasibility of developing stem-directed universal influenza vaccines for humans. PMID:22896678

  18. Hepatitis C virus load and expression of a unique subset of cellular genes in circulating lymphoid cells differentiate non-responders from responders to pegylated interferon alpha-ribavirin treatment.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tram N Q; Lin, Dolly M H; Mulrooney-Cousins, Patricia M; Churchill, Norma D; Kowala-Piaskowska, Arleta; Mozer-Lisewska, Iwona; Machaj, Anna; Pazgan-Simon, Monika; Zalewska, Malgorzata; Simon, Krzysztof; King, Dawn; Reddy, S Bharati; Michalak, Tomasz I

    2013-03-01

    Based on investigations of liver biopsy material, certain cellular genes have been implicated as correlates of success or failure to interferon alpha-ribavirin (IFN/RBV) therapy against hepatitis C. The current study aimed at determining whether expression of host genes thought to be relevant to HCV replication in the liver would be correlated with HCV infection status in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and also with patient responsiveness to IFN/RBV treatment. Therefore, PBMCs from patients with chronic hepatitis C responding (n = 35) or not (n = 49) to IFN/RBV and from healthy controls (n = 15) were evaluated for HCV RNA load and cellular gene expression. Non-responders had 3- to 10-fold higher basal levels of interleukin (IL)-8, IFN-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15), 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), and Toll-like receptors (TLR)-4, -5, and -7 compared to responders. Non-responders with similar post-treatment follow-ups as responders persistently expressed 6- to 20-fold greater levels of IL-8, ISG15, and OAS after therapy. Higher expression of IFN-α, IFN-γ, and IFN-λ was found in PBMCs of individuals achieving sustained virological response, either before or after therapy. Pre-treatment HCV RNA loads in PBMCs of non-responders were significantly higher (P = 0.016) than those of responders. In conclusion, the data indicate that immune cells of responders and non-responders to IFN/RBV therapy exhibited significantly different virological and host gene expression profiles. Elevated baseline HCV loads and TLR-4, -5, and -7 levels, and persistently high levels of IL-8, ISG15, and OAS were correlated with IFN non-responsiveness. The results warrant further investigations on the utilization of PBMCs for predicting success or failure to IFN-based therapies. PMID:23280583

  19. Uniqueness of place: uniqueness of models. The FLEX modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenicia, F.; Savenije, H. H. G.; Wrede, S.; Schoups, G.; Pfister, L.

    2009-04-01

    The current practice in hydrological modelling is to make use of model structures that are fixed and a-priori defined. However, for a model to reflect uniqueness of place while maintaining parsimony, it is necessary to be flexible in its architecture. We have developed a new approach for the development and testing of hydrological models, named the FLEX approach. This approach allows the formulation of alternative model structures that vary in configuration and complexity, and uses an objective method for testing and comparing model performance. We have tested this approach on three headwater catchments in Luxembourg with marked differences in hydrological response, where we have generated 15 alternative model structures. Each of the three catchments is best represented by a different model architecture. Our results clearly show that uniqueness of place necessarily leads to uniqueness of models.

  20. The genetic structure of a tribal population, the Yanomama Indians XI. Gene frequencies for 10 blood groups and the ABH-Le secretor traits in the Yanomama and their neighbors; the uniqueness of the tribe.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, R H; Gershowitz, H; Layrisse, M; Neel, J V

    1975-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of blood group typings for a total of 33 villages distributed among five South American Indian tribes--Yanomama (21 villages), Makiritare (eight villages), Macushi (two villages), Piaroa (one village), and Wapishana (one village). These new results for the Yanomama and Makiritare tribes have been combined with those previously reported to allow a better appreciation of the distribution of allelic frequencies in the tribes. The relationship of the Yanomama to other South American Indian tribes is investigated using data on six polymorphic loci (Rh, MNS, Fy, Jk, Di, Hp). By use of four genetic measures (two of genetic relationship and two of genetic diversity), we demonstrate that the Yanomama are genetically unique among a sample of 20 South American tribes. In addition, the Yanomama show somewhat less genetic diversity for the six loci analyzed than the average South American tribe. Taken together, these results indicate a rather long period of isolation for the population antecedent to the Yanomama--perhaps since the time of entry of man into the South American continent. The pattern of genetic relationships and genetic diversity for the 20 tribes is consistent with the hypothesis that evolution in South America proceeded by a process of fission-fusion leading to isolation of subpopulations with subsequent genetic differentiation as a consequence of population isolation. The uniqueness of the Yanomama appears to stem entirely from such a process, there being no evidence of any selective differential for the loci analyzed. PMID:50736

  1. Genetic and Biochemical Characterization of an Acquired Subgroup B3 Metallo-β-Lactamase Gene, blaAIM-1, and Its Unique Genetic Context in Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Australia

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Dongeun; Toleman, Mark A.; Bell, Jan; Ritchie, Brett; Pratt, Rachael; Ryley, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Three clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates (WCH2677, WCH2813, and WCH2837) isolated from the Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide, Australia, produced a metallo-β-lactamase (MBL)-positive Etest result. All isolates were PCR negative for known MBL genes. A gene bank was created, and an MBL gene, designated blaAIM-1, was cloned and fully characterized. The encoded enzyme, AIM-1, is a group B3 MBL that has the highest level of identity to THIN-B and L1. It is chromosomal and flanked by two copies (one intact and one truncated) of an ISCR element, ISCR15. Southern hybridization studies indicated the movement of both ISCR15 and blaAIM-1 within the three different clinical isolates. AIM-1 hydrolyzes most β-lactams, with the exception of aztreonam and, to a lesser extent, ceftazidime; however, it possesses significantly higher kcat values for cefepime and carbapenems than most other MBLs. AIM-1 was the first mobile group B3 enzyme detected and signals further problems for already beleaguered antimicrobial regimes to treat serious P. aeruginosa and other Gram-negative infections. PMID:22985886

  2. Genetic and biochemical characterization of an acquired subgroup B3 metallo-β-lactamase gene, blaAIM-1, and its unique genetic context in Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Australia.

    PubMed

    Yong, Dongeun; Toleman, Mark A; Bell, Jan; Ritchie, Brett; Pratt, Rachael; Ryley, Henry; Walsh, Timothy R

    2012-12-01

    Three clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates (WCH2677, WCH2813, and WCH2837) isolated from the Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide, Australia, produced a metallo-β-lactamase (MBL)-positive Etest result. All isolates were PCR negative for known MBL genes. A gene bank was created, and an MBL gene, designated bla(AIM-1), was cloned and fully characterized. The encoded enzyme, AIM-1, is a group B3 MBL that has the highest level of identity to THIN-B and L1. It is chromosomal and flanked by two copies (one intact and one truncated) of an ISCR element, ISCR15. Southern hybridization studies indicated the movement of both ISCR15 and bla(AIM-1) within the three different clinical isolates. AIM-1 hydrolyzes most β-lactams, with the exception of aztreonam and, to a lesser extent, ceftazidime; however, it possesses significantly higher k(cat) values for cefepime and carbapenems than most other MBLs. AIM-1 was the first mobile group B3 enzyme detected and signals further problems for already beleaguered antimicrobial regimes to treat serious P. aeruginosa and other Gram-negative infections. PMID:22985886

  3. Unique communities of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria in saline lakes of Salar de Atacama (Chile): evidence for a new phylogenetic lineage of phototrophic Gammaproteobacteria from pufLM gene analyses.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Vera; Tank, Marcus; Neulinger, Sven C; Gehrmann, Linda; Dorador, Cristina; Imhoff, Johannes F

    2010-12-01

    Phototrophic bacteria are important primary producers of salt lakes in the Salar de Atacama and at times form visible mass developments within and on top of the lake sediments. The communities of phototrophic bacteria from two of these lakes were characterized by molecular genetic approaches using key genes for the biosynthesis of the photosynthetic apparatus in phototrophic purple bacteria (pufLM) and in green sulfur bacteria (fmoA). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism of the pufLM genes indicated high variability of the community composition between the two lakes and subsamples thereof. The communities were characterized by the dominance of a novel, so far undescribed lineage of pufLM containing bacteria and the presence of representatives related to known halophilic Chromatiaceae and Ectothiorhodospiraceae. In addition, the presence of BChl b-containing anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria and of aerobic anoxygenic bacteria was indicated. Green sulfur bacteria were not detected in the environmental samples, although a bacterium related to Prosthecochloris indicum was identified in an enrichment culture. This is the first comprehensive description of phototrophic bacterial communities in a salt lake of South America made possible only due to the application of the functional pufLM genes. PMID:20868378

  4. Comparative Metabolomic and Genomic Analyses of TCDD-Elicited Metabolic Disruption in Mouse and Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Forgacs, Agnes L.; Kent, Michael N.; Makley, Meghan K.; Mets, Bryan; DelRaso, Nicholas; Jahns, Gary L.; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Zacharewski, Timothy R.; Reo, Nicholas V.

    2012-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) elicits a broad spectrum of species-specific effects that have not yet been fully characterized. This study compares the temporal effects of TCDD on hepatic aqueous and lipid metabolite extracts from immature ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice and Sprague-Dawley rats using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance–based metabolomic approaches and integrates published gene expression data to identify species-specific pathways affected by treatment. TCDD elicited metabolite and gene expression changes associated with lipid metabolism and transport, choline metabolism, bile acid metabolism, glycolysis, and glycerophospholipid metabolism. Lipid metabolism is altered in mice resulting in increased hepatic triacylglycerol as well as mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acid (FA) levels. Mouse-specific changes included the induction of CD36 and other cell surface receptors as well as lipases- and FA-binding proteins consistent with hepatic triglyceride and FA accumulation. In contrast, there was minimal hepatic fat accumulation in rats and decreased CD36 expression. However, choline metabolism was altered in rats, as indicated by decreases in betaine and increases in phosphocholine with the concomitant induction of betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase and choline kinase gene expression. Results from these studies show that aryl hydrocarbon receptor–mediated differential gene expression could be linked to metabolite changes and species-specific alterations of biochemical pathways. PMID:21964420

  5. Different Vaccine Vectors Delivering the Same Antigen Elicit CD8+ T Cell Responses with Distinct Clonotype and Epitope Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, M.; Robinson, H.; Wang, R.; Kong, W.-P.; Kanekiyo, M.; Akahata, W.; Xu, L.; Matsuo, K.; Natarajan, K.; Asher, T. E.; Price, D. A.; Douek, D. C.; Margulies, D. H.; Nabel, G. J.

    2009-08-15

    Prime-boost immunization with gene-based vectors has been developed to generate more effective vaccines for AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis. Although these vectors elicit potent T cell responses, the mechanisms by which they stimulate immunity are not well understood. In this study, we show that immunization by a single gene product, HIV-1 envelope, with alternative vector combinations elicits CD8{sup +} cells with different fine specificities and kinetics of mobilization. Vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells recognized overlapping third V region loop peptides. Unexpectedly, two anchor variants bound H-2D{sup d} better than the native sequences, and clones with distinct specificities were elicited by alternative vectors. X-ray crystallography revealed major differences in solvent exposure of MHC-bound peptide epitopes, suggesting that processed HIV-1 envelope gave rise to MHC-I/peptide conformations recognized by distinct CD8{sup +} T cell populations. These findings suggest that different gene-based vectors generate peptides with alternative conformations within MHC-I that elicit distinct T cell responses after vaccination.

  6. Different Vaccine Vectors Delivering the Same Antigen Elicit CD8plus T Cell Responses with Distinct Clonotype and Epitope Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    M Honda; R Wang; W Kong; M Kanekiyo; Q Akahata; L Xu; K Matsuo; K Natarajan; H Robinson; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Prime-boost immunization with gene-based vectors has been developed to generate more effective vaccines for AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis. Although these vectors elicit potent T cell responses, the mechanisms by which they stimulate immunity are not well understood. In this study, we show that immunization by a single gene product, HIV-1 envelope, with alternative vector combinations elicits CD8{sup +} cells with different fine specificities and kinetics of mobilization. Vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells recognized overlapping third V region loop peptides. Unexpectedly, two anchor variants bound H-2D{sup d} better than the native sequences, and clones with distinct specificities were elicited by alternative vectors. X-ray crystallography revealed major differences in solvent exposure of MHC-bound peptide epitopes, suggesting that processed HIV-1 envelope gave rise to MHC-I/peptide conformations recognized by distinct CD8{sup +} T cell populations. These findings suggest that different gene-based vectors generate peptides with alternative conformations within MHC-I that elicit distinct T cell responses after vaccination.

  7. What makes Xanthomonas albilineans unique amongst xanthomonads?

    PubMed

    Pieretti, Isabelle; Pesic, Alexander; Petras, Daniel; Royer, Monique; Süssmuth, Roderich D; Cociancich, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas albilineans causes leaf scald, a lethal disease of sugarcane. Compared to other species of Xanthomonas, X. albilineans exhibits distinctive pathogenic mechanisms, ecology and taxonomy. Its genome, which has experienced significant erosion, has unique genomic features. It lacks two loci required for pathogenicity in other plant pathogenic species of Xanthomonas: the xanthan gum biosynthesis and the Hrp-T3SS (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity-type three secretion system) gene clusters. Instead, X. albilineans harbors in its genome an SPI-1 (Salmonella pathogenicity island-1) T3SS gene cluster usually found in animal pathogens. X. albilineans produces a potent DNA gyrase inhibitor called albicidin, which blocks chloroplast differentiation, resulting in the characteristic white foliar stripe symptoms. The antibacterial activity of albicidin also confers on X. albilineans a competitive advantage against rival bacteria during sugarcane colonization. Recent chemical studies have uncovered the unique structure of albicidin and allowed us to partially elucidate its fascinating biosynthesis apparatus, which involves an enigmatic hybrid PKS/NRPS (polyketide synthase/non-ribosomal peptide synthetase) machinery. PMID:25964795

  8. The liberal illusion of uniqueness.

    PubMed

    Stern, Chadly; West, Tessa V; Schmitt, Peter G

    2014-01-01

    In two studies, we demonstrated that liberals underestimate their similarity to other liberals (i.e., display truly false uniqueness), whereas moderates and conservatives overestimate their similarity to other moderates and conservatives (i.e., display truly false consensus; Studies 1 and 2). We further demonstrated that a fundamental difference between liberals and conservatives in the motivation to feel unique explains this ideological distinction in the accuracy of estimating similarity (Study 2). Implications of the accuracy of consensus estimates for mobilizing liberal and conservative political movements are discussed. PMID:24247730

  9. CCSI Risk Estimation: An Application of Expert Elicitation

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.

    2012-10-01

    The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a multi-laboratory simulation-driven effort to develop carbon capture technologies with the goal of accelerating commercialization and adoption in the near future. One of the key CCSI technical challenges is representing and quantifying the inherent uncertainty and risks associated with developing, testing, and deploying the technology in simulated and real operational settings. To address this challenge, the CCSI Element 7 team developed a holistic risk analysis and decision-making framework. The purpose of this report is to document the CCSI Element 7 structured systematic expert elicitation to identify additional risk factors. We review the significance of and established approaches to expert elicitation, describe the CCSI risk elicitation plan and implementation strategies, and conclude by discussing the next steps and highlighting the contribution of risk elicitation toward the achievement of the overarching CCSI objectives.

  10. Uniquely identifying wheat plant structures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Uniquely naming wheat (Triticum aestivum L. em Thell) plant parts is useful for communicating plant development research and the effects of environmental stresses on normal wheat development. Over the past 30+ years, several naming systems have been proposed for wheat shoot, leaf, spike, spikelet, ...

  11. Identity Foreclosure: A Unique Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petitpas, Al

    1978-01-01

    Foreclosure occurs when individuals prematurely make a firm commitment to an occupation or an ideology. If the pressure of having an occupational identity can be eased, then it may be possible to establish an environment in which foreclosed students could move toward the consolidation of their unique identities. (Author)

  12. COPD: Unique to Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Multiple Health Problems Prevention Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z COPD Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ... not a weakness or a normal part of aging. Most people feel better with ... help you can, so that your COPD does not prevent you from living your life ...

  13. Application of a five-tiered scheme for standardized classification of 2,360 unique mismatch repair gene variants lodged on the InSiGHT locus-specific database

    PubMed Central

    Plazzer, John-Paul; Greenblatt, Marc S.; Akagi, Kiwamu; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Bapat, Bharati; Bernstein, Inge; Capellá, Gabriel; den Dunnen, Johan T.; du Sart, Desiree; Fabre, Aurelie; Farrell, Michael P.; Farrington, Susan M.; Frayling, Ian M.; Frebourg, Thierry; Goldgar, David E.; Heinen, Christopher D.; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Kohonen-Corish, Maija; Robinson, Kristina Lagerstedt; Leung, Suet Yi; Martins, Alexandra; Moller, Pal; Morak, Monika; Nystrom, Minna; Peltomaki, Paivi; Pineda, Marta; Qi, Ming; Ramesar, Rajkumar; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; Scott, Rodney J.; Sijmons, Rolf; Tavtigian, Sean V.; Tops, Carli M.; Weber, Thomas; Wijnen, Juul; Woods, Michael O.; Macrae, Finlay; Genuardi, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Clinical classification of sequence variants identified in hereditary disease genes directly affects clinical management of patients and their relatives. The International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumours (InSiGHT) undertook a collaborative effort to develop, test and apply a standardized classification scheme to constitutional variants in the Lynch Syndrome genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Unpublished data submission was encouraged to assist variant classification, and recognized by microattribution. The scheme was refined by multidisciplinary expert committee review of clinical and functional data available for variants, applied to 2,360 sequence alterations, and disseminated online. Assessment using validated criteria altered classifications for 66% of 12,006 database entries. Clinical recommendations based on transparent evaluation are now possible for 1,370 variants not obviously protein-truncating from nomenclature. This large-scale endeavor will facilitate consistent management of suspected Lynch Syndrome families, and demonstrates the value of multidisciplinary collaboration for curation and classification of variants in public locus-specific databases. PMID:24362816

  14. Molecular cytogenetic findings in a three-way novel variant of t(1;8;21)(p35;q22;q22): a unique relocation of the AML1/ETO fusion gene 1p35 in AML-M2.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Firoz; Kokate, Prajakta; Chheda, Pratiksha; Dalvi, Rupa; Das, Bibhu Ranjan; Mandava, Swarna

    2008-01-15

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a malignant neoplasm of hematopoietic stem cells characterized by an abnormal proliferation of myeloid precursors, a reduced rate of apoptosis, and an arrest in cellular differentiation. The present report deals with the results of hematologic, immunophenotypic, cytogenetic, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and molecular analyses of a 53-year-old female patient diagnosed with AML-M2. Cytogenetic and FISH analysis revealed a complex translocation involving three chromosomes showing t(1;8;21)(p35;q22;q22). The observation of breakpoints at 8q22 and 21q22 suggests a rearrangement of the ETO and AML1 genes, respectively. Using a dual-color FISH test with ETO and AML1 probes, an AML1/ETO fusion signal on the derivative 1p35 instead of der(8) was demonstrated. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report about the relocation of the AML1/ETO fusion gene to the 1p35 rather than der(8), suggesting the presence of a novel variant of t(8;21)(q22;q22) in the observed patient. PMID:18206543

  15. Caryotricha minuta (Xu et al., 2008) nov. comb., a unique marine ciliate (Protista, Ciliophora, Spirotrichea), with phylogenetic analysis of the ambiguous genus Caryotricha inferred from the small-subunit rRNA gene sequence.

    PubMed

    Miao, Miao; Shao, Chen; Jiang, Jiamei; Li, Liqiong; Stoeck, Thorsten; Song, Weibo

    2009-02-01

    A population of Kiitricha minuta Xu et al., 2008, a small kiitrichid ciliate, was isolated from a brackish water sample in Jiaozhou Bay, Qingdao, northern China. After comparison of its morphology and infraciliature, it is believed that this morphotype should be assigned to the genus Caryotricha; hence, a new combination is suggested, Caryotricha minuta (Xu et al., 2008) nov. comb. The small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequence was determined in order to elucidate the phylogenetic position of this poorly known, ambiguous genus. The organism can be clearly separated from its congener, Caryotricha convexa Kahl, 1932, by the extremely shortened ventral cirral rows in the posterior ends. Based on the data available, an improved diagnosis is given for the genus: marine Kiitrichidae with prominent buccal field; two highly developed undulating membranes; non-grouped, uniform cirral rows on both ventral and dorsal sides; enlarged transverse cirri present, which are the only differentiated cirri; marginal cirri not present; one short migratory row located posterior to buccal field; structure of dorsal kineties generally in Kiitricha pattern. The sequence of the SSU rRNA gene of C. minuta differs by 13 % from that of Kiitricha marina. Molecular phylogenetic analyses (Bayesian inference, least squares, neighbour joining, maximum parsimony) indicate that Caryotricha, together with Kiitricha, diverges at a deep level from all other spirotrichs. Its branching position is between Phacodiniidia and Licnophoridia. The results strongly support the distinct separation of the Kiitricha-Caryotricha clade, which always branches basal to the Stichotrichia-Hypotrichia-Oligotrichia-Choreotrichia assemblage. These results also confirm the previous hypothesis that the Kiitricha-Caryotricha group, long assumed to be a close relation to the euplotids, represents a taxon at subclass level within the spirotrichs. PMID:19196791

  16. Unique MSV for every job

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-06-01

    Consafe is now using a computer-aided design and drafting system adapting its multipurpose support vessels (MSVS) to specific user requirements. The vessels are based on the concept of standard container modules adapted into living quarters, workshops, service units, offices with each application for a specific project demanding a unique mix. There is also the need for constant refurbishment program as service conditions take their toll on the modules. The computer-aided design system is described.

  17. Elicitation of structure-specific antibodies by epitope scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Ofek, Gilad; Guenaga, F. Javier; Schief, William R.; Skinner, Jeff; Baker, David; Wyatt, Richard; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-01-01

    Elicitation of antibodies against targets that are immunorecessive, cryptic, or transient in their native context has been a challenge for vaccine design. Here we demonstrate the elicitation of structure-specific antibodies against the HIV-1 gp41 epitope of the broadly neutralizing antibody 2F5. This conformationally flexible region of gp41 assumes mostly helical conformations but adopts a kinked, extended structure when bound by antibody 2F5. Computational techniques were employed to transplant the 2F5 epitope into select acceptor scaffolds. The resultant “2F5-epitope scaffolds” possessed nanomolar affinity for antibody 2F5 and a range of epitope flexibilities and antigenic specificities. Crystallographic characterization of the epitope scaffold with highest affinity and antigenic discrimination confirmed good to near perfect attainment of the target conformation for the gp41 molecular graft in free and 2F5-bound states, respectively. Animals immunized with 2F5-epitope scaffolds showed levels of graft-specific immune responses that correlated with graft flexibility (p < 0.04), while antibody responses against the graft—as dissected residue-by-residue with alanine substitutions—resembled more closely those of 2F5 than sera elicited with flexible or cyclized peptides, a resemblance heightened by heterologous prime-boost. Lastly, crystal structures of a gp41 peptide in complex with monoclonal antibodies elicited by the 2F5-epitope scaffolds revealed that the elicited antibodies induce gp41 to assume its 2F5-recognized shape. Epitope scaffolds thus provide a means to elicit antibodies that recognize a predetermined target shape and sequence, even if that shape is transient in nature, and a means by which to dissect factors influencing such elicitation. PMID:20876137

  18. Free fall - A partial unique motion environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.

    1980-01-01

    Conditions leading to the elicitation of motion sickness have been divided into two main categories: partial motion environments, in which head movements are required to elicit motion sickness, and complete motion environments, in which independent movements of the head are not required for the production of symptoms. It is postulated that, according to this categorization, free fall constitutes a partial motion environment. In support of this hypothesis evidence is reviewed from Skylab missions, experiments in parabolic flight, and ground-based studies.

  19. Elicitation of jasmonate-mediated host defense in Brassica juncea (L.) attenuates population growth of mustard aphid Lipaphis erysimi (Kalt.).

    PubMed

    Koramutla, Murali Krishna; Kaur, Amandeep; Negi, Manisha; Venkatachalam, Perumal; Bhattacharya, Ramcharan

    2014-07-01

    The productivity of Brassica oilseeds is severely affected by its major pest: aphids. Unavailability of resistance source within the crossable germplasms has stalled the breeding efforts to derive aphid resistant cultivars. In this study, jasmonate-mediated host defense in Indian mustard Brassica juncea (L.) Czern. was evaluated and compared with regard to its elicitation in response to mustard aphid Lipaphis erysimi (Kalt.) and the defense elicitor methyl jasmonate (MeJ). Identification of jasmonate-induced unigenes in B. juncea revealed that most are orthologous to aphid-responsive genes, identified in taxonomically diverse plant-aphid interactions. The unigenes largely represented genes related to signal transduction, response to biotic and abiotic stimuli and homeostasis of reactive oxygen species (ROS), in addition to genes related to cellular and metabolic processes involved in cell organization, biogenesis, and development. Gene expression studies revealed induction of the key jasmonate biosynthetic genes (LOX, AOC, 12-OPDR), redox genes (CAT3 and GST6), and other downstream defense genes (PAL, ELI3, MYR, and TPI) by several folds, both in response to MeJ and plant-wounding. However, interestingly aphid infestation even after 24 h did not elicit any activation of these genes. In contrast, when the jasmonate-mediated host defense was elicited by exogenous application of MeJ the treated B. juncea plants showed a strong antibiosis effect on the infesting aphids and reduced the growth of aphid populations. The level of redox enzymes CAT, APX, and SOD, involved in ROS homeostasis in defense signaling, and several defense enzymes viz. POD, PPO, and PAL, remained high in treated plants. We conclude that in B. juncea, the jasmonate activated endogenous-defense, which is not effectively activated in response to mustard aphids, has the potential to reduce population growth of mustard aphids. PMID:24771023

  20. The bacterial magnetosome: a unique prokaryotic organelle.

    PubMed

    Lower, Brian H; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial magnetosome is a unique prokaryotic organelle comprising magnetic mineral crystals surrounded by a phospholipid bilayer. These inclusions are biomineralized by the magnetotactic bacteria which are ubiquitous, aquatic, motile microorganisms. Magnetosomes cause cells of magnetotactic bacteria to passively align and swim along the Earth's magnetic field lines, as miniature motile compass needles. These specialized compartments consist of a phospholipid bilayer membrane surrounding magnetic crystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4). The morphology of these membrane-bound crystals varies by species with a nominal magnetic domain size between 35 and 120 nm. Almost all magnetotactic bacteria arrange their magnetosomes in a chain within the cell there by maximizing the magnetic dipole moment of the cell. It is presumed that magnetotactic bacteria use magnetotaxis in conjunction with chemotaxis to locate and maintain an optimum position for growth and survival based on chemistry, redox and physiology in aquatic habitats with vertical chemical concentration and redox gradients. The biosynthesis of magnetosomes is a complex process that involves several distinct steps including cytoplasmic membrane modifications, iron uptake and transport, initiation of crystallization, crystal maturation and magnetosome chain formation. While many mechanistic details remain unresolved, magnetotactic bacteria appear to contain the genetic determinants for magnetosome biomineralization within their genomes in clusters of genes that make up what is referred to as the magnetosome gene island in some species. In addition, magnetosomes contain a unique set of proteins, not present in other cellular fractions, which control the biomineralization process. Through the development of genetic systems, proteomic and genomic work, and the use of molecular and biochemical tools, the functions of a number of magnetosome membrane proteins have been demonstrated and the molecular

  1. Expression alterations define unique molecular characteristics of spinal ependymomas

    PubMed Central

    Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Rahman, Ruman; Grundy, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Ependymomas are glial tumors that originate in either intracranial or spinal regions. Although tumors from different regions are histologically similar, they are biologically distinct. We therefore sought to identify molecular characteristics of spinal ependymomas (SEPN) in order to better understand the disease biology of these tumors. Using gene expression profiles of 256 tumor samples, we identified increased expression of 1,866 genes in SEPN when compared to intracranial ependymomas. These genes are mainly related to anterior/posterior pattern specification, response to oxidative stress, glial cell differentiation, DNA repair, and PPAR signalling, and also significantly enriched with cellular senescence genes (P = 5.5 × 10−03). In addition, a high number of significantly down-regulated genes in SEPN are localized to chromosome 22 (81 genes from chr22: 43,325,255 – 135,720,974; FDR = 1.77 × 10−23 and 22 genes from chr22: 324,739 – 32,822,302; FDR = 2.07 × 10−09) including BRD1, EP300, HDAC10, HIRA, HIC2, MKL1, and NF2. Evaluation of NF2 co-expressed genes further confirms the enrichment of chromosome 22 regions. Finally, systematic integration of chromosome 22 genes with interactome and NF2 co-expression data identifies key candidate genes. Our results reveal unique molecular characteristics of SEPN such as altered expression of cellular senescence and chromosome 22 genes. PMID:25909290

  2. Expert elicitation on the uncertainties associated with chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Tyshenko, Michael G; Oraby, Tamer; Darshan, Shalu; Westphal, Margit; Croteau, Maxine C; Aspinall, Willy; Elsaadany, Susie; Krewski, Daniel; Cashman, Neil

    2016-01-01

    A high degree of uncertainty exists for chronic wasting disease (CWD) transmission factors in farmed and wild cervids. Evaluating the factors is important as it helps to inform future risk management strategies. Expert opinion is often used to assist decision making in a number of health, science, and technology domains where data may be sparse or missing. Using the "Classical Model" of elicitation, a group of experts was asked to estimate the most likely values for several risk factors affecting CWD transmission. The formalized expert elicitation helped structure the issues and hence provide a rational basis for estimating some transmission risk factors for which evidence is lacking. Considered judgments regarding environmental transmission, latency of CWD transmission, management, and species barrier were provided by the experts. Uncertainties for many items were determined to be large, highlighting areas requiring more research. The elicited values may be used as surrogate values until research evidence becomes available. PMID:27556566

  3. Gender differences in preschoolers' help-eliciting communication.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R B

    1999-09-01

    Gender differences in help-eliciting communication and the relationship of such utterances with ability were explored. A sample of 71 preschoolers (38 boys, 33 girls; mean age 4 years 3 months) were videotaped as they solved a difficult puzzle. Spontaneous talk was analyzed for orientation (to whom or to what an utterance referred) and for the frequency of utterances coded as help eliciting. Significant main effects for gender were observed, with more frequent help-eliciting utterances (HEUs) made by the girls than by the boys, particularly HEUs about themselves (self-disclosing). Although the girls' HEUs were not predictive of ability on the puzzle, the boys' were. No gender differences in puzzle-solving ability were observed. Findings are discussed with regard to problem solving and social/linguistic development. PMID:10515069

  4. Deep sequencing reveals transcriptome re-programming of Polygonum multiflorum thunb. roots to the elicitation with methyl jasmonate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongchang; Wu, Wei; Hou, Kai; Chen, Junwen; Zhao, Zhi

    2016-02-01

    The phytohormone methyl jasmonate (MeJA) has been successfully used as an effective elicitor to enhance production of stilbenoid which is induced in plants as a secondary metabolite possibly in defense against herbivores and pathogens. However, the mechanism of MeJA-mediated stilbenoid biosynthesis remains unclear. Genomic information for Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. (P. multiflorum) is currently unavailable. To obtain insight into the global regulation mechanism of MeJA in the steady state of stilbene glucoside production (26 h after MeJA elicitation), especially on stilbene glucoside biosynthesis, we sequenced the transcriptomes of MeJA-treated and untreated P. multiflorum roots and obtained more than 51 million clean reads, from which 79,565 unigenes were obtained by de novo assembly. 56,972 unigenes were annotated against databases including Nr, Nt, Swiss-Prot, KEGG and COG. 18,677 genes expressed differentially between untreated and treated roots. Expression level analysis indicated that a large number of genes were associated with plant-pathogen interaction, plant hormone signal transduction, stilbenoid backbone biosynthesis, and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. 15 known genes involved in the biosynthesis of stilbenoid backbone were found with 7 genes showing increased transcript abundance following elicitation of MeJA. The significantly up (down)-regulated changes of 70 genes in stilbenoid biosynthesis were validated by qRT-PCR assays and PCR product sequencing. According to the expression changes and the previously proposed enzyme functions, multiple candidates for the unknown steps in stilbene glucoside biosynthesis were identified. We also found some genes putatively involved in the transcription factors. This comprehensive description of gene expression information could greatly facilitate our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of MeJA-mediated stilbenoid biosynthesis in P. multiflorum roots. Our results shed new light on the global regulation

  5. Biologically inspired robots elicit a robust fear response in zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladu, Fabrizio; Bartolini, Tiziana; Panitz, Sarah G.; Butail, Sachit; Macrı, Simone; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the behavioral response of zebrafish to three fear-evoking stimuli. In a binary choice test, zebrafish are exposed to a live allopatric predator, a biologically-inspired robot, and a computer-animated image of the live predator. A target tracking algorithm is developed to score zebrafish behavior. Unlike computer-animated images, the robotic and live predator elicit a robust avoidance response. Importantly, the robotic stimulus elicits more consistent inter-individual responses than the live predator. Results from this effort are expected to aid in hypothesis-driven studies on zebrafish fear response, by offering a valuable approach to maximize data-throughput and minimize animal subjects.

  6. The probabilities of unique events.

    PubMed

    Khemlani, Sangeet S; Lotstein, Max; Johnson-Laird, Phil

    2012-01-01

    Many theorists argue that the probabilities of unique events, even real possibilities such as President Obama's re-election, are meaningless. As a consequence, psychologists have seldom investigated them. We propose a new theory (implemented in a computer program) in which such estimates depend on an intuitive non-numerical system capable only of simple procedures, and a deliberative system that maps intuitions into numbers. The theory predicts that estimates of the probabilities of conjunctions should often tend to split the difference between the probabilities of the two conjuncts. We report two experiments showing that individuals commit such violations of the probability calculus, and corroborating other predictions of the theory, e.g., individuals err in the same way even when they make non-numerical verbal estimates, such as that an event is highly improbable. PMID:23056224

  7. The Probabilities of Unique Events

    PubMed Central

    Khemlani, Sangeet S.; Lotstein, Max; Johnson-Laird, Phil

    2012-01-01

    Many theorists argue that the probabilities of unique events, even real possibilities such as President Obama's re-election, are meaningless. As a consequence, psychologists have seldom investigated them. We propose a new theory (implemented in a computer program) in which such estimates depend on an intuitive non-numerical system capable only of simple procedures, and a deliberative system that maps intuitions into numbers. The theory predicts that estimates of the probabilities of conjunctions should often tend to split the difference between the probabilities of the two conjuncts. We report two experiments showing that individuals commit such violations of the probability calculus, and corroborating other predictions of the theory, e.g., individuals err in the same way even when they make non-numerical verbal estimates, such as that an event is highly improbable. PMID:23056224

  8. Compare Gene Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    2014-05-31

    Compare Gene Profiles (CGP) performs pairwise gene content comparisons among a relatively large set of related bacterial genomes. CGP performs pairwise BLAST among gene calls from a set of input genome and associated annotation files, and combines the results to generate lists of common genes, unique genes, homologs, and genes from each genome that differ substantially in length from corresponding genes in the other genomes. CGP is implemented in Python and runs in a Linux environment in serial or parallel mode.

  9. L-Theanine elicits umami taste via the T1R1 + T1R3 umami taste receptor.

    PubMed

    Narukawa, Masataka; Toda, Yasuka; Nakagita, Tomoya; Hayashi, Yukako; Misaka, Takumi

    2014-06-01

    L-Theanine is a unique amino acid present in green tea. It elicits umami taste and has a considerable effect on tea taste and quality. We investigated L-theanine activity on the T1R1 + T1R3 umami taste receptor. L-Theanine activated T1R1 + T1R3-expressing cells and showed a synergistic response with inosine 5'-monophosphate. The site-directed mutagenesis analysis revealed that L-theanine binds to L-amino acid binding site in the Venus flytrap domain of T1R1. This study shows that L-theanine elicits an umami taste via T1R1 + T1R3. PMID:24633359

  10. Molecular Basis of the Increase in Invertase Activity Elicited by Gravistimulation of Oat-Shoot Pulvini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Liu-Lai; Song, Il; Kim, Donghern; Kaufman, Peter B.

    1993-01-01

    An asymmetric (top vs. bottom) increase in invertase activity is elicited by gravistimulation in oatshoot pulvini starting within 3h after treatment. In order to analyze the regulation of invertase gene expression in this system, we examined the effect of gravistimulation on invertase mRNA induction. Total RNA and poly(A)(+)RNA, isolated from oat pulvini, and two oligonucleotide primers, corresponding to two conserved amino-acid sequences (NDPNG and WECPD) found in invertase from other species, were used for the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). A partial-length cDNA (550 base pairs) was obtained and characterized. There was a 52 % deduced amino-acid sequence homology to that of carrot beta-fructosi- dase and a 48 % homology to that of tomato invertase. Northern blot analysis showed that there was an obvious transient accumulation of invertase mRNA elicited by gravistimulation of oat pulvini. The mRNA was rapidly induced to a maximum level at 1h following gravistimulation treatment and gradually decreased afterwards. The mRNA level in the bottom half of the oat pulvinus was significantly higher (five-fold) than that in the top half of the pulvinus tissue. The induction of invertase mRNA was consistent with the transient enhancement of invertase activity during the graviresponse of the pulvinus. These data indicate that the expression of the invertase gene(s) could be regulated by gravistimulation at the transcriptional and/or translational levels. Southern blot analysis showed that there were four genomic DNA fragments hybridized to the invertase cDNA. This suggests that an invertase gene family may exist in oat plants.

  11. Cellular resistance to HIV-1 infection in target cells coincides with a rapid induction of X-DING-CD4 mRNA: indication of the unique host innate response to virus regulated through function of the X-DING-CD4 gene.

    PubMed

    Shilpi, Rasheda Y; Sachdeva, Rakhee; Simm, Malgorzata

    2012-08-01

    Clinical reports indicate that some infected individuals control HIV-1 replication through undefined mechanisms. Our group reported that a human protein named X-DING-CD4 holds a potent antiviral activity, blocking transcription of HIV-1 LTR through the inhibition of NF-κB/DNA binding. Based on observations that transformed HIV-1 resistant CD4(+) T cells produce higher levels of soluble X-DING-CD4 protein upon their exposure to virus, we hypothesized that resistance to HIV-1 in these cells may be regulated through function of the X-DING-CD4 gene. Real-time PCR evaluations of X-DING-CD4 mRNA expression confirmed our hypothesis; HIV-1 exposure caused rapid up-regulation of X-DING-CD4 mRNA in resistant, but not susceptible, cells; and the burst of X-DING-CD4 mRNA expression correlated with restriction of HIV-1 transcription. Subsequently, we examined the activity of the X-DING-CD4 gene in monocytes and macrophages from (n = 13) HIV-negative donors. The assessment of HIV-1 gag mRNA showed that the majority of cells were permissive to virus replication; however, macrophages from four donors were refractory to HIV-1 infection. In response to virus, these cells up-regulated X-DING-CD4 gene expression by 2- to 1000-fold. These data provide evidence that the X-DING-CD4 gene contributes to early cellular protection from HIV infection in some individuals and this protection depends solely on the unique genetic regulation of the host. PMID:22042911

  12. Some Uniqueness Results for PARAFAC2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ten Berge, Jos M. F.; Kiers, Henk A. L.

    1996-01-01

    Some uniqueness properties are presented for the PARAFAC2 model for covariance matrices, focusing on uniqueness in the rank two case of PARAFAC2. PARAFAC2 is shown to be usually unique with four matrices, but not unique with three unless a certain additional assumption is introduced. (SLD)

  13. L-Amino Acids Elicit Diverse Response Patterns in Taste Sensory Cells: A Role for Multiple Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Pal Choudhuri, Shreoshi; Delay, Rona J.; Delay, Eugene R.

    2015-01-01

    Umami, the fifth basic taste, is elicited by the L-amino acid, glutamate. A unique characteristic of umami taste is the response potentiation by 5’ ribonucleotide monophosphates, which are also capable of eliciting an umami taste. Initial reports using human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells suggested that there is one broadly tuned receptor heterodimer, T1r1+T1r3, which detects L-glutamate and all other L-amino acids. However, there is growing evidence that multiple receptors detect glutamate in the oral cavity. While much is understood about glutamate transduction, the mechanisms for detecting the tastes of other L-amino acids are less well understood. We used calcium imaging of isolated taste sensory cells and taste cell clusters from the circumvallate and foliate papillae of C57BL/6J and T1r3 knockout mice to determine if other receptors might also be involved in detection of L-amino acids. Ratiometric imaging with Fura-2 was used to study calcium responses to monopotassium L-glutamate, L-serine, L-arginine, and L-glutamine, with and without inosine 5’ monophosphate (IMP). The results of these experiments showed that the response patterns elicited by L-amino acids varied significantly across taste sensory cells. L-amino acids other than glutamate also elicited synergistic responses in a subset of taste sensory cells. Along with its role in synergism, IMP alone elicited a response in a large number of taste sensory cells. Our data indicate that synergistic and non-synergistic responses to L-amino acids and IMP are mediated by multiple receptors or possibly a receptor complex. PMID:26110622

  14. Elicited Production of Relative Clauses in Children with Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zukowski, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Relative clauses have been implicated alternately as a strength and a weakness in the language of people with Williams Syndrome (WS). To clarify the facts, an elicited production test was administered to 10 people with WS (age 10-16 years), 10 typically developing children (age 4-7 years), and 12 typically developing adults. Nearly every WS…

  15. Computational Support for Early Elicitation and Classification of Tone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Steven; Lee, Haejoong

    2014-01-01

    Investigating a tone language involves careful transcription of tone on words and phrases. This is challenging when the phonological categories--the tones or melodies--have not been identified. Effects such as coarticulation, sandhi, and phrase-level prosody appear as obstacles to early elicitation and classification of tone. This article presents…

  16. A Study of the Affective Responses Elicited by Occupational Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoon, Craig G.

    1976-01-01

    The semantic differential was used to assess the properties of affect elicited by occupational stimuli. Vocationally committed men studying medicine, business, and engineering responded to a semantic differential containing occupational concepts. Results show a semantic space for all three groups composed of three orthogonal dimensions of affect…

  17. Creating a Framework: Art Therapy Elicits the Narrative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harber, Karen

    2011-01-01

    A case study illustrates how art therapy was used to elicit the narrative of an adolescent male student in transition from incarceration to a transfer school setting. Childhood trauma was addressed in individual sessions and within a literacy group co-led by a reading specialist. The art therapist responded to the client's needs by broadening the…

  18. Engaging Young Children in Research through Photo Elicitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyle, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Embracing the new sociology of childhood, this paper describes a participatory research method built on a belief in the competency of young children. The paper begins with a critical review of the photo elicitation literature exploring the varied levels of children's participation. Drawing on the strengths of the previous research, a…

  19. Photo-Elicitation: Reflexivity on Method, Analysis, and Graphic Portraits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Veronica M.; Lahman, Maria K. E.

    2015-01-01

    In this methodological discussion, the authors detail and reflect on the processes of using photo-elicitation interviewing as a way to align with positive qualitative methodologies, to gain access to participant beliefs and values, and to highlight participant voices through their choices of words and visuals. A review of the literature and an…

  20. Clinicians as Communication Partners: Developing a Mediated Discourse Elicitation Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hengst, Julie A.; Duff, Melissa C.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the development and piloting of a mediated discourse elicitation protocol. Grounded in situated theories of communication and informed by mediated discourse analysis, this protocol selectively samples familiar discourse types in a manner designed to preserve interactional aspects of communication. Critically, the mediated…

  1. Stimulus Duration Preference at Electrode Sites Yielding Elicited Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, V. C.

    1970-01-01

    The latency to display eating or drinking during hypothalamic stimulation was compared with the preferred duration of the same stimulus intensity in a self-stimulation situation. All the animals preferred longer stimulus durations than those required to elicit eating or drinking

  2. Eliciting Design Patterns for E-Learning Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Retalis, Symeon; Georgiakakis, Petros; Dimitriadis, Yannis

    2006-01-01

    Design pattern creation, especially in the e-learning domain, is a highly complex process that has not been sufficiently studied and formalized. In this paper, we propose a systematic pattern development cycle, whose most important aspects focus on reverse engineering of existing systems in order to elicit features that are cross-validated through…

  3. A Task that Elicits Reasoning: A Dual Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yankelewitz, Dina; Mueller, Mary; Maher, Carolyn A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the forms of reasoning elicited as fourth grade students in a suburban district and sixth grade students in an urban district worked on similar tasks involving reasoning with the use of Cuisenaire rods. Analysis of the two data sets shows similarities in the reasoning used by both groups of students on specific tasks, and the…

  4. Elicitation Support Requirements of Multi-Expertise Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitter-Rijpkema, Marlies; Martens, Rob; Jochems, Wim

    2005-01-01

    Tools to support knowledge elicitation are used more and more in situations where employees or students collaborate using the computer. Studies indicate that differences exist between experts and novices regarding their methods of work and reasoning. However, the commonly preferred approach tends to deal with team members as a single system with…

  5. Using Automatic Speech Recognition Technology with Elicited Oral Response Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Troy L.; Davies, Randall S.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the use of automatic speech recognition (ASR) scored elicited oral response (EOR) tests to assess the speaking ability of English language learners. It also examined the relationship between ASR-scored EOR and other language proficiency measures and the ability of the ASR to rate speakers without bias to gender or native…

  6. Eliciting Production of L2 Target Structures through Priming Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, Kim; Trofimovich, Pavel; Neumann, Heike

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the pedagogical applications of structural priming research in an English for academic purposes (EAP) context, investigating whether priming activities are an effective tool for eliciting production of target grammatical structures. University students across four EAP classes carried out a total of 6 information-exchange…

  7. Transfer of Aversive Respondent Elicitation in Accordance with Equivalence Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valverde, Miguel Rodriguez; Luciano, Carmen; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigates the transfer of aversively conditioned respondent elicitation through equivalence classes, using skin conductance as the measure of conditioning. The first experiment is an attempt to replicate Experiment 1 in Dougher, Augustson, Markham, Greenway, and Wulfert (1994), with different temporal parameters in the…

  8. Eliciting Students' Beliefs about Who Is Good at Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morge, Shelby P.

    2007-01-01

    This article highlights a series of activities designed to elicit students' mathematics-related beliefs, particularly those related to gender. As a result of the activities, females in upper-level classes rated themselves as having less confidence than males, and viewing a movie clip was sufficient for some students to modify their descriptions of…

  9. The Role of Elicited Verbal Imitation in Toddlers' Word Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Rosemary; Munro, Natalie; Baker, Elise; McGregor, Karla; Docking, Kimberley; Arciuli, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    This study is about the role of elicited verbal imitation in toddler word learning. Forty-eight toddlers were taught eight nonwords linked to referents. During training, they were asked to imitate the nonwords. Naming of the referents was tested at three intervals (one minute later [uncued], five minutes, and 1-7 days later [cued]) and recognition…

  10. Photo-Elicitation Method Gives Voice and Reactions of Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, C. Zoe; Woodward, Anne-Marie

    1999-01-01

    Describes a research assignment (called "photo-elicitation") in a graduate course on the role of photography in society in which students interview people similar to the subjects in the photographs to discover how the photographs affect them. Includes material from one research project interviewing three recovering drug addicts responding to Larry…

  11. Preparing Beginning Teachers to Elicit and Interpret Students' Mathematical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleep, Laurie; Boerst, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated how teacher education assignments can be designed to support beginning teachers in learning to do the work of teaching. We examined beginners' formative assessment practices--in particular, their eliciting and interpreting of students' mathematical thinking--in the context of an elementary mathematics methods assignment,…

  12. Engineered mammalian RNAi can elicit antiviral protection that negates the requirement for the interferon response

    PubMed Central

    Bouhaddou, Mehdi; Sachs, David; tenOever, Benjamin Robert

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY While the intrinsic antiviral cell defenses of many kingdoms utilize pathogen-specific small RNAs, the antiviral response of chordates is primarily protein-based and not uniquely tailored to the incoming microbe. In an effort to explain this evolutionary bifurcation, we determined whether antiviral RNA interference (RNAi) was sufficient to replace the protein-based type I interferon (IFN-I) system of mammals. To this end, we recreated an RNAi-like response in mammals and determined its effectiveness to combat influenza A virus in vivo in the presence and absence of the canonical IFN-I system. Mammalian antiviral RNAi, elicited by either host- or virus-derived small RNAs, effectively attenuated virus and prevented disease independently of the innate immune response. These data find that chordates could have utilized RNAi as their primary antiviral cell defense and suggest that the IFN-I system emerged as a result of natural selection imposed by ancient pathogens. PMID:26549455

  13. Respiratory infections unique to Asia.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Kenneth W; File, Thomas M

    2008-11-01

    Asia is a highly heterogeneous region with vastly different cultures, social constitutions and populations affected by a wide spectrum of respiratory diseases caused by tropical pathogens. Asian patients with community-acquired pneumonia differ from their Western counterparts in microbiological aetiology, in particular the prominence of Gram-negative organisms, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Burkholderia pseudomallei and Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, the differences in socioeconomic and health-care infrastructures limit the usefulness of Western management guidelines for pneumonia in Asia. The importance of emerging infectious diseases such as severe acute respiratory syndrome and avian influenza infection remain as close concerns for practising respirologists in Asia. Specific infections such as melioidosis, dengue haemorrhagic fever, scrub typhus, leptospirosis, salmonellosis, penicilliosis marneffei, malaria, amoebiasis, paragonimiasis, strongyloidiasis, gnathostomiasis, trinchinellosis, schistosomiasis and echinococcosis occur commonly in Asia and manifest with a prominent respiratory component. Pulmonary eosinophilia, endemic in parts of Asia, could occur with a wide range of tropical infections. Tropical eosinophilia is believed to be a hyper-sensitivity reaction to degenerating microfilariae trapped in the lungs. This article attempts to address the key respiratory issues in these respiratory infections unique to Asia and highlight the important diagnostic and management issues faced by practising respirologists. PMID:18945321

  14. Unique role for ATG5 in neutrophil-mediated immunopathology during M. tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Kimmey, Jacqueline M; Huynh, Jeremy P; Weiss, Leslie A; Park, Sunmin; Kambal, Amal; Debnath, Jayanta; Virgin, Herbert W; Stallings, Christina L

    2015-12-24

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a major global health threat, replicates in macrophages in part by inhibiting phagosome-lysosome fusion, until interferon-γ (IFNγ) activates the macrophage to traffic M. tuberculosis to the lysosome. How IFNγ elicits this effect is unknown, but many studies suggest a role for macroautophagy (herein termed autophagy), a process by which cytoplasmic contents are targeted for lysosomal degradation. The involvement of autophagy has been defined based on studies in cultured cells where M. tuberculosis co-localizes with autophagy factors ATG5, ATG12, ATG16L1, p62, NDP52, BECN1 and LC3 (refs 2-6), stimulation of autophagy increases bacterial killing, and inhibition of autophagy increases bacterial survival. Notably, these studies reveal modest (~1.5-3-fold change) effects on M. tuberculosis replication. By contrast, mice lacking ATG5 in monocyte-derived cells and neutrophils (polymorponuclear cells, PMNs) succumb to M. tuberculosis within 30 days, an extremely severe phenotype similar to mice lacking IFNγ signalling. Importantly, ATG5 is the only autophagy factor that has been studied during M. tuberculosis infection in vivo and autophagy-independent functions of ATG5 have been described. For this reason, we used a genetic approach to elucidate the role for multiple autophagy-related genes and the requirement for autophagy in resistance to M. tuberculosis infection in vivo. Here we show that, contrary to expectation, autophagic capacity does not correlate with the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection. Instead, ATG5 plays a unique role in protection against M. tuberculosis by preventing PMN-mediated immunopathology. Furthermore, while Atg5 is dispensable in alveolar macrophages during M. tuberculosis infection, loss of Atg5 in PMNs can sensitize mice to M. tuberculosis. These findings shift our understanding of the role of ATG5 during M. tuberculosis infection, reveal new outcomes of ATG5 activity, and shed light on early events in innate

  15. Differential Specificity and Immunogenicity of Adenovirus Type 5 Neutralizing Antibodies Elicited by Natural Infection or Immunization▿

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Cheng; Gall, Jason G. D.; Nason, Martha; King, C. Richter; Koup, Richard A.; Roederer, Mario; McElrath, M. Juliana; Morgan, Cecilia A.; Churchyard, Gavin; Baden, Lindsey R.; Duerr, Ann C.; Keefer, Michael C.; Graham, Barney S.; Nabel, Gary J.

    2010-01-01

    A recent clinical trial of a T-cell-based AIDS vaccine delivered with recombinant adenovirus type 5 (rAd5) vectors showed no efficacy in lowering viral load and was associated with increased risk of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Preexisting immunity to Ad5 in humans could therefore affect both immunogenicity and vaccine efficacy. We hypothesized that vaccine-induced immunity is differentially affected, depending on whether subjects were exposed to Ad5 by natural infection or by vaccination. Serum samples from vaccine trial subjects receiving a DNA/rAd5 AIDS vaccine with or without prior immunity to Ad5 were examined for the specificity of their Ad5 neutralizing antibodies and their effect on HIV-1 immune responses. Here, we report that rAd5 neutralizing antibodies were directed to different components of the virion, depending on whether they were elicited by natural infection or vaccination in HIV vaccine trial subjects. Neutralizing antibodies elicited by natural infection were directed largely to the Ad5 fiber, while exposure to rAd5 through vaccination elicited antibodies primarily to capsid proteins other than fiber. Notably, preexisting immunity to Ad5 fiber from natural infection significantly reduced the CD4 and CD8 cell responses to HIV Gag after DNA/rAd5 vaccination. The specificity of Ad5 neutralizing antibodies therefore differs depending on the route of exposure, and natural Ad5 infection compromises Ad5 vaccine-induced immunity to weak immunogens, such as HIV-1 Gag. These results have implications for future AIDS vaccine trials and the design of next-generation gene-based vaccine vectors. PMID:19846512

  16. Neutralizing linear epitopes of B19 parvovirus cluster in the VP1 unique and VP1-VP2 junction regions.

    PubMed Central

    Saikawa, T; Anderson, S; Momoeda, M; Kajigaya, S; Young, N S

    1993-01-01

    Presentation of linear epitopes of the B19 parvovirus capsid proteins as peptides might be a useful vaccine strategy. We produced overlapping fusion proteins to span the viral capsid sequence, inoculated rabbits, and determined whether the resulting antisera contained antibodies that neutralized the ability of the virus to infect human erythroid progenitor cells. Antibodies that bound to virus in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were present in antisera raised against 10 of 11 peptides; strongest activity was found for antisera against the carboxyl-terminal half of the major capsid protein. However, strong neutralizing activity was elicited in animals immunized with peptides from the amino-terminal portion of the unique region of the minor capsid protein and peptides containing the sequence of the junction region between the minor and major capsid proteins. The development of neutralizing activity in animals was elicited most rapidly with the fusion peptide from the first quarter of the unique region. A 20-amino-acid region of the unique region of the minor capsid protein was shown to contain a neutralizing epitope. Multiple antigenic peptides, based on the sequence of the unique region and produced by covalent linkage through a polylysine backbone, elicited strong neutralizing antibody responses. Synthetic peptides and fusion proteins containing small regions of the unique portion of the minor capsid protein might be useful as immunogens in a human vaccine against B19 parvovirus. Images PMID:7684458

  17. Nonlinear Analyses of Elicited Modal, Raised, and Pressed Rabbit Phonation

    PubMed Central

    Awan, Shaheen N.; Novaleski, Carolyn K.; Rousseau, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis The purpose of this study was to use nonlinear dynamic analysis methods such as phase space portraits and correlation dimension (D2) as well as descriptive spectrographic analyses to characterize acoustic signals produced during evoked rabbit phonation. Methods Seventeen New Zealand white breeder rabbits were used to perform the study. A Grass S-88 stimulator (SA Instrumentation, Encinitas, CA) and constant current isolation unit (Grass Telefactor, model PSIU6; West Warwick, RI) were used to provide electrical stimulation to laryngeal musculature, and transglottal airflow rate and stimulation current (mA) were manipulated to elicit modal, raised intensity, and pressed phonations. Central 1 second portions of the most stable portion of the acoustic waveform for modal, raised intensity, and pressed phonations were edited, and then analyzed via phase space portraits, Poincaré sections, and the estimation of the correlation dimension (D2). In an attempt to limit the effects of the highly variable and nonstationary characteristics of some of the signals being analyzed, D2 analysis was also performed on the most stable central 200 ms portion of the acoustic waveform. Descriptive analysis of each phonation was also conducted using sound spectrograms. Results Results showed that the complexity of phonation and the subsequent acoustic waveform is increased as transglottal airflow rate and degree of glottal adduction is manipulated in the evoked rabbit phonation model. In particular, phonatory complexity, as quantified via correlation dimension analyses and demonstrated via spectrographic characteristics, increases from “modal” (i.e., phonation elicited at just above the phonation threshold pressure) to raised intensity (phonation elicited by increasing transglottal airflow rate) to pressed (phonation elicited by increasing the stimulation current delivered to the larynx). Variations in a single dynamic dimension (airflow rate or adductory force

  18. Systems-Level Comparison of Host-Responses Elicited by Avian H5N1 and Seasonal H1N1 Influenza Viruses in Primary Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suki M. Y.; Gardy, Jennifer L.; Cheung, C. Y.; Cheung, Timothy K. W.; Hui, Kenrie P. Y.; Ip, Nancy Y.; Guan, Y.; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Peiris, J. S. Malik

    2009-01-01

    Human disease caused by highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 can lead to a rapidly progressive viral pneumonia leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome. There is increasing evidence from clinical, animal models and in vitro data, which suggests a role for virus-induced cytokine dysregulation in contributing to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. The key target cells for the virus in the lung are the alveolar epithelium and alveolar macrophages, and we have shown that, compared to seasonal human influenza viruses, equivalent infecting doses of H5N1 viruses markedly up-regulate pro-inflammatory cytokines in both primary cell types in vitro. Whether this H5N1-induced dysregulation of host responses is driven by qualitative (i.e activation of unique host pathways in response to H5N1) or quantitative differences between seasonal influenza viruses is unclear. Here we used microarrays to analyze and compare the gene expression profiles in primary human macrophages at 1, 3, and 6 h after infection with H5N1 virus or low-pathogenic seasonal influenza A (H1N1) virus. We found that host responses to both viruses are qualitatively similar with the activation of nearly identical biological processes and pathways. However, in comparison to seasonal H1N1 virus, H5N1 infection elicits a quantitatively stronger host inflammatory response including type I interferon (IFN) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α genes. A network-based analysis suggests that the synergy between IFN-β and TNF-α results in an enhanced and sustained IFN and pro-inflammatory cytokine response at the early stage of viral infection that may contribute to the viral pathogenesis and this is of relevance to the design of novel therapeutic strategies for H5N1 induced respiratory disease. PMID:20011590

  19. Fractionated extracts of Russian wheat aphid eliciting defense responses in wheat.

    PubMed

    Lapitan, Nora L V; Li, You-Chun; Peng, Junhua; Botha, Anna-Maria

    2007-06-01

    It is hypothesized that the interaction between aphids and plants follows a gene-for-gene model. The recent appearance of several new Russian wheat aphid, Diuraphis noxia (Kurdjumov) (Homoptera: Aphididae), biotypes in the United States and the differential response of wheat, Triticum aestivum L., genotypes containing different resistance genes also suggest a gene-for-gene interaction. However, aphid elicitors remain unknown. This study was conducted to identify fractionated Russian wheat aphid extracts capable of eliciting differential responses between resistant and susceptible wheat genotypes. We extracted whole soluble compounds and separated proteins and metabolites from two Russian wheat aphid biotypes (1 and 2), injected these extracts into seedlings of susceptible wheat Gamtoos (dn7) and resistant 94M370 (Dn7), and determined phenotypic and biochemical plant responses. Injections of whole extract or protein extract from both biotypes induced the typical susceptible symptom, leaf rolling, in the susceptible cultivar, but not in the resistant cultivar. Furthermore, multiple injections with protein extract from biotype 2 induced the development of chlorosis, head trapping, and stunting in susceptible wheat. Injection with metabolite, buffer, or chitin, did not produce any susceptible symptoms in either genotype. The protein extract from the two biotypes also induced significantly higher activities of three defense-response enzymes (catalase, peroxidase, and beta-glucanase) in 94M370 than in Gamtoos. These results indicate that a protein elicitor from the Russian wheat aphid is recognized by a plant receptor, and the recognition is mediated by the Dn7-gene product. The increased activities of defense-response enzymes in resistant plants after injection with the protein fraction suggest that defense response genes are induced after recognition of aphid elicitors by the plant. PMID:17598566

  20. Head movements in low and high gravitoinertial force environments elicit motion sickness - Implications for space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, James R.; Graybiel, Ashton

    1987-01-01

    Astronauts report that head movements in flight tend to bring on symptoms of space motion sickness (SMS). The effects of head movements in pitch, yaw, and roll (made both with normal vision and with eyes occluded) on susceptibility to motion sickness in the zero G phase of parabolic flight maneuvers were evaluated. The findings are clear-cut: pitch head movements are most provocative, yaw least provocative, and roll intermediate. These experiments suggest that SMS is not a unique nosological entity, but is the consequence of exposure to nonterrestrial force levels. Head movements during departures in either direction from 1 G elicit symptoms.

  1. Exogenous Abscisic Acid and Gibberellic Acid Elicit Opposing Effects on Fusarium graminearum Infection in Wheat.

    PubMed

    Buhrow, Leann M; Cram, Dustin; Tulpan, Dan; Foroud, Nora A; Loewen, Michele C

    2016-09-01

    Although the roles of salicylate (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) have been well-characterized in Fusarium head blight (FHB)-infected cereals, the roles of other phytohormones remain more ambiguous. Here, the association between an array of phytohormones and FHB pathogenesis in wheat is investigated. Comprehensive profiling of endogenous hormones demonstrated altered cytokinin, gibberellic acid (GA), and JA metabolism in a FHB-resistant cultivar, whereas challenge by Fusarium graminearum increased abscisic acid (ABA), JA, and SA in both FHB-susceptible and -resistant cultivars. Subsequent investigation of ABA or GA coapplication with fungal challenge increased and decreased FHB spread, respectively. These phytohormones-induced effects may be attributed to alteration of the F. graminearum transcriptome because ABA promoted expression of early-infection genes, including hydrolases and cytoskeletal reorganization genes, while GA suppressed nitrogen metabolic gene expression. Neither ABA nor GA elicited significant effects on F. graminearum fungal growth or sporulation in axenic conditions, nor do these phytohormones affect trichothecene gene expression, deoxynivalenol mycotoxin accumulation, or SA/JA biosynthesis in F. graminearum-challenged wheat spikes. Finally, the combined application of GA and paclobutrazol, a Fusarium fungicide, provided additive effects on reducing FHB severity, highlighting the potential for combining fungicidal agents with select phytohormone-related treatments for management of FHB infection in wheat. PMID:27135677

  2. The Placenta Harbors a Unique Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Aagaard, Kjersti; Ma, Jun; Antony, Kathleen M.; Ganu, Radhika; Petrosino, Joseph; Versalovic, James

    2016-01-01

    Humans and their microbiomes have coevolved as a physiologic community composed of distinct body site niches with metabolic and antigenic diversity. The placental microbiome has not been robustly interrogated, despite recent demonstrations of intracellular bacteria with diverse metabolic and immune regulatory functions. A population-based cohort of placental specimens collected under sterile conditions from 320 subjects with extensive clinical data was established for comparative 16S ribosomal DNA–based and whole-genome shotgun (WGS) metagenomic studies. Identified taxa and their gene carriage patterns were compared to other human body site niches, including the oral, skin, airway (nasal), vaginal, and gut microbiomes from nonpregnant controls. We characterized a unique placental microbiome niche, composed of nonpathogenic commensal microbiota from the Firmicutes, Tenericutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Fusobacteria phyla. In aggregate, the placental microbiome profiles were most akin (Bray-Curtis dissimilarity <0.3) to the human oral microbiome. 16S-based operational taxonomic unit analyses revealed associations of the placental microbiome with a remote history of antenatal infection (permutational multivariate analysis of variance, P = 0.006), such as urinary tract infection in the first trimester, as well as with preterm birth <37 weeks (P = 0.001). PMID:24848255

  3. Cathepsin K: a unique collagenolytic cysteine peptidase.

    PubMed

    Novinec, Marko; Lenarčič, Brigita

    2013-09-01

    Cathepsin K has emerged as a promising target for the treatment of osteoporosis in recent years. Initially identified as a papain-like cysteine peptidase expressed in high levels in osteoclasts, the important role of this enzyme in bone metabolism was highlighted by the finding that mutations in the CTSK gene cause the rare recessive disorder pycnodysostosis, which is characterized by severe bone anomalies. At the molecular level, the physiological role of cathepsin K is reflected by its unique cleavage pattern of type I collagen molecules, which is fundamentally different from that of other endogenous collagenases. Several cathepsin K inhibitors have been developed to reduce the excessive bone matrix degradation associated with osteoporosis, with the frontrunner odanacatib about to successfully conclude Phase 3 clinical trials. Apart from osteoclasts, cathepsin K is expressed in different cell types throughout the body and is involved in processes of adipogenesis, thyroxine liberation and peptide hormone regulation. Elevated activity of cathepsin K has been associated with arthritis, atherosclerosis, obesity, schizophrenia, and tumor metastasis. Accordingly, its activity is tightly regulated via multiple mechanisms, including competitive inhibition by endogenous macromolecular inhibitors and allosteric regulation by glycosaminoglycans. This review provides a state-of-the-art description of the activity of cathepsin K at the molecular level, its biological functions and the mechanisms involved in its regulation. PMID:23629523

  4. Elicitation of Diacetylenic Compounds in Suspension Cultured Cells of Eggplant

    PubMed Central

    Imoto, Setsuko; Ohta, Yoshimoto

    1988-01-01

    Induction of stress metabolites in the suspension cultured cells of eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) was examined. When autoclaved RNase A or nigeran, both of which are nonspecific phytoalexin elicitors in bean cells, were added to the cell culture of eggplant, greatly enhanced levels of three compounds were observed. One of them was cis-pentadeca-6-ene-1,3-diyne-5,15-diol, a novel diacetylenic compound. This compound has considerable fungitoxic activity. Also identified was falcarindiol, another fungitoxic diacetylenic compound previously reported as one of the phytoalexins in infected tomato fruits and leaves. Elicited compounds preferentially accumulated in the culture medium rather than in the cells and decreased to original levels during prolonged culturing. The elicitation of these compounds was closely correlated with cellular damage in terms of the decrease of growth rate and was inhibited by 10 micromolar cycloheximide. PMID:16665862

  5. Voltage transients elicited by sudden step-up of auxin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickard, B. G.

    1984-01-01

    It is hypothesized (i) that the molecular mechanism for the reception of friction and flexure and the mechanism by which auxin enhances ethylene production have in common a release of free calcium into the cytosol, (ii) that elevated cytosolic calcium initiates vesicle exocytosis, and (iii) that the vesicles release a factor or set of factors which depolarizes the plasmalemma and promotes ethylene synthesis. One consequence of such exocytosis should be small, extracellularly observable voltage transients. Transients, ranging in size up to 600 microvolts and possessing risetimes (10-90%) of approximately 200 ms, are known to be elicited in etiolated stems of Pisum sativum L. by friction and are here shown to be elicited by sudden increase of auxin concentration and also by a Ca2+ ionophore.

  6. Expert elicitation for a national-level volcano hazard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebbington, Mark; Stirling, Mark; Cronin, Shane; Wang, Ting; Jolly, Gill

    2016-04-01

    The quantification of volcanic hazard at national level is a vital pre-requisite to placing volcanic risk on a platform that permits meaningful comparison with other hazards such as earthquakes. New Zealand has up to a dozen dangerous volcanoes, with the usual mixed degrees of knowledge concerning their temporal and spatial eruptive history. Information on the 'size' of the eruptions, be it in terms of VEI, volume or duration, is sketchy at best. These limitations and the need for a uniform approach lend themselves to a subjective hazard analysis via expert elicitation. Approximately 20 New Zealand volcanologists provided estimates for the size of the next eruption from each volcano and, conditional on this, its location, timing and duration. Opinions were likewise elicited from a control group of statisticians, seismologists and (geo)chemists, all of whom had at least heard the term 'volcano'. The opinions were combined via the Cooke classical method. We will report on the preliminary results from the exercise.

  7. Simplified Expert Elicitation Procedure for Risk Assessment of Operating Events

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring; David Gertman; Jeffrey Joe; Julie Marble; William Galyean; Larry Blackwood; Harold Blackman

    2005-06-01

    This report describes a simplified, tractable, and usable procedure within the US Nuclear Regulator Commission (NRC) for seeking expert opinion and judgment. The NRC has increased efforts to document the reliability and risk of nuclear power plants (NPPs) through Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) models. The Significance Determination Process (SDP) and Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) programs at the NRC utilize expert judgment on the probability of failure, human error, and the operability of equipment in cases where otherwise insufficient operational data exist to make meaningful estimates. In the past, the SDP and ASP programs informally sought the opinion of experts inside and outside the NRC. This document represents a formal, documented procedure to take the place of informal expert elicitation. The procedures outlined in this report follow existing formal expert elicitation methodologies, but are streamlined as appropriate to the degree of accuracy required and the schedule for producing SDP and ASP analyses.

  8. Arousal recognition system based on heartbeat dynamics during auditory elicitation.

    PubMed

    Nardelli, Mimma; Valenza, Gaetano; Greco, Alberto; Lanata, Antonio; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale

    2015-08-01

    This study reports on the recognition of different arousal levels, elicited by affective sounds, performed using estimates of autonomic nervous system dynamics. Specifically, as a part of the circumplex model of affect, arousal levels were recognized by properly combining information gathered from standard and nonlinear analysis of heartbeat dynamics, which was derived from the electrocardiogram (ECG). Affective sounds were gathered from the International Affective Digitized Sound System and grouped into four different levels of arousal. A group of 27 healthy volunteers underwent such elicitation while ECG signals were continuously recorded. Results showed that a quadratic discriminant classifier, as applied implementing a leave-one-subject-out procedure, achieved a recognition accuracy of 84.26%. Moreover, this study confirms the crucial role of heartbeat nonlinear dynamics for emotion recognition, hereby estimated through lagged Poincare plots. PMID:26737686

  9. Elicitation of specific syntactic structures in primary progressive aphasia

    PubMed Central

    DeLeon, Jessica; Gesierich, Benno; Besbris, Max; Ogar, Jennifer; Henry, Maya L.; Miller, Bruce L.; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Wilson, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Many patients with primary progressive aphasia (PPA) are impaired in syntactic production. Because most previous studies of expressive syntax in PPA have relied on quantitative analysis of connected speech samples, which is a relatively unconstrained task, it is not well understood which specific syntactic structures are most challenging for these patients. We used an elicited syntactic production task to identify which syntactic structures pose difficulties for 31 patients with three variants of PPA: non-fluent/agrammatic, semantic and logopenic. Neurodegenerative and healthy age-matched participants were included as controls. As expected, non-fluent/agrammatic patients made the most syntactic errors. The structures that resulted in the most errors were constructions involving third person singular present agreement, and constructions involving embedded clauses. Deficits on this elicited production task were associated with atrophy of the left posterior inferior frontal gyrus. PMID:23046707

  10. Purification and cDNA Cloning of Isochorismate Synthase from Elicited Cell Cultures of Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    van Tegelen, Léon J.P.; Moreno, Paolo R.H.; Croes, Anton F.; Verpoorte, Robert; Wullems, George J.

    1999-01-01

    Isochorismate is an important metabolite formed at the end of the shikimate pathway, which is involved in the synthesis of both primary and secondary metabolites. It is synthesized from chorismate in a reaction catalyzed by the enzyme isochorismate synthase (ICS; EC 5.4.99.6). We have purified ICS to homogeneity from elicited Catharanthus roseus cell cultures. Two isoforms with an apparent molecular mass of 64 kD were purified and characterized. The Km values for chorismate were 558 and 319 μm for isoforms I and II, respectively. The isoforms were not inhibited by aromatic amino acids and required Mg2+ for enzyme activity. Polymerase chain reaction on a cDNA library from elicited C. roseus cells with a degenerated primer based on the sequence of an internal peptide from isoform II resulted in an amplification product that was used to screen the cDNA library. This led to the first isolation, to our knowledge, of a plant ICS cDNA. The cDNA encodes a protein of 64 kD with an N-terminal chloroplast-targeting signal. The deduced amino acid sequence shares homology with bacterial ICS and also with anthranilate synthases from plants. Southern analysis indicates the existence of only one ICS gene in C. roseus. PMID:9952467

  11. Molecular Mechanisms Elicited by d-Aspartate in Leydig Cells and Spermatogonia

    PubMed Central

    Di Fiore, Maria Maddalena; Santillo, Alessandra; Falvo, Sara; Longobardi, Salvatore; Chieffi Baccari, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    A bulk of evidence suggests that d-aspartate (d-Asp) regulates steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in vertebrate testes. This review article focuses on intracellular signaling mechanisms elicited by d-Asp possibly via binding to the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in both Leydig cells, and spermatogonia. In Leydig cells, the amino acid upregulates androgen production by eliciting the adenylate cyclase-cAMP and/or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. d-Asp treatment enhances gene and protein expression of enzymes involved in the steroidogenic cascade. d-Asp also directly affects spermatogonial mitotic activity. In spermatogonial GC-1 cells, d-Asp induces phosphorylation of MAPK and AKT serine-threonine kinase proteins, and stimulates expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and aurora kinase B (AURKB). Further stimulation of spermatogonial GC-1 cell proliferation might come from estradiol/estrogen receptor β (ESR2) interaction. d-Asp modulates androgen and estrogen levels as well as the expression of their receptors in the rat epididymis by acting on mRNA levels of Srd5a1 and Cyp19a1 enzymes, hence suggesting involvement in spermatozoa maturation. PMID:27428949

  12. Molecular Mechanisms Elicited by d-Aspartate in Leydig Cells and Spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Di Fiore, Maria Maddalena; Santillo, Alessandra; Falvo, Sara; Longobardi, Salvatore; Chieffi Baccari, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    A bulk of evidence suggests that d-aspartate (d-Asp) regulates steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in vertebrate testes. This review article focuses on intracellular signaling mechanisms elicited by d-Asp possibly via binding to the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in both Leydig cells, and spermatogonia. In Leydig cells, the amino acid upregulates androgen production by eliciting the adenylate cyclase-cAMP and/or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. d-Asp treatment enhances gene and protein expression of enzymes involved in the steroidogenic cascade. d-Asp also directly affects spermatogonial mitotic activity. In spermatogonial GC-1 cells, d-Asp induces phosphorylation of MAPK and AKT serine-threonine kinase proteins, and stimulates expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and aurora kinase B (AURKB). Further stimulation of spermatogonial GC-1 cell proliferation might come from estradiol/estrogen receptor β (ESR2) interaction. d-Asp modulates androgen and estrogen levels as well as the expression of their receptors in the rat epididymis by acting on mRNA levels of Srd5a1 and Cyp19a1 enzymes, hence suggesting involvement in spermatozoa maturation. PMID:27428949

  13. Chromate sensitization and elicitation from cement with iron sulfate.

    PubMed

    Bruze, M; Gruvberger, B; Hradil, E

    1990-01-01

    For some years, iron sulfate has been added to cement manufactured in the Scandinavian countries to prevent sensitization to and elicitation from chromate in cement. Allergic contact dermatitis from chromate is reported here in 3 workers with hand dermatitis and exposure to cement containing iron sulfate. Although iron sulfate had been added to the cement, high chromate concentrations were found in many samples of cement to which these workers were exposed. PMID:1969204

  14. A Step-Wise Approach to Elicit Triangular Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Marc W.

    2013-01-01

    Adapt/combine known methods to demonstrate an expert judgment elicitation process that: 1.Models expert's inputs as a triangular distribution, 2.Incorporates techniques to account for expert bias and 3.Is structured in a way to help justify expert's inputs. This paper will show one way of "extracting" expert opinion for estimating purposes. Nevertheless, as with most subjective methods, there are many ways to do this.

  15. Elicitation of macrophages from the peritoneal cavity of channel catfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, J.A.; Klesius, P.H.

    1998-01-01

    Four chemicals were evaluated for elicitation of macrophages in peritoneal cavities of 250-300g healthy channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus. Cellular exudates were collected at 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, and 20 d following intraperitoneal injections with squalene, Freund's incomplete adjuvant (FIA), goat serum, thioglycollate, or as a control, phosphate-buffered saline. Injection with either squalene or FIA induced significantly greater (P ??? 0.0001) macrophage recruitment than the other chemicals. The effectiveness of squalene and FIA was compared further by macrophage collection daily for 7 d. Squalene and FIA elicited similarly high macrophage responses (P ??? 0.0450), the highest being 3.43 x 106 macrophages/mL (SE, 2.4 x l06) at 99% purity at day 2 and 2.1 X 106 macrophages/mL (SE, 0.7 x 106) at day 14 at 80% purity, respectively. In both experiments, the time after injection was not statistically significant, nor was there an interaction between time and chemicals. The occurrence of cells other than macrophages decreased with time to yield macrophage recoveries of 47-99% for squalene and 30-80% for FIA. Two subsets of macrophages were observed by means of flow cytometry. As demonstrated by chemiluminescence, the squalene-elicited cells produced high-energy oxygen compounds important to the phagocytic process.

  16. Eliciting and analyzing expert judgment: A practical guide

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, M.A.; Booker, J.M. )

    1990-01-01

    In this book we describe how to elicit and analyze expert judgment. Expert judgment is defined here to include both the experts' answers to technical questions and their mental processes in reaching an answer. It refers specifically to data that are obtained in a deliberate, structured manner that makes use of the body of research on human cognition and communication. Our aim is to provide a guide for lay persons in expert judgment. These persons may be from physical and engineering sciences, mathematics and statistics, business, or the military. We provide background on the uses of expert judgment and on the processes by which humans solve problems, including those that lead to bias. Detailed guidance is offered on how to elicit expert judgment ranging from selecting the questions to be posed of the experts to selecting and motivating the experts to setting up for and conducting the elicitation. Analysis procedures are introduced and guidance is given on how to understand the data base structure, detect bias and correlation, form models, and aggregate the expert judgments.

  17. Role of local neurons in cerebrocortical vasodilation elicited from cerebellum

    SciTech Connect

    Iadecola, C.; Arneric, S.P.; Baker, H.D.; Tucker, L.W.; Reis, D.J.

    1987-06-01

    The vasodilation elicited in cerebral cortex by stimulation of the cerebellar fastigial nucleus (FN) is mediated by input pathways coming from the basal forebrain. The authors studied whether these pathways mediate the cortical vasodilation via a direct action on local blood vessels or via interposed local neurons. Neurons were destroyed in the primary sensory cortex by local microinjection of the excitotoxin ibotenic acid (IBO). Five days later rats were anesthetized, paralyzed, and ventilated. Arterial pressure and blood gases were controlled, and FN was stimulated electrically. Local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) was measured using the (/sup 14/C)iodoantipyrine technique with autoradiography. Five days after IBO, neurons were destroyed in a restricted cortical area, and afferent fibers and terminals were preserved. The selectivity of the neuronal loss was established by histological and biochemical criteria and by transport of horseradish, peroxidase from or into the lesion. Within the lesion, resting LCBF was unaffected, but the increase in LCBF evoked from the FN was abolished. In contrast the vasodilation elicited by hypercapnia was preserved. In the rest of the brain the vasodilation elicited from FN was largely unaffected. The authors conclude that the vasodilation evoked from FN in cerebral cortex depends on the integrity of a restricted population of local neurons that interact with the local microvasculature.

  18. Intrathecal orphenadrine elicits spinal block in the rat.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Chen, Yu-Chung; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the local anesthetic effect of orphenadrine, an anti-muscarinic agent, in spinal anesthesia and its comparison with the local anesthetic lidocaine. After the rat was injected intrathecally, the spinal block of orphenadrine and lidocaine was constructed in a dosage-dependent fashion. The potency and duration of spinal anesthesia with orphenadrine were compared with that of lidocaine. Our data demonstrated that orphenadrine and lidocaine elicited dose-dependent spinal blockades on the motor function, sensory, and proprioception. On the 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the ranks of potency in motor function, nociception, and proprioception were orphenadrine>lidocaine (P<0.01). At equipotent doses (ED25, ED50, ED75), the block duration elicited by orphenadrine was greater than that elicited by lidocaine (P<0.01). Orphenadrine, but not lidocaine, exhibited longer duration of nociceptive/sensory blockade than that of motor blockade at equipotent doses. Ineffective-dose orphenadrine as adjuvant did not enhance spinal anesthesia with lidocaine. The preclinical data revealed that orphenadrine with a more sensory-selective action over motor block exhibited more potent and longer spinal anesthesia when compared to lidocaine. PMID:25205132

  19. Elicited versus emitted behavior: Time to abandon the distinction.

    PubMed

    Domjan, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The concept of emitted behavior was formulated as a part of the original argument for the validity of a new kind of learning called operant conditioning. The rationale for operant conditioning contrasted it with Pavlovian or classical conditioning, which was (and remains) fundamentally based on responses to conditioned and unconditioned stimuli. Classical conditioned responses were said to be elicited. In contrast, operant behavior was viewed as emitted and controlled primarily by response consequences rather than antecedents. I argue that the distinction between emitted and elicited behavior is no longer warranted for three major reasons. First, the distinction was based on a view of Pavlovian conditioning that is no longer viable. Second, the distinction is incompatible with both empirical data and contemporary conceptualizations of operant behavior. Third, the only way to overcome these problems is to define emitted and elicited in terms of the type of conditioning (operant and classical) that produces these behaviors, but that approach makes the definitions circular and does not avoid implications of the terms that are misleading and counterproductive in light of contemporary research and thinking. PMID:26872681

  20. Physiological responses induced by emotion-eliciting films.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Cristina; Pascual, Juan C; Soler, Joaquim; Elices, Matilde; Portella, Maria J; Fernández-Abascal, Enrique

    2012-06-01

    Emotion-eliciting films are commonly used to evoke subjective emotional responses in experimental settings. The main aim of the present study was to investigate whether a set of film clips with discrete emotions were capable to elicit measurable objective physiological responses. The convergence between subjective and objective measures was evaluated. Finally, the effect of gender on emotional responses was investigated. A sample of 123 subjects participated in the study. Individuals were asked to view a set of emotional film clips capable to induce seven emotions: anger, fear, sadness, disgust, amusement, tenderness and neutral state. Skin conductance level (SCL), heart rate (HR) and subjective emotional responses were measured for each film clip. In comparison with neutral films, SCL was significantly increased after viewing fear films, and HR was also significantly incremented for anger and fear films. Physiological variations were associated with arousal measures indicating a convergence between subjective and objective reactions. Women appeared to display significantly greater SCL and HR responses for films inducing sadness. The findings suggest that physiological activation would be more easily induced by emotion-eliciting films that tap into emotions with higher subjective arousal such as anger and fear. PMID:22311202

  1. CCK-58 elicits both satiety and satiation in rats while CCK-8 elicits only satiation.

    PubMed

    Overduin, Joost; Gibbs, James; Cummings, David E; Reeve, Joseph R

    2014-04-01

    Reduction of food intake by exogenous cholecystokinin (CCK) has been demonstrated primarily for its short molecular form, CCK-8. Mounting evidence, however, implicates CCK-58 as a major physiologically active CCK form, with different neural and exocrine response profiles than CCK-8. In three studies, we compared meal-pattern effects of intraperitoneal injections CCK-8 vs. CCK-58 in undeprived male Sprague-Dawley rats consuming sweetened condensed milk. In study 1, rats (N=10) received CCK-8, CCK-58 (0.45, 0.9, 1.8 and 3.6 nmol/kg) or vehicle before a 4-h test-food presentation. At most doses, both CCK-8 and CCK-58 similarly reduced meal size relative to vehicle. Meal-size reduction prompted a compensatory shortening of the intermeal interval (IMI) after CCK-8, but not after CCK-58, which uniquely increased the satiety ratio (IMI/size of the preceding meal). In the second study, lick patterns were monitored after administration of 0.9 nmol/kg CCK-58, CCK-8 or vehicle. Lick cluster size, lick efficiency and interlick-interval distribution remained unaltered compared to vehicle, implying natural satiation, rather than illness, following both CCK forms. In study 3, threshold satiating doses of the two CCK forms were given at 5 and 30 min after meal termination, respectively. CCK 58, but not CCK-8 increased the intermeal interval and satiety ratio compared to vehicle. In conclusion, while CCK 58 and CCK-8 both stimulate satiation, thereby reducing meal size, CCK-58 consistently exerts a satiety effect, prolonging IMI. Given the physiological prominence of CCK-58, these results suggest that CCK's role in food intake regulation may require re-examination. PMID:24468546

  2. Explaining human uniqueness: genome interactions with environment, behaviour and culture

    PubMed Central

    Varki, Ajit; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Eichler, Evan E.

    2009-01-01

    What makes us human? Specialists in each discipline respond through the lens of their own expertise. In fact, ‘anthropogeny’ (explaining the origin of humans) requires a transdisciplinary approach that eschews such barriers. Here we take a genomic and genetic perspective towards molecular variation, explore systems analysis of gene expression and discuss an organ-systems approach. Rejecting any ‘genes versus environment’ dichotomy, we then consider genome interactions with environment, behaviour and culture, finally speculating that aspects of human uniqueness arose because of a primate evolutionary trend towards increasing and irreversible dependence on learned behaviours and culture — perhaps relaxing allowable thresholds for large-scale genomic diversity. PMID:18802414

  3. Rediscovering area CA2: unique properties and functions

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Serena M.; Alexander, Georgia M.; Farris, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal area CA2 has several features that distinguish it from CA1 and CA3, including a unique gene expression profile, failure to display long-term potentiation and relative resistance to cell death. A recent increase in interest in the CA2 region, combined with the development of new methods to define and manipulate its neurons, has led to some exciting new discoveries on the properties of CA2 neurons and their role in behaviour. Here, we review these findings and call attention to the idea that the definition of area CA2 ought to be revised in light of gene expression data. PMID:26806628

  4. Gender differences in autobiographical memory for everyday events: retrieval elicited by SenseCam images versus verbal cues.

    PubMed

    St Jacques, Peggy L; Conway, Martin A; Cabeza, Roberto

    2011-10-01

    Gender differences are frequently observed in autobiographical memory (AM). However, few studies have investigated the neural basis of potential gender differences in AM. In the present functional MRI (fMRI) study we investigated gender differences in AMs elicited using dynamic visual images vs verbal cues. We used a novel technology called a SenseCam, a wearable device that automatically takes thousands of photographs. SenseCam differs considerably from other prospective methods of generating retrieval cues because it does not disrupt the ongoing experience. This allowed us to control for potential gender differences in emotional processing and elaborative rehearsal, while manipulating how the AMs were elicited. We predicted that males would retrieve more richly experienced AMs elicited by the SenseCam images vs the verbal cues, whereas females would show equal sensitivity to both cues. The behavioural results indicated that there were no gender differences in subjective ratings of reliving, importance, vividness, emotion, and uniqueness, suggesting that gender differences in brain activity were not due to differences in these measures of phenomenological experience. Consistent with our predictions, the fMRI results revealed that males showed a greater difference in functional activity associated with the rich experience of SenseCam vs verbal cues, than did females. PMID:20981611

  5. Transcript profiling of jasmonate-elicited Taxus cells reveals a β-phenylalanine-CoA ligase.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Estrada, Karla; Altabella, Teresa; Onrubia, Miriam; Moyano, Elisabeth; Notredame, Cedric; Osuna, Lidia; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Goossens, Alain; Cusido, Rosa M; Palazon, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell cultures constitute eco-friendly biotechnological platforms for the production of plant secondary metabolites with pharmacological activities, as well as a suitable system for extending our knowledge of secondary metabolism. Despite the high added value of taxol and the importance of taxanes as anticancer compounds, several aspects of their biosynthesis remain unknown. In this work, a genomewide expression analysis of jasmonate-elicited Taxus baccata cell cultures by complementary DNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) indicated a correlation between an extensive elicitor-induced genetic reprogramming and increased taxane production in the targeted cultures. Subsequent in silico analysis allowed us to identify 15 genes with a jasmonate-induced differential expression as putative candidates for genes encoding enzymes involved in five unknown steps of taxane biosynthesis. Among them, the TB768 gene showed a strong homology, including a very similar predicted 3D structure, with other genes previously reported to encode acyl-CoA ligases, thus suggesting a role in the formation of the taxol lateral chain. Functional analysis confirmed that the TB768 gene encodes an acyl-CoA ligase that localizes to the cytoplasm and is able to convert β-phenylalanine, as well as coumaric acid, into their respective derivative CoA esters. β-phenylalanyl-CoA is attached to baccatin III in one of the last steps of the taxol biosynthetic pathway. The identification of this gene will contribute to the establishment of sustainable taxol production systems through metabolic engineering or synthetic biology approaches. PMID:25899320

  6. Insect regurgitant and wounding elicit similar defense responses in poplar leaves: not something to spit at?

    PubMed

    Major, Ian T; Constabel, C Peter

    2007-01-01

    How plants perceive insect attacks is an area of active research. Numerous studies have shown that regurgitant from feeding insects elicits a defense response in plants, which is often assumed to be distinct from a wound response. We have characterized the inducible defense response in hybrid poplar and found it to be qualitatively similar between wounding and application of regurgitant from forest tent caterpillar. We suggest that this is likely attributable to our wounding treatment which is much more intense compared to most other studies. These overlapping responses appear to be activated via jasmonic acid signaling, and we speculate that they are both triggered by elicitors of plant origin. Wounding would release such elicitor molecules when leaf cells are disrupted, and regurgitant may contain them in a modified or processed form. This hypothesis could explain why some other necrosis-inducing stresses also induce herbivore defense genes. PMID:19704794

  7. Antiangiogenic Therapy Elicits Malignant Progression of Tumors to Increased Local Invasion and Distant Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Pàez-Ribes, Marta; Allen, Elizabeth; Hudock, James; Takeda, Takaaki; Okuyama, Hiroaki; Viñals, Francesc; Inoue, Masahiro; Bergers, Gabriele; Hanahan, Douglas; Casanovas, Oriol

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Multiple angiogenesis inhibitors have been therapeutically validated in preclinical cancer models, and several in clinical trials. Here we report that angiogenesis inhibitors targeting the VEGF pathway demonstrate antitumor effects in mouse models of pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma and glioblastoma but concomitantly elicit tumor adaptation and progression to stages of greater malignancy, with heightened invasiveness and in some cases increased lymphatic and distant metastasis. Increased invasiveness is also seen by genetic ablation of the Vegf-A gene in both models, substantiating the results of the pharmacological inhibitors. The realization that potent angiogenesis inhibition can alter the natural history of tumors by increasing invasion and metastasis warrants clinical investigation, as the prospect has important implications for the development of enduring antiangiogenic therapies. PMID:19249680

  8. The future costs of nuclear power using multiple expert elicitations: effects of RD&D and elicitation design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Anadón, Laura; Nemet, Gregory; Verdolini, Elena

    2013-09-01

    Characterization of the anticipated performance of energy technologies to inform policy decisions increasingly relies on expert elicitation. Knowledge about how elicitation design factors impact the probabilistic estimates emerging from these studies is, however, scarce. We focus on nuclear power, a large-scale low-carbon power option, for which future cost estimates are important for the design of energy policies and climate change mitigation efforts. We use data from three elicitations in the USA and in Europe and assess the role of government research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) investments on expected nuclear costs in 2030. We show that controlling for expert, technology, and design characteristics increases experts’ implied public RD&D elasticity of expected costs by 25%. Public sector and industry experts’ cost expectations are 14% and 32% higher, respectively than academics. US experts are more optimistic than their EU counterparts, with median expected costs 22% lower. On average, a doubling of public RD&D is expected to result in an 8% cost reduction, but the uncertainty is large. The difference between the 90th and 10th percentile estimates is on average 58% of the experts’ median estimates. Public RD&D investments do not affect uncertainty ranges, but US experts are less confident about costs than Europeans.

  9. Disruption of Francisella tularensis Schu S4 iglI, iglJ, and pdpC Genes Results in Attenuation for Growth in Human Macrophages and In Vivo Virulence in Mice and Reveals a Unique Phenotype for pdpC

    PubMed Central

    Long, Matthew E.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Rasmussen, Jed A.; Jones, Bradley D.

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of tularemia. After infection of macrophages, the organism escapes from its phagosome and replicates to high density in the cytosol, but the bacterial factors required for these aspects of virulence are incompletely defined. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis strain Schu S4 mutants that lack functional iglI, iglJ, or pdpC, three genes of the Francisella pathogenicity island. Our data demonstrate that these mutants were defective for replication in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and murine J774 cells yet exhibited two distinct phenotypes. The iglI and iglJ mutants were similar to one another, exhibited profound defects in phagosome escape and intracellular growth, and appeared to be trapped in cathepsin D-positive phagolysosomes. Conversely, the pdpC mutant avoided trafficking to lysosomes, phagosome escape was diminished but not ablated, and these organisms replicated in a small subset of infected macrophages. The phenotype of each mutant strain was reversed by trans complementation. In vivo virulence was assessed by intranasal infection of BALB/c mice. The mutants appeared avirulent, as all mice survived infection with 108 CFU iglJ- or pdpC-deficient bacteria. Nevertheless, the pdpC mutant disseminated to the liver and spleen before being eliminated, whereas the iglJ mutant did not. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the pathogenicity island genes tested are essential for F. tularensis Schu S4 virulence and further suggest that pdpC may play a unique role in this process, as indicated by its distinct intermediate phenotype. PMID:23275090

  10. Disruption of Francisella tularensis Schu S4 iglI, iglJ, and pdpC genes results in attenuation for growth in human macrophages and in vivo virulence in mice and reveals a unique phenotype for pdpC.

    PubMed

    Long, Matthew E; Lindemann, Stephen R; Rasmussen, Jed A; Jones, Bradley D; Allen, Lee-Ann H

    2013-03-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of tularemia. After infection of macrophages, the organism escapes from its phagosome and replicates to high density in the cytosol, but the bacterial factors required for these aspects of virulence are incompletely defined. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis strain Schu S4 mutants that lack functional iglI, iglJ, or pdpC, three genes of the Francisella pathogenicity island. Our data demonstrate that these mutants were defective for replication in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and murine J774 cells yet exhibited two distinct phenotypes. The iglI and iglJ mutants were similar to one another, exhibited profound defects in phagosome escape and intracellular growth, and appeared to be trapped in cathepsin D-positive phagolysosomes. Conversely, the pdpC mutant avoided trafficking to lysosomes, phagosome escape was diminished but not ablated, and these organisms replicated in a small subset of infected macrophages. The phenotype of each mutant strain was reversed by trans complementation. In vivo virulence was assessed by intranasal infection of BALB/c mice. The mutants appeared avirulent, as all mice survived infection with 10(8) CFU iglJ- or pdpC-deficient bacteria. Nevertheless, the pdpC mutant disseminated to the liver and spleen before being eliminated, whereas the iglJ mutant did not. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the pathogenicity island genes tested are essential for F. tularensis Schu S4 virulence and further suggest that pdpC may play a unique role in this process, as indicated by its distinct intermediate phenotype. PMID:23275090

  11. A Multivalent Clade C HIV-1 Env Trimer Cocktail Elicits a Higher Magnitude of Neutralizing Antibodies than Any Individual Component

    PubMed Central

    Bricault, Christine A.; Kovacs, James M.; Nkolola, Joseph P.; Yusim, Karina; Giorgi, Elena E.; Shields, Jennifer L.; Perry, James; Lavine, Christy L.; Cheung, Ann; Ellingson-Strouss, Katharine; Rademeyer, Cecelia; Gray, Glenda E.; Williamson, Carolyn; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Seaman, Michael S.; Korber, Bette T.; Chen, Bing

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The sequence diversity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) presents a formidable challenge to the generation of an HIV-1 vaccine. One strategy to address such sequence diversity and to improve the magnitude of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is to utilize multivalent mixtures of HIV-1 envelope (Env) immunogens. Here we report the generation and characterization of three novel, acute clade C HIV-1 Env gp140 trimers (459C, 405C, and 939C), each with unique antigenic properties. Among the single trimers tested, 459C elicited the most potent NAb responses in vaccinated guinea pigs. We evaluated the immunogenicity of various mixtures of clade C Env trimers and found that a quadrivalent cocktail of clade C trimers elicited a greater magnitude of NAbs against a panel of tier 1A and 1B viruses than any single clade C trimer alone, demonstrating that the mixture had an advantage over all individual components of the cocktail. These data suggest that vaccination with a mixture of clade C Env trimers represents a promising strategy to augment vaccine-elicited NAb responses. IMPORTANCE It is currently not known how to generate potent NAbs to the diverse circulating HIV-1 Envs by vaccination. One strategy to address this diversity is to utilize mixtures of different soluble HIV-1 envelope proteins. In this study, we generated and characterized three distinct, novel, acute clade C soluble trimers. We vaccinated guinea pigs with single trimers as well as mixtures of trimers, and we found that a mixture of four trimers elicited a greater magnitude of NAbs than any single trimer within the mixture. The results of this study suggest that further development of Env trimer cocktails is warranted. PMID:25540368

  12. Inheritance of unique fruit and foliage color mutation in NuMex piñata.

    PubMed

    Votava, E J; Balok, C; Coon, D; Bosland, P W

    2000-01-01

    The inheritance of mature fruit color in peppers (Capsicum spp.) is controlled by several genes. However, the inheritance of the transition of colors the fruit undergo during ripening has not been described extensively. The authors describe the inheritance of a unique gene which affects foliage color and fruit color transition occurring in the jalapeño cultivar NuMex Piñata. The gene responsible is designated the tra gene. PMID:10739128

  13. Sample Size for Measuring Grammaticality in Preschool Children from Picture-Elicited Language Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, Sarita L.; Guo, Ling-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a shorter language sample elicited with fewer pictures (i.e., 7) would yield a percent grammatical utterances (PGU) score similar to that computed from a longer language sample elicited with 15 pictures for 3-year-old children. Method: Language samples were elicited by asking forty…

  14. Research Dilemmas Associated with Photo Elicitation in Comparative Early Childhood Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkeland, Asta

    2013-01-01

    Photo elicitation has become an important method to produce data in qualitative research. There is quite an extensive literature indicating the benefits of photo elicitation in order to facilitate collaboration in meaning making between researcher and the interviewee. This article addresses dilemmas associated with using photo elicitation in a…

  15. Undergraduate Students' Use of Information Elicited During E-Mail "Tutorials."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trushell, John; Reymond, Christine; Burrell, Clare

    1998-01-01

    Considers questions posed by students during e-mail tutorials to elicit information from guest lecturers and the use of that information by students in their essays. Findings indicate: tutees tend to pose questions to elicit information or clarification rather than to elicit opinions of the guest lecturer; and two-thirds of tutees' essays cited…

  16. Developing Socio-Cultural Scaffolding Model to Elicit Learners's Speech Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englishtina, Inti

    2015-01-01

    This study is concerned with developing scaffolding model to elicit bilingual kindergarten children's English speech production. It is aimed at describing what the teachers need in eliciting their students' speech production; how a scaffolding model should be developed to elicit the children's speech production; and how effective is the…

  17. 7α-Hydroxycholesterol Elicits TLR6-Mediated Expression of IL-23 in Monocytic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyun Chul; Kim, Sun-Mi; Eo, Seong-Kug; Rhim, Byung-Yong; Kim, Koanhoi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the question of whether 7-oxygenated cholesterol derivatives could affect inflammatory and/or immune responses in atherosclerosis by examining their effects on expression of IL-23 in monocytic cells. 7α-Hydroxycholesterol (7αOHChol) induced transcription of the TLR6 gene and elevated the level of cell surface TLR6 protein in THP-1 monocytic cells. Addition of an agonist of TLR6, FSL-1, to TLR6-expressing cells by treatment with 7αOHChol resulted in enhanced production of IL-23 and transcription of genes encoding the IL-23 subunit α (p19) and the IL-12 subunit β (p40). However, treatment with 7-ketocholesterol (7K) and 7β-hydroxycholesterol (7βOHChol) did not affect TLR6 expression, and addition of FSL-1 to cells treated with either 7K or 7βOHChol did not influence transcription of the genes. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK, Akt, or PI3K resulted in attenuated transcription of TLR6 induced by 7αOHChol as well as secretion of IL-23 enhanced by 7αOHChol plus FSL-1. Inhibition of p38 MAPK or JNK resulted in attenuated secretion of IL-23. These results indicate that a certain type of 7-oxygenated cholesterol like 7αOHChol can elicit TLR6-mediated expression of IL-23 by monocytic cells via PI3K/Akt and MAPKs pathways. PMID:25593648

  18. The role of macrophage mediators in respirable quartz-elicited inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Berlo, D.; Albrecht, C.; Knaapen, A. M.; van Schooten, F. J.; Schins, R. P. F.

    2009-02-01

    The instigation and persistence of an inflammatory response is widely considered to be critically important in quartz-induced lung cancer and fibrosis. Macrophages have been long recognised as a crucial player in pulmonary inflammation, but evidence for the role of type II epithelial cells is accumulating. Investigations were performed in the rat lung type II cell line RLE and the rat alveolar macrophage cell line NR8383 using Western blotting, NF-κB immunohistochemistry and qRT-PCR of the pro-inflammatory genes iNOS and COX-2, as well as the cellular stress gene HO-1. The direct effect of quartz on pro-inflammatory signalling cascades and gene expression in RLE cells was compared to the effect of conditioned media derived from quartz-treated NR8383 cells. Conditioned media activated the NF-κB signalling pathway and induced a far stronger upregulation of iNOS mRNA than quartz itself. Quartz elicited a stronger, progressive induction of COX-2 and HO-1 mRNA. Our results suggest a differentially mediated inflammatory response, in which reactive particles themselves induce oxidative stress and activation of COX-2, while mediators released from particle-activated macrophages trigger NF-κB activation and iNOS expression in type II cells.

  19. Adaptive Immune Responses Elicited by Baculovirus and Impacts on Subsequent Transgene Expression In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wen-Yi; Lin, Shih-Yeh; Lo, Kai-Wei; Lu, Chia-Hsin; Hung, Chang-Lin; Chen, Chi-Yuan; Chang, Chien-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Baculovirus (BV) is a promising gene therapy vector and typically requires readministration because BV mediates transient expression. However, how the prime-boost regimen triggers BV-specific adaptive responses and their impacts on BV readministration, transgene expression, and therapeutic/vaccine efficacy remain unknown. Here we unraveled that BV injection into BALB/c mice induced the production of BV-specific antibodies, including IgG1 and IgG2a, which could neutralize BV by antagonizing the envelope protein gp64 and impede BV-mediated transgene expression. Moreover, humans did not possess preexisting anti-BV antibodies. BV injection also elicited BV-specific Th1 and Th2 responses as well as CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. gp64 was a primary immunogen to activate the antibody and CD8+ T cell response, with its peptide at positions 457 to 465 (peptide 457-465) being the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I epitope to stimulate CD8+ T cell and cytotoxic responses. Nonetheless, a hybrid Sleeping Beauty-based BV enabled long-term expression for >1 year by a single injection, indicating that the T cell responses did not completely eradicate BV-transduced cells and implicating the potential of this hybrid BV vector for gene therapy. These data unveil that BV injection triggers adaptive immunity and benefit rational design of BV administration schemes for gene therapy and vaccination. PMID:23408634

  20. Oxidized LDL Immune Complexes and Oxidized LDL Differentially Affect the Expression of Genes Involved with Inflammation and Survival In Human U937 Monocytic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hammad, Samar M; Twal, Waleed O; Barth, Jeremy L; Smith, Kent J.; Saad, Antonio F; Virella, Gabriel; Argraves, W. Scott; Lopes-Virella., Maria F

    2008-01-01

    Objective To compare the global effects of oxidized LDL (oxLDL) and oxLDL-containing immune complexes (oxLDL-IC) on gene expression in human monocytic cells and to identify differentially expressed genes involved with inflammation and survival. Methods and Results U937 cells were treated with oxLDL-IC, oxLDL, Keyhole limpet hemocyanin immune complexes (KLH-IC), or vehicle for 4 h. Transcriptome profiling was performed using DNA microarrays. oxLDL-IC uniquely affected the expression of genes involved with pro-survival (RAD54B, RUFY3, SNRPB2, and ZBTB24). oxLDL-IC also regulated many genes in a manner similar to KLH-IC. Functional categorization of these genes revealed that 39% are involved with stress responses, including the unfolded protein response which impacts cell survival, 19% with regulation of transcription, 10% with endocytosis and intracellular transport of protein and lipid, and 16% with inflammatory responses including regulation of I-κB/NF-κB cascade and cytokine activity. One gene in particular, HSP70 6, greatly up-regulated by ox-LDL-IC, was found to be required for the process by which oxLDL-IC augments IL1-β secretion. The study also revealed genes uniquely up-regulated by oxLDL including genes involved with growth inhibition (OKL38, NEK3, and FTH1), oxidoreductase activity (SPXN1 and HMOX1), and transport of amino acids and fatty acids (SLC7A11 and ADFP). Conclusions These findings highlight early transcriptional responses elicited by oxLDL-IC that may underlie its cytoprotective and pro-inflammatory effects. Cross-linking of Fcγ receptors appears to be the trigger for most of the transcriptional responses to oxLDL-IC. The findings further strengthen the hypothesis that oxLDL and oxLDL-IC elicit disparate inflammatory responses and play distinct roles in the process of atherosclerosis. PMID:18597759

  1. Audio-vocal responses elicited in adult cochlear implant users

    PubMed Central

    Loucks, Torrey M.; Suneel, Deepa; Aronoff, Justin M.

    2015-01-01

    Auditory deprivation experienced prior to receiving a cochlear implant could compromise neural connections that allow for modulation of vocalization using auditory feedback. In this report, pitch-shift stimuli were presented to adult cochlear implant users to test whether compensatory motor changes in vocal F0 could be elicited. In five of six participants, rapid adjustments in vocal F0 were detected following the stimuli, which resemble the cortically mediated pitch-shift responses observed in typical hearing individuals. These findings suggest that cochlear implants can convey vocal F0 shifts to the auditory pathway that might benefit audio-vocal monitoring. PMID:26520350

  2. Unattractive infant faces elicit negative affect from adults

    PubMed Central

    Schein, Stevie S.; Langlois, Judith H.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the relationship between infant attractiveness and adult affect by investigating whether differing levels of infant facial attractiveness elicit facial muscle movement correlated with positive and negative affect from adults (N = 87) using electromyography. Unattractive infant faces evoked significantly more corrugator supercilii and levator labii superioris movement (physiological correlates of negative affect) than attractive infant faces. These results suggest that unattractive infants may be at risk for negative affective responses from adults, though the relationship between those responses and caregiving behavior remains elusive. PMID:25658199

  3. Beyond reminiscence: using generic video to elicit conversational language.

    PubMed

    Davis, Boyd H; Shenk, Dena

    2015-02-01

    Videos and multimedia are increasingly used to stimulate reminiscence in dementia care. However, they are also valuable in eliciting a wide range of language patterns that are not necessarily keyed to reminiscence about self. Low-technology, home-made generic and personalized videos were tested with 2 samples of persons with dementia, to increase engagement and support the retention of identity. Participants showed a slight, though not significant, preference for looking first at personalized videos and produced a wider range of conversational language topics and phrasal patterns in response to the generic videos. PMID:24851873

  4. Simplifying Probability Elicitation and Uncertainty Modeling in Bayesian Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, Patrick R; Carroll, Thomas E; Sivaraman, Chitra; Neorr, Peter A; Unwin, Stephen D; Hossain, Shamina S

    2011-04-16

    In this paper we contribute two methods that simplify the demands of knowledge elicitation for particular types of Bayesian networks. The first method simplify the task of providing probabilities when the states that a random variable takes can be described by a new, fully ordered state set in which a state implies all the preceding states. The second method leverages Dempster-Shafer theory of evidence to provide a way for the expert to express the degree of ignorance that they feel about the estimates being provided.

  5. Bed bugs evolved unique adaptive strategy to resist pyrethroid insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fang; Gujar, Hemant; Gordon, Jennifer R.; Haynes, Kenneth F.; Potter, Michael F.; Palli, Subba R.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in genomic and post-genomic technologies have facilitated a genome-wide analysis of the insecticide resistance-associated genes in insects. Through bed bug, Cimex lectularius transcriptome analysis, we identified 14 molecular markers associated with pyrethroid resistance. Our studies revealed that most of the resistance-associated genes functioning in diverse mechanisms are expressed in the epidermal layer of the integument, which could prevent or slow down the toxin from reaching the target sites on nerve cells, where an additional layer of resistance (kdr) is possible. This strategy evolved in bed bugs is based on their unique morphological, physiological and behavioral characteristics and has not been reported in any other insect species. RNA interference-aided knockdown of resistance associated genes showed the relative contribution of each mechanism towards overall resistance development. Understanding the complexity of adaptive strategies employed by bed bugs will help in designing the most effective and sustainable bed bug control methods. PMID:23492626

  6. Protective antibody responses against Clostridium difficile elicited by a DNA vaccine expressing the enzymatic domain of toxin B

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ke; Wang, Shixia; Zhang, Chunhua; Xiao, Yanling; Lu, Shan; Huang, Zuhu

    2013-01-01

    A DNA vaccination approach was used in the current study to screen for the immunogenicity of different fragments of toxin A and toxin B from Clostridium difficile. With this approach, protein antigens do not need to be produced in vitro and the immunogenicity of candidate C. difficile antigens can be identified directly in animals. Codon optimized toxin gene fragments were individually cloned into the DNA vaccine vector and tested in mice and rabbits for their ability to elicit C. difficile toxin-specific antibody responses. Only a subset of the C. difficile toxin fragments, including the C-terminal receptor binding domain of toxin A and a novel N-terminal enzymatic domain of toxin B, were able to elicit protective antibody responses as determined by protection of target cells in a cytotoxicity assay or by preventing death of mice in a passive antibody protection study. Significantly, antibodies elicited by the novel N-terminus of the toxin B DNA vaccine were able to increase the level of protection when used in combination with anti-toxin A antibodies in a toxin challenge model in mice. PMID:23143772

  7. [A new unique HIV-1 recombinant form detected in Belarus].

    PubMed

    Eremin, V F; Gasich, E L; Sosinovich, S V

    2012-01-01

    Republican Research-and-Practical Center for Epidemiology and Microbiology, Ministry of Health of Belarus, Minsk The paper presents data on the molecular genetic characteristics of a new HIV-1 recombinant form. The study has shown that the virus is referred to as HIV-1 subtype B in terms of the gag gene and HIV-1 subtype A in terms of the pol and env genes. At the same time the new isolate is closer, in terms of the gag gene, to the HIV-1 DQ207943 strain isolated in Georgia, in terms of the pol gene, to the HIV-1 AF413987.1 strain isolated in Ukraine and, in terms of the env gene to the HIV-1 AY500393 strain isolated in Russia. Thus, the described new HIV-1 recombinant form has the following structure: BgagApolAenv. The gag, pol, and env gene sequences from the new unique HIV-1 recombinant form have been registered in the international database EMBL/Genbank/DDBJ under accession numbers FR775442.1, FN995656.1, and FR775443.1. PMID:22905420

  8. Life without Oxygen: Gene Regulatory Responses of the Crucian Carp (Carassius carassius) Heart Subjected to Chronic Anoxia

    PubMed Central

    Stensløkken, Kåre-Olav; Ellefsen, Stian; Vasieva, Olga; Fang, Yongxiang; Farrell, Anthony P.; Olohan, Lisa; Vaage, Jarle; Nilsson, Göran E.; Cossins, Andrew R.

    2014-01-01

    Crucian carp are unusual among vertebrates in surviving extended periods in the complete absence of molecular oxygen. During this time cardiac output is maintained though these mechanisms are not well understood. Using a high-density cDNA microarray, we have defined the genome-wide gene expression responses of cardiac tissue after exposing the fish at two temperatures (8 and 13°C) to one and seven days of anoxia, followed by seven days after restoration to normoxia. At 8°C, using a false discovery rate of 5%, neither anoxia nor re-oxygenation elicited appreciable changes in gene expression. By contrast, at 13°C, 777 unique genes responded strongly. Up-regulated genes included those involved in protein turnover, the pentose phosphate pathway and cell morphogenesis while down-regulated gene categories included RNA splicing and transcription. Most genes were affected between one and seven days of anoxia, indicating gene regulation over the medium term but with few early response genes. Re-oxygenation for 7 days was sufficient to completely reverse these responses. Glycolysis displayed more complex responses with anoxia up-regulated transcripts for the key regulatory enzymes, hexokinase and phosphofructokinase, but with down-regulation of most of the non-regulatory genes. This complex pattern of responses in genomic transcription patterns indicates divergent cardiac responses to anoxia, with the transcriptionally driven reprogramming of cardiac function seen at 13°C being largely completed at 8°C. PMID:25372666

  9. Life without oxygen: gene regulatory responses of the crucian carp (Carassius carassius) heart subjected to chronic anoxia.

    PubMed

    Stensløkken, Kåre-Olav; Ellefsen, Stian; Vasieva, Olga; Fang, Yongxiang; Farrell, Anthony P; Olohan, Lisa; Vaage, Jarle; Nilsson, Göran E; Cossins, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    Crucian carp are unusual among vertebrates in surviving extended periods in the complete absence of molecular oxygen. During this time cardiac output is maintained though these mechanisms are not well understood. Using a high-density cDNA microarray, we have defined the genome-wide gene expression responses of cardiac tissue after exposing the fish at two temperatures (8 and 13 °C) to one and seven days of anoxia, followed by seven days after restoration to normoxia. At 8 °C, using a false discovery rate of 5%, neither anoxia nor re-oxygenation elicited appreciable changes in gene expression. By contrast, at 13 °C, 777 unique genes responded strongly. Up-regulated genes included those involved in protein turnover, the pentose phosphate pathway and cell morphogenesis while down-regulated gene categories included RNA splicing and transcription. Most genes were affected between one and seven days of anoxia, indicating gene regulation over the medium term but with few early response genes. Re-oxygenation for 7 days was sufficient to completely reverse these responses. Glycolysis displayed more complex responses with anoxia up-regulated transcripts for the key regulatory enzymes, hexokinase and phosphofructokinase, but with down-regulation of most of the non-regulatory genes. This complex pattern of responses in genomic transcription patterns indicates divergent cardiac responses to anoxia, with the transcriptionally driven reprogramming of cardiac function seen at 13 °C being largely completed at 8 °C. PMID:25372666

  10. Absence of shock-elicited aggression in pigeons1

    PubMed Central

    Rashotte, Michael E.; Dove, L. Duane; Looney, Thomas A.

    1974-01-01

    Two pigeons that attacked a taxidermically prepared target pigeon during a schedule of positive reinforcement for key pecking, and two that did not, were shocked through implanted electrodes in the presence of the target. Shock intensities of 2 and 4 mA, durations of 0.1 and 1.3 sec, and frequencies of 2, 6, 20, and 35 per minute were delivered across 16 sessions with 180 shocks per session. No pigeon attacked the target; one pecked the shockplug on its back. The two pigeons that had not attacked during the positive reinforcement schedules were conditioned to peck the target for food reinforcement before another 16 sessions of shock. No attack was observed in these shock sessions. During subsequent positive reinforcement of key pecking, the target was attacked by the two pigeons that had originally attacked and by one that had not. Absence of shock-elicited attack in these pigeons may be related to the parameters of the experiment or may be yet another instance of the absence of shock-elicited attack in the class Aves. At least under the present conditions, it was not possible to predict the level of attack during electric shock from the level of attack during schedules of positive reinforcement for key pecking. PMID:4856078

  11. Cognitive constraints on constituent order: Evidence from elicited pantomime

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Matthew L.; Mayberry, Rachel I.; Ferreira, Victor S.

    2014-01-01

    To what extent does human cognition influence the structure of human language? Recent experiments using elicited pantomime suggest that the prevalence of Subject-Object-Verb (SOV) order across the world's languages may arise in part because SOV order is most compatible with how we conceptually represent transitive events (Goldin-Meadow, So, Özyürek, & Mylander, 2008). However, this raises the question as to why non-SOV orders exist. Two recent studies (Meir, Lifshitz, Ilkbasaran, & Padden, 2010; Gibson et al., 2013) suggest that SOV might be suboptimal for describing events in which both the agent and patient are plausible agents (e.g. a woman pushing a boy); we call these “reversible” events. We replicate these findings using elicited pantomime and offer a new interpretation. Meir et al.'s (2010) account is framed largely in terms of constraints on comprehension, while Gibson et al.'s (2013) account involves minimizing the risk of information loss or memory degradation. We offer an alternative hypothesis that is grounded in constraints on production. We consider the implications of these findings for the distribution of constituent order in the world's spoken languages and for the structure of emerging sign languages. PMID:23792806

  12. Emotion Elicitation: A Comparison of Pictures and Films

    PubMed Central

    Uhrig, Meike K.; Trautmann, Nadine; Baumgärtner, Ulf; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Henrich, Florian; Hiller, Wolfgang; Marschall, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Pictures and film clips are widely used and accepted stimuli to elicit emotions. Based on theoretical arguments it is often assumed that the emotional effects of films exceed those of pictures, but to date this assumption has not been investigated directly. The aim of the present study was to compare pictures and films in terms of their capacity to induce emotions verified by means of explicit measures. Stimuli were (a) single pictures presented for 6 s, (b) a set of three consecutive pictures with emotionally congruent contents presented for 2 s each, (c) short film clips with a duration of 6 s. A total of 144 participants rated their emotion and arousal states following stimulus presentation. Repeated-measures ANOVAs revealed that the film clips and 3-picture version were as effective as the classical 1-picture method to elicit positive emotions, however, modulation toward positive valence was little. Modulation toward negative valence was more effective in general. Film clips were less effective than pictorial stimuli in producing the corresponding emotion states (all p < 0.001) and were less arousing (all p ≤ 0.02). Possible reasons for these unexpected results are discussed. PMID:26925007

  13. Eliciting spatial statistics from geological experts using genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Matthew; Curtis, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    A new method to obtain the statistics of a geostatistical model is introduced. The method elicits the statistical information from a geological expert directly, by iteratively updating a population of vectors of statistics, based on the expert's subjective opinion of the corresponding geological simulations. Thus, it does not require the expert to have knowledge of the mathematical and statistical details of the model. The process uses a genetic algorithm to generate new vectors. We demonstrate the methodology for a particular geostatistical model used to model rock pore-space, which simulates the spatial distribution of matrix and pores over a 2-D grid, using multipoint statistics specified by conditional probabilities. Experts were asked to use the algorithm to estimate the statistics of a given target pore-space image with known statistics; thus, their numerical rates of convergence could be calculated. Convergence was measured for all experts, showing that the algorithm can be used to find appropriate probabilities given the expert's subjective input. However, considerable and apparently irreducible residual misfit was found between the true statistics and the estimates of statistics obtained by the experts, with the root-mean-square error on the conditional probabilities typically >0.1. This is interpreted as the limit of the experts' abilities to distinguish between realizations of different spatial statistics using the algorithm. More accurate discrimination is therefore likely to require complementary elicitation techniques or sources of information independent of expert opinion.

  14. Hypoglycemic activity of withanolides and elicitated Withania somnifera.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, Jonathan; Rosenberg, Rivka; Smotrich, Avinoam; Hanuš, Lumír; Bernstein, Nirit

    2015-08-01

    Withania somnifera, known in India as Asghawhanda, is used traditionally to treat many medical problems including diabetes and has demonstrated therapeutic activity in various animal models as well as in diabetic patients. While much of W. somnifera's therapeutic activity is attributed to withanolides, their role in the anti-diabetic activity of W. somnifera has not been adequately studied. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-diabetic activity of W. somnifera extract and purified withanolides, as well as the effect of various elicitors on this activity. W. somnifera leaf and root extracts increased glucose uptake in myotubes and adipocytes in a dose dependent manner, with the leaf extract more active than the root extract. Leaf but not root extract increased insulin secretion in basal pancreatic beta cells but not in stimulated cells. Six withanolides isolated from W. somnifera were tested for anti-diabetic activity based on glucose uptake in skeletal myotubes. Withaferin A was found to increase glucose uptake, with 10μM producing a 54% increase compared with control, suggesting that withaferin A is at least partially responsible for W. somnifera's anti-diabetic activity. Elicitors applied to the root growing solutions affected the physiological state of the plants, altering membrane leakage or osmotic potential. Methyl salicylate and chitosan increased withaferin A content by 75% and 69% respectively, and extracts from elicited plants increased glucose uptake to a higher extent than non-elicited plants, demonstrating a correlation between increased content of withaferin A and anti-diabetic activity. PMID:25796090

  15. Emotion Elicitation: A Comparison of Pictures and Films.

    PubMed

    Uhrig, Meike K; Trautmann, Nadine; Baumgärtner, Ulf; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Henrich, Florian; Hiller, Wolfgang; Marschall, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Pictures and film clips are widely used and accepted stimuli to elicit emotions. Based on theoretical arguments it is often assumed that the emotional effects of films exceed those of pictures, but to date this assumption has not been investigated directly. The aim of the present study was to compare pictures and films in terms of their capacity to induce emotions verified by means of explicit measures. Stimuli were (a) single pictures presented for 6 s, (b) a set of three consecutive pictures with emotionally congruent contents presented for 2 s each, (c) short film clips with a duration of 6 s. A total of 144 participants rated their emotion and arousal states following stimulus presentation. Repeated-measures ANOVAs revealed that the film clips and 3-picture version were as effective as the classical 1-picture method to elicit positive emotions, however, modulation toward positive valence was little. Modulation toward negative valence was more effective in general. Film clips were less effective than pictorial stimuli in producing the corresponding emotion states (all p < 0.001) and were less arousing (all p ≤ 0.02). Possible reasons for these unexpected results are discussed. PMID:26925007

  16. Landing responses of Anopheles gambiae elicited by oxocarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Healy, T P; Copland, M J W; Cork, A; Przyborowska, A; Halket, J M

    2002-06-01

    A wind tunnel bioassay and video system were used to observe Anopheles gambiae Giles sensu stricto (Diptera: Culicidae) landing on glass cylinders, heated to human skin temperature (34 degrees C) and treated with aqueous solutions of oxocarboxylic acids. Six of nine compounds tested: 2-oxobutanoic, 2-oxo-3-methylbutanoic, 2-oxopentanoic, 2-oxo-3-methylpentanoic, 2-oxo-4-methylpentanoic and 2-oxohexanoic elicited significant landing responses in comparison to a water control. Landing responses appeared to be restricted to C4-C6, 2-oxocarboxylic acids. A solution of 1 microg/microL of 2-oxopentanoic acid elicited the highest level of response that was temperature dependent: significant numbers of landings occurred only within +/-2 degrees C of human skin temperature. Chemical analysis by linked gas-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry of methyl-oxime, trimethylsilyl derivatized samples of human sweat extracts revealed the presence of 2-oxopropanoic (pyruvic) acid and three behaviourally active, branched chain acids: 2-oxo-3-methylbutanoic, 2-oxo-3-methylpentanoic and 2-oxo-4-methylpentanoic. PMID:12109705

  17. Constructing Dense Graphs with Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not difficult to construct dense graphs containing Hamiltonian cycles, but it is difficult to generate dense graphs that are guaranteed to contain a unique Hamiltonian cycle. This article presents an algorithm for generating arbitrarily large simple graphs containing "unique" Hamiltonian cycles. These graphs can be turned into dense graphs…

  18. Teaching and Learning with Individually Unique Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joerding, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the pedagogical benefits of giving students individually unique homework exercises from an exercise template. Evidence from a test of this approach shows statistically significant improvements in subsequent exam performance by students receiving unique problems compared with students who received traditional…

  19. Elicitation of expert judgments of uncertainty in the risk assessment of herbicide-tolerant oilseed crops.

    PubMed

    Krayer von Krauss, Martin P; Casman, Elizabeth A; Small, Mitchell J

    2004-12-01

    One of the lay public's concerns about genetically modified (GM) organisms (GMO) and related emerging technologies is that not all the important risks are evaluated or even identified yet--and that ignorance of the unanticipated risks could lead to severe environmental or public health consequences. To some degree, even the scientists who participated in the analysis of the risks from GMOs (arguably the people most qualified to critique these analyses) share some of this concern. To formally explore the uncertainty in the risk assessment of a GM crop, we conducted detailed interviews of seven leading experts on GM oilseed crops to obtain qualitative and quantitative information on their understanding of the uncertainties associated with the risks to agriculture from GM oilseed crops (canola or rapeseed). The results of these elicitations revealed three issues of potential concern that are currently left outside the scope of risk assessments. These are (1) the potential loss of the agronomic and environmental benefits of glyphosate (a herbicide widely used in no-till agriculture) due to the combined problems of glyphosate-tolerant canola and wheat volunteer plants, (2) the growing problem of seed lot contamination, and (3) the potential market impacts. The elicitations also identified two areas where knowledge is insufficient. These are: the occurrence of hybridization between canola and wild relatives and the ability of the hybrids to perpetuate themselves in nature, and the fate of the herbicide-tolerance genes in soil and their interaction with soil microfauna and -flora. The methodological contribution of this work is a formal approach to analyzing the uncertainty surrounding complex problems. PMID:15660608

  20. Latent Variable Models of Need for Uniqueness.

    PubMed

    Tepper, K; Hoyle, R H

    1996-10-01

    The theory of uniqueness has been invoked to explain attitudinal and behavioral nonconformity with respect to peer-group, social-cultural, and statistical norms, as well as the development of a distinctive view of self via seeking novelty goods, adopting new products, acquiring scarce commodities, and amassing material possessions. Present research endeavors in psychology and consumer behavior are inhibited by uncertainty regarding the psychometric properties of the Need for Uniqueness Scale, the primary instrument for measuring individual differences in uniqueness motivation. In an important step toward facilitating research on uniqueness motivation, we used confirmatory factor analysis to evaluate three a priori latent variable models of responses to the Need for Uniqueness Scale. Among the a priori models, an oblique three-factor model best accounted for commonality among items. Exploratory factor analysis followed by estimation of unrestricted three- and four-factor models revealed that a model with a complex pattern of loadings on four modestly correlated factors may best explain the latent structure of the Need for Uniqueness Scale. Additional analyses evaluated the associations among the three a priori factors and an array of individual differences. Results of those analyses indicated the need to distinguish among facets of the uniqueness motive in behavioral research. PMID:26788594

  1. Induction of 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid in wounded plants and elicited plant cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Parchmann, S; Gundlach, H; Mueller, M J

    1997-01-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) is rapidly biosynthesized from alpha-linolenic acid in plants upon contact with pathogens or wounding, and triggers gene activation, leading to the synthesis of defensive secondary metabolites and proteins. Despite the recent finding that its precursor, 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (PDA), is a more powerful inducer of gene activation, interest has focused so far almost exclusively on JA. A validated negative chemical ionization-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method has been developed that allows the simultaneous quantification of endogenous 12-oxo-PDA and JA in plant tissues. In six out of eight plant species tested maximal levels of 12-oxo-PDA exceeded peak levels of JA by approximately 3- to 5-fold after elicitation with a yeast cell wall preparation or when plants were wounded. These experiments support the hypothesis that 12-oxo-PDA acts as the predominant jasmonate signal in most plants, whereas JA remains an active metabolite of its precursor. Furthermore, JA but not 12-oxo-PDA was shown to be secreted into the medium from cultured plant cells, suggesting that JA may also act as an intercellular signal. PMID:9390438

  2. Reliance on luck: identifying which achievement goals elicit superstitious behavior.

    PubMed

    Hamerman, Eric J; Morewedge, Carey K

    2015-03-01

    People often resort to superstitious behavior to facilitate goal achievement. We examined whether the specific type of achievement goal pursued influences the propensity to engage in superstitious behavior. Across six studies, we found that performance goals were more likely than learning goals to elicit superstitious behavior. Participants were more likely to engage in superstitious behavior at high than at low levels of chronic performance orientation, but superstitious behavior was not influenced by chronic learning orientation (Studies 1 and 2). Similarly, participants exhibited stronger preferences for lucky items when primed to pursue performance goals rather than learning goals (Studies 3 and 4). As uncertainty of goal achievement increased, superstitious behavior increased when participants pursued performance goals but not learning goals (Study 5). Finally, assignment to use a lucky (vs. unlucky) item resulted in greater confidence of achieving performance goals but not learning goals (Study 6). PMID:25617118

  3. PROBES: a framework for probability elicitation from experts.

    PubMed Central

    Lau, A. H.; Leong, T. Y.

    1999-01-01

    A decision analytic model represents uncertainties as probability distributions. These distributions are hard to assess especially for large and dynamic models. We propose an integrated framework that facilitates elicitation of the relevant probability distributions for dynamic decision models from the domain experts. The experts usually use some judgmental heuristics to aid probability assessments; the resulting distributions may be proned to cognitive biases. Our framework aims to minimize the effects of these biases and to improve the quality of decisions made. We have implemented a prototype system of the framework and evaluated its effectiveness via a case study in the follow-up management of colorectal cancer patients after curative surgery. Preliminary results demonstrate the practical promise of the framework. Images Figure 4 PMID:10566369

  4. Eliciting design patterns for e-learning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retalis, Symeon; Georgiakakis, Petros; Dimitriadis, Yannis

    2006-06-01

    Design pattern creation, especially in the e-learning domain, is a highly complex process that has not been sufficiently studied and formalized. In this paper, we propose a systematic pattern development cycle, whose most important aspects focus on reverse engineering of existing systems in order to elicit features that are cross-validated through the use of appropriate, authentic scenarios. However, an iterative pattern process is proposed that takes advantage of multiple data sources, thus emphasizing a holistic view of the teaching learning processes. The proposed schema of pattern mining has been extensively validated for Asynchronous Network Supported Collaborative Learning (ANSCL) systems, as well as for other types of tools in a variety of scenarios, with promising results.

  5. Elicitation: a tool for enriching the bioactive composition of foods.

    PubMed

    Baenas, Nieves; García-Viguera, Cristina; Moreno, Diego A

    2014-01-01

    Elicitation is a good strategy to induce physiological changes and stimulate defense or stress-induced responses in plants. The elicitor treatments trigger the synthesis of phytochemical compounds in fruits, vegetables and herbs. These metabolites have been widely investigated as bioactive compounds responsible of plant cell adaptation to the environment, specific organoleptic properties of foods, and protective effects in human cells against oxidative processes in the development of neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases and certain types of cancer. Biotic (biological origin), abiotic (chemical or physical origin) elicitors and phytohormones have been applied alone or in combinations, in hydroponic solutions or sprays, and in different selected time points of the plant growth or during post-harvest. Understanding how plant tissues and their specific secondary metabolic pathways respond to specific treatments with elicitors would be the basis for designing protocols to enhance the production of secondary metabolites, in order to produce quality and healthy fresh foods. PMID:25255755

  6. Ontological leveling and elicitation for complex industrial transactions

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, L.R.; Goldsmith, S.Y.; Spires, S.V.

    1998-11-01

    The authors present an agent-oriented mechanism that uses a central ontology as a means to conduct complex distributed transactions. This is done by instantiating a template object motivated solely by the ontology, then automatically and explicitly linking each temple element to an independently constructed interface component. Validation information is attached directly to the links so that the agent need not know a priori the semantics of data validity, merely how to execute a general validation process to satisfy the conditions given in the link. Ontological leveling is critical: all terms presented to informants must be semantically coherent within the central ontology. To illustrate this approach in an industrial setting, they discuss an existing implementation that conducted international commercial transactions on the World-Wide Web. Agents operating within a federated architecture construct, populate by Web-based elicitation, and manipulate a distributed composite transaction object to effect transport of goods over the US/Mexico border.

  7. Compare Gene Profiles

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-05-31

    Compare Gene Profiles (CGP) performs pairwise gene content comparisons among a relatively large set of related bacterial genomes. CGP performs pairwise BLAST among gene calls from a set of input genome and associated annotation files, and combines the results to generate lists of common genes, unique genes, homologs, and genes from each genome that differ substantially in length from corresponding genes in the other genomes. CGP is implemented in Python and runs in a Linuxmore » environment in serial or parallel mode.« less

  8. Promoting environmental sustainability via an expert elicitation process

    SciTech Connect

    Swor, Tom; Canter, Larry

    2011-09-15

    Environmental sustainability (ES) planning was applied to the 981-mile, commercially navigable Ohio River. Navigation improvement needs were identified within the broad study along with actions to restore aquatic and riparian ecological resources to a higher state of sustainability. The actions were identified via an Expert Elicitation Process (EEP) involving aquatic and riparian/terrestrial experts knowledgeable of Ohio River resources. The received information was synthesized into goals for the selected resources (Valued Ecosystem Components - or VECs), actions or measures to attain the goals, and monitoring to evaluate conditions. Finally, 26 types of ES actions were identified and classified into three ES alternatives. These alternatives were then evaluated relative to key decision criteria, and such evaluations, based on pertinent decision criteria, were also conducted for four navigation improvement alternatives. Finally, the best combination of ES and navigation alternatives was identified. The key lessons derived from this use of EEP were that: (1) EEP can support the preliminary identification of ES measures; however, more detailed study of specific designs and cost evaluations will be necessary; (2) the method promotes collaboration between key scientists and policymakers from governmental agencies and private sectors, and such collaboration will ultimately provide the foundation for implementation of sustainability actions; and (3) an effective EEP does not occur by accident, it requires careful planning, implementation, and documentation. - Research Highlights: > Use of an Expert Elicitation Process (EEP) is demonstrated in this study. > EEP was used to identify Environmental Sustainability (ES) needs for the Ohio River. > EEP helped develop consensus among resource experts on ES needs. > EEP promotes collaboration to identify and contribute to common resource goals. > EEP may be used in assessing cumulative effects and formulating restoration plans.

  9. Noncanonical Roles of the Immune System in Eliciting Oncogene Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Stephanie C.; Bellovin, David I.; Felsher, Dean W.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cancer is highly complex. The magnitude of this complexity makes it highly surprising that even the brief suppression of an oncogene can sometimes result in rapid and sustained tumor regression illustrating that cancers can be “oncogene addicted” [1-10]. The essential implication is that oncogenes may not only fuel the initiation of tumorigenesis, but in some cases necessarily their surfeit of activation is paramaount to maintain a neoplastic state [11]. Oncogene suppression acutely restores normal physiological programs that effectively overrides secondary genetic events and a cancer collapses [12,13]. Oncogene addiction is mediated both through both tumor intrinsic cell-autonomous mechanisms including proliferative arrest, apoptosis, differentiation and cellular senescence [1,2,4,12] but also host-dependent mechanisms that interact with these tumor intrinsic programs [14,15]. Notably, oncogene inactivation elicits a host immune response that involves specific immune effectors and cytokines that facilitate a remodeling of the tumor microenvironment including the shut down of angiogenesis and the induction of cellular senescence of tumor cells [16]. Hence, immune effectors are critically involved in tumor initiation and prevention [17-19] and progression [20], but also appear to be essential to tumor regression upon oncogene inactivation [21-23]. The understanding how the inactivation of an oncogene elicits a systemic signal in the host that prompts a deconstruction of a tumor could have important implications. The combination of oncogene-targeted therapy together with immunomodulatory therapy may be ideal for the development of both a robust tumor intrinsic as well as immunological effectively leading to sustained tumor regression. PMID:23571026

  10. Knowledge elicitation techniques and application to nuclear plant maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, E. Kevin

    The new millennium has brought with it the opportunity of global trade which in turn requires the utmost in efficiency from each individual industry. This includes the nuclear power industry, a point which was emphasized when the electrical generation industry began to be de regulated across North America the late 1990s and re-emphasized when the northeast power grid of North America collapsed in the summer of 2003. This dissertation deals with reducing the cost of the maintenance function of Candu nuclear power plants and initiating a strong link between universities and the Canadian nuclear industry. Various forms of RCM (reliability-centred maintenance) have been the tools of choice in industry for improving the maintenance function during the last 20 years. In this project, pilot studies, conducted at Bruce Power between 1999 and 2005, and reported on in this dissertation, lay out a path to implement statistical improvements as the next step after RCM in reducing the cost of the maintenance. Elicitation protocols, designed for the age group being elicited, address the much-documented issue of a lack of data. Clear, graphical, inferential statistical interfaces are accentuated and developed to aid in building the teams required to implement the various methodologies and to help in achieving funding targets. Graphical analysis and Crow/AMSAA (army materials systems analysis activity) plots are developed and demonstrated from the point of view of justifying the expenditures of cost reduction efforts. This dissertation ultimately speaks to the great opportunity being presented by this approach at this time: of capturing the baby-boom generation's huge pool of knowledge before those people retire. It is expected that the protocols and procedures referenced here will have applicability across the many disciplines where collecting expert information from a similar age group is required.

  11. Tactile stimulation of the oropharynx elicits sympathoexcitation in conscious humans

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Matthew D.; Mast, Jessica L.; Cui, Jian; Heffernan, Matthew J.; McQuillan, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Tactile stimulation of the oropharynx (TSO) elicits the gag reflex and increases heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) in anesthetized patients. However, the interaction between upper-airway defense reflexes and the sympathetic nervous system has not been investigated in conscious humans. In Experiment 1, beat-by-beat measurements of HR, MAP, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), and renal vascular resistance (RVR) were measured during TSO and tactile stimulation of the hard palate (Sham) in the supine posture. In Experiment 2, TSO was performed before (pre) and after (post) inhalation of 4% lidocaine via nebulizer. Rate pressure product (RPP) was determined. Compared with Sham, TSO elicited the gag reflex and increased RPP [absolute change (Δ)36 ± 6 vs. 17 ± 5%], MSNA (Δ122 ± 39 vs. 19 ± 19%), and RVR (Δ55 ± 11 vs. 4 ± 4%). This effect occurred within one to two cardiac cycles of TSO. The ΔMAP (12 ± 3 vs. 6 ± 1 mmHg) and the ΔHR (10 ± 3 vs. 3 ± 3 beats/min) were also greater following TSO compared with Sham. Lidocaine inhalation blocked the gag reflex and attenuated increases in MAP (Δpre: 16 ± 2; Δpost: 5 ± 2 mmHg) and HR (Δpre: 12 ± 3; Δpost: 2 ± 2 beats/min) in response to TSO. When mechanically stimulated, afferents in the oropharynx not only serve to protect the airway but also cause reflex increases in MSNA, RVR, MAP, and HR. An augmented sympathoexcitatory response during intubation and laryngoscopy may contribute to perioperative cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:23599399

  12. Nest sanitation elicits egg discrimination in cuckoo hosts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Canchao; Chen, Min; Wang, Longwu; Liang, Wei; Møller, Anders Pape

    2015-11-01

    Nest sanitation is a nearly universal behavior in birds, while egg discrimination is a more specific adaptation that has evolved to counter brood parasitism. These two behaviors are closely related with nest sanitation being the ancestral behavior, and it has been hypothesized to constitute a preadaptation for egg discrimination. However, previous studies found little evidence to support this hypothesis. Here, we conducted an empirical test of the association between nest sanitation and egg discrimination in the barn swallow (Hirundo rustica) by inserting a single non-mimetic model egg or a non-mimetic model egg plus half a peanut shell into host nests. Compared to the rejection rate of single model eggs, barn swallows significantly increased egg rejection frequency if a half peanut shell was simultaneously introduced. Our result for the first time shows the impact of nest sanitation on egg discrimination and demonstrates that nest sanitation can elicit egg discrimination in hosts of brood parasites. This study provided evidence for nest sanitation being a preadaptation to egg discrimination by facilitating egg rejection, thereby significantly advancing our understanding of avian cognition of foreign objects. Furthermore, we suggest that egg discrimination behavior in many accepters and intermediate rejecters may be lost or diluted. Such egg discrimination can be elicited and restored after nest sanitation, implying a sensitive and rapid phenotypic response to increased risk of parasitism. Our study offers a novel perspective for investigating the role of so-called intermediate rejecter individuals or species in the long-term coevolutionary cycle between brood parasites and their hosts. PMID:26160343

  13. Cripto-1 vaccination elicits protective immunity against metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ligtenberg, M. A.; Witt, K.; Galvez-Cancino, F.; Sette, A.; Lundqvist, A.; Lladser, A.; Kiessling, R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Metastatic melanoma is a fatal disease that responds poorly to classical treatments but can be targeted by T cell-based immunotherapy. Cancer vaccines have the potential to generate long-lasting cytotoxic CD8+ T cell responses able to eradicate established and disseminated tumors. Vaccination against antigens expressed by tumor cells with enhanced metastatic potential represents a highly attractive strategy to efficiently target deadly metastatic disease. Cripto-1 is frequently over-expressed in human carcinomas and melanomas, but is expressed only at low levels on normal differentiated tissues. Cripto-1 is particularly upregulated in cancer-initiating cells and is involved in cellular processes such as cell migration, invasion and epithelial–mesenchymal transition, which are hallmarks of aggressive cancer cells able to initiate metastatic disease. Here, we explored the potential of Cripto-1 vaccination to target metastatic melanoma in a preclinical model. Cripto-1 was overexpressed in highly metastatic B16F10 cells as compared to poorly metastatic B16F1 cells. Moreover, B16F10 cells grown in sphere conditions to enrich for cancer stem cells (CSC) progressively upregulated cripto1 expression. Vaccination of C57Bl/6 mice with a DNA vaccine encoding mouse Cripto-1 elicited a readily detectable/strong cytotoxic CD8+ T cell response specific for a H-2 Kb-restricted epitope identified based on its ability to bind H-2b molecules. Remarkably, Cripto-1 vaccination elicited a protective response against lung metastasis and subcutaneous challenges with highly metastatic B16F10 melanoma cells. Our data indicate that vaccination against Cripto-1 represents a novel strategy to be tested in the clinic.

  14. Gene Expression Profile Analysis as a Prognostic Indicator of Normal Tissue Response to Simulated Space Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Story, Michael; Stivers, David N.

    2004-01-01

    This project was funded as a pilot project to determine the feasibility of using gene expression profiles to characterize the response of human cells to exposure to particulate radiations such as those encountered in the spaceflight environment. We proposed to use microarray technology to examine the gene expression patterns of a bank of well-characterized human fibroblast cell cultures. These fibroblast cultures were derived from breast or head and neck cancer patients who exhibited normal, minimal, or severe normal tissue reactions following low LET radiation exposure via radiotherapy. Furthermore, determination of SF2 values from fibroblasts cultured from these individuals were predictive of risk for severe late reactions. We hypothesized that by determining the expression of thousands of genes we could identify gene expression patterns that reflect how normal tissues respond to high Z and energy (HZE) particles, that is, that there are molecular signatures for HZE exposures. We also hypothesized that individuals who are intrinsically radiosensitive may elicit a unique response. Because this was funded as a pilot project we focused our initial studies on logistics and appropriate experimental design, and then to test our hypothesis that there is a unique molecular response to specific particles, in this case C and Fe, for primary human skin fibroblasts.

  15. Falls Prevention: Unique to Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Sleep Problems Stroke Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Falls Prevention Unique to ... difficulties. Optimizing Management of Congestive Heart Failure and COPD Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) Many older people develop ...

  16. Unique Ideas in a New Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamby, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    Unique features of a new vocational agriculture department facility in Diamond, Missouri, are described, which include an overhead hoist system, arc welders, storage areas, paint room, and greenhouse. (TA)

  17. Unique Biosignatures in Caves of All Lithologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boston, P. J.; Schubert, K. E.; Gomez, E.; Conrad, P. G.

    2015-10-01

    Unique maze-like microbial communities on cave surfaces on all lithologies all over the world are an excellent candidate biosignatures for life detection missions into caves and other extraterrestrial environments.

  18. Giraffe genome sequence reveals clues to its unique morphology and physiology.

    PubMed

    Agaba, Morris; Ishengoma, Edson; Miller, Webb C; McGrath, Barbara C; Hudson, Chelsea N; Bedoya Reina, Oscar C; Ratan, Aakrosh; Burhans, Rico; Chikhi, Rayan; Medvedev, Paul; Praul, Craig A; Wu-Cavener, Lan; Wood, Brendan; Robertson, Heather; Penfold, Linda; Cavener, Douglas R

    2016-01-01

    The origins of giraffe's imposing stature and associated cardiovascular adaptations are unknown. Okapi, which lacks these unique features, is giraffe's closest relative and provides a useful comparison, to identify genetic variation underlying giraffe's long neck and cardiovascular system. The genomes of giraffe and okapi were sequenced, and through comparative analyses genes and pathways were identified that exhibit unique genetic changes and likely contribute to giraffe's unique features. Some of these genes are in the HOX, NOTCH and FGF signalling pathways, which regulate both skeletal and cardiovascular development, suggesting that giraffe's stature and cardiovascular adaptations evolved in parallel through changes in a small number of genes. Mitochondrial metabolism and volatile fatty acids transport genes are also evolutionarily diverged in giraffe and may be related to its unusual diet that includes toxic plants. Unexpectedly, substantial evolutionary changes have occurred in giraffe and okapi in double-strand break repair and centrosome functions. PMID:27187213

  19. Giraffe genome sequence reveals clues to its unique morphology and physiology

    PubMed Central

    Agaba, Morris; Ishengoma, Edson; Miller, Webb C.; McGrath, Barbara C.; Hudson, Chelsea N.; Bedoya Reina, Oscar C.; Ratan, Aakrosh; Burhans, Rico; Chikhi, Rayan; Medvedev, Paul; Praul, Craig A.; Wu-Cavener, Lan; Wood, Brendan; Robertson, Heather; Penfold, Linda; Cavener, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    The origins of giraffe's imposing stature and associated cardiovascular adaptations are unknown. Okapi, which lacks these unique features, is giraffe's closest relative and provides a useful comparison, to identify genetic variation underlying giraffe's long neck and cardiovascular system. The genomes of giraffe and okapi were sequenced, and through comparative analyses genes and pathways were identified that exhibit unique genetic changes and likely contribute to giraffe's unique features. Some of these genes are in the HOX, NOTCH and FGF signalling pathways, which regulate both skeletal and cardiovascular development, suggesting that giraffe's stature and cardiovascular adaptations evolved in parallel through changes in a small number of genes. Mitochondrial metabolism and volatile fatty acids transport genes are also evolutionarily diverged in giraffe and may be related to its unusual diet that includes toxic plants. Unexpectedly, substantial evolutionary changes have occurred in giraffe and okapi in double-strand break repair and centrosome functions. PMID:27187213

  20. Spaceflight Transcriptomes: Unique Responses to a Novel Environment

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Anna-Lisa; Zupanska, Agata K.; Ostrow, Dejerianne T.; Zhang, Yanping; Sun, Yijun; Li, Jian-Liang; Shanker, Savita; Farmerie, William G.; Amalfitano, Claire E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The spaceflight environment presents unique challenges to terrestrial biology, including but not limited to the direct effects of gravity. As we near the end of the Space Shuttle era, there remain fundamental questions about the response and adaptation of plants to orbital spaceflight conditions. We address a key baseline question of whether gene expression changes are induced by the orbital environment, and then we ask whether undifferentiated cells, cells presumably lacking the typical gravity response mechanisms, perceive spaceflight. Arabidopsis seedlings and undifferentiated cultured Arabidopsis cells were launched in April, 2010, as part of the BRIC-16 flight experiment on STS-131. Biologically replicated DNA microarray and averaged RNA digital transcript profiling revealed several hundred genes in seedlings and cell cultures that were significantly affected by launch and spaceflight. The response was moderate in seedlings; only a few genes were induced by more than 7-fold, and the overall intrinsic expression level for most differentially expressed genes was low. In contrast, cell cultures displayed a more dramatic response, with dozens of genes showing this level of differential expression, a list comprised primarily of heat shock–related and stress-related genes. This baseline transcriptome profiling of seedlings and cultured cells confirms the fundamental hypothesis that survival of the spaceflight environment requires adaptive changes that are both governed and displayed by alterations in gene expression. The comparison of intact plants with cultures of undifferentiated cells confirms a second hypothesis: undifferentiated cells can detect spaceflight in the absence of specialized tissue or organized developmental structures known to detect gravity. Key Words: Tissue culture—Microgravity—Low Earth orbit—Space Shuttle—Microarray. Astrobiology 12, 40–56. PMID:22221117

  1. Development of a knowledge elicitation shell for materials performance evaluation in seawater systems

    SciTech Connect

    Trethewey, K.R; Phillips, S.; Roberge, P.R.

    1994-12-31

    It has been shown that people have a considerable aggravating influence on system failure by corrosion. In the 21st century, when the emphasis is expected to fall firmly on conservation of valuable resources and more economic use of energy -- issues likely to be governed by law -- KBSs will have a considerable role to play in reducing the incidence of premature failure by corrosion. Knowledge elicitation is a precursor to the construction of knowledge based systems (KBSS) but represents a serious difficulty for software developers. The complex transformation of lifetime industrial expertise into software requires the willing and active participation of domain experts, frequently unfamiliar with computers and not necessarily inclined or able to share the details of their thought processes. Whilst knowledge and experience can be shared by a group of people, expertise is uniquely tinted by the expert`s own individuality. This paper discusses the strategies for the formulation of expert knowledge applicable to each of the groups of people involved in corrosion failure. 38 refs.

  2. Multisensory stimuli elicit altered oscillatory brain responses at gamma frequencies in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Stone, David B; Coffman, Brian A; Bustillo, Juan R; Aine, Cheryl J; Stephen, Julia M

    2014-01-01

    Deficits in auditory and visual unisensory responses are well documented in patients with schizophrenia; however, potential abnormalities elicited from multisensory audio-visual stimuli are less understood. Further, schizophrenia patients have shown abnormal patterns in task-related and task-independent oscillatory brain activity, particularly in the gamma frequency band. We examined oscillatory responses to basic unisensory and multisensory stimuli in schizophrenia patients (N = 46) and healthy controls (N = 57) using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Time-frequency decomposition was performed to determine regions of significant changes in gamma band power by group in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli relative to baseline levels. Results showed significant behavioral differences between groups in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli. In addition, time-frequency analysis revealed significant decreases and increases in gamma-band power in schizophrenia patients relative to healthy controls, which emerged both early and late over both sensory and frontal regions in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli. Unisensory gamma-band power predicted multisensory gamma-band power differently by group. Furthermore, gamma-band power in these regions predicted performance in select measures of the Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (MATRICS) test battery differently by group. These results reveal a unique pattern of task-related gamma-band power in schizophrenia patients relative to controls that may indicate reduced inhibition in combination with impaired oscillatory mechanisms in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:25414652

  3. Snapchat elicits more jealousy than Facebook: a comparison of Snapchat and Facebook use.

    PubMed

    Utz, Sonja; Muscanell, Nicole; Khalid, Cameran

    2015-03-01

    Recent news in the media has suggested that younger people are using popular social media such as Facebook less and are quickly adopting newer media, such as the self-destructing app Snapchat. Snapchat is unique in that it erases messages several seconds after they have been sent, affording its users a higher level of privacy. Yet, little research exists on Snapchat use in general, let alone its broader psychological implications. This article offers a preliminary comparison of Snapchat and Facebook use and psychological effects on romantic jealousy. General motives for using Snapchat and Facebook are examined, as well as the nature of the content that Snapchat users most frequently share. Further, because of the differences in privacy and persistence of information, potential psychological effects in the domain of romantic jealousy are also examined, which has been widely studied on Facebook in the last few years. Findings show that the main difference in motives were that Snapchat was used more for flirting and finding new love interests, whereas Facebook was still the main social networking site used for keeping in touch with friends. Further, when presenting users with a series of potentially jealousy provoking scenarios, Snapchat elicited higher levels of jealousy than did Facebook. These findings are explained based on an affordance approach. PMID:25667961

  4. Multisensory stimuli elicit altered oscillatory brain responses at gamma frequencies in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Stone, David B.; Coffman, Brian A.; Bustillo, Juan R.; Aine, Cheryl J.; Stephen, Julia M.

    2014-01-01

    Deficits in auditory and visual unisensory responses are well documented in patients with schizophrenia; however, potential abnormalities elicited from multisensory audio-visual stimuli are less understood. Further, schizophrenia patients have shown abnormal patterns in task-related and task-independent oscillatory brain activity, particularly in the gamma frequency band. We examined oscillatory responses to basic unisensory and multisensory stimuli in schizophrenia patients (N = 46) and healthy controls (N = 57) using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Time-frequency decomposition was performed to determine regions of significant changes in gamma band power by group in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli relative to baseline levels. Results showed significant behavioral differences between groups in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli. In addition, time-frequency analysis revealed significant decreases and increases in gamma-band power in schizophrenia patients relative to healthy controls, which emerged both early and late over both sensory and frontal regions in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli. Unisensory gamma-band power predicted multisensory gamma-band power differently by group. Furthermore, gamma-band power in these regions predicted performance in select measures of the Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (MATRICS) test battery differently by group. These results reveal a unique pattern of task-related gamma-band power in schizophrenia patients relative to controls that may indicate reduced inhibition in combination with impaired oscillatory mechanisms in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:25414652

  5. Translation elicits a growth rate-dependent, genome-wide, differential protein production in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Olivier; Goelzer, Anne; Schaffer, Marc; Calabre, Magali; Mäder, Ulrike; Aymerich, Stéphane; Jules, Matthieu; Fromion, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Complex regulatory programs control cell adaptation to environmental changes by setting condition-specific proteomes. In balanced growth, bacterial protein abundances depend on the dilution rate, transcript abundances and transcript-specific translation efficiencies. We revisited the current theory claiming the invariance of bacterial translation efficiency. By integrating genome-wide transcriptome datasets and datasets from a library of synthetic gfp-reporter fusions, we demonstrated that translation efficiencies in Bacillus subtilis decreased up to fourfold from slow to fast growth. The translation initiation regions elicited a growth rate-dependent, differential production of proteins without regulators, hence revealing a unique, hard-coded, growth rate-dependent mode of regulation. We combined model-based data analyses of transcript and protein abundances genome-wide and revealed that this global regulation is extensively used in B. subtilis We eventually developed a knowledge-based, three-step translation initiation model, experimentally challenged the model predictions and proposed that a growth rate-dependent drop in free ribosome abundance accounted for the differential protein production. PMID:27193784

  6. The Bordetella Adenylate Cyclase Repeat-in-Toxin (RTX) Domain Is Immunodominant and Elicits Neutralizing Antibodies*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianzhe; Maynard, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    The adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) is a multifunctional virulence factor secreted by Bordetella species. Upon interaction of its C-terminal hemolysin moiety with the cell surface receptor αMβ2 integrin, the N-terminal cyclase domain translocates into the host cell cytosol where it rapidly generates supraphysiological cAMP concentrations, which inhibit host cell anti-bacterial activities. Although ACT has been shown to induce protective immunity in mice, it is not included in any current acellular pertussis vaccines due to protein stability issues and a poor understanding of its role as a protective antigen. Here, we aimed to determine whether any single domain could recapitulate the antibody responses induced by the holo-toxin and to characterize the dominant neutralizing antibody response. We first immunized mice with ACT and screened antibody phage display libraries for binding to purified ACT. The vast majority of unique antibodies identified bound the C-terminal repeat-in-toxin (RTX) domain. Representative antibodies binding two nonoverlapping, neutralizing epitopes in the RTX domain prevented ACT association with J774A.1 macrophages and soluble αMβ2 integrin, suggesting that these antibodies inhibit the ACT-receptor interaction. Sera from mice immunized with the RTX domain showed similar neutralizing activity as ACT-immunized mice, indicating that this domain induced an antibody response similar to that induced by ACT. These data demonstrate that RTX can elicit neutralizing antibodies and suggest it may present an alternative to ACT. PMID:25505186

  7. Modularity, comparative cognition and human uniqueness.

    PubMed

    Shettleworth, Sara J

    2012-10-01

    Darwin's claim 'that the difference in mind between man and the higher animals … is certainly one of degree and not of kind' is at the core of the comparative study of cognition. Recent research provides unprecedented support for Darwin's claim as well as new reasons to question it, stimulating new theories of human cognitive uniqueness. This article compares and evaluates approaches to such theories. Some prominent theories propose sweeping domain-general characterizations of the difference in cognitive capabilities and/or mechanisms between adult humans and other animals. Dual-process theories for some cognitive domains propose that adult human cognition shares simple basic processes with that of other animals while additionally including slower-developing and more explicit uniquely human processes. These theories are consistent with a modular account of cognition and the 'core knowledge' account of children's cognitive development. A complementary proposal is that human infants have unique social and/or cognitive adaptations for uniquely human learning. A view of human cognitive architecture as a mosaic of unique and species-general modular and domain-general processes together with a focus on uniquely human developmental mechanisms is consistent with modern evolutionary-developmental biology and suggests new questions for comparative research. PMID:22927578

  8. Modularity, comparative cognition and human uniqueness

    PubMed Central

    Shettleworth, Sara J.

    2012-01-01

    Darwin's claim ‘that the difference in mind between man and the higher animals … is certainly one of degree and not of kind’ is at the core of the comparative study of cognition. Recent research provides unprecedented support for Darwin's claim as well as new reasons to question it, stimulating new theories of human cognitive uniqueness. This article compares and evaluates approaches to such theories. Some prominent theories propose sweeping domain-general characterizations of the difference in cognitive capabilities and/or mechanisms between adult humans and other animals. Dual-process theories for some cognitive domains propose that adult human cognition shares simple basic processes with that of other animals while additionally including slower-developing and more explicit uniquely human processes. These theories are consistent with a modular account of cognition and the ‘core knowledge’ account of children's cognitive development. A complementary proposal is that human infants have unique social and/or cognitive adaptations for uniquely human learning. A view of human cognitive architecture as a mosaic of unique and species-general modular and domain-general processes together with a focus on uniquely human developmental mechanisms is consistent with modern evolutionary-developmental biology and suggests new questions for comparative research. PMID:22927578

  9. Unilateral muscimol inactivations of the interstitial nucleus of Cajal in the alert rhesus monkey do not elicit seesaw nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Rambold, H; Helmchen, C; Büttner, U

    1999-09-10

    Seesaw-nystagmus (SSN) is a unique form of nystagmus with disconjugate vertical and conjugate torsional eye movements. Although rare, this disorder serves as a model for neuronal binocular control of the alignment of vertical-torsional eye movements of both eyes. The pathomechanism of SSN, however, is unclear. Studies in patients have suggested that the jerk SSN is associated with a midbrain lesion, i.e. a lesion of the interstitial nucleus of Cajal (iC), a center of integration of vertical and torsional eye movements. To test this hypothesis, we examined three dimensional binocular eye movements after reversible local inactivations of the iC and its immediate vicinity in the midbrain of the alert monkey. Inactivations were induced by muscimol microinjections. Eye movements were recorded with binocular scleral search coils. Isolated inactivations of neither the iC nor its immediate vicinity in the midbrain (including the adjacent rostral interstitial nucleus of the medial longitudinal fascicle, riMLF) elicited a disconjugate vertical/torsional nystagmus (SSN). However, there was a direction-specific right/left asymmetry in which a larger vertical amplitude was associated with the contralesional eye and a larger torsional amplitude with the ipsilesional eye, indicating a vestibular imbalance. We conclude that, first, iC lesions do not elicit SSN and, second, that apart from the gaze holding deficit a vestibular imbalance contributes to the vertical/torsional nystagmus after iC lesions. PMID:10507545

  10. Chromaticity of unique white in object mode.

    PubMed

    Kevin, A G Smet; Geert, Deconinck; Peter, Hanselaer

    2014-10-20

    The chromaticity of unique white viewed in object mode and under dark adapted conditions was investigated for 3 luminance levels (200, 1000 and 2000 cd/m(2)) using two experimental methods: unique white setting and rating. The results of the two methods were found to agree well. Both showed quite large observer variation and an apparent shift of the average unique white (across observers) towards colder correlated color temperatures as the stimulus luminance was dropped from 2000 cd/m(2) to 200 cd/m(2), although no such trend was observable at the individual observer level. Unique white was shown to encompass a region in color space, mostly located below the blackbody locus at around 6000 K. The low and high color temperature ends of the CIE class A and B white regions tend to respectively over- and slightly underestimate the size of the chromaticity area perceived as white by the dark adapted average observer. However, the agreement along a direction approximately perpendicular to the blackbody locus was quite good. Finally, the unique white ratings were modeled by a bivariate Gaussian function, resulting in a simple empirical metric to predict the degree of neutrality of any object stimulus viewed under dark adapted conditions. PMID:25401616

  11. Potentially bioaccessible phenolics, antioxidant activity and nutritional quality of young buckwheat sprouts affected by elicitation and elicitation supported by phenylpropanoid pathway precursor feeding.

    PubMed

    Świeca, Michał

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the study on impact of elicitation and the phenylpropanoid pathway feeding on the nutritional quality, the potentially bioaccessible phenolics and the antioxidant capacity of young buckwheat sprouts. Phenolics content was increased by elicitation and feeding with tyrosine and shikimic acid--an elevation of 30% and 17%, respectively. Antioxidant capacity was improved by feeding with tyrosine--an increase of 16.7% and 17.1% in both untreated and treated sprouts, respectively. The highest protein digestibility was determined for the control sprouts and those obtained after tyrosine feeding. The lowest starch digestibility was found for elicited sprouts obtained from seeds fed with tyrosine (a decrease by 52%). An increase of expected glycemic index by 38% was determined for elicited sprouts obtained after phenylalanine feeding. Starch and protein digestibility were negatively correlated with total phenolics (r = -0.55 and -0.58, respectively), however starch digestibility was also affected by resistant starch content. PMID:26304392

  12. Identification of expression profiles of sorghum genes in response to greenbug phloem-feeding using cDNA subtraction and microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Jin; Huang, Yinghua; Ayoubi, Patricia

    2006-04-01

    The phloem-feeding by greenbug (Schizaphis graminum) elicits unique interactions with their host plants. To investigate the expression profiles of sorghum genes responsive to greenbug feeding, two subtractive cDNA libraries were constructed through different combinatorial subtractions in a strong greenbug resistance sorghum M627 line and a susceptible Tx7000 line with or without greenbug infestation. A total of 3,508 cDNAs were selected from the two cDNA libraries, and subsequent cDNA microarray and northern blot analyses were performed for identification of sorghum genes responsive to greenbugs. In total, 157 sorghum transcripts were identified to be differentially expressed by greenbug feeding. The greenbug responsive genes were isolated and classified into nine categories according to the functional roles in plant metabolic pathways, such as defense, signal transduction, cell wall fortification, oxidative burst/stress, photosynthesis, development, cell maintenance, abiotic stress, and unknown function. Overall, the profiles of sorghum genes, responsive to greenbug phloem-feeding shared common identities with other expression profiles known to be elicited by diverse stresses, including pathogenesis, abiotic stress, and wounding. In addition to well-known defense related regulators such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and abscisic acid, auxin and gibberellic acid were also involved in mediation of the defense responses against greenbug phloem-feeding in sorghum. PMID:16292568

  13. Core and Shell Song Systems Unique to the Parrot Brain

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Mukta; Walløe, Solveig; Nedergaard, Signe; Fridel, Emma E.; Dabelsteen, Torben; Pakkenberg, Bente; Bertelsen, Mads F.; Dorrestein, Gerry M.; Brauth, Steven E.; Durand, Sarah E.; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to imitate complex sounds is rare, and among birds has been found only in parrots, songbirds, and hummingbirds. Parrots exhibit the most advanced vocal mimicry among non-human animals. A few studies have noted differences in connectivity, brain position and shape in the vocal learning systems of parrots relative to songbirds and hummingbirds. However, only one parrot species, the budgerigar, has been examined and no differences in the presence of song system structures were found with other avian vocal learners. Motivated by questions of whether there are important differences in the vocal systems of parrots relative to other vocal learners, we used specialized constitutive gene expression, singing-driven gene expression, and neural connectivity tracing experiments to further characterize the song system of budgerigars and/or other parrots. We found that the parrot brain uniquely contains a song system within a song system. The parrot “core” song system is similar to the song systems of songbirds and hummingbirds, whereas the “shell” song system is unique to parrots. The core with only rudimentary shell regions were found in the New Zealand kea, representing one of the only living species at a basal divergence with all other parrots, implying that parrots evolved vocal learning systems at least 29 million years ago. Relative size differences in the core and shell regions occur among species, which we suggest could be related to species differences in vocal and cognitive abilities. PMID:26107173

  14. Unique components of the plant mitochondrial protein import apparatus.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Owen; Murcha, Monika W; Whelan, James

    2013-02-01

    The basic mitochondrial protein import apparatus was established in the earliest eukaryotes. Over the subsequent course of evolution and the divergence of the plant, animal and fungal lineages, this basic import apparatus has been modified and expanded in order to meet the specific needs of protein import in each kingdom. In the plant kingdom, the arrival of the plastid complicated the process of protein trafficking and is thought to have given rise to the evolution of a number of unique components that allow specific and efficient targeting of mitochondrial proteins from their site of synthesis in the cytosol, to their final location in the organelle. This includes the evolution of two unique outer membrane import receptors, plant Translocase of outer membrane 20 kDa subunit (TOM20) and Outer membrane protein of 64 kDa (OM64), the loss of a receptor domain from an ancestral import component, Translocase of outer membrane 22 kDa subunit (TOM22), evolution of unique features in the disulfide relay system of the inter membrane space, and the addition of an extra membrane spanning domain to another ancestral component of the inner membrane, Translocase of inner membrane 17 kDa subunit (TIM17). Notably, many of these components are encoded by multi-gene families and exhibit differential sub-cellular localisation and functional specialisation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Import and Quality Control in Mitochondria and Plastids. PMID:22406071

  15. Uniquely designed nuclear structures of lower eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Masaaki; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2016-06-01

    The nuclear structures of lower eukaryotes, specifically protists, often vary from those of yeasts and metazoans. Several studies have demonstrated the unique and fascinating features of these nuclear structures, such as a histone-independent condensed chromatin in dinoflagellates and two structurally distinct nuclear pore complexes in ciliates. Despite their unique molecular/structural features, functions required for formation of their cognate molecules/structures are highly conserved. This provides important information about the structure-function relationship of the nuclear structures. In this review, we highlight characteristic nuclear structures found in lower eukaryotes, and discuss their attractiveness as potential biological systems for studying nuclear structures. PMID:26963276

  16. Uniqueness of conserved currents in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, P.

    2003-10-01

    It is proved by a functional method that the conventional expression for the Dirac current is the only conserved 4-vector implied by the Dirac equation that is a function of just the quantum state. The demonstration is extended to derive the unique conserved currents implied by the coupled Maxwell-Dirac equations and the Klein-Gordon equation. The uniqueness of the usual Pauli and Schrödinger currents follows by regarding these as the non-relativistic limits of the Dirac and Klein-Gordon currents, respectively. The existence and properties of further conserved vectors that are not functions of just the state is examined.

  17. Unique forbidden beta decays and neutrino mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvornický, Rastislav; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2015-10-01

    The measurement of the electron energy spectrum in single β decays close to the endpoint provides a direct determination of the neutrino masses. The most sensitive experiments use β decays with low Q value, e.g. KATRIN (tritium) and MARE (rhenium). We present the theoretical spectral shape of electrons emitted in the first, second, and fourth unique forbidden β decays. Our findings show that the Kurie functions for these unique forbidden β transitions are linear in the limit of massless neutrinos like the Kurie function of the allowed β decay of tritium.

  18. Unique forbidden beta decays and neutrino mass

    SciTech Connect

    Dvornický, Rastislav; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2015-10-28

    The measurement of the electron energy spectrum in single β decays close to the endpoint provides a direct determination of the neutrino masses. The most sensitive experiments use β decays with low Q value, e.g. KATRIN (tritium) and MARE (rhenium). We present the theoretical spectral shape of electrons emitted in the first, second, and fourth unique forbidden β decays. Our findings show that the Kurie functions for these unique forbidden β transitions are linear in the limit of massless neutrinos like the Kurie function of the allowed β decay of tritium.

  19. Augmentation of metastasis formation by thioglycollate-elicited macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gorelik, E; Wiltrout, R H; Brunda, M J; Holden, H T; Herberman, R B

    1982-05-15

    Inoculation of thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) into C57BL/6 mice reduced the rate of lung clearance of several intravenously (i.v.) injected murine tumor cells, and increased by up to 100-fold the number of artificially-induced metastatic lung nodules produced by the i.v. injection of B16 melanoma or Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL) tumor cells. Maximum effects were observed when PEC were injected either before, or shortly after, tumor cells. Modulation of lung clearance or metastasis formation was observed only with PEC and not with a variety of other cells, such as splenocytes, thymocytes P815 mastocytoma cells, or several macrophage-like cell lines (PU5-1.8 and IC-21). Lysates of PEC were as efficient in reducing lung clearance and augmenting metastasis formation as were intact viable PEC. Lysates of other cell types, including P815 and the macrophage-like cell lines, were unable to produce these effects. PEC populations, enriched for macrophages by adherence to plastic or by percoll density gradient sedimentation, also increased the number of B16-induced artificial metastasis, implicating the macrophage as the cell responsible for these observations. PMID:7095902

  20. Dreamed movement elicits activation in the sensorimotor cortex.

    PubMed

    Dresler, Martin; Koch, Stefan P; Wehrle, Renate; Spoormaker, Victor I; Holsboer, Florian; Steiger, Axel; Sämann, Philipp G; Obrig, Hellmuth; Czisch, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Since the discovery of the close association between rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and dreaming, much effort has been devoted to link physiological signatures of REM sleep to the contents of associated dreams [1-4]. Due to the impossibility of experimentally controlling spontaneous dream activity, however, a direct demonstration of dream contents by neuroimaging methods is lacking. By combining brain imaging with polysomnography and exploiting the state of "lucid dreaming," we show here that a predefined motor task performed during dreaming elicits neuronal activation in the sensorimotor cortex. In lucid dreams, the subject is aware of the dreaming state and capable of performing predefined actions while all standard polysomnographic criteria of REM sleep are fulfilled [5, 6]. Using eye signals as temporal markers, neural activity measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was related to dreamed hand movements during lucid REM sleep. Though preliminary, we provide first evidence that specific contents of REM-associated dreaming can be visualized by neuroimaging. PMID:22036177

  1. Eliciting the most prominent perceived differences between microphones.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Andy; Brookes, Tim; Dewhirst, Martin; Mason, Russell

    2016-05-01

    The attributes contributing to the differences perceived between microphones (when auditioning recordings made with those microphones) are not clear from previous research. Consideration of technical specifications and expert opinions indicated that recording five programme items with eight studio and two microelectromechanical system microphones could allow determination of the attributes related to the most prominent inter-microphone differences. Pairwise listening comparisons between the resulting 50 recordings, followed by multi-dimensional scaling analysis, revealed up to 5 salient dimensions per programme item; 17 corresponding pairs of recordings were selected exemplifying the differences across those dimensions. Direct elicitation and panel discussions on the 17 pairs identified a hierarchy of 40 perceptual attributes. An attribute contribution experiment on the 31 lowest-level attributes in the hierarchy allowed them to be ordered by degree of contribution and showed brightness, harshness, and clarity to always contribute highly to perceived inter-microphone differences. This work enables the future development of objective models to predict these important attributes. PMID:27250188

  2. Naturalistic Enactment to Elicit and Recognize Caregiver State Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Darien; Favela, Jesus; Ibarra, Catalina; Cruz, Netzahualcoyotl

    2016-09-01

    Caring for people with dementia imposes significant stress on family members and caregivers. Often, these informal caregivers have no coping strategy to deal with these behaviors. Anxiety and stress episodes are often triggered by problematic behaviors exhibited by the person who suffers from dementia. Detecting these behaviors could help them in dealing with them and reduce caregiver burden. However, work on anxiety detection using physiological signals has mostly been done under controlled conditions. In this paper we describe an experiment aimed at inducing anxiety among caregivers of people with dementia under naturalistic conditions. We report an experiment, using the naturalistic enactment technique, in which 10 subjects were asked to care for an older adult who acts as if she experiences dementia. We record physiological signals from the participants (GSR, HR, EEG) during the sessions that lasted for approximately 30 min. We explain how we obtained ground truth from self-report and observation data. We conducted two different tests using the Support Vector Machine technique. We obtained an average precision of 77.8 % and 38.1 % recall when classifying two different possible states: "Anxious" and "Not anxious". Analysis of the data provides evidence that the experiment elicits state anxiety and that it can be detected using wearable sensors. Furthermore, if episodes of problematic behaviors can also be detected, the recognition of anxiety in the caregiver can be improved, leading to the enactment of appropriate interventions to help caregivers cope with anxiety episodes. PMID:27443338

  3. Invisible visual stimuli elicit increases in alpha-band power.

    PubMed

    Bareither, Isabelle; Chaumon, Maximilien; Bernasconi, Fosco; Villringer, Arno; Busch, Niko A

    2014-09-01

    The cerebral cortex responds to stimuli of a wide range of intensities. Previous studies have demonstrated that undetectably weak somatosensory stimuli cause a functional deactivation or inhibition in somatosensory cortex. In the present study, we tested whether invisible visual stimuli lead to similar responses, indicated by an increase in EEG alpha-band power-an index of cortical excitability. We presented subliminal and supraliminal visual stimuli after estimating each participant's detection threshold. Stimuli consisted of peripherally presented small circular patches that differed in their contrast to a background consisting of a random white noise pattern. We demonstrate that subliminal and supraliminal stimuli each elicit specific neuronal response patterns. Supraliminal stimuli evoked an early, strongly phase-locked lower-frequency response representing the evoked potential and induced a decrease in alpha-band power from 400 ms on. By contrast, subliminal visual stimuli induced an increase of non-phase-locked power around 300 ms that was maximal within the alpha-band. This response might be due to an inhibitory mechanism, which reduces spurious visual activation that is unlikely to result from external stimuli. PMID:24872526

  4. Comparison of physiological responses to affect eliciting pictures and music.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongwan; Wedell, Douglas H

    2016-03-01

    Recent investigations of the neural correlates of affect elicited from different modalities have found both modality-general and modality-specific representations (Chikazoe et al., 2014). The implications for how physiological responses to affect differ across stimulus modalities have not been fully investigated. This study examined similarities and differences between physiological signatures of affect derived from two different modes of presentation: visual pictures and auditory music sampled from an affective space defined by valence and arousal. Electromyography recordings for the zygomaticus major (EMGZ) and corrugator supercilii (EMGC) were measured along with heart rate and skin conductance level (SCL). Multidimensional scaling was used to visualize relationships from physiological and behavioral responses, and the observed relationships were statistically evaluated using multivariate and univariate analyses. Results for physiological measures demonstrated that valence was represented in the same general way across modalities, primarily reflected in EMGC responses. Arousal, however, was represented in a modality-specific manner, with SCL and EMGZ sensitive to music-based arousal but not picture-based arousal. Stimulus modality itself was predicted from EMGC. Thus, physiological responses to valence were similar across modalities but physiological responses to arousal differed across modalities. These results support the utility of testing for affective markers across modalities within the same experimental setting to reveal how physiological responses are linked to either affect, stimulus modality or both. PMID:26752207

  5. Point of view filming and the elicitation interview.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Jonathan; Gormley, Gerard J

    2016-08-01

    Face-to-face interviews are a fundamental research tool in qualitative research. Whilst this form of data collection can provide many valuable insights, it can often fall short of providing a complete picture of a research subject's experiences. Point of view (PoV) interviewing is an elicitation technique used in the social sciences as a means of enriching data obtained from research interviews. Recording research subjects' first person perspectives, for example by wearing digital video glasses, can afford deeper insights into their experiences. PoV interviewing can promote making visible the unverbalizable and does not rely as much on memory as the traditional interview. The use of such relatively inexpensive technology is gaining interest in health profession educational research and pedagogy, such as dynamic simulation-based learning and research activities. In this interview, Dr Gerry Gormley (a medical education researcher) talks to Dr Jonathan Skinner (an anthropologist with an interest in PoV interviewing), exploring some of the many crossover implications with PoV interviewing for medical education research and practice. PMID:27438056

  6. Chinese characters elicit face-like N170 inversion effects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Man-Ying; Kuo, Bo-Cheng; Cheng, Shih-Kuen

    2011-12-01

    Recognition of both faces and Chinese characters is commonly believed to rely on configural information. While faces typically exhibit behavioral and N170 inversion effects that differ from non-face stimuli (Rossion, Joyce, Cottrell, & Tarr, 2003), the current study examined whether a similar reliance on configural processing may result in similar inversion effects for faces and Chinese characters. Participants were engaged in an orientation judgment task (Experiment 1) and a one-back identity matching task (Experiment 2). Across two experiments, the N170 was delayed and enhanced in magnitude for upside-down faces and compound Chinese characters, compared to upright stimuli. The inversion effects for these two stimulus categories were bilateral for latency and right-lateralized for amplitudes. For simple Chinese characters, only the latency inversion effects were significant. Moreover, the size of the right-hemisphere inversion effects in N170 amplitude was larger for faces than Chinese characters. These findings show the N170 inversion effects from non-face stimuli closely parallel effects seen with faces. Face-like N170 inversion effects elicited by Chinese compound characters were attributed to the difficulty of part-whole integration as well as the disrupted regularity in relational information due to inversion. Hemispheric difference in Chinese character processing is also discussed. PMID:21944865

  7. Cancer-induced immunosuppression: IL-18-elicited immunoablative NK cells.

    PubMed

    Terme, Magali; Ullrich, Evelyn; Aymeric, Laetitia; Meinhardt, Kathrin; Coudert, Jérôme D; Desbois, Mélanie; Ghiringhelli, François; Viaud, Sophie; Ryffel, Bernard; Yagita, Hideo; Chen, Lieping; Mécheri, Salaheddine; Kaplanski, Gilles; Prévost-Blondel, Armelle; Kato, Masashi; Schultze, Joachim L; Tartour, Eric; Kroemer, Guido; Degli-Esposti, Mariapia; Chaput, Nathalie; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2012-06-01

    During cancer development, a number of regulatory cell subsets and immunosuppressive cytokines subvert adaptive immune responses. Although it has been shown that tumor-derived interleukin (IL)-18 participates in the PD-1-dependent tumor progression in NK cell-controlled cancers, the mechanistic cues underlying this immunosuppression remain unknown. Here, we show that IL-18 converts a subset of Kit(-) (CD11b(-)) into Kit(+) natural killer (NK) cells, which accumulate in all lymphoid organs of tumor bearers and mediate immunoablative functions. Kit(+) NK cells overexpressed B7-H1/PD-L1, a ligand for PD-1. The adoptive transfer of Kit(+) NK cells promoted tumor growth in two pulmonary metastases tumor models and significantly reduced the dendritic and NK cell pools residing in lymphoid organs in a B7-H1-dependent manner. Neutralization of IL-18 by RNA interference in tumors or systemically by IL-18-binding protein dramatically reduced the accumulation of Kit(+)CD11b(-) NK cells in tumor bearers. Together, our findings show that IL-18 produced by tumor cells elicits Kit(+)CD11b(-) NK cells endowed with B7-H1-dependent immunoablative functions in mice. PMID:22427351

  8. Optic nerve evoked potentials elicited by electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yasuhiro; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Matsumoto, Masato; Oikawa, Tomoyoshi; Itakura, Takeshi; Kodama, Namio

    2005-07-01

    This study investigated whether the optic nerve evoked potential (ONEP) elicited by electrical stimulation of the optic nerve can serve as a reliable intraoperative indicator of visual function. In the experimental study, two silver-ball stimulating electrodes were placed on the dog optic nerve adjacent to the apex of the orbit and one recording electrode was placed on the optic nerve near the chiasm. The nerve was stimulated with 0.1 to 10 mA rectangular pulses. Stable and reproducible ONEPs were obtained. The ONEPs were not influenced by electromyographic potentials and were recorded more clearly on the optic nerve than on the surrounding tissue. Stepwise incremental transection of the thickness of the nerve resulted in incremental amplitude reduction proportional to the transected area. No response was recorded after complete sectioning of the nerve. In the clinical study, recordings were obtained from 15 patients after craniotomy to treat parasellar tumors or cerebral aneurysms. Reproducible ONEPs were recorded intraoperatively from the electrode placed on the optic nerve near the chiasm in 14 of 15 patients. In the remaining patient, the ONEP, recorded only after tumor removal because the optic nerve was stretched and extremely thin, was remarkably small and the patient developed unilateral blindness postoperatively. These experimental and clinical results suggest the possibility of intraoperative monitoring of visual function in patients undergoing craniotomy for the treatment of lesions near the optic nerve. PMID:16041180

  9. Impact of discussion on preferences elicited in a group setting

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Ken; Ratcliffe, Julie; Round, Ali; Milne, Ruairidh; Brazier, John E

    2006-01-01

    Background The completeness of preferences is assumed as one of the axioms of expected utility theory but has been subject to little empirical study. Methods Fifteen non-health professionals was recruited and familiarised with the standard gamble technique. The group then met five times over six months and preferences were elicited independently on 41 scenarios. After individual valuation, the group discussed the scenarios, following which preferences could be changed. Changes made were described and summary measures (mean and median) before and after discussion compared using paired t test and Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test. Semi-structured telephone interviews were carried out to explore attitudes to discussing preferences. These were transcribed, read by two investigators and emergent themes described. Results Sixteen changes (3.6%) were made to preferences by seven (47%) of the fifteen members. The difference between individual preference values before and after discussion ranged from -0.025 to 0.45. The average effect on the group mean was 0.0053. No differences before and after discussion were statistically significant. The group valued discussion highly and suggested it brought four main benefits: reassurance; improved procedural performance; increased group cohesion; satisfying curiosity. Conclusion The hypothesis that preferences are incomplete cannot be rejected for a proportion of respondents. However, brief discussion did not result in substantial number of changes to preferences and these did not have significant impact on summary values for the group, suggesting that incompleteness, if present, may not have an important effect on cost-utility analyses. PMID:16571106

  10. Eliciting Parents' Individual Requirements for an Inclusive Digital School System.

    PubMed

    Eftring, Håkan; Rassmus-Gröhn, Kirsten; Hedvall, Per-Olof

    2016-01-01

    Parents often have a busy time sorting out their life puzzles, including getting information about their children's activities in school. More and more communication between teachers and parents take place via digital school systems. It can be hard for parents to find the information they are looking for and the teacher decides when information is sent and what communication method to use. All parents, but especially parents with disabilities, might have individual preferences on how to receive information and how to adapt meetings at school. In this paper we present a project where we involved parents and teachers in focus groups, an idea workshop and iterative user trials of a digital prototype. The goal was to elicit parents' individual requirements for an inclusive digital school system, where they can store their individual preferences about how and when to receive information from school and what requirements they have on meetings at school. Preliminary results show that we managed to create open and focused discussions among parents and teachers. The parents reacted very positively on an onboarding page with the possibility to quickly and easily enter preferences after their first log in, but more work needs to be done on how preferences are categorized on the onboarding page. Finally, parents need to get clear feedback from teachers and school when they have entered or updated preferences, so they can trust that their preferences will be met. PMID:27534306

  11. Mesencephalic stimulation elicits inhibition of phrenic nerve activity in cat.

    PubMed

    Gallman, E A; Lawing, W L; Millhorn, D E

    1991-05-01

    1. Previous work from this laboratory has indicated that the mesencephalon is the anatomical substrate for a mechanism capable of inhibiting central respiratory drive in glomectomized cats for periods of up to 1 h or more following brief exposure to systemic hypoxia; phrenic nerve activity was used as an index of central respiratory drive. 2. The present study was undertaken to further localize the region responsible for the observed post-hypoxic inhibition of respiratory drive. We studied the phrenic nerve response to stimulations of the mesencephalon in anaesthetized, paralysed peripherally chemo-denervated cats with end-expired PCO2 and body temperature servo-controlled. 3. Stimulations of two types were employed. Electrical stimulation allowed rapid determination of sites from which phrenic inhibition could be elicited. Microinjections of excitatory amino acids were used subsequently in order to confine excitation to neuronal cell bodies and not axons of passage. 4. Stimulation of discrete regions of the ventromedial aspect of the mesencephalon in the vicinity of the red nucleus produced substantial inhibition of phrenic activity which lasted up to 45 min. Stimulation of other areas of the mesencephalon either produced no phrenic inhibition or resulted in a slight stimulation of phrenic activity. 5. The results are discussed in the context of the central respiratory response to hypoxia. PMID:1676420

  12. The Scharff-technique: eliciting intelligence from human sources.

    PubMed

    Oleszkiewicz, Simon; Granhag, Pär Anders; Montecinos, Sebastian Cancino

    2014-10-01

    This study is on how to elicit intelligence from human sources. We compared the efficacy of two human intelligence gathering techniques: the Scharff-technique (conceptualized as four different tactics) and the Direct Approach (a combination of open and direct questions). Participants (N = 60) were asked to take on the role of "sources" and were given information about a planned terrorist attack. They were to reveal part of this information in an upcoming interview. Critically, the participants were instructed to strike a balance between not revealing too much or too little information. As predicted, the participants revealed significantly more, and more precise, new information when interviewed with the Scharff-technique (vs. the Direct Approach). Furthermore, and as predicted, the participants in the Scharff condition underestimated how much new information they revealed whereas the participants in the Direct Approach overestimated how much new information they revealed. The study provides rather strong support for the Scharff-technique as an effective human intelligence gathering technique. PMID:24707914

  13. Intranasal Antibody Gene Transfer in Mice and Ferrets Elicits Broad Protection Against Pandemic Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Limberis, Maria P.; Adam, Virginie S.; Wong, Gary; Gren, Jason; Kobasa, Darwyn; Ross, Ted M.; Kobinger, Gary P.; Tretiakova, Anna; Wilson, James M.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of a new influenza pandemic remains a threat that could result in a substantial loss of life and economic disruption worldwide. Advances in human antibody isolation have led to the discovery of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that have broad neutralizing activity against various influenza strains, although their direct use for prophylaxis is impractical. To overcome this limitation, our approach is to deliver antibody via adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors to the site of initial infection, which, for respiratory viruses such as influenza, is the nasopharyngeal mucosa. AAV vectors based on serotype 9 were engineered to express a modified version of the previously isolated broadly neutralizing mAb to influenza A, FI6. We demonstrate that intranasal delivery of AAV9.FI6 into mice afforded complete protection and log reductions in viral load to 100 LD50 (median lethal dose) of three clinical isolates of H5N1 and two clinical isolates of H1N1, all of which have been associated with historic human pandemics (including H1N1 1918). Similarly, complete protection was achieved in ferrets challenged with lethal doses of H5N1 and H1N1. This approach serves as a platform for the prevention of natural or deliberate respiratory diseases for which a protective antibody is available. PMID:23720583

  14. CREB-BDNF Pathway Influences Alcohol Cue-Elicited Hyperactivation in Drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiayu; Hutchison, Kent E.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Claus, Eric; Turner, Jessica A.; Sui, Jing; Liu, Jingyu

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol dependence (AD) is suggested to have polygenic risk factors and also exhibits neurological complications, strongly encouraging a translational study to explore the associations between aggregates of genetic variants and brain function alterations related to alcohol use. In this study, we used a semiblind multivariate approach, parallel independent component analysis with multiple references (pICA-MR) to investigate relationships of genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with alcohol cue elicited brain activations in 326 healthy drinkers. The genetic component derived from the CREB-BDNF pathway reference was significantly associated (r = −0.36, p = 2.98×10−11) with an imaging component reflecting hyperactivation in precuneus, superior parietal lobule, and posterior cingulate for drinkers with more severe AD scores. The highlighted brain regions participate in many cognitive processes and have been robustly implicated in craving-related studies. The genetic factor highlighted the CREB and BDNF references, as well as other genes including GRM5, GRM7, GRID1, GRIN2A, PRKCA and PRKCB. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis indicated that the genetic component was enriched in synaptic plasticity, GABA and protein kinase A signaling. In summary, our findings suggest genetic variations in various neural plasticity and signaling pathways partially explain the variance of precuneus reactivity to alcohol cue which appears to be associated with AD severity. PMID:25939814

  15. Regulation of sesquiterpenoid metabolism in recombinant and elicited Valeriana officinalis hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Ricigliano, Vincent; Kumar, Santosh; Kinison, Scott; Brooks, Christopher; Nybo, S Eric; Chappell, Joe; Howarth, Dianella G

    2016-05-01

    The medicinal properties of Valerian (Valeriana officinalis) root preparations are attributed to the anxiolytic sesquiterpenoid valerenic acid and its biosynthetic precursors valerenal and valerenadiene, as well as the anti-inflammatory sesquiterpenoid β-caryophyllene. In order to study and engineer the biosynthesis of these pharmacologically active metabolites, a binary vector co-transformation system was developed for V. officinalis hairy roots. The relative expression levels and jasmonate-inducibility of a number of genes associated with sesquiterpenoid metabolism were profiled in roots: farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (VoFPS), valerendiene synthase (VoVDS), germacrene C synthase (VoGCS), and a cytochrome P450 (CYP71D442) putatively associated with terpene metabolism based on sequence homology. Recombinant hairy root lines overexpressing VoFPS or VoVDS were generated and compared to control cultures. Overexpression of the VoFPS cDNA increased levels of the corresponding transcript 4- to 8-fold and sesquiterpene hydrocarbon accumulation by 1.5- to 4-fold. Overexpression of the VoVDS cDNA increased the corresponding transcript levels 5- to 9-fold and markedly increased yields of the oxygenated sesquiterpenoids valerenic acid and valerenal. Our findings suggest that the availability of cytoplasmic farnesyl diphosphate and valerenadiene are potential bottlenecks in Valeriana-specific sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis, which is also subject to regulation by methyl jasmonate elicitation. PMID:26920719

  16. Recombinant Encephalomyocarditis Viruses Elicit Neutralizing Antibodies against PRRSV and CSFV in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shu; Guo, Xin; Keyes, Lisa R.; Yang, Hanchun; Ge, Xinna

    2015-01-01

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) is capable of infecting a wide range of species and the infection can cause myocarditis and reproductive failure in pigs as well as febrile illness in human beings. In this study, we introduced the entire ORF5 of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) or the neutralization epitope regions in the E2 gene of the classical swine fever virus (CSFV), into the genome of a stably attenuated EMCV strain, T1100I. The resultant viable recombinant viruses, CvBJC3m/I-ΔGP5 and CvBJC3m/I-E2, respectively expressed partial PRRSV envelope protein GP5 or CSFV neutralization epitope A1A2 along with EMCV proteins. These heterologous proteins fused to the N-terminal of the nonstructural leader protein could be recognized by anti-GP5 or anti-E2 antibody. We also tested the immunogenicity of these fusion proteins by immunizing BALB/c mice with the recombinant viruses. The immunized animals elicited neutralizing antibodies against PRRSV and CSFV. Our results suggest that EMCV can be engineered as an expression vector and serve as a tool in the development of novel live vaccines in various animal species. PMID:26076449

  17. TSLP-elicited basophil responses can mediate the pathogenesis of eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Noti, Mario; Tait Wojno, Elia D.; Kim, Brian S.; Siracusa, Mark C.; Giacomin, Paul R.; Nair, Meera G.; Benitez, Alain J.; Ruymann, Kathryn R.; Muir, Amanda B.; Hill, David A.; Chikwava, Kudakwashe R.; Moghaddam, Amin E.; Sattentau, Quentin J.; Alex, Aneesh; Zhou, Chao; Yearley, Jennifer H.; Menard-Katcher, Paul; Kubo, Masato; Obata-Ninomiya, Kazushige; Karasuyama, Hajime; Comeau, Michael R.; Brown-Whitehorn, Terri; de Waal Malefyt, Rene; Sleiman, Patrick M.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Cianferoni, Antonella; Falk, Gary W.; Wang, Mei-Lun; Spergel, Jonathan M.; Artis, David

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a food allergy-associated inflammatory disease characterized by esophageal eosinophilia. EoE has become increasingly common, but current management strategies are nonspecific. Thus, there is an urgent need to identify specific immunological pathways that could be targeted to treat this disease. EoE is associated with polymorphisms in the gene that encodes thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), a cytokine that promotes allergic inflammation, but how TSLP might contribute to EoE disease pathogenesis remains unknown. Here, we describe a new mouse model of EoE-like disease that developed independently of IgE but was dependent on TSLP-elicited basophils. Therapeutic TSLP neutralization or basophil depletion also ameliorated established EoE-like disease. Critically, in human subjects with EoE, we observed elevated TSLP levels and exaggerated basophil responses in esophageal biopsies, and a gain-of-function TSLP polymorphism was associated with increased basophil responses. Together, these data suggest that the TSLP-basophil axis could be therapeutically targeted to treat EoE. PMID:23872715

  18. BcIEB1, a Botrytis cinerea secreted protein, elicits a defense response in plants.

    PubMed

    Frías, Marcos; González, Mario; González, Celedonio; Brito, Nélida

    2016-09-01

    BcIEB1 is a very abundant protein in the secretome of Botrytis cinerea but it has no known function and no similarity to any characterized protein family. Previous results suggested that this protein is an elicitor of the plant defense system. In this work we have generated loss-of-function B. cinerea mutants lacking BcIEB1 and we have expressed the protein in yeast to assay its activity on plants. Analysis of the Δbcieb1 mutants did not result in any observable phenotype, including no difference in the virulence on a variety of hosts. However, when BcIEB1 was applied to plant tissues it produced necrosis as well as a whole range of symptoms: inhibition of seedling growth in Arabidopsis and tobacco, ion leakage from tobacco leaf disks, a ROS burst, cell death and autofluorescence in onion epidermis, as well as the expression of defense genes in tobacco. Moreover, tobacco plants treated with BcIEB1 showed an increased systemic resistance to B. cinerea. A small 35-amino acids peptide derived from a conserved region of BcIEB1 is almost as active on plants as the whole protein. These results clearly indicate that BcIEB1 elicits plant defenses, probably as a consequence of its recognition as a pathogen associated molecular pattern. PMID:27457989

  19. Magnaporthe oryzae-Secreted Protein MSP1 Induces Cell Death and Elicits Defense Responses in Rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiming; Wu, Jingni; Kim, Sang Gon; Tsuda, Kenichi; Gupta, Ravi; Park, Sook-Young; Kim, Sun Tae; Kang, Kyu Young

    2016-04-01

    The Magnaporthe oryzae snodprot1 homolog (MSP1), secreted by M. oryzae, is a cerato-platanin family protein. msp1-knockout mutants have reduced virulence on barley leaves, indicating that MSP1 is required for the pathogenicity of rice blast fungus. To investigate the functional roles of MSP1 and its downstream signaling in rice, recombinant MSP1 was produced in Escherichia coli and was assayed for its functionality. Application of MSP1 triggered cell death and elicited defense responses in rice. MSP1 also induced H2O2 production and autophagic cell death in both suspension-cultured cells and rice leaves. One or more protein kinases triggered cell death, jasmonic acid and abscisic acid enhanced cell death, while salicylic acid suppressed it. We demonstrated that the secretion of MSP1 into the apoplast is a prerequisite for triggering cell death and activating defense-related gene expression. Furthermore, pretreatment of rice with a sublethal MSP1 concentration potentiated resistance to the pathogen. Taken together, our results showed that MSP1 induces a high degree of cell death in plants, which might be essential for its virulence. Moreover, rice can recognize MSP1, resulting in the induction of pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity. PMID:26780420

  20. Some Unique Causes of Black Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaights, Ernest; Simpson, Gloria

    1986-01-01

    Aspects of suicide unique to blacks are: cultural expectations for males, which include repression of feelings and strict obedience to parents and elders; difficulty identifying with their race; gangs and drug abuse; poverty; and racism. These factors can cause depression, a known factor in suicidal behavior. (Author/ABB)

  1. Using Quantum Confinement to Uniquely Identify Devices.

    PubMed

    Roberts, J; Bagci, I E; Zawawi, M A M; Sexton, J; Hulbert, N; Noori, Y J; Young, M P; Woodhead, C S; Missous, M; Migliorato, M A; Roedig, U; Young, R J

    2015-01-01

    Modern technology unintentionally provides resources that enable the trust of everyday interactions to be undermined. Some authentication schemes address this issue using devices that give a unique output in response to a challenge. These signatures are generated by hard-to-predict physical responses derived from structural characteristics, which lend themselves to two different architectures, known as unique objects (UNOs) and physically unclonable functions (PUFs). The classical design of UNOs and PUFs limits their size and, in some cases, their security. Here we show that quantum confinement lends itself to the provision of unique identities at the nanoscale, by using fluctuations in tunnelling measurements through quantum wells in resonant tunnelling diodes (RTDs). This provides an uncomplicated measurement of identity without conventional resource limitations whilst providing robust security. The confined energy levels are highly sensitive to the specific nanostructure within each RTD, resulting in a distinct tunnelling spectrum for every device, as they contain a unique and unpredictable structure that is presently impossible to clone. This new class of authentication device operates with minimal resources in simple electronic structures above room temperature. PMID:26553435

  2. The Unique American Vision of Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozturk, Mehmet Ali; Debelak, Charles

    2008-01-01

    The present article scrutinizes "the unique American vision of childhood" (UAVC) as a phenomenon undermining high academic expectations and good work ethics, and in turn, contributing to the generally low academic achievement of U.S. students compared to their counterparts in other advanced countries. It starts with a definition of UAVC, followed…

  3. (-)-Botryodiplodin, A Unique Ribose Analog Toxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many toxins owe their mechanisms of action to being structural analogs of essential metabolites, messengers or structural components. Examples range from tubo-curare to penicillin. Ribose plays a unique role in the metabolism of living organisms, whether prokaryotes or eukaryotes. It and its deri...

  4. Art Libraries: Creating Access to Unique Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falls, Sarah E.

    2009-01-01

    Art libraries face similar issues to other types of libraries during the digital transition but have unique twists driven by the needs of their collections. Art library information seekers may possess a sense of what an art library is: a library, set apart, to support the study of art and art history. For art libraries, it is the collection,…

  5. Unraveling the evolution of uniquely human cognition

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, Evan L.

    2016-01-01

    A satisfactory account of human cognitive evolution will explain not only the psychological mechanisms that make our species unique, but also how, when, and why these traits evolved. To date, researchers have made substantial progress toward defining uniquely human aspects of cognition, but considerably less effort has been devoted to questions about the evolutionary processes through which these traits have arisen. In this article, I aim to link these complementary aims by synthesizing recent advances in our understanding of what makes human cognition unique, with theory and data regarding the processes of cognitive evolution. I review evidence that uniquely human cognition depends on synergism between both representational and motivational factors and is unlikely to be accounted for by changes to any singular cognitive system. I argue that, whereas no nonhuman animal possesses the full constellation of traits that define the human mind, homologies and analogies of critical aspects of human psychology can be found in diverse nonhuman taxa. I suggest that phylogenetic approaches to the study of animal cognition—which can address questions about the selective pressures and proximate mechanisms driving cognitive change—have the potential to yield important insights regarding the processes through which the human cognitive phenotype evolved. PMID:27274041

  6. Unraveling the evolution of uniquely human cognition.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Evan L

    2016-06-01

    A satisfactory account of human cognitive evolution will explain not only the psychological mechanisms that make our species unique, but also how, when, and why these traits evolved. To date, researchers have made substantial progress toward defining uniquely human aspects of cognition, but considerably less effort has been devoted to questions about the evolutionary processes through which these traits have arisen. In this article, I aim to link these complementary aims by synthesizing recent advances in our understanding of what makes human cognition unique, with theory and data regarding the processes of cognitive evolution. I review evidence that uniquely human cognition depends on synergism between both representational and motivational factors and is unlikely to be accounted for by changes to any singular cognitive system. I argue that, whereas no nonhuman animal possesses the full constellation of traits that define the human mind, homologies and analogies of critical aspects of human psychology can be found in diverse nonhuman taxa. I suggest that phylogenetic approaches to the study of animal cognition-which can address questions about the selective pressures and proximate mechanisms driving cognitive change-have the potential to yield important insights regarding the processes through which the human cognitive phenotype evolved. PMID:27274041

  7. Unique characteristics of Geneva apple rootstocks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Geneva® apple rootstock breeding program has been operating since the early 1970’s. It is a unique program in that it had access to important germplasm resources that later became the USDA ARS apple collection in Geneva, NY. This genetic diversity allowed for the achievement of one of the proj...

  8. LCA – Unique and Controversial Case Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    This session will focus on case studies and applications that have a unique or controversial aspect. Some of the most recent topics that seem to have significant interest include: LCA-based product declarations, LCA-based standards, LCA-based labels, alternative energy, agricul...

  9. Helping Homeless People: Unique Challenges and Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Clemmie, Ed.; Jackson-Jobe, Peggy, Ed.

    This publication is designed to provide a practical guide for gaining a detailed awareness and understanding of homelessness. After a foreword by Jesse Jackson, these chapters are included: (1) Introduction: Assessing the Unique Needs of Homeless People (Clemmie Solomon), which discusses the need for helping professionals to commit to addressing…

  10. Marketing the Uniqueness of Small Towns. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Douglas; Hogg, David H.

    The key to marketing a town is determining and promoting the town's "differential advantage" or uniqueness that would make people want to visit or live there. Exercises to help communities gain important insights into the town's competitive edge include a brainstorming session with knowledgeable community members, a visitor questionnaire, a…

  11. A Graduation Stole Uniquely Designed for Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Lawrence H.

    2009-01-01

    In response to student requests, and to help celebrate the graduation of our physics majors, we have designed a graduation stole uniquely befitting physics. The design incorporates the four visible spectral lines of hydrogen--the Balmer series. Since the 2002 debut of the design, all our graduates have proudly worn their physics graduation stoles…

  12. Static black hole uniqueness and Penrose inequality

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Ryosuke; Shiromizu, Tetsuya; Ohashi, Seiju

    2010-02-15

    Under certain conditions, we offer a new way to prove the uniqueness of the static black hole in higher dimensional asymptotically flat spacetimes. In the proof, the Penrose inequality plays a key role in higher dimensions as well as four dimensions.

  13. The Uniqueness of Speech among Motor Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Ray

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers evidence that the speech muscles are unique in their genetic, developmental, functional and phenotypical properties. The literature was reviewed using PubMed, ScienceDirect, ComDisDome and other literature-retrieval systems to identify studies reporting on the craniofacial and laryngeal muscles. Particular emphasis was given…

  14. Unique Discovery Aspects of Utilizing Botanical Sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of a long tradition of use in humans, botanicals have many unique advantages to offer as sources of natural products with pharmaceutical influence, especially in terms of opportunities for the development of diverse botanical products. This chapter outlines their use in screening programs, ...

  15. Using Quantum Confinement to Uniquely Identify Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J.; Bagci, I. E.; Zawawi, M. A. M.; Sexton, J.; Hulbert, N.; Noori, Y. J.; Young, M. P.; Woodhead, C. S.; Missous, M.; Migliorato, M. A.; Roedig, U.; Young, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    Modern technology unintentionally provides resources that enable the trust of everyday interactions to be undermined. Some authentication schemes address this issue using devices that give a unique output in response to a challenge. These signatures are generated by hard-to-predict physical responses derived from structural characteristics, which lend themselves to two different architectures, known as unique objects (UNOs) and physically unclonable functions (PUFs). The classical design of UNOs and PUFs limits their size and, in some cases, their security. Here we show that quantum confinement lends itself to the provision of unique identities at the nanoscale, by using fluctuations in tunnelling measurements through quantum wells in resonant tunnelling diodes (RTDs). This provides an uncomplicated measurement of identity without conventional resource limitations whilst providing robust security. The confined energy levels are highly sensitive to the specific nanostructure within each RTD, resulting in a distinct tunnelling spectrum for every device, as they contain a unique and unpredictable structure that is presently impossible to clone. This new class of authentication device operates with minimal resources in simple electronic structures above room temperature.

  16. Using Quantum Confinement to Uniquely Identify Devices

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, J.; Bagci, I. E.; Zawawi, M. A. M.; Sexton, J.; Hulbert, N.; Noori, Y. J.; Young, M. P.; Woodhead, C. S.; Missous, M.; Migliorato, M. A.; Roedig, U.; Young, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    Modern technology unintentionally provides resources that enable the trust of everyday interactions to be undermined. Some authentication schemes address this issue using devices that give a unique output in response to a challenge. These signatures are generated by hard-to-predict physical responses derived from structural characteristics, which lend themselves to two different architectures, known as unique objects (UNOs) and physically unclonable functions (PUFs). The classical design of UNOs and PUFs limits their size and, in some cases, their security. Here we show that quantum confinement lends itself to the provision of unique identities at the nanoscale, by using fluctuations in tunnelling measurements through quantum wells in resonant tunnelling diodes (RTDs). This provides an uncomplicated measurement of identity without conventional resource limitations whilst providing robust security. The confined energy levels are highly sensitive to the specific nanostructure within each RTD, resulting in a distinct tunnelling spectrum for every device, as they contain a unique and unpredictable structure that is presently impossible to clone. This new class of authentication device operates with minimal resources in simple electronic structures above room temperature. PMID:26553435

  17. Unique rig fulfills unusual mobility requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    This article describes a unique rig designed by SEDCO FOREX operating in the Paris basin of France. Built to drill clusters of wells from a single pad, Rig 47 significantly reduces the time needed to move from well to well on a pad and from location to location.

  18. Concurrent Data Elicitation Procedures, Processes, and the Early Stages of L2 Learning: A Critical Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leow, Ronald P.; Grey, Sarah; Marijuan, Silvia; Moorman, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    Given the current methodological interest in eliciting direct data on the cognitive processes L2 learners employ as they interact with L2 data during the early stages of the learning process, this article takes a critical and comparative look at three concurrent data elicitation procedures currently employed in the SLA literature: Think aloud (TA)…

  19. Elicitation of the "Passe Compose" in French Preschoolers with and without Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royle, Phaedra; Thordardottir, Elin T.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines inflectional abilities in French-speaking children with specific language impairment (SLI) using a verb elicitation task. Eleven children with SLI and age-matched controls (37-52 months) participated in the experiment. We elicited the "passe compose" using eight regular and eight irregular high frequency verbs matched for age…

  20. Systematic review of expert elicitation methods as a tool for source attribution of enteric illness.

    PubMed

    Butler, Ainslie J; Thomas, M Kate; Pintar, Katarina D M

    2015-05-01

    Expert elicitation is a useful tool to explore sources of uncertainty and to answer questions where data are expensive or difficult to collect. It has been used across a variety of disciplines and represents an important method for estimating source attribution for enteric illness. A systematic review was undertaken to explore published expert elicitation studies, identify key considerations, and to make recommendations for designing an expert elicitation in the context of enteric illness source attribution. Fifty-nine studies were reviewed. Five key themes were identified: the expert panel including composition and recruitment; the pre-elicitation material, which clarifies the research question and provides training in uncertainty and probability; the choice of elicitation tool and method (e.g., questionnaires, surveys, and interviews); research design; and analysis of elicited data. Careful consideration of these themes is critical in designing and implementing an expert elicitation in order to reduce bias and produce the best possible results. While there are various epidemiological and microbiological methods available to explore source attribution of enteric illness, expert elicitation provides an opportunity to identify gaps in our understanding and where such studies are not feasible or available, represents the only possible method for synthesizing knowledge about transmission. PMID:25826450

  1. Identifying and Responding to Personal Stressors: Utilizing Photo Elicitation in Health Education Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Theresa

    2014-01-01

    The "Photo Elicitation Project" teaching idea applies the techniques of photo elicitation to stress prevention and management. This activity is designed to help students identify their personal stressors and to determine which stress prevention strategies are most useful for them. Objectives: students will be able to (a) identify current…

  2. Uncovering Pre-Service Teacher Beliefs about Young Children: A Photographic Elicitation Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockall, Nancy; Davis, Sara

    2011-01-01

    This illustrative paper provides an introduction to using mixed qualitative methods of photo-elicitation, face to face interviews and semiotic analysis to uncover pre-service students' beliefs about young children. The researchers share their experience on conducting a study using photo-elicitation and engaging pre-service teachers in a discussion…

  3. Stone Soup: Photo-Elicitation as a Learning Tool in the Food Geography Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurtz, Hilda E.; Wood, Jason

    2014-01-01

    This paper showcases self-reflective and inclusive pedagogy using photo-elicitation in a food geography course assignment. The Stone Soup project positions students as both researchers and participant-subjects in a participant-driven photo-elicitation (PDPE) study of students' foodways. Student papers for this assignment demonstrate rich…

  4. Naturalistic Observations of Elicited Expressive Communication of Children with Autism: An Analysis of Teacher Instructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, Hsu-Min

    2009-01-01

    This study observed expressive communication of 17 Australian and 15 Taiwanese children with autism who were mute or had limited spoken language during 2 hour regular school routines and analyzed teacher instructions associated with elicited expressive communication. Results indicated: (a) the frequency of occurrence of elicited expressive…

  5. From Drawings to Diagrams: Maintaining Researcher Control during Graphic Elicitation in Qualitative Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varga-Atkins, Tunde; O'Brien, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Graphic elicitation, i.e. asking participants to draw, is an interview technique used to focus the interviewee on the given topic or gain extra meaning not covered verbally as part of the interview. This study analyses two interview contexts which included visual elicitation. It describes a successful example in which the researcher maintained…

  6. Designedly Incomplete Utterances: A Pedagogical Practice for Eliciting Knowledge Displays in Error Correction Sequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koshik, Irene

    2002-01-01

    Uses a conversation analytic framework to analyze a practice used by teachers in 1-0-1, second language writing conferences when eliciting self-correction of students' written language errors. This type of turn used to elicit a knowledge display from the student is labeled designedly incomplete utterance (DIU). Teachers use DIUs made up of…

  7. Dynamic Assessment of Elicited Imitation: A Case Analysis of an Advanced L2 English Speaker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Compernolle, Rémi A.; Zhang, Haomin

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the design, administration, and scoring of a dynamically administered elicited imitation test of L2 English morphology. Drawing on Vygotskian sociocultural psychology, particularly the concepts of zone of proximal development and dynamic assessment, we argue that support provided during the elicited imitation test…

  8. A second family with CATSHL syndrome: Confirmatory report of another unique FGFR3 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Luis F; Tucker, Megan; Bamshad, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Here we describe the second reported family with the CATSHL syndrome, a condition resulting from a unique mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene. Our family confirms the consistent and unique phenotype of this condition, and the specificity of the mutation in FGFR3. The CATSHL syndrome appears to be an autosomal dominant disorder with full penetrance. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27139183

  9. Metaphors of Distress: Photo-Elicitation Enhances a Discourse Analysis of Parents' Accounts.

    PubMed

    Kantrowitz-Gordon, Ira; Vandermause, Roxanne

    2016-07-01

    In research on sensitive topics, photo-elicitation can be a profound aid to data collection and interpretation processes. Photo-elicitation methods were used in this manner in a discourse analysis of parents' distress at least 6 months after preterm birth. After an initial interview, participants were asked to take digital photographs representing their distress and to return for a second interview to discuss the photographs. The elicited photo representations supported participants' engagement with their current or past distress and generated new meanings from the reappraisal of old photographs. Photo-elicitation demonstrated the embodiment of parents' distress in the child and the placement of distress in specific locations. Photographs of documents showed the power of the written word in generating and maintaining distress. Participants used existing photographs from their child's photo history to generate rich metaphors for their distress as parents. These findings have implications for enhancing interpretive health research by incorporating photo-elicitation methods. PMID:25792488

  10. Comparison of elicitation methods for moral and affective beliefs in the theory of planned behaviour.

    PubMed

    Dean, M; Arvola, A; Vassallo, M; Lähteenmäki, L; Raats, M M; Saba, A; Shepherd, R

    2006-09-01

    Although the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) has been applied successfully in the area of food choice, it has been criticized for its pure utilitarian approach to the factors determining behaviour. Despite the increase in predictive power of the model with added components such as affective attitude and moral and ethical concerns, in most studies the elicitation process still only addresses people's utilitarian beliefs about the behaviour with little attention paid to other aspects. This study compares the traditional method of elicitation of advantages and disadvantages with two other methods (word association and open-ended) in the elicitations of beliefs, attitudes and moral concerns in relation to the consumption of organic foods. Results show the traditional method to be best for eliciting cognitive beliefs, open-ended emotion task for eliciting emotional beliefs and open-ended beliefs task best for moral concerns. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed. PMID:16782230

  11. Novel Attenuated Chikungunya Vaccine Candidates Elicit Protective Immunity in C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Kakoulidou, Maria; Lulla, Aleksei; Kümmerer, Beate M.; Johansson, Daniel X.; Mutso, Margit; Lulla, Valeria; Fazakerley, John K.; Roques, Pierre; Le Grand, Roger; Merits, Andres; Liljeström, Peter

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a reemerging mosquito-borne alphavirus that has caused severe epidemics in Africa and Asia and occasionally in Europe. As of today, there is no licensed vaccine available to prevent CHIKV infection. Here we describe the development and evaluation of novel CHIKV vaccine candidates that were attenuated by deleting a large part of the gene encoding nsP3 or the entire gene encoding 6K and were administered as viral particles or infectious genomes launched by DNA. The resulting attenuated mutants were genetically stable and elicited high magnitudes of binding and neutralizing antibodies as well as strong T cell responses after a single immunization in C57BL/6 mice. Subsequent challenge with a high dose of CHIKV demonstrated that the induced antibody responses protected the animals from viremia and joint swelling. The protective antibody response was long-lived, and a second homologous immunization further enhanced immune responses. In summary, this report demonstrates a straightforward means of constructing stable and efficient attenuated CHIKV vaccine candidates that can be administered either as viral particles or as infectious genomes launched by DNA. IMPORTANCE Similar to other infectious diseases, the best means of preventing CHIKV infection would be by vaccination using an attenuated vaccine platform which preferably raises protective immunity after a single immunization. However, the attenuated CHIKV vaccine candidates developed to date rely on a small number of attenuating point mutations and are at risk of being unstable or even sensitive to reversion. We report here the construction and preclinical evaluation of novel CHIKV vaccine candidates that have been attenuated by introducing large deletions. The resulting mutants proved to be genetically stable, attenuated, highly immunogenic, and able to confer durable immunity after a single immunization. Moreover, these mutants can be administered either as viral particles or as

  12. Characterization of a Novel Human-Specific STING Agonist that Elicits Antiviral Activity Against Emerging Alphaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Sali, Tina M.; Pryke, Kara M.; Abraham, Jinu; Liu, Andrew; Archer, Iris; Broeckel, Rebecca; Staverosky, Julia A.; Smith, Jessica L.; Al-Shammari, Ahmed; Amsler, Lisi; Sheridan, Kayla; Nilsen, Aaron; Streblow, Daniel N.; DeFilippis, Victor R.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacologic stimulation of innate immune processes represents an attractive strategy to achieve multiple therapeutic outcomes including inhibition of virus replication, boosting antitumor immunity, and enhancing vaccine immunogenicity. In light of this we sought to identify small molecules capable of activating the type I interferon (IFN) response by way of the transcription factor IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). A high throughput in vitro screen yielded 4-(2-chloro-6-fluorobenzyl)-N-(furan-2-ylmethyl)-3-oxo-3,4-dihydro-2H-benzo[b][1,4]thiazine-6-carboxamide (referred to herein as G10), which was found to trigger IRF3/IFN-associated transcription in human fibroblasts. Further examination of the cellular response to this molecule revealed expression of multiple IRF3-dependent antiviral effector genes as well as type I and III IFN subtypes. This led to the establishment of a cellular state that prevented replication of emerging Alphavirus species including Chikungunya virus, Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis virus, and Sindbis virus. To define cellular proteins essential to elicitation of the antiviral activity by the compound we employed a reverse genetics approach that utilized genome editing via CRISPR/Cas9 technology. This allowed the identification of IRF3, the IRF3-activating adaptor molecule STING, and the IFN-associated transcription factor STAT1 as required for observed gene induction and antiviral effects. Biochemical analysis indicates that G10 does not bind to STING directly, however. Thus the compound may represent the first synthetic small molecule characterized as an indirect activator of human STING-dependent phenotypes. In vivo stimulation of STING-dependent activity by an unrelated small molecule in a mouse model of Chikungunya virus infection blocked viremia demonstrating that pharmacologic activation of this signaling pathway may represent a feasible strategy for combating emerging Alphaviruses. PMID:26646986

  13. Feeding-elicited cataplexy in orexin knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Erika L.; Baumann, Christian R.; Cano, Georgina; Scammell, Thomas E.; Mochizuki, Takatoshi

    2009-01-01

    Mice lacking orexin/hypocretin signaling have sudden episodes of atonia and paralysis during active wakefulness. These events strongly resemble cataplexy, episodes of sudden muscle weakness triggered by strong positive emotions in people with narcolepsy, but it remains unknown whether murine cataplexy is triggered by positive emotions. To determine whether positive emotions elicit murine cataplexy, we placed orexin knockout (KO) mice on a scheduled feeding protocol with regular or highly palatable food. Baseline sleep/wake behavior was recorded with ad lib regular chow. Mice were then placed on a scheduled feeding protocol in which they received 60% of their normal amount of chow 3 hr after dark onset for the next 10 days. Wild-type and KO mice rapidly entrained to scheduled feeding with regular chow, with more wake and locomotor activity prior to the feeding time. On day 10 of scheduled feeding, orexin KO mice had slightly more cataplexy during the food-anticipation period and more cataplexy in the second half of the dark period, when they may have been foraging for residual food. To test whether more palatable food increases cataplexy, mice were then switched to scheduled feeding with an isocaloric amount of Froot Loops, a food often used as a reward in behavioral studies. With this highly palatable food, orexin KO mice had much more cataplexy during the food-anticipation period and throughout the dark period. The increase in cataplexy with scheduled feeding, especially with highly palatable food, suggests that positive emotions may trigger cataplexy in mice, just as in people with narcolepsy. Establishing this connection helps validate orexin KO mice as an excellent model of human narcolepsy and provides an opportunity to better understand the mechanisms that trigger cataplexy. PMID:19362119

  14. Muscular dysfunction elicited by creep of lumbar viscoelastic tissue.

    PubMed

    Solomonow, M; Baratta, R V; Zhou, B-H; Burger, E; Zieske, A; Gedalia, A

    2003-08-01

    The biomechanics, histology and electromyography of the lumbar viscoelastic tissues and multifidus muscles of the in vivo feline were investigated during 20 min of static as well as cyclic flexion under load control and during 7 h of rest following the flexion. It was shown that the creep developed in the viscoelastic tissues during the 20 min of static or cyclic flexion did not fully recover over the 7 h of following rest. It was further seen that a neuromuscular disorder with five distinct components developed during and after the static and cyclic flexion. The neuromuscular disorder consisted of a decreasing magnitude of reflexive EMG from the multifidus upon flexion as well as of superimposed spasms. The recovery period was characterized by an initial muscle hyperexcitability, a slowly increasing reflexive EMG and a delayed hyperexcitability. Histological data from the supraspinous ligament demonstrate significant increase (x 10) in neutrophil density in the ligament 2 h into the recovery and even larger increase (x 100) 6 h into the recovery from the 20 min flexion, indicating an acute soft tissue inflammation. It was concluded that sustained static or cyclic loading of lumbar viscoelastic tissues may cause micro-damage in the collagen structure, which in turn reflexively elicit spasms in the multifidus as well as hyperexcitability early in the recovery when the majority of the creep recovers. The micro-damage, however, results in the time dependent development of inflammation. In all cases, the spasms, initial and delayed hyperexcitabilities represent increased muscular forces applied across the intervertebral joints in an attempt to limit the range of motion and unload the viscoelastic tissues in order to prevent further damage and to promote healing. It is suggested that a significant insight is gained as to the development and implications of a common idiopathic low back disorder as well as to the development of cumulative trauma disorders. PMID:12832168

  15. Xylaria hypoxylon Lectin as Adjuvant Elicited Tfh Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Kang, J; Zuo, Y; Guo, Q; Wang, H; Liu, Q; Liu, Q; Xia, G; Kang, Y

    2015-11-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) caused by FMD virus (FMDV) is a major health and economic problem in the farming industry. Vaccination of livestock against this highly infectious viral disease is crucial, and inactivated FMD vaccine has been effective at controlling infection. However, accumulated data show that the inactivated vaccine generates weak immune responses and that the oil formulation results in undesirable side effects. Mushroom lectins have recently been shown to display adjuvant effects when incorporated into DNA vaccines. In this study, to enhance the cellular immune response of FMDV antigen (146S), C57BL/6 mice were immunized with 146S combined with Xylaria hypoxylon lectin (XHL). The oil formulation (146S/Oil) was served as control group. Strong humoral immune responses were elicited in mice immunized with 146S/XHL as shown by high 146S antigen-specific IgG levels, and also in 146S/Oil group. Interestingly, XHL in conjunction with inactivated FMD vaccine activated strong Th1 and Tc1 cell responses, especially Tfh cell responses, in immunized mice. XHL stimulated dendritic cell maturation by upregulating expression of major histocompatibility complex II (MHCII) molecules and co-stimulatory molecules CD40 and CD86 in immunized mice. No XHL-specific IgG or inflammatory factors were detected indicating the safety of XHL as an adjuvant. Taken together, these results suggest the effectiveness of XHL at inducing cellular immune responses and therefore confirm its suitability as an adjuvant for inactivated FMD vaccine. PMID:26289530

  16. What monitor can replace the cathode-ray tube for visual stimulation to elicit multifocal electroretinograms?

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Celso Soiti; Shinoda, Kei; Matsumoto, Harue; Seki, Keisuke; Nagasaka, Eiichiro; Iwata, Takeshi; Mizota, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    To compare a conventional cathode-ray tube (CRT) screen to organic light-emitting diode (OLED) and liquid crystal display (LCD) screens as visual stimulators to elicit multifocal electroretinograms (mfERGs), mfERGs were recorded from seven eyes of seven healthy volunteers (21 ± 2 years). The mfERGs elicited by a conventional CRT screen (S710, Compaq Computer Co.) were compared to those elicited by a studio-grade master OLED monitor (PVM-1741, Sony, Japan) and a conventional LCD (S1721, Flexscan, Eizo Nanao Corp., Japan). The luminance changes of each monitor were measured with a photodiode. CRT, OLED, and LCD screens with a frame frequency of 60 Hz were studied. A hexagonal stimulus array with 61 stimulus elements was created on each monitor. The serial white stimuli of the OLED screen at 60 Hz did not fuse, and that of the LCD screens fused. The amplitudes of P1 and P2 of the first-order kernels of the mfERGs were not significantly different from those elicited by the CRT and OLED screens, and the P1 amplitude of the first-order kernel elicited by the LCD stimuli was significantly smaller than that elicited by the CRT in all the groups of the averaged hexagonal elements. The implicit times were approximately 10 ms longer in almost all components elicited by the LCD screen compared to those elicited by the CRT screen. The mfERGs elicited by monitors other than the CRT should be carefully interpreted, especially those elicited by LCD screens. The OLED had good performance, and we conclude that it can replace the CRT as a stimulator for mfERGs; however, a collection of normative data is recommended. PMID:25096155

  17. Stem rust spores elicit rapid RPG1 phosphorylation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem rust threatens cereal production worldwide. Understanding the mechanism by which durable resistance genes, such as Rpg1, function is critical. We show that the RPG1 protein is phosphorylated within 5 min by exposure to spores from avirulent but not virulent races of stem rust. Transgenic mutant...

  18. Molecular determinants of pathogen recognition and defense elicitation in potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potato late blight pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, is able to rapidly evolve to overcome resistance genes. The pathogen accomplishes this by secreting an arsenal of proteins, termed effectors, that function to modify host cells. Although hundreds of candidate effectors have been identified in ...

  19. UNIQUE GENOMIC PROFILE OF FIBROLAMELLAR HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA

    PubMed Central

    Cornella, Helena; Alsinet, Clara; Sayols, Sergi; Zhang, Zhongyang; Hao, Ke; Cabellos, Laia; Hoshida, Yujin; Villanueva, Augusto; Thung, Swan; Ward, Stephen C.; Rodriguez-Carunchio, Leonardo; Vila-Casadesús, Maria; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Lachenmayer, Anja; Quaglia, Alberto; Nagorney, David M.; Minguez, Beatriz; Carrilho, Flair; Roberts, Lewis R.; Waxman, Samuel; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Schwartz, Myron; Esteller, Manel; Heaton, Nigel D.; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Llovet, Josep M.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma (FLC) is a rare primary hepatic cancer that develops in children and young adults without cirrhosis. Little is known about its pathogenesis, and it can only be treated with surgery. We performed an integrative genomic analysis of a large series of patients with FLC to identify associated genetic factors. Methods Using 78 clinically annotated FLC samples, we performed whole-transcriptome (n=58), single-nucleotide polymorphism array (n=41), and next-generation sequencing (n=48) analyses; we also assessed the prevalence of the DNAJB1–PRKACA fusion transcript associated with this cancer (n=73). We performed class discovery using non-negative matrix factorization, and functional annotation using gene set enrichment analyses, nearest template prediction, ingenuity pathway analyses, and immunohistochemistry. The genomic identification of significant targets in cancer algorithm was used to identify chromosomal aberrations, MuTect and VarScan2 were used to identify somatic mutations, and the random survival forest was used to determine patient prognoses. Findings were validated in an independent cohort. Results Unsupervised gene expression clustering revealed 3 robust molecular classes of tumors: the proliferation class (51% of samples) had altered expression of genes that regulate proliferation and mTOR signaling activation; the inflammation class (26% of samples) had altered expression of genes that regulate inflammation and cytokine production; and the unannotated class (23% of samples) had a gene expression signature not previously associated with liver tumors. Expression of genes that regulate neuroendocrine function, as well has histologic markers of cholangiocytes and hepatocytes, were detected in all 3 classes. FLCs had few copy number variations; the most frequent were focal amplification at 8q24.3 (in 12.5% of samples) and deletions at 19p13 (in 28% of samples) and 22q13.32 (in 25% of samples). The DNAJB1

  20. Alternative oxidase in animals: unique characteristics and taxonomic distribution.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Allison E; Vanlerberghe, Greg C; Staples, James F

    2009-08-01

    Alternative oxidase (AOX), a ubiquinol oxidase, introduces a branch point into the respiratory electron transport chain, bypassing complexes III and IV and resulting in cyanide-resistant respiration. Previously, AOX was thought to be limited to plants and some fungi and protists but recent work has demonstrated the presence of AOX in most kingdoms of life, including animals. In the present study we identified AOX in 28 animal species representing nine phyla. This expands the known taxonomic distribution of AOX in animals by 10 species and two phyla. Using bioinformatics we found AOX gene sequences in members of the animal phyla Porifera, Placozoa, Cnidaria, Mollusca, Annelida, Nematoda, Echinodermata, Hemichordata and Chordata. Using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with degenerate primers designed to recognize conserved regions of animal AOX, we demonstrated that AOX genes are transcribed in several animals from different phyla. An analysis of full-length AOX sequences revealed an amino acid motif in the C-terminal region of the protein that is unique to animal AOXs. Animal AOX also lacks an N-terminal cysteine residue that is known to be important for AOX enzyme regulation in plants. We conclude that the presence of AOX is the ancestral state in animals and hypothesize that its absence in some lineages, including vertebrates, is due to gene loss events. PMID:19648408