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Sample records for elimination par catalyse

  1. [Investigation of a measles outbreak in Pará State, Brazil, in the age of elimination of the disease].

    PubMed

    Jesus, Hiane Santos de; Nascimento, Gilmara Lima; Rosa, Fabiano Marques; Santos, Deise Aparecida dos

    2015-10-01

    In July 27th, 2010, witnessed the late notification of a positive test result for measles IgM antibodies in Belém, Pará State, Brazil, sparking an epidemiological investigation and control and preventive measures. Two more confirmed cases were identified, both of whom were siblings of the index case, with clinical signs and symptoms and incubation period consistent with measles. We conducted a retrospective search in hospitals and laboratories for suspected cases that lived in or had visited Pará State from May 1st to August 4th, 2010, and had presented fever and exanthema accompanied by cough and/or sneezing and/or conjunctivitis. All identified cases were investigated by telephone contact and/or home visits. We reviewed 183,854 consultation forms and identified 56 (0.03%) suspected cases. We applied 2,535 doses of triple viral vaccine distributed between blockades vaccination intensifications. A household measles outbreak occurred in Belém with the detection and isolation of a viral genotype imported from Europe. Timely and sensitive epidemiological surveillance is recommended for the detection of suspected cases of measles and maintenance of high immunization coverage. PMID:26735390

  2. A study on the AMACR catalysed elimination reaction and its application to inhibitor testing† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: 1H NMR spectra of synthesised compounds; details of X-ray crystal structure determination of compound 35; original data for Table 1; plots of fluorescence resulting from reaction of sensors 33 and 34 with fluoride solutions. CCDC 1408401. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c5ob01541c Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Yevglevskis, Maksims; Lee, Guat L.; Sun, Jenny; Zhou, Shiyi; Sun, Xiaolong; Kociok-Köhn, Gabriele; James, Tony D.; Woodman, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    α-Methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR; P504S) catalyses a key step in the degradation of branched-chain fatty acids and is important for the pharmacological activation of Ibuprofen and related drugs. Levels of AMACR are increased in prostate and other cancers, and it is a drug target. Development of AMACR as a drug target is hampered by lack of a convenient assay. AMACR irreversibly catalyses the elimination of HF from 3-fluoro-2-methylacyl-CoA substrates, and this reaction was investigated for use as an assay. Several known inhibitors and alternative substrates reduced conversion of 3-fluoro-2-methyldecanoyl-CoA by AMACR, as determined by 1H NMR. The greatest reduction of activity was observed with known potent inhibitors. A series of novel acyl-CoA esters with aromatic side chains were synthesised for testing as chromophoric substrates. These acyl-CoA esters were converted to unsaturated products by AMACR, but their use was limited by non-enzymatic elimination. Fluoride sensors were also investigated as a method of quantifying released fluoride and thus AMACR activity. These sensors generally suffered from high background signal and lacked reproducibility under the assay conditions. In summary, the elimination reaction can be used to characterise inhibitors, but it was not possible to develop a convenient colorimetric or fluorescent assay using 3-fluoro-2-methylacyl-CoA substrates. PMID:26537174

  3. Ru-catalysed C-H silylation of unprotected gramines, tryptamines and their congeners.

    PubMed

    Devaraj, K; Sollert, C; Juds, C; Gates, P J; Pilarski, L T

    2016-04-30

    Selective Ru-catalysed C2-H silylation of heteroarenes is presented. The transformation works with or without directing group assistance and requires no protecting groups. Gramines and tryptamines may be converted efficiently whilst avoiding deleterious elimination side-reactions. Mechanistic studies reveal an unusual activation of the indole C4-H bond by an electron-rich metal. PMID:27050747

  4. Fundamental aspects of catalysed coal char gasification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangwal, S. K.; Truesdale, R. S.

    1980-06-01

    A brief review of the basic aspects of catalysed coal char gasification is presented. Kinetics and mechanisms of catalysed and uncatalysed gasification reactions of coal char with steam, carbon dioxide and hydrogen are discussed. Mass transport effects and internal structure of coals are shown to be important in determining rates of these reactions. The importance of the type of catalyst used is also discussed. Such factors as catalyst cations and anions, the method by which the catalyst is contacted with the coal char, and physical and chemical states of the catalyst both prior to and during reaction are shown to be important in the gasification process. Finally, research instruments and equipment used recently for studies in catalysed gasification are reviewed. These include various types of reactor systems for following the course of these reactions and analytical instruments for assessing the physical and/or chemical state of the catalysts and/or coal char both prior to and during the gasification reactions.

  5. THE MEASURES PAR PROJECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouin, R. J.; Franz, B.

    2009-12-01

    The solar energy available for photosynthesis, known as PAR, controls the growth of phytoplankton and, therefore, regulates the composition and evolution of marine ecosystems. Knowing the spatial and temporal distribution of PAR over the oceans is critical to understanding biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nutrients, and oxygen, and to address important climate and global change issues such as the fate of anthropogenic atmospheric carbon dioxide. In view of this, a 12-year time series of PAR at the ocean surface, starting in September 1997, is being produced by the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group from SeaWiFS, MODIS-Terra, and MODIS-Aqua data. The product covers the global oceans, with a spatial resolution of about 9.3x9.3 km (equal area grid) and a temporal resolution of one day. PAR is computed as the difference between the 400-700 nm solar flux incident on the top of the atmosphere (known) and reflected back to space by the atmosphere and surface (derived from satellite radiance), taking into account atmospheric absorption (modeled). Knowledge of pixel composition is not required, eliminating the need for cloud screening and arbitrary assumptions about sub-pixel cloudiness. Combining data from satellite sensors with different equatorial crossing times accounts for the diurnal variability of clouds and, therefore, increases accuracy on a daily time scale. The processing system, including routine check of accuracy and control of quality, is designed to operate during the entire lifetime of SeaWiFS and MODIS, and to accommodate future sensors with ocean-color capabilities. Maps of daily, weekly, and monthly PAR obtained from individual sensors are presented, as well as merged products. Accuracy is quantified in comparisons with other satellite estimates, the National Centers for Environmental Prediction reanalysis product, and in-situ measurements from fixed buoys and platforms. The good statistical performance makes the satellite PAR product suitable for large

  6. Palladium-catalysed hydroxylation and alkoxylation.

    PubMed

    Enthaler, Stephan; Company, Anna

    2011-10-01

    The formation of oxygen-carbon bonds is one of the fundamental transformations in organic synthesis. In this regard the application of palladium-based catalysts has been extensively studied during recent years. Nowadays it is an established methodology and the success has been proven in manifold synthetic procedures. This tutorial review summarizes the advances on palladium-catalysed C-O bond formation, means hydroxylation and alkoxylation reactions. PMID:21643619

  7. An enzyme catalysing the conjugation of epoxides with glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Boyland, E.; Williams, K.

    1965-01-01

    1. Liver supernatant preparations from rats and ferrets catalyse the conjugation of some epoxides with glutathione. The enzyme involved might be called `glutathione S-epoxidetransferase', as it is different from glutathione S-aryltransferase, the enzyme catalysing the conjugation of 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene, 4-nitro-pyridine N-oxide and other cyclic compounds with glutathione and from the enzyme catalysing the conjugation of iodomethane and glutathione. 2. The enzyme does not catalyse the reaction with cysteine. It is not inactivated by dialysis but is unstable at pH 5·0. 3. The role of the enzyme in metabolism of foreign compounds is discussed. PMID:14342229

  8. Mechanism of iridium-catalysed branched-selective hydroarylation of vinyl ethers: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Huang, Genping

    2016-02-16

    The iridium-catalysed branched-selective hydroarylation of vinyl ethers represents a rare example of the branched-selective hydroarylation involving the non-styrene-type alkenes. Herein, we report our DFT calculations on the mechanism of this reaction. The results show that after C-H oxidative addition, instead of the widely accepted Chalk-Harrod type mechanism, the branched-selective hydroarylation may proceed through an unconventional modified Chalk-Harrod type mechanism, involving the migratory insertion into the Ir-C bond and C-H reductive elimination. Both steric and electronic effects of the alkoxy group were found to account for the complete branched selectivity. PMID:26804666

  9. Investigation of copper(II) tetrafluoroborate catalysed epoxide opening

    PubMed Central

    Capes, Amy S.; Crossman, Arthur T.; Webster, Lauren A.; Ferguson, Michael A.J.; Gilbert, Ian H.

    2011-01-01

    We report the extension of the copper(II) tetrafluoroborate catalysed opening of epoxides with alcohols to include a wider variety of alcohols, a range of solvents and a method to purify the products from the reaction. PMID:22505782

  10. Enzyme-catalysed conjugations of glutathione with unsaturated compounds

    PubMed Central

    Boyland, E.; Chasseaud, L. F.

    1967-01-01

    1. Rat-liver supernatant catalyses the reaction of diethyl maleate with glutathione. 2. Evidence is presented that the enzyme involved is different from the known glutathione-conjugating enzymes, glutathione S-alkyltransferase, S-aryltransferase and S-epoxidetransferase. 3. Rat-liver supernatant catalyses the reaction of a number of other αβ-unsaturated compounds, including aldehydes, ketones, lactones, nitriles and nitro compounds, with glutathione: separate enzymes may be responsible for these reactions. PMID:6035529

  11. Iron-catalysed tritiation of pharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pony Yu, Renyuan; Hesk, David; Rivera, Nelo; Pelczer, István; Chirik, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of a drug in animal models is a critical component of drug discovery and development. Such studies are performed in vivo and in vitro at various stages of the development process—ranging from preclinical absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) studies to late-stage human clinical trials—to elucidate a drug molecule’s metabolic profile and to assess its toxicity. Radiolabelled compounds, typically those that contain 14C or 3H isotopes, are one of the most powerful and widely deployed diagnostics for these studies. The introduction of radiolabels using synthetic chemistry enables the direct tracing of the drug molecule without substantially altering its structure or function. The ubiquity of C-H bonds in drugs and the relative ease and low cost associated with tritium (3H) make it an ideal radioisotope with which to conduct ADME studies early in the drug development process. Here we describe an iron-catalysed method for the direct 3H labelling of pharmaceuticals by hydrogen isotope exchange, using tritium gas as the source of the radioisotope. The site selectivity of the iron catalyst is orthogonal to currently used iridium catalysts and allows isotopic labelling of complementary positions in drug molecules, providing a new diagnostic tool in drug development.

  12. Iron-catalysed tritiation of pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Yu, Renyuan Pony; Hesk, David; Rivera, Nelo; Pelczer, István; Chirik, Paul J

    2016-01-14

    A thorough understanding of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of a drug in animal models is a critical component of drug discovery and development. Such studies are performed in vivo and in vitro at various stages of the development process--ranging from preclinical absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) studies to late-stage human clinical trials--to elucidate a drug molecule's metabolic profile and to assess its toxicity. Radiolabelled compounds, typically those that contain (14)C or (3)H isotopes, are one of the most powerful and widely deployed diagnostics for these studies. The introduction of radiolabels using synthetic chemistry enables the direct tracing of the drug molecule without substantially altering its structure or function. The ubiquity of C-H bonds in drugs and the relative ease and low cost associated with tritium ((3)H) make it an ideal radioisotope with which to conduct ADME studies early in the drug development process. Here we describe an iron-catalysed method for the direct (3)H labelling of pharmaceuticals by hydrogen isotope exchange, using tritium gas as the source of the radioisotope. The site selectivity of the iron catalyst is orthogonal to currently used iridium catalysts and allows isotopic labelling of complementary positions in drug molecules, providing a new diagnostic tool in drug development. PMID:26762456

  13. Dynamics of Radical-Mediated Enzyme Catalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warncke, Kurt

    1997-11-01

    An emergent class of enzymes harnesses the extreme reactivity of electron-deficient free radical species to perform some of the most difficult reactions in biology. The regio- and stereo-selectivity achieved by these enzymes defies long-held ideas that radical reactions are non-specific. The common primary step in these catalyses is metal- or metallocenter-assisted generation of an electron-deficient organic "initiator radical". The initiator radical abstracts a hydrogen atom from the substrate, opening a new reaction channel for rearrangement to the product. Our aim is to elucidate the detailed molecular mechanisms of the radical pair separation and radical rearrangement steps. Radical pair separation and substrate radical rearrangement are tracked by using time-resolved (10-7 to 10-3 s) techniques of pulsed-electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (FT-EPR, ESEEM). Synchronous time-evolution of the reactions is attained by triggering with a visible laser pulse. Transient non-Boltzmann population of the states of the spin-coupled systems, and resultant electron spin polarization, facilitates study at or near room temperature under conditions where the enzymes are operative. The systems examined include ethanolamine deaminase, a vitamin B12 coenzyme-dependent enzyme, ribonucleotide reductase and photosynthetic reaction centers. The electronic and nuclear structural and kinetic information obtained from the pulsed-EPR studies is used to address how the initiator radicals are stabilized against deleterious recombination with the metal, and to distinguish the participation of concerted versus sequential rearrangement pathways.

  14. Palladium/N-heterocyclic carbene catalysed regio and diastereoselective reaction of ketones with allyl reagents via inner-sphere mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bai, Da-Chang; Yu, Fei-Le; Wang, Wan-Ying; Chen, Di; Li, Hao; Liu, Qing-Rong; Ding, Chang-Hua; Chen, Bo; Hou, Xue-Long

    2016-01-01

    The palladium-catalysed allylic substitution reaction is one of the most important reactions in transition-metal catalysis and has been well-studied in the past decades. Most of the reactions proceed through an outer-sphere mechanism, affording linear products when monosubstituted allyl reagents are used. Here, we report an efficient Palladium-catalysed protocol for reactions of β-substituted ketones with monosubstituted allyl substrates, simply by using N-heterocyclic carbene as ligand, leading to branched products with up to three contiguous stereocentres in a (syn, anti)-mode with excellent regio and diastereoselectivities. The scope of the protocol in organic synthesis has been examined preliminarily. Mechanistic studies by both experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that the reaction proceeds via an inner-sphere mechanism-nucleophilic attack of enolate oxygen on Palladium followed by C-C bond-forming [3,3']-reductive elimination. PMID:27283477

  15. Palladium/N-heterocyclic carbene catalysed regio and diastereoselective reaction of ketones with allyl reagents via inner-sphere mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Da-Chang; Yu, Fei-Le; Wang, Wan-Ying; Chen, Di; Li, Hao; Liu, Qing-Rong; Ding, Chang-Hua; Chen, Bo; Hou, Xue-Long

    2016-01-01

    The palladium-catalysed allylic substitution reaction is one of the most important reactions in transition-metal catalysis and has been well-studied in the past decades. Most of the reactions proceed through an outer-sphere mechanism, affording linear products when monosubstituted allyl reagents are used. Here, we report an efficient Palladium-catalysed protocol for reactions of β-substituted ketones with monosubstituted allyl substrates, simply by using N-heterocyclic carbene as ligand, leading to branched products with up to three contiguous stereocentres in a (syn, anti)-mode with excellent regio and diastereoselectivities. The scope of the protocol in organic synthesis has been examined preliminarily. Mechanistic studies by both experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that the reaction proceeds via an inner-sphere mechanism—nucleophilic attack of enolate oxygen on Palladium followed by C–C bond-forming [3,3']-reductive elimination. PMID:27283477

  16. Biohydrogen production from kitchen based vegetable waste: effect of pyrolysis temperature and time on catalysed and non-catalysed operation.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Manu; Tardio, James; Mohan, S Venkata

    2013-02-01

    Pyrolysis of kitchen based vegetable waste (KVW) was studied in a designed packed bed reactor. The effect of process parameters like temperature, time and catalyst on bio-gas yield and its composition was studied. The total bio-gas yield was found to be maximum with non-catalysed operation (260ml/g) at 1073K (180min). Higher hydrogen (H(2)) yield with non-catalysed operation (32.68%) was observed at 1073K (180min) while with catalysed operation the requisite temperature (873K) and time (120min) reduced with both silica gel (33.34%) and sand (41.82%) thus, saving energy input. Methane (CH(4)) yield was found to be highest (4.44times than non-catalysed and 1.42 with silica gel) in presence of sand (71.485ml/g) at medium temperature (873K) and time (60min). The catalyst operation reduced the carbondioxide (CO(2)) share from 47.29% to 41.30% (silica gel catalysed) and 21.91% (sand catalysed) at 873K. PMID:23313698

  17. A practical guide to modelling enzyme-catalysed reactions

    PubMed Central

    Lonsdale, Richard; Harvey, Jeremy N.; Mulholland, Adrian J.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular modelling and simulation methods are increasingly at the forefront of elucidating mechanisms of enzyme-catalysed reactions, and shedding light on the determinants of specificity and efficiency of catalysis. These methods have the potential to assist in drug discovery and the design of novel protein catalysts. This Tutorial Review highlights some of the most widely used modelling methods and some successful applications. Modelling protocols commonly applied in studying enzyme-catalysed reactions are outlined here, and some practical implications are considered, with cytochrome P450 enzymes used as a specific example. PMID:22278388

  18. Transglycosylation reactions catalysed by two beta-mannanases.

    PubMed Central

    Coulombel, C; Clermont, S; Foglietti, M J; Percheron, F

    1981-01-01

    By using [3H]mannobiose as a labelled acceptor, it was possible to demonstrate transfer reactions catalysed by two beta-mannanases, with mannotetraose and mannopentaose as substrates. The enzyme from Streptomyces transfers one mannose unit from the oligosaccharides, whereas the enzyme from fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) seeds is able to transfer oligomannose residues. PMID:7306059

  19. Silver-catalysed intramolecular hydroamination of alkynes with trichloroacetimidates.

    PubMed

    Wong, Valerie H L; Hor, T S Andy; Hii, King Kuok Mimi

    2013-10-18

    Silver(I) complexes catalyse the intramolecular addition of trichloroacetimidates to alkynes. In the absence of a ligand, the selectivity of the reaction is dependent upon the nature of the counter-anion and solvent. The introduction of non-chelating nitrogeneous ligands suppresses competitive Brønsted acid catalysis, improving the yield and selectivity of the reaction. PMID:23999555

  20. Pars Injuries in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Oren, Jonathan H; Gallina, Jason M

    2016-03-01

    Pars injuries are common causes of low back pain in adolescent athletes. Workup traditionally has included lumbar radiographs with oblique views and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). However, recent literature has demonstrated the accuracy of MRI as a diagnostic modality. Acute injuries may be amenable to bracing with the goal of a healed lesion. Most cases of spondylolysis will result in asymptomatic non-union, though pars repair is an option for symptomatic pars defects without spondylolisthesis. PMID:26977552

  1. Enzyme-catalysed assembly of DNA hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Soong Ho; Lee, Jong Bum; Park, Nokyoung; Kwon, Sang Yeon; Umbach, Christopher C.; Luo, Dan

    2006-10-01

    DNA is a remarkable polymer that can be manipulated by a large number of molecular tools including enzymes. A variety of geometric objects, periodic arrays and nanoscale devices have been constructed. Previously we synthesized dendrimer-like DNA and DNA nanobarcodes from branched DNA via ligases. Here we report the construction of a hydrogel entirely from branched DNA that are three-dimensional and can be crosslinked in nature. These DNA hydrogels were biocompatible, biodegradable, inexpensive to fabricate and easily moulded into desired shapes and sizes. The distinct difference of the DNA hydrogel to other bio-inspired hydrogels (including peptide-based, alginate-based and DNA (linear)-polyacrylamide hydrogels) is that the crosslinking is realized via efficient, ligase-mediated reactions. The advantage is that the gelling processes are achieved under physiological conditions and the encapsulations are accomplished in situ-drugs including proteins and even live mammalian cells can be encapsulated in the liquid phase eliminating the drug-loading step and also avoiding denaturing conditions. Fine tuning of these hydrogels is easily accomplished by adjusting the initial concentrations and types of branched DNA monomers, thus allowing the hydrogels to be tailored for specific applications such as controlled drug delivery, tissue engineering, 3D cell culture, cell transplant therapy and other biomedical applications.

  2. Nonconsecutive Pars Interarticularis Defects.

    PubMed

    Elgafy, Hossein; Hart, Ryan C; Tanios, Mina

    2015-12-01

    Lumbar spondylolysis is a well-recognized condition occurring in adolescents because of repetitive overuse in sports. Nonconsecutive spondylolysis involving the lumbar spine is rare. In contrast to single-level pars defects that respond well to conservative treatment, there is no consensus about the management of multiple-level pars fractures; a few reports indicated that conservative management is successful, and the majority acknowledged that surgery is often required. The current study presents a rare case of pars fracture involving nonconsecutive segments and discusses the management options. In this case report, we review the patient's history, clinical examination, radiologic findings, and management, as well as the relevant literature. An 18-year-old man presented to the clinic with worsening lower back pain related to nonconsecutive pars fractures at L2 and L5. After 6 months of conservative management, diagnostic computed tomography-guided pars block was used to localize the symptomatic level at L2, which was treated surgically; the L5 asymptomatic pars fracture did not require surgery. At the last follow-up 2 years after surgery, the patient was playing baseball and basketball, and denied any back pain. This article reports a case of rare nonconsecutive pars fractures. Conservative management for at least 6 months is recommended. Successful management depends on the choice of appropriate treatment for each level. Single-photon emission computed tomography scan, and computed tomography-guided pars block are valuable preoperative tools to identify the symptomatic level in such a case. PMID:26665257

  3. Nickel-catalysed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of amides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weires, Nicholas A.; Baker, Emma L.; Garg, Neil K.

    2016-01-01

    The Suzuki-Miyaura coupling has become one of the most important and prevalent methods for the construction of C-C bonds. Although palladium catalysis has historically dominated the field, the use of nickel catalysis has become increasingly widespread because of its unique ability to cleave carbon-heteroatom bonds that are unreactive towards other transition metals. We report the first nickel-catalysed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of amides, which proceeds by an uncommon cleavage of the amide C-N bond after N-tert-butoxycarbonyl activation. The methodology is mild, functional-group tolerant and can be strategically employed in sequential transition-metal-catalysed cross-coupling sequences to unite heterocyclic fragments. These studies demonstrate that amides, despite classically considered inert substrates, can be harnessed as synthons for use in reactions that form C-C bonds through cleavage of the C-N bond using non-precious metal catalysis.

  4. Enantioselective synthesis of cyanohydrins catalysed by hydroxynitrile lyases - a review.

    PubMed

    Bracco, Paula; Busch, Hanna; von Langermann, Jan; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2016-07-01

    The first enantioselective synthesis was the selective addition of cyanide to benzaldehyde catalysed by a hydroxynitrile lyase (HNL). Since then these enzymes have been developed into a reliable tool in organic synthesis. HNLs to prepare either the (R)- or the (S)-enantiomer of the desired cyanohydrin are available and a wide variety of reaction conditions can be applied. As a result of this, numerous applications of these enzymes in organic synthesis have been described. Here the examples of the last decade are summarised, the enzyme catalysed step is discussed and the follow-up chemistry is shown. This proves HNLs to be part of main stream organic synthesis. Additionally the newest approaches via immobilisation and reaction engineering are introduced. PMID:27282284

  5. Enantioselective iron-catalysed O-H bond insertions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shou-Fei; Cai, Yan; Mao, Hong-Xiang; Xie, Jian-Hua; Zhou, Qi-Lin

    2010-07-01

    The ready availability, low price and environmentally benign character of iron mean that it is an ideal alternative to precious metals in catalysis. Recent growth in the number of iron-catalysed reactions reported reflects an increasing demand for sustainable chemistry. Only a limited number of chiral iron catalysts have been reported and these have, in general, proven less enantioselective than other transition-metal catalysts, thus limiting their appeal. Here, we report that iron complexes of spiro-bisoxazoline ligands are highly efficient catalysts for asymmetric O-H bond insertion reactions. These complexes catalyse insertions into the O-H bond of a wide variety of alcohols and even water, with exceptional enantioselectivities under mild reaction conditions. The selectivities surpass those obtained with other transition-metal catalysts. This study should inspire and encourage the use of iron instead of traditional precious metals in the development of greener catalysts for catalytic asymmetric synthesis.

  6. Protease-catalysed Direct Asymmetric Mannich Reaction in Organic Solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yang; Li, Ling-Po; He, Yan-Hong; Guan, Zhi

    2012-10-01

    We reported the first enzyme-catalysed, direct, three-component asymmetric Mannich reaction using protease type XIV from Streptomyces griseus (SGP) in acetonitrile. Yields of up to 92% with enantioselectivities of up to 88% e.e. and diastereoselectivities of up to 92:8 (syn:anti) were achieved under the optimised conditions. This enzyme's catalytic promiscuity expands the application of this biocatalyst and provides a potential alternative method for asymmetric Mannich reactions.

  7. Protease-catalysed direct asymmetric Mannich reaction in organic solvent.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yang; Li, Ling-Po; He, Yan-Hong; Guan, Zhi

    2012-01-01

    We reported the first enzyme-catalysed, direct, three-component asymmetric Mannich reaction using protease type XIV from Streptomyces griseus (SGP) in acetonitrile. Yields of up to 92% with enantioselectivities of up to 88% e.e. and diastereoselectivities of up to 92:8 (syn:anti) were achieved under the optimised conditions. This enzyme's catalytic promiscuity expands the application of this biocatalyst and provides a potential alternative method for asymmetric Mannich reactions. PMID:23094136

  8. Protease-catalysed Direct Asymmetric Mannich Reaction in Organic Solvent

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yang; Li, Ling-Po; He, Yan-Hong; Guan, Zhi

    2012-01-01

    We reported the first enzyme-catalysed, direct, three-component asymmetric Mannich reaction using protease type XIV from Streptomyces griseus (SGP) in acetonitrile. Yields of up to 92% with enantioselectivities of up to 88% e.e. and diastereoselectivities of up to 92:8 (syn:anti) were achieved under the optimised conditions. This enzyme's catalytic promiscuity expands the application of this biocatalyst and provides a potential alternative method for asymmetric Mannich reactions. PMID:23094136

  9. Par Pond water balance

    SciTech Connect

    Hiergesell, R.A.; Dixon, K.L.

    1996-06-01

    A water budget for the Par Pond hydrologic system was established in order to estimate the rate of groundwater influx to Par Pond. This estimate will be used in modeling exercises to predict Par Pond reservoir elevation and spillway discharge in the scenario where Savannah River water is no longer pumped and discharged into Par Pond. The principal of conservation of mass was used to develop the water budget, where water inflow was set equal to water outflow. Components of the water budget were identified, and the flux associated with each was determined. The water budget was considered balanced when inflow and outflow summed to zero. The results of this study suggest that Par Pond gains water from the groundwater system in the upper reaches of the reservoir, but looses water to the groundwater system near the dam. The rate of flux of groundwater from the water table aquifer into Par Pond was determined to be 13 cfs. The rate of flux from Par Pond to the water table aquifer near the dam was determined to be 7 cfs.

  10. The molecular mechanism of palladium-catalysed cyanoesterification of methyl cyanoformate onto norbornene.

    PubMed

    Ishitsuka, Takuya; Okuda, Yasuhiro; Szilagyi, Robert K; Mori, Seiji; Nishihara, Yasushi

    2016-05-01

    Potential energy surface mapping was completed for the entire catalytic cycle of palladium-catalysed cyanoesterification onto norbornene (NBE) using density functional theory calculations. We found that after the oxidative addition step of the reagent methyl cyanoformate, the reaction proceeds through an insertion of olefin into a Pd(II)-COOMe bond first. Subsequently, reductive elimination occurs by transferring the cyanide group from the Pd center to NBE. This rearrangement is triggered by the rotation of the ester group into a π-interaction with the Pd(II) centre. The regioselectivity of olefin insertion is controlled by ionic and covalent interactions in the precursor π-complex formation step. Importantly, all of the intermediates and transition states along the exo pathway were found to be more stable than the corresponding structures of the endo pathway without any sign of crossing over between the two surfaces via isomerization. The rate-determining step is the reductive elimination despite the fact that the corresponding activation barrier is reduced by conformational changes via the rotation of a MeOOC-C(NBE) bond. PMID:27062989

  11. Microbially induced and microbially catalysed precipitation: two different carbonate factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The landmark paper by Schlager (2003) has revealed three types of benthic carbonate production referred to as "carbonate factories", operative at different locations at different times in Earth history. The tropical or T-factory comprises the classical platforms and fringing reefs and is dominated by carbonate precipitation by autotrophic calcifying metazoans ("biotically controlled" precipitation). The cool or C-factory is also biotically controlled but via heterotrophic, calcifying metazoans in cold and deep waters at the continental margins. A further type is the mud-mound or M-factory, where carbonate precipitation is supported by microorganisms but not controlled by a specific enzymatic pathway ("biotically induced" precipitation). How exactly the microbes influence precipitation is still poorly understood. Based on recent experimental and field studies, the microbial influence on modern mud mound and microbialite growth includes two fundamentally different processes: (1) Metabolic activity of microbes may increase the saturation state with respect to a particular mineral phase, thereby indirectly driving the precipitation of the mineral phase: microbially induced precipitation. (2) In a situation, where a solution is already supersaturated but precipitation of the mineral is inhibited by a kinetic barrier, microbes may act as a catalyser, i.e. they lower the kinetic barrier: microbially catalysed precipitation. Such a catalytic effect can occur e.g. via secreted polymeric substances or specific chemical groups on the cell surface, at which the minerals nucleate or which facilitate mechanistically the bonding of new ions to the mineral surface. Based on these latest developments in microbialite formation, I propose to extend the scheme of benthic carbonate factories of Schlager et al. (2003) by introducing an additional branch distinguishing microbially induced from microbially catalysed precipitation. Although both mechanisms could be operative in a M

  12. Enhanced plasmonic properties of gold-catalysed semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumenko, Denys; Zannier, Valentina; Grillo, Vincenzo; Cassese, Damiano; Priante, Giacomo; Dal Zilio, Simone; Rubini, Silvia; Lazzarino, Marco

    2014-10-01

    A key challenge for the development of plasmonic nanodevices is their integration into active semiconducting structures. Gold-catalysed semiconductor nanowires are promising candidates for their bottom-up growth process that aligns a single gold nanoparticle at each nanowire apex. Unfortunately these show extremely poor plasmonic properties. In this work, we propose a way to enhance their plasmonic resonance up to those of ideal and isolated gold nanoparticles. A suitable purification protocol compatible with GaAs and ZnSe molecular beam epitaxy of nanowires is used to produce plasmonic active nanowires, which were used to enhance the Raman signal of pentacene and graphene oxide. Enhancement factors up to three orders of magnitude are demonstrated.A key challenge for the development of plasmonic nanodevices is their integration into active semiconducting structures. Gold-catalysed semiconductor nanowires are promising candidates for their bottom-up growth process that aligns a single gold nanoparticle at each nanowire apex. Unfortunately these show extremely poor plasmonic properties. In this work, we propose a way to enhance their plasmonic resonance up to those of ideal and isolated gold nanoparticles. A suitable purification protocol compatible with GaAs and ZnSe molecular beam epitaxy of nanowires is used to produce plasmonic active nanowires, which were used to enhance the Raman signal of pentacene and graphene oxide. Enhancement factors up to three orders of magnitude are demonstrated. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: SEM characterization of: (i) transferred ZnSe NWs onto the glass substrates, (ii) etched gold NPs of ZnSe NWs in Ar+ plasma, and (iii) self-catalysed GaAs NWs. Simulation of extinction spectra. Statistical characterization of plasmon-active sites at the focal plane with a length of NWs. Photoluminescence on ZnSe NWs. B3g Raman mode of pentacene as an indicator of molecule orientation. The dependence of graphene oxide Raman

  13. uPAR

    PubMed Central

    Uhrin, Pavel; Breuss, Johannes M.

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-initiated angiogenesis requires both coordinated proteolytic degradation of extracellular matrix provided by the urokinase plasminogen activator/urokinase receptor (uPA/uPAR) system and regulation of cell-migration provided by integrin–matrix interaction. Previously we have shown that stimulation of pericellular proteolysis induced by VEGF occurs via the VEGF receptor-2 leading to redistribution of uPAR to focal adhesions at the leading edge of endothelial cells. In our recent work published in Cardiovascular Research, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the uPAR-dependent modulation of VEGF-induced endothelial migration. By applying a micropatterning technique we described that VEGF stimulation results in complex formation between uPAR and α5β1-integrin on the cell surface. The subsequent internalization of this complex, important for receptor redistribution, was demonstrated by flow-cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Targeting of the interaction site between uPAR and α5β1 impairs receptor internalization and leads to the inhibition of endothelial cell migration in vitro and in an angiogenesis model in vivo. This proof-of-principle that the interface of uPAR and α5β1-integrin may represent a promising site to therapeutically target tumor angiogenesis raises hope for the development of an anti-angiogenic approach that is limited to only the mobilizing effect of VEGF to endothelial cells, and does not interfere with the inarguably positive effect of VEGF as survival factor. PMID:23076213

  14. Slanted baffle mist eliminator

    DOEpatents

    Vance, Richard F.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus for the elimination of mist from off-gas during vitrification f nuclear waste, where baffles are installed on a slant toward the flow of the off-gasses eliminating the need to expand the cross-sectional area of the duct size.

  15. Slanted baffle mist eliminator

    DOEpatents

    Vance, Richard F.

    1995-11-07

    An apparatus for the elimination of mist from off-gas during vitrification f nuclear waste, where baffles are installed on a slant toward the flow of the off-gasses eliminating the need to expand the cross-sectional area of the duct size.

  16. Palladium-catalysed hydroamidocarbonylation of 1,3-dienes.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoquan; Fang, Xianjie; Jackstell, Ralf; Neumann, Helfried; Beller, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Herein, we report our recent result on the development of the selective catalytic method towards the synthesis of β,γ-unsaturated imides via Pd-catalysed hydroamidocarbonylation of conjugated dienes. Note that this reaction proceeds under acid additive free conditions. Various dienes, including those of high industrial value (e.g. isoprene, 1,3-butadiene), are shown to be compatible with our established method (28 examples, 40-99% yield), which leads to the corresponding β,γ-unsaturated imides in a highly efficient and atom-economic fashion. PMID:27169986

  17. Palladium/N-heterocyclic carbene catalysed regio and diastereoselective reaction of ketones with allyl reagents via inner-sphere mechanism

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bai, Da -Chang; Yu, Fei -Le; Wang, Wan -Ying; Chen, Di; Li, Hao; Liu, Qing -Rong; Ding, Chang -Hua; Chen, Bo; Hou, Xue -Long

    2016-06-10

    The palladium-catalysed allylic substitution reaction is one of the most important reactions in transition-metal catalysis and has been well-studied in the past decades. Most of the reactions proceed through an outer-sphere mechanism, affording linear products when monosubstituted allyl reagents are used. Here, we report an efficient Palladium-catalysed protocol for reactions of beta-substituted ketones with monosubstituted allyl substrates, simply by using N-heterocyclic carbene as ligand, leading to branched products with up to three contiguous stereocentres in a (syn, anti)-mode with excellent regio and diastereoselectivities. The scope of the protocol in organic synthesis has been examined preliminarily. As a result, mechanistic studiesmore » by both experiments and density functional theory ( DFT) calculations reveal that the reaction proceeds via an inner-sphere mechanism-nucleophilic attack of enolate oxygen on Palladium followed by C-C bond-forming [3,3']-reductive elimination.« less

  18. Peroxidase-catalysed interfacial adhesion of aquatic caddisworm silk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Shuen; Pan, Huaizhong; Weerasekare, G Mahika; Stewart, Russell J

    2015-11-01

    Casemaker caddisfly (Hesperophylax occidentalis) larvae use adhesive silk fibres to construct protective shelters under water. The silk comprises a distinct peripheral coating on a viscoelastic fibre core. Caddisworm silk peroxinectin (csPxt), a haem-peroxidase, was shown to be glycosylated by lectin affinity chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Using high-resolution H2O2 and peroxidase-dependent silver ion reduction and nanoparticle deposition, imaged by electron microscopy, csPxt activity was shown to be localized in the peripheral layer of drawn silk fibres. CsPxt catalyses dityrosine cross-linking within the adhesive peripheral layer post-draw, initiated perhaps by H2O2 generated by a silk gland-specific superoxide dismutase 3 (csSOD3) from environmental reactive oxygen species present in natural water. CsSOD3 was also shown to be a glycoprotein and is likely localized in the peripheral layer. Using a synthetic fluorescent phenolic copolymer and confocal microscopy, it was shown that csPxt catalyses oxidative cross-linking to external polyphenolic compounds capable of diffusive interpenetration into the fuzzy peripheral coating, including humic acid, a natural surface-active polyphenol. The results provide evidence of enzyme-mediated covalent cross-linking of a natural bioadhesive to polyphenol conditioned interfaces as a mechanism of permanent adhesion underwater. PMID:26490632

  19. A [NiFe]hydrogenase model that catalyses the release of hydrogen from formic acid.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nga T; Mori, Yuki; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Yatabe, Takeshi; Kabe, Ryota; Nakai, Hidetaka; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Ogo, Seiji

    2014-11-11

    We report the decomposition of formic acid to hydrogen and carbon dioxide, catalysed by a NiRu complex originally developed as a [NiFe]hydrogenase model. This is the first example of H2 evolution, catalysed by a [NiFe]hydrogenase model, which does not require additional energy. PMID:25234420

  20. Prospects for tuberculosis elimination.

    PubMed

    Dye, Christopher; Glaziou, Philippe; Floyd, Katherine; Raviglione, Mario

    2013-01-01

    The target for TB elimination is to reduce annual incidence to less than one case per million population by 2050. Meeting that target requires a 1,000-fold reduction in incidence in little more than 35 years. This can be achieved only by combining the effective treatment of active TB-early case detection and high cure rates to interrupt transmission-with methods to prevent new infections and to neutralize existing latent infections. Vigorous implementation of the WHO Stop TB Strategy is needed to achieve the former, facilitated by the effective supply of, and demand for, health services. The latter calls for new technology, including biomarkers of TB risk, diagnostics, drugs, and vaccines. An important milestone en route to elimination will be reached when there is less than 1 TB death per 100,000 population, marking entry into the elimination phase. This landmark can be reached by many countries within 1-2 decades. PMID:23244049

  1. La pelade par plaques

    PubMed Central

    Spano, Frank; Donovan, Jeff C.

    2015-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Présenter aux médecins de famille des renseignements de base pour faire comprendre l’épidémiologie, la pathogenèse, l’histologie et l’approche clinique au diagnostic de la pelade par plaques. Sources des données Une recension a été effectuée dans PubMed pour trouver des articles pertinents concernant la pathogenèse, le diagnostic et le pronostic de la pelade par plaques. Message principal La pelade par plaques est une forme de perte pileuse auto-immune dont la prévalence durant une vie est d’environ 2 %. Des antécédents personnels ou familiaux de troubles auto-immuns concomitants, comme le vitiligo ou une maladie de la thyroïde, peuvent être observés dans un petit sous-groupe de patients. Le diagnostic peut souvent être posé de manière clinique en se fondant sur la perte de cheveux non cicatricielle et circulaire caractéristique, accompagnée de cheveux en « point d’exclamation » en périphérie chez ceux dont le problème en est aux premiers stades. Le diagnostic des cas plus complexes ou des présentations inhabituelles peut être facilité par une biopsie et un examen histologique. Le pronostic varie largement et de mauvais résultats sont associés à une apparition à un âge précoce, une perte importante, la variante ophiasis, des changements aux ongles, des antécédents familiaux ou des troubles auto-immuns concomitants. Conclusion La pelade par plaques est une forme auto-immune de perte de cheveux périodiquement observée en soins primaires. Les médecins de famille sont bien placés pour identifier la pelade par plaques, déterminer la gravité de la maladie et poser le diagnostic différentiel approprié. De plus, ils sont en mesure de renseigner leurs patients à propos de l’évolution clinique de la maladie ainsi que du pronostic général selon le sous-type de patients.

  2. Elimination of Social Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Toole, Teddy

    The thesis of this document is that arbitrary social rules must be eliminated. Chapters cover: (1) what it is like to be a student whose personal activities are controlled; (2) the necessity of environmental freedom as a prerequisite to successful educational reform; (3) the question of environmental control; (4) the legal history of environmental…

  3. Minding Rachlin's Eliminative Materialism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, J. J.

    2012-01-01

    Rachlin's teleological behaviorism eliminates the first-person ontology of conscious experience by identifying mental states with extended patterns of behavior, and thereby maintains the materialist ontology of science. An alternate view, informed by brain-based and externalist philosophies of mind, is shown also to maintain the materialist…

  4. Carbon–heteroatom bond formation catalysed by organometallic complexes

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, John F.

    2010-01-01

    At one time the synthetic chemist’s last resort, reactions catalysed by transition metals are now the preferred method for synthesizing many types of organic molecule. A recent success in this type of catalysis is the discovery of reactions that form bonds between carbon and heteroatoms (such as nitrogen, oxygen, sulphur, silicon and boron) via complexes of transition metals with amides, alkoxides, thiolates, silyl groups or boryl groups. The development of these catalytic processes has been supported by the discovery of new elementary reactions that occur at metal–heteroatom bonds and by the identification of factors that control these reactions. Together, these findings have led to new synthetic processes that are in daily use and have formed a foundation for the development of processes that are likely to be central to synthetic chemistry in the future. PMID:18800130

  5. Visualization of oscillatory behaviour of Pt nanoparticles catalysing CO oxidation.

    PubMed

    Vendelbo, S B; Elkjær, C F; Falsig, H; Puspitasari, I; Dona, P; Mele, L; Morana, B; Nelissen, B J; van Rijn, R; Creemer, J F; Kooyman, P J; Helveg, S

    2014-09-01

    Many catalytic reactions under fixed conditions exhibit oscillatory behaviour. The oscillations are often attributed to dynamic changes in the catalyst surface. So far, however, such relationships were difficult to determine for catalysts consisting of supported nanoparticles. Here, we employ a nanoreactor to study the oscillatory CO oxidation catalysed by Pt nanoparticles using time-resolved high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, mass spectrometry and calorimetry. The observations reveal that periodic changes in the CO oxidation are synchronous with a periodic refacetting of the Pt nanoparticles. The oscillatory reaction is modelled using density functional theory and mass transport calculations, considering the CO adsorption energy and the oxidation rate as site-dependent. We find that to successfully explain the oscillations, the model must contain the phenomenon of refacetting. The nanoreactor approach can thus provide atomic-scale information that is specific to surface sites. This will improve the understanding of dynamic properties in catalysis and related fields. PMID:25038730

  6. Glycosylation of ribonuclease A catalysed by rabbit liver extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Khalkhall, Z; Marshall, R D

    1975-01-01

    Crude extracts of rabbit liver catalyse in vitro the transfer of N-acetylglucosamine from UDP-N-acetylglucosamine to bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A. The enzymic activity is contained in rough endoplasmic reticulum. It has an absolute requirement for a bivalent metal ion: Co-2+ greater than Mn-2+ greater than Ni-2+. Mg-2+ is ineffective. There is enzymic activity in the absence of detergent, but increased activity is observed in the presence of Triton X-100. The site of glycosylation of ribonuclease A is asparagine-34, and glycosylation occurs only at this point. These findings agree with the hypothesis that the sequence Asn-X-Thr(Ser) (where X may be one of a number of types of amino acid) is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for N-acetylglucosaminylation of a protein-bound asparagine residue. PMID:1156375

  7. Enhanced plasmonic properties of gold-catalysed semiconductor nanowires.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Denys; Zannier, Valentina; Grillo, Vincenzo; Cassese, Damiano; Priante, Giacomo; dal Zilio, Simone; Rubini, Silvia; Lazzarino, Marco

    2014-11-21

    A key challenge for the development of plasmonic nanodevices is their integration into active semiconducting structures. Gold-catalysed semiconductor nanowires are promising candidates for their bottom-up growth process that aligns a single gold nanoparticle at each nanowire apex. Unfortunately these show extremely poor plasmonic properties. In this work, we propose a way to enhance their plasmonic resonance up to those of ideal and isolated gold nanoparticles. A suitable purification protocol compatible with GaAs and ZnSe molecular beam epitaxy of nanowires is used to produce plasmonic active nanowires, which were used to enhance the Raman signal of pentacene and graphene oxide. Enhancement factors up to three orders of magnitude are demonstrated. PMID:25274074

  8. Rhodium catalysed hydroformylation of alkenes using highly fluorophilic phosphines.

    PubMed

    Adams, Dave J; Bennett, James A; Cole-Hamilton, David J; Hope, Eric G; Hopewell, Jonathan; Kight, Jo; Pogorzelec, Peter; Stuart, Alison M

    2005-12-21

    Highly fluorophilic phosphines incorporating at least one aromatic ring containing two directly attached perfluoroalkyl groups have been synthesised, their partition coefficients (organic phase : fluorous phase) measured and their electronic properties probed using (1)J(PtP) data for their trans-[PtCl(2)L(2)] complexes. These phosphines have been used as modifying ligands for the rhodium catalysed hydroformylation of 1-octene in perfluorocarbon solvents. Catalyst activity, regioselectivity and the levels of rhodium leaching to the product phase vary with the substitution patterns of the modifying ligands that do not correlate with the electronic properties or partition coefficients of these ligands, but can be interpreted in terms of differences in the resting states of the catalysts. PMID:16311639

  9. Ag-catalysed cutting of multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    La Torre, A; Rance, G A; Miners, S A; Herreros Lucas, C; Smith, E F; Fay, M W; Zoberbier, T; Giménez-López, M C; Kaiser, U; Brown, P D; Khlobystov, A N

    2016-04-29

    In this work, the cutting of carbon nanotubes is investigated using silver nanoparticles deposited on arc discharge multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The composite is subsequently heated in air to fabricate shortened multi-walled nanotubes. Complementary transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques shed light on the cutting mechanism. The nanotube cutting is catalysed by the fundamental mechanism based on the coordination of the silver atoms to the π-bonds of carbon nanotubes. As a result of the metal coordination, the strength of the carbon-carbon bond is reduced, promoting the oxidation of carbon at lower temperature when heated in air, or lowering the activation energy required for the removal of carbon atoms by electron beam irradiation, assuring in both cases the cutting of the nanotubes. PMID:26987452

  10. Formation mechanism of diamond nanocrystal from catalysed carbon black

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Bin; Li, Tingju; Dong, Chuang; Zhang, Xingguo; Yao, Shan; Cao, Zhiqiang; Wang, Dehe; Ji, Shouhua; Jin, Junze

    2004-10-01

    Recently, our group has synthesized nanocrystal n-diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC) from catalysed carbon black. Based on the results of XRD, TGA and DTA, a formation mechanism has been proposed to explain the phase transformation from carbon black to diamond nanocrystal. With the increase of temperature and hence the carbon diffusion in iron, the phase sequence is from Fe(OH)3 into Fe2O3, agr-Fe, ggr-Fe, then liquid iron. When the carbon in the liquid iron is saturated, DLC or graphite separates out of the liquid iron. With decrease of temperature, the carbon in ggr-Fe is separated out, and n-diamond nuclei form and grow.

  11. Ag-catalysed cutting of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Torre, A.; Rance, G. A.; Miners, S. A.; Herreros Lucas, C.; Smith, E. F.; Fay, M. W.; Zoberbier, T.; Giménez-López, M. C.; Kaiser, U.; Brown, P. D.; Khlobystov, A. N.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the cutting of carbon nanotubes is investigated using silver nanoparticles deposited on arc discharge multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The composite is subsequently heated in air to fabricate shortened multi-walled nanotubes. Complementary transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques shed light on the cutting mechanism. The nanotube cutting is catalysed by the fundamental mechanism based on the coordination of the silver atoms to the π-bonds of carbon nanotubes. As a result of the metal coordination, the strength of the carbon-carbon bond is reduced, promoting the oxidation of carbon at lower temperature when heated in air, or lowering the activation energy required for the removal of carbon atoms by electron beam irradiation, assuring in both cases the cutting of the nanotubes.

  12. La pelade par plaques

    PubMed Central

    Spano, Frank; Donovan, Jeff C.

    2015-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Présenter aux médecins de famille des renseignements de base pour faire comprendre les schémas thérapeutiques et les résultats des traitements pour la pelade par plaques, de même que les aider à identifier les patients pour qui une demande de consultation en dermatologie pourrait s’imposer. Sources des données Une recension a été effectuée dans PubMed pour trouver des articles pertinents concernant le traitement de la pelade par plaques. Message principal La pelade par plaques est une forme auto-immune de perte pileuse qui touche à la fois les enfants et les adultes. Même s’il n’y a pas de mortalité associée à la maladie, la morbidité découlant des effets psychologiques de la perte des cheveux peut être dévastatrice. Lorsque la pelade par plaques et le sous-type de la maladie sont identifiés, un schéma thérapeutique approprié peut être amorcé pour aider à arrêter la chute des cheveux et possiblement faire commencer la repousse. Les traitements de première intention sont la triamcinolone intralésionnelle avec des corticostéroïdes topiques ou du minoxidil ou les 2. Les médecins de famille peuvent prescrire ces traitements en toute sécurité et amorcer ces thérapies. Les cas plus avancés ou réfractaires pourraient avoir besoin de diphénylcyclopropénone topique ou d’anthraline topique. On peut traiter la perte de cils avec des analogues de la prostaglandine. Les personnes ayant subi une perte de cheveux abondante peuvent recourir à des options de camouflage ou à des prothèses capillaires. Il est important de surveiller les troubles psychiatriques en raison des effets psychologiques profonds de la perte de cheveux. Conclusion Les médecins de famille verront de nombreux patients qui perdent leurs cheveux. La reconnaissance de la pelade par plaques et la compréhension du processus pathologique sous-jacent permettent d’amorcer un schéma thérapeutique approprié. Les cas plus graves ou r

  13. Minding Rachlin's eliminative materialism.

    PubMed

    McDowell, J J

    2012-01-01

    Rachlin's teleological behaviorism eliminates the first-person ontology of conscious experience by identifying mental states with extended patterns of behavior, and thereby maintains the materialist ontology of science. An alternate view, informed by brain-based and externalist philosophies of mind, is shown also to maintain the materialist ontology of science, but without eliminating the phenomenology of consciousness. This view implies that to be judged human, machines not only must exhibit complicated temporally structured patterns of behavior, but also must have first-person conscious experience. Although confirming machine sentience is likely to be problematic, extended contact with a machine that results in a person interacting with it as if it were conscious could reasonably lead to the conclusion that for all intents and purposes it is. PMID:22942531

  14. Minding Rachlin's Eliminative Materialism

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, J.J

    2012-01-01

    Rachlin's teleological behaviorism eliminates the first-person ontology of conscious experience by identifying mental states with extended patterns of behavior, and thereby maintains the materialist ontology of science. An alternate view, informed by brain-based and externalist philosophies of mind, is shown also to maintain the materialist ontology of science, but without eliminating the phenomenology of consciousness. This view implies that to be judged human, machines not only must exhibit complicated temporally structured patterns of behavior, but also must have first-person conscious experience. Although confirming machine sentience is likely to be problematic, extended contact with a machine that results in a person interacting with it as if it were conscious could reasonably lead to the conclusion that for all intents and purposes it is. PMID:22942531

  15. Phased array ghost elimination.

    PubMed

    Kellman, Peter; McVeigh, Elliot R

    2006-05-01

    Parallel imaging may be applied to cancel ghosts caused by a variety of distortion mechanisms, including distortions such as off-resonance or local flow, which are space variant. Phased array combining coefficients may be calculated that null ghost artifacts at known locations based on a constrained optimization, which optimizes SNR subject to the nulling constraint. The resultant phased array ghost elimination (PAGE) technique is similar to the method known as sensitivity encoding (SENSE) used for accelerated imaging; however, in this formulation is applied to full field-of-view (FOV) images. The phased array method for ghost elimination may result in greater flexibility in designing acquisition strategies. For example, in multi-shot EPI applications ghosts are typically mitigated by the use of an interleaved phase encode acquisition order. An alternative strategy is to use a sequential, non-interleaved phase encode order and cancel the resultant ghosts using PAGE parallel imaging. Cancellation of ghosts by means of phased array processing makes sequential, non-interleaved phase encode acquisition order practical, and permits a reduction in repetition time, TR, by eliminating the need for echo-shifting. Sequential, non-interleaved phase encode order has benefits of reduced distortion due to off-resonance, in-plane flow and EPI delay misalignment. Furthermore, the use of EPI with PAGE has inherent fat-water separation and has been used to provide off-resonance correction using a technique referred to as lipid elimination with an echo-shifting N/2-ghost acquisition (LEENA), and may further generalized using the multi-point Dixon method. Other applications of PAGE include cancelling ghosts which arise due to amplitude or phase variation during the approach to steady state. Parallel imaging requires estimates of the complex coil sensitivities. In vivo estimates may be derived by temporally varying the phase encode ordering to obtain a full k-space dataset in a scheme

  16. Metallaphotoredox-catalysed sp(3)-sp(3) cross-coupling of carboxylic acids with alkyl halides.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Craig P; Smith, Russell T; Allmendinger, Simon; MacMillan, David W C

    2016-08-18

    In the past 50 years, cross-coupling reactions mediated by transition metals have changed the way in which complex organic molecules are synthesized. The predictable and chemoselective nature of these transformations has led to their widespread adoption across many areas of chemical research. However, the construction of a bond between two sp(3)-hybridized carbon atoms, a fundamental unit of organic chemistry, remains an important yet elusive objective for engineering cross-coupling reactions. In comparison to related procedures with sp(2)-hybridized species, the development of methods for sp(3)-sp(3) bond formation via transition metal catalysis has been hampered historically by deleterious side-reactions, such as β-hydride elimination with palladium catalysis or the reluctance of alkyl halides to undergo oxidative addition. To address this issue, nickel-catalysed cross-coupling processes can be used to form sp(3)-sp(3) bonds that utilize organometallic nucleophiles and alkyl electrophiles. In particular, the coupling of alkyl halides with pre-generated organozinc, Grignard and organoborane species has been used to furnish diverse molecular structures. However, the manipulations required to produce these activated structures is inefficient, leading to poor step- and atom-economies. Moreover, the operational difficulties associated with making and using these reactive coupling partners, and preserving them through a synthetic sequence, has hindered their widespread adoption. A generically useful sp(3)-sp(3) coupling technology that uses bench-stable, native organic functional groups, without the need for pre-functionalization or substrate derivatization, would therefore be valuable. Here we demonstrate that the synergistic merger of photoredox and nickel catalysis enables the direct formation of sp(3)-sp(3) bonds using only simple carboxylic acids and alkyl halides as the nucleophilic and electrophilic coupling partners, respectively. This metallaphotoredox

  17. Multimetallic catalysed cross-coupling of aryl bromides with aryl triflates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, Laura K. G.; Lovell, Matthew M.; Weix, Daniel J.

    2015-08-01

    The advent of transition-metal catalysed strategies for forming new carbon-carbon bonds has revolutionized the field of organic chemistry, enabling the efficient synthesis of ligands, materials, and biologically active molecules. In cases where a single metal fails to promote a selective or efficient transformation, the synergistic cooperation of two distinct catalysts--multimetallic catalysis--can be used instead. Many important reactions rely on multimetallic catalysis, such as the Wacker oxidation of olefins and the Sonogashira coupling of alkynes with aryl halides, but this approach has largely been limited to the use of metals with distinct reactivities, with only one metal catalyst undergoing oxidative addition. Here, we demonstrate that cooperativity between two group 10 metal catalysts--(bipyridine)nickel and (1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane)palladium--enables a general cross-Ullmann reaction (the cross-coupling of two different aryl electrophiles). Our method couples aryl bromides with aryl triflates directly, eliminating the use of arylmetal reagents and avoiding the challenge of differentiating between multiple carbon-hydrogen bonds that is required for direct arylation methods. Selectivity can be achieved without an excess of either substrate and originates from the orthogonal reactivity of the two catalysts and the relative stability of the two arylmetal intermediates. While (1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane)palladium reacts preferentially with aryl triflates to afford a persistent intermediate, (bipyridine)nickel reacts preferentially with aryl bromides to form a transient, reactive intermediate. Although each catalyst forms less than 5 per cent cross-coupled product in isolation, together they are able to achieve a yield of up to 94 per cent. Our results reveal a new method for the synthesis of biaryls, heteroaryls, and dienes, as well as a general mechanism for the selective transfer of ligands between two metal catalysts. We anticipate that this

  18. Recent advances in N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-catalysed benzoin reactions

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Rajeev S; Biju, Akkattu T

    2016-01-01

    Summary N-Heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) have emerged as a powerful class of organocatalysts that mediate a variety of organic transformations. The Benzoin reaction constitutes one of the earliest known carbon–carbon bond-forming reactions catalysed by NHCs. The rapid growth of NHC catalysis in general has resulted in the development of a variety of benzoin and benzoin-type reactions. An overview of such NHC-catalysed benzoin reactions is presented. PMID:27340440

  19. 'Impact hunters' catalyse cooperative hunting in two wild chimpanzee communities.

    PubMed

    Gilby, Ian C; Machanda, Zarin P; Mjungu, Deus C; Rosen, Jeremiah; Muller, Martin N; Pusey, Anne E; Wrangham, Richard W

    2015-12-01

    Even when hunting in groups is mutually beneficial, it is unclear how communal hunts are initiated. If it is costly to be the only hunter, individuals should be reluctant to hunt unless others already are. We used 70 years of data from three communities to examine how male chimpanzees 'solve' this apparent collective action problem. The 'impact hunter' hypothesis proposes that group hunts are sometimes catalysed by certain individuals that hunt more readily than others. In two communities (Kasekela and Kanyawara), we identified a total of five males that exhibited high hunt participation rates for their age, and whose presence at an encounter with red colobus monkeys increased group hunting probability. Critically, these impact hunters were observed to hunt first more often than expected by chance. We argue that by hunting first, these males dilute prey defences and create opportunities for previously reluctant participants. This by-product mutualism can explain variation in group hunting rates within and between social groups. Hunting rates declined after the death of impact hunter FG in Kasekela and after impact hunter MS stopped hunting frequently in Kanyawara. There were no impact hunters in the third, smaller community (Mitumba), where, unlike the others, hunting probability increased with the number of females present at an encounter with prey. PMID:26503679

  20. KOH catalysed preparation of activated carbon aerogels for dye adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ling, Sie King; Tian, H Y; Wang, Shaobin; Rufford, Thomas; Zhu, Z H; Buckley, C E

    2011-05-01

    Organic carbon aerogels (CAs) were prepared by a sol-gel method from polymerisation of resorcinol, furfural, and hexamethylenetetramine catalysed by KOH at around pH 9 using ambient pressure drying. The effect of KOH in the sol-gel on CA synthesis was studied. It was found that addition of KOH prior to the sol-gel polymerisation process improved thermal stability of the gel, prevented the crystallinity of the gel to graphite, increased the microporosity of CA and promoted activation of CA. The CAs prepared using the KOH catalyst exhibited higher porosity than uncatalysed prepared samples. Activation in CO(2) at higher temperature also enhanced the porosity of CAs. Adsorption tests indicated that the CAs were effective for both basic and acid dye adsorption and the adsorption increased with increasing surface area and pore volume. The kinetic adsorption of dyes was diffusion control and could be described by the second-order kinetic model. The equilibrium adsorption of dyes was higher than activated carbon. PMID:21345448

  1. Copper-catalysed enantioselective stereodivergent synthesis of amino alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Shi-Liang; Wong, Zackary L.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2016-04-01

    The chirality, or ‘handedness’, of a biologically active molecule can alter its physiological properties. Thus it is routine procedure in the drug discovery and development process to prepare and fully characterize all possible stereoisomers of a drug candidate for biological evaluation. Despite many advances in asymmetric synthesis, developing general and practical strategies for obtaining all possible stereoisomers of an organic compound that has multiple contiguous stereocentres remains a challenge. Here, we report a stereodivergent copper-based approach for the expeditious construction of amino alcohols with high levels of chemo-, regio-, diastereo- and enantioselectivity. Specifically, we synthesized these amino-alcohol products using sequential, copper-hydride-catalysed hydrosilylation and hydroamination of readily available enals and enones. This strategy provides a route to all possible stereoisomers of the amino-alcohol products, which contain up to three contiguous stereocentres. We leveraged catalyst control and stereospecificity simultaneously to attain exceptional control of the product stereochemistry. Beyond the immediate utility of this protocol, our strategy could inspire the development of methods that provide complete sets of stereoisomers for other valuable synthetic targets.

  2. A DFT study of IRMOF-3 catalysed Knoevenagel condensation.

    PubMed

    Cortese, Remedios; Duca, Dario

    2011-09-21

    It has been recently reported that IRMOF-3 [Gascon et al., J. Catal, 2009, 261, 75] may behave as a basic catalyst, active in the Knoevenagel condensation. In particular, it has been shown that the basicity of aniline-like amino moieties is enhanced, along with the catalytic activity, when incorporated into MOF structures. The computational study here was aimed at finding possible atomistic explanations of the increased basicity and catalytic activity of the IRMOF-3 embedded aniline groups, experimentally claimed. It was, moreover, aimed at guessing a reaction mechanism for the IRMOF-3 catalysed Knoevenagel condensation of benzaldehyde and ethyl-cyanoacetate. Within the DFT framework we have studied structure and basicity properties of IRMOF-3 and we have analysed the energetics of the catalytic cycle as well as of possible deactivation paths, including it. The increased basicity of IRMOF-3 over other amminic catalysts has been explained via the formation of protonated conjugate derivatives, involving hydrogen-bonds and originating quasi-planar 6-term rings. Several plausible reaction steps have been moreover taken into account and a mechanism for the Knoevenagel condensation, including catalyst deactivation, has been proposed for aniline molecules and embedded aniline moieties. This allowed us to suggest that the increased IRMOF-3 activity, as a basic catalyst, should be mostly related to its water adsorption ability, preserving the properties of the catalytically active amino moieties. PMID:21814670

  3. Single elimination competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, T. M. A.; Coe, J. B.; Ahnert, S. E.

    2008-09-01

    We study a simple model of competition in which each player has a fixed strength: randomly selected pairs of players compete, the stronger one wins and the loser is eliminated. We show that the best indicator of future success is not the number of wins but a player's wealth: the accumulated wealth of all defeated players. We calculate the distributions of strength and wealth for two versions of the problem: in the first, the loser is replaced; in the second, the loser is not. The probability of attaining a given wealth is shown to be path-independent. We illustrate our model with the popular game of conkers and discuss an extension to round-robin sports competition.

  4. Vinylogous chain branching catalysed by a dedicated polyketide synthase module.

    PubMed

    Bretschneider, Tom; Heim, Joel B; Heine, Daniel; Winkler, Robert; Busch, Benjamin; Kusebauch, Björn; Stehle, Thilo; Zocher, Georg; Hertweck, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Bacteria use modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) to assemble complex polyketides, many of which are leads for the development of clinical drugs, in particular anti-infectives and anti-tumoral agents. Because these multifarious compounds are notoriously difficult to synthesize, they are usually produced by microbial fermentation. During the past two decades, an impressive body of knowledge on modular PKSs has been gathered that not only provides detailed insight into the biosynthetic pathways but also allows the rational engineering of enzymatic processing lines to yield structural analogues. Notably, a hallmark of all PKS modules studied so far is the head-to-tail fusion of acyl and malonyl building blocks, which leads to linear backbones. Yet, structural diversity is limited by this uniform assembly mode. Here we demonstrate a new type of PKS module from the endofungal bacterium Burkholderia rhizoxinica that catalyses a Michael-type acetyl addition to generate a branch in the carbon chain. In vitro reconstitution of the entire PKS module, X-ray structures of a ketosynthase-branching didomain and mutagenesis experiments revealed a crucial role of the ketosynthase domain in branching the carbon chain. We present a trapped intermediary state in which acyl carrier protein and ketosynthase are covalently linked by the branched polyketide and suggest a new mechanism for chain alkylation, which is functionally distinct from terpenoid-like β-branching. For the rice seedling blight toxin rhizoxin, one of the strongest known anti-mitotic agents, the non-canonical polyketide modification is indispensable for phytotoxic and anti-tumoral activities. We propose that the formation of related pharmacophoric groups follows the same general scheme and infer a unifying vinylogous branching reaction for PKS modules with a ketosynthase-branching-acyl-carrier-protein architecture. This study unveils the structure and function of a new PKS module that broadens the biosynthetic scope of

  5. Synthesis of substituted benzooxaborinin-1-ols via palladium-catalysed cyclisation of alkenyl- and alkynyl-boronic acids.

    PubMed

    Benhamou, Laure; Walker, Daniel W; Bučar, Dejan-Krešimir; Aliev, Abil E; Sheppard, Tom D

    2016-09-14

    Two new palladium-catalysed reactions have been developed for the synthesis of stable 4-substituted benzooxaborinin-1-ols. A palladium-catalysed cyclisation of ortho-alkenylbenzene boronic acids can be used to access 4-chlorobenzooxaborinin-1-ols via a Wacker-type oxidation and chlorination. Alternatively, ortho-alkynylbenzene boronic acids undergo a palladium-catalysed oxyallylation reaction to provide 4-allylbenzooxaborinin-1-ols. PMID:27506186

  6. Evaluation of the PAR corneal topography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindal, Prateek; Cheung, Susan; Pirouzian, Amir; Keates, Richard H.; Ren, Qiushi

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the raster photogrammetry based Corneal Topography System by determining: inter-operator variability, reproducibility of images, effects of defocused and decentered images, and the precision of data at different optical zones. 4 human cadaver eyes were used to study the inter-operator variability. To study the reproducibility of images, 3 human cadaver eyes and a test surface doped with flourescine (provided by PAR Vision Systems Corporation) were focused and their images taken four successive times. Defocused and decentered images were taken of 4 human cadaver eyes and four times of the test surface mentioned above. The precision of defocused/decentered cadaver eyes was evaluated at the following optical zones: 3 mm, 4 mm, 5 mm, and 6 mm. All human cadaver eyes used in the above experiments had their epithelial layer removed before imaging. Average inter-operator variability was 0.06 D. In reproducibility attempts, there was an average deviation of 0.28 D for the human cadaver eyes and 0.04 D for the test surface. The defocused and decentered test surface gave an average deviation of 0.09 D. Defocused and decentered cadaver eyes resulted in an average deviation of 0.52 D, 0.37 D, 0.24 D, and 0.22 D at optical zones of 3 mm, 4 mm, 5 mm, and 6 mm, respectively. The imaging method employed by PAR Vision Systems Corporation virtually eliminates inter-operator variability. The PAR Corneal Topography System's clinical usefulness, however, could be improved by improving the reproducibility of images, decreasing the sensitivity to spatial alignment, and increasing accuracy over smaller optical zones.

  7. Protease-activated receptor (PAR)1, PAR2 and PAR4 expressions in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LI, Si-Man; JIANG, Ping; XIANG, Yang; WANG, Wei-Wei; ZHU, Yue-Chun; FENG, Wei-Yang; LI, Shu-De; YU, Guo-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Here, we used reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and western blot to detect protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1, PAR 2 and PAR 4 expression in cancer tissues and cell lines of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and investigated the co-relationship between PAR expression and clinic-pathological data for esophageal cancer. The methylation of PAR4 gene promoter involved in esophageal carcinoma was also analyzed. By comparing the mRNA expressions of normal esophageal tissue and human esophageal epithelial cells (HEEpiC), we found that among the 28 cases of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, PAR1 (60%) and PAR2 (71%) were elevated in 17 and 20 cases, respectively, and PAR4 (68%) expression was lowered in 19 cases. Whereas, in human esophageal squamous cells (TE-1 and TE-10), PAR1 and PAR2 expression was increased but PAR4 was decreased. Combined with clinical data, the expression of PAR1 in poorly differentiated (P=0.016) and middle and lower parts of the esophagus (P=0.016) was higher; expression of PAR4 in poorly differentiated carcinoma was lower (P=0.049). Regarding TE-1 and TE-10 protein expression, we found that in randomized esophageal carcinoma, PAR1 (P=0.027) and PAR2 (P=0.039) expressions were increased, but lowered for PAR4 (P=0.0001). In HEEpiC, TE-1, TE-10, esophageal and normal esophagus tissue samples (case No. 7), the frequency of methylation at the 19 CpG loci of PAR4 was 35.4%, 95.2%, 83.8%, 62.6% and 48.2%, respectively. Our results indicate that the expression of PAR1 and PAR2 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is increased but PAR4 is decreased. Hypermethylation of the promoter of the PAR4 gene may contribute to reduced expression of PAR4 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:25297082

  8. USA supports measles elimination.

    PubMed

    1996-06-01

    The United States, through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), has approved an $8 million grant in support of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) goal to eliminate measles in the Americas by the year 2000. From 1996 to 2001, the grant will complement regional efforts to stop the disease. Mrs. Hillary Clinton had pledged the support on World Health Day 1995. Although record low levels of measles cases were reported in 1995 for the region, the virus could be imported from elsewhere in the world. A major obstacle is the accumulation of susceptible preschool-aged children. As the proportion of susceptibles expands, the risk of a measles outbreak increases, if the virus is reintroduced. To prevent this, follow-up campaigns are being conducted throughout the region, focusing on all children aged 1-4 years, regardless of previous vaccination or disease history. PAHO recommends follow-up whenever the number of susceptible preschool children approaches the size of an average birth cohort. The interval between these campaigns and the specific age group targeted will depend on the vaccination coverage obtained through routine services since the last campaign. Follow-up campaigns were conducted in Cuba in 1993; in Belize, Brazil, Columbia, and Jamaica in 1995; and in Chile and the countries of Central America during April 1996. 19 million children were reached. Follow-up campaigns are planned for the remaining countries of the English-speaking Caribbean later in 1996. USAID played a key role in the successful completion of the 1994 poliomyelitis eradication initiative; the agency contributed approximately 60% of the external costs associated with the hemispheric campaign. PMID:12347182

  9. Transition metal catalysed dehydrogenation of amine-borane fuel blends.

    PubMed

    Mal, Sib Sankar; Stephens, Frances H; Baker, R Tom

    2011-03-14

    Mixtures containing ammonia-borane and sec-butylamine-borane remain liquid throughout the hydrogen release process that affords tri(N-sec-butyl)borazine and polyborazylene. Concentrated solutions with metal catalysts afford >5 wt% H(2) in 1 h at 80 °C and addition of (EMIM)EtSO(4) ionic liquid co-solvent eliminates competing formation of insoluble linear poly(aminoborane) (EMIM = 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium). PMID:21258748

  10. Cobalt-catalysed site-selective intra- and intermolecular dehydrogenative amination of unactivated sp3 carbons

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xuesong; Yang, Ke; Zhao, Yan; Sun, Hao; Li, Guigen; Ge, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt-catalysed sp2 C–H bond functionalization has attracted considerable attention in recent years because of the low cost of cobalt complexes and interesting modes of action in the process. In comparison, much less efforts have been devoted to the sp3 carbons. Here we report the cobalt-catalysed site-selective dehydrogenative cyclization of aliphatic amides via a C–H bond functionalization process on unactivated sp3 carbons with the assistance of a bidentate directing group. This method provides a straightforward synthesis of monocyclic and spiro β- or γ-lactams with good to excellent stereoselectivity and functional group tolerance. In addition, a new procedure has been developed to selectively remove the directing group, which enables the synthesis of free β- or γ-lactam compounds. Furthermore, the first cobalt-catalysed intermolecular dehydrogenative amination of unactivated sp3 carbons is also realized. PMID:25753366

  11. 1,10-Phenanthroline as an accelerator for Ag nanoparticle-catalysed electroless copper deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chia-Ru; Chou, Nan-Kuang; Li, Cheng-Hsing; Chen, Ho-Rei; Lee, Chien-Liang

    2014-10-01

    1,10-Phenanthroline (phen) can be successfully used as an accelerator for Ag-catalysed electroless copper deposition (ECD) processes. Electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance analyses indicate that the mass activity in terms of thickness of deposited Cu layer and average ECD rate within a deposition time of 110 s for Ag nanoparticles activated by phen are 7.86 × 10-3 μm μg-1 and 1.43 × 10-4 μm μg-1 s-1, respectively, whereas Ag nanoparticles without phen cannot catalyse the reaction. Furthermore, Tafel and cyclic voltammetric results show that the addition of phen to the ECD bath significantly enhances the ability of the Ag nanoparticles to catalyse the oxidation of HCHO and suppresses the formation of CuO.

  12. Ferric sulphate catalysed esterification of free fatty acids in waste cooking oil.

    PubMed

    Gan, Suyin; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Ooi, Chun Weng; Motala, Nafisa Osman; Ismail, Mohd Anas Farhan

    2010-10-01

    In this work, the esterification of free fatty acids (FFA) in waste cooking oil catalysed by ferric sulphate was studied as a pre-treatment step for biodiesel production. The effects of reaction time, methanol to oil ratio, catalyst concentration and temperature on the conversion of FFA were investigated on a laboratory scale. The results showed that the conversion of FFA reached equilibrium after an hour, and was positively dependent on the methanol to oil molar ratio and temperature. An optimum catalyst concentration of 2 wt.% gave maximum FFA conversion of 59.2%. For catalyst loadings of 2 wt.% and below, this catalysed esterification was proposed to follow a pseudo-homogeneous pathway akin to mineral acid-catalysed esterification, driven by the H(+) ions produced through the hydrolysis of metal complex [Fe(H(2)O)(6)](3+) (aq). PMID:20435468

  13. Par Pond vegetation status 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Riley, R.S.

    1996-12-01

    The water level of Par Pond was lowered approximately 20 feet in mid-1991 in order to protect downstream residents from possible dam failure suggested by subsidence on the downstream slope of the dam and to repair the dam. This lowering exposed both emergent and nonemergent macrophyte beds to drying conditions resulting in extensive losses. A survey of the newly emergent, shoreline aquatic plant communities of Par Pond began in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet above mean sea level. These surveys continued in July, September, and late October, 1995, and into the early spring and late summer of 1996. Communities similar to the pre-drawdown, Par Pond aquatic plant communities continue to become re-established. Emergent beds of maidencane, lotus, waterlily, watershield, and Pontederia are extensive and well developed. Measures of percent cover, width of beds, and estimates of area of coverage with satellite data indicate regrowth within two years of from 40 to 60% of levels prior to the draw down. Cattail occurrence continued to increase during the summer of 1996, especially in the former warm arm of Par Pond, but large beds common to Par Pond prior to the draw down still have not formed. Lotus has invaded and occupies many of the areas formerly dominated by cattail beds. To track the continued development of macrophytes in Par Pond, future surveys through the summer and early fall of 1997, along with the evaluation of satellite data to map the extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond, are planned.

  14. Immunopathogenic Background of Pars Planitis.

    PubMed

    Przeździecka-Dołyk, Joanna; Węgrzyn, Agnieszka; Turno-Kręcicka, Anna; Misiuk-Hojło, Marta

    2016-04-01

    Pars planitis is defined as an intermediate uveitis of unknown background of systemic disease with characteristic formations such as vitreous snowballs, snowbanks and changes in peripheral retina. The incidence of pars planitis varies 2.4-15.4 % of the uveitis patients. The pathogenesis of the disease is to be determined in future. Clinical and histopathological findings suggest an autoimmune etiology, most likely as a reaction to endogenous antigen of unknown source, with T cells predominant in both vitreous and pars plana infiltrations. T cells subsets play an important role as a memory-effector peripheral cell. Snowbanks are formed as an effect of post inflammatory glial proliferation of fibrous astrocytes. There is also a genetic predisposition for pars planitis by human leukocyte antigen and several other genes. A coexistence of multiple sclerosis and optic neuritis has been described in numerous studies. Epiretinal membrane, cataract, cystoid macular edema, retinal detachment, retinal vasculitis, neovascularization, vitreous peripheral traction, peripheral hole formation, vitreous hemorrhage, disc edema are common complications observed in pars planitis. There is a need to expand the knowledge of the pathogenic and immunologic background of the pars planitis to create an accurate pharmacological treatment. PMID:26438050

  15. Copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloadditions (CuAAC): an update.

    PubMed

    Haldón, Estela; Nicasio, M Carmen; Pérez, Pedro J

    2015-10-01

    The reactions of organic azides and alkynes catalysed by copper species represent the prototypical examples of click chemistry. The so-called CuAAC reaction (copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition), discovered in 2002, has been expanded since then to become an excellent tool in organic synthesis. In this contribution the recent results described in the literature since 2010 are reviewed, classified according to the nature of the catalyst precursor: copper(I) or copper(II) salts or complexes, metallic or nano-particulated copper and several solid-supported copper systems. PMID:26284434

  16. CuH-Catalysed Hydroamination of Styrene with Hydroxylamine Esters: A Coupled Cluster Scrutiny of Mechanistic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Tobisch, Sven

    2016-06-01

    A detailed computational exploration of mechanistic intricacies of the copper(I) hydride (CuH)-catalysed hydroamination of styrene with a prototype hydroxylamine ester by a recently reported [(dppbz)CuH] catalyst (dppbz≡{P^P}≡1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)-benzene) is presented. A variety of plausible mechanistic avenues have been pursued by means of a sophisticated computational methodology, from which a general understanding of the factors controlling hydroamination catalysis emerged. The catalytically competent {P^P}Cu(I) hydride, which is predominantly present as its dimer, involves in irreversible hydrocupration proceeding with complete 2,1 regioselectivity to form a secondary {P^P}Cu(I) benzyl intermediate. Its interception with benzylamine ester produces the branched tertiary amine product and {P^P}Cu(I) benzoate upon intramolecular SN 2 disruption of the amine electrophile's N-O linkage, to precede a highly rapid, strongly exergonic C-N bond-forming reductive elimination. The {P^P}Cu(I) benzoate corresponds to the catalyst resting state and its conversion back into the {P^P}Cu(I) hydride upon transmetalation with a hydrosilane is turnover limiting. The effect of electronic perturbations at the amine electrophile upon the reaction rate for productive hydroamination catalysis and also non-productive reduction of the hydroxylamine ester has been gauged, which unveiled a more fundamental insight into catalytic structure-performance relationships. PMID:27138470

  17. Rhenium-catalysed dehydrogenative borylation of primary and secondary C(sp3)-H bonds adjacent to a nitrogen atom.

    PubMed

    Murai, Masahito; Omura, Tetsuya; Kuninobu, Yoichiro; Takai, Kazuhiko

    2015-03-18

    Rhenium-catalysed C(sp(3))-H bond borylation in the absence of any oxidant, hydrogen acceptor, or external ligand, with the generation of H2 as the sole byproduct is described. The transformation, which represents a rare example of rhenium-catalysed C(sp(3))-H bond functionalisation, features high atom efficiency and simple reaction conditions. PMID:25688385

  18. Exploration of locomotion in the ParA/ParB system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindal, Lavisha; Emberly, Eldon

    2015-03-01

    In many bacteria the ParA/ParB system is responsible for actively segregating DNA during replication. ParB precessively moves by hydrolyzing DNA bound ParA-ATP forming a depleted ParA region in its wake. Recent in-vitro experiments have shown that a ParB covered bead can traverse a ParA bound DNA substrate. It has been suggested that the formation of a gradient in ParA leads to diffusion-ratchet like motion of the ParB bead but its origin and potential consequences requires investigation. We have developed a deterministic model for the in-vitro ParA/ParB system and show that any amount of spatial noise in ParA can lead to the spontaneous formation of its gradient. The velocity of the bead is independent of this noise but depends on the scale over which ParA exerts a force on the bead and the scale over which ParB hydrolyzes ParA from the substrate. There is a particular ratio of these scales at which the velocity is a maximum. We also explore the effects of cooperative vs independent rebinding of ParA to the substrate. Our model shows how the driving force for ParB originates and highlights necessary conditions for directed motion in the in-vitro system that may provide insight into the in-vivo behaviour of the ParA/ParB system.

  19. Room-Temperature Gold-Catalysed Arylation of Heteroarenes: Complementarity to Palladium Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, Alexander J; Lloyd-Jones, Guy C

    2016-08-26

    Tailoring of the pre-catalyst, the oxidant and the arylsilane enables the first room-temperature, gold-catalysed, innate C-H arylation of heteroarenes. Regioselectivity is consistently high and, in some cases, distinct from that reported with palladium catalysis. Tolerance to halides and boronic esters, in both the heteroarene and silane partners, provides orthogonality to Suzuki-Miyaura coupling. PMID:27325239

  20. Tandem Ru-alkylidene-catalysed cross metathesis/hydrogenation: synthesis of lipophilic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen J; Spiccia, Nicolas D; Jackson, W Roy; Robinson, Andrea J

    2013-08-01

    Highly efficient synthesis of lipidic amino acids can be achieved via Ru-alkylidene-catalysed cross metathesis of long chain alkenes with commercially available allylglycine. The resultant unsaturated analogues can be then optionally hydrogenated under mild reaction conditions by using the spent metathesis catalyst. PMID:23733491

  1. Ancillary ligand-free copper catalysed hydrohydrazination of terminal alkynes with NH2NH2.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Jesse L; Jazzar, Rodolphe; Melaimi, Mohand; Bertrand, Guy

    2016-02-14

    An efficient and selective Cu-catalysed hydrohydrazination of terminal alkynes with parent hydrazine is reported. The methodology tolerates a broad range of functional groups, allows for the synthesis of symmetrical and unsymmetrical azines, and can be extended to hydrazine derivatives and amines. PMID:26757745

  2. Radical C-H arylations of (hetero)arenes catalysed by gallic acid.

    PubMed

    Perretti, Marcelle D; Monzón, Diego M; Crisóstomo, Fernando P; Martín, Víctor S; Carrillo, Romen

    2016-07-12

    Gallic acid efficiently catalyses radical arylations in water-acetone at room temperature. This methodology proved to be versatile and scalable. Therefore, it constitutes a greener alternative to arylation. Moreover, considering that gallic acid is an abundant vegetable tannin, this work also unleashes an alternative method for the reutilisation of bio-wastes. PMID:26804947

  3. Enantioselective synthesis of (-)-chloramphenicol via silver-catalysed asymmetric isocyanoacetate aldol reaction.

    PubMed

    Franchino, Allegra; Jakubec, Pavol; Dixon, Darren J

    2016-01-01

    The highly enantio- and diastereoselective aldol reaction of isocyanoacetates catalysed by Ag2O and cinchona-derived amino phosphines applied to the synthesis of (-)- and (+)-chloramphenicol is described. The concise synthesis showcases the utility of this catalytic asymmetric methodology for the preparation of bioactive compounds possessing α-amino-β-hydroxy motifs. PMID:26510469

  4. p-Toluenesulphonic acid-promoted, I2-catalysed sulphenylation of pyrazolones with aryl sulphonyl hydrazides.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xia; Zhang, Lipeng; Li, Tianjiao; Liu, Guiyan; Wang, Haomeng; Lu, Kui

    2014-11-01

    Aryl pyrazolone thioethers were synthesized via the I2-catalysed cross-coupling of pyrazolones with aryl sulphonyl hydrazides in the presence of p-toluenesulphonic acid, which has been proposed to promote the reaction by facilitating the decomposition of sulphonyl hydrazides. PMID:25225659

  5. Structure sensitivity in the nonscalable regime explored via catalysed ethylene hydrogenation on supported platinum nanoclusters

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Crampton, Andrew S.; Rötzer, Marian D.; Ridge, Claron J.; Schweinberger, Florian F.; Heiz, Ueli; Yoon, Bokwon; Landman, Uzi

    2016-01-28

    The sensitivity, or insensitivity, of catalysed reactions to catalyst structure is a commonly employed fundamental concept. Here we report on the nature of nano-catalysed ethylene hydrogenation, investigated through experiments on size-selected Ptn (n=8-15) clusters soft-landed on magnesia and first-principles simulations, yielding benchmark information about the validity of structure sensitivity/insensitivity at the bottom of the catalyst size range. Both ethylene-hydrogenation-to-ethane and the parallel hydrogenation–dehydrogenation ethylidyne-producing route are considered, uncovering that at the <1 nm size-scale the reaction exhibits characteristics consistent with structure sensitivity, in contrast to structure insensitivity found for larger particles. The onset of catalysed hydrogenation occurs for Ptn (n≥10)more » clusters at T>150 K, with maximum room temperature reactivity observed for Pt13. Structure insensitivity, inherent for specific cluster sizes, is induced in the more active Pt13 by a temperature increase up to 400 K leading to ethylidyne formation. As a result, control of sub-nanometre particle size may be used for tuning catalysed hydrogenation activity and selectivity.« less

  6. NHC-catalysed diastereoselective synthesis of multifunctionalised piperidines via cascade reaction of enals with azalactones.

    PubMed

    Singh, Atul K; Chawla, Ruchi; Rai, Ankita; Yadav, Lal Dhar S

    2012-04-18

    NHC-catalysed azalactone ring-opening and piperidine ring-closing cascade with α,β-unsaturated aldehydes (enals) in a one-pot operation is reported. The present reaction cascade offers a convenient method for a highly diastereoselective synthesis of multifunctionalised piperidines in excellent yields under mild conditions. PMID:22399056

  7. Structure sensitivity in the nonscalable regime explored via catalysed ethylene hydrogenation on supported platinum nanoclusters

    PubMed Central

    Crampton, Andrew S.; Rötzer, Marian D.; Ridge, Claron J.; Schweinberger, Florian F.; Heiz, Ueli; Yoon, Bokwon; Landman, Uzi

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity, or insensitivity, of catalysed reactions to catalyst structure is a commonly employed fundamental concept. Here we report on the nature of nano-catalysed ethylene hydrogenation, investigated through experiments on size-selected Ptn (n=8–15) clusters soft-landed on magnesia and first-principles simulations, yielding benchmark information about the validity of structure sensitivity/insensitivity at the bottom of the catalyst size range. Both ethylene-hydrogenation-to-ethane and the parallel hydrogenation–dehydrogenation ethylidyne-producing route are considered, uncovering that at the <1 nm size-scale the reaction exhibits characteristics consistent with structure sensitivity, in contrast to structure insensitivity found for larger particles. The onset of catalysed hydrogenation occurs for Ptn (n≥10) clusters at T>150 K, with maximum room temperature reactivity observed for Pt13. Structure insensitivity, inherent for specific cluster sizes, is induced in the more active Pt13 by a temperature increase up to 400 K leading to ethylidyne formation. Control of sub-nanometre particle size may be used for tuning catalysed hydrogenation activity and selectivity. PMID:26817713

  8. [Physiology of protease-activated receptors (PARs): involvement of PARs in digestive functions].

    PubMed

    Kawabata, A; Kuroda, R; Hollenberg, M D

    1999-10-01

    The protease-activated receptor (PAR), a G protein-coupled receptor present on cell surface, mediates cellular actions of extracellular proteases. Proteases cleave the extracellular N-terminal of PAR molecules at a specific site, unmasking and exposing a novel N-terminal, a tethered ligand, that binds to the body of receptor molecules resulting in receptor activation. Amongst four distinct PARs that have been cloned, PARs 1, 3 and 4 are activated by thrombin, but PAR-2 is activated by trypsin or mast cell tryptase. Human platelets express two distinct thrombin receptors, PAR-1 and PAR-4, while murine platelets express PAR-3 and PAR-4. Apart from roles of PARs in platelet activation, PARs are distributed to a number of organs in various species, predicting their physiological importance. We have been evaluating agonists specific for each PAR, using multiple procedures including a HEK cell calcium signal receptor desensitization assay. Using specific agonists that we developed, we found the following: 1) the salivary glands express PAR-2 mRNA and secret saliva in response to PAR-2 activation; 2) pancreatic juice secretion occurs following in vivo PAR-2 activation; 3) PAR-1 and PAR-2 modulate duodenal motility. Collectively, PAR plays various physiological and/or pathophysiological roles, especially in the digestive systems, and could be a novel target for drug development. PMID:10629876

  9. Microcystin elimination during sediment contact.

    PubMed

    Grützmacher, Gesche; Wessel, Gabriele; Klitzke, Sondra; Chorus, Ingrid

    2010-01-15

    Microcystins (MCYSTs) are a group of structurally similar toxic peptides produced by cyanobacteria ("blue-green algae") which occur frequently in surface waters worldwide. Reliable elimination is necessary when using these waters as drinking water sources. Bank filtration and artificial groundwater recharge utilize adsorption and degradation processes in the subsurface, commonly through sand and gravel aquifers, for the elimination of a wide range of substances during drinking water (pre-) treatment. To obtain parameters for estimating whether MCYST breakthrough is likely in field settings, we tested MCYST elimination in laboratory experiments (batch experiments, column experiments) under a range of conditions. Adsorption coefficients (k(d)-values) obtained from batch studies ranged from 0.2 mL/g for filter sand to 11.6 mL/g for fine grained aquifer materials with 2% fine grains (<63 microm) and 0.8% organic matter. First order degradation rates in column studies reached 1.87 d(-1) under aerobic conditions and showed high variations under anoxic conditions (<0.01-1.35 d(-1)). These results show that, next to sediment texture, redox conditions play an important role for MCYST elimination during sediment passage. Biodegradation was identified as the dominating process for MCYST elimination in sandy aquifer material. PMID:20000604

  10. Malaria elimination: surveillance and response

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Daniel J; Winters, Anna M; Hamer, Davidson H

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, substantial progress has been made in reducing malaria-associated morbidity and mortality across the globe. Nevertheless, sustained malaria control is essential to continue this downward trend. In some countries, where aggressive malaria control has reduced malaria to a low burden level, elimination, either nationally or subnationally, is now the aim. As countries or areas with a low malaria burden move towards elimination, there is a transition away from programs of universal coverage towards a strategy of localized detection and response to individual malaria cases. To do so and succeed, it is imperative that a strong surveillance and response system is supported, that community cadres are trained to provide appropriate diagnostics and treatment, and that field diagnostics are further developed such that their sensitivity allows for the detection and subsequent treatment of malaria reservoirs in low prevalence environments. To be certain, there are big challenges on the road to elimination, notably the development of drug and insecticide resistance. Nevertheless, countries like Zambia are making great strides towards implementing systems that support malaria elimination in target areas. Continued development of new diagnostics and antimalarial therapies is needed to support progress in malaria control and elimination. PMID:23265423

  11. Eliminating ill-founded eliminations in handwriting comparison cases.

    PubMed

    McAlexander, T V; Maguire, K B

    1991-01-01

    Document examiners sometimes eliminate writers on the basis of differences which are given too much weight. This article is an attempt to explain some conditions whereby differences in the writing of one individual are misinterpreted as significant differences, when they are actually caused by conditions which are unknown to the examiner. PMID:1744624

  12. Par Pond Fish, Water, and Sediment Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Paller, M.H.; Wike, L.D.

    1996-06-01

    The objectives of this report are to describe the Par Pond fish community and the impact of the drawdown and refill on the community, describe contaminant levels in Par Pond fish, sediments, and water and indicate how contaminant concentrations and distributions were affected by the drawdown and refill, and predict possible effects of future water level fluctuations in Par Pond.

  13. Directed and persistent movement arises from mechanochemistry of the ParA/ParB system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Longhua; Vecchiarelli, Anthony G.; Mizuuchi, Kiyoshi; Neuman, Keir C.; Liu, Jian

    The segregation of DNA prior to cell division is essential for faithful genetic inheritance. In many bacteria, segregation of the low-copy-number plasmids involves an active partition system composed of ParA ATPase and its stimulator protein ParB. Recent experiments suggest that ParA/ParB system motility is driven by a diffusion-ratchet mechanism in which ParB-coated plasmid both creates and follows a ParA gradient on the nucleoid surface. However, the detailed mechanism of ParA/ParB-mediated directed and persistent movement remains unknown. We develop a theoretical model describing ParA/ParB-mediated motility. We show that the ParA/ParB system can work as a Brownian ratchet, which effectively couples the ATPase-dependent cycling of ParA-nucleoid affinity to the motion of the ParB bound cargo. Paradoxically, the resulting processive motion relies on quenching diffusive plasmid motion through a large number of transient ParA/ParB-mediated tethers to the nucleoid surface. Our work sheds light on a new emergent phenomenon in which non-motor proteins work collectively via mechanochemical coupling to propel cargos -- an ingenious solution shaped by evolution to cope with the lack of processive motor proteins in bacteria.

  14. The ParB-parS Chromosome Segregation System Modulates Competence Development in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Attaiech, Laetitia; Minnen, Anita; Kjos, Morten; Gruber, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT ParB proteins bind centromere-like DNA sequences called parS sites and are involved in plasmid and chromosome segregation in bacteria. We previously showed that the opportunistic human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae contains four parS sequences located close to the origin of replication which are bound by ParB. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we found here that ParB spreads out from one of these parS sites, parS(−1.6°), for more than 5 kb and occupies the nearby comCDE operon, which drives competence development. Competence allows S. pneumoniae to take up DNA from its environment, thereby mediating horizontal gene transfer, and is also employed as a general stress response. Mutating parS(−1.6°) or deleting parB resulted in transcriptional up-regulation of comCDE and ssbB (a gene belonging to the competence regulon), demonstrating that ParB acts as a repressor of competence. However, genome-wide transcription analysis showed that ParB is not a global transcriptional regulator. Different factors, such as the composition of the growth medium and antibiotic-induced stress, can trigger the sensitive switch driving competence. This work shows that the ParB-parS chromosome segregation machinery also influences this developmental process. PMID:26126852

  15. Alkene Cleavage Catalysed by Heme and Nonheme Enzymes: Reaction Mechanisms and Biocatalytic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Mutti, Francesco G.

    2012-01-01

    The oxidative cleavage of alkenes is classically performed by chemical methods, although they display several drawbacks. Ozonolysis requires harsh conditions (−78°C, for a safe process) and reducing reagents in a molar amount, whereas the use of poisonous heavy metals such as Cr, Os, or Ru as catalysts is additionally plagued by low yield and selectivity. Conversely, heme and nonheme enzymes can catalyse the oxidative alkene cleavage at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure in an aqueous buffer, showing excellent chemo- and regioselectivities in certain cases. This paper focuses on the alkene cleavage catalysed by iron cofactor-dependent enzymes encompassing the reaction mechanisms (in case where it is known) and the application of these enzymes in biocatalysis. PMID:22811656

  16. Cytochrome c catalyses the formation of pentyl radical and octanoic acid radical from linoleic acid hydroperoxide.

    PubMed Central

    Iwahashi, Hideo; Nishizaki, Koji; Takagi, Ichiro

    2002-01-01

    A reaction of 13-hydroperoxide octadecadienoic acid (13-HPODE) with cytochrome c was analysed using ESR, HPLC-ESR and HPLC-ESR-MS by the combined use of the spin-trapping technique. The ESR, HPLC-ESR and HPLC-ESR-MS analyses showed that cytochrome c catalyses formation of pentyl and octanoic acid radicals from 13-HPODE. On the other hand, only the alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-t-butylnitrone/octanoic acid radical adduct was detected in the elution profile of HPLC-ESR for a mixture of 13-HPODE with haematin, indicating that haematin catalyses the formation of octanoic acid radical. In addition, the reaction of 13-HPODE with cytochrome c was inhibited by chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and ferulic acid via two possible mechanisms, i.e. reducing cytochrome c (chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid) and scavenging the radical intermediates (chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and ferulic acid). PMID:11742529

  17. Iron-catalysed cross-coupling of organolithium compounds with organic halides

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhenhua; Liu, Qiang; Peng, Xiao-Shui; Wong, Henry N. C.

    2016-01-01

    In past decades, catalytic cross-coupling reactions between organic halides and organometallic reagents to construct carbon–carbon bond have achieved a tremendous progress. However, organolithium reagents have rarely been used in cross-coupling reactions, due mainly to their high reactivity. Another limitation of this transformation using organolithium reagents is how to control reactivity with excellent selectivity. Although palladium catalysis has been applied in this field recently, the development of an approach to replace catalytic systems of noble metals with nonprecious metals is currently in high demand. Herein, we report an efficient synthetic protocol involving iron-catalysed cross-coupling reactions employing organolithium compounds as key coupling partners to unite aryl, alkyl and benzyl fragments and also disclose an efficient iron-catalysed release-capture ethylene coupling with isopropyllithium. PMID:26847602

  18. A steric tethering approach enables palladium-catalysed C-H activation of primary amino alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calleja, Jonas; Pla, Daniel; Gorman, Timothy W.; Domingo, Victoriano; Haffemayer, Benjamin; Gaunt, Matthew J.

    2015-12-01

    Aliphatic primary amines are a class of chemical feedstock essential to the synthesis of higher-order nitrogen-containing molecules, commonly found in biologically active compounds and pharmaceutical agents. New methods for the construction of complex amines remain a continuous challenge to synthetic chemists. Here, we outline a general palladium-catalysed strategy for the functionalization of aliphatic C-H bonds within amino alcohols, an important class of small molecule. Central to this strategy is the temporary conversion of catalytically incompatible primary amino alcohols into hindered secondary amines that are capable of undergoing a sterically promoted palladium-catalysed C-H activation. Furthermore, a hydrogen bond between amine and catalyst intensifies interactions around the palladium and orients the aliphatic amine substituents in an ideal geometry for C-H activation. This catalytic method directly transforms simple, easily accessible amines into highly substituted, functionally concentrated and structurally diverse products, and can streamline the synthesis of biologically important amine-containing molecules.

  19. The mechanism of hydrogen evolution in Cu(bztpen)-catalysed water reduction: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Liao, Rong-Zhen; Wang, Mei; Sun, Licheng; Siegbahn, Per E M

    2015-06-01

    The mechanism of water reduction catalysed by a mononuclear copper complex Cu(bztpen) (bztpen = N-benzyl-N,N',N'-tris(pyridine-2-ylmethyl)ethylenediamine) has been elucidated by DFT calculations, revealing that hydrogen evolution proceeds via coupling of a Cu(ii)-hydride and a pendant pyridinium, and providing important implications for the future design of new catalytic systems for water reduction. PMID:25928325

  20. Total Synthesis of (±)-Paroxetine by Diastereoconvergent Cobalt-Catalysed Arylation

    PubMed Central

    Despiau, Carole F; Dominey, Andrew P; Harrowven, David C; Linclau, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    A total synthesis of paroxetine is reported, with a diastereoselective and diastereoconvergent cobalt-catalysed sp3–sp2 coupling reaction involving a 3-substituted 4-bromo-N-Boc-piperidine (Boc = tert-butoxycarbonyl) substrate as a key step. A 9:1 diastereoselectivity was obtained, while a control experiment involving a conformationally locked 3-substituted 4-bromo-tert-butyl cyclohexane ring proceeded with essentially complete stereoselectivity. PMID:25505371

  1. Iodine-catalysed regioselective thiolation of flavonoids using sulfonyl hydrazides as sulfenylation reagents.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xia; Deng, Zhijie; Wei, Aoqi; Li, Boyang; Lu, Kui

    2016-08-14

    Iodine-catalysed regioselective sulfenylation of flavonoid derivatives with sulfonyl hydrazides was developed. Various flavonoid thioethers were obtained in moderate to good yield. The thiolation could be conveniently directed to C-8 for flavone, flavonol, dihydroflavone, and isoflavone derivatives or to C-7 for aurone derivatives by employing the isopropyl ethers of flavonoids bearing free OH groups at the C-5 or C-4 positions. PMID:27397410

  2. Elimination sequence optimization for SPAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Harry A.

    1986-01-01

    SPAR is a large-scale computer program for finite element structural analysis. The program allows user specification of the order in which the joints of a structure are to be eliminated since this order can have significant influence over solution performance, in terms of both storage requirements and computer time. An efficient elimination sequence can improve performance by over 50% for some problems. Obtaining such sequences, however, requires the expertise of an experienced user and can take hours of tedious effort to affect. Thus, an automatic elimination sequence optimizer would enhance productivity by reducing the analysts' problem definition time and by lowering computer costs. Two possible methods for automating the elimination sequence specifications were examined. Several algorithms based on the graph theory representations of sparse matrices were studied with mixed results. Significant improvement in the program performance was achieved, but sequencing by an experienced user still yields substantially better results. The initial results provide encouraging evidence that the potential benefits of such an automatic sequencer would be well worth the effort.

  3. Reducing Crime by Eliminating Cash.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warwick, David R.

    Ending the use of cash in the United States can provide substantial social and economic gain while requiring only modest levels of investment. One primary benefit is the reduction of cash-related crimes. Because most street crime is committed to obtain cash or uses cash as a transaction medium, elimination of cash will dramatically reduce crime.…

  4. Parallel Climate Analysis Toolkit (ParCAT)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-06-30

    The parallel analysis toolkit (ParCAT) provides parallel statistical processing of large climate model simulation datasets. ParCAT provides parallel point-wise average calculations, frequency distributions, sum/differences of two datasets, and difference-of-average and average-of-difference for two datasets for arbitrary subsets of simulation time. ParCAT is a command-line utility that can be easily integrated in scripts or embedded in other application. ParCAT supports CMIP5 post-processed datasets as well as non-CMIP5 post-processed datasets. ParCAT reads and writes standard netCDF files.

  5. Enzyme-catalysed synthesis and reactions of benzene oxide/oxepine derivatives of methyl benzoates.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Derek R; Sharma, Narain D; Harrison, John S; Malone, John F; McRoberts, W Colin; Hamilton, John T G; Harper, David B

    2008-04-01

    A series of twelve benzoate esters was metabolised, by species of the Phellinus genus of wood-rotting fungi, to yield the corresponding benzyl alcohol derivatives and eight salicylates. The isolation of a stable oxepine metabolite, from methyl benzoate, allied to evidence of the migration and retention of a carbomethoxy group (the NIH Shift), during enzyme-catalysed ortho-hydroxylation of alkyl benzoates to form salicylates, is consistent with a mechanism involving an initial arene epoxidation step. This mechanism was confirmed by the isolation of a remarkably stable, optically active, substituted benzene oxide metabolite of methyl 2-(trifluoromethyl)benzoate, which slowly converted into the racemic form. The arene oxide was found to undergo a cycloaddition reaction with 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione to yield a crystalline cycloadduct whose structure and racemic nature was established by X-ray crystallography. The metabolite was also found to undergo some novel benzene oxide reactions, including epoxidation to give an anti-diepoxide, base-catalysed hydrolysis to form a trans-dihydrodiol and acid-catalysed aromatisation to yield a salicylate derivative via the NIH Shift of a carbomethoxy group. PMID:18362966

  6. Effect of antioxidants on enzyme-catalysed biodegradation of carbon nanotubes†

    PubMed Central

    Kotchey, Gregg P.; Gaugler, James A.; Kapralov, Alexander A.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2013-01-01

    The growing applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) inevitably increase the risk of exposure to this potentially toxic nanomaterial. In an attempt to address this issue, research has been implemented to study the biodegradation of CNTs. In particular, myeloperoxidase (MPO), an enzyme expressed by inflammatory cells of animals including humans, catalyse the degradation of oxidized carbon nanomaterials. While reactive intermediates generated by MPO efficiently degrade oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (o-SWCNTs); the exact mechanism of enzyme-catalysed biodegradation remains ambiguous. In this work, we tried to explain enzymatic oxidation in terms of redox potentials by employing competitive substrates for MPO such as chloride, which is oxidized by MPO to form a strong oxidant (hypochlorite), and antioxidants that have lower redox potentials than CNTs. Employing transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the addition of antioxidants, L-ascorbic acid and L-glutathione, with or without chloride significantly mitigates MPO-catalysed biodegradation of o-SWCNTs. This study focuses on a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of enzymatic biodegradation of CNTs and the impact of antioxidants on these pathways. PMID:23626907

  7. Bacterial dioxygenase- and monooxygenase-catalysed sulfoxidation of benzo[b]thiophenes.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Derek R; Sharma, Narain D; McMurray, Brian; Haughey, Simon A; Allen, Christopher C R; Hamilton, John T G; McRoberts, W Colin; O'Ferrall, Rory A More; Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina; Coulombel, Lydie A; O'Connor, Kevin E

    2012-01-28

    Asymmetric heteroatom oxidation of benzo[b]thiophenes to yield the corresponding sulfoxides was catalysed by toluene dioxygenase (TDO), naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) and styrene monooxygenase (SMO) enzymes present in P. putida mutant and E. coli recombinant whole cells. TDO-catalysed oxidation yielded the relatively unstable benzo[b]thiophene sulfoxide; its dimerization, followed by dehydrogenation, resulted in the isolation of stable tetracyclic sulfoxides as minor products with cis-dihydrodiols being the dominant metabolites. SMO mainly catalysed the formation of enantioenriched benzo[b]thiophene sulfoxide and 2-methyl benzo[b]thiophene sulfoxides which racemized at ambient temperature. The barriers to pyramidal sulfur inversion of 2- and 3-methyl benzo[b]thiophene sulfoxide metabolites, obtained using TDO and NDO as biocatalysts, were found to be ca.: 25-27 kcal mol(-1). The absolute configurations of the benzo[b]thiophene sulfoxides were determined by ECD spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography and stereochemical correlation. A site-directed mutant E. coli strain containing an engineered form of NDO, was found to change the regioselectivity toward preferential oxidation of the thiophene ring rather than the benzene ring. PMID:22134441

  8. PAR-2 elicits afferent arteriolar vasodilation by NO-dependent and NO-independent actions.

    PubMed

    Trottier, Greg; Hollenberg, Morley; Wang, Xuemei; Gui, Yu; Loutzenhiser, Kathy; Loutzenhiser, Rodger

    2002-05-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are a novel class of G protein-coupled receptors that respond to signals through endogenous proteinases. PAR activation involves enzymatic cleavage of the extracellular NH(2)-terminal domain and unmasking of a new NH(2) terminus, which serves as an anchored ligand to activate the receptor. At least four PAR subtypes have been identified. In the present study, we used the in vitro perfused hydronephrotic rat kidney to examine the effects of activating PAR-2 on the afferent arteriole. The synthetic peptide SLIGRL-NH(2), which corresponds to the exposed ligand sequence and selectively activates PAR-2, did not alter basal afferent arteriolar diameter but caused a concentration-dependent vasodilation (3-30 microM) of arterioles preconstricted by angiotensin II (0.1 nM). A modified peptide sequence (LSIGRL-NH(2), inactive at PAR-2) had no effect. This vasodilation was characterized by an initial transient component followed by a smaller sustained response. A similar pattern of vasodilation was seen when SLIGRL-NH(2) was administered to isolated perfused normal rat kidney. The sustained component of the PAR-2-induced afferent arteriolar vasodilation was eliminated by nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibition (100 microM nitro-L-arginine methyl ester). In contrast, the transient vasodilation persisted under these conditions. This transient response was not observed when afferent arterioles were preconstricted with elevated KCl, suggesting involvement of an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor. Finally, RT-PCR revealed the presence of PAR-2 mRNA in isolated afferent arterioles. These findings indicate that PAR-2 is expressed in the afferent arteriole and that its activation elicits afferent arteriolar vasodilation by NO-dependent and NO-independent mechanisms. PMID:11934700

  9. Directed and persistent movement arises from mechanochemistry of the ParA/ParB system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Longhua; Vecchiarelli, Anthony G; Mizuuchi, Kiyoshi; Neuman, Keir C; Liu, Jian

    2015-12-22

    The segregation of DNA before cell division is essential for faithful genetic inheritance. In many bacteria, segregation of low-copy number plasmids involves an active partition system composed of a nonspecific DNA-binding ATPase, ParA, and its stimulator protein ParB. The ParA/ParB system drives directed and persistent movement of DNA cargo both in vivo and in vitro. Filament-based models akin to actin/microtubule-driven motility were proposed for plasmid segregation mediated by ParA. Recent experiments challenge this view and suggest that ParA/ParB system motility is driven by a diffusion ratchet mechanism in which ParB-coated plasmid both creates and follows a ParA gradient on the nucleoid surface. However, the detailed mechanism of ParA/ParB-mediated directed and persistent movement remains unknown. Here, we develop a theoretical model describing ParA/ParB-mediated motility. We show that the ParA/ParB system can work as a Brownian ratchet, which effectively couples the ATPase-dependent cycling of ParA-nucleoid affinity to the motion of the ParB-bound cargo. Paradoxically, this resulting processive motion relies on quenching diffusive plasmid motion through a large number of transient ParA/ParB-mediated tethers to the nucleoid surface. Our work thus sheds light on an emergent phenomenon in which nonmotor proteins work collectively via mechanochemical coupling to propel cargos-an ingenious solution shaped by evolution to cope with the lack of processive motor proteins in bacteria. PMID:26647183

  10. Directed and persistent movement arises from mechanochemistry of the ParA/ParB system

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Longhua; Vecchiarelli, Anthony G.; Mizuuchi, Kiyoshi; Neuman, Keir C.; Liu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The segregation of DNA before cell division is essential for faithful genetic inheritance. In many bacteria, segregation of low-copy number plasmids involves an active partition system composed of a nonspecific DNA-binding ATPase, ParA, and its stimulator protein ParB. The ParA/ParB system drives directed and persistent movement of DNA cargo both in vivo and in vitro. Filament-based models akin to actin/microtubule-driven motility were proposed for plasmid segregation mediated by ParA. Recent experiments challenge this view and suggest that ParA/ParB system motility is driven by a diffusion ratchet mechanism in which ParB-coated plasmid both creates and follows a ParA gradient on the nucleoid surface. However, the detailed mechanism of ParA/ParB-mediated directed and persistent movement remains unknown. Here, we develop a theoretical model describing ParA/ParB-mediated motility. We show that the ParA/ParB system can work as a Brownian ratchet, which effectively couples the ATPase-dependent cycling of ParA–nucleoid affinity to the motion of the ParB-bound cargo. Paradoxically, this resulting processive motion relies on quenching diffusive plasmid motion through a large number of transient ParA/ParB-mediated tethers to the nucleoid surface. Our work thus sheds light on an emergent phenomenon in which nonmotor proteins work collectively via mechanochemical coupling to propel cargos—an ingenious solution shaped by evolution to cope with the lack of processive motor proteins in bacteria. PMID:26647183

  11. How To Eliminate Narcissism Overnight

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition appears likely to eliminate the diagnosis of narcissistic personality disorder. There are significant problems with the discriminant validity of the current narcissistic personality disorder critiera set; furthermore, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition's narrow focus on “grandiosity” probably contributes to the wide disparity between low narcissistic personality disorder prevalence rates in epidemiological studies and high rates of narcissistic personality disorder in clinical practice. Nevertheless, the best course of action may be to refine the narcissistic personality disorder criteria, followed by careful field testing and a search for biomarkers, rather than wholesale elimination of the narcissistic personality disorder category. The construct of “malignant narcissism” is also worthy of more intense empirical investigation. PMID:21468294

  12. Cancer risks: Strategies for elimination

    SciTech Connect

    Bannasch, P.

    1987-01-01

    This book deals with the possibilities for identifying and eliminating cancer risk factors. The current state of knowledge on the detection, assessment and elimination of chemical, physical (radiation), and biological (viruses) risk factors are comprehensively presented in 15 contributions. Chemical risk factors resulting from smoking and environmental contamination are given special attention. The coverage of cancer risks by radiation includes some of the consequences of the Chernobyl disaster. Finally, the discussion of the possible risks that certain viruses hold for cancer in man is intended to further the development of vaccinations against these viral infections. The information is directed not only at specialists, but also at a wider interested audience. Its primary aim is to convey established findings that are already being used for cancer prevention. Furthermore, the book aims to promote more intense research in the field of primary cancer prevention. Contents: General aspects; chemical carcinogens: Risk assessment; chemical carcinogens: Primary prevention; physical carcinogens - Oncogenic viruses and subject index.

  13. Eliminating sexism in the classroom.

    PubMed

    Shellenbarger, T

    1993-01-01

    Sexism exists in many nursing classrooms without the teacher or students being aware of it. Speech patterns, written-communication, and pedagogical styles may contribute to sexism. Nurse educators need to take measures to identify and eliminate sexism from the classroom, because it subordinates and limits students. The classroom should promote gender-free situations that enhance and contribute to learning and advancement of all students. PMID:8487980

  14. Role of PAR-4 in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Meynier, Sonia; Kramer, Marianne; Ribaux, Pascale; Tille, Jean-Christophe; Delie, Florence; Petignat, Patrick; Cohen, Marie

    2015-09-01

    Prostate apoptosis response-4 (PAR-4) is considered as a tumour suppressor due to its ability to selectively induce cell apoptosis in most cancer cells. However little is known about the role of PAR-4 in ovarian cancer. In this study, we investigated for the first time the role of PAR-4 in ovarian carcinogenesis. We showed that PAR-4 mRNA level is not significantly different between healthy and cancer ovarian cells. Immunohistochemistry on ovarian tissue showed that ovarian cancer cells are positive for PAR-4 nuclear and cytoplasmic staining whereas ovarian healthy cells are negative for PAR-4 nuclear staining. We then studied the role of PAR-4 in cell apoptosis. We determined that PAR-4 induces cell apoptosis in response to stimuli, in vitro, but is also involved in the relocation of GRP78 from endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface of ovarian cancer cell line (SKOV-3 cells). In ovo, PAR-4 decreases ovarian tumour development and increases the response to taxol treatment. These observations suggest that PAR-4 is a very interesting therapeutic target against ovarian carcinogenesis. PMID:26246468

  15. Role of PAR-4 in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meynier, Sonia; Kramer, Marianne; Ribaux, Pascale; Tille, Jean-Christophe; Delie, Florence; Petignat, Patrick; Cohen, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Prostate apoptosis response-4 (PAR-4) is considered as a tumour suppressor due to its ability to selectively induce cell apoptosis in most cancer cells. However little is known about the role of PAR-4 in ovarian cancer. In this study, we investigated for the first time the role of PAR-4 in ovarian carcinogenesis. We showed that PAR-4 mRNA level is not significantly different between healthy and cancer ovarian cells. Immunohistochemistry on ovarian tissue showed that ovarian cancer cells are positive for PAR-4 nuclear and cytoplasmic staining whereas ovarian healthy cells are negative for PAR-4 nuclear staining. We then studied the role of PAR-4 in cell apoptosis. We determined that PAR-4 induces cell apoptosis in response to stimuli, in vitro, but is also involved in the relocation of GRP78 from endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface of ovarian cancer cell line (SKOV-3 cells). In ovo, PAR-4 decreases ovarian tumour development and increases the response to taxol treatment. These observations suggest that PAR-4 is a very interesting therapeutic target against ovarian carcinogenesis. PMID:26246468

  16. Pars triangularis asymmetry and language dominance.

    PubMed Central

    Foundas, A L; Leonard, C M; Gilmore, R L; Fennell, E B; Heilman, K M

    1996-01-01

    The pars triangular is a portion of Broca's area. The convolutions that form the inferior and caudal extent of the pars triangularis include the anterior horizontal and anterior ascending rami of the sylvian fissure, respectively. To learn if there are anatomic asymmetries of the pars triangularis, these convolutions were measured on volumetric magnetic resonance imaging scans of 11 patients who had undergone selective hemispheric anesthesia (Wada testing) to determine hemispheric speech and language lateralization. Of the 10 patients with language lateralized to the left hemisphere, 9 had a leftward asymmetry of the pars triangularis. The 1 patient with language lateralized to the right hemisphere had a significant rightward asymmetry of the pars triangularis. Our data suggest that asymmetries of the pars triangularis may be related to speech-language lateralization. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8570622

  17. Stochastic elimination of cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Michor, Franziska; Nowak, Martin A; Frank, Steven A; Iwasa, Yoh

    2003-01-01

    Tissues of multicellular organisms consist of stem cells and differentiated cells. Stem cells divide to produce new stem cells or differentiated cells. Differentiated cells divide to produce new differentiated cells. We show that such a tissue design can reduce the rate of fixation of mutations that increase the net proliferation rate of cells. It has, however, no consequence for the rate of fixation of neutral mutations. We calculate the optimum relative abundance of stem cells that minimizes the rate of generating cancer cells. There is a critical fraction of stem cell divisions that is required for a stochastic elimination ('wash out') of cancer cells. PMID:14561289

  18. The feasibility of eliminating podoconiosis

    PubMed Central

    Wanji, Samuel; Shafi, Oumer; M Tukahebwa, Edrida; Umulisa, Irenee; Molyneux, David H; Davey, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Podoconiosis is an inflammatory disease caused by prolonged contact with irritant minerals in soil. Major symptoms include swelling of the lower limb (lymphoedema) and acute pain. The disease has major social and economic consequences through stigma and loss of productivity. In the last five years there has been good progress in podoconiosis research and control. Addressing poverty at household level and infrastructure development such as roads, water and urbanization can all help to reduce podoconiosis incidence. Specific control methods include the use of footwear, regular foot hygiene and floor coverings. Secondary and tertiary prevention are based on the management of the lymphoedema-related morbidity and include foot hygiene, foot care, wound care, compression, exercises, elevation of the legs and treatment of acute infections. Certain endemic countries are taking the initiative to include podoconiosis in their national plans for the control of neglected tropical diseases and to scale up interventions against the disease. Advocacy is needed for provision of shoes as a health intervention. We suggest case definitions and elimination targets as a starting point for elimination of the disease. PMID:26600613

  19. Can Cognitive Explanations Be Eliminated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkarainen, Kai

    The purpose of article is to analyze the arguments of Bruno Latour and Steve Woolgar aimed at eliminating `superfluous' cognitive explanations from discussion of scientific activity. They proposed to a ten-year moratorium on cognitive explanations of scientific activity and promised to reassess explanation in terms of cognition after this period of time if some aspects of scientific inquiry would not be accounted by sociological explanations. Intensive laboratory studies of scientific practice indicated that scientific thinking is not based on mental processes alone but relies on external tools and instruments. On the basis of these kinds of observations, they rejected all cognitive explanations of scientific inquiry. By building on sociocultural theories of cognition, the present study makes the case that the use of conceptual tools significantly transforms cognitive processes. It is concluded that the failure to appreciate cognitive explanations reflects a far toon arrow and non-social concept of cognition: Even after the ten-year moratorium there appears to be many good reasons to reassess the proposal of eliminating cognitive explanations altogether.

  20. Regioselectivity and Enantioselectivity in Nickel-Catalysed Reductive Coupling Reactions of Alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Moslin, Ryan M.; Miller-Moslin, Karen; Jamison, Timothy F.

    2011-01-01

    Nickel-catalysed reductive coupling reactions of alkynes have emerged as powerful synthetic tools for the selective preparation of functionalized alkenes. One of the greatest challenges associated with these transformations is control of regioselectivity. Recent work from our laboratory has provided an improved understanding of several of the factors governing regioselectivity in these reactions, and related studies have revealed that the reaction mechanism can differ substantially depending on the ligand employed. A discussion of stereoselective transformations and novel applications of nickel catalysis in coupling reactions of alkynes is also included. PMID:17971951

  1. Practically convenient and industrially-aligned methods for iridium-catalysed hydrogen isotope exchange processes.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, A R; Idziak, C; Kerr, W J; Mondal, B; Paterson, L C; Tuttle, T; Andersson, S; Nilsson, G N

    2014-06-14

    The use of alternative solvents in the iridium-catalysed hydrogen isotope exchange reaction with developing phosphine/NHC Ir(I) complexes has identified reaction media which are more widely applicable and industrially acceptable than the commonly employed chlorinated solvent, dichloromethane. Deuterium incorporation into a variety of substrates has proceeded to deliver high levels of labelling (and regioselectivity) in the presence of low catalyst loadings and over short reaction times. The preparative outputs have been complemented by DFT studies to explore ligand orientation, as well as solvent and substrate binding energies within the catalyst system. PMID:24756541

  2. Enantioselective synthesis of chiral heterocycles containing both chroman and pyrazolone derivatives catalysed by a chiral squaramide.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Hua; Du, Da-Ming

    2015-05-28

    An efficient chiral squaramide-catalysed enantioselective Michael addition of pyrazolin-5-ones to 3-nitro-2H-chromenes for the synthesis of chiral heterocyclic systems containing both chroman and pyrazolone derivatives has been developed. This reaction afforded the desired products in high to excellent yields (up to 98%) with high enantioselectivities (up to 96%) and excellent diastereoselectivities (up to 99 : 1) under very low catalyst loading (0.2 mol%). This catalytic asymmetric reaction provides an efficient route toward the synthesis of chiral heterocyclic systems containing both chroman and pyrazolone derivatives, which possess potential pharmaceutical activities. PMID:25882378

  3. Unprecedented Carbonato Intermediates in Cyclic Carbonate Synthesis Catalysed by Bimetallic Aluminium(Salen) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Castro-Osma, José A; North, Michael; Offermans, Willem K; Leitner, Walter; Müller, Thomas E

    2016-04-21

    The mechanism by which [Al(salen)]2 O complexes catalyse the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and carbon dioxide in the absence of a halide cocatalyst has been investigated. Density functional theory (DFT) studies, mass spectrometry and (1) H NMR, (13) C NMR and infrared spectroscopies provide evidence for the formation of an unprecedented carbonato bridged bimetallic aluminium complex which is shown to be a key intermediate for the halide-free synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and carbon dioxide. Deuterated and enantiomerically-pure epoxides were used to study the reaction pathway. Based on the experimental and theoretical results, a catalytic cycle is proposed. PMID:27029954

  4. Asymmetric Isothiourea-Catalysed Formal [3+2] Cycloadditions of Ammonium Enolates with Oxaziridines

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Siobhan R; Fallan, Charlene; Taylor, James E; McLennan, Ross; Daniels, David S B; Morrill, Louis C; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Smith, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    A highly enantioselective Lewis base-catalysed formal [3+2] cycloaddition of ammonium enolates and oxaziridines to give stereodefined oxazolidin-4-ones in high yield is described. Employing an enantioenriched oxaziridine in this process leads to a matched/mis-matched effect with the isothiourea catalyst and allowed the synthesis of either syn- or anti-stereodefined oxazolidin-4-ones in high d.r., yield and ee. Additionally, the oxazolidin-4-one products have been derivatised to afford functionalised enantioenriched building blocks. PMID:26073559

  5. PAR for the Course: A Congruent Pedagogical Approach for a PAR Methods Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Joyce D.; Hicks, Maria; Kalman, Rowenn; Miller, Jason

    2005-01-01

    In the past two years, three graduate students and a senior faculty member have co-taught a participatory action research (PAR) course to undergraduate and graduate students. In this article the co-teachers advocate a set of pedagogical principles and practices in a PAR-oriented classroom that establishes congruency with community PAR projects in…

  6. Par Pond vegetation status Summer 1995 -- Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Riley, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    The water level of Par Pond was lowered approximately 20 feet in mid-1991 in order to protect downstream residents from possible dam failure suggested by subsidence on the downstream slope of the dam and to repair the dam. This lowering exposed both emergent and nonemergent macrophyte beds to drying conditions resulting in extensive losses. A survey of the newly emergent, shoreline aquatic plant communities of Par Pond began in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet above mean sea level. These surveys continued in July, September, and late October, 1995. Communities similar to the pre-drawdown, Par Pond aquatic plant communities are becoming re-established. Emergent beds of maidencane, lotus, waterlily, and watershield are extensive and well developed. Cattail occurrence continued to increase during the summer, but large beds common to Par Pond prior to the drawdown have not formed. Estimates from SPOT HRV, remote sensing satellite data indicated that as much as 120 hectares of emergent wetlands vegetation may have been present along the Par Pond shoreline by early October, 1995. To track the continued development of macrophytes in Par Pond, future surveys throughout 1996 and 1997, along with the continued evaluation of satellite data to map the areal extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond, are planned.

  7. Leprosy elimination: A myth busted

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Nidhi; Kar, Sumit; Madke, Bhushan; Dashatwar, Digambar; Singh, Neha; Prasad, Kameshwar; Kesari, Vikash

    2014-01-01

    Background: Leprosy is mainly a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. The disease mainly affects the skin, the peripheral nerves, mucosa of the upper respiratory tract and eyes. Though the target of leprosy elimination was achieved at national level in 2006 even then a large proportion of leprosy cases reported globally still constitute from India. Aim and Objective: To study the clinico-epidemiological profile of new cases of leprosy in a rural tertiary hospital. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five newly diagnosed cases of leprosy presented in out-patient/admitted in the department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprosy (between September 2012 and August 2013) were included in the study. Detailed history regarding leprosy, deformity, sensory loss, skin smear for AFB and histopathological examination were done in every patient. Results: The incidence was more in age group of 20 to 39 years (48.57%) and 40 to 59 years (37.14%). 68.57% were males. 48.57% cases were found to have facial deformity and ear lobe thickening was found to be pre-dominant form of facial deformity. Ulnar (88.87%) and common peroneal nerve (34.28%) were the most commonly involved nerves. The split skin smear examination was found to be positive in 27 out of 35 cases. On histopathological examination 10 patients (28.57%) were of lepromatous pole (LL), 4 (11.43%) were of indeterminate, 6 (17.14%) were of tuberculoid type (TT), 4 BT (11.4%) and 1 BL type (2.8%). Conclusions: This study helps in concluding that leprosy is still not eliminated. Active surveillance is still needed to detect the sub-clinical cases and undiagnosed cases. PMID:25540534

  8. Elimination communication as colic therapy.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Geraldine J

    2014-09-01

    Colic is generally defined as excessive crying in early infancy and can have negative consequences on the infant as well as on the infant's family life. Excessive crying can result in escalating parental stress levels, abusive caregiver response, increased risk of shaken baby syndrome and parental postpartum depression. In addition to excessive crying, symptoms and descriptors of infant colic include inconsolable crying, screaming, legs drawn up against the abdomen, furrowing of eyebrows, distended abdomen, arched back, passing gas, post-feeding crying and difficulty defecating. There are few well-designed, reproducible, randomized, large-scale studies which demonstrate efficacy of any therapeutic method for colic. An unexplored etiology is that colic is functionally related to a decrease in stooling frequency. Gut distention may periodically result in intensifying discomfort for the infant and in concomitant inconsolable crying. Elimination communication (EC; also known as Natural Infant Hygiene and sometimes referred to as infant potty training, baby-led potty training or assisted infant toilet training) involves the use of cues by which the infant signals to the caregiver that the infant needs to micturate or defecate. Such cues can include types of crying, squirming, straining, wriggling, grimacing, fussing, vocalizing, intent look at caregiver, red face, passing gas and grunting, many of which are the same initial symptoms related to the onset of colicky infant states. A caregiver's attentive and nurturant response to an infant's cues involve uncovering the infant's intergluteal cleft and cradling the infant gently and non-coercively in a supported, secure squatting position. This position will increase the infant's anorectal angle thus facilitating complete defecation. It is hypothesized that effective and timely elimination will cause increased physical comfort for the infant; colic symptoms will concomitantly decrease. PMID:24962210

  9. Non-stabilized nucleophiles in Cu-catalysed dynamic kinetic asymmetric allylic alkylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Hengzhi; Rideau, Emeline; Sidera, Mireia; Fletcher, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    The development of new reactions forming asymmetric carbon-carbon bonds has enabled chemists to synthesize a broad range of important carbon-containing molecules, including pharmaceutical agents, fragrances and polymers. Most strategies to obtain enantiomerically enriched molecules rely on either generating new stereogenic centres from prochiral substrates or resolving racemic mixtures of enantiomers. An alternative strategy--dynamic kinetic asymmetric transformation--involves the transformation of a racemic starting material into a single enantiomer product, with greater than 50 per cent maximum yield. The use of stabilized nucleophiles (pKa < 25, where Ka is the acid dissociation constant) in palladium-catalysed asymmetric allylic alkylation reactions has proved to be extremely versatile in these processes. Conversely, the use of non-stabilized nucleophiles in such reactions is difficult and remains a key challenge. Here we report a copper-catalysed dynamic kinetic asymmetric transformation using racemic substrates and alkyl nucleophiles. These nucleophiles have a pKa of >=50, more than 25 orders of magnitude more basic than the nucleophiles that are typically used in such transformations. Organometallic reagents are generated in situ from alkenes by hydrometallation and give highly enantioenriched products under mild reaction conditions. The method is used to synthesize natural products that possess activity against tuberculosis and leprosy, and an inhibitor of para-aminobenzoate biosynthesis. Mechanistic studies indicate that the reaction proceeds through a rapidly isomerizing intermediate. We anticipate that this approach will be a valuable complement to existing asymmetric catalytic methods.

  10. Atomic scale observation of oxygen delivery during silver–oxygen nanoparticle catalysed oxidation of carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yonghai; Yuchi, Datong; Guan, Pengfei; Xu, Jia; Guo, Lin; Liu, Jingyue

    2016-01-01

    To probe the nature of metal-catalysed processes and to design better metal-based catalysts, atomic scale understanding of catalytic processes is highly desirable. Here we use aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy to investigate the atomic scale processes of silver-based nanoparticles, which catalyse the oxidation of multi-wall carbon nanotubes. A direct semi-quantitative estimate of the oxidized carbon atoms by silver-based nanoparticles is achieved. A mechanism similar to the Mars–van Krevelen process is invoked to explain the catalytic oxidation process. Theoretical calculations, together with the experimental data, suggest that the oxygen molecules dissociate on the surface of silver nanoparticles and diffuse through the silver nanoparticles to reach the silver/carbon interfaces and subsequently oxidize the carbon. The lattice distortion caused by oxygen concentration gradient within the silver nanoparticles provides the direct evidence for oxygen diffusion. Such direct observation of atomic scale dynamics provides an important general methodology for investigations of catalytic processes. PMID:27406595

  11. Challenging nickel-catalysed amine arylations enabled by tailored ancillary ligand design.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Christopher M; MacQueen, Preston M; Rotta-Loria, Nicolas L; Sawatzky, Ryan S; Borzenko, Andrey; Chisholm, Alicia J; Hargreaves, Breanna K V; McDonald, Robert; Ferguson, Michael J; Stradiotto, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Palladium-catalysed C(sp(2))-N cross-coupling (that is, Buchwald-Hartwig amination) is employed widely in synthetic chemistry, including in the pharmaceutical industry, for the synthesis of (hetero)aniline derivatives. However, the cost and relative scarcity of palladium provides motivation for the development of alternative, more Earth-abundant catalysts for such transformations. Here we disclose an operationally simple and air-stable ligand/nickel(II) pre-catalyst that accommodates the broadest combination of C(sp(2))-N coupling partners reported to date for any single nickel catalyst, without the need for a precious-metal co-catalyst. Key to the unprecedented performance of this pre-catalyst is the application of the new, sterically demanding yet electron-poor bisphosphine PAd-DalPhos. Featured are the first reports of nickel-catalysed room temperature reactions involving challenging primary alkylamine and ammonia reaction partners employing an unprecedented scope of electrophiles, including transformations involving sought-after (hetero)aryl mesylates for which no capable catalyst system is known. PMID:27004442

  12. Palladium-catalysed norbornene-mediated C-H functionalization of arenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Juntao; Lautens, Mark

    2015-11-01

    The Catellani reaction -- a palladium-catalysed C-H functionalization reaction mediated by norbornene -- was first reported in 1997. The capacity to functionalize both the ortho and ipso positions of aryl halides in a single transformation held great appeal. We reported an annulative Catellani reaction in 2000. Since then, our two groups have explored the synthetic utility of this reaction and dramatic progress has been made by a number of groups in the past five years. Whereas the original Catellani reaction uses Pd(0) catalysts, recent studies have shown that Pd(II) catalysts can be used in combination with norbornene to effect (1) direct 2-alkylation of indoles and pyrroles and (2) selective meta-C-H functionalization of arenes bearing commonly used ortho-directing groups, thereby opening new avenues for future research. We describe the most recent developments concerning the Pd-catalysed norbornene-mediated C-H functionalization of arenes, including applications in natural products synthesis. We outline challenges and future opportunities.

  13. Non-stabilized nucleophiles in Cu-catalysed dynamic kinetic asymmetric allylic alkylation.

    PubMed

    You, Hengzhi; Rideau, Emeline; Sidera, Mireia; Fletcher, Stephen P

    2015-01-15

    The development of new reactions forming asymmetric carbon-carbon bonds has enabled chemists to synthesize a broad range of important carbon-containing molecules, including pharmaceutical agents, fragrances and polymers. Most strategies to obtain enantiomerically enriched molecules rely on either generating new stereogenic centres from prochiral substrates or resolving racemic mixtures of enantiomers. An alternative strategy--dynamic kinetic asymmetric transformation--involves the transformation of a racemic starting material into a single enantiomer product, with greater than 50 per cent maximum yield. The use of stabilized nucleophiles (pKa < 25, where Ka is the acid dissociation constant) in palladium-catalysed asymmetric allylic alkylation reactions has proved to be extremely versatile in these processes. Conversely, the use of non-stabilized nucleophiles in such reactions is difficult and remains a key challenge. Here we report a copper-catalysed dynamic kinetic asymmetric transformation using racemic substrates and alkyl nucleophiles. These nucleophiles have a pKa of ≥50, more than 25 orders of magnitude more basic than the nucleophiles that are typically used in such transformations. Organometallic reagents are generated in situ from alkenes by hydrometallation and give highly enantioenriched products under mild reaction conditions. The method is used to synthesize natural products that possess activity against tuberculosis and leprosy, and an inhibitor of para-aminobenzoate biosynthesis. Mechanistic studies indicate that the reaction proceeds through a rapidly isomerizing intermediate. We anticipate that this approach will be a valuable complement to existing asymmetric catalytic methods. PMID:25592541

  14. Challenging nickel-catalysed amine arylations enabled by tailored ancillary ligand design

    PubMed Central

    Lavoie, Christopher M.; MacQueen, Preston M.; Rotta-Loria, Nicolas L.; Sawatzky, Ryan S.; Borzenko, Andrey; Chisholm, Alicia J.; Hargreaves, Breanna K. V.; McDonald, Robert; Ferguson, Michael J.; Stradiotto, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Palladium-catalysed C(sp2)–N cross-coupling (that is, Buchwald–Hartwig amination) is employed widely in synthetic chemistry, including in the pharmaceutical industry, for the synthesis of (hetero)aniline derivatives. However, the cost and relative scarcity of palladium provides motivation for the development of alternative, more Earth-abundant catalysts for such transformations. Here we disclose an operationally simple and air-stable ligand/nickel(II) pre-catalyst that accommodates the broadest combination of C(sp2)–N coupling partners reported to date for any single nickel catalyst, without the need for a precious-metal co-catalyst. Key to the unprecedented performance of this pre-catalyst is the application of the new, sterically demanding yet electron-poor bisphosphine PAd-DalPhos. Featured are the first reports of nickel-catalysed room temperature reactions involving challenging primary alkylamine and ammonia reaction partners employing an unprecedented scope of electrophiles, including transformations involving sought-after (hetero)aryl mesylates for which no capable catalyst system is known. PMID:27004442

  15. Atomic scale observation of oxygen delivery during silver-oxygen nanoparticle catalysed oxidation of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yonghai; Yuchi, Datong; Guan, Pengfei; Xu, Jia; Guo, Lin; Liu, Jingyue

    2016-01-01

    To probe the nature of metal-catalysed processes and to design better metal-based catalysts, atomic scale understanding of catalytic processes is highly desirable. Here we use aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy to investigate the atomic scale processes of silver-based nanoparticles, which catalyse the oxidation of multi-wall carbon nanotubes. A direct semi-quantitative estimate of the oxidized carbon atoms by silver-based nanoparticles is achieved. A mechanism similar to the Mars-van Krevelen process is invoked to explain the catalytic oxidation process. Theoretical calculations, together with the experimental data, suggest that the oxygen molecules dissociate on the surface of silver nanoparticles and diffuse through the silver nanoparticles to reach the silver/carbon interfaces and subsequently oxidize the carbon. The lattice distortion caused by oxygen concentration gradient within the silver nanoparticles provides the direct evidence for oxygen diffusion. Such direct observation of atomic scale dynamics provides an important general methodology for investigations of catalytic processes. PMID:27406595

  16. Atomic scale observation of oxygen delivery during silver-oxygen nanoparticle catalysed oxidation of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yonghai; Yuchi, Datong; Guan, Pengfei; Xu, Jia; Guo, Lin; Liu, Jingyue

    2016-07-01

    To probe the nature of metal-catalysed processes and to design better metal-based catalysts, atomic scale understanding of catalytic processes is highly desirable. Here we use aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy to investigate the atomic scale processes of silver-based nanoparticles, which catalyse the oxidation of multi-wall carbon nanotubes. A direct semi-quantitative estimate of the oxidized carbon atoms by silver-based nanoparticles is achieved. A mechanism similar to the Mars-van Krevelen process is invoked to explain the catalytic oxidation process. Theoretical calculations, together with the experimental data, suggest that the oxygen molecules dissociate on the surface of silver nanoparticles and diffuse through the silver nanoparticles to reach the silver/carbon interfaces and subsequently oxidize the carbon. The lattice distortion caused by oxygen concentration gradient within the silver nanoparticles provides the direct evidence for oxygen diffusion. Such direct observation of atomic scale dynamics provides an important general methodology for investigations of catalytic processes.

  17. Palladium-catalysed norbornene-mediated C-H functionalization of arenes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Juntao; Lautens, Mark

    2015-11-01

    The Catellani reaction--a palladium-catalysed C-H functionalization reaction mediated by norbornene--was first reported in 1997. The capacity to functionalize both the ortho and ipso positions of aryl halides in a single transformation held great appeal. We reported an annulative Catellani reaction in 2000. Since then, our two groups have explored the synthetic utility of this reaction and dramatic progress has been made by a number of groups in the past five years. Whereas the original Catellani reaction uses Pd(0) catalysts, recent studies have shown that Pd(II) catalysts can be used in combination with norbornene to effect (1) direct 2-alkylation of indoles and pyrroles and (2) selective meta-C-H functionalization of arenes bearing commonly used ortho-directing groups, thereby opening new avenues for future research. We describe the most recent developments concerning the Pd-catalysed norbornene-mediated C-H functionalization of arenes, including applications in natural products synthesis. We outline challenges and future opportunities. PMID:26492005

  18. Use of ESR and HPLC to follow the anaerobic reaction catalysed by lipoxygenases.

    PubMed

    Brandicourt, Stéphanie; Nicolas, Jacques; Boussard, Aline; Riquet, Anne-Marie

    2015-02-01

    The measurement of the 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPOL) consumption by using ESR allows to follow the anaerobic reaction between linoleic acid (LH) and its 13-hydroperoxide (LOOH) catalysed by lipoxygenase. During this reaction, two types of radicals are initially obtained, alkyl (L) and alkoxyl (LO) radicals which formed two types of adducts (LT and OLT) with TEMPOL as characterised by HPLC. The stoichiometry of the adduct formation is two mole of TEMPOL consumed for one mole of LH and one mole of LOOH. Using ESR, the kinetic parameters and the mechanism of the anaerobic reaction have been determined at pH 6.5 for three different lipoxygenases, soybean, horse bean and wheat and compared to the values obtained at pH 9 for soybean lipoxygenase. Wheat lipoxygenase is very weakly active compared to the other enzymes. An uncompetitive inhibition of the anaerobic reaction catalysed by soybean and horse bean lipoxygenases was observed with 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT). PMID:25172715

  19. Test Bias and the Elimination of Racism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedlacek, William E.

    1977-01-01

    Three types of test bias are discussed: content bias, atmosphere bias, and use bias. Use bias is considered the most important. Tests reflect the bias in society, and eliminating test bias means eliminating racism and sexism in society. A six-stage model to eliminate racism and sexism is presented. (Author)

  20. Gold-catalysed facile access to indene scaffolds via sequential C-H functionalization and 5-endo-dig carbocyclization.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ben; Wu, Ziang; Huang, Ben; Liu, Lu; Zhang, Junliang

    2016-08-01

    A concise synthesis of functionalized indene derivatives via the gold(i)-catalysed cascade C-H functionalization/conia-ene type reaction of electron-rich aromatics with o-alkynylaryl α-diazoesters has been developed. In this transformation, the gold catalyst not only catalysed the formation of the zwitterionic intermediate via intermolecular C-H functionalization but promoted the subsequent intramolecular 5-endo-dig cyclization via activation of alkynes. The reaction is characterized by high chemo- and site-selectivity, readily available starting materials, nice functional-group tolerance and mild reaction conditions. PMID:27373228

  1. EDITORIAL: Catalysing progress Catalysing progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Examples of the merits of blue-sky research in the history of science are legion. The invention of the laser, celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, is an excellent example. When it was invented it was considered to be 'a solution waiting for a problem', and yet the level to which it has now infiltrated our day-to-day technological landscape speaks volumes. At the same time it is also true to say that the direction of research is also at times rightly influenced by the needs and concerns of the general public. Over recent years, growing concerns about the environment have had a noticeable effect on research in nanotechnology, motivating work on a range of topics from green nanomaterial synthesis [1] to high-efficiency solar cells [2] and hydrogen storage [3]. The impact of the world's energy consumption on the welfare of the planet is now an enduring and well founded concern. In the face of an instinctive reluctance to curtail habits of comfort and convenience and the appendages of culture and consumerism, research into renewable and more efficient energy sources seem an encouraging approach to alleviating an impending energy crisis. Fuel cells present one alternative to traditional combustion cells that have huge benefits in terms of the efficiency of energy conversion and the limited harmful emissions. In last week's issue of Nanotechnology, Chuan-Jian Zhong and colleagues at the State University of New York at Binghamton in the USA presented an overview of research on nanostructured catalysts in fuel cells [4]. The topical review includes insights into the interactions between nanoparticles and between nanoparticles and their substrate as well as control over the composition and nanostructure of catalysts. The review also serves to highlight how the flourishing of nanotechnology research has heralded great progress in the exploitation of catalysts with nanostructures ingeniously controlled to maximize surface area and optimize energetics for synthesis procedures. One man who was well aware of the role of nanostructured catalysts in the progress of material science research was the late Ulrich Gösele, director at the Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik Halle, who passed away at the age of 60 on 8 November, 2009. Ulrich Gösele published over 750 papers of premium calibre research that have collectively been cited over 20,000 times. His research output includes a cornucopia of excellent work published in Nanotechnology, amongst which are a number of papers detailing the deft manipulation of nanocatalysts to control the quality and structure of nanomaterials [5-8]. Ulrich Gösele was a pioneer in nanoscience. In 1991, when the nanotechnology revolution was little more than a portentous rumble, he published a seminal report examining the effect of quantum confinement on the optical properties of silicon nanowires [9]. While we lament the loss to the community, we have much to celebrate in the insights his legacy has provided for the progress of materials science. It would be unwise to assume that science will or can ultimately advance in such a way as to allow ample means to indulge an unrestrained appetite for consumerism and energy consumption. As with most things, a balanced approach, considering solutions to the problem from many angles, seems sensible. Nonetheless, a browse through the latest literature leaves much cause for optimism for the positive role science can play in improving and sustaining our lifestyle. References [1] Mukherjee P, Roy M, Mandal B P, Dey G K, Mukherjee P K, Ghatak J, Tyagi A K and Kale S P 2008 Nanotechnology 19 075103 [2] Greenham N C and Grätzel M 2008 Nanotechnology 19 420201 [3] Vajo J, Pinkerton F and Stetson N 2009 Nanotechnology 20 200201 [4] Zhong C-J, Luo J, Fang B, Wanjala B N, Njoki P N, Loukrakpam R and Yin J 2010 Nanotechnology 21 062001 [5] Sivakov V A, Scholz A, Syrowatka F, Falk F, Gösele U and Christiansen S H 2009 Nanotechnology 20 405607 [6] Liu L, Lee W, Huang Z, Scholz R and Gösele U 2008 Nanotechnology 19 335604 [7] Fan H J et al 2006 Nanotechnology 1

  2. EDITORIAL: Catalysing progress Catalysing progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Examples of the merits of blue-sky research in the history of science are legion. The invention of the laser, celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, is an excellent example. When it was invented it was considered to be 'a solution waiting for a problem', and yet the level to which it has now infiltrated our day-to-day technological landscape speaks volumes. At the same time it is also true to say that the direction of research is also at times rightly influenced by the needs and concerns of the general public. Over recent years, growing concerns about the environment have had a noticeable effect on research in nanotechnology, motivating work on a range of topics from green nanomaterial synthesis [1] to high-efficiency solar cells [2] and hydrogen storage [3]. The impact of the world's energy consumption on the welfare of the planet is now an enduring and well founded concern. In the face of an instinctive reluctance to curtail habits of comfort and convenience and the appendages of culture and consumerism, research into renewable and more efficient energy sources seem an encouraging approach to alleviating an impending energy crisis. Fuel cells present one alternative to traditional combustion cells that have huge benefits in terms of the efficiency of energy conversion and the limited harmful emissions. In last week's issue of Nanotechnology, Chuan-Jian Zhong and colleagues at the State University of New York at Binghamton in the USA presented an overview of research on nanostructured catalysts in fuel cells [4]. The topical review includes insights into the interactions between nanoparticles and between nanoparticles and their substrate as well as control over the composition and nanostructure of catalysts. The review also serves to highlight how the flourishing of nanotechnology research has heralded great progress in the exploitation of catalysts with nanostructures ingeniously controlled to maximize surface area and optimize energetics for synthesis procedures. One man who was well aware of the role of nanostructured catalysts in the progress of material science research was the late Ulrich Gösele, director at the Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik Halle, who passed away at the age of 60 on 8 November, 2009. Ulrich Gösele published over 750 papers of premium calibre research that have collectively been cited over 20,000 times. His research output includes a cornucopia of excellent work published in Nanotechnology, amongst which are a number of papers detailing the deft manipulation of nanocatalysts to control the quality and structure of nanomaterials [5-8]. Ulrich Gösele was a pioneer in nanoscience. In 1991, when the nanotechnology revolution was little more than a portentous rumble, he published a seminal report examining the effect of quantum confinement on the optical properties of silicon nanowires [9]. While we lament the loss to the community, we have much to celebrate in the insights his legacy has provided for the progress of materials science. It would be unwise to assume that science will or can ultimately advance in such a way as to allow ample means to indulge an unrestrained appetite for consumerism and energy consumption. As with most things, a balanced approach, considering solutions to the problem from many angles, seems sensible. Nonetheless, a browse through the latest literature leaves much cause for optimism for the positive role science can play in improving and sustaining our lifestyle. References [1] Mukherjee P, Roy M, Mandal B P, Dey G K, Mukherjee P K, Ghatak J, Tyagi A K and Kale S P 2008 Nanotechnology 19 075103 [2] Greenham N C and Grätzel M 2008 Nanotechnology 19 420201 [3] Vajo J, Pinkerton F and Stetson N 2009 Nanotechnology 20 200201 [4] Zhong C-J, Luo J, Fang B, Wanjala B N, Njoki P N, Loukrakpam R and Yin J 2010 Nanotechnology 21 062001 [5] Sivakov V A, Scholz A, Syrowatka F, Falk F, Gösele U and Christiansen S H 2009 Nanotechnology 20 405607 [6] Liu L, Lee W, Huang Z, Scholz R and Gösele U 2008 Nanotechnology 19 335604 [7] Fan H J et al 2006 Nanotechnology 17 S231-9 [8] Stelzner Th et al 2006 Nanotechnology 17 2895-8 [9] Lehmann V and Gösele U 1991 Appl. Phys. Lett. 58 856-8

  3. ParAB Partition Dynamics in Firmicutes: Nucleoid Bound ParA Captures and Tethers ParB-Plasmid Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Lioy, Virginia S.; Volante, Andrea; Soberón, Nora E.; Lurz, Rudi; Ayora, Silvia; Alonso, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    In Firmicutes, small homodimeric ParA-like (δ2) and ParB-like (ω2) proteins, in concert with cis-acting plasmid-borne parS and the host chromosome, secure stable plasmid inheritance in a growing bacterial population. This study shows that (ω:YFP)2 binding to parS facilitates plasmid clustering in the cytosol. (δ:GFP)2 requires ATP binding but not hydrolysis to localize onto the cell’s nucleoid as a fluorescent cloud. The interaction of (δ:CFP)2 or δ2 bound to the nucleoid with (ω:YFP)2 foci facilitates plasmid capture, from a very broad distribution, towards the nucleoid and plasmid pairing. parS-bound ω2 promotes redistribution of (δ:GFP)2, leading to the dynamic release of (δ:GFP)2 from the nucleoid, in a process favored by ATP hydrolysis and protein-protein interaction. (δD60A:GFP)2, which binds but cannot hydrolyze ATP, also forms unstable complexes on the nucleoid. In the presence of ω2, (δD60A:GFP)2 accumulates foci or patched structures on the nucleoid. We propose that (δ:GFP)2 binding to different nucleoid regions and to ω2-parS might generate (δ:GFP)2 gradients that could direct plasmid movement. The iterative pairing and unpairing cycles may tether plasmids equidistantly on the nucleoid to ensure faithful plasmid segregation by a mechanism compatible with the diffusion-ratchet mechanism as proposed from in vitro reconstituted systems. PMID:26161642

  4. Eliminating bias in CEM systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jahnke, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    The emission of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and particulate matter from fossil-fuel fired power plants and industrial sources, is a matter of public concern that has led to both State and Federal requirements for pollution control. The accuracy of continuous emission monitoring (CEM) system data has been an issue of considerable importance in the development and implementation of the Acid Rain Program. The more stringent relative accuracy requirements of this program, coupled with the importance of emission trading allowances, has led to the need to minimize systematic errors in emissions measurement. With the inclusion of the t-test for bias in the Acid Rain Regulations of 40 CFR Part 75, a method was introduced that could be used to uncover systematic error, or bias, in CEM system measurements. Once bias is detected, it is highly desirable to either eliminate the cause of the bias or to apply correction factors to minimize its effect. However, a problem occurs in determining the cause of the bias; a task that is often both difficult and time consuming. This paper explains the rationale behind the bias test as applied to CEM systems and summarizes potential sources of systematic error in both extractive and in-situ CEM systems. The paper examines a number of factors that contribute to CEM system measurement error. Methods are suggested for both the detection and correction of the resulting biases.

  5. Clinical inhibition of CYP2D6-catalysed metabolism by the antianginal agent perhexiline

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Benjamin J L; Coller, Janet K; James, Heather M; Gillis, David; Somogyi, Andrew A; Horowitz, John D; Morris, Raymond G; Sallustio, Benedetta C

    2004-01-01

    Aims Perhexiline is an antianginal agent that displays both saturable and polymorphic metabolism via CYP2D6. The aim of this study was to determine whether perhexiline produces clinically significant inhibition of CYP2D6-catalysed metabolism in angina patients. Methods The effects of perhexiline on CYP2D6-catalysed metabolism were investigated by comparing urinary total dextrorphan/dextromethorphan metabolic ratios following a single dose of dextromethorphan (16.4 mg) in eight matched control patients not taking perhexiline and 24 patients taking perhexiline. All of the patients taking perhexiline had blood drawn for CYP2D6 genotyping as well as to measure plasma perhexiline and cis-OH-perhexiline concentrations. Results Median (range) dextrorphan/dextromethorphan metabolic ratios were significantly higher (P < 0.0001) in control patients, 271.1 (40.3–686.1), compared with perhexiline-treated patients, 5.0 (0.3–107.9). In the perhexiline-treated group 10/24 patients had metabolic ratios consistent with poor metabolizer phenotypes; however, none was a genotypic poor metabolizer. Interestingly, 89% of patients who had phenocopied to poor metabolizers had only one functional CYP2D6 gene. There was a significant negative linear correlation between the log of the dextrorphan/dextromethorphan metabolic ratio and plasma perhexiline concentrations (r2 = 0.69, P < 0.0001). Compared with patients with at least two functional CYP2D6 genes, those with one functional gene were on similar perhexiline dosage regimens but had significantly higher plasma perhexiline concentrations, 0.73 (0.21–1.00) vs. 0.36 (0.04–0.69) mg l−1 (P = 0.04), lower cis-OH-perhexiline/perhexiline ratios, 2.85 (0.35–6.10) vs. 6.51 (1.84–11.67) (P = 0.03), and lower dextrorphan/dextromethorphan metabolic ratios, 2.51 (0.33–39.56) vs. 11.80 (2.90–36.93) (P = 0.005). Conclusions Perhexiline significantly inhibits CYP2D6-catalysed metabolism in angina patients. The plasma cis

  6. Supercritical carbon dioxide, a new medium for aerobic alcohol oxidations catalysed by copper-TEMPO.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Matthew; Montilla, Francisco; Galindo, Agustín

    2010-01-21

    The copper catalysed aerobic oxidation of selected alcohol substrates in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)), employing a range of simple copper(II) catalyst compounds, is here described. The copper acetate complex of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) functionalised pyridine (1), compound 2, has previously been synthesised and characterised by us and its solubility in scCO(2) demonstrated. Due to this solubility we anticipated that the selective aerobic oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes could be homogeneously catalysed by this compound in scCO(2) in combination with the co-catalyst 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yloxy free radical (TEMPO). Our initial results showed that complete oxidation of 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol was achieved within 4 h of reaction. However, the activities of analogous copper derivatives containing simpler pyridine substituents, [Cu(AcO)(2)(py)](2) and [Cu(AcO)(2)(4VP)](2) (4VP = 4-vinylpyridine), were shown to be similar, in spite of their negligible solubility in scCO(2). When we repeated the reactions in highly non-polar hexane rather than scCO(2) similar observations were made. In both cases, as 2 is soluble and the pyridine analogues are not, a much higher reaction rate was anticipated for 2 as it is the only compound capable of homogeneous catalysis. However, in some cases slightly better activities were observed for [Cu(AcO)(2)(py)](2) rather than for the PDMS functionalised analogue, 2. Thus, despite poor catalyst solubility typically being very inhibitory in this type of catalytic process, in this system solubilisation of the catalyst is not necessary. In continuation the activity of silica supported copper complexes was therefore investigated. Employing such catalysts the 4-nitrobenzyl and benzyl alcohol substrates were completely oxidised to the corresponding aldehydes in scCO(2), this time employing lower catalyst loadings. Other types of alcohol substrate showed more limited conversions however. To conclude, alcohol oxidation in the non

  7. Convenient synthesis of allenylphosphoryl compounds via Cu-catalysed couplings of P(O)H compounds with propargyl acetates.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ruwei; Luo, Bing; Yang, Jianlin; Zhang, Lixiong; Han, Li-Biao

    2016-05-11

    A novel Cu-catalysed substitution reaction of propargyl acetates with P(O)H compounds is developed to afford allenylphosphoryl compounds via C-P bond coupling in high yields under mild conditions. A plausible mechanism involving the nucleophilic interception of the Cu-allenylidene intermediates is proposed. PMID:27097899

  8. One-pot three-component synthesis of quinazolines via a copper-catalysed oxidative amination reaction.

    PubMed

    Duan, Tiantian; Zhai, Tianran; Liu, Huanhuan; Yan, Zilong; Zhao, Yue; Feng, Lei; Ma, Chen

    2016-07-01

    A copper-catalysed three-component reaction for constructing a series of quinazoline derivatives has been developed. In this system, solvents act as the reactants and different functional groups are well tolerated to obtain corresponding products in moderate to good yields. PMID:27304252

  9. Use of an ionic liquid in a two-phase system to improve an alcohol dehydrogenase catalysed reduction.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Marrit; Villela Filho, Murillo; Liese, Andreas; Kragl, Udo

    2004-05-01

    Due to favourable partition coefficients the highly enantioselective reduction of 2-octanone, catalysed by an alcohol dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus brevis, is faster in a biphasic system containing buffer and the ionic liquid [BMIM][(CF(3)SO(2))(2)N] compared to the reduction in a biphasic system containing buffer and methyl tert-butyl ether. PMID:15116196

  10. pH-dependence and structure–activity relationships in the papain-catalysed hydrolysis of anilides

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, G.; Yuthavong, Y.

    1971-01-01

    The pH-dependence of the Michaelis–Menten parameters for the papain-catalysed hydrolysis of N-acetyl-l-phenylalanylglycine p-nitroanilide was determined. The equilibrium binding constant, Ks, is independent of pH between 3.7 and 9.3, whereas the acylation constant, k+2, shows bell-shaped pH-dependence with apparent pKa values of 4.2 and 8.2. The effect of substituents in the leaving group on the acylation constant of the papain-catalysed hydrolysis of hippuryl anilides and N-acetyl-l-phenylalanylglycine anilides gives rise in both series to a Hammett ρ value of −1.04. This indicates that the enzyme provides electrophilic, probably general-acid, catalysis, as well as the nucleophilic or general-base catalysis previously found. A mechanism involving a tetrahedral intermediate whose formation is general-base-catalysed and whose breakdown is general-acid-catalysed seems most likely. The similarity of the Hammett ρ values appears to exclude facilitated proton transfer as a means through which the specificity of papain is expressed. PMID:5126467

  11. Elimination of Onchocerciasis from Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A.; Fernández-Santos, Nadia A.; Orozco-Algarra, María E.; Rodríguez-Atanacio, José A.; Domínguez-Vázquez, Alfredo; Rodríguez-Morales, Kristel B.; Real-Najarro, Olga; Prado-Velasco, Francisco G.; Cupp, Eddie W.; Richards, Frank O.; Hassan, Hassan K.; González-Roldán, Jesús F.; Kuri-Morales, Pablo A.; Unnasch, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mexico is one of the six countries formerly endemic for onchocerciasis in Latin America. Transmission has been interrupted in the three endemic foci of that country and mass drug distribution has ceased. Three years after mass drug distribution ended, post-treatment surveillance (PTS) surveys were undertaken which employed entomological indicators to check for transmission recrudescence. Methodology/Principal findings In-depth entomologic assessments were performed in 18 communities in the three endemic foci of Mexico. None of the 108,212 Simulium ochraceum s.l. collected from the three foci were found to contain parasite DNA when tested by polymerase chain reaction-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELISA), resulting in a maximum upper bound of the 95% confidence interval (95%-ULCI) of the infective rate in the vectors of 0.035/2,000 flies examined. This is an order of magnitude below the threshold of a 95%-ULCI of less than one infective fly per 2,000 flies tested, the current entomological criterion for interruption of transmission developed by the international community. The point estimate of seasonal transmission potential (STP) was zero, and the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval for the STP ranged from 1.2 to 1.7 L3/person/season in the different foci. This value is below all previous estimates for the minimum transmission potential required to maintain the parasite population. Conclusions/Significance The results from the in-depth entomological post treatment surveillance surveys strongly suggest that transmission has not resumed in the three foci of Mexico during the three years since the last distribution of ivermectin occurred; it was concluded that transmission remains undetectable without intervention, and Onchocerca volvulus has been eliminated from Mexico. PMID:26161558

  12. Hydrophobic properties conferred to Kraft pulp by a laccase-catalysed treatment with lauryl gallate.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Céline; Tapin-Lingua, Sandra; Elegir, Graziano; Petit-Conil, Michel; Baumberger, Stéphanie

    2013-09-10

    Hydrophobic properties were conferred to a high-lignin-content Kraft pulp by a laccase-catalysed treatment in the presence of lauryl gallate (LG). The treatment resulted in a two-fold increase in contact angle and conferred water absorption resistance to the pulp. Kappa number was increased, indicating that some phenolic compounds were incorporated in the pulp. A control treatment with LG alone did not affect water absorption, demonstrating that laccase was essential to attain these new properties. The loss of hydrophobicity after an acetone Soxhlet extraction highlighted that adsorbed acetone-soluble compounds played a key role in the properties. GC-FID and HPSEC-UV analysis of the acetone extract indicated the formation of dodecanol and different phenolic oligomers. SEM images showed the treatment-induced changes in the fibre network. Additional experiments with various reaction times and reactant concentrations highlighted the role of LG oxidation products in the introduction of absorption resistance. PMID:23876480

  13. Scope and limitations of the dual-gold-catalysed hydrophenoxylation of alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Suárez, Adrián; Oonishi, Yoshihiro; Martin, Anthony R

    2016-01-01

    Summary Due to the synthetic advantages presented by the dual-gold-catalysed hydrophenoxylation of alkynes, a thorough study of this reaction was carried out in order to fully define the scope and limitations of the methodology. The protocol tolerates a wide range of functional groups, such as nitriles, ketones, esters, aldehydes, ketals, naphthyls, allyls or polyphenols, in a milder and more efficient manner than the previously reported methodologies. We have also identified that while we are able to use highly steric hindered phenols, small changes on the steric bulk of the alkynes have a dramatic effect on the reactivity. More importantly, we have observed that the use of substrates that facilitate the formation of diaurated species such as gem-diaurated or σ,π-digold–acetylide species, hinder the catalytic activity. Moreover, we have identified that the use of directing groups in unsymmetrical alkynes can help to achieve high regioselectivity in the hydrophenoxylation. PMID:26977176

  14. Palladium-catalysed formation of vicinal all-carbon quaternary centres via propargylation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin; Wu, Shangze; Wu, Wangteng; Li, Pengbin; Fu, Chunling; Ma, Shengming

    2016-01-01

    Construction of two vicinal all-carbon quaternary carbon centres is of great importance due to the common presence of such units in natural and unnatural molecules with attractive functions. However, it remains a significant challenge. Here, we have developed a palladium-catalysed general coupling for the efficient connection of two tertiary carbon atoms: Specifically, propargylic carbonate has been treated with a fully loaded soft functionalized nucleophile to connect such two fully loaded carbon atoms with a simple palladium catalyst. It is observed that the central chirality in the optically active tertiary propargylic carbonates has been remembered and transferred into the products with very high efficiency. The triple bond and the functional groups such as ester, cyano and unsaturated C–C bonds make this method a relatively general solution for such a purpose due to their high synthetic versatility. PMID:27558203

  15. Enantioselective construction of quaternary N-heterocycles by palladium-catalysed decarboxylative allylic alkylation of lactams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behenna, Douglas C.; Liu, Yiyang; Yurino, Taiga; Kim, Jimin; White, David E.; Virgil, Scott C.; Stoltz, Brian M.

    2012-02-01

    The enantioselective synthesis of nitrogen-containing heterocycles (N-heterocycles) represents a substantial chemical research effort and resonates across numerous disciplines, including the total synthesis of natural products and medicinal chemistry. In this Article, we describe the highly enantioselective palladium-catalysed decarboxylative allylic alkylation of readily available lactams to form 3,3-disubstituted pyrrolidinones, piperidinones, caprolactams and structurally related lactams. Given the prevalence of quaternary N-heterocycles in biologically active alkaloids and pharmaceutical agents, we envisage that our method will provide a synthetic entry into the de novo asymmetric synthesis of such structures. As an entry for these investigations we demonstrate how the described catalysis affords enantiopure quaternary lactams that intercept synthetic intermediates previously used in the synthesis of the Aspidosperma alkaloids quebrachamine and rhazinilam, but that were previously only available by chiral auxiliary approaches or as racemic mixtures.

  16. A palladium-catalysed multicomponent coupling approach to conjugated poly(1,3-dipoles) and polyheterocycles

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, David C.; Kayser, Laure V.; Han, Zhi-Yong; Siamaki, Ali R.; Keyzer, Evan N.; Gefen, Ashley; Arndtsen, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Conjugated polymers have emerged over the past several decades as key components for a range of applications, including semiconductors, molecular wires, sensors, light switchable transistors and OLEDs. Nevertheless, the construction of many such polymers, especially highly substituted variants, typically involves a multistep synthesis. This can limit the ability to both access and tune polymer structures for desired properties. Here we show an alternative approach to synthesize conjugated materials: a metal-catalysed multicomponent polymerization. This reaction assembles multiple monomer units into a new polymer containing reactive 1,3-dipoles, which can be modified using cycloaddition reactions. In addition to the synthetic ease of this approach, its modularity allows easy adaptation to incorporate a range of desired substituents, all via one-pot reactions. PMID:26077769

  17. Probing water micro-solvation in proteins by water catalysed proton-transfer tautomerism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jiun-Yi; Chao, Wei-Chih; Liu, Chun; Pan, Hsiao-An; Yang, Hsiao-Ching; Chen, Chi-Lin; Lan, Yi-Kang; Lin, Li-Ju; Wang, Jinn-Shyan; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Chun-Wei Chou, Steven; Tang, Kuo-Chun; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2013-11-01

    Scientists have made tremendous efforts to gain understanding of the water molecules in proteins via indirect measurements such as molecular dynamic simulation and/or probing the polarity of the local environment. Here we present a tryptophan analogue that exhibits remarkable water catalysed proton-transfer properties. The resulting multiple emissions provide unique fingerprints that can be exploited for direct sensing of a site-specific water environment in a protein without disrupting its native structure. Replacing tryptophan with the newly developed tryptophan analogue we sense different water environments surrounding the five tryptophans in human thromboxane A2 synthase. This development may lead to future research to probe how water molecules affect the folding, structures and activities of proteins.

  18. Characterisation of hydrocarbonaceous overlayers important in metal-catalysed selective hydrogenation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennon, David; Warringham, Robbie; Guidi, Tatiana; Parker, Stewart F.

    2013-12-01

    The hydrogenation of alkynes to alkenes over supported metal catalysts is an important industrial process and it has been shown that hydrocarbonaceous overlayers are important in controlling selectivity profiles of metal-catalysed hydrogenation reactions. As a model system, we have selected propyne hydrogenation over a commercial Pd(5%)/Al2O3 catalyst. Inelastic neutron scattering studies show that the C-H stretching mode ranges from 2850 to 3063 cm-1, indicating the mostly aliphatic nature of the overlayer and this is supported by the quantification of the carbon and hydrogen on the surface. There is also a population of strongly hydrogen-bonded hydroxyls, their presence would indicate that the overlayer probably contains some oxygen functionality. There is little evidence for any olefinic or aromatic species. This is distinctly different from the hydrogen-poor overlayers that are deposited on Ni/Al2O3 catalysts during methane reforming.

  19. Bray-Liebhafsky and non-catalysed Briggs-Rauscher oscillating reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Guy; Furrow, Stanley D.

    2016-02-01

    In order to propose mechanisms of complicated chemical systems, it is necessary to study simpler subsystems. The mechanism we have proposed for the Bray-Liebhafsky (BL) oscillating reaction is based on kinetic studies of several reactions of iodine compounds between them and with hydrogen peroxide. Because the reactants of the non-catalysed Briggs-Rauscher (BR) oscillating reaction are the same as those of the BL reaction plus malonic acid, we propose now to extend the mechanism of the BL reaction to the BR reaction. With this aim, we add radical reactions of iodine compounds and of malonic acid. The choice of these reactions is based on our recent study of the unusual kinetics of the iodate reduction by high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide.

  20. Synthesis of asymmetric supramolecular compounds using a Ni(0) catalysed homo-coupling approach.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Lynda; Horn, Sabine; Cleary, Laura; Halpin, Yvonne; Browne, Wesley R; Vos, Johannes G

    2009-05-28

    The synthesis and characterisation of a series of dinuclear ruthenium and osmium polypyridyl metal complexes based on the bridging ligands [5-(5'-bipyridin-2',2''-yl)-3-(pyridin-2-yl)]-1,2,4-triazole (Hpytr-bipy), 2,2'-bis(pyridin-2''yl)-5,5'-bis(pyridin-3''-yl) (bipy-bipy) and 5,5'-bis(pyridin-2''-yl)-3,3'-bis(1,2,4-triazole) (Hpytr-Hpytr) are reported. The dinuclear complexes have been synthesised via a Ni(0) catalysed cross-coupling reaction from brominated precursors. With this approach a mixture of three products is obtained, which are separated by chromatographic methods. The compounds obtained are characterised by elemental analysis, (1)H NMR, absorption and emission spectroscopy. The synthetic approach developed offers a new route to asymmetric multinuclear supramolecular structures that is complimentary to the complexes as ligands/complexes as metal approaches. PMID:19440590

  1. The ortho-substituent effect on the Ag-catalysed decarboxylation of benzoic acids.

    PubMed

    Grainger, Rachel; Cornella, Josep; Blakemore, David C; Larrosa, Igor; Campanera, Josep M

    2014-12-01

    A combined experimental and computational investigation on the Ag-catalysed decarboxylation of benzoic acids is reported herein. The present study demonstrates that a substituent at the ortho position exerts dual effects in the decarboxylation event. On one hand, ortho-substituted benzoic acids are inherently destabilised starting materials compared to their meta- and para-substituted counterparts. On the other hand, the presence of an ortho-electron-withdrawing group results in an additional stabilisation of the transition state. The combination of both effects results in an overall reduction of the activation energy barrier associated with the decarboxylation event. Furthermore, the Fujita-Nishioka linear free energy relationship model indicates that steric bulk of the substituent can also exert a negative effect by destabilising the transition state of decarboxylation. PMID:25336158

  2. Influence of Fe(2+)-catalysed iron oxide recrystallization on metal cycling.

    PubMed

    Latta, Drew E; Gorski, Christopher A; Scherer, Michelle M

    2012-12-01

    Recent work has indicated that iron (oxyhydr-)oxides are capable of structurally incorporating and releasing metals and nutrients as a result of Fe2+-induced iron oxide recrystallization. In the present paper, we briefly review the current literature examining the mechanisms by which iron oxides recrystallize and summarize how recrystallization affects metal incorporation and release. We also provide new experimental evidence for the Fe2+-induced release of structural manganese from manganese-doped goethite. Currently, the exact mechanism(s) for Fe2+-induced recrystallization remain elusive, although they are likely to be both oxide-and metal-dependent. We conclude by discussing some future research directions for Fe2+-catalysed iron oxide recrystallization. PMID:23176453

  3. Chlorophyll catalyse the photo-transformation of carcinogenic benzo[a]pyrene in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Lijuan; Lai, Xueying; Chen, Baowei; Lin, Li; Fang, Ling; Tam, Nora F. Y.; Luan, Tiangang

    2015-08-01

    Algal blooms cause great damage to water quality and aquaculture. However, this study showed that dead algal cells and chlorophyll could accelerate the photo-transformation of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a ubiquitous and persistent pollutant with potently mutagenic and carcinogenic toxicities, under visible light irradiation. Chlorophyll was found to be the major active substance in dead algal cells, and generated a high level of singlet oxygen to catalyse the photo-transformation of BaP. According to various BaP metabolites formed, the degradation mechanism was proposed as that chlorophyll in dead algal cells photo-oxidized BaP to quinones via photocatalytic generation of singlet oxygen. The results provided a good insight into the role of chlorophyll in the photo-transformation of organic contaminants and could be a possible remediation strategy of organic pollutants in natural environment.

  4. On the Mechanism of the Digold(I)-Hydroxide-Catalysed Hydrophenoxylation of Alkynes.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Suárez, Adrián; Oonishi, Yoshihiro; Martin, Anthony R; Vummaleti, Sai V C; Nelson, David J; Cordes, David B; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Cavallo, Luigi; Nolan, Steven P; Poater, Albert

    2016-01-18

    Herein, we present a detailed investigation of the mechanistic aspects of the dual gold-catalysed hydrophenoxylation of alkynes by both experimental and computational methods. The dissociation of [{Au(NHC)}2 (μ-OH)][BF4 ] is essential to enter the catalytic cycle, and this step is favoured by the presence of bulky, non-coordinating counter ions. Moreover, in silico studies confirmed that phenol does not only act as a reactant, but also as a co-catalyst, lowering the energy barriers of several transition states. A gem-diaurated species might form during the reaction, but this lies deep within a potential energy well, and is likely to be an "off-cycle" rather than an "in-cycle" intermediate. PMID:26662656

  5. Palladium-catalysed formation of vicinal all-carbon quaternary centres via propargylation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Wu, Shangze; Wu, Wangteng; Li, Pengbin; Fu, Chunling; Ma, Shengming

    2016-01-01

    Construction of two vicinal all-carbon quaternary carbon centres is of great importance due to the common presence of such units in natural and unnatural molecules with attractive functions. However, it remains a significant challenge. Here, we have developed a palladium-catalysed general coupling for the efficient connection of two tertiary carbon atoms: Specifically, propargylic carbonate has been treated with a fully loaded soft functionalized nucleophile to connect such two fully loaded carbon atoms with a simple palladium catalyst. It is observed that the central chirality in the optically active tertiary propargylic carbonates has been remembered and transferred into the products with very high efficiency. The triple bond and the functional groups such as ester, cyano and unsaturated C-C bonds make this method a relatively general solution for such a purpose due to their high synthetic versatility. PMID:27558203

  6. Copper catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) in liquid ammonia.

    PubMed

    Ji, Pengju; Atherton, John H; Page, Michael I

    2012-10-21

    Copper(I) catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reactions (CuAAC) occur smoothly in liquid ammonia (LNH(3)) at room temperature to give exclusively 1,4-substituted 1,2,3-triazoles with excellent yields (up to 99%). The CuAAC reactions in liquid ammonia require relatively small amounts of copper(I) catalyst (0.5 mole%) compared with that in conventional solvents. The product can be obtained conveniently by simply evaporation of ammonia, indicating its potential application in industry. The rate of the CuAAC reaction in liquid ammonia shows a second order dependence on the copper(I) concentration and the reaction occurs only with terminal alkynes. Deuterium exchange experiments with phenyl acetylene-d(1) show that the acidity of the alkyne is increased at least 1000-fold with catalytic amounts of copper(I) in liquid ammonia. The mechanism of the CuAAC reaction in liquid ammonia is discussed. PMID:22930181

  7. Regio- and stereodivergent antibiotic oxidative carbocyclizations catalysed by Rieske oxygenase-like enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydor, Paulina K.; Barry, Sarah M.; Odulate, Olanipekun M.; Barona-Gomez, Francisco; Haynes, Stuart W.; Corre, Christophe; Song, Lijiang; Challis, Gregory L.

    2011-05-01

    Oxidative cyclizations, exemplified by the biosynthetic assembly of the penicillin nucleus from a tripeptide precursor, are arguably the most synthetically powerful implementation of C-H activation reactions in nature. Here, we show that Rieske oxygenase-like enzymes mediate regio- and stereodivergent oxidative cyclizations to form 10- and 12-membered carbocyclic rings in the key steps of the biosynthesis of the antibiotics streptorubin B and metacycloprodigiosin, respectively. These reactions represent the first examples of oxidative carbocyclizations catalysed by non-haem iron-dependent oxidases and define a novel type of catalytic activity for Rieske enzymes. A better understanding of how these enzymes achieve such remarkable regio- and stereocontrol in the functionalization of unactivated hydrocarbon chains will greatly facilitate the development of selective man-made C-H activation catalysts.

  8. Scope and limitations of the dual-gold-catalysed hydrophenoxylation of alkynes.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Suárez, Adrián; Oonishi, Yoshihiro; Martin, Anthony R; Nolan, Steven P

    2016-01-01

    Due to the synthetic advantages presented by the dual-gold-catalysed hydrophenoxylation of alkynes, a thorough study of this reaction was carried out in order to fully define the scope and limitations of the methodology. The protocol tolerates a wide range of functional groups, such as nitriles, ketones, esters, aldehydes, ketals, naphthyls, allyls or polyphenols, in a milder and more efficient manner than the previously reported methodologies. We have also identified that while we are able to use highly steric hindered phenols, small changes on the steric bulk of the alkynes have a dramatic effect on the reactivity. More importantly, we have observed that the use of substrates that facilitate the formation of diaurated species such as gem-diaurated or σ,π-digold-acetylide species, hinder the catalytic activity. Moreover, we have identified that the use of directing groups in unsymmetrical alkynes can help to achieve high regioselectivity in the hydrophenoxylation. PMID:26977176

  9. Chlorophyll catalyse the photo-transformation of carcinogenic benzo[a]pyrene in water

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Lijuan; Lai, Xueying; Chen, Baowei; Lin, Li; Fang, Ling; Tam, Nora F. Y.; Luan, Tiangang

    2015-01-01

    Algal blooms cause great damage to water quality and aquaculture. However, this study showed that dead algal cells and chlorophyll could accelerate the photo-transformation of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a ubiquitous and persistent pollutant with potently mutagenic and carcinogenic toxicities, under visible light irradiation. Chlorophyll was found to be the major active substance in dead algal cells, and generated a high level of singlet oxygen to catalyse the photo-transformation of BaP. According to various BaP metabolites formed, the degradation mechanism was proposed as that chlorophyll in dead algal cells photo-oxidized BaP to quinones via photocatalytic generation of singlet oxygen. The results provided a good insight into the role of chlorophyll in the photo-transformation of organic contaminants and could be a possible remediation strategy of organic pollutants in natural environment. PMID:26239357

  10. Acceptorless Dehydrogenative Oxidation of Secondary Alcohols Catalysed by Cp*Ir(III) -NHC Complexes.

    PubMed

    Gülcemal, Süleyman; Gülcemal, Derya; Whitehead, George F S; Xiao, Jianliang

    2016-07-18

    A series of new Ir(III) complexes with carbene ligands that contain a range of benzyl wingtip groups have been prepared and fully characterised by NMR spectroscopy, HRMS, elemental analysis and X-ray diffraction. All the complexes were active in the acceptorless dehydrogenation of alcohol substrates in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol to give the corresponding carbonyl compounds. The most active complex bore an electron-rich carbene ligand; this complex was used to catalyse the highly efficient and chemoselective dehydrogenation of a wide range of secondary alcohols to their respective ketones, with turnover numbers up to 1660. Mechanistic studies suggested that the turnover of the dehydrogenation reaction is limited by the H2 -formation step. PMID:27321021

  11. Crystal structure of a membrane-bound metalloenzyme that catalyses the biological oxidation of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, R.L.; Rosenzweig, A.C.

    2010-03-08

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is an integral membrane metalloenzyme that catalyses the conversion of methane to methanol. Knowledge of how pMMO performs this extremely challenging chemistry may have an impact on the use of methane as an alternative energy source by facilitating the development of new synthetic catalysts. We have determined the structure of pMMO from the methanotroph Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) to a resolution of 2.8 {angstrom}. The enzyme is a trimer with an {alpha}{sub 3}{beta}{sub 3}{gamma}{sub 3} polypeptide arrangement. Two metal centres, modelled as mononuclear copper and dinuclear copper, are located in soluble regions of each pmoB subunit, which resembles cytochrome c oxidase subunit II. A third metal centre, occupied by zinc in the crystal, is located within the membrane. The structure provides new insight into the molecular details of biological methane oxidation.

  12. Enantioselective construction of quaternary N-heterocycles by palladium-catalysed decarboxylative allylic alkylation of lactams.

    PubMed

    Behenna, Douglas C; Liu, Yiyang; Yurino, Taiga; Kim, Jimin; White, David E; Virgil, Scott C; Stoltz, Brian M

    2012-02-01

    The enantioselective synthesis of nitrogen-containing heterocycles (N-heterocycles) represents a substantial chemical research effort and resonates across numerous disciplines, including the total synthesis of natural products and medicinal chemistry. In this Article, we describe the highly enantioselective palladium-catalysed decarboxylative allylic alkylation of readily available lactams to form 3,3-disubstituted pyrrolidinones, piperidinones, caprolactams and structurally related lactams. Given the prevalence of quaternary N-heterocycles in biologically active alkaloids and pharmaceutical agents, we envisage that our method will provide a synthetic entry into the de novo asymmetric synthesis of such structures. As an entry for these investigations we demonstrate how the described catalysis affords enantiopure quaternary lactams that intercept synthetic intermediates previously used in the synthesis of the Aspidosperma alkaloids quebrachamine and rhazinilam, but that were previously only available by chiral auxiliary approaches or as racemic mixtures. PMID:22270628

  13. RNA with iron(II) as a cofactor catalyses electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Chiaolong; Chou, I.-Chun; Okafor, C. Denise; Bowman, Jessica C.; O'Neill, Eric B.; Athavale, Shreyas S.; Petrov, Anton S.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Wartell, Roger M.; Harvey, Stephen C.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2013-06-01

    Mg2+ is essential for RNA folding and catalysis. However, for the first 1.5 billion years of life on Earth RNA inhabited an anoxic Earth with abundant and benign Fe2+. We hypothesize that Fe2+ was an RNA cofactor when iron was abundant, and was substantially replaced by Mg2+ during a period known as the ‘great oxidation’, brought on by photosynthesis. Here, we demonstrate that reversing this putative metal substitution in an anoxic environment, by removing Mg2+ and replacing it with Fe2+, expands the catalytic repertoire of RNA. Fe2+ can confer on some RNAs a previously uncharacterized ability to catalyse single-electron transfer. We propose that RNA function, in analogy with protein function, can be understood fully only in the context of association with a range of possible metals. The catalysis of electron transfer, requisite for metabolic activity, may have been attenuated in RNA by photosynthesis and the rise of O2.

  14. Comparative cactus architecture and par interception

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, G.N.; Nobel, P.S. )

    1987-07-01

    Because CO{sup 2} uptake by cacti can be limited by low levels of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and because plant form affects PAR interception, various cactus forms were studied using a computer model, field measurements, and laboratory phototropic studies. Model predictions indicated that CO{sub 2} uptake by individual stems at an equinox was greatest when the stem were vertical, but at the summer and the winter solstice CO{sub 2} uptake was greatest for stems titled 30{degree} away from the equator. Stem tilting depended on form and taxonomic group. Not only can the shape of cacti be affected by PAR, but also shape influences PAR interception and hence CO{sub 2} uptake.

  15. Laccase catalysed grafting of phenolic onto xylan to improve its applicability in films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Jicheng; Wang, Bing; Zhang, Fangdong; Li, Zhongyang; Yin, Yunbei; Zhang, Dongxu

    2015-07-01

    Xylan can be tailored for various value-added applications. However, its use in aqueous systems is hampered by its complex structure, and small molecular weight. This research aimed at improving the xylan molecular weight and changing its structure. Laccase-catalysed oxidation of 4-coumaric acid (PCA), ferulic acid (FA), syringaldehyde (SD), and vanillin (VA) onto xylan was grafted to study the changes in its structure, tensile properties, and antibacterial activities. A Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum analyser was used to observe the changes in functional groups of xylan. The results showed a band at 1635 cm-1 corresponding to the stretching vibration of conjugated carbonyl carboxy hemoglobin and a benzene ring structure were strengthened; the appearance of a new band between 1200 cm-1 and 1270 cm-1 corresponding to alkyl ethers on the aryl C-O stretching vibration was due to the fact that during the grafting process, the number of benzene ring structures increased and covalent connections occurred between phenols and xylan. The reaction mechanism for the laccase-catalysed oxidation of phenol compounds onto xylan was preliminary explored by 13C-NMR. The results showed that PCA-xylan, FA-xylan graft poly onto xylan by Cγ ester bond, SD-xylan graft poly onto xylan by ether bond and an ester bond, and VD-xylan graft poly onto xylan by ether bond. The film strength of xylan derivatives has been significantly increased, especially for the PCA-xylan derivative. The increases in tensile stress at break, tensile strength, tensile yield stress, and Young's modulus were: 24.04%, 31.30%, 55.56%, and 28.21%, respectively. After laccase/phenolics were modified, xylan had a good antibacterial effect to E. coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum, and Bacillus subtilis. The SD-xylan, FA-xylan, and PCA-xylan showed a greater efficacy against E. coli, Corynebacterium glutamicum, and Bacillus subtilis, respectively.

  16. A unique cytosolic activity related but distinct from NQO1 catalyses metabolic activation of mitomycin C

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, P; Jaiswal, A K

    2000-01-01

    Mitomycin C (MMC) is a prototype bioreductive drug employed to treat a variety of cancers including head and neck cancer. Among the various enzymes, dicoumarol inhibitable cytosolic NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase1 (NQO1) was shown to catalyse bioreductive activation of MMC leading to cross-linking of the DNA and cytotoxicity. However, the role of NQO1 in metabolic activation of MMC has been disputed. In this report, we present cellular and animal models to demonstrate that NQO1 may play only a minor role in metabolic activation of MMC. We further demonstrate that bioreductive activation of MMC is catalysed by a unique cytosolic activity which is related but distinct from NQO1. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were developed that permanently express higher levels of cDNA-derived NQO1. These cells showed significantly increased protection against menadione toxicity. However, they failed to demonstrate higher cytotoxicity due to exposure to MMC under oxygen (normal air) or hypoxia, as compared to the wild-type control CHO cells. Disruption of the NQO1 gene by homologous recombination generated NQO1–/– mice that do not express the NQO1 gene resulting in the loss of NQO1 protein and activity. The cytosolic fractions from liver and colon tissues of NQO1–/– mice showed similar amounts of DNA cross-linking upon exposure to MMC, as observed in NQO1+/+ mice. The unique cytosolic activity that activated MMC in cytosolic fractions of liver and colon tissues of NQO1–/– mice was designated as cytosolic MMC reductase. This activity, like NQO1, was inhibited by dicoumarol and immunologically related to NQO1. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10755406

  17. Nocardia globerula NHB-2 nitrilase catalysed biotransformation of 4-cyanopyridine to isonicotinic acid

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Isonicotinic acid (INA) is an important pyridine derivative used in the manufacture of isoniazid (antituberculosatic drug) and other pharmaceutically important drugs. Nitrilase catalysed processes for the synthesis of pharmaceutically important acids from their corresponding nitriles are promising alternative over the cumbersome, hazardous, and energy demanding chemical processes. Nitrilase of Nocardia globerula NHB-2 (NitNHB2) is expressed in presence of isobutyronitrile in the growth medium (1.0% glucose, 0.5% peptone, 0.3% beef extract, and 0.1 % yeast extract, pH 7.5). NitNHB2 hydrolyses 4-cyanopyridine (4-CP) to INA without accumulation of isonicotinamide, which is common in the reaction catalysed via fungal nitrilases. The NitNHB2 suffers from substrate inhibition effect and hydrolysing activity up to 250 mM 4-CP was recorded. Complete conversion of 200 mM 4-CP to INA was achieved in 40 min using resting cell concentration corresponding to 10 U mL-1 nitrilase activity in the reaction. Substrate inhibition effect in the fed batch reaction (200 mM substrate feed/40min) led to formation of only 729 mM INA. In a fed batch reaction (100 mM 4-CP/20min), substrate inhibition effect was encountered after 7th feed and a total of 958 mM INA was produced in 400 min. The fed batch reaction scaled up to 1 L and 100% hydrolysis of 700 mM of 4-CP to INA at 35°C achieved in 140 min. The rate of INA production was 21.1 g h-1 mgDCW-1. This is the fastest biotransformation process ever reported for INA production with time and space productivity of 36 g L-1 h-1 using a bacterial nitrilase. PMID:22537922

  18. Thermodynamics of the maleate and citraconate hydration reactions catalysed by malease from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes.

    PubMed

    van der Werf, M J; van den Tweel, W J; Hartmans, S

    1993-11-01

    Malease from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes catalyses the hydration of both maleate and citraconate to D-malate and D-citramalate, respectively. The Kapp for these hydration reactions were 2050 and 104, respectively, under standard biochemical conditions (25 degrees C, pH 7.0, I = 0.1). The influence of the pH (6.0-8.5) on Kapp was determined. The Gibbs-free-energy changes under standard biochemical conditions for the hydration of the dianionic acids were calculated to be -19.28 kJ.mol-1 and -11.65 kJ.mol-1, respectively. From the obtained data together with data from the literature, the Gibbs free energy of formation of maleate2- and citraconate2- were calculated to be -588.91 kJ.mol-1 and -600.56 kJ.mol-1, respectively. The influence of the temperature (10-40 degrees C) on Kapp was determined for both hydration reactions. The enthalpy change (delta H degrees') and entropy change (delta S degrees') under standard biochemical conditions for the maleate2- (delta H degrees' = 18.07 kJ.mol-1, delta S degrees' = 2.94 J.mol-1 x K-1) and citraconate2- (delta H degrees' = -22.55 kJ.mol-1, delta S degrees' = -35.92 kJ.mol-1 x K-1) hydration reactions were calculated. The reaction rate of malease from Ps. pseudoalcaligenes was studied for both hydration reactions as a function of temperature. From these studies, the Gibbs free energies of activation for the maleate and citraconate hydration reactions catalysed by malease from Ps. pseudoalcaligenes were calculated to be 62.21 kJ.mol-1 and 63.43 kJ.mol-1, respectively. PMID:8223624

  19. Mapping residual transmission for malaria elimination.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Robert C; Le Menach, Arnaud; Kunene, Simon; Ntshalintshali, Nyasatu; Hsiang, Michelle S; Perkins, T Alex; Greenhouse, Bryan; Tatem, Andrew J; Cohen, Justin M; Smith, David L

    2015-01-01

    Eliminating malaria from a defined region involves draining the endemic parasite reservoir and minimizing local malaria transmission around imported malaria infections . In the last phases of malaria elimination, as universal interventions reap diminishing marginal returns, national resources must become increasingly devoted to identifying where residual transmission is occurring. The needs for accurate measures of progress and practical advice about how to allocate scarce resources require new analytical methods to quantify fine-grained heterogeneity in malaria risk. Using routine national surveillance data from Swaziland (a sub-Saharan country on the verge of elimination), we estimated individual reproductive numbers. Fine-grained maps of reproductive numbers and local malaria importation rates were combined to show 'malariogenic potential', a first for malaria elimination. As countries approach elimination, these individual-based measures of transmission risk provide meaningful metrics for planning programmatic responses and prioritizing areas where interventions will contribute most to malaria elimination. PMID:26714110

  20. Radioecological implications of the Par Pond drawdown

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, H.; Whicker, F.W.

    1991-12-05

    The drawdown of the Par Pond reservoir created dramatic alterations in this formerly stable lentic ecosystem. In addition, the radiation environment at Par Pond has changed significantly because of the exposure of Cesium 137-contaminated sediments and the appearance of new transport pathways to the terrestrial environment. In response to this situation, SREL was asked to study the radioecological implications of the reservoir drawdown. This report contains the objectives, methods, and results of the SREL study.

  1. Structural analysis of the ParR/parC plasmid partition complex.

    PubMed

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Ringgaard, Simon; Mercogliano, Christopher P; Gerdes, Kenn; Löwe, Jan

    2007-10-17

    Accurate DNA partition at cell division is vital to all living organisms. In bacteria, this process can involve partition loci, which are found on both chromosomes and plasmids. The initial step in Escherichia coli plasmid R1 partition involves the formation of a partition complex between the DNA-binding protein ParR and its cognate centromere site parC on the DNA. The partition complex is recognized by a second partition protein, the actin-like ATPase ParM, which forms filaments required for the active bidirectional movement of DNA replicates. Here, we present the 2.8 A crystal structure of ParR from E. coli plasmid pB171. ParR forms a tight dimer resembling a large family of dimeric ribbon-helix-helix (RHH)2 site-specific DNA-binding proteins. Crystallographic and electron microscopic data further indicate that ParR dimers assemble into a helix structure with DNA-binding sites facing outward. Genetic and biochemical experiments support a structural arrangement in which the centromere-like parC DNA is wrapped around a ParR protein scaffold. This structure holds implications for how ParM polymerization drives active DNA transport during plasmid partition. PMID:17898804

  2. Techniques for measuring intercepted and absorbed PAR in corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    1984-01-01

    The quantity of radiation potentially available for photosynthesis that is captured by the crop is best described as absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Absorbed PAR (APAR) is the difference between descending and ascending fluxes. The four components of APAR were measured above and within two planting densities of corn (Zea mays L.) and several methods of measuring and estimating APAR were examined. A line quantum sensor that spatially averages the photosynthetic photon flux density provided a rapid and portable method of measuring APAR. PAR reflectance from the soil (Typic Argiaquoll) surface decreased from 10% to less than 1% of the incoming PAR as the canopy cover increased. PAR reflectance from the canopy decreased to less than 3% at maximum vegetative cover. Intercepted PAR (1 - transmitted PAR) generally overestimated absorbed PAR by less than 4% throughout most of the growing season. Thus intercepted PAR appears to be a reasonable estimate of absorbed PAR.

  3. Eliminating Tracking-System Clock Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiun-Tsong; Bertiger, William I.

    1989-01-01

    Problems of redundancy and correlation avoided. ORTHO computer program eliminates effect of clock errors in differential solutions for positions of users of Global Positioning System (GPS). Main application, elimination of clock errors in tracking system based on GPS. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  4. Probing the ATP-binding site of P1 ParA: partition and repression have different requirements for ATP binding and hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Emma; Bouet, Jean-Yves; Funnell, Barbara E.

    2001-01-01

    The ParA family of proteins is involved in partition of a variety of plasmid and bacterial chromosomes. P1 ParA plays two roles in partition: it acts as a repressor of the par operon and has an undefined yet indispensable role in P1 plasmid localization. We constructed seven mutations in three putative ATP-binding motifs of ParA. Three classes of phenotypes resulted, each represented by mutations in more than one motif. Three mutations created ‘super-repressors’, in which repressor activity was much stronger than in wild-type ParA, while the remainder damaged repressor activity. All mutations eliminated partition activities, but two showed a plasmid stability defect that was worse than that of a null mutation. Four mutant ParAs, two super-repressors and two weak repressors, were analyzed biochemically, and all exhibited damaged ATPase activity. The super-repressors bound site-specifically to the par operator sequence, and this activity was strongly stimulated by ATP and ADP. These results support the proposal that ATP binding is essential but hydrolysis is inhibitory for ParA’s repressor activity and suggest that ATP hydrolysis is essential for plasmid localization. PMID:11532954

  5. A DFT study on the NHC catalysed Michael addition of enols to α,β-unsaturated acyl-azoliums. A base catalysed C-C bond-formation step.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Luis R; Sáez, José A; Arnó, Manuel

    2014-02-14

    The NHC catalysed nucleophilic additions of enols to α,β-unsaturated acyl-azolium intermediates have been investigated using DFT methods at the MPWB1K/6-31G** computational level. In the direct and the conjugate additions, formation of a hydrogen bond (HB) with the carboxyl oxygen is not sufficient to favour the C-C bond formation as a consequence of the low nucleophilic character of enols. Interestingly, when enols form a HB with the chloride counterion, the activation energies associated with the conjugate addition decrease as a consequence of the increased nucleophilic character of enols and the increased electrophilic character of the 'acyl-azolium + Cl' ion pair. Analysis of the DFT reactivity indices allows establishing a base catalysed C-C bond-formation step promoted by the chloride counterion. PMID:24343422

  6. ParCAT: Parallel Climate Analysis Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Brian E.; Steed, Chad A.; Shipman, Galen M.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Thornton, Peter E.; Wehner, Michael; Williams, Dean N.

    2013-01-01

    Climate science is employing increasingly complex models and simulations to analyze the past and predict the future of Earth s climate. This growth in complexity is creating a widening gap between the data being produced and the ability to analyze the datasets. Parallel computing tools are necessary to analyze, compare, and interpret the simulation data. The Parallel Climate Analysis Toolkit (ParCAT) provides basic tools to efficiently use parallel computing techniques to make analysis of these datasets manageable. The toolkit provides the ability to compute spatio-temporal means, differences between runs or differences between averages of runs, and histograms of the values in a data set. ParCAT is implemented as a command-line utility written in C. This allows for easy integration in other tools and allows for use in scripts. This also makes it possible to run ParCAT on many platforms from laptops to supercomputers. ParCAT outputs NetCDF files so it is compatible with existing utilities such as Panoply and UV-CDAT. This paper describes ParCAT and presents results from some example runs on the Titan system at ORNL.

  7. Metal-catalysed azidation of tertiary C-H bonds suitable for late-stage functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ankit; Hartwig, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Many enzymes oxidize unactivated aliphatic C-H bonds selectively to form alcohols; however, biological systems do not possess enzymes that catalyse the analogous aminations of C-H bonds. The absence of such enzymes limits the discovery of potential medicinal candidates because nitrogen-containing groups are crucial to the biological activity of therapeutic agents and clinically useful natural products. In one prominent example illustrating the importance of incorporating nitrogen-based functionality, the conversion of the ketone of erythromycin to the -N(Me)CH2- group in azithromycin leads to a compound that can be dosed once daily with a shorter treatment time. For such reasons, synthetic chemists have sought catalysts that directly convert C-H bonds to C-N bonds. Most currently used catalysts for C-H bond amination are ill suited to the intermolecular functionalization of complex molecules because they require excess substrate or directing groups, harsh reaction conditions, weak or acidic C-H bonds, or reagents containing specialized groups on the nitrogen atom. Among C-H bond amination reactions, those forming a C-N bond at a tertiary alkyl group would be particularly valuable, because this linkage is difficult to form from ketones or alcohols that might be created in a biosynthetic pathway by oxidation. Here we report a mild, selective, iron-catalysed azidation of tertiary C-H bonds that occurs without excess of the valuable substrate. The reaction tolerates aqueous environments and is suitable for the functionalization of complex structures in the late stages of a multistep synthesis. Moreover, this azidation makes it possible to install a range of nitrogen-based functional groups, including those from Huisgen `click' cycloadditions and the Staudinger ligation. We anticipate that these reactions will create opportunities to modify natural products, their precursors and their derivatives to produce analogues that contain different polarity and charge as a

  8. QM/MM Molecular Dynamics Study of the Galactopyranose → Galactofuranose Reaction Catalysed by Trypanosoma cruzi UDP-Galactopyranose Mutase

    PubMed Central

    Pierdominici-Sottile, Gustavo; Cossio Pérez, Rodrigo; Galindo, Johan F.; Palma, Juliana

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme UDP-Galactopyranose Mutase (UGM) catalyses the conversion of galactopyranose into galactofuranose. It is known to be critical for the survival and proliferation of several pathogenic agents, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic. Among them is Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite responsible for Chagas' disease. Since the enzyme is not present in mammals, it appears as a promising target for the design of drugs to treat this illness. A precise knowledge of the mechanism of the catalysed reaction would be crucial to assist in such design. In this article we present a detailed study of all the putative steps of the mechanism. The study is based on QM/MM free energy calculations along properly selected reaction coordinates, and on the analysis of the main structural changes and interactions taking place at every step. The results are discussed in connection with the experimental evidence and previous theoretical studies. PMID:25299056

  9. Determination of the time course of an enzymatic reaction by 1H NMR spectroscopy: hydroxynitrile lyase catalysed transhydrocyanation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickel, A.; Gradnig, G.; Griengl, H.; Schall, M.; Sterk, H.

    1996-01-01

    The time course of the enzyme catalysed transhydrocyanation of benzaldehyde to give ( S)-mandelonitrile was investigated using a hydroxynitrile lyase from Hevea brasiliensis as catalyst and acetone cyanohydrin as cyanide donor. Employing special techniques it was possible to apply 1H NMR spectroscopy in aqueous medium to monitor the concentration changes of all substrates and products. By this technique strong evidence for inhibition of the enzyme at higher substrate concentrations was obtained.

  10. Laccase‐catalysed oxidations of naturally occurring phenols: from in vivo biosynthetic pathways to green synthetic applications

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jong‐Rok; Baldrian, Petr; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Chang, Yoon‐Seok

    2012-01-01

    Summary Laccases are oxidases that contain several copper atoms, and catalyse single‐electron oxidations of phenolic compounds with concomitant reduction of oxygen to water. The enzymes are particularly widespread in ligninolytic basidiomycetes, but also occur in certain prokaryotes, insects and plants. Depending on the species, laccases are involved in various biosynthetic processes contributing to carbon recycling in land ecosystems and the morphogenesis of biomatrices, wherein low‐molecular‐weight naturally occurring phenols serve as key enzyme substrates. Studies of these in vivo synthetic pathways have afforded new insights into fungal laccase applicability in green synthetic chemistry. Thus, we here review fungal laccase‐catalysed oxidations of naturally occurring phenols that are particularly relevant to the synthesis of fine organic chemicals, and we discuss how the discovered synthetic strategies mimic laccase‐involved in vivo pathways, thus enhancing the green nature of such reactions. Laccase‐catalysed in vivo processes yield several types of biopolymers, including those of cuticles, lignin, polyflavonoids, humus and the melanin pigments, using natural mono‐ or poly‐phenols as building blocks. The in vivo synthetic pathways involve either phenoxyl radical‐mediated coupling or cross‐linking reactions, and can be adapted to the design of in vitro oxidative processes involving fungal laccases in organic synthesis; the laccase substrates and the synthetic mechanisms reflect in vivo processes. Notably, such in vitro synthetic pathways can also reproduce physicochemical properties (e.g. those of chromophores, and radical‐scavenging, hydration and antimicrobial activities) found in natural biomaterials. Careful study of laccase‐associated in vivo metabolic pathways has been rewarded by the discovery of novel green applications for fungal laccases. This review comprehensively summarizes the available data on laccase‐catalysed

  11. Laccase-catalysed oxidations of naturally occurring phenols: from in vivo biosynthetic pathways to green synthetic applications.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong-Rok; Baldrian, Petr; Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2012-05-01

    Laccases are oxidases that contain several copper atoms, and catalyse single-electron oxidations of phenolic compounds with concomitant reduction of oxygen to water. The enzymes are particularly widespread in ligninolytic basidiomycetes, but also occur in certain prokaryotes, insects and plants. Depending on the species, laccases are involved in various biosynthetic processes contributing to carbon recycling in land ecosystems and the morphogenesis of biomatrices, wherein low-molecular-weight naturally occurring phenols serve as key enzyme substrates. Studies of these in vivo synthetic pathways have afforded new insights into fungal laccase applicability in green synthetic chemistry. Thus, we here review fungal laccase-catalysed oxidations of naturally occurring phenols that are particularly relevant to the synthesis of fine organic chemicals, and we discuss how the discovered synthetic strategies mimic laccase-involved in vivo pathways, thus enhancing the green nature of such reactions. Laccase-catalysed in vivo processes yield several types of biopolymers, including those of cuticles, lignin, polyflavonoids, humus and the melanin pigments, using natural mono- or poly-phenols as building blocks. The in vivo synthetic pathways involve either phenoxyl radical-mediated coupling or cross-linking reactions, and can be adapted to the design of in vitro oxidative processes involving fungal laccases in organic synthesis; the laccase substrates and the synthetic mechanisms reflect in vivo processes. Notably, such in vitro synthetic pathways can also reproduce physicochemical properties (e.g. those of chromophores, and radical-scavenging, hydration and antimicrobial activities) found in natural biomaterials. Careful study of laccase-associated in vivo metabolic pathways has been rewarded by the discovery of novel green applications for fungal laccases. This review comprehensively summarizes the available data on laccase-catalysed biosynthetic pathways and associated

  12. Gold-catalysed cross-coupling between aryldiazonium salts and arylboronic acids: probing the usefulness of photoredox conditions.

    PubMed

    Cornilleau, Thomas; Hermange, Philippe; Fouquet, Eric

    2016-08-21

    The synthesis of biaryl compounds from aryldiazonium salts and arylboronic acids was achieved using PPh3AuCl as catalyst, CsF as base and acetonitrile as solvent. Combined to photosensitizers, irradiation by blue LEDs allowed accelerating the reaction and expanding its scope. Various functional groups were compatible including bromoaryls, iodoaryls, aldehydes and alcohols. A 2-iodobenzyl alcohol moiety was smoothly introduced by this method, enabling its consecutive isotopic labelling by a Pd-catalysed alkoxycarbonylation. PMID:27452177

  13. The role of enzyme dynamics and tunnelling in catalysing hydride transfer: studies of distal mutants of dihydrofolate reductase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Goodey, Nina M; Benkovic, Stephen J; Kohen, Amnon

    2006-01-01

    Residues M42 and G121 of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR) are on opposite sides of the catalytic centre (15 and 19 Å away from it, respectively). Theoretical studies have suggested that these distal residues might be part of a dynamics network coupled to the reaction catalysed at the active site. The ecDHFR mutant G121V has been extensively studied and appeared to have a significant effect on rate, but only a mild effect on the nature of H-transfer. The present work examines the effect of M42W on the physical nature of the catalysed hydride transfer step. Intrinsic kinetic isotope effects (KIEs), their temperature dependence and activation parameters were studied. The findings presented here are in accordance with the environmentally coupled hydrogen tunnelling. In contrast to the wild-type (WT), fluctuations of the donor–acceptor distance were required, leading to a significant temperature dependence of KIEs and deflated intercepts. A comparison of M42W and G121V to the WT enzyme revealed that the reduced rates, the inflated primary KIEs and their temperature dependences resulted from an imperfect potential surface pre-arrangement relative to the WT enzyme. Apparently, the coupling of the enzyme's dynamics to the reaction coordinate was altered by the mutation, supporting the models in which dynamics of the whole protein is coupled to its catalysed chemistry. PMID:16873118

  14. An ecotoxicological study on tin- and bismuth-catalysed PDMS based coatings containing a surface-active polymer.

    PubMed

    Pretti, Carlo; Oliva, Matteo; Mennillo, Elvira; Barbaglia, Martina; Funel, Marco; Reddy Yasani, Bhaskar; Martinelli, Elisa; Galli, Giancarlo

    2013-12-01

    Novel films were prepared by condensation curing reaction of a poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) matrix with bismuth neodecanoate and dibutyltin diacetate catalysts. An ecotoxicological study was performed on the leachates of the coatings using the bacterium Vibrio fischeri, the unicellular alga Dunaliella tertiolecta, the crustacean Artemia salina and the fish Sparus aurata (larvae) as testing organisms. A copper-based self-polishing commercial paint was also tested as reference. The results showed that the tin-catalysed coatings and the copper paint were highly toxic against at least two of the four test organisms, whereas bismuth-catalysed coatings did not show any toxic effect. Moreover, the same biological assessment was also carried out on PDMS coatings containing a surface-active fluorinated polymer. The toxicity of the entire polymeric system resulted only from the tin catalyst used for the condensation curing reaction, as the bismuth catalysed coatings incorporating the surface-active polymer remained atoxic toward all the tested organisms. PMID:24125869

  15. Fluorescent labelling of in situ hybridisation probes through the copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Susann; Manetto, Antonio; Cassinelli, Valentina; Fuchs, Jörg; Ma, Lu; Raddaoui, Nada; Houben, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    In situ hybridisation is a powerful tool to investigate the genome and chromosome architecture. Nick translation (NT) is widely used to label DNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). However, NT is limited to the use of long double-stranded DNA and does not allow the labelling of single-stranded and short DNA, e.g. oligonucleotides. An alternative technique is the copper(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC), at which azide and alkyne functional groups react in a multistep process catalysed by copper(I) ions to give 1,4-distributed 1,2,3-triazoles at a high yield (also called 'click reaction'). We successfully applied this technique to label short single-stranded DNA probes as well as long PCR-derived double-stranded probes and tested them by FISH on plant chromosomes and nuclei. The hybridisation efficiency of differently labelled probes was compared to those obtained by conventional labelling techniques. We show that copper(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition-labelled probes are reliable tools to detect different types of repetitive sequences on chromosomes opening new promising routes for the detection of single copy gene. Moreover, a combination of FISH using such probes with other techniques, e.g. immunohistochemistry (IHC) and cell proliferation assays using 5-ethynyl-deoxyuridine, is herein shown to be easily feasible. PMID:27095480

  16. Uncatalysed and catalysed soot combustion under NO{sub x} + O{sub 2}: Real diesel versus model soots

    SciTech Connect

    Atribak, I.; Bueno-Lopez, A.; Garcia-Garcia, A.

    2010-11-15

    In this work, the uncatalysed and catalysed combustion of two commercial carbon blacks and three diesel soot samples were analysed and related to the physico-chemical properties of these carbon materials. Model soot samples are less reactive than real soot samples, which can be attributed, mainly, to a lower proportion in heteroatoms and a higher graphitic order for the case of one of the carbon blacks. Among the diesel soot samples tested, the most relevant differences are the volatile matter/fixed carbon contents, which are directly related to the engine operating conditions (idle or loaded) and to the use of an oxidation catalyst or not in the exhaust. The soot collected after an oxidation catalyst (A-soot) is more reactive than the counterpart virgin soot obtained under the same engine operating modes but before the oxidation catalyst. The reactivity of the different soot samples follows the same trend under uncatalysed and catalysed combustion, the combustion profiles being always shifted towards lower temperatures for the catalysed reactions. The differences between the soot samples become less relevant in the presence of a catalyst. The ceria-zirconia catalysts tested are very effective not only to oxidise soot but also to combust the soluble organic fraction emitted at low temperatures. The most reactive soot (A-soot) exhibits a T{sub 50%} parameter of 450 C when using the most active catalyst. (author)

  17. Advocating for malaria elimination - learning from the successes of other infectious disease elimination programmes.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Maxine A; Dean, Angela J; Chancellor, Arna

    2014-01-01

    Malaria elimination is back on the agenda, but it remains challenging for countries to make the transition from effective control to elimination. Many other infectious diseases have been targeted by globally-coordinated elimination advocacy campaigns, and advocacy has been considered an essential component of the success of other disease elimination programmes. What can the malaria community learn from these successes? A review of infectious disease elimination programmes to identify successful elements of advocacy for disease elimination was undertaken. Key elements are: (i) a global elimination plan, supported by international health bodies; (ii) thorough costings and tools to support the business case; (iii) an approach that is positioned within a development framework; (iv) core elimination advocacy messages; (v) provision of advocacy tools for partners (vi) extensive and effective community engagement; and (vii) strong partnerships. These features provide insights into 'what works' in global elimination advocacy. Advocacy is a powerful tool to support the long-term political and financial commitment necessary for malaria elimination. The global malaria community needs to work together, to ensure that the early steps towards the end goal of malaria elimination are taken. PMID:24902848

  18. Extraction of copper from an oxidized (lateritic) ore using bacterially catalysed reductive dissolution.

    PubMed

    Nancucheo, Ivan; Grail, Barry M; Hilario, Felipe; du Plessis, Chris; Johnson, D Barrie

    2014-01-01

    An oxidized lateritic ore which contained 0.8 % (by weight) copper was bioleached in pH- and temperature-controlled stirred reactors under acidic reducing conditions using pure and mixed cultures of the acidophilic chemolithotrophic bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. Sulfur was provided as the electron donor for the bacteria, and ferric iron present in goethite (the major ferric iron mineral present in the ore) acted as electron acceptor. Significantly more copper was leached by bacterially catalysed reductive dissolution of the laterite than in aerobic cultures or in sterile anoxic reactors, with up to 78 % of the copper present in the ore being extracted. This included copper that was leached from acid-labile minerals (chiefly copper silicates) and that which was associated with ferric iron minerals in the lateritic ore. In the anaerobic bioreactors, soluble iron in the leach liquors was present as iron (II) and copper as copper (I), but both metals were rapidly oxidized (to iron (III) and copper (II)) when the reactors were aerated. The number of bacteria added to the reactors had a critical role in dictating the rate and yield of copper solubilised from the ore. This work has provided further evidence that reductive bioprocessing, a recently described approach for extracting base metals from oxidized deposits, has the potential to greatly extend the range of metal ores that can be biomined. PMID:24687752

  19. Arginine demethylation is catalysed by a subset of JmjC histone lysine demethylases.

    PubMed

    Walport, Louise J; Hopkinson, Richard J; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Schiller, Rachel; Ge, Wei; Kawamura, Akane; Schofield, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    While the oxygen-dependent reversal of lysine N(ɛ)-methylation is well established, the existence of bona fide N(ω)-methylarginine demethylases (RDMs) is controversial. Lysine demethylation, as catalysed by two families of lysine demethylases (the flavin-dependent KDM1 enzymes and the 2-oxoglutarate- and oxygen-dependent JmjC KDMs, respectively), proceeds via oxidation of the N-methyl group, resulting in the release of formaldehyde. Here we report detailed biochemical studies clearly demonstrating that, in purified form, a subset of JmjC KDMs can also act as RDMs, both on histone and non-histone fragments, resulting in formaldehyde release. RDM catalysis is studied using peptides of wild-type sequences known to be arginine-methylated and sequences in which the KDM's methylated target lysine is substituted for a methylated arginine. Notably, the preferred sequence requirements for KDM and RDM activity vary even with the same JmjC enzymes. The demonstration of RDM activity by isolated JmjC enzymes will stimulate efforts to detect biologically relevant RDM activity. PMID:27337104

  20. Sequence-defined bioactive macrocycles via an acid-catalysed cascade reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porel, Mintu; Thornlow, Dana N.; Phan, Ngoc N.; Alabi, Christopher A.

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic macrocycles derived from sequence-defined oligomers are a unique structural class whose ring size, sequence and structure can be tuned via precise organization of the primary sequence. Similar to peptides and other peptidomimetics, these well-defined synthetic macromolecules become pharmacologically relevant when bioactive side chains are incorporated into their primary sequence. In this article, we report the synthesis of oligothioetheramide (oligoTEA) macrocycles via a one-pot acid-catalysed cascade reaction. The versatility of the cyclization chemistry and modularity of the assembly process was demonstrated via the synthesis of >20 diverse oligoTEA macrocycles. Structural characterization via NMR spectroscopy revealed the presence of conformational isomers, which enabled the determination of local chain dynamics within the macromolecular structure. Finally, we demonstrate the biological activity of oligoTEA macrocycles designed to mimic facially amphiphilic antimicrobial peptides. The preliminary results indicate that macrocyclic oligoTEAs with just two-to-three cationic charge centres can elicit potent antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  1. Discrimination against diacylglycerol ethers in lipase-catalysed ethanolysis of shark liver oil.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Óscar; Vázquez, Luis; Reglero, Guillermo; Torres, Carlos F

    2013-01-15

    Lipase-catalysed ethanolysis of squalene-free shark liver oil was investigated. The mentioned shark liver oil was comprised mainly of diacylglycerol ether and triacylglycerols. In order to test discrimination against diacylglycerol ether, up to 10 different lipases were compared. The ratio of oil to ethanol and lipase stability were also evaluated. Surprisingly, lipase from Pseudomonas stutzeri was the fastest biocatalyst among all assayed, although poor discrimination against diacylglycerol ether was observed. The best results in terms of selectivity and stability were obtained with immobilised lipase from Candida antarctica (Novozym 435). Ethanolysis reaction after 24h in the presence of Novozym 435 produced total disappearance of triacylglycerol and a final reaction mixture comprised mainly of diacylglycerol ethers (10.6%), monoacylglycerol ethers (32.9%) and fatty acid ethyl esters (46.0%). In addition, when an excess of ethanol was used, diacylglycerol ethers completely disappeared after 15 h, giving a final product mainly composed of monoacylglycerol ethers (36.6%) and fatty acid ethyl esters (46.4%). PMID:23122085

  2. Palladium-catalysed transannular C-H functionalization of alicyclic amines.

    PubMed

    Topczewski, Joseph J; Cabrera, Pablo J; Saper, Noam I; Sanford, Melanie S

    2016-03-10

    Discovering pharmaceutical candidates is a resource-intensive enterprise that frequently requires the parallel synthesis of hundreds or even thousands of molecules. C-H bonds are present in almost all pharmaceutical agents. Consequently, the development of selective, rapid and efficient methods for converting these bonds into new chemical entities has the potential to streamline pharmaceutical development. Saturated nitrogen-containing heterocycles (alicyclic amines) feature prominently in pharmaceuticals, such as treatments for depression (paroxetine, amitifadine), diabetes (gliclazide), leukaemia (alvocidib), schizophrenia (risperidone, belaperidone), malaria (mefloquine) and nicotine addiction (cytisine, varenicline). However, existing methods for the C-H functionalization of saturated nitrogen heterocycles, particularly at sites remote to nitrogen, remain extremely limited. Here we report a transannular approach to selectively manipulate the C-H bonds of alicyclic amines at sites remote to nitrogen. Our reaction uses the boat conformation of the substrates to achieve palladium-catalysed amine-directed conversion of C-H bonds to C-C bonds on various alicyclic amine scaffolds. We demonstrate this approach by synthesizing new derivatives of several bioactive molecules, including varenicline. PMID:26886789

  3. Arginine demethylation is catalysed by a subset of JmjC histone lysine demethylases

    PubMed Central

    Walport, Louise J.; Hopkinson, Richard J.; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Schiller, Rachel; Ge, Wei; Kawamura, Akane; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    While the oxygen-dependent reversal of lysine Nɛ-methylation is well established, the existence of bona fide Nω-methylarginine demethylases (RDMs) is controversial. Lysine demethylation, as catalysed by two families of lysine demethylases (the flavin-dependent KDM1 enzymes and the 2-oxoglutarate- and oxygen-dependent JmjC KDMs, respectively), proceeds via oxidation of the N-methyl group, resulting in the release of formaldehyde. Here we report detailed biochemical studies clearly demonstrating that, in purified form, a subset of JmjC KDMs can also act as RDMs, both on histone and non-histone fragments, resulting in formaldehyde release. RDM catalysis is studied using peptides of wild-type sequences known to be arginine-methylated and sequences in which the KDM's methylated target lysine is substituted for a methylated arginine. Notably, the preferred sequence requirements for KDM and RDM activity vary even with the same JmjC enzymes. The demonstration of RDM activity by isolated JmjC enzymes will stimulate efforts to detect biologically relevant RDM activity. PMID:27337104

  4. Epoxidation of olefins catalysed by vanadium-salan complexes: a theoretical mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Maxim L; Pessoa, João Costa

    2009-07-28

    Plausible mechanisms of olefin epoxidation catalysed by a V-salan model complex [VIV(=O)(L)(H2O)] (1, L=(CH2NHCH2CH=CHO-)2) in the presence of H2O2 are investigated and compared by theoretical methods using density functional theory. Three main routes, i.e. the Mimoun, Sharpless and biradical mechanisms, were examined in detail, and the Sharpless pathway was found to be the most favourable one. The reaction starts from the formation of an active catalytic species [VV(=O)(OO)(LH)] (3c) upon interaction of 1 with H2O2, then concerted, highly synchronous attack of the olefin to 3c occurs yielding the epoxide and catalyst [VV(=O)2(LH)], the latter being oxidized by H2O2 to 3c. The activation barrier strongly depends on the proton location in the catalyst molecule and is the lowest when one of the oxygen atoms of the salan ligand is protonated and the vanadium atom is penta-coordinated with one vacant coordination position (complex 3c). The olefin in this reaction acts as an electron donor (nucleophile) rather than as an electron acceptor (electrophile). PMID:19587988

  5. Chemical synthesis of lactic acid from cellulose catalysed by lead(II) ions in water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanliang; Deng, Weiping; Wang, Binju; Zhang, Qinghong; Wan, Xiaoyue; Tang, Zhenchen; Wang, Ye; Zhu, Chun; Cao, Zexing; Wang, Guichang; Wan, Huilin

    2013-01-01

    The direct transformation of cellulose, which is the main component of lignocellulosic biomass, into building-block chemicals is the key to establishing biomass-based sustainable chemical processes. Only limited successes have been achieved for such transformations under mild conditions. Here we report the simple and efficient chemocatalytic conversion of cellulose in water in the presence of dilute lead(II) ions, into lactic acid, which is a high-value chemical used for the production of fine chemicals and biodegradable plastics. The lactic acid yield from microcrystalline cellulose and several lignocellulose-based raw biomasses is >60% at 463 K. Both theoretical and experimental studies suggest that lead(II) in combination with water catalyses a series of cascading steps for lactic acid formation, including the isomerization of glucose formed via the hydrolysis of cellulose into fructose, the selective cleavage of the C3-C4 bond of fructose to trioses and the selective conversion of trioses into lactic acid. PMID:23846730

  6. Rhodium-catalysed syn-carboamination of alkenes via a transient directing group.

    PubMed

    Piou, Tiffany; Rovis, Tomislav

    2015-11-01

    Alkenes are the most ubiquitous prochiral functional groups--those that can be converted from achiral to chiral in a single step--that are accessible to synthetic chemists. For this reason, difunctionalization reactions of alkenes (whereby two functional groups are added to the same double bond) are particularly important, as they can be used to produce highly complex molecular architectures. Stereoselective oxidation reactions, including dihydroxylation, aminohydroxylation and halogenation, are well established methods for functionalizing alkenes. However, the intermolecular incorporation of both carbon- and nitrogen-based functionalities stereoselectively across an alkene has not been reported. Here we describe the rhodium-catalysed carboamination of alkenes at the same (syn) face of a double bond, initiated by a carbon-hydrogen activation event that uses enoxyphthalimides as the source of both the carbon and the nitrogen functionalities. The reaction methodology allows for the intermolecular, stereospecific formation of one carbon-carbon and one carbon-nitrogen bond across an alkene, which is, to our knowledge, unprecedented. The reaction design involves the in situ generation of a bidentate directing group and the use of a new cyclopentadienyl ligand to control the reactivity of rhodium. The results provide a new way of synthesizing functionalized alkenes, and should lead to the convergent and stereoselective assembly of amine-containing acyclic molecules. PMID:26503048

  7. Synthesis of deuterium-labelled halogen derivatives of L-tryptophan catalysed by tryptophanase.

    PubMed

    Winnicka, Elżbieta; Szymańska, Jolanta; Kańska, Marianna

    2016-06-01

    The isotopomers of halogen derivatives of l-tryptophan (l-Trp) (4'-F-, 7'-F-, 5'-Cl- and 7'-Br-l-Trp), specifically labelled with deuterium in α-position of the side chain, were obtained by enzymatic coupling of the corresponding halogenated derivatives of indole with S-methyl-l-cysteine in (2)H2O, catalysed by enzyme tryptophanase (EC 4.1.99.1). The positional deuterium enrichment of the resulting tryptophan derivatives was controlled using (1)H NMR. In accordance with the mechanism of the lyase reaction, a 100% deuterium labelling was observed in the α-position; the chemical yields were between 23 and 51%. Furthermore, β-F-l-alanine, synthesized from β-F-pyruvic acid by the l-alanine dehydrogenase reaction, has been tested as a coupling agent to obtain the halogenated deuterium-labelled derivatives of l-Trp. The chemical yield (∼30%) corresponded to that as observed with S-methyl-l-cysteine but the deuterium label was only 63%, probably due to the use of a not completely deuterated incubation medium. PMID:26586366

  8. Vanillin formation from ferulic acid in Vanilla planifolia is catalysed by a single enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Gallage, Nethaji J.; Hansen, Esben H.; Kannangara, Rubini; Olsen, Carl Erik; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Holme, Inger; Hebelstrup, Kim; Grisoni, Michel; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2014-01-01

    Vanillin is a popular and valuable flavour compound. It is the key constituent of the natural vanilla flavour obtained from cured vanilla pods. Here we show that a single hydratase/lyase type enzyme designated vanillin synthase (VpVAN) catalyses direct conversion of ferulic acid and its glucoside into vanillin and its glucoside, respectively. The enzyme shows high sequence similarity to cysteine proteinases and is specific to the substitution pattern at the aromatic ring and does not metabolize caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid as demonstrated by coupled transcription/translation assays. VpVAN localizes to the inner part of the vanilla pod and high transcript levels are found in single cells located a few cell layers from the inner epidermis. Transient expression of VpVAN in tobacco and stable expression in barley in combination with the action of endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and UDP-glucosyltransferases result in vanillyl alcohol glucoside formation from endogenous ferulic acid. A gene encoding an enzyme showing 71% sequence identity to VpVAN was identified in another vanillin-producing plant species Glechoma hederacea and was also shown to be a vanillin synthase as demonstrated by transient expression in tobacco. PMID:24941968

  9. Characterization of uronate dehydrogenases catalysing the initial step in an oxidative pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pick, André; Schmid, Jochen; Sieber, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Uronate dehydrogenases catalyse the oxidation of uronic acids to aldaric acids, which represent ‘top value-added chemicals’ that have the potential to substitute petroleum-derived chemicals. The identification and annotation of three uronate dehydrogenases derived from Fulvimarina pelagi HTCC2506, Streptomyces viridochromogenes DSM 40736 and Oceanicola granulosus DSM 15982 via sequence analysis is described. Characterization and comparison with two known uronate dehydrogenases in regard to substrate spectrum, catalytic activity and pH as well as temperature dependence was performed. The catalytic efficiency was investigated in two different buffer systems; potassium phosphate and Tris-HCl. In addition to the typical and well available substrates glucuronate and galacturonate also mannuronate as part of many structural polysaccharides were tested. The uronate dehydrogenase of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Pseudomonas syringae showed catalytic dependency on the buffer system resulting in an increased Km especially for glucuronate in potassium phosphate compared with Tris-HCl buffer. Enzyme stability at 37°C of the different Udhs was in the order: P. syringae < S. viridochromogens < A. tumefaciens < F. pelagi < O. granulosus. All enzymes showed activity within a broad pH range from 7.0 to 9.5, only O. granulosus had a very narrow range around 7.0. PMID:25884328

  10. Resolvase-catalysed reactions between res sites differing in the central dinucleotide of subsite I.

    PubMed Central

    Stark, W M; Grindley, N D; Hatfull, G F; Boocock, M R

    1991-01-01

    The resolvase-catalysed reaction between two res sites in a circular DNA substrate normally gives two circular recombination products linked in a two-noded catenane. Homology between the two res sites at the central overlap dinucleotide of subsite I is important for recombination. Reactions between res sites differing at one position in the central dinucleotide (AC X AT) gave a low yield of recombinants containing mismatched base-pairs, but gave large amounts of a non-recombinant four-noded knot. This result was predicted by a 'simple rotation' model for strand exchange. The mismatch is evidently recognized only after commitment to an initial 180 degrees rotation of the resolvase-linked DNA ends, and it induces a second 180 degrees rotation which restores correct base-pairing at the overlap, giving the four-noded product. Correct base-pairing is not essential for religation, but may be important for release of the products. Characteristic patterns of 4, 6, 8 and 10 node knots, or 4, 8, 12 and 16 node knots were obtained, depending on the reaction conditions and the resolvase. Two pathways for multiple rounds of rotation in 360 degrees steps are inferred. The results support a model for strand exchange by supercoil-directed subunit rotation within a resolvase tetramer. Images PMID:1655422

  11. Glycolysis of carbon fiber-epoxy unidirectional mat catalysed by sodium hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaini, Mariana Binti Mohd; Badri, Khairiah Haji

    2014-09-01

    This study was conducted to recycle carbon fibre-epoxy (CFRP) composite in woven sheet/ mat form. The CFRP was recycled through glycolysis with polyethlyene glycol (PEG 200) as the solvent. The CFRP was loaded into the solvent at a ratio of 4:1 (w/w). PEG200 was diluted with water to a ratio of 80:20 (v/v). This reaction was catalysed by sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution with varying concentrations at 1.5, 1.7 and 1.9% (w/v). The glycolysis was conducted at 180-190 °C. The recovered CF (rCF) was analysed using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX) while the degraded solution was analysed using FTIR and the epoxy content was determined. The FTIR spectrum of the rCF exhibited the disappearance of the COC peak belonged to epoxy and supported by the SEM micrographs that showed clear rCF. On the other hand, the analysed filtrate detected the disappearance of oxygen peak element in the EDX spectrum for all rCF samples. This gave an indication that the epoxy resin has been removed from the surface of the carbon fiber.

  12. Vanillin formation from ferulic acid in Vanilla planifolia is catalysed by a single enzyme.

    PubMed

    Gallage, Nethaji J; Hansen, Esben H; Kannangara, Rubini; Olsen, Carl Erik; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Holme, Inger; Hebelstrup, Kim; Grisoni, Michel; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2014-01-01

    Vanillin is a popular and valuable flavour compound. It is the key constituent of the natural vanilla flavour obtained from cured vanilla pods. Here we show that a single hydratase/lyase type enzyme designated vanillin synthase (VpVAN) catalyses direct conversion of ferulic acid and its glucoside into vanillin and its glucoside, respectively. The enzyme shows high sequence similarity to cysteine proteinases and is specific to the substitution pattern at the aromatic ring and does not metabolize caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid as demonstrated by coupled transcription/translation assays. VpVAN localizes to the inner part of the vanilla pod and high transcript levels are found in single cells located a few cell layers from the inner epidermis. Transient expression of VpVAN in tobacco and stable expression in barley in combination with the action of endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and UDP-glucosyltransferases result in vanillyl alcohol glucoside formation from endogenous ferulic acid. A gene encoding an enzyme showing 71% sequence identity to VpVAN was identified in another vanillin-producing plant species Glechoma hederacea and was also shown to be a vanillin synthase as demonstrated by transient expression in tobacco. PMID:24941968

  13. Rhodium-catalysed asymmetric allylic arylation of racemic halides with arylboronic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidera, Mireia; Fletcher, Stephen P.

    2015-11-01

    Csp2-Csp2 cross-coupling reactions between arylboronic acid and aryl halides are widely used in both academia and industry and are strategically important in the development of new agrochemicals and pharmaceuticals. Csp2-Csp3 cross-coupling reactions have been developed, but enantioselective variations are rare and simply retaining the stereochemistry is a problem. Here we report a highly enantioselective Csp2-Csp3 bond-forming method that couples arylboronic acids to racemic allyl chlorides. Both enantiomers of a cyclic chloride are converted into a single enantiomer of product via a dynamic kinetic asymmetric transformation. This Rh-catalysed method uses readily available and inexpensive building blocks and is mild and broadly applicable. For electron-deficient, electron-rich or ortho-substituted boronic acids better results are obtained with racemic allyl bromides. Oxygen substitution in the allyl halide is tolerated and the products can be functionalized to provide diverse building blocks. The approach fills a significant gap in the methods for catalytic asymmetric synthesis.

  14. Palladium-catalysed transannular C-H functionalization of alicyclic amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topczewski, Joseph J.; Cabrera, Pablo J.; Saper, Noam I.; Sanford, Melanie S.

    2016-03-01

    Discovering pharmaceutical candidates is a resource-intensive enterprise that frequently requires the parallel synthesis of hundreds or even thousands of molecules. C-H bonds are present in almost all pharmaceutical agents. Consequently, the development of selective, rapid and efficient methods for converting these bonds into new chemical entities has the potential to streamline pharmaceutical development. Saturated nitrogen-containing heterocycles (alicyclic amines) feature prominently in pharmaceuticals, such as treatments for depression (paroxetine, amitifadine), diabetes (gliclazide), leukaemia (alvocidib), schizophrenia (risperidone, belaperidone), malaria (mefloquine) and nicotine addiction (cytisine, varenicline). However, existing methods for the C-H functionalization of saturated nitrogen heterocycles, particularly at sites remote to nitrogen, remain extremely limited. Here we report a transannular approach to selectively manipulate the C-H bonds of alicyclic amines at sites remote to nitrogen. Our reaction uses the boat conformation of the substrates to achieve palladium-catalysed amine-directed conversion of C-H bonds to C-C bonds on various alicyclic amine scaffolds. We demonstrate this approach by synthesizing new derivatives of several bioactive molecules, including varenicline.

  15. Glycolysis of carbon fiber-epoxy unidirectional mat catalysed by sodium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Zaini, Mariana Binti Mohd; Badri, Khairiah Haji

    2014-09-03

    This study was conducted to recycle carbon fibre-epoxy (CFRP) composite in woven sheet/ mat form. The CFRP was recycled through glycolysis with polyethlyene glycol (PEG 200) as the solvent. The CFRP was loaded into the solvent at a ratio of 4:1 (w/w). PEG200 was diluted with water to a ratio of 80:20 (v/v). This reaction was catalysed by sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution with varying concentrations at 1.5, 1.7 and 1.9% (w/v). The glycolysis was conducted at 180-190 °C. The recovered CF (rCF) was analysed using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX) while the degraded solution was analysed using FTIR and the epoxy content was determined. The FTIR spectrum of the rCF exhibited the disappearance of the COC peak belonged to epoxy and supported by the SEM micrographs that showed clear rCF. On the other hand, the analysed filtrate detected the disappearance of oxygen peak element in the EDX spectrum for all rCF samples. This gave an indication that the epoxy resin has been removed from the surface of the carbon fiber.

  16. Hydride transfer catalysed by Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis dihydrofolate reductase: coupled motions and distal mutations.

    PubMed

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Watney, James B

    2006-08-29

    This paper reviews the results from hybrid quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations of the hydride transfer reaction catalysed by wild-type (WT) and mutant Escherichia coli and WT Bacillus subtilis dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). Nuclear quantum effects such as zero point energy and hydrogen tunnelling are significant in these reactions and substantially decrease the free energy barrier. The donor-acceptor distance decreases to ca 2.7 A at transition-state configurations to enable the hydride transfer. A network of coupled motions representing conformational changes along the collective reaction coordinate facilitates the hydride transfer reaction by decreasing the donor-acceptor distance and providing a favourable geometric and electrostatic environment. Recent single-molecule experiments confirm that at least some of these thermally averaged equilibrium conformational changes occur on the millisecond time-scale of the hydride transfer. Distal mutations can lead to non-local structural changes and significantly impact the probability of sampling configurations conducive to the hydride transfer, thereby altering the free-energy barrier and the rate of hydride transfer. E. coli and B. subtilis DHFR enzymes, which have similar tertiary structures and hydride transfer rates with 44% sequence identity, exhibit both similarities and differences in the equilibrium motions and conformational changes correlated to hydride transfer, suggesting a balance of conservation and flexibility across species. PMID:16873124

  17. Why Should We Pivot in Gaussian Elimination?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozema, Edward

    1988-01-01

    The article discusses the use of computers to teacher college level mathematics. In particular, the Gaussian elimination procedure for solving a system of n linear equations in n unknowns, using a computer, is examined. (PK)

  18. Elimination Problems in Infants and Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... inability to digest wheat (CELIAC DISEASE) or milk (LACTOSE INTOLERANCE) can cause these symptoms. Eliminate foods that make ... be an appropriate substitute for infants who have lactose intolerance. No 4. Does your child seem to have ...

  19. Diagnostic Tools for Onchocerciasis Elimination Programs.

    PubMed

    Vlaminck, Johnny; Fischer, Peter U; Weil, Gary J

    2015-11-01

    Onchocerciasis (river blindness) is a major public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa. Major disease-control programs have greatly reduced both disease and infection prevalence by mass distribution of donated ivermectin. Recent studies have shown that local elimination was achieved in some areas following many years of ivermectin. The global health community has recently decided to build on these successes with a new program that aims to eliminate onchocerciasis. Diagnostic tests that were useful for identifying priority areas for disease prevention may not be adequate tools for elimination programs. This paper reviews available and emerging diagnostic tests for onchocerciasis and considers how they might be best employed during different stages of onchocerciasis elimination programs. PMID:26458784

  20. ParA and ParB coordinate chromosome segregation with cell elongation and division during Streptomyces sporulation.

    PubMed

    Donczew, Magdalena; Mackiewicz, Paweł; Wróbel, Agnieszka; Flärdh, Klas; Zakrzewska-Czerwińska, Jolanta; Jakimowicz, Dagmara

    2016-04-01

    In unicellular bacteria, the ParA and ParB proteins segregate chromosomes and coordinate this process with cell division and chromosome replication. During sporulation of mycelial Streptomyces, ParA and ParB uniformly distribute multiple chromosomes along the filamentous sporogenic hyphal compartment, which then differentiates into a chain of unigenomic spores. However, chromosome segregation must be coordinated with cell elongation and multiple divisions. Here, we addressed the question of whether ParA and ParB are involved in the synchronization of cell-cycle processes during sporulation in Streptomyces To answer this question, we used time-lapse microscopy, which allows the monitoring of growth and division of single sporogenic hyphae. We showed that sporogenic hyphae stop extending at the time of ParA accumulation and Z-ring formation. We demonstrated that both ParA and ParB affect the rate of hyphal extension. Additionally, we showed that ParA promotes the formation of massive nucleoprotein complexes by ParB. We also showed that FtsZ ring assembly is affected by the ParB protein and/or unsegregated DNA. Our results indicate the existence of a checkpoint between the extension and septation of sporogenic hyphae that involves the ParA and ParB proteins. PMID:27248800

  1. ParA and ParB coordinate chromosome segregation with cell elongation and division during Streptomyces sporulation

    PubMed Central

    Donczew, Magdalena; Mackiewicz, Paweł; Wróbel, Agnieszka; Flärdh, Klas; Zakrzewska-Czerwińska, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    In unicellular bacteria, the ParA and ParB proteins segregate chromosomes and coordinate this process with cell division and chromosome replication. During sporulation of mycelial Streptomyces, ParA and ParB uniformly distribute multiple chromosomes along the filamentous sporogenic hyphal compartment, which then differentiates into a chain of unigenomic spores. However, chromosome segregation must be coordinated with cell elongation and multiple divisions. Here, we addressed the question of whether ParA and ParB are involved in the synchronization of cell-cycle processes during sporulation in Streptomyces. To answer this question, we used time-lapse microscopy, which allows the monitoring of growth and division of single sporogenic hyphae. We showed that sporogenic hyphae stop extending at the time of ParA accumulation and Z-ring formation. We demonstrated that both ParA and ParB affect the rate of hyphal extension. Additionally, we showed that ParA promotes the formation of massive nucleoprotein complexes by ParB. We also showed that FtsZ ring assembly is affected by the ParB protein and/or unsegregated DNA. Our results indicate the existence of a checkpoint between the extension and septation of sporogenic hyphae that involves the ParA and ParB proteins. PMID:27248800

  2. Schistosomiasis elimination by 2020 or 2030?

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Alan; Jourdan, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Schistosomiasis has been a public health burden in a number of countries across the globe for centuries and probably beyond. The World Health Organization and partners are currently preparing to move towards elimination of this disease. However, given the historical challenges and barriers to ridding areas of this water-borne parasite infection, we question whether the current targets for eliminating schistosomiasis as a global health problem can be achieved. PMID:26907938

  3. Mapping residual transmission for malaria elimination

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Robert C; Le Menach, Arnaud; Kunene, Simon; Ntshalintshali, Nyasatu; Hsiang, Michelle S; Perkins, T Alex; Greenhouse, Bryan; Tatem, Andrew J; Cohen, Justin M; Smith, David L

    2015-01-01

    Eliminating malaria from a defined region involves draining the endemic parasite reservoir and minimizing local malaria transmission around imported malaria infections . In the last phases of malaria elimination, as universal interventions reap diminishing marginal returns, national resources must become increasingly devoted to identifying where residual transmission is occurring. The needs for accurate measures of progress and practical advice about how to allocate scarce resources require new analytical methods to quantify fine-grained heterogeneity in malaria risk. Using routine national surveillance data from Swaziland (a sub-Saharan country on the verge of elimination), we estimated individual reproductive numbers. Fine-grained maps of reproductive numbers and local malaria importation rates were combined to show ‘malariogenic potential’, a first for malaria elimination. As countries approach elimination, these individual-based measures of transmission risk provide meaningful metrics for planning programmatic responses and prioritizing areas where interventions will contribute most to malaria elimination. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09520.001 PMID:26714110

  4. Intestinal elimination of ciprofloxacin in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Ramon, J; Dautrey, S; Farinoti, R; Carbon, C; Rubinstein, E

    1994-01-01

    The intestinal transepithelial elimination of ciprofloxacin was studied in a rabbit model. Jejunal, ileal, and cecal segments along with their intact blood vessels were isolated and perfused, and their contents were collected over a 120-min period following administration of a single parenteral dose of 27 mg of ciprofloxacin per kg of body weight. The intestinal elimination rates of ciprofloxacin were 0.126 +/- 0.084, 0.235 +/- 0.22, and 0.11 +/- 0.084 micrograms.min-1.cm-2 for the jejunal, ileal, and cecal segments, respectively. The calculated fractions of ciprofloxacin eliminated were 3.3 mg from the jejunum and 13.8 mg from the ileum, representing 19% of the administered dose. Additional amounts of 2.5 to 3.7 mg or 4.9 to 7.3% of the administered dose were eliminated from the cecum. Elimination was probably not due to a passive diffusion process but rather due to an active transepithelial transport. This intestinal elimination pattern of ciprofloxacin may explain the unusual activity of the fluoroquinolones in modifying the intestinal flora. PMID:8031042

  5. Par-4: A New Activator of Myosin Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Vetterkind, Susanne; Lee, Eunhee; Sundberg, Eric; Poythress, Ransom H.; Tao, Terence C.; Preuss, Ute

    2010-01-01

    Myosin phosphatase (MP) is a key regulator of myosin light chain (LC20) phosphorylation, a process essential for motility, apoptosis, and smooth muscle contractility. Although MP inhibition is well studied, little is known about MP activation. We have recently demonstrated that prostate apoptosis response (Par)-4 modulates vascular smooth muscle contractility. Here, we test the hypothesis that Par-4 regulates MP activity directly. We show, by proximity ligation assays, surface plasmon resonance and coimmunoprecipitation, that Par-4 interacts with the targeting subunit of MP, MYPT1. Binding is mediated by the leucine zippers of MYPT1 and Par-4 and reduced by Par-4 phosphorylation. Overexpression of Par-4 leads to increased phosphatase activity of immunoprecipitated MP, whereas small interfering RNA knockdown of endogenous Par-4 significantly decreases MP activity and increases MYPT1 phosphorylation. LC20 phosphorylation assays demonstrate that overexpression of Par-4 reduces LC20 phosphorylation. In contrast, a phosphorylation site mutant, but not wild-type Par-4, interferes with zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK)-mediated MP inhibition. We conclude from our results Par-4 operates through a “padlock” model in which binding of Par-4 to MYPT1 activates MP by blocking access to the inhibitory phosphorylation sites, and inhibitory phosphorylation of MYPT1 by ZIPK requires “unlocking” of Par-4 by phosphorylation and displacement of Par-4 from the MP complex. PMID:20130087

  6. suPAR and Team Nephrology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) accounts for nearly 10 % of patients who require renal replacement therapy. Elevated circulating levels of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) have been identified as a biomarker to discriminate primary FSGS from other glomerulopathies. Subsequent reports have questioned the diagnostic utility of this test. In a study in BMC Medicine, Huang et al. demonstrate that urinary soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) excretion assists in distinguishing primary FSGS from other glomerular diseases, and that high plasma suPAR concentrations are not directly linked to a decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). This observation suggests that further investigation of suPAR is warranted in patients with FSGS. It should be interpreted in light of a recent report that B7-1 is expressed in the podocytes of a subset of patients with FSGS, and that blocking this molecule may represent the first successful targeted intervention for this disease. These advances highlight the rapid pace of scientific progress in the field of nephrology. Nephrologists should work together, share resources, and expedite the design of protocols to evaluate these novel biomarkers in a comprehensive and scientifically valid manner. Please see related article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/12/81. PMID:24885021

  7. suPAR and Team Nephrology.

    PubMed

    Trachtman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) accounts for nearly 10 % of patients who require renal replacement therapy. Elevated circulating levels of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) have been identified as a biomarker to discriminate primary FSGS from other glomerulopathies. Subsequent reports have questioned the diagnostic utility of this test. In a study in BMC Medicine, Huang et al. demonstrate that urinary soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) excretion assists in distinguishing primary FSGS from other glomerular diseases, and that high plasma suPAR concentrations are not directly linked to a decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). This observation suggests that further investigation of suPAR is warranted in patients with FSGS. It should be interpreted in light of a recent report that B7-1 is expressed in the podocytes of a subset of patients with FSGS, and that blocking this molecule may represent the first successful targeted intervention for this disease. These advances highlight the rapid pace of scientific progress in the field of nephrology. Nephrologists should work together, share resources, and expedite the design of protocols to evaluate these novel biomarkers in a comprehensive and scientifically valid manner. PMID:24885021

  8. Conversion du methanol en ethanol par carbonylation suivie d'hydrogenolyse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaucher, Melissa

    Ce projet de maîtrise s'inscrit dans le cadre des nouvelles filières énergétiques renouvelables et s'effectue au sein de la Chaire de recherche industrielle sur l'éthanol cellulosique créée par trois partenaires industriels (Enerkem, CRB et Ethanol Greenfield) et le gouvernement du Québec en collaboration avec l'Université de Sherbrooke. La stratégie d'un des partenaires, Enerkem, est de convertir par gazéification des résidus de biomasse non homogène en Syngas, ce gaz est ensuite converti en méthanol puis en éthanol. L'objectif principal de ce projet est la conversion catalytique de l'acétate en alcool. Un catalyseur commercial, composé de cuivre et de chrome, a permis l'obtention des conversions de plus de 95 % et une sélectivité pour l'éthanol de plus de 50 % avec l'acétate de méthyle, de 99 % avec l'acétate d'éthyle et de 50 % avec l'acétate de butyle. Les conditions optimales trouvées impliquent une température de 215 °C, une pression de 350 psig, une vitesse spatiale de 1800 h -1 H2 STP et un ratio H2 : Acétate de 7. Un catalyseur alternatif, à base de cuivre et de zinc, a aussi été testé. L'objectif secondaire est la carbonylation du méthanol en acétate. Cette étape a été réalisée en phase gazeuse où des rendements très élevés, soit plus de 2000 kg d'acétate de méthyle par kg de métal précieux à l'heure (kg AM/ kg métal précieux/h), ont été obtenus. Les conditions d'opérations testées impliquent une température variant entre 200-240 °C, une pression entre 250-600 psig, des ratios McOH : CO de 1 à 2,5. Mots clés: Carbonylation, Éthanol, Hydrogénolyse, Catalyse hétérogène.

  9. View from east to west of PAR site storage building; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from east to west of PAR site storage building; formerly PAR dispensary - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Storage Building, Across street from Family Housing Units 110 & 111, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  10. View from west to east of PAR site resident engineer's ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from west to east of PAR site resident engineer's office building (REOB) - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Resident Engineers Office Building, Southeast of intersection of PAR Access Road & Fourth Avenue, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  11. A Combined Global and Local Approach to Elucidate Spatial Organization of the Mycobacterial ParB-parS Partition Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    B Chaudhuri; S Gupta; V Urban; M Chance; R DMello; L Smith; K Lyons; J Gee

    2011-12-31

    Combining diverse sets of data at global (size, shape) and local (residue) scales is an emerging trend for elucidating the organization and function of the cellular assemblies. We used such a strategy, combining data from X-ray and neutron scattering with H/D-contrast variation and X-ray footprinting with mass spectrometry, to elucidate the spatial organization of the ParB-parS assembly from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The ParB-parS participates in plasmid and chromosome segregation and condensation in predivisional bacterial cells. ParB polymerizes around the parS centromere(s) to form a higher-order assembly that serves to recruit cyto-skeletal ParA ATPases and SMC proteins for chromosome segregation. A hybrid model of the ParB-parS was built by combining and correlating computational models with experiment-derived information about size, shape, position of the symmetry axis within the shape, internal topology, DNA-protein interface, exposed surface patches, and prior knowledge. This first view of the ParB-parS leads us to propose how ParB spread on the chromosome to form a larger assembly.

  12. A Combined Global and Local Approach to Elucidate Spatial Organization of the Mycobacterial ParB-parS Partition

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Barnali; Gupta, Sayan; Urban, Volker S; Chance, Mark; D'Mello, Rhijuta; Smith, Lauren; Lyons, Kelly; Gee, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Combining diverse sets of data at global (size, shape) and local (residue) scales is an emerging trend for elucidating the organization and function of the cellular assemblies. We used such a strategy, combining data from X-ray and neutron scattering with H/D-contrast variation and X-ray footprinting with mass spectrometry, to elucidate the spatial organization of the ParB-parS assembly from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The ParB-parS participates in plasmid and chromosome segregation and condensation in predivisional bacterial cells. ParB polymerizes around the parS centromere(s) to form a higher-order assembly that serves to recruit cyto-skeletal ParA ATPases and SMC proteins for chromosome segregation. A hybrid model of the ParB-parS was built by combining and correlating computational models with experiment-derived information about size, shape, position of the symmetry axis within the shape, internal topology, DNA-protein interface, exposed surface patches, and prior knowledge. This first view of the ParB-parS leads us to propose how ParB spread on the chromosome to form a larger assembly.

  13. Martian Atmospheric Pressure Static Charge Elimination Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    A Martian pressure static charge elimination tool is currently in development in the Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory (ESPL) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. In standard Earth atmosphere conditions, static charge can be neutralized from an insulating surface using air ionizers. These air ionizers generate ions through corona breakdown. The Martian atmosphere is 7 Torr of mostly carbon dioxide, which makes it inherently difficult to use similar methods as those used for standard atmosphere static elimination tools. An initial prototype has been developed to show feasibility of static charge elimination at low pressure, using corona discharge. A needle point and thin wire loop are used as the corona generating electrodes. A photo of the test apparatus is shown below. Positive and negative high voltage pulses are sent to the needle point. This creates positive and negative ions that can be used for static charge neutralization. In a preliminary test, a floating metal plate was charged to approximately 600 volts under Martian atmospheric conditions. The static elimination tool was enabled and the voltage on the metal plate dropped rapidly to -100 volts. This test data is displayed below. Optimization is necessary to improve the electrostatic balance of the static elimination tool.

  14. Body elimination attitude family resemblance in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Al-Fayez, Ghenaim; Awadalla, Abdelwahid; Arikawa, Hiroko; Templer, Donald I; Hutton, Shane

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the family resemblance of attitude toward body elimination in Kuwaiti participants. This study was conceptualized in the context of the theories of moral development, importance of cleanliness in the Muslim religion, cross-cultural differences in personal hygiene practices, previous research reporting an association between family attitudes and body elimination attitude, and health implications. The 24-item Likert-type format Body Elimination Attitude Scale-Revised was administered to 277 Kuwaiti high school students and 437 of their parents. Females scored higher, indicating greater disgust, than the males. Moreover, sons' body elimination attitude correlated more strongly with fathers' attitude (r = .85) than with that of the mothers (r = .64). Daughters' attitude was similarly associated with the fathers' (r = .89) and the mothers' attitude (r = .86). The high correlations were discussed within the context of Kuwait having a collectivistic culture with authoritarian parenting style. The higher adolescent correlations, and in particular the boys' correlation with fathers than with mothers, was explained in terms of the more dominant role of the Muslim father in the family. Public health and future research implications were suggested. A theoretical formulation was advanced in which "ideal" body elimination attitude is relative rather than absolute, and is a function of one's life circumstances, one's occupation, one's culture and subculture, and the society that one lives in. PMID:22029659

  15. Defective Cytochrome P450-Catalysed Drug Metabolism in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease.

    PubMed

    Nicoli, Elena-Raluca; Al Eisa, Nada; Cluzeau, Celine V M; Wassif, Christopher A; Gray, James; Burkert, Kathryn R; Smith, David A; Morris, Lauren; Cologna, Stephanie M; Peer, Cody J; Sissung, Tristan M; Uscatu, Constantin-Daniel; Figg, William D; Pavan, William J; Vite, Charles H; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M

    2016-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in either the NPC1 or NPC2 gene. NPC is characterised by storage of multiple lipids in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment, resulting in cellular and organ system dysfunction. The underlying molecular mechanisms that lead to the range of clinical presentations in NPC are not fully understood. While evaluating potential small molecule therapies in Npc1-/- mice, we observed a consistent pattern of toxicity associated with drugs metabolised by the cytochrome P450 system, suggesting a potential drug metabolism defect in NPC1 disease. Investigation of the P450 system in the context of NPC1 dysfunction revealed significant changes in the gene expression of many P450 associated genes across the full lifespan of Npc1-/- mice, decreased activity of cytochrome P450 reductase, and a global decrease of multiple cytochrome P450 catalysed dealkylation reactions. In vivo drug metabolism studies using a prototypic P450 metabolised drug, midazolam, confirmed dysfunction in drug clearance in the Npc1-/- mouse. Expression of the Phase II enzyme uridinediphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) was also significantly reduced in Npc1-/- mice. Interestingly, reduced activity within the P450 system was also observed in heterozygous Npc1+/- mice. The reduced activity of P450 enzymes may be the result of bile acid deficiency/imbalance in Npc1-/- mice, as bile acid treatment significantly rescued P450 enzyme activity in Npc1-/- mice and has the potential to be an adjunctive therapy for NPC disease patients. The dysfunction in the cytochrome P450 system were recapitulated in the NPC1 feline model. Additionally, we present the first evidence that there are alterations in the P450 system in NPC1 patients. PMID:27019000

  16. Defective Cytochrome P450-Catalysed Drug Metabolism in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wassif, Christopher A.; Gray, James; Burkert, Kathryn R.; Smith, David A.; Morris, Lauren; Cologna, Stephanie M.; Peer, Cody J.; Sissung, Tristan M.; Uscatu, Constantin-Daniel; Figg, William D.; Pavan, William J.; Vite, Charles H.; Porter, Forbes D.; Platt, Frances M.

    2016-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in either the NPC1 or NPC2 gene. NPC is characterised by storage of multiple lipids in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment, resulting in cellular and organ system dysfunction. The underlying molecular mechanisms that lead to the range of clinical presentations in NPC are not fully understood. While evaluating potential small molecule therapies in Npc1-/- mice, we observed a consistent pattern of toxicity associated with drugs metabolised by the cytochrome P450 system, suggesting a potential drug metabolism defect in NPC1 disease. Investigation of the P450 system in the context of NPC1 dysfunction revealed significant changes in the gene expression of many P450 associated genes across the full lifespan of Npc1-/- mice, decreased activity of cytochrome P450 reductase, and a global decrease of multiple cytochrome P450 catalysed dealkylation reactions. In vivo drug metabolism studies using a prototypic P450 metabolised drug, midazolam, confirmed dysfunction in drug clearance in the Npc1-/- mouse. Expression of the Phase II enzyme uridinediphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) was also significantly reduced in Npc1-/- mice. Interestingly, reduced activity within the P450 system was also observed in heterozygous Npc1+/- mice. The reduced activity of P450 enzymes may be the result of bile acid deficiency/imbalance in Npc1-/- mice, as bile acid treatment significantly rescued P450 enzyme activity in Npc1-/- mice and has the potential to be an adjunctive therapy for NPC disease patients. The dysfunction in the cytochrome P450 system were recapitulated in the NPC1 feline model. Additionally, we present the first evidence that there are alterations in the P450 system in NPC1 patients. PMID:27019000

  17. Kinetics of acyl transfer reactions in organic media catalysed by Candida antarctica lipase B.

    PubMed

    Martinelle, M; Hult, K

    1995-09-01

    The acyl transfer reactions catalysed by Candida antartica lipase B in organic media followed a bi-bi ping-pong mechanism, with competitive substrate inhibition by the alcohols used as acyl acceptors. The effect of organic solvents on Vm and Km was investigated. The Vm values in acetonitrile was 40-50% of those in heptane. High Km values in acetonitrile compared to those in heptane could partly be explained by an increased solvation of the substrates in acetonitrile. Substrate solvation caused a 10-fold change in substrate specificity, defined as (Vm/Km)ethyl octanoate/(Vm/Km)octanoic acid, going from heptane to acetonitrile. Deacylation was the rate determining step for the acyl transfer in heptane with vinyl- and ethyl octanoate as acyl donors and (R)-2-octanol as acyl acceptor. With 1-octanol, a rate determining deacylation step in heptane was indicated using the same acyl donors. Using 1-octanol as acceptor in heptane, S-ethyl thiooctanoate had a 25- to 30-fold lower Vm/Km value and vinyl octanoate a 4-fold higher Vm/Km value than that for ethyl octanoate. The difference showed to be a Km effect for vinyl octanoate and mainly a Km effect for S-ethyl thiooctanoate. The Vm values of the esterification of octanoic acid with different alcohols was 10-30-times lower than those for the corresponding transesterification of ethyl octanoate. The low activity could be explained by a low pH around the enzyme caused by the acid or a withdrawing of active enzyme by nonproductive binding by the acid. PMID:7669809

  18. Eukaryotic formylglycine-generating enzyme catalyses a monooxygenase type of reaction.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jianhe; Alam, Sarfaraz; Radhakrishnan, Karthikeyan; Mariappan, Malaiyalam; Rudolph, Markus Georg; May, Caroline; Dierks, Thomas; von Figura, Kurt; Schmidt, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    C α-formylglycine (FGly) is the catalytic residue of sulfatases in eukaryotes. It is generated by a unique post-translational modification catalysed by the FGly-generating enzyme (FGE) in the endoplasmic reticulum. FGE oxidizes a cysteine residue within the conserved CxPxR sequence motif of nascent sulfatase polypeptides to FGly. Here we show that this oxidation is strictly dependent on molecular oxygen (O2) and consumes 1 mol O2 per mol FGly formed. For maximal activity FGE requires an O2 concentration of 9% (105 μM). Sustained FGE activity further requires the presence of a thiol-based reductant such as DTT. FGly is also formed in the absence of DTT, but its formation ceases rapidly. Thus inactivated FGE accumulates in which the cysteine pair Cys336/Cys341 in the catalytic site is oxidized to form disulfide bridges between either Cys336 and Cys341 or Cys341 and the CxPxR cysteine of the sulfatase. These results strongly suggest that the Cys336/Cys341 pair is directly involved in the O2 -dependent conversion of the CxPxR cysteine to FGly. The available data characterize eukaryotic FGE as a monooxygenase, in which Cys336/Cys341 disulfide bridge formation donates the electrons required to reduce one oxygen atom of O2 to water while the other oxygen atom oxidizes the CxPxR cysteine to FGly. Regeneration of a reduced Cys336/Cys341 pair is accomplished in vivo by a yet unknown reductant of the endoplasmic reticulum or in vitro by DTT. Remarkably, this monooxygenase reaction utilizes O2 without involvement of any activating cofactor. PMID:26077311

  19. Kinetic analysis of GTP hydrolysis catalysed by the Arf1-GTP–ASAP1 complex

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ruibai; Ahvazi, Bijan; Amariei, Diana; Shroder, Deborah; Burrola, Beatriz; Losert, Wolfgang; Randazzo, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    Arf (ADP-ribosylation factor) GAPs (GTPase-activating proteins) are enzymes that catalyse the hydrolysis of GTP bound to the small GTP-binding protein Arf. They have also been proposed to function as Arf effectors and oncogenes. We have set out to characterize the kinetics of the GAP-induced GTP hydrolysis using a truncated form of ASAP1 [Arf GAP with SH3 (Src homology 3) domain, ankyrin repeats and PH (pleckstrin homology) domains 1] as a model. We found that ASAP1 used Arf1-GTP as a substrate with a kcat of 57±5 s−1 and a Km of 2.2±0.5 μM determined by steady-state kinetics and a kcat of 56±7 s−1 determined by single-turnover kinetics. Tetrafluoroaluminate (AlF4−), which stabilizes complexes of other Ras family members with their cognate GAPs, also stabilized a complex of Arf1-GDP with ASAP1. As anticipated, mutation of Arg-497 to a lysine residue affected kcat to a much greater extent than Km. Changing Trp-479, Iso-490, Arg-505, Leu-511 or Asp-512 was predicted, based on previous studies, to affect affinity for Arf1-GTP. Instead, these mutations primarily affected the kcat. Mutants that lacked activity in vitro similarly lacked activity in an in vivo assay of ASAP1 function, the inhibition of dorsal ruffle formation. Our results support the conclusion that the Arf GAP ASAP1 functions in binary complex with Arf1-GTP to induce a transition state towards GTP hydrolysis. The results have led us to speculate that Arf1-GTP–ASAP1 undergoes a significant conformational change when transitioning from the ground to catalytically active state. The ramifications for the putative effector function of ASAP1 are discussed. PMID:17112341

  20. The mechanism of the reaction catalysed by adenosine triphosphate–creatine phosphotransferase

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, J. F.; James, Elizabeth

    1965-01-01

    1. The forward and reverse reactions catalysed by ATP–creatine phosphotransferase have been studied kinetically at pH8·0 in the presence and absence of products, under conditions in which the free Mg2+ concentration was maintained constant at 1mm. Thus at fixed pH the reaction may be considered as being bireactant and expressed as:MgATP2−+creatine0⇌MgADP−+phosphocreatine2−2. The initial-velocity pattern in the absence of products and the product-inhibition pattern have been determined. These are consistent with a random mechanism in which all steps are in rapid equilibrium except that concerned with the interconversion of the central ternary complexes, and in which two dead-end complexes (enzyme–MgADP–creatine and enzyme–MgATP–phosphocreatine) are formed. The results are in accord with previous suggestions that the enzyme possesses distinct sites for the combination of the nucleotide and guanidino substrates. 3. Values have been determined for the Michaelis and dissociation constants involved in the combination of each substrate with various enzyme forms. Although these values cannot be regarded as absolute, they appear to indicate that the presence of one substrate on the enzyme enhances the combination of the second substrate. In addition, it would seem that in the formation of the enzyme–MgADP–creatine complex the concentration of one reactant does not affect the combination of the other. This contrasts with the formation of the enzyme–MgATP–phosphocreatine complex, where each reactant hinders the combination of the other. PMID:16749122

  1. Palladium-catalysed C-H activation of aliphatic amines to give strained nitrogen heterocycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, Andrew; Haffemayer, Benjamin; Collins, Beatrice S. L.; Gaunt, Matthew J.

    2014-06-01

    The development of new chemical transformations based on catalytic functionalization of unactivated C-H bonds has the potential to simplify the synthesis of complex molecules dramatically. Transition metal catalysis has emerged as a powerful tool with which to convert these unreactive bonds into carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds, but the selective transformation of aliphatic C-H bonds is still a challenge. The most successful approaches involve a `directing group', which positions the metal catalyst near a particular C-H bond, so that the C-H functionalization step occurs via cyclometallation. Most directed aliphatic C-H activation processes proceed through a five-membered-ring cyclometallated intermediate. Considering the number of new reactions that have arisen from such intermediates, it seems likely that identification of distinct cyclometallation pathways would lead to the development of other useful chemical transformations. Here we report a palladium-catalysed C-H bond activation mode that proceeds through a four-membered-ring cyclopalladation pathway. The chemistry described here leads to the selective transformation of a methyl group that is adjacent to an unprotected secondary amine into a synthetically versatile nitrogen heterocycle. The scope of this previously unknown bond disconnection is highlighted through the development of C-H amination and carbonylation processes, leading to the synthesis of aziridines and β-lactams (respectively), and is suggestive of a generic C-H functionalization platform that could simplify the synthesis of aliphatic secondary amines, a class of small molecules that are particularly important features of many pharmaceutical agents.

  2. Low-temperature oxidation of CO catalysed by Co(3)O(4) nanorods.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaowei; Li, Yong; Liu, Zhi-Quan; Haruta, Masatake; Shen, Wenjie

    2009-04-01

    Low-temperature oxidation of CO, perhaps the most extensively studied reaction in the history of heterogeneous catalysis, is becoming increasingly important in the context of cleaning air and lowering automotive emissions. Hopcalite catalysts (mixtures of manganese and copper oxides) were originally developed for purifying air in submarines, but they are not especially active at ambient temperatures and are also deactivated by the presence of moisture. Noble metal catalysts, on the other hand, are water tolerant but usually require temperatures above 100 degrees C for efficient operation. Gold exhibits high activity at low temperatures and superior stability under moisture, but only when deposited in nanoparticulate form on base transition-metal oxides. The development of active and stable catalysts without noble metals for low-temperature CO oxidation under an ambient atmosphere remains a significant challenge. Here we report that tricobalt tetraoxide nanorods not only catalyse CO oxidation at temperatures as low as -77 degrees C but also remain stable in a moist stream of normal feed gas. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that the Co(3)O(4) nanorods predominantly expose their {110} planes, favouring the presence of active Co(3+) species at the surface. Kinetic analyses reveal that the turnover frequency associated with individual Co(3+) sites on the nanorods is similar to that of the conventional nanoparticles of this material, indicating that the significantly higher reaction rate that we have obtained with a nanorod morphology is probably due to the surface richness of active Co(3+) sites. These results show the importance of morphology control in the preparation of base transition-metal oxides as highly efficient oxidation catalysts. PMID:19360084

  3. Proteolytic elimination of N-myristoyl modifications by the Shigella virulence factor IpaJ

    PubMed Central

    Burnaevskiy, Nikolay; Fox, Thomas G.; Plymire, Daniel A.; Ertelt, James M.; Weigele, Bethany A.; Selyunin, Andrey S.; Way, Sing Sing; Patrie, Steven M.; Alto, Neal M.

    2013-01-01

    Protein N-myristoylation is a 14-carbon fatty-acid modification that is conserved across eukaryotic species and occurs on nearly 1% of the cellular proteome1,2. The ability of the myristoyl group to facilitate dynamic protein–protein and protein–membrane interactions (known as the myristoyl switch) makes it an essential feature of many signal transduction systems3. Thus pathogenic strategies that facilitate protein demyristoylation would markedly alter the signalling landscape of infected host cells. Here we describe an irreversible mechanism of protein demyristoylation catalysed by invasion plasmid antigen J (IpaJ), a previously uncharacterized Shigella flexneri type III effector protein with cysteine protease activity. A yeast genetic screen for IpaJ substrates identified ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF)1p and ARF2p, small molecular mass GTPases that regulate cargo transport through the Golgi apparatus4. Mass spectrometry showed that IpaJ cleaved the peptide bond between N-myristoylated glycine-2 and asparagine-3 of human ARF1, thereby providing a new mechanism for host secretory inhibition by a bacterial pathogen5,6. We further demonstrate that IpaJ cleaves an array of N-myristoylated proteins involved in cellular growth, signal transduction, autophagasome maturation and organelle function. Taken together, these findings show a previously unrecognized pathogenic mechanism for the site-specific elimination of N-myristoyl protein modification. PMID:23535599

  4. Reactions of the ionized enol tautomer of acetanilide: elimination of HNCO via a novel rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Heydorn, Lisa N; Carter, Lynn M; Bowen, Richard D; Terlouw, Johan K

    2003-01-01

    The reactions of ionised acetanilide, C(6)H(5)NH(=O)CH(3)(.+), and its enol, C(6)H(5)NH(OH)=CH(2)(.+), have been studied by a combination of tandem mass spectrometric and computational methods. These two isomeric radical cations have distinct chemistries at low internal energies. The keto tautomer eliminates exclusively CH(2)=C=O to give ionised aniline. In contrast, the enol tautomer loses H-N=C=O, via an unusual skeletal rearrangement, to form predominantly ionised methylene cyclohexadiene. Hydrogen atom loss also occurs from the enol tautomer, with the formation of protonated oxindole. The mechanisms for H-N=C=O and hydrogen atom loss both involve cyclisation; the former proceeds via a spiro transition state formed by attachment of the methylene group to the ipso position, whereas the latter entails the formation of a five-membered ring by attachment to the ortho position. The behaviour of labelled analogues reveals that these two processes have different site selectivities. Hydrogen atom loss involves a reverse critical energy and is subject to an isotope effect. Surprisingly, attempts to promote the enolisation of ionised acetanilide by proton-transport catalysis were unsuccessful. In a reversal of the usual situation for ionised carbonyl compounds, ionised acetanilide is actually more stable than its enol tautomer. The enol tautomer was resistant to proton-transport catalysed ketonisation to ionised acetanilide, possibly because the favoured geometry of the encounter complex with the base molecule is inappropriate for facilitating tautomerisation. PMID:12939486

  5. Structure-activity relationships for chemical and glutathione S-transferase-catalysed glutathione conjugation reactions of a series of 2-substituted 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzenes.

    PubMed Central

    Van der Aar, E M; Bouwman, T; Commandeur, J N; Vermeulen, N P

    1996-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) constitute an important class of phase II (de)toxifying enzymes, catalysing the conjugation of glutathione (GSH) with electrophilic compounds. In the present study, Km, kcat and kcat/Km values for the rat GST 1-1-, 3-3-, 4-4- and 7-7-catalysed conjugation reactions between GSH and a series of 10 different 2-substituted 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzenes, and the second-order rate constants (ks) of the corresponding base-catalysed reactions, were correlated with nine classical physicochemical parameters (electronic, steric and lipophilic) of the substituents and with 16 computer-calculated molecular parameters of the substrates and of the corresponding Meisenheimer complexes with MeS- as a model nucleophile for GS- (charge distributions and several energy values), giving structure-activity relationships. On the basis of an identical dependence of the base-catalysed as well as the GST 1-1- and GST 7-7-catalysed reactions on electronic parameters (among others, Hammett substituent constant sigma p and charge on p-nitro substituents), and the finding that the corresponding reactions catalysed by GSTs 3-3 and 4-4 depend to a significantly lesser extent on these parameters, it was concluded that the Mu-class GST isoenzymes have a rate-determining transition state in the conjugation reaction between 2-substituted 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzenes and GSH which is different from that of the other two GSTs. Several alternative rate-limiting transition states for GST 3-3 and 4-4 are discussed. Furthermore, based on the obtained structure-activity relationships, it was possible to predict the kcat/Km values of the four GST isoenzymes and the ks of the base-catalysed GSH conjugation of 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzene. PMID:8973562

  6. Elimination and recursions in the scattering equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Carlos; Kalousios, Chrysostomos

    2016-05-01

    We use the elimination theory to explicitly construct the (n - 3) ! order polynomial in one of the variables of the scattering equations. The answer can be given either in terms of a determinant of Sylvester type of dimension (n - 3) ! or a determinant of Bézout type of dimension (n - 4) !. We present a recursive formula for the Sylvester determinant. Expansion of the determinants yields expressions in terms of Plücker coordinates. Elimination of the rest of the variables of the scattering equations is also presented.

  7. Noise elimination algorithm for modal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, X. X.; Li, C. L.; Xiong, C. B.

    2015-07-27

    Modal analysis is an ongoing interdisciplinary physical issue. Modal parameters estimation is applied to determine the dynamic characteristics of structures under vibration excitation. Modal analysis is more challenging for the measured vibration response signals are contaminated with noise. This study develops a mathematical algorithm of structured low rank approximation combined with the complex exponential method to estimate the modal parameters. Physical experiments using a steel cantilever beam with ten accelerometers mounted, excited by an impulse load, demonstrate that this method can significantly eliminate noise from measured signals and accurately identify the modal frequencies and damping ratios. This study provides a fundamental mechanism of noise elimination using structured low rank approximation in physical fields.

  8. Recognizing, Confronting, and Eliminating Workplace Bullying.

    PubMed

    Berry, Peggy Ann; Gillespie, Gordon L; Fisher, Bonnie S; Gormley, Denise K

    2016-07-01

    Workplace bullying (WPB) behaviors negatively affect nurse productivity, satisfaction, and retention, and hinder safe patient care. The purpose of this article is to define WPB, differentiate between incivility and WPB, and recommend actions to prevent WPB behaviors. Informed occupational and environmental health nurses and nurse leaders must recognize, confront, and eliminate WPB in their facilities and organizations. Recognizing, confronting, and eliminating WPB behaviors in health care is a crucial first step toward sustained improvements in patient care quality and the health and safety of health care employees. PMID:27053288

  9. Lens implant surgery in pars planitis.

    PubMed

    Michelson, J B; Friedlaender, M H; Nozik, R A

    1990-08-01

    Intraocular lens (IOL) implantation is usually contraindicated in eyes with active inflammation, but patients with "burned-out" pars planitis also may be considered as candidates. Fifteen of 16 eyes in eight patients underwent extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) with posterior chamber IOL (PC IOL) implantation combined with pars plana vitrectomy for both cataracts and chronic cystoid macular edema (CME); 60% achieved visual acuity of 20/40 or better. Even with "low-grade" inflammation in these patients, however, a persistent veil of debris accumulated over the posterior and anterior surface of the IOL. One patient (patient 2) required 27 YAG procedures for two eyes, and another required 11 YAG procedures and eventual removal of the IOL. Another patient required surgical "brushing-off" of the IOL and vitrectomy. Even in eyes with "burned-out" uveitis, a continual low-grade inflammation may complicate the use of IOL implantation. PMID:2402411

  10. Par Pond refill water quality sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J.W. II; Martin, F.D.; Westbury, H.M.

    1996-08-01

    This study was designed to document anoxia and its cause in the event that the anoxia caused a fish kill. However, no fish kill was observed during this study, and dissolved oxygen and nutrient concentrations generally remained within the range expected for southeastern reservoirs. Par Pond water quality monitoring will continue during the second summer after refill as the aquatic macrophytes become reestablished and nutrients in the sediments are released to the water column.

  11. Combined DSEK and Transconjunctival Pars Plana Vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sane, Mona; Shaikh, Naazli

    2016-01-01

    We report here three patients who underwent combined Descemet's stripping with endothelial keratoplasty and transconjunctival pars plana vitrectomy for bullous keratopathy and posterior segment pathology. A surgical technique and case histories are described. Anatomic and visual outcomes of combined Descemet's stripping with endothelial keratoplasty and vitrectomy were excellent. Our experience provides technical guidelines and limitations. The combined minimally invasive techniques allow for rapid anatomical recovery and return of function and visual acuity in a single sitting. PMID:27413563

  12. Operations Handbook: Helping Eliminate Early Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Central Point School District 6, OR.

    The operations handbook for Project HEELD (Helping Eliminate Early Learning Disabilities) describes procedures used to identify and remediate learning disabilities among 5-year-old children in an Oregon school district. Described are the following project phases: selection of participants and training of staff, special class instruction for…

  13. Eliminating Sexism from Children's Theatre Productions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Kaarin S.

    To help reduce sexism in children's theatre productions, directors should make a conscious effort to eliminate negative patterns from scripts. They should give attention to the roles of the characters, since female characters are often relegated to the roles of waiting for a male, a supportive parent or sister, or a passive admirer of a male.…

  14. Eliminating Computational Instability In Multibody Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Gaines L.

    1994-01-01

    TWOBODY implements improved version of Lagrange multiplier method. Program ultilizes programming technique eliminating computational instability in multibody simulations in which Lagrange multipliers used. In technique, one uses constraint equations, instead of integration, to determine coordinates that are not independent. To illustrate technique, it includes simple mathematical model of solid rocket booster and parachute connected by frictionless swivel. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  15. Taking Centrioles to the Elimination Round.

    PubMed

    Schoborg, Todd A; Rusan, Nasser M

    2016-07-11

    Two recent papers published in The Journal of Cell Biology (Borrego-Pinto et al., 2016) and Science (Pimenta-Marques et al., 2016) have begun to shed light on the mechanism of centriole elimination during female oogenesis, highlighting a protective role for Polo kinase and the pericentriolar material. PMID:27404354

  16. Tackling imported malaria: an elimination endgame.

    PubMed

    Sturrock, Hugh J W; Roberts, Kathryn W; Wegbreit, Jennifer; Ohrt, Colin; Gosling, Roly D

    2015-07-01

    As countries move toward malaria elimination, imported infections become increasingly significant as they often represent the majority of cases, can sustain transmission, cause resurgences, and lead to mortality. Here we review and critique current methods to prevent malaria importation in countries pursuing elimination and explore methods applied in other transmission settings and to other diseases that could be transferred to support malaria elimination. To improve intervention targeting we need a better understanding of the characteristics of populations importing infections and their patterns of migration, improved methods to reliably classify infections as imported or acquired locally, and ensure early and accurate diagnosis. The potential for onward transmission in the most receptive and vulnerable locations can be predicted through high-resolution risk mapping that can help malaria elimination or prevention of reintroduction programs target resources. Cross border and regional initiatives can be highly effective when based on an understanding of human and parasite movement. Ultimately, determining the optimal combinations of approaches to address malaria importation will require an evaluation of their impact, cost effectiveness, and operational feasibility. PMID:26013369

  17. Promoting Relationships and Eliminating Violence in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepler, Debra; Craig, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    The Promoting Relationships and Eliminating Violence Network (PREVNet) involves Canadian researchers and national organizations working to promote healthy relationships and prevent bullying. In this paper, we provide the rationale for establishing PREVNet, a description of the work of the network, and an assessment of the success of PREVNet.…

  18. Tackling Imported Malaria: An Elimination Endgame

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, Hugh J. W.; Roberts, Kathryn W.; Wegbreit, Jennifer; Ohrt, Colin; Gosling, Roly D.

    2015-01-01

    As countries move toward malaria elimination, imported infections become increasingly significant as they often represent the majority of cases, can sustain transmission, cause resurgences, and lead to mortality. Here we review and critique current methods to prevent malaria importation in countries pursuing elimination and explore methods applied in other transmission settings and to other diseases that could be transferred to support malaria elimination. To improve intervention targeting we need a better understanding of the characteristics of populations importing infections and their patterns of migration, improved methods to reliably classify infections as imported or acquired locally, and ensure early and accurate diagnosis. The potential for onward transmission in the most receptive and vulnerable locations can be predicted through high-resolution risk mapping that can help malaria elimination or prevention of reintroduction programs target resources. Cross border and regional initiatives can be highly effective when based on an understanding of human and parasite movement. Ultimately, determining the optimal combinations of approaches to address malaria importation will require an evaluation of their impact, cost effectiveness, and operational feasibility. PMID:26013369

  19. Telescoping of instrumentation tubing eliminates swaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Clellan, E. L.

    1966-01-01

    Short sections of stainless steel tubing of slide-fit sizes fitted together and silver-soldered at the junctions form small-diameter tubing assemblies with accurately stepped-down dimensions. This method of fabrication eliminates the costly swaging operations formerly used.

  20. Gram-Schmidt Orthogonalization by Gauss Elimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pursell, Lyle; Trimble, S. Y.

    1991-01-01

    Described is the hand-calculation method for the orthogonalization of a given set of vectors through the integration of Gaussian elimination with existing algorithms. Although not numerically preferable, this method adds increased precision as well as organization to the solution process. (JJK)

  1. Tuberculosis elimination: theory and practice in Europe.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosio, Lia; Dara, Masoud; Tadolini, Marina; Centis, Rosella; Sotgiu, Giovanni; van der Werf, Marieke J; Gaga, Mina; Cirillo, Daniela; Spanevello, Antonio; Raviglione, Mario; Blasi, Francesco; Migliori, Giovanni Battista

    2014-05-01

    Although Europe identified the pathway to tuberculosis (TB) elimination in 1990, no information on programmes for country preparedness is available. A questionnaire investigating TB elimination activities was submitted to 38 national TB programme representatives of low TB incidence (<20 cases per 100 000 population) European countries/territories of the World Health Organization European region. Out of 31 providing a complete answer, 17 (54.8%) reported to have a dedicated national TB programme, 20 (64.5%) a national plan including TB elimination (13 (41.9%) including targets), 22 (71%) guidelines, 14 (45.2%) a specific budget for TB activities, and 23 (74.2%) TB reference centres. All countries reported having case-based electronic TB surveillance, 19 (61.3%) perform regular supervision, 12 (38.7%) have a monitoring and evaluation plan and five (16.1%) perform modelling. In three countries (9.7%), TB health services are free for insured individuals only. In 22 countries/territories (71%) not all TB drugs were available, while in 12 (38.7%) drug stock-outs have been described. Although high-risk group screening for latent TB infection is performed by the majority of countries, only 6 (19.4%) provided figures on preventive treatment completion rates. Not all elements identified as essential for country preparedness to achieve TB elimination are available in the countries surveyed. PMID:24389868

  2. Rabies in South Asia: fighting for elimination.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Fazle-Rabbi; Basher, Ariful; Amin, Mohammad R; Hassan, Nazia; Patwary, Mohammad I

    2015-01-01

    South Asia is regarded as the hot spot for the tourist and travelers. Unfortunately, three big countries (India, Pakistan and Bangladesh) of this region belong to top five rabies endemic countries of the world. Around 55,000 people die of rabies every year globally and 45% of them belong to South and South East Asia. Countries are now working on the elimination of rabies by the year 2020. Elimination of animal rabies is the pivotal of controlling human rabies. Dog (primary source) registration, population control and mass vaccination are the different ways of eliminating animal rabies. Pre (for risk groups including travelers) and post-exposure vaccine is the core for controlling human rabies. Post-exposure vaccine consists of nerve tissue vaccine and tissue culture vaccine. Due to low antigenicity and post-vaccine neurological complications all countries of South Asia except Pakistan have phased out the production and use of nerve tissue vaccine. To reduce the cost intramuscular regimen is now largely replaced by intradermal regimen and equine rabies immunoglobulin will probably replace human immunoglobulin in future for category III animal bite. 'SAARC' took initiatives for rabies elimination through 'SAARC development fund' which would hopefully play a vital role in regional collaboration to make the region rabies free. PMID:25858305

  3. Eliminating Barriers to Dual Enrollment in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Rick; Gamez Vargas, Juanita; David, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Policy, financial, and transportation barriers have limited participation in dual enrollment for marginalized (low-socioeconomic, first-generation, and ethnic minority) students in Oklahoma. This chapter presents a collaborative effort by education and community leaders that has successfully eliminated these barriers and increased the number of…

  4. Mechanisms of apoptosis by the tumor suppressor Par-4.

    PubMed

    Hebbar, Nikhil; Wang, Chi; Rangnekar, Vivek M

    2012-12-01

    Par-4 is a pro-apoptotic, tumor suppressor protein that induces apoptosis selectively in cancer cells. Endoplasmic reticulum-stress and higher levels of protein kinase A in tumor cells confer the coveted feature of cancer selective response to extracellular and intracellular Par-4, respectively. Recent studies have shown that systemic Par-4 confers resistance to tumor growth in mice, and that tumor-resistance is transferable by bone-marrow transplantation. Moreover, recombinant Par-4 inhibits the growth of tumors in mice. As systemic Par-4 induces apoptosis via cell surface GRP78, strategies that promote GRP78 trafficking to the cell surface are expected sensitize cancer cells to circulating levels of Par-4. This review illustrates the domains and mechanisms by which Par-4 orchestrates the apoptotic process in both cell culture models and in physiological settings. PMID:22552839

  5. Ru-Catalysed C–H Arylation of Indoles and Pyrroles with Boronic Acids: Scope and Mechanistic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sollert, Carina; Devaraj, Karthik; Orthaber, Andreas; Gates, Paul J; Pilarski, Lukasz T

    2015-01-01

    The Ru-catalysed C2–H arylation of indoles and pyrroles by using boronic acids under oxidative conditions is reported. This reaction can be applied to tryptophan derivatives and tolerates a wide range of functional groups on both coupling partners, including bromides and iodides, which can be further derivatised selectively. New indole-based ruthenacyclic complexes are described and investigated as possible intermediates in the reaction. Mechanistic studies suggest the on-cycle intermediates do not possess a para-cymene ligand and that the on-cycle metalation occurs through an electrophilic attack by the Ru centre. PMID:25689052

  6. Highly Enantioselective Formation of α-Allyl-α-Arylcyclopentanones via Pd-Catalysed Decarboxylative Asymmetric Allylic Alkylation.

    PubMed

    Akula, Ramulu; Doran, Robert; Guiry, Patrick J

    2016-07-11

    A highly enantioselective Pd-catalysed decarboxylative asymmetric allylic alkylation of cyclopentanone derived α-aryl-β-keto esters employing the (R,R)-ANDEN-phenyl Trost ligand has been developed. The product (S)-α-allyl-α-arylcyclopentanones were obtained in excellent yields and enantioselectivities (up to >99.9 % ee). This represents one of the most highly enantioselective formations of an all-carbon quaternary stereogenic center reported to date. This reaction was demonstrated on a 4.0 mmol scale without any deterioration of enantioselectivity and was exploited as the key enantioselective transformation in an asymmetric formal synthesis of the natural product (+)-tanikolide. PMID:27191198

  7. Rh-catalysed [5 + 1] cycloaddition of allenylcyclopropanes and CO: reaction development and application to the formal synthesis of (-)-galanthamine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-Hang; Yu, Zhi-Xiang

    2016-07-01

    A Rh-catalysed [5 + 1] cycloaddition of allenylcyclopropanes and CO has been developed to synthesize functionalized 2-methylidene-3,4-cyclohexenones. The scope of this methodology has been investigated, showing that various functional groups can be tolerated. Both di- and tri-substituted allenylcyclopropanes can be applied to this cycloaddition and the [5 + 1] cycloadducts with the E configuration were obtained as the major products. In addition, the present [5 + 1] cycloaddition reaction has been utilized as a key step in the formal synthesis of the natural product (-)-galanthamine. PMID:27253492

  8. A Single parS Sequence from the Cluster of Four Sites Closest to oriC Is Necessary and Sufficient for Proper Chromosome Segregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Jecz, Paulina; Bartosik, Aneta A.; Glabski, Krzysztof; Jagura-Burdzy, Grazyna

    2015-01-01

    Among the mechanisms that control chromosome segregation in bacteria are highly-conserved partitioning systems comprising three components: ParA protein (a deviant Walker-type ATPase), ParB protein (a DNA-binding element) and multiple cis-acting palindromic centromere-like sequences, designated parS. Ten putative parS sites have been identified in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome, four localized in close proximity of oriC and six, diverged by more than one nucleotide from a perfect palindromic sequence, dispersed along the chromosome. Here, we constructed and analyzed P. aeruginosa mutants deprived of each single parS sequence and their different combinations. The analysis included evaluation of a set of phenotypic features, chromosome segregation, and ParB localization in the cells. It was found that ParB binds specifically to all ten parS sites, although with different affinities. The P. aeruginosa parS mutant with all ten parS sites modified (parSnull) is viable however it demonstrates the phenotype characteristic for parAnull or parBnull mutants: slightly slower growth rate, high frequency of anucleate cells, and defects in motility. The genomic position and sequence of parS determine its role in P. aeruginosa biology. It transpired that any one of the four parS sites proximal to oriC (parS1 to parS4), which are bound by ParB with the highest affinity, is necessary and sufficient for the parABS role in chromosome partitioning. When all these four sites are mutated simultaneously, the strain shows the parSnull phenotype, which indicates that none of the remaining six parS sites can substitute for these four oriC-proximal sites in this function. A single ectopic parS2 (inserted opposite oriC in the parSnull mutant) facilitates ParB organization into regularly spaced condensed foci and reverses some of the mutant phenotypes but is not sufficient for accurate chromosome segregation. PMID:25794281

  9. Alkaline-Earth-Catalysed Cross-Dehydrocoupling of Amines and Hydrosilanes: Reactivity Trends, Scope and Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Clément; Dorcet, Vincent; Carpentier, Jean-François; Tobisch, Sven; Sarazin, Yann

    2016-03-18

    Alkaline-earth (Ae=Ca, Sr, Ba) complexes are shown to catalyse the chemoselective cross-dehydrocoupling (CDC) of amines and hydrosilanes. Key trends were delineated in the benchmark couplings of Ph3 SiH with pyrrolidine or tBuNH2 . Ae{E(SiMe3)2}2 ⋅(THF)x (E=N, CH; x=2-3) are more efficient than {N^N}Ae{E(SiMe3)2}⋅(THF)n (E=N, CH; n=1-2) complexes (where {N^N}(-) ={ArN(o-C6H4)C(H)=NAr}(-) with Ar=2,6-iPr2 -C6H3) bearing an iminoanilide ligand, and alkyl precatalysts are better than amido analogues. Turnover frequencies (TOFs) increase in the order Ca30 products) includes diamines and di(hydrosilane)s. Kinetic analysis of the Ba-promoted CDC of pyrrolidine and Ph3SiH shows that 1) the kinetic law is rate=k[Ba](1) [amine](0) [hydrosilane](1), 2) electron-withdrawing p-substituents on the arylhydrosilane improve the reaction rate and 3) a maximal kinetic isotopic effect (kSiH/kSiD =4.7) is seen for Ph3SiX (X=H, D). DFT calculations identified the prevailing mechanism; instead of an inaccessible σ-bond-breaking metathesis pathway, the CDC appears to follow a stepwise reaction path with N-Si bond-forming nucleophilic attack of the catalytically competent Ba pyrrolide onto the incoming silane, followed by rate limiting hydrogen-atom transfer to barium. The participation of a Ba silyl species is prevented energetically. The reactivity trend Ca

  10. Escherichia coli low-copy-number plasmid R1 centromere parC forms a U-shaped complex with its binding protein ParR

    PubMed Central

    Hoischen, C.; Bussiek, M.; Langowski, J.; Diekmann, S.

    2008-01-01

    The Escherichia coli low-copy-number plasmid R1 contains a segregation machinery composed of parC, ParR and parM. The R1 centromere-like site parC contains two separate sets of repeats. By atomic force microscopy (AFM) we show here that ParR molecules bind to each of the 5-fold repeated iterons separately with the intervening sequence unbound by ParR. The two ParR protein complexes on parC do not complex with each other. ParR binds with a stoichiometry of about one ParR dimer per each single iteron. The measured DNA fragment lengths agreed with B-form DNA and each of the two parC 5-fold interon DNA stretches adopts a linear path in its complex with ParR. However, the overall parC/ParR complex with both iteron repeats bound by ParR forms an overall U-shaped structure: the DNA folds back on itself nearly completely, including an angle of ∼150°. Analysing linear DNA fragments, we never observed dimerized ParR complexes on one parC DNA molecule (intramolecular) nor a dimerization between ParR complexes bound to two different parC DNA molecules (intermolecular). This bacterial segrosome is compared to other bacterial segregation complexes. We speculate that partition complexes might have a similar overall structural organization and, at least in part, common functional properties. PMID:18056157

  11. Haploidization via Chromosome Elimination: Means and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Takayoshi; Karimi-Ashtiyani, Raheleh; Houben, Andreas

    2016-04-29

    The ability to generate haploids and subsequently induce chromosome doubling significantly accelerates the crop breeding process. Haploids have been induced through the generation of plants from haploid tissues (in situ gynogenesis and androgenesis) and through the selective loss of a parental chromosome set via inter- or intraspecific hybridization. Here, we focus on the mechanisms responsible for this selective chromosome elimination. CENH3, a variant of the centromere-specific histone H3, has been exploited to create an efficient method of haploid induction, and we discuss this approach in some detail. Parallels have been drawn with chromosome-specific elimination, which occurs as a normal part of differentiation and sex determination in many plant and animal systems. PMID:26772657

  12. The thiostrepton A tryptophan methyltransferase TsrM catalyses a cob(II)alamin-dependent methyl transfer reaction.

    PubMed

    Benjdia, Alhosna; Pierre, Stéphane; Gherasim, Carmen; Guillot, Alain; Carmona, Manon; Amara, Patricia; Banerjee, Ruma; Berteau, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are a novel class of natural products including several antibiotics and bacterial toxins. In countless RiPP biosynthetic pathways, cobalamin-dependent radical SAM (B12/rSAM) enzymes play a pivotal role. In the biosynthetic pathway of the antibiotic and anti-cancer agent thiostrepton A, TsrM, a B12/rSAM enzyme, catalyses the transfer of a methyl group to an electrophilic carbon atom of tryptophan. Here we show that methylcob(III)alamin is the probable physiological enzyme cofactor, and cob(II)alamin rather than cob(I)alamin is a key reaction intermediate. Furthermore, we establish that TsrM and a triple-alanine mutant alkylate cob(II)alamin efficiently leading to the synthesis of MeCbl. Exploiting TsrM substrate ambiguity, we demonstrate that TsrM does not catalyse substrate H-atom abstraction like most radical SAM enzymes. Based on these data, we propose an unprecedented radical-based C-methylation mechanism, which further expands the chemical versatility of rSAM enzymes. PMID:26456915

  13. A novel glucuronosyltransferase has an unprecedented ability to catalyse continuous two-step glucuronosylation of glycyrrhetinic acid to yield glycyrrhizin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guojie; Cai, Wei; Gao, Wei; Liu, Chunsheng

    2016-10-01

    Glycyrrhizin is an important bioactive compound that is used clinically to treat chronic hepatitis and is also used as a sweetener world-wide. However, the key UDP-dependent glucuronosyltransferases (UGATs) involved in the biosynthesis of glycyrrhizin remain unknown. To discover unknown UGATs, we fully annotated potential UGATs from Glycyrrhiza uralensis using deep transcriptome sequencing. The catalytic functions of candidate UGATs were determined by an in vitro enzyme assay. Systematically screening 434 potential UGATs, we unexpectedly found one unique GuUGAT that was able to catalyse the glucuronosylation of glycyrrhetinic acid to directly yield glycyrrhizin via continuous two-step glucuronosylation. Expression analysis further confirmed the key role of GuUGAT in the biosynthesis of glycyrrhizin. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that Gln-352 may be important for the initial step of glucuronosylation, and His-22, Trp-370, Glu-375 and Gln-392 may be important residues for the second step of glucuronosylation. Notably, the ability of GuUGAT to catalyse a continuous two-step glucuronosylation reaction was determined to be unprecedented among known glycosyltransferases of bioactive plant natural products. Our findings increase the understanding of traditional glycosyltransferases and pave the way for the complete biosynthesis of glycyrrhizin. PMID:27252088

  14. Bifunctional CYP81AA proteins catalyse identical hydroxylations but alternative regioselective phenol couplings in plant xanthone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    El-Awaad, Islam; Bocola, Marco; Beuerle, Till; Liu, Benye; Beerhues, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    Xanthones are natural products present in plants and microorganisms. In plants, their biosynthesis starts with regioselective cyclization of 2,3′,4,6-tetrahydroxybenzophenone to either 1,3,5- or 1,3,7-trihydroxyxanthones, catalysed by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. Here we isolate and express CYP81AA-coding sequences from Hypericum calycinum and H. perforatum in yeast. Microsomes catalyse two consecutive reactions, that is, 3′-hydroxylation of 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzophenone and C–O phenol coupling of the resulting 2,3′,4,6-tetrahydroxybenzophenone. Relative to the inserted 3′-hydroxyl, the orthologues Hc/HpCYP81AA1 cyclize via the para position to form 1,3,7-trihydroxyxanthone, whereas the paralogue HpCYP81AA2 directs cyclization to the ortho position, yielding the isomeric 1,3,5-trihydroxyxanthone. Homology modelling and reciprocal mutagenesis reveal the impact of S375, L378 and A483 on controlling the regioselectivity of HpCYP81AA2, which is converted into HpCYP81AA1 by sextuple mutation. However, the reciprocal mutations in HpCYP81AA1 barely affect its regiospecificity. Product docking rationalizes the alternative C–O phenol coupling reactions. Our results help understand the machinery of bifunctional CYPs. PMID:27145837

  15. Recent developments in the application of nanomaterials to understanding molecular level processes in cobalt catalysed Fischer-Tropsch synthesis.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, S K

    2014-03-21

    This perspective offers an overview of using nanomaterials for understanding cobalt catalysed Fischer-Tropsch chemistry. Nanomaterials now afford unprecedented control of size, shape and structure at the nanometre scale. This makes them invaluable tools for studying heterogeneous catalysis. The Fischer-Tropsch reaction, especially using cobalt based catalysts, is a linchpin in many processes for utilising other feedstocks (via gasification) that have been envisaged as short/medium term replacements for crude oil. The underlying chemistry has therefore garnered considerable renewed interest. The current state of the art in mechanistic understanding is summarised and the application of nanomaterials to developing this further is explored. Several specific questions, to which nanomaterials have already contributed answers, are addressed: how do nanomaterials contribute to our understanding of cobalt particle size effects, reducibility, and the effect of support porosity and how do precious metal promoters operate in cobalt catalysed Fischer-Tropsch chemistry? Future possible uses for nanomaterials in studying this field are also identified. PMID:24487570

  16. Reversed reactivity of anilines with alkynes in the rhodium-catalysed C–H activation/carbonylation tandem

    PubMed Central

    Midya, Siba P.; Sahoo, Manoj K.; Landge, Vinod G.; Rajamohanan, P. R.; Balaraman, Ekambaram

    2015-01-01

    Development of multicatalytic approach consisting of two or more mechanistically distinct catalytic steps using a single-site catalyst for rapid and straightforward access of structurally complex molecules under eco-benign conditions has significance in contemporary science. We have developed herein a rhodium-catalysed C–H activation strategy which uses an unprotected anilines and an electron-deficient alkynes to C–C bonded products as a potential intermediate in contrast to the archetypical C–N bonded products with high levels of regioselectivity. This is followed by carbonylation of C–H bond activated intermediate and subsequent annulation into quinolines has been described. This rhodium-catalysed auto-tandem reaction operates under mild, environmentally benign conditions using water as the solvent and CO surrogates as the carbonyl source with the concomitant generation of hydrogen gas. The strategy may facilitate the development of new synthetic protocols for the efficient and sustainable production of chemicals in an atom-economic way from simple, abundant starting materials. PMID:26486182

  17. Alternative substrates reveal catalytic cycle and key binding events in the reaction catalysed by anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cookson, Tammie V M; Castell, Alina; Bulloch, Esther M M; Evans, Genevieve L; Short, Francesca L; Baker, Edward N; Lott, J Shaun; Parker, Emily J

    2014-07-01

    AnPRT (anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase), required for the biosynthesis of tryptophan, is essential for the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). AnPRT catalyses the Mg2+-dependent transfer of a phosphoribosyl group from PRPP (5'-phosphoribosyl-1'-pyrophosphate) to anthranilate to form PRA (5'-phosphoribosyl anthranilate). Mtb-AnPRT was shown to catalyse a sequential reaction and significant substrate inhibition by anthranilate was observed. Antimycobacterial fluoroanthranilates and methyl-substituted analogues were shown to act as alternative substrates for Mtb-AnPRT, producing the corresponding substituted PRA products. Structures of the enzyme complexed with anthranilate analogues reveal two distinct binding sites for anthranilate. One site is located over 8 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) from PRPP at the entrance to a tunnel leading to the active site, whereas in the second, inner, site anthranilate is adjacent to PRPP, in a catalytically relevant position. Soaking the analogues for variable periods of time provides evidence for anthranilate located at transient positions during transfer from the outer site to the inner catalytic site. PRPP and Mg2+ binding have been shown to be associated with the rearrangement of two flexible loops, which is required to complete the inner anthranilate-binding site. It is proposed that anthranilate first binds to the outer site, providing an unusual mechanism for substrate capture and efficient transfer to the catalytic site following the binding of PRPP. PMID:24712732

  18. Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) from human breast milk activates PAR-2 receptors, of the intestinal epithelial cells HT-29, regulating cytokines and defensins.

    PubMed

    Barrera, G J; Tortolero, G Sanchez

    2016-01-01

    Trefoil factors are effector molecules in gastrointestinal tract physiology. Each one improves healing of the gastrointestinal tract. Trefoil factors may be grouped into three classes: the gastric peptides (TFF1), spasmolytic peptide (TFF2) and intestinal trefoil factor (TFF3). Significant amounts of TFF3 are present in human breast milk. Previously, we have reported that trefoil factor 3 isolated from human breast milk produces down regulation of cytokines and promotes human beta defensins expression in intestinal epithelial cells. This study aimed to determine the molecular mechanism involved. Here we showed that the presence of TFF3 strongly correlated with protease activated receptors 2 (PAR-2) activation in human intestinal cells. Intracellular calcium ((Ca2+)i)mobilization was induced by the treatment with: 1) TFF3, 2) synthetic PAR-2 agonist peptide. The co-treatment with a synthetic PAR-2 antagonist peptide and TFF3 eliminates the latter's effect. Additionally, we demonstrated the existence of interactions among TFF3 and PAR-2 receptors through far Western blot and co-precipitation. Finally, down regulation of PAR-2 by siRNA resulted in a decrease of TFF3 induced intracellular (Ca2+)i mobilization, cytokine regulation and defensins expression. These findings suggest that TFF3 activates intestinal cells through PAR-2 (Fig. 4, Ref. 19). PMID:27546365

  19. Should Pneumococcal Vaccines Eliminate Nasopharyngeal Colonization?

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Larry S; Swiatlo, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae remains an important human pathogen. For more than 100 years, there have been vaccine efforts to prevent pneumococcal infection. The pneumococcal conjugate vaccines have significantly reduced invasive disease. However, these vaccines have changed pneumococcal ecology within the human nasopharynx. We suggest that elimination of the pneumococcus from the human nasopharynx can have consequences that should be considered as the next generation of pneumococcal vaccines is developed. PMID:27222469

  20. Troubleshooting and elimination of artifact in polysomnography.

    PubMed

    Beine, Bretton

    2005-12-01

    A sleep technician who runs a sleep study without understanding the basis of the signals being acquired can spend a lot of time and energy trying to improve poor signal quality without success. Poor signal quality often results in an image that cannot be interpreted or is difficult to interpret, and extensive troubleshooting often results in a very disrupted sleep study. This article addresses trouble-shooting and elimination of artifact in polysomnography. PMID:16303593

  1. Eliminating invalid self-report survey data.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, S B; Jason, L A; Schoeny, M; Curie, C J; Townsend, S M

    2001-08-01

    A sample of 6,370 students in Grades 6 to 8 completed a questionnaire on their attitudes and use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs. A subsample showed questionable data based on three criteria: missing responses, invalid responses, and inconsistent responses. Analysis indicated that this subsample was significantly different from the main group on demographic variables and self-reported life-time tobacco use. Results support efforts to identify and eliminate invalid data. PMID:11729537

  2. Should Pneumococcal Vaccines Eliminate Nasopharyngeal Colonization?

    PubMed Central

    Swiatlo, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT  Streptococcus pneumoniae remains an important human pathogen. For more than 100 years, there have been vaccine efforts to prevent pneumococcal infection. The pneumococcal conjugate vaccines have significantly reduced invasive disease. However, these vaccines have changed pneumococcal ecology within the human nasopharynx. We suggest that elimination of the pneumococcus from the human nasopharynx can have consequences that should be considered as the next generation of pneumococcal vaccines is developed. PMID:27222469

  3. Challenges for malaria elimination in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Marcelo U; Castro, Marcia C

    2016-01-01

    Brazil currently contributes 42 % of all malaria cases reported in the Latin America and the Caribbean, a region where major progress towards malaria elimination has been achieved in recent years. In 2014, malaria burden in Brazil (143,910 microscopically confirmed cases and 41 malaria-related deaths) has reached its lowest levels in 35 years, Plasmodium falciparum is highly focal, and the geographic boundary of transmission has considerably shrunk. Transmission in Brazil remains entrenched in the Amazon Basin, which accounts for 99.5 % of the country's malaria burden. This paper reviews major lessons learned from past and current malaria control policies in Brazil. A comprehensive discussion of the scientific and logistic challenges that may impact malaria elimination efforts in the country is presented in light of the launching of the Plan for Elimination of Malaria in Brazil in November 2015. Challenges for malaria elimination addressed include the high prevalence of symptomless and submicroscopic infections, emerging anti-malarial drug resistance in P. falciparum and Plasmodium vivax and the lack of safe anti-relapse drugs, the largely neglected burden of malaria in pregnancy, the need for better vector control strategies where Anopheles mosquitoes present a highly variable biting behaviour, human movement, the need for effective surveillance and tools to identify foci of infection in areas with low transmission, and the effects of environmental changes and climatic variability in transmission. Control actions launched in Brazil and results to come are likely to influence control programs in other countries in the Americas. PMID:27206924

  4. Elimination of Rhodnius prolixus in Central America

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Rhodnius prolixus is one of the main vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease. In Central America, it was first discovered in 1915 in El Salvador, from where it spread northwest to Guatemala and Mexico, and southeast to Nicaragua and Costa Rica, arriving also in Honduras in the late 1950s. Indoor residual spraying (IRS) by the antimalaria services of Costa Rica prevented its spread southwards, and similar IRS programmes appear to have eliminated it from El Salvador by the late 1970s. In 1997, by resolution of the Ministers of Health of the seven Central American countries, a multinational initiative against Chagas disease (IPCA) was launched with one of the specific objectives being the elimination of R. prolixus from the region. As a result, more and more infested areas were encountered, and progressively sprayed using an IRS strategy already deployed against Triatoma infestans in the southern cone countries of South America. In 2008, Guatemala became the first of these countries to be formally certified as free of Chagas disease transmission due to R. prolixus. The other infested countries have since been similarly certified, and none of these has reported the presence of R. prolixus since June 2010. Further surveillance is required, but current evidence suggests that R. prolixus may now been eliminated from throughout the mesoamerican region, with a corresponding decline in the incidence of T. cruzi infections. PMID:22357219

  5. Comparing materials used in mist eliminators

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, B.; Baleno, B.; Boles, G.L.; Telow, J.

    2007-11-15

    Wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, or wet scrubbers, are notoriously capital - and maintenance-intensive. Mist eliminators are an integral part of most wet FGD systems. These are available in a variety of materials - polypropylene, fiberglass reinforced polymer (FRP), polysulfone and stainless steel. The article discusses the material properties, performance attributes and relative cost differences associated with each of these four materials. It describes the common problems with mist eliminators - fouling and corrosion. These can be minimised by routine cleaning and use of chemical additives to prevent deposition. An analysis was carried out to compare the four materials at APS Cholla power plant. As a result the facility is retrofitting its remaining wet scrubber towers in Unit 2 with mist eliminators constructed from polysulfone as each of the current ones of the existing polypropylene needs replacing. Polysulfone is cheaper to clean and components require replacing less frequently than polypropylene. Switching from stainless steel to polypropylene has proved advantageous on 22 wet scrubbers operated by PPL Montana. 5 figs. 2 tabs.

  6. Demystifying the selection of mist eliminators

    SciTech Connect

    Fabian, P.; Cusack, R.; Hennessey, P.; Neuman, M. )

    1993-11-01

    In any process where gases and liquids come in intimate contact, mists are generated by the entrainment of liquid droplets into the gas streams. The formation of such mists often results in process inefficiencies and product loss in evaporators, knockout drums, distillation columns, and environmental scrubbers. Besides, these mists can cause serious damage to rotating equipment. hence the need to know how best to remove the liquid droplets from a misty gas stream. Today, one can select from many classes of equipment, known as mist eliminators or entrainment separators, designed to remove the liquid droplets along with any solid particles from the gas stream. Before arriving at a selection, one must weigh several important factors: The sizes of droplets that the separator must remove; The pressure drop that can be tolerated in achieving the required level of mist removal; Susceptibility of the separator to plugging by solids, if solids are present; Liquid handling capability of the separator; Whether the mist eliminator can be installed inside existing equipment, or if it requires a stand alone vessel instead; The availability of the materials of construction that are compatible with the process; and Costs of the mists eliminator itself and other required vessels, piping, instrumentation, and utilities.

  7. Role of genomics in eliminating health disparities

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Meghana V; Nolan, Michael; Sprouse, Marc; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Cross, Deanna; Roby, Rhonda; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K

    2015-01-01

    The Texas Center for Health Disparities, a National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities Center of Excellence, presents an annual conference to discuss prevention, awareness education, and ongoing research about health disparities both in Texas and among the national population. The 2014 Annual Texas Conference on Health Disparities brought together experts in research, patient care, and community outreach on the “Role of Genomics in Eliminating Health Disparities.” Rapid advances in genomics and pharmacogenomics are leading the field of medicine to use genetics and genetic risk to build personalized or individualized medicine strategies. We are at a critical juncture of ensuring such rapid advances benefit diverse populations. Relatively few forums have been organized around the theme of the role of genomics in eliminating health disparities. The conference consisted of three sessions addressing “Gene-Environment Interactions and Health Disparities,” “Personalized Medicine and Elimination of Health Disparities,” and “Ethics and Public Policy in the Genomic Era.” This article summarizes the basic science, clinical correlates, and public health data presented by the speakers. PMID:26435701

  8. Eliminating the cost of task set reconfiguration.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Amelia R; Klein, Raymond M

    2002-06-01

    With insufficient time to fully prepare for a switch in task, a deterioration in performance on the first trial of a new task would be expected. The interest of researchers has been captured by the residual switch costs that, surprisingly, remain despite sufficient time to prepare. We used avery simple task to investigate the costs to reaction time and accuracy associated with changing between two different instructional sets every eight trials. Subjects responded to left and right visual targets by making either spatially compatible or incompatible eye movements (Experiment 1) or buttonpress responses (Experiment 2). The subjects were cued as to whether to make the compatible or the incompatible response by the color of a border appearing on the perimeter of the display. In cases in which the subject alternated between making pro- and antisaccades, the large costs to reaction time and accuracy at the short cue-target stimulus onset asynchrony were completely eliminated when sufficient time was provided to prepare for the switch. This complete elimination of residual switch costs was not obtained when the same alternation was applied to manual responses. This pattern of results links residual costs to response selection processes and suggests that they are not a necessary component of the switch process. We propose that the elimination of "stubborn" residual switch costs is rooted in our use of a hypercompatible task (making saccades toward targets) that places minimal demands on response selection. PMID:12184554

  9. Modelisation par elements finis du muscle strie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Mathieu

    Ce present projet de recherche a permis. de creer un modele par elements finis du muscle strie humain dans le but d'etudier les mecanismes engendrant les lesions musculaires traumatiques. Ce modele constitue une plate-forme numerique capable de discerner l'influence des proprietes mecaniques des fascias et de la cellule musculaire sur le comportement dynamique du muscle lors d'une contraction excentrique, notamment le module de Young et le module de cisaillement de la couche de tissu conjonctif, l'orientation des fibres de collagene de cette membrane et le coefficient de poisson du muscle. La caracterisation experimentale in vitro de ces parametres pour des vitesses de deformation elevees a partir de muscles stries humains actifs est essentielle pour l'etude de lesions musculaires traumatiques. Le modele numerique developpe est capable de modeliser la contraction musculaire comme une transition de phase de la cellule musculaire par un changement de raideur et de volume a l'aide des lois de comportement de materiau predefinies dans le logiciel LS-DYNA (v971, Livermore Software Technology Corporation, Livermore, CA, USA). Le present projet de recherche introduit donc un phenomene physiologique qui pourrait expliquer des blessures musculaires courantes (crampes, courbatures, claquages, etc.), mais aussi des maladies ou desordres touchant le tissu conjonctif comme les collagenoses et la dystrophie musculaire. La predominance de blessures musculaires lors de contractions excentriques est egalement exposee. Le modele developpe dans ce projet de recherche met ainsi a l'avant-scene le concept de transition de phase ouvrant la porte au developpement de nouvelles technologies pour l'activation musculaire chez les personnes atteintes de paraplegie ou de muscles artificiels compacts pour l'elaboration de protheses ou d'exosquelettes. Mots-cles Muscle strie, lesion musculaire, fascia, contraction excentrique, modele par elements finis, transition de phase

  10. Hydrogen generation from alcohols (α-hydroxy carboxylic acids) and alcohol-ammonia coupling in aqueous media catalysed by water-soluble bipyridine-Cp*Ir (Rh or Os) catalyst: a computational mechanism insight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dan-Dan; Chen, Xian-Kai; Liu, Hui-Ling; Huang, Xu-Ri

    2015-06-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to elucidate the mechanism of the dehydrogenative oxidation of various primary alcohols (or α-hydroxy carboxylic acids) and the dehydrogenative coupling of alcohols with ammonia catalysed by the same water-soluble Cp*Ir complex bearing a 2-pyridonate-based ligand (A-Ir). Another two new catalysts A-Rh and A-Os are computationally designed for the dehydrogenative oxidation of alcohols. The plausible pathway for alcohol dehydrogenation includes three steps: alcohol oxidation to aldehyde (step I); the generation of dihydrogen in the metal coordination sphere (step II); and the liberation of dihydrogen accompanied with the regeneration of active catalyst A (step III). Among them, the step I follows bifunctional concerted double hydrogen transfer mechanism rather than the β-H elimination. For step II, the energy barriers involving the addition of one or two water molecules are higher than in absence of water. Our results also confirm that A-Ir can be applied in the dehydrogenation of various α-hydroxy carboxylic acids by the similar mechanism. Remarkably, A-Ir is also found to be efficient for the coupling reactions of various primary benzyl alcohols with ammonia to afford amides.

  11. A Conserved Mode of Protein Recognition and Binding in a ParD−ParE Toxin−Antitoxin Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, Kevin M.; Crosson, Sean

    2010-05-06

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems form a ubiquitous class of prokaryotic proteins with functional roles in plasmid inheritance, environmental stress response, and cell development. ParDE family TA systems are broadly conserved on plasmids and bacterial chromosomes and have been well characterized as genetic elements that promote stable plasmid inheritance. We present a crystal structure of a chromosomally encoded ParD-ParE complex from Caulobacter crescentus at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. This TA system forms an {alpha}{sub 2}{beta}{sub 2} heterotetramer in the crystal and in solution. The toxin-antitoxin binding interface reveals extensive polar and hydrophobic contacts of ParD antitoxin helices with a conserved recognition and binding groove on the ParE toxin. A cross-species comparison of this complex structure with related toxin structures identified an antitoxin recognition and binding subdomain that is conserved between distantly related members of the RelE/ParE toxin superfamily despite a low level of overall primary sequence identity. We further demonstrate that ParD antitoxin is dimeric, stably folded, and largely helical when not bound to ParE toxin. Thus, the paradigmatic model in which antitoxin undergoes a disorder-to-order transition upon toxin binding does not apply to this chromosomal ParD-ParE TA system.

  12. A conserved mode of protein recognition and binding in a ParD-ParE toxin-antitoxin complex†

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Kevin M.; Crosson, Sean

    2010-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems form a ubiquitous class of prokaryotic proteins with functional roles in plasmid inheritance, environmental stress response, and cell development. ParDE-family TA systems are broadly conserved on plasmids and bacterial chromosomes, and have been well characterized as genetic elements that promote stable plasmid inheritance. We present a crystal structure of a chromosomally-encoded ParD-ParE complex from Caulobacter crescentus at 2.6 Å resolution. This TA system forms an α2β2 heterotetramer in the crystal and in solution. The toxin-antitoxin binding interface reveals extensive polar and hydrophobic contacts of ParD antitoxin helices with a conserved recognition and binding groove on the ParE toxin. A cross-species comparison of this complex structure with related toxin structures identified an antitoxin recognition and binding sub-domain that is conserved between distantly-related members of the RelE/ParE toxin superfamily despite low overall primary sequence identity. We further demonstrate that ParD antitoxin is dimeric, stably folded, and largely helical when not bound to ParE toxin. Thus, the paradigmatic model in which antitoxin undergoes a disorder-to-order transition upon toxin binding does not apply to this chromosomal ParD-ParE TA system. PMID:20143871

  13. Historic macrophyte development in Par Pond

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, J.B.

    1985-08-01

    Aerial photographs from 1975, 1980, and 1983 were examined to evaluate the changes that have occurred in the wetland vegetation of Par Pond, a reactor-cooling reservoir. Evaluation of the aerial photographs was based on comparisons with ground-level vegetation maps made during July 1984. Comparisons of photographs from August and December of 1983 revealed the main seasonal change in the aerial coverage of wetland vegetation to be the wintertime loss of non-persistent emergent species such as Nelumbo lutea and Nymphaea odorata. Comparisons between September 1980 and August 1983 revealed that the lakeward extent of non-persistent macrophytes has increased by an average of 8.2 m, though not all sites have changed equally. For persistent macrophytes (principally Typha), the average increase in lakeward extent between December 1975 and August 1983 was 3.48 m. The extensive development of wetland vegetation in Par Pond as well as the substantial spread of vegetation over only a few years time indicates the high suitability of this habitat for the growth of wetland plants.

  14. A Par-1-Par-3-Centrosome Cell Polarity Pathway and Its Tuning for Isotropic Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; McKinley, R F Andrew; McGill, Melanie A; Angers, Stephane; Harris, Tony J C

    2015-10-19

    To form regulated barriers between body compartments, epithelial cells polarize into apical and basolateral domains and assemble adherens junctions (AJs). Despite close links with polarity networks that generate single polarized domains, AJs distribute isotropically around the cell circumference for adhesion with all neighboring cells [1-3]. How AJs avoid the influence of polarity networks to maintain their isotropy has been unclear. In established epithelia, trans cadherin interactions could maintain AJ isotropy [4], but AJs are dynamic during epithelial development and remodeling [5, 6], and thus specific mechanisms may control their isotropy. In Drosophila, aPKC prevents hyper-polarization of junctions as epithelia develop from cellularization to gastrulation [7]. Here, we show that aPKC does so by inhibiting a positive feedback loop between Bazooka (Baz)/Par-3, a junctional organizer [5, 8-10], and centrosomes. Without aPKC, Baz and centrosomes lose their isotropic distributions and recruit each other to single plasma membrane (PM) domains. Surprisingly, our loss- and gain-of-function analyses show that the Baz-centrosome positive feedback loop is driven by Par-1, a kinase known to phosphorylate Baz and inhibit its basolateral localization [8, 11, 12]. We find that Par-1 promotes the positive feedback loop through both centrosome microtubule effects and Baz phosphorylation. Normally, aPKC attenuates the circuit by expelling Par-1 from the apical domain at gastrulation. The combination of local activation and global inhibition is a common polarization strategy [13-16]. Par-1 seems to couple both effects for a potent Baz polarization mechanism that is regulated for the isotropy of Baz and AJs around the cell circumference. PMID:26455305

  15. 2. HI PAR (ACQUISITION RADAR) TOWER AND ENLISTED MEN (EM) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. HI PAR (ACQUISITION RADAR) TOWER AND ENLISTED MEN (EM) BARRACKS WITH RADAR ATTACHED. - Nike Hercules Missile Battery Summit Site, Battery Control Administration & Barracks Building, Anchorage, Anchorage, AK

  16. Carbanion reactivity, kinetic and equilibrium studies of sigma-adduct formation and elimination in the reactions of 4-nitrobenzofurazan derivatives with nitroalkane anions.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Basim H M; Crampton, Michael R

    2007-05-21

    1H NMR studies are reported of the reactions in [2H(6)]-DMSO of 4-nitrobenzofurazan, 2a, and its 7-chloro- and 7-methoxy-derivatives, 2b and 2c respectively, with anions derived from nitromethane, 3, nitroethane, 4, and 2-nitropropane, 5. The initial reactions result in sigma-adduct formation by carbanion attack at the 5-position of 2a-c and in the case of reaction of 2a with 5 the adduct at the 7-position is also observed. These reactions may be followed by base catalysed elimination of nitrous acid to yield anionic alkene derivatives. Kinetic and equilibrium measurements of these reactions were made spectrophotometrically in methanol. The carbon nucleophilicities of the carbanions decrease in the order 3> 4> 5, as also found in their reactions with benzhydrylium cations, and are much lower than the nucleophilicities of some cyano-substituted carbanions. Comparison with corresponding sigma-adduct forming reactions of 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene, TNB, show that here 2 and TNB have similar electrophilicity, although the value of the intrinsic rate coefficient k(o) = 0.05, for reaction of 2 is rather lower than that, k(o) = 0.20, for the TNB reactions. Literature data suggest that for reaction with a variety of nucleophiles 2 and TNB show similar electrophilicities. Measurements of the rates of elimination of nitrous acid from some 5-adducts in methanol catalysed by methoxide ions are reported. Values of rate constants may be influenced both by steric requirements at the reaction centre and by the electronic effects of the 7-substituent. PMID:17571196

  17. Synthesis of cinnolines via Rh(iii)-catalysed dehydrogenative C-H/N-H functionalization: aggregation induced emission and cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Mayakrishnan, Sivakalai; Arun, Yuvaraj; Balachandran, Chandrasekar; Emi, Nobuhiko; Muralidharan, Doraiswamy; Perumal, Paramasivan Thirumalai

    2016-02-14

    Rhodium catalysed dehydrogenative C-H/N-H functionalization was developed to construct phthalazino[2,3-a]-/indazolo[1,2-a]cinnolines by reacting N-phenyl phthalazine/indazole with alkynes. The synthesized compounds exhibit prominent fluorescence properties in solid and aggregation states. Their application in cell imaging was investigated using various cancer cell lines. PMID:26754143

  18. Auditing reduces accidents by eliminating unsafe practices

    SciTech Connect

    Collinge, J.A. )

    1992-08-24

    This paper reports that auditing for unsafe acts can remove the basic causes of accidents through the adoption of a proactive approach to safety. The process of auditing for unsafe acts is aimed at eliminating unsafe situations and practices by a method of constructive dialogue between managers and workers. One of the major objectives of the process is to change the cultural attitude toward safety so that it is viewed as a personal responsibility of each member of management, supervision, and the workforce. In large organizations it is common to see policy statements concerning the health and safety of employees and people associated with the business, such as contractors. In recent years, such organizations have also placed emphasis on statements related to protecting the environment. Policy guidelines for Shell companies are unambiguous: Health. The companies conduct business in such a way as to avoid harm to the health of employees and others, and to promote, as appropriate, the health of employees. Safety. Companies work on the principle that all injuries should be prevented and actively promote the high standards of safety consciousness and discipline that this principle demands. Environment. Companies pursue progressive reductions of emissions, effluents, and discharges of waste materials known to have a negative impact on the environment, with the ultimate aim of eliminating those discharges.

  19. Elimination of frequency noise from groundwater measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Y.M.; Bryce, R.W.; Strait, S.R.; Yeatman, R.A.

    1986-04-01

    Groundwater response to atmospheric fluctuation can be effectively removed from downhole-pressure records using the systematic approach. The technique is not as successful for removal of earth tides, due to a probable discrepancy between the actual earth tide and the theoretical earth tide. The advantage of the systematic technique is that a causative relationship is established for each component of the pressure response removed. This concept of data reduction is easily understood and well accepted. The disadvantage is that a record of the stress causing the pressure fluctuation must be obtained. This may be done by monitoring or synthesizing the stress. Frequency analysis offers a simpler way to eliminate the undesirable hydrologic fluctuations from the downhole pressure. Frequency analysis may prove to be impractical if the fluctuations being removed have broadband characteristics. A combination of the two techniques, such as eliminating the atmospheric effect with the systematic method and the earth-tide fluctuations with the frequency method, is the most effective and efficient approach.

  20. The elimination of Chagas' disease from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    MASSAD, E.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY On 9 June 2006 the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) presented the Minister of Health of Brazil with the International Elimination of Transmission of Chagas' Disease Certificate. This act was the culmination of an intensive process that began in 1991 with the Southern Cone Initiative, a joint agreement between the governments of Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay, Uruguay and Peru, to control Chagas' disease by the elimination of the main vector, Triatoma infestans. This initiative has been highly successful and the prevalence area of the vector diminished rapidly in the last years. As a consequence, the current seroprevalence in children aged between 0 and 5 years is of the order of 10−5, a clear indication that transmission, if it is occurring, is only accidental. In this review I calculate the basic reproduction number, R0, for Chagas' disease and demonstrate that its relatively low value (1·25) explains why vectorial transmission was interrupted relatively easily. In addition, I used a mathematical model to forecast how long the remaining cases of the disease, as well as the additional vertically transmitted cases will last. PMID:18053273

  1. Genetic elimination of dengue vector mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Wise de Valdez, Megan R.; Nimmo, Derric; Betz, John; Gong, Hong-Fei; James, Anthony A.; Alphey, Luke; Black, William C.

    2011-01-01

    An approach based on mosquitoes carrying a conditional dominant lethal gene (release of insects carrying a dominant lethal, RIDL) is being developed to control the transmission of dengue viruses by vector population suppression. A transgenic strain, designated OX3604C, of the major dengue vector, Aedes aegypti, was engineered to have a repressible female-specific flightless phenotype. This strain circumvents the need for radiation-induced sterilization, allows genetic sexing resulting in male-only releases, and permits the release of eggs instead of adult mosquitoes. OX3604C males introduced weekly into large laboratory cages containing stable target mosquito populations at initial ratios of 8.5–10∶1 OX3604C∶target eliminated the populations within 10–20 weeks. These data support the further testing of this strain in contained or confined field trials to evaluate mating competitiveness and environmental and other effects. Successful completion of the field trials should facilitate incorporation of this approach into area-wide dengue control or elimination efforts as a component of an integrated vector management strategy. PMID:21383140

  2. Eliminating Major Tornadoes in Tornado Alley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, R.

    2015-03-01

    In my recent paper, I propose that major tornadoes in Tornado Alley can be eliminated by building east-west ranged walls, 300 meter high and 50 meter wide. The work has received much attention, but some meteorologists are against the idea, claiming that the major tornadoes in Tornado Alley are not related to the collisions between northbound warm air flow and southbound cold air flow because supercells are not at the collision front. In this talk, we will show that wind tunnel experiments and airplane wing tip vortices clearly demonstrate that vortices produced by air mass collisions are usually not at the collision front because of the extremely volatile condition over there; they are either near the ends or at side of the collision fronts. When the warm and moist wind collides with the cold wind violently in Tornado Alley, similarly, the supercell storms cannot be right at the collision fronts, but are near the ends or at sides of the collision fronts. While only a small portion of vortices in the warm air side may have a chance to develop into tornadoes, the major tornadoes in Tornado Alley indeed start from the air mass clashes. If we can weaken such violent air mass collisions, we will eliminate the major tornadoes in Tornado Alley. The work is supported in part by Naval Research Lab.

  3. Transcriptome profiling reveals links between ParS/ParR, MexEF-OprN, and quorum sensing in the regulation of adaptation and virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ParS/ParR two component regulatory system plays critical roles for multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It was demonstrated that in the presence of antimicrobials, ParR enhances bacterial survival by distinct mechanisms including activation of the mexXY efflux genes, enhancement of lipopolysaccharide modification through the arn operon, and reduction of the expression of oprD porin. Results In this study, we report on transcriptomic analyses of P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild type and parS and parR mutants growing in a defined minimal medium. Our transcriptomic analysis provides the first estimates of transcript abundance for the 5570 coding genes in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Comparative transcriptomics of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and par mutants identified a total of 464 genes regulated by ParS and ParR. Results also showed that mutations in the parS/parR system abolished expression of the mexEF-oprN operon by down-regulating the regulatory gene mexS. In addition to the known effects on drug resistance genes, transcript abundances of the quorum sensing genes (rhlIR and pqsABCDE-phnAB) were higher in both parS and parR mutants. In accordance with these results, a significant portion of the ParS/ParR regulated genes belonged to the MexEF-OprN and quorum sensing regulons. Deletion of the par genes also led to increased phenazine production and swarming motility, consistent with the up-regulation of the phenazine and rhamnolipid biosynthetic genes, respectively. Conclusion Our results link the ParS/ParR two component signal transduction system to MexEF-OprN and quorum sensing systems in P. aeruginosa. These results expand our understanding of the roles of the ParS/ParR system in the regulation of gene expression in P. aeruginosa, especially in the absence of antimicrobials. PMID:24034668

  4. A direct approach to amines with remote stereocenters by enantioselective CuH-catalysed reductive relay hydroamination

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shaolin; Niljianskul, Nootaree; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Amines with remote stereocenters (stereocenters that are three or more bonds away from the C–N bond) are important structural elements in many pharmaceutical agents and natural products. However, previously reported methods to prepare these compounds in an enantioselective manner are indirect and require multistep synthesis. Here we report a copper hydride-catalysed, enantioselective synthesis of γ- or δ-chiral amines from readily available allylic alcohols, esters, and ethers using a reductive relay hydroamination strategy (a net reductive process in which an amino group is installed at a site remote from the original C–C double bond). The protocol was suitable for substrates containing a wide range of functional groups and provided remote chiral amine products with high levels of regio- and enantioselectivity. Sequential amination of substrates containing several carbon-carbon double bonds could be achieved, demonstrating the high chemoselectivity of this process. PMID:26791897

  5. Enantioselective Benzylic Hydroxylation Catalysed by P450 Monooxygenases: Characterisation of a P450cam Mutant Library and Molecular Modelling.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Anja; Gricman, Łukasz; Herter, Susanne; Kelly, Paul P; Turner, Nicholas J; Pleiss, Jürgen; Flitsch, Sabine L

    2016-03-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases can catalyse the stereoselective C-H activation of a very broad range of substrates. Prediction and control of enantioselectivity of this enzyme class is of great interest for the synthesis of high-value chiral molecules. Here we have used a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and experimental screening to study the enantioselectivity of a library of active-site mutants of chimeric P450cam-RhFRed towards the benzylic hydroxylation of structurally related regioisomers of ethylmethylbenzene. Small variations either in substrate structure or in enzyme active site architecture were shown to lead to dramatic changes in enantioselectivity; this was broadly in agreement with computational predictions. In addition to validating computational approaches, these studies have provided us with a deeper understanding of effects that might control stereoselectivity in these biooxidation reactions. PMID:26698167

  6. The electrochemical oxidation of toluene catalysed by Co(II) in N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide.

    PubMed

    Balaji, S; Kannan, K; Moon, I S

    2015-12-14

    The electrochemical oxidation of toluene in N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([bmpyr](+)[Ntf2](-)) was investigated by using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic electrolysis in the presence of Co(II) at a Pt disc working electrode. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) investigations revealed that Co(II)-Co(III) oxidation is a diffusion controlled electron transfer process. The diffusion coefficient values of Co(II) were found to increase from 0.38 × 10(-7) to 1.9 × 10(-7) cm(2) s(-1) as the temperature was increased from 25 °C to 80 °C. The CV peak current for toluene electro-oxidation increased by nearly 7 fold in the presence of Co(II) demonstrating a good catalytic effect. Co(II) catalysed galvanostatic electrolysis of toluene at room temperature has shown that benzaldehyde was formed along with a small quantity of 3-methyl-1-hexanol. PMID:26538114

  7. A direct approach to amines with remote stereocentres by enantioselective CuH-catalysed reductive relay hydroamination.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shaolin; Niljianskul, Nootaree; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2016-02-01

    Amines with remote stereocentres (stereocentres that are three or more bonds away from the C-N bond) are important structural elements in many pharmaceutical agents and natural products. However, previously reported methods to prepare these compounds in an enantioselective manner are indirect and require multistep synthesis. Here, we report a copper-hydride-catalysed, enantioselective synthesis of γ- or δ-chiral amines from readily available allylic alcohols, esters and ethers using a reductive relay hydroamination strategy (a net reductive process in which an amino group is installed at a site remote from the original carbon-carbon double bond). The protocol was suitable for substrates containing a wide range of functional groups and provided remote chiral amine products with high levels of regio- and enantioselectivity. Sequential amination of substrates containing several carbon-carbon double bonds could be achieved, demonstrating the high chemoselectivity of this process. PMID:26791897

  8. Montmorillonite-catalysed formation of RNA oligomers: the possible role of catalysis in the origins of life

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, James P

    2006-01-01

    Large deposits of montmorillonite are present on the Earth today and it is believed to have been present at the time of the origin of life and has recently been detected on Mars. It is formed by aqueous weathering of volcanic ash. It catalyses the formation of oligomers of RNA that contain monomer units from 2 to 30–50. Oligomers of this length are formed because this catalyst controls the structure of the oligomers formed and does not generate all possible isomers. Evidence of sequence-, regio- and homochiral selectivity in these oligomers has been obtained. Postulates on the role of selective versus specific catalysts on the origins of life are discussed. An introduction to the origin of life is given with an emphasis on reaction conditions based on the recent data obtained from zircons 4.0–4.5 Ga. PMID:17008218

  9. Chirality Transfer in Gold(I)-Catalysed Direct Allylic Etherifications of Unactivated Alcohols: Experimental and Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Graeme; Johnson, David G; Young, Paul C; Macgregor, Stuart A; Lee, Ai-Lan

    2015-01-01

    Gold(I)-catalysed direct allylic etherifications have been successfully carried out with chirality transfer to yield enantioenriched, γ-substituted secondary allylic ethers. Our investigations include a full substrate-scope screen to ascertain substituent effects on the regioselectivity, stereoselectivity and efficiency of chirality transfer, as well as control experiments to elucidate the mechanistic subtleties of the chirality-transfer process. Crucially, addition of molecular sieves was found to be necessary to ensure efficient and general chirality transfer. Computational studies suggest that the efficiency of chirality transfer is linked to the aggregation of the alcohol nucleophile around the reactive π-bound Au–allylic ether complex. With a single alcohol nucleophile, a high degree of chirality transfer is predicted. However, if three alcohols are present, alternative proton transfer chain mechanisms that erode the efficiency of chirality transfer become competitive. PMID:26248980

  10. Rhodium-catalysed C(sp(2))-C(sp(2)) bond formation via C-H/C-F activation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Panpan; Feng, Chao; Loh, Teck-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Fluoroalkenes represent a class of privileged structural motifs, which found widespread use in medicinal chemistry. However, the synthetic access to fluoroalkenes was much underdeveloped with previous reported methods suffering from either low step economy or harsh reaction conditions. Here we present a Rh(III)-catalysed tandem C-H/C-F activation for the synthesis of (hetero)arylated monofluoroalkenes. The use of readily available gem-difluoroalkenes as electrophiles provides a highly efficient and operationally simple method for the introduction of α-fluoroalkenyl motifs onto (hetero)arenes under oxidant-free conditions. Furthermore, the employment of alcoholic solvent and the in-situ generated hydrogen fluoride are found to be beneficial in this transformation, indicating the possibility of the involvement of hydrogen bond activation mode with regards to the C-F bond cleavage step. PMID:26081837

  11. Copper-catalysed cyanoalkylative cycloetherification of alkenes to 1,3-dihydroisobenzofurans: development and application to the synthesis of citalopram.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tu M; Wang, Qian; Zhu, Jieping

    2016-09-25

    A copper-catalysed cyanoalkylative cycloetherification of alkenes was developed. Heating a solution of substituted (2-vinylphenyl)methanol in MeCN/MeOH (v/v 7/3) in the presence of a catalytic amount of copper(ii) tetrafluoroborate hydrate [Cu(BF4)2·6H2O], bathophenanthroline, K3PO4, BnOH and (tBuO)2 afforded 1,3-dihydroisobenzofurans (phthalanes) via formation of one C(sp(3))-C(sp(3)) and one C(sp(3))-O bonds. A concise synthesis of citalopram, a marketed anti-depressant drug, was accomplished by applying this novel synthetic transformation. PMID:27546372

  12. A direct approach to amines with remote stereocentres by enantioselective CuH-catalysed reductive relay hydroamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shaolin; Niljianskul, Nootaree; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2016-02-01

    Amines with remote stereocentres (stereocentres that are three or more bonds away from the C-N bond) are important structural elements in many pharmaceutical agents and natural products. However, previously reported methods to prepare these compounds in an enantioselective manner are indirect and require multistep synthesis. Here, we report a copper-hydride-catalysed, enantioselective synthesis of γ- or δ-chiral amines from readily available allylic alcohols, esters and ethers using a reductive relay hydroamination strategy (a net reductive process in which an amino group is installed at a site remote from the original carbon-carbon double bond). The protocol was suitable for substrates containing a wide range of functional groups and provided remote chiral amine products with high levels of regio- and enantioselectivity. Sequential amination of substrates containing several carbon-carbon double bonds could be achieved, demonstrating the high chemoselectivity of this process.

  13. Taare Zameen Par and dyslexic savants.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Ambar

    2009-04-01

    The film Taare Zameen Par (Stars upon the Ground) portrays the tormented life at school and at home of a child with dyslexia and his eventual success after his artistic talents are discovered by his art teacher at the boarding school. The film hints at a curious neurocognitive phenomenon of creativity in the midst of language disability, as exemplified in the lives of people like Leonardo da Vinci and Albert Einstein, both of whom demonstrated extraordinary creativity even though they were probably affected with developmental learning disorders. It has been hypothesized that a developmental delay in the dominant hemisphere most likely 'disinhibits' the nondominant parietal lobe, unmasking talents-artistic or otherwise-in some such individuals. It has been suggested that, in remedial training, children with learning disorders be encouraged to develop such hidden talents to full capacity, rather than be subjected to the usual overemphasis on the correction of the disturbed coded symbol operations. PMID:20142854

  14. Taare Zameen Par and dyslexic savants

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Ambar

    2009-01-01

    The film Taare Zameen Par (Stars upon the Ground) portrays the tormented life at school and at home of a child with dyslexia and his eventual success after his artistic talents are discovered by his art teacher at the boarding school. The film hints at a curious neurocognitive phenomenon of creativity in the midst of language disability, as exemplified in the lives of people like Leonardo da Vinci and Albert Einstein, both of whom demonstrated extraordinary creativity even though they were probably affected with developmental learning disorders. It has been hypothesized that a developmental delay in the dominant hemisphere most likely ‘disinhibits’ the nondominant parietal lobe, unmasking talents—artistic or otherwise—in some such individuals. It has been suggested that, in remedial training, children with learning disorders be encouraged to develop such hidden talents to full capacity, rather than be subjected to the usual overemphasis on the correction of the disturbed coded symbol operations. PMID:20142854

  15. Self-catalysed InAs{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires grown directly on bare Si substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Anyebe, E.A. Zhuang, Q.

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Self-catalysed InAs{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires grown directly on bare Si substrates. • InAs{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires directly grown on bare Si substrates without employing the commonly used nucleation nanowire stems which could be problematic in device applications. • Pre-deposited Indium droplets were employed to facilitate InAs{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowire nucleation and growth. • Unravels a promising route for the direct integration of InAs{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires with the well-established Silicon platform. - Abstract: We report the self-catalysed growth of InAs{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires directly on bare Si substrates. Vertically aligned and non-tapered InAs{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires were realized via indium-assisted nucleation without using nanowire stems. The compositions of the InAs{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires were determined by high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD). It is observed that the geometry of the nanowires is modified by the Sb flux resulting in an almost doubling of the lateral dimension and a corresponding suppression in the axial growth of the InAs{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires. This observation unravels a method to modify the geometry of InAs nanowire and open up a promising route for the direct integration of InAs{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x} nanowires with the well-established Si platform.

  16. cyp7b1 catalyses the 7alpha-hydroxylation of dehydroepiandrosterone and 25-hydroxycholesterol in rat prostate.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, C; Bean, R; Rose, K; Habib, F; Seckl, J

    2001-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is the most prominent circulating steroid in humans, and it is a precursor for sex-steroid synthesis in peripheral tissues, including the prostate. Recently, enzyme-mediated pre-receptor metabolism has been recognized as a key step in determining steroid action in vivo. Hydroxylation of 3beta-steroids at the 7alpha-position has been reported in rat and human prostate to be a major inhibitory pathway to sex-steroid synthesis/action. However, the molecular identity of the enzyme responsible is so far unknown. We recently described a novel cytochrome P450 enzyme, cyp7b1, strongly expressed in the hippocampus of rodent brain, which catalyses the metabolism of DHEA, pregnenolone and 25-hydroxycholesterol to 7alpha-hydroxy products. In the light of this new enzyme, we have examined its possible role in 7alpha-hydroxylation conversion in rat prostate. NADPH-dependent 7alpha-hydroxylation was confirmed for 3beta-hydroxysteroids including DHEA and androstenediol, as well as 25-hydroxycholesterol. Kinetic analysis yielded an apparent K(m) of 14+/-1 microM for 7alpha-hydroxylation of DHEA in the prostate gland, a value similar to that recorded for recombinant cyp7b1 enzyme [13.6 microM; Rose, Stapleton, Dott, Kieny, Best, Schwarz, Russell, Bjoorkheim, Seckl and Lathe (1997) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 94, 4925-4930]. The V(max) value of the prostate was 46+/-2 pmol/min per mg, and this activity was inhibited by clotrimazole, a P450-enzyme blocker. Moreover, RNA analysis (reverse-transcription PCR, Northern blotting and in situ hybridization) revealed a high expression of cyp7b1 mRNA in the rat prostate, restricted to the epithelium, suggesting that cyp7b1 catalyses oxysterol 7alpha-hydroxylation in the prostate gland. PMID:11284740

  17. Stereochemical features of the hydrolysis of 9,10-epoxystearic acid catalysed by plant and mammalian epoxide hydrolases.

    PubMed Central

    Summerer, Stephan; Hanano, Abdulsamie; Utsumi, Shigeru; Arand, Michael; Schuber, Francis; Blée, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    cis-9,10-epoxystearic acid was used as a tool to probe the active sites of epoxide hydrolases (EHs) of mammalian and plant origin. We have compared the stereochemical features of the hydrolysis of this substrate catalysed by soluble and membrane-bound rat liver EHs, by soluble EH (purified to apparent homogeneity) obtained from maize seedlings or celeriac roots, and by recombinant soybean EH expressed in yeast. Plant EHs were found to differ in their enantioselectivity, i.e. their ability to discriminate between the two enantiomers of 9,10-epoxystearic acid. For example, while the maize enzyme hydrated both enantiomers at the same rate, the EH from soybean exhibited very high enantioselectivity in favour of 9R,10S-epoxystearic acid. This latter enzyme also exhibited a strict stereoselectivity, i.e. it hydrolysed the racemic substrate with a very high enantioconvergence, yielding a single chiral diol product, threo-9R,10R-dihydroxystearic acid. Soybean EH shared these distinctive stereochemical features with the membrane-bound rat liver EH. The stereochemical outcome of these enzymes probably results from a stereoselective attack by the nucleophilic residue on the oxirane ring carbon having the (S)-configuration, leading to the presumed (in plant EH) covalent acyl-enzyme intermediate. In sharp contrast, the reactions catalysed by cytosolic rat liver EH exhibited a complete absence of enantioselectivity and enantioconvergence; this latter effect might be ascribed to a regioselective formation of the acyl-enzyme intermediate involving C-10 of 9,10-epoxystearic acid, independent of its configuration. Thus, compared with soybean EH, the active site of rat liver soluble EH displays a very distinct means of anchoring the oxirane ring of the fatty acid epoxides, and therefore appears to be a poor model for mapping the catalytic domain of plant EHs. PMID:12020347

  18. Stereochemical features of the hydrolysis of 9,10-epoxystearic acid catalysed by plant and mammalian epoxide hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Summerer, Stephan; Hanano, Abdulsamie; Utsumi, Shigeru; Arand, Michael; Schuber, Francis; Blée, Elizabeth

    2002-09-01

    cis-9,10-epoxystearic acid was used as a tool to probe the active sites of epoxide hydrolases (EHs) of mammalian and plant origin. We have compared the stereochemical features of the hydrolysis of this substrate catalysed by soluble and membrane-bound rat liver EHs, by soluble EH (purified to apparent homogeneity) obtained from maize seedlings or celeriac roots, and by recombinant soybean EH expressed in yeast. Plant EHs were found to differ in their enantioselectivity, i.e. their ability to discriminate between the two enantiomers of 9,10-epoxystearic acid. For example, while the maize enzyme hydrated both enantiomers at the same rate, the EH from soybean exhibited very high enantioselectivity in favour of 9R,10S-epoxystearic acid. This latter enzyme also exhibited a strict stereoselectivity, i.e. it hydrolysed the racemic substrate with a very high enantioconvergence, yielding a single chiral diol product, threo-9R,10R-dihydroxystearic acid. Soybean EH shared these distinctive stereochemical features with the membrane-bound rat liver EH. The stereochemical outcome of these enzymes probably results from a stereoselective attack by the nucleophilic residue on the oxirane ring carbon having the (S)-configuration, leading to the presumed (in plant EH) covalent acyl-enzyme intermediate. In sharp contrast, the reactions catalysed by cytosolic rat liver EH exhibited a complete absence of enantioselectivity and enantioconvergence; this latter effect might be ascribed to a regioselective formation of the acyl-enzyme intermediate involving C-10 of 9,10-epoxystearic acid, independent of its configuration. Thus, compared with soybean EH, the active site of rat liver soluble EH displays a very distinct means of anchoring the oxirane ring of the fatty acid epoxides, and therefore appears to be a poor model for mapping the catalytic domain of plant EHs. PMID:12020347

  19. Biased signaling: potential agonist and antagonist of PAR2.

    PubMed

    Kakarala, Kavita Kumari; Jamil, Kaiser

    2016-06-01

    Protease activated receptor 2 (PAR2) has emerged as one of the promising therapeutic targets to inhibit rapidly metastasizing breast cancer cells. However, its elusive molecular mechanism of activation and signaling has made it a difficult target for drug development. In this study, in silico methods were used to unfold PAR2 molecular mechanism of signaling based on the concept of GPCR receptor plasticity. Although, there are no conclusive evidences of the presence of specific endogenous ligands for PAR2, the efficacy of synthetic agonist and antagonist in PAR2 signaling has opened up the possibilities of ligand-mediated signaling. Furthermore, it has been proved that ligands specific for one GPCR can induce signaling in GPCRs belonging to other subfamilies. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify potential agonists and antagonists from the GPCR ligand library (GLL), which may induce biased signaling in PAR2 using the concept of existence of multiple ligand-stabilized receptor conformations. The results of our in silico study suggest that PAR2 may show biased signaling mainly with agonists of serotonin type 1, β-adrenergic type 1,3 and antagonists of substance K (NK1), serotonin type 2, dopamine type 4, and thromboxane receptors. Further, this study also throws light on the putative ligand-specific conformations of PAR2. Thus, the results of this study provide structural insights to putative conformations of PAR2 and also gives initial clues to medicinal chemists for rational drug design targeting this challenging receptor. PMID:26295578

  20. A sticky situation: the unexpected stability of malaria elimination.

    PubMed

    Smith, David L; Cohen, Justin M; Chiyaka, Christinah; Johnston, Geoffrey; Gething, Peter W; Gosling, Roly; Buckee, Caroline O; Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Hay, Simon I; Tatem, Andrew J

    2013-08-01

    Malaria eradication involves eliminating malaria from every country where transmission occurs. Current theory suggests that the post-elimination challenges of remaining malaria-free by stopping transmission from imported malaria will have onerous operational and financial requirements. Although resurgent malaria has occurred in a majority of countries that tried but failed to eliminate malaria, a review of resurgence in countries that successfully eliminated finds only four such failures out of 50 successful programmes. Data documenting malaria importation and onwards transmission in these countries suggests malaria transmission potential has declined by more than 50-fold (i.e. more than 98%) since before elimination. These outcomes suggest that elimination is a surprisingly stable state. Elimination's 'stickiness' must be explained either by eliminating countries starting off qualitatively different from non-eliminating countries or becoming different once elimination was achieved. Countries that successfully eliminated were wealthier and had lower baseline endemicity than those that were unsuccessful, but our analysis shows that those same variables were at best incomplete predictors of the patterns of resurgence. Stability is reinforced by the loss of immunity to disease and by the health system's increasing capacity to control malaria transmission after elimination through routine treatment of cases with antimalarial drugs supplemented by malaria outbreak control. Human travel patterns reinforce these patterns; as malaria recedes, fewer people carry malaria from remote endemic areas to remote areas where transmission potential remains high. Establishment of an international resource with backup capacity to control large outbreaks can make elimination stickier, increase the incentives for countries to eliminate, and ensure steady progress towards global eradication. Although available evidence supports malaria elimination's stickiness at moderate

  1. Proteases in agricultural dust induce lung inflammation through PAR-1 and PAR-2 activation.

    PubMed

    Romberger, Debra J; Heires, Art J; Nordgren, Tara M; Souder, Chelsea P; West, William; Liu, Xiang-de; Poole, Jill A; Toews, Myron L; Wyatt, Todd A

    2015-08-15

    Workers exposed to aerosolized dust present in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are susceptible to inflammatory lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Extracts of dust collected from hog CAFOs [hog dust extract (HDE)] are potent stimulators of lung inflammatory responses in several model systems. The observation that HDE contains active proteases prompted the present study, which evaluated the role of CAFO dust proteases in lung inflammatory processes and tested whether protease-activated receptors (PARs) are involved in the signaling pathway for these events. We hypothesized that the damaging proinflammatory effect of HDE is due, in part, to the proteolytic activation of PARs, and inhibiting the proteases in HDE or disrupting PAR activation would attenuate HDE-mediated inflammatory indexes in bronchial epithelial cells (BECs), in mouse lung slices in vitro, and in a murine in vivo exposure model. Human BECs and mouse lung slice cultures stimulated with 5% HDE released significantly more of each of the cytokines measured (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, keratinocyte-derived chemokine/CXC chemokine ligand 1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2/CXC chemokine ligand 2) than controls, and these effects were markedly diminished by protease inhibition. Inhibition of PARs also blunted the HDE-induced cytokine release from BECs. In addition, protease depletion inhibited HDE-induced BEC intracellular PKCα and PKCε activation. C57BL/6J mice administered 12.5% HDE intranasally, either once or daily for 3 wk, exhibited increased total cellular and neutrophil influx, bronchial alveolar fluid inflammatory cytokines, lung histopathology, and inflammatory scores compared with mice receiving protease-depleted HDE. These data suggest that proteases in dust from CAFOs are important mediators of lung inflammation, and these proteases and their receptors may provide novel targets for therapeutic intervention in CAFO dust-induced airways disease. PMID

  2. Cancer-selective apoptosis by tumor suppressor par-4.

    PubMed

    Hebbar, Nikhil; Shrestha-Bhattarai, Tripti; Rangnekar, Vivek M

    2014-01-01

    Tumor suppressor genes play an important role in preventing neoplastic transformation and maintaining normal tissue homeostasis. Par-4 is one such tumor suppressor which is unique in its ability to selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells while leaving the normal cells unaffected. The cancer cell specific activity of Par-4 is elicited through intracellular as well as extracellular mechanisms. Intracellularly Par-4 acts through the inhibition of pro-survival pathways and activation of Fas mediated apoptosis whereas extracellular (secreted Par-4) acts by binding to cell surface GRP78 leading to activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Many studies have highlighted the importance of Par-4 not only in preventing cancer development/recurrence but also as a promising anticancer therapeutic agent. PMID:25001535

  3. PAR-3 and PAR-1 Inhibit LET-99 Localization to Generate a Cortical Band Important for Spindle Positioning in Caenorhabditis elegans Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jui-Ching

    2007-01-01

    The conserved PAR proteins are localized in asymmetric cortical domains and are required for the polarized localization of cell fate determinants in many organisms. In Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, LET-99 and G protein signaling act downstream of the PARs to regulate spindle positioning and ensure asymmetric division. PAR-3 and PAR-2 localize LET-99 to a posterior cortical band through an unknown mechanism. Here we report that LET-99 asymmetry depends on cortically localized PAR-1 and PAR-4 but not on cytoplasmic polarity effectors. In par-1 and par-4 embryos, LET-99 accumulates at the entire posterior cortex, but remains at low levels at the anterior cortex occupied by PAR-3. Further, PAR-3 and PAR-1 have graded cortical distributions with the highest levels at the anterior and posterior poles, respectively, and the lowest levels of these proteins correlate with high LET-99 accumulation. These results suggest that PAR-3 and PAR-1 inhibit the localization of LET-99 to generate a band pattern. In addition, PAR-1 kinase activity is required for the inhibition of LET-99 localization, and PAR-1 associates with LET-99. Finally, examination of par-1 embryos suggests that the banded pattern of LET-99 is critical for normal posterior spindle displacement and to prevent spindle misorientation caused by cell shape constraints. PMID:17761536

  4. Cell competition: how to eliminate your neighbours

    PubMed Central

    Amoyel, Marc; Bach, Erika A.

    2014-01-01

    A conventional view of development is that cells cooperate to build an organism. However, based on studies of Drosophila, it has been known for years that viable cells can be eliminated by their neighbours through a process termed cell competition. New studies in mammals have revealed that this process is universal and that many factors and mechanisms are conserved. During cell competition, cells with lower translation rates or those with lower levels of proteins involved in signal transduction, polarity and cellular growth can survive in a homogenous environment but are killed when surrounded by cells of higher fitness. Here, we discuss recent advances in the field as well as the mechanistic steps involved in this phenomenon, which have shed light on how and why cell competition exists in developing and adult organisms. PMID:24550108

  5. Eliminating iodine deficiency: obstacles and their removal.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Carmencita David; Fagela-Domingo, Carmelita

    2008-12-01

    Iodine deficiency remains a global concern for developing countries and some industrialised countries. Iodine deficiency is the most common cause of preventable mental retardation, posing a threat to the social and economic development of countries. Initiatives were developed and instituted to accelerate progress to achieve the goal of universal salt iodisation (USI). However, these efforts were not successful in eliminating iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) in some countries. Every year, 50 million children are born without the protection that iodine offers to the growing brain and body and about 18 million suffer some significant degree of mental impairment. The World Health Organization (WHO), United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and non-governmental organisations assist to ensure that populations at risk have access to iodised salt. This paper will review the highlights of iodine deficiency and present the experiences in the various countries in Asia, i.e. assessments of the situation, action plans, and obstacles to implementation. PMID:19904447

  6. [Prospects for malaria elimination in Azerbaijan].

    PubMed

    Kondrashin, A V; Baranova, A M; Mammedov, S; Gasimov, É; Morozova, L F; Stepanova, E V

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological analysis of the malaria in the Republic of Azerbaijan has revealed that: 1. In the past year, malaria problem has considerably improved in reducing morbidity and the number of active foci of malaria in the republic. 2. All active foci of malaria have been in its endemic area. 3. Despite the presence of favorable climatic preconditions for malaria in a large part of the republic, socioeconomic preconditions are considerably decreased, causing the malariogenic potential to substantially reduce. 4. All sets a favorable stage for possible interruption of local malaria transmission on the whole territory of the republic provided that financial support for the national malaria elimination program will be increased from the country's government and other sources in conjunction with the implementation of revised malaria control strategy and with the use of current methods for the detection, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of malaria. PMID:21476253

  7. The elimination of lead in gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, V.M.

    1995-11-01

    Due to the health consequences of lead exposure, as well as to the introduction of catalytic converters, many countries have reduced or eliminate use of lead additives in motor gasolines. But in many other countries, leaded gasoline remains the norm. In these countries there is often confusion about the health significance of gasoline lead, the ability of cars to use unleaded gasoline, and the costs of unleaded gasoline. This chapter shows that leaded gasoline is a major source of human lead exposure. All cars, with or without catalytic converters, and with or without hardened exhaust valve seats, can use unleaded gasoline exclusively. Unleaded gasoline typically costs on the order of $0.01 more per liter than leaded gasoline to produce. Recent concerns about benzene exposure from unleaded gasoline have been addressed through choice of gasoline formulation and other measures. 115 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Targeting Human Transmission Biology for Malaria Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Buckee, Caroline; Marti, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains one of the leading causes of death worldwide, despite decades of public health efforts. The recent commitment by many endemic countries to eliminate malaria marks a shift away from programs aimed at controlling disease burden towards one that emphasizes reducing transmission of the most virulent human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Gametocytes, the only developmental stage of malaria parasites able to infect mosquitoes, have remained understudied, as they occur in low numbers, do not cause disease, and are difficult to detect in vivo by conventional methods. Here, we review the transmission biology of P. falciparum gametocytes, featuring important recent discoveries of genes affecting parasite commitment to gametocyte formation, microvesicles enabling parasites to communicate with each other, and the anatomical site where immature gametocytes develop. We propose potential parasite targets for future intervention and highlight remaining knowledge gaps. PMID:26086192

  9. Detergent water use eliminates VOC concerns

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, M.

    1996-01-01

    The article describes an electronics manufacturer`s use of detergent water and mechanical equipment (heated pressure washers and floor scrubbers) to replace volatile organic compounds. The cleaning formula development and detergent recovery system are emphasized. Detailed chemical analyses of the waste detergent water and spent filters are provided. The rationale for using detergent water; a process flow diagram for cleaning, recovery and storage; and cost considerations are summarized. At a cost of $300,000, the system removed a significant source of air emissions and enabled the plant to eliminate 30 tons of liquid hazardous waste, improve cleaning effectiveness, and save $99,000 per year in cleaning-related costs. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Elimination of the hazards from hazardous wastes.

    PubMed Central

    Gloyna, E F; Taylor, R D

    1978-01-01

    The "hazard" associated with a waste essentially controls the overall engineering approach to finding suitable alternatives for solving potential disposal problems. It should be recognized that all factors affecting environmental equilibrium must be considered, including product sales, process design, financing, pre- and end-of-pipe treatment, residuals management, and ultimate bioaccumulation of residuals. To meet this challenge, a systems approach to waste treatment and residuals disposal provides a logical approach, but this management concept requires a thorough understanding of the important physical and chemical aspects of the problem, as well as many social implications of the resulting decisions. Thus waste management within a plant necessarily involves process control, pretreatment and end-of-pipe treatment. Further, it follows that residuals management from a disposal point-of-view must ultimately embrace what is called the "multi-barrier concept." In essence, hazard elimination occurs in varying degrees during each phase of a properly engineered system. PMID:738249

  11. Lean for Government: Eliminating the Seven Wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Christena C.

    2012-01-01

    With shrinking budgets and a slow economy, it is becoming increasingly important for all government agencies to become more efficient. Citizens expect and deserve efficient and effective services from federal, state and local government agencies. One of the best methods to improve efficiency and eliminate waste is to institute the business process improvement methodologies known collectively as Lean; however, with reduced budgets, it may not be possible to train everyone in Lean or to engage the services of a trained consultant. It is possible, however, to raise awareness of the "Seven Wastes" of Lean in each employee, and encourage them to identify areas for improvement. Management commitment is vital to the success of these initiatives, and it is also important to develop the right metrics that will track the success of these changes.

  12. Evaluation of static eliminators containing polonium-210

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.J.

    1999-01-01

    Six static eliminators containing radioactive polonium-210 microspheres were examined subsequent to a contamination incident at a commercial facility. It was found that cracked and broken microspheres were being produced and incorporated into new devices and even as received devices were potential sources of contamination. It is shown that rough handling of the devices may initiate polonium-210 leakage during or prior to service. The epoxy binder used in the devices appears to suffer significant environmental and material damage even under ambient conditions. The effects of solvents, heat, moisture, or vibration during service may accelerate this damage. The breakdown of the epoxy binder appears to be a significant contributor to the contamination by loose microspheres or microsphere fragments.

  13. Astrocytes Control Synapse Formation, Function, and Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Won-Suk; Allen, Nicola J.; Eroglu, Cagla

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes, through their close associations with synapses, can monitor and alter synaptic function, thus actively controlling synaptic transmission in the adult brain. Besides their important role at adult synapses, in the last three decades a number of critical findings have highlighted the importance of astrocytes in the establishment of synaptic connectivity in the developing brain. In this article, we will review the key findings on astrocytic control of synapse formation, function, and elimination. First, we will summarize our current structural and functional understanding of astrocytes at the synapse. Then, we will discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms through which developing and mature astrocytes instruct the formation, maturation, and refinement of synapses. Our aim is to provide an overview of astrocytes as important players in the establishment of a functional nervous system. PMID:25663667

  14. Error-eliminating rapid ultrasonic firing

    DOEpatents

    Borenstein, J.; Koren, Y.

    1993-08-24

    A system for producing reliable navigation data for a mobile vehicle, such as a robot, combines multiple range samples to increase the confidence'' of the algorithm in the existence of an obstacle. At higher vehicle speed, it is crucial to sample each sensor quickly and repeatedly to gather multiple samples in time to avoid a collision. Erroneous data is rejected by delaying the issuance of an ultrasonic energy pulse by a predetermined wait-period, which may be different during alternate ultrasonic firing cycles. Consecutive readings are compared, and the corresponding data is rejected if the readings differ by more than a predetermined amount. The rejection rate for the data is monitored and the operating speed of the navigation system is reduced if the data rejection rate is increased. This is useful to distinguish and eliminate noise from the data which truly represents the existence of an article in the field of operation of the vehicle.

  15. Error-eliminating rapid ultrasonic firing

    DOEpatents

    Borenstein, Johann; Koren, Yoram

    1993-08-24

    A system for producing reliable navigation data for a mobile vehicle, such as a robot, combines multiple range samples to increase the "confidence" of the algorithm in the existence of an obstacle. At higher vehicle speed, it is crucial to sample each sensor quickly and repeatedly to gather multiple samples in time to avoid a collision. Erroneous data is rejected by delaying the issuance of an ultrasonic energy pulse by a predetermined wait-period, which may be different during alternate ultrasonic firing cycles. Consecutive readings are compared, and the corresponding data is rejected if the readings differ by more than a predetermined amount. The rejection rate for the data is monitored and the operating speed of the navigation system is reduced if the data rejection rate is increased. This is useful to distinguish and eliminate noise from the data which truly represents the existence of an article in the field of operation of the vehicle.

  16. Comparing three feedback internal multiple elimination methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jiawen; Verschuur, Eric; Chen, Xiaohong

    2013-08-01

    Multiple reflections have posed a great challenge for current seismic imaging and inversion methods. Compared to surface multiples, internal multiples are more difficult to remove due to poorer move-out discrimination with primaries and we are left with wave equation-based prediction and subtraction methods. In this paper, we focus on the comparison of three data-driven internal multiple elimination (IME) methods based on the feedback model, where two are well established prediction-and-subtraction methods using back-propagated data and surface data, referred to as CFP-based method and surface-based method, respectively, and the third one, an inversion-based method, has been recently extended from estimation of primaries by sparse inversion (EPSI). All these three methods are based on the separation of events from above and below a certain level, after which internal multiples are predicted by convolutions and correlations. We begin with theory review of layer-related feedback IME methods, where implementation steps for each method are discussed, and involved event separation are further analyzed. Then, recursive application of the three IME methods is demonstrated on synthetic data and field data. It shows that the two well established prediction-and-subtraction methods provide similar primary estimation results, with most of the internal multiples being removed while multiple leakage and primary distortion have been observed where primaries and internal multiples interfere. In contrast, generalized EPSI provides reduced multiple leakage and better primary restoration which is of great value for current seismic amplitude-preserved processing. As a main conclusion, with adaptive subtraction avoided, the inversion-based method is more effective than the prediction-and-subtraction methods for internal multiple elimination when primaries and internal multiples overlap. However, the inversion-based method is quite computationally intensive, and more researches on

  17. Recombination in the Human Pseudoautosomal Region PAR1

    PubMed Central

    Hinch, Anjali G.; Altemose, Nicolas; Noor, Nudrat; Donnelly, Peter; Myers, Simon R.

    2014-01-01

    The pseudoautosomal region (PAR) is a short region of homology between the mammalian X and Y chromosomes, which has undergone rapid evolution. A crossover in the PAR is essential for the proper disjunction of X and Y chromosomes in male meiosis, and PAR deletion results in male sterility. This leads the human PAR with the obligatory crossover, PAR1, to having an exceptionally high male crossover rate, which is 17-fold higher than the genome-wide average. However, the mechanism by which this obligatory crossover occurs remains unknown, as does the fine-scale positioning of crossovers across this region. Recent research in mice has suggested that crossovers in PAR may be mediated independently of the protein PRDM9, which localises virtually all crossovers in the autosomes. To investigate recombination in this region, we construct the most fine-scale genetic map containing directly observed crossovers to date using African-American pedigrees. We leverage recombination rates inferred from the breakdown of linkage disequilibrium in human populations and investigate the signatures of DNA evolution due to recombination. Further, we identify direct PRDM9 binding sites using ChIP-seq in human cells. Using these independent lines of evidence, we show that, in contrast with mouse, PRDM9 does localise peaks of recombination in the human PAR1. We find that recombination is a far more rapid and intense driver of sequence evolution in PAR1 than it is on the autosomes. We also show that PAR1 hotspot activities differ significantly among human populations. Finally, we find evidence that PAR1 hotspot positions have changed between human and chimpanzee, with no evidence of sharing among the hottest hotspots. We anticipate that the genetic maps built and validated in this work will aid research on this vital and fascinating region of the genome. PMID:25033397

  18. Recombination in the human Pseudoautosomal region PAR1.

    PubMed

    Hinch, Anjali G; Altemose, Nicolas; Noor, Nudrat; Donnelly, Peter; Myers, Simon R

    2014-07-01

    The pseudoautosomal region (PAR) is a short region of homology between the mammalian X and Y chromosomes, which has undergone rapid evolution. A crossover in the PAR is essential for the proper disjunction of X and Y chromosomes in male meiosis, and PAR deletion results in male sterility. This leads the human PAR with the obligatory crossover, PAR1, to having an exceptionally high male crossover rate, which is 17-fold higher than the genome-wide average. However, the mechanism by which this obligatory crossover occurs remains unknown, as does the fine-scale positioning of crossovers across this region. Recent research in mice has suggested that crossovers in PAR may be mediated independently of the protein PRDM9, which localises virtually all crossovers in the autosomes. To investigate recombination in this region, we construct the most fine-scale genetic map containing directly observed crossovers to date using African-American pedigrees. We leverage recombination rates inferred from the breakdown of linkage disequilibrium in human populations and investigate the signatures of DNA evolution due to recombination. Further, we identify direct PRDM9 binding sites using ChIP-seq in human cells. Using these independent lines of evidence, we show that, in contrast with mouse, PRDM9 does localise peaks of recombination in the human PAR1. We find that recombination is a far more rapid and intense driver of sequence evolution in PAR1 than it is on the autosomes. We also show that PAR1 hotspot activities differ significantly among human populations. Finally, we find evidence that PAR1 hotspot positions have changed between human and chimpanzee, with no evidence of sharing among the hottest hotspots. We anticipate that the genetic maps built and validated in this work will aid research on this vital and fascinating region of the genome. PMID:25033397

  19. Circulating suPAR in Two Cohorts of Primary FSGS

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Changli; Trachtman, Howard; Li, Jing; Dong, Chuanhui; Friedman, Aaron L.; Gassman, Jennifer J.; McMahan, June L.; Radeva, Milena; Heil, Karsten M.; Trautmann, Agnes; Anarat, Ali; Emre, Sevinc; Ghiggeri, Gian M.; Ozaltin, Fatih; Haffner, Dieter; Gipson, Debbie S.; Kaskel, Frederick; Fischer, Dagmar-Christiane; Schaefer, Franz

    2012-01-01

    Overexpression of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) causes pathology in animal models similar to primary FSGS, and one recent study demonstrated elevated levels of serum suPAR in patients with the disease. Here, we analyzed circulating suPAR levels in two cohorts of children and adults with biopsy-proven primary FSGS: 70 patients from the North America–based FSGS clinical trial (CT) and 94 patients from PodoNet, the Europe-based consortium studying steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. Circulating suPAR levels were elevated in 84.3% and 55.3% of patients with FSGS patients in the CT and PodoNet cohorts, respectively, compared with 6% of controls (P<0.0001); inflammation did not account for this difference. Multiple regression analysis suggested that lower suPAR levels associated with higher estimated GFR, male sex, and treatment with mycophenolate mofetil. In the CT cohort, there was a positive association between the relative reduction of suPAR after 26 weeks of treatment and reduction of proteinuria, with higher odds for complete remission (P=0.04). In the PodoNet cohort, patients with an NPHS2 mutation had higher suPAR levels than those without a mutation. In conclusion, suPAR levels are elevated in geographically and ethnically diverse patients with FSGS and do not reflect a nonspecific proinflammatory milieu. The associations between a change in circulating suPAR with different therapeutic regimens and with remission support the role of suPAR in the pathogenesis of FSGS. PMID:23138488

  20. Circulating suPAR in two cohorts of primary FSGS.

    PubMed

    Wei, Changli; Trachtman, Howard; Li, Jing; Dong, Chuanhui; Friedman, Aaron L; Gassman, Jennifer J; McMahan, June L; Radeva, Milena; Heil, Karsten M; Trautmann, Agnes; Anarat, Ali; Emre, Sevinc; Ghiggeri, Gian M; Ozaltin, Fatih; Haffner, Dieter; Gipson, Debbie S; Kaskel, Frederick; Fischer, Dagmar-Christiane; Schaefer, Franz; Reiser, Jochen

    2012-12-01

    Overexpression of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) causes pathology in animal models similar to primary FSGS, and one recent study demonstrated elevated levels of serum suPAR in patients with the disease. Here, we analyzed circulating suPAR levels in two cohorts of children and adults with biopsy-proven primary FSGS: 70 patients from the North America-based FSGS clinical trial (CT) and 94 patients from PodoNet, the Europe-based consortium studying steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. Circulating suPAR levels were elevated in 84.3% and 55.3% of patients with FSGS patients in the CT and PodoNet cohorts, respectively, compared with 6% of controls (P<0.0001); inflammation did not account for this difference. Multiple regression analysis suggested that lower suPAR levels associated with higher estimated GFR, male sex, and treatment with mycophenolate mofetil. In the CT cohort, there was a positive association between the relative reduction of suPAR after 26 weeks of treatment and reduction of proteinuria, with higher odds for complete remission (P=0.04). In the PodoNet cohort, patients with an NPHS2 mutation had higher suPAR levels than those without a mutation. In conclusion, suPAR levels are elevated in geographically and ethnically diverse patients with FSGS and do not reflect a nonspecific proinflammatory milieu. The associations between a change in circulating suPAR with different therapeutic regimens and with remission support the role of suPAR in the pathogenesis of FSGS. PMID:23138488

  1. Condensation and localization of the partitioning protein ParB on the bacterial chromosome.

    PubMed

    Broedersz, Chase P; Wang, Xindan; Meir, Yigal; Loparo, Joseph J; Rudner, David Z; Wingreen, Ned S

    2014-06-17

    The ParABS system mediates chromosome segregation and plasmid partitioning in many bacteria. As part of the partitioning mechanism, ParB proteins form a nucleoprotein complex at parS sites. The biophysical basis underlying ParB-DNA complex formation and localization remains elusive. Specifically, it is unclear whether ParB spreads in 1D along DNA or assembles into a 3D protein-DNA complex. We show that a combination of 1D spreading bonds and a single 3D bridging bond between ParB proteins constitutes a minimal model for a condensed ParB-DNA complex. This model implies a scaling behavior for ParB-mediated silencing of parS-flanking genes, which we confirm to be satisfied by experimental data from P1 plasmids. Furthermore, this model is consistent with experiments on the effects of DNA roadblocks on ParB localization. Finally, we show experimentally that a single parS site is necessary and sufficient for ParB-DNA complex formation in vivo. Together with our model, this suggests that ParB binding to parS triggers a conformational switch in ParB that overcomes a nucleation barrier. Conceptually, the combination of spreading and bridging bonds in our model provides a surface tension ensuring the condensation of the ParB-DNA complex, with analogies to liquid-like compartments such as nucleoli in eukaryotes. PMID:24927534

  2. SPRY1 promotes the degradation of uPAR and inhibits uPAR-mediated cell adhesion and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiufeng; Lan, Yan; Zhang, Di; Wang, Kai; Wang, Yao; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a GPI anchored cell surface protein that is closely associated with invasion, migration, and metastasis of cancer cells. Many functional extracellular proteins and transmembrane receptors interact with uPAR. However, few studies have examined the association of uPAR with cytoplasm proteins. We previously used yeast two-hybrid screening to isolate several novel uPAR-interacting cytoplasmic proteins, including Sprouty1 (SPRY1), an inhibitor of the (Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase) MAPK pathway. In this study, we show that SPRY1 interacts with uPAR and directs it toward lysosomal-mediated degradation. Overexpression of SPRY1 decreased the cell surface and cytoplasmic uPAR protein level. Moreover, SPRY1 overexpression augmented uPAR-induced cell adhesion to vitronectin as well as proliferation of cancer cells. Our results also further support the critical role of SPRY1 contribution to tumor growth. In a subcutaneous tumor model, overexpression of SPRY1 in HCT116 or A549 xenograft in athymic nude mice led to great suppression of tumor growth. These results show that SPRY1 may affect tumor cell function through direct interaction with uPAR and promote its lysosomal degradation. PMID:25520860

  3. Traitement des fractures des plateaux externes par vissage percutané assisté par arthroscopie

    PubMed Central

    Abouchane, Merouane; Belmoubarik, Amine; Benameur, Hamza; Haddoun, Ahmed Reda; Nechad, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Le but de notre étude est d'évaluer les résultats de fractures des plateaux tibiaux externes traitées par ostéosynthèse percutanée assistée par arthroscopie. Dix patients (8 hommes et 2 femmes) de 32 ans en moyenne ont subi cette intervention afin de réparer des fractures des plateaux tibiaux Schatzker I-III. Après avoir appliqué un garrot pneumatique, nous avons réduit et fixé la fracture au moyen de vis cannelées souschondrales. Lésions associées retrouvent deux lésions partielles du ménisque externe ont été retrouvé, traitées par résection partielle. Une orthèse de genou été de mise à but antalgique et protectrice pendant six semaines avec béquillage et interdiction de l'appui pour une durée de douze semaines avec reprise d'appui partiel au delà. La durée d'hospitalisation été d'une moyenne de cinq jours. La rééducation passive a été commence le lendemain de l'intervention et continuait dans chez un kinésithérapeute à la sortie du patient du service. Le suivi été à J7, J15, 1mois, 3mois, 6 mois puis tous les 6 mois. Neuf de nos patients ont été revu régulièrement sauf un perdu de vue. Le recul moyen de notre série été de 16 mois (10 et 24 mois). Le score de Lysholm a été utilisé pour évaluer les résultats cliniques chez nos neuf patients: excellent chez trois patients bons chez trois moyen chez un seul et mauvais chez deux patients. Tous nos neuf patients ont consolidé (figure 10 contrôle scopique d un article). Aucune gonarthrose n'a été note chez nos neuf patients due essentiellement au recul moyen faible de 16 mois. Le traitement des fractures des plateaux tibiaux externes assisté par arthroscopie produit des résultats satisfaisants et peut être accepté comme solution de rechange efficace au traitement des fractures des plateaux tibiaux causées par un choc de faible énergie. PMID:26587137

  4. 41 CFR 101-27.405 - Criteria for elimination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations System FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS SUPPLY AND PROCUREMENT 27-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.4-Elimination of Items From Inventory § 101-27.405 Criteria for elimination. Inactive items, items which no... Government or commercial sources shall be eliminated from inventory. The determination of a slow-moving...

  5. Selection and Elimination of Candidates in Counselor Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redfering, David L.; Biasco, Frank

    1976-01-01

    This study compared actual with ideal procedures in the selection and elimination of candidates in counselor education programs. A two-factor analysis for each category (selection and elimination) resulted in some significant differences between the actual and ideal procedures in both selection and elimination. (Author)

  6. Control of cleavage spindle orientation in Caenorhabditis elegans: The role of the genes par-2 and par-3

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, N.N.; Kirby, C.M.; Kemphues, K.J.

    1995-02-01

    Polarized asymmetric divisions play important roles in the development of plants and animals. The first two embryonic cleavages of Caenorhabditis elegans provide an opportunity to study the mechanisms controlling polarized asymmetric divisions. The first cleavage is unequal, producing daughters with different sizes and fates. The daughter blastomeres divide with different orientations at the second cleavage; the anterior blastomere divides equally across the long axis of the egg, whereas the posterior blastomere divides unequally along the long axis. We report here the results of our analysis of the genes par-2 and par-3 with respect to their contribution to the polarity of these divisions. Strong loss-of-function mutations in both genes lead to an equal first cleavage and an altered second cleavage. Interestingly, the mutations exhibit striking gene-specific differences at the second cleavage. The par-2 mutations lead to transverse spindle orientations in both blastomeres, whereas par-3 mutations lead to longitudinal spindle orientations in both blastomeres. The spindle orientation defects correlate with defects in centrosome movements during both the first and the second cell cycle. Temperature shift experiments with par-2 (it5ts) indicate that the par-2(+) activity is not required after the two-cell stage. Analysis of double mutants shows that par-3 is epistatic to par-2. We propose a model wherein par-2(+) and par-3(+) act in concert during the first cell cycle to affect asymmetric modification of the cytoskeleton. This polar modification leads to different behaviors of centrosomes in the anterior and posterior and leads ultimately to blastomere-specific spindle orientations at the second cleavage. 44 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymer is a death signal

    PubMed Central

    Andrabi, Shaida A.; Kim, No Soo; Yu, Seong-Woon; Wang, Hongmin; Koh, David W.; Sasaki, Masayuki; Klaus, Judith A.; Otsuka, Takashi; Zhang, Zhizheng; Koehler, Raymond C.; Hurn, Patricia D.; Poirier, Guy G.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2006-01-01

    Excessive activation of the nuclear enzyme, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) plays a prominent role in various of models of cellular injury. Here, we identify poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymer, a product of PARP-1 activity, as a previously uncharacterized cell death signal. PAR polymer is directly toxic to neurons, and degradation of PAR polymer by poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) or phosphodiesterase 1 prevents PAR polymer-induced cell death. PARP-1-dependent, NMDA excitotoxicity of cortical neurons is reduced by neutralizing antibodies to PAR and by overexpression of PARG. Neuronal cultures with reduced levels of PARG are more sensitive to NMDA excitotoxicity than WT cultures. Transgenic mice overexpressing PARG have significantly reduced infarct volumes after focal ischemia. Conversely, mice with reduced levels of PARG have significantly increased infarct volumes after focal ischemia compared with WT littermate controls. These results reveal PAR polymer as a signaling molecule that induces cell death and suggests that interference with PAR polymer signaling may offer innovative therapeutic approaches for the treatment of cellular injury. PMID:17116882

  8. ORTHO- ELIMINATION OF TRACKING SYSTEM CLOCK ERRORS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    ORTHO is part of the Global Positioning System (GPS) being developed by the U.S. Air Force, a navigational system that will use 18 NAVSTAR satellites to broadcast navigation messages and achieve worldwide coverage. The normal positioning technique uses one receiver which receives signals from at least four GPS satellites. For higher accuracy work it is often necessary to use a differential technique in which more than one receiver is used. The geodetic measurement has all receivers on the ground and allows the determination of the relative locations of the ground sites. The main application of the ORTHO program is in the elimination of clock errors in a GPS based tracking system. The measured distance (pseudo-range) from a GPS receiver contains errors due to differences in the receiver and satellite clocks. The conventional way of eliminating clock errors is to difference pseudo-ranges between different GPS satellites and receivers. The Householder transformation used in this program performs a function similar to the conventional single differencing or double differencing. This method avoids the problem of redundancy and correlation encountered in a differencing scheme. It is able to keep all information contained in the measurements within the scope of a least square estimation. For multiple transmitter and receiver GPS tracking network, this method is in general more accurate than the differencing technique. This program assumes that the non-clock measurement partial derivatives for the particular application are computed earlier by another program. With the partial derivatives and information to identify the transmitters and receivers as the input, the program performs the Householder transformation on the partial derivatives. The transformed partials are output by the program and may be used as an input to the filter program in the subsequent estimation process. Clock partial derivatives are generated internally and are not part of the input to the program

  9. Polio elimination in Nigeria: A review.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Usman Nakakana; Bandyopadhyay, Ananda Sankar; Montagnani, Francesca; Akite, Jacqueline Elaine; Mungu, Etaluka Blanche; Uche, Ifeanyi Valentine; Ismaila, Ahmed Mohammed

    2016-03-01

    Nigeria has made tremendous strides towards eliminating polio and has been free of wild polio virus (WPV) for more than a year as of August 2015. However, sustained focus towards getting rid of all types of poliovirus by improving population immunity and enhancing disease surveillance will be needed to ensure it sustains the polio-free status. We reviewed the pertinent literature including published and unpublished, official reports and working documents of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) partners as well as other concerned organizations. The literature were selected based on the following criteria: published in English Language, published after year 2000, relevant content and conformance to the theme of the review and these were sorted accordingly. The challenges facing the Polio Eradication Initiative (PEI) in Nigeria were found to fall into 3 broad categories viz failure to vaccinate, failure of the Oral Polio Vaccine (OPV) and epidemiology of the virus. Failure to vaccinate resulted from insecurity, heterogeneous political support, programmatic limitation in implementation of vaccination campaigns, poor performance of vaccination teams in persistently poor performing Local Government areas and sporadic vaccine refusals in Northern Nigeria. Sub optimal effectiveness of OPV in some settings as well as the rare occurrence of VDPVs associated with OPV type 2 in areas of low immunization coverage were also found to be key issues. Some of the innovations which helped to manage the threats to the PEI include a strong government accountability frame work, change from type 2 containing OPV to bi valent OPVs for supplementary immunization activities (SIA), enhancing environmental surveillance in key states (Sokoto, Kano and Borno) along with an overall improvement in SIA quality. There has been an improvement in coverage of routine immunization and vaccination campaigns, which has resulted in Nigeria being removed from the list of endemic countries

  10. Multi-scale photoacoustic remote sensing (PARS) (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji Reza, Parsin; Bell, Kevan; Shi, W.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a novel multi-scale photoacoustic remote sensing (PARS) imaging system. Our system can provide optical resolution details for superficial structures as well as acoustic resolution for deep-tissue imaging down to 5 cm, in a non-contact setting. PARS system does not require any contact with the sample or ultrasound coupling medium. The optical resolution PARS (OR-OARS) system uses optically focused pulsed excitation with optical detection of photoacoustic signatures using a long-coherence interrogation beam co-focused and co-scanned with the excitation spot. In the OR-PARS initial pressures are sampled right at their subsurface origin where acoustic pressures are largest. The Acoustic resolution PARS (AR-PARS) picks up the surface oscillation of the tissue caused by generated photoacoustic signal using a modified version of Michelson interferometry. By taking advantage of 4-meters polarization maintaining single-mode fiber and a green fiber laser we have generated a multi-wavelength source using stimulated Raman scattering. Remote functional imaging using this multi-wavelength excitation source and PARS detection mechanism has been demonstrated. The oxygen saturation estimations are shown for both phantom and in vivo studies. Images of blood vessel structures for an In vivo chicken embryo model is demonstrated. The Phantom studies indicates ~3µm and ~300µm lateral resolution for OR-PARS and AR-PARS respectively. To the best of our knowledge this is the first dual modality non-contact optical and acoustic resolution system used for in vivo imaging.

  11. Protease-Activated Receptor (PAR)2, but Not PAR1, Is Involved in Collateral Formation and Anti-Inflammatory Monocyte Polarization in a Mouse Hind Limb Ischemia Model

    PubMed Central

    Nossent, Anne Yael; van Oeveren-Rietdijk, Annemarie M.; de Vries, Margreet R.; Spek, C. Arnold; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Reitsma, Pieter H.; Hamming, Jaap F.; de Boer, Hetty C.; Versteeg, Henri H.; Quax, Paul H. A.

    2013-01-01

    Aims In collateral development (i.e. arteriogenesis), mononuclear cells are important and exist as a heterogeneous population consisting of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory/repair-associated cells. Protease-activated receptor (PAR)1 and PAR2 are G-protein-coupled receptors that are both expressed by mononuclear cells and are involved in pro-inflammatory reactions, while PAR2 also plays a role in repair-associated responses. Here, we investigated the physiological role of PAR1 and PAR2 in arteriogenesis in a murine hind limb ischemia model. Methods and Results PAR1-deficient (PAR1-/-), PAR2-deficient (PAR2-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice underwent femoral artery ligation. Laser Doppler measurements revealed reduced post-ischemic blood flow recovery in PAR2-/- hind limbs when compared to WT, while PAR1-/- mice were not affected. Upon ischemia, reduced numbers of smooth muscle actin (SMA)-positive collaterals and CD31-positive capillaries were found in PAR2-/- mice when compared to WT mice, whereas these parameters in PAR1-/- mice did not differ from WT mice. The pool of circulating repair-associated (Ly6C-low) monocytes and the number of repair-associated (CD206-positive) macrophages surrounding collaterals in the hind limbs were increased in WT and PAR1-/- mice, but unaffected in PAR2-/- mice. The number of repair-associated macrophages in PAR2-/- hind limbs correlated with CD11b- and CD115-expression on the circulating monocytes in these animals, suggesting that monocyte extravasation and M-CSF-dependent differentiation into repair-associated cells are hampered. Conclusion PAR2, but not PAR1, is involved in arteriogenesis and promotes the repair-associated response in ischemic tissues. Therefore, PAR2 potentially forms a new pro-arteriogenic target in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. PMID:23637930

  12. Novel Role for Proteinase-activated Receptor 2 (PAR2) in Membrane Trafficking of Proteinase-activated Receptor 4 (PAR4)*

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Margaret R.; McIntosh, Kathryn A.; Pediani, John D.; Robben, Joris; Cooke, Alexandra E.; Nilsson, Mary; Gould, Gwyn W.; Mundell, Stuart; Milligan, Graeme; Plevin, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors 4 (PAR4) is a class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) recognized through the ability of serine proteases such as thrombin and trypsin to mediate receptor activation. Due to the irreversible nature of activation, a fresh supply of receptor is required to be mobilized to the cell surface for responsiveness to agonist to be sustained. Unlike other PAR subtypes, the mechanisms regulating receptor trafficking of PAR4 remain unknown. Here, we report novel features of the intracellular trafficking of PAR4 to the plasma membrane. PAR4 was poorly expressed at the plasma membrane and largely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in a complex with the COPI protein subunit β-COP1. Analysis of the PAR4 protein sequence identified an arginine-based (RXR) ER retention sequence located within intracellular loop-2 (R183AR → A183AA), mutation of which allowed efficient membrane delivery of PAR4. Interestingly, co-expression with PAR2 facilitated plasma membrane delivery of PAR4, an effect produced through disruption of β-COP1 binding and facilitation of interaction with the chaperone protein 14-3-3ζ. Intermolecular FRET studies confirmed heterodimerization between PAR2 and PAR4. PAR2 also enhanced glycosylation of PAR4 and activation of PAR4 signaling. Our results identify a novel regulatory role for PAR2 in the anterograde traffic of PAR4. PAR2 was shown to both facilitate and abrogate protein interactions with PAR4, impacting upon receptor localization and cell signal transduction. This work is likely to impact markedly upon the understanding of the receptor pharmacology of PAR4 in normal physiology and disease. PMID:22411985

  13. Novel role for proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) in membrane trafficking of proteinase-activated receptor 4 (PAR4).

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Margaret R; McIntosh, Kathryn A; Pediani, John D; Robben, Joris; Cooke, Alexandra E; Nilsson, Mary; Gould, Gwyn W; Mundell, Stuart; Milligan, Graeme; Plevin, Robin

    2012-05-11

    Proteinase-activated receptors 4 (PAR(4)) is a class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) recognized through the ability of serine proteases such as thrombin and trypsin to mediate receptor activation. Due to the irreversible nature of activation, a fresh supply of receptor is required to be mobilized to the cell surface for responsiveness to agonist to be sustained. Unlike other PAR subtypes, the mechanisms regulating receptor trafficking of PAR(4) remain unknown. Here, we report novel features of the intracellular trafficking of PAR(4) to the plasma membrane. PAR(4) was poorly expressed at the plasma membrane and largely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in a complex with the COPI protein subunit β-COP1. Analysis of the PAR(4) protein sequence identified an arginine-based (RXR) ER retention sequence located within intracellular loop-2 (R(183)AR → A(183)AA), mutation of which allowed efficient membrane delivery of PAR(4). Interestingly, co-expression with PAR(2) facilitated plasma membrane delivery of PAR(4), an effect produced through disruption of β-COP1 binding and facilitation of interaction with the chaperone protein 14-3-3ζ. Intermolecular FRET studies confirmed heterodimerization between PAR(2) and PAR(4). PAR(2) also enhanced glycosylation of PAR(4) and activation of PAR(4) signaling. Our results identify a novel regulatory role for PAR(2) in the anterograde traffic of PAR(4). PAR(2) was shown to both facilitate and abrogate protein interactions with PAR(4), impacting upon receptor localization and cell signal transduction. This work is likely to impact markedly upon the understanding of the receptor pharmacology of PAR(4) in normal physiology and disease. PMID:22411985

  14. Participation of Chromosome Segregation Protein ParAI of Vibrio cholerae in Chromosome Replication▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kadoya, Ryosuke; Baek, Jong Hwan; Sarker, Arnab; Chattoraj, Dhruba K.

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae carries homologs of plasmid-borne parA and parB genes on both of its chromosomes. The par genes help to segregate many plasmids and chromosomes. Here we have studied the par genes of V. cholerae chromosome I. Earlier studies suggested that ParBI binds to the centromeric site parSI near the origin of replication (oriI), and parSI-ParBI complexes are placed at the cell poles by ParAI. Deletion of parAI and parSI caused the origin-proximal DNA to be less polar. Here we found that deletion of parBI also resulted in a less polar localization of oriI. However, unlike the deletion of parAI, the deletion of parBI increased the oriI number. Replication was normal when both parAI and parBI were deleted, suggesting that ParBI mediates its action through ParAI. Overexpression of ParAI in a parABI-deleted strain also increased the DNA content. The results are similar to those found for Bacillus subtilis, where ParA (Soj) stimulates replication and this activity is repressed by ParB (SpoOJ). As in B. subtilis, the stimulation of replication most likely involves the replication initiator DnaA. Our results indicate that control of chromosomal DNA replication is an additional function of chromosomal par genes conserved across the Gram-positive/Gram-negative divide. PMID:21257772

  15. Predicted PAR1 inhibitors from multiple computational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Jinfeng; Zhu, Tong; Zhang, Lujia; He, Xiao; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2016-08-01

    Multiple computational approaches are employed in order to find potentially strong binders of PAR1 from the two molecular databases: the Specs database containing more than 200,000 commercially available molecules and the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) database. By combining the use of popular docking scoring functions together with detailed molecular dynamics simulation and protein-ligand free energy calculations, a total of fourteen molecules are found to be potentially strong binders of PAR1. The atomic details in protein-ligand interactions of these molecules with PAR1 are analyzed to help understand the binding mechanism which should be very useful in design of new drugs.

  16. Method for eliminating artifacts in CCD imagers

    DOEpatents

    Turko, B.T.; Yates, G.J.

    1992-06-09

    An electronic method for eliminating artifacts in a video camera employing a charge coupled device (CCD) as an image sensor is disclosed. The method comprises the step of initializing the camera prior to normal read out and includes a first dump cycle period for transferring radiation generated charge into the horizontal register while the decaying image on the phosphor being imaged is being integrated in the photosites, and a second dump cycle period, occurring after the phosphor image has decayed, for rapidly dumping unwanted smear charge which has been generated in the vertical registers. Image charge is then transferred from the photosites and to the vertical registers and read out in conventional fashion. The inventive method allows the video camera to be used in environments having high ionizing radiation content, and to capture images of events of very short duration and occurring either within or outside the normal visual wavelength spectrum. Resultant images are free from ghost, smear and smear phenomena caused by insufficient opacity of the registers and, and are also free from random damage caused by ionization charges which exceed the charge limit capacity of the photosites. 3 figs.

  17. Elimination of formate production in Clostridium thermocellum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rydzak, Thomas; Lynd, Lee R.; Guss, Adam M.

    2015-07-11

    We study the ability of Clostridium thermocellum to rapidly degrade cellulose and ferment resulting hydrolysis products into ethanol makes it a promising platform organism for cellulosic biofuel production via consolidated bioprocessing. Currently, however, ethanol yield are far below theoretical maximum due to branched product pathways that divert carbon and electrons towards formate, H2, lactate, acetate, and secreted amino acids. To redirect carbon and electron flux away from formate, pyruvate:formate lyase (pfl) and respective PFL-activating enzyme were deleted. Formate production in the resulting Δpfl strain was eliminated and acetate production decreased by 50% on both complex and defined medium. Growth ratemore » of Δpfl decreased by 2.9-fold on defined medium and diauxic growth was observed on complex medium. Supplementation of defined medium with 2 mM formate restored Δpfl growth rate to 80% of the parent strain. Finally, we discuss the role of pfl in metabolic engineering strategies and C1 metabolism.« less

  18. Elimination of radon from the body

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, J.H.; Jetter, E.S.; Nelson, N.

    1994-01-01

    A series of experiments were run on the retention of inhaled radon. The radon absorbed by the body is present in a multiphase system, showing five distinct elimination coefficients. After high-level radon exposure for a normal working day, an appreciable breath radon output is found 72 h after removal from exposure. This is a practical consideration in breath radon sampling, and it must be realized that the breath measurement may indicate a higher body radium content than that actually present. Another valuable result is that the radon retention figures allow us to reconcile the results of breath radon analyses and total body radium analyses on unexposed persons. The results of our breath measurements averaged 6[times]10[sup [minus]9] g on ten unexposed individuals. It is apparent that the breath radon measurement is not capable of measuring normal body radium, due both to the small quantity present, and to the interference of radon absorbed by the body from the normal environment. 2 refs., 3 figs., 4 tab.

  19. Method for eliminating artifacts in CCD imagers

    DOEpatents

    Turko, Bojan T.; Yates, George J.

    1992-01-01

    An electronic method for eliminating artifacts in a video camera (10) employing a charge coupled device (CCD) (12) as an image sensor. The method comprises the step of initializing the camera (10) prior to normal read out and includes a first dump cycle period (76) for transferring radiation generated charge into the horizontal register (28) while the decaying image on the phosphor (39) being imaged is being integrated in the photosites, and a second dump cycle period (78), occurring after the phosphor (39) image has decayed, for rapidly dumping unwanted smear charge which has been generated in the vertical registers (32). Image charge is then transferred from the photosites (36) and (38) to the vertical registers (32) and read out in conventional fashion. The inventive method allows the video camera (10) to be used in environments having high ionizing radiation content, and to capture images of events of very short duration and occurring either within or outside the normal visual wavelength spectrum. Resultant images are free from ghost, smear and smear phenomena caused by insufficient opacity of the registers (28) and (32), and are also free from random damage caused by ionization charges which exceed the charge limit capacity of the photosites (36) and (37).

  20. Minimizing or eliminating refueling of nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Doncals, Richard A.; Paik, Nam-Chin; Andre, Sandra V.; Porter, Charles A.; Rathbun, Roy W.; Schwallie, Ambrose L.; Petras, Diane S.

    1989-01-01

    Demand for refueling of a liquid metal fast nuclear reactor having a life of 30 years is eliminated or reduced to intervals of at least 10 years by operating the reactor at a low linear-power density, typically 2.5 kw/ft of fuel rod, rather than 7.5 or 15 kw/ft, which is the prior art practice. So that power of the same magnitude as for prior art reactors is produced, the volume of the core is increased. In addition, the height of the core and it diameter are dimensioned so that the ratio of the height to the diameter approximates 1 to the extent practicable considering the requirement of control and that the pressure drop in the coolant shall not be excessive. The surface area of a cylinder of given volume is a minimum if the ratio of the height to the diameter is 1. By minimizing the surface area, the leakage of neutrons is reduced. By reducing the linear-power density, increasing core volume, reducing fissile enrichment and optimizing core geometry, internal-core breeding of fissionable fuel is substantially enhanced. As a result, core operational life, limited by control worth requirements and fuel burnup capability, is extended up to 30 years of continuous power operation.

  1. Reward eliminates retrieval-induced forgetting

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Hisato; Kim, Dongho; Sasaki, Yuka; Watanabe, Takeo

    2014-01-01

    Although it is well known that reward enhances learning and memory, how extensively such enhancement occurs remains unclear. To address this question, we examined how reward influences retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF) in which the retrieval of a nonpracticed item under the same category as a practiced item is worse than the retrieval of a nonpracticed item outside the category. Subjects were asked to try to encode category-exemplar pairs (e.g., FISH–salmon). Then, they were presented with a category name and a two-letter word stem (e.g., FISH–sa) and were asked to complete an encoded word (retrieval practice). For a correct response, apple juice was given as a reward in the reward condition and a beeping sound was presented in the no-reward condition. Finally, subjects were asked to report whether each exemplar had been presented in the first phase. RIF was replicated in the no-reward condition. However, in the reward condition, RIF was eliminated. These results suggest that reward enhances processing of retrieval of unpracticed members by mechanisms such as spreading activation within the same category, irrespective of whether items were practiced or not. PMID:25404297

  2. Isolation of Endotoxin Eliminating Lactic Acid Bacteria and a Property of Endotoxin Eliminating Protein.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Ayaka; Asami, Kyoko; Suda, Yoshihito; Shimoyamada, Makoto; Kanauchi, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Recently, many scholars have reported lactic acid bacteria (LAB) functions, such as anticancer activity and anti-inflammatory activity for intestines. To decrease inflammatory substances such as endotoxins, LAB consumed safely with meals were isolated from food and food ingredients. First, LAB were isolated as 168 strains of bacillus LAB (49 strain) and coccus LAB (119 strains) from food ingredients and fermented foods such as rice, rice bran, malt, grains, miso soy paste, and some pickles. Their LAB (168 strains) were cultivated in medium containing endotoxin from Escherichia coli O18 LPS at 15 and 30 °C for 64 h to identify endotoxin-eliminating LAB. Consequently, the AK-23 strain was screened as an endotoxin-eliminating LAB strain. The strain decreased endotoxin in YP medium without sugar at 30 °C for 64 h until 9% of endotoxin. The strain was identified as Pediococcus pentosaceus according to morphological characteristics such as its cell shape, physiological characteristics related to its fermentation type, assimilation of sugars, pH tolerance, optimum growth temperature, and molecular biological characteristics as its homology to 16S rRNA. To investigate the location of the endotoxin-eliminating substance, 4 fractions were separated from AK-23 cells as extracellular, cell wall digestion, cytoplasm, and cell membrane fractions. The endotoxin-decreasing substance, located on a cell wall, was identified as a 217 kDa protein. PMID:27096744

  3. FtmOx1, a non-heme Fe(II) and alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase, catalyses the endoperoxide formation of verruculogen in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Steffan, Nicola; Grundmann, Alexander; Afiyatullov, Shamil; Ruan, Hanli; Li, Shu-Ming

    2009-10-01

    Verruculogen is a tremorgenic mycotoxin and contains an endoperoxide bond. In this study, we describe the cloning, overexpression and purification of a non-heme Fe(ii) and alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase FtmOx1 from Aspergillus fumigatus, which catalyses the conversion of fumitremorgin B to verruculogen by inserting an endoperoxide bond between two prenyl moieties. Incubation with (18)O(2)-enriched atmosphere demonstrated that both oxygen atoms of the endoperoxide bond are derived from one molecule of O(2). FtmOx1 is the first endoperoxide-forming non-heme Fe(ii) and alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase reported so far. A mechanism of FtmOx1-catalysed verruculogen formation is postulated and discussed. PMID:19763315

  4. View from northeast to southwest of PAR site sentry station; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from northeast to southwest of PAR site sentry station; formerly the bachelor's enlisted men's quarter (BEQ) - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Sentry Station, North of Second Avenue & West of Electrical Switch Station No. 2, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  5. View from southwest to northeast of PAR site fresh water ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from southwest to northeast of PAR site fresh water pump house - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Fresh Water Pump House, In Limited Access Area, on Patrol Road next to Open Storage Reservoir No. 736, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  6. PARS: Programs for Analysis and Resizing of Structures, user manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.; Prasad, B.; Tsach, U.

    1979-01-01

    PARS processors and their use, flutter analysis, sensitivity analysis for stresses, and resizing are presented. Design variable definition and interface with finite element model, static constraints and their derivatives, flutter derivatives, and optimization are discussed.

  7. Rhodium(i)-catalysed skeletal reorganisation of benzofused spiro[3.3]heptanes via consecutive carbon-carbon bond cleavage.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Takanori; Yuihara, Itaru; Kondo, Kazuki

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal reorganisation of benzofused spiro[3.3]heptanes has been achieved using rhodium(i) catalysts. The reaction of benzofused 2-(2-pyridylmethylene)spiro[3.3]heptanes proceeds via sequential C-C bond oxidative addition and β-carbon elimination. On the other hand, benzofused spiro[3.3]heptan-2-ols undergo two consecutive β-carbon elimination processes. In both cases, substituted naphthalenes are obtained. PMID:27357097

  8. 1,2-N-Migration in a Gold-Catalysed Synthesis of Functionalised Indenes by the 1,1-Carboalkoxylation of Ynamides

    PubMed Central

    Adcock, Holly V; Langer, Thomas; Davies, Paul W

    2014-01-01

    Unique α-hemiaminal ether gold carbene intermediates were accessed by a gold-catalysed 1,1-carboalkoxylation strategy and evolved through a highly selective 1,2-N-migration. This skeletal rearrangement gave functionalised indenes, and isotopic labelling confirmed the rare C–N bond cleavage of the ynamide moiety. The effect of substituents on the migration has been explored, and a model is proposed to rationalise the observed selectivity. PMID:24828030

  9. A sticky situation: the unexpected stability of malaria elimination

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David L.; Cohen, Justin M.; Chiyaka, Christinah; Johnston, Geoffrey; Gething, Peter W.; Gosling, Roly; Buckee, Caroline O.; Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Hay, Simon I.; Tatem, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Malaria eradication involves eliminating malaria from every country where transmission occurs. Current theory suggests that the post-elimination challenges of remaining malaria-free by stopping transmission from imported malaria will have onerous operational and financial requirements. Although resurgent malaria has occurred in a majority of countries that tried but failed to eliminate malaria, a review of resurgence in countries that successfully eliminated finds only four such failures out of 50 successful programmes. Data documenting malaria importation and onwards transmission in these countries suggests malaria transmission potential has declined by more than 50-fold (i.e. more than 98%) since before elimination. These outcomes suggest that elimination is a surprisingly stable state. Elimination's ‘stickiness’ must be explained either by eliminating countries starting off qualitatively different from non-eliminating countries or becoming different once elimination was achieved. Countries that successfully eliminated were wealthier and had lower baseline endemicity than those that were unsuccessful, but our analysis shows that those same variables were at best incomplete predictors of the patterns of resurgence. Stability is reinforced by the loss of immunity to disease and by the health system's increasing capacity to control malaria transmission after elimination through routine treatment of cases with antimalarial drugs supplemented by malaria outbreak control. Human travel patterns reinforce these patterns; as malaria recedes, fewer people carry malaria from remote endemic areas to remote areas where transmission potential remains high. Establishment of an international resource with backup capacity to control large outbreaks can make elimination stickier, increase the incentives for countries to eliminate, and ensure steady progress towards global eradication. Although available evidence supports malaria elimination's stickiness at moderate

  10. A DFT study of the mechanism of NHC catalysed annulation reactions involving α,β-unsaturated acyl azoliums and β-naphthol.

    PubMed

    Aurell, M José; Domingo, Luis R; Arnó, Manuel; Zaragozá, Ramón J

    2016-09-21

    The mechanism of NHC catalysed annulation reactions involving an α,β-unsaturated acyl azolium and β-naphthol has been studied using DFT methods at the MPWB1K/6-311G(d,p) level in toluene. For the C-C bond formation step, which corresponds to the rate- and stereo-determining step of this NHC catalysed reaction, the two competitive addition modes, i.e. the 1,2- and the 1,4-additions, have been studied. In toluene, acyl azolium forms an ion pair (IP) with the counterion chloride anion. Interestingly, β-naphthol forms a hydrogen bond with the chloride anion of IP, increasing the nucleophilic character of β-naphthol and the electrophilic character of the acyl azolium moiety. For the first time, the transition state (TS) associated with the 1,2-addition is found and characterised. An analysis of the activation Gibbs free energies involved in the two competitive pathways makes it possible to rule out the pathway associated with the 1,2-addition. The relative Gibbs free energy of stereoisomeric TSs present in the 1,4-additions, accounts for the experimentally observed stereoselectivity. Finally, a comparative study of the pathways associated with the 1,2- and the 1,4-addition of β-naphthalenethiol to the acyl azolium moiety of IP accounts for the low reactivity of β-naphthalenethiol in these NHC catalysed annulation reactions involving α,β-unsaturated acyl azoliums. PMID:27530598

  11. Par-4 secretion: stoichiometry of 3-arylquinoline binding to vimentin.

    PubMed

    Sviripa, Vitaliy M; Burikhanov, Ravshan; Obiero, Josiah M; Yuan, Yaxia; Nickell, Justin R; Dwoskin, Linda P; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Liu, Chunming; Tsodikov, Oleg V; Rangnekar, Vivek M; Watt, David S

    2016-01-01

    Advanced prostate tumors usually metastasize to the lung, bone, and other vital tissues and are resistant to conventional therapy. Prostate apoptosis response-4 protein (Par-4) is a tumor suppressor that causes apoptosis in therapy-resistant prostate cancer cells by binding specifically to a receptor, Glucose-regulated protein-78 (GRP78), found only on the surface of cancer cells. 3-Arylquinolines or "arylquins" induce normal cells to release Par-4 from the intermediate filament protein, vimentin and promote Par-4 secretion that targets cancer cells in a paracrine manner. A structure-activity study identified arylquins that promote Par-4 secretion, and an evaluation of arylquin binding to the hERG potassium ion channel using a [(3)H]-dofetilide binding assay permitted the identification of structural features that separated this undesired activity from the desired Par-4 secretory activity. A binding study that relied on the natural fluorescence of arylquins and that used the purified rod domain of vimentin (residues 99-411) suggested that the mechanism behind Par-4 release involved arylquin binding to multiple sites in the rod domain. PMID:26548370

  12. Croissance epitaxiale de GaAs sur substrats de Ge par epitaxie par faisceaux chimiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belanger, Simon

    La situation energetique et les enjeux environnementaux auxquels la societe est confrontee entrainent un interet grandissant pour la production d'electricite a partir de l'energie solaire. Parmi les technologies actuellement disponibles, la filiere du photovoltaique a concentrateur solaire (CPV pour concentrator photovoltaics) possede un rendement superieur et mi potentiel interessant a condition que ses couts de production soient competitifs. La methode d'epitaxie par faisceaux chimiques (CBE pour chemical beam epitaxy) possede plusieurs caracteristiques qui la rendent interessante pour la production a grande echelle de cellules photovoltaiques a jonctions multiples a base de semi-conducteurs III-V. Ce type de cellule possede la meilleure efficacite atteinte a ce jour et est utilise sur les satellites et les systemes photovoltaiques a concentrateur solaire (CPV) les plus efficaces. Une des principales forces de la technique CBE se trouve dans son potentiel d'efficacite d'utilisation des materiaux source qui est superieur a celui de la technique d'epitaxie qui est couramment utilisee pour la production a grande echelle de ces cellules. Ce memoire de maitrise presente les travaux effectues dans le but d'evaluer le potentiel de la technique CBE pour realiser la croissance de couches de GaAs sur des substrats de Ge. Cette croissance constitue la premiere etape de fabrication de nombreux modeles de cellules solaires a haute performance decrites plus haut. La realisation de ce projet a necessite le developpement d'un procede de preparation de surface pour les substrats de germanium, la realisation de nombreuses sceances de croissance epitaxiale et la caracterisation des materiaux obtenus par microscopie optique, microscopie a force atomique (AFM), diffraction des rayons-X a haute resolution (HRXRD), microscopie electronique a transmission (TEM), photoluminescence a basse temperature (LTPL) et spectrometrie de masse des ions secondaires (SIMS). Les experiences ont permis

  13. Palladium-catalysed directed C-H activation by anilides and ureas; water participation in a general base mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rauf, Waqar; Brown, John M

    2016-06-21

    C-H activation plays a central role in organometallic catalysis. Concerted metallation-deprotonation (CMD) has been dominant as the pathway for C-H bond cleavage. In the course of studying the mechanism of C-H activation of arylamides and arylureas with Pd complexes as part of catalytic oxidative Heck reactions, DFT calculations were carried out. The turnover-limiting C-H activation is acid-catalysed and can occur readily in the absence of acetate or other coordinating bases. The calculations simulated experiment, so that ligated sulfonate and water, both previously observed by X-ray characterization, were incorporated in the model. A Wheland-type complex between acetanilide and Pd was readily located, but the reactive C-H and the coordinated sulfonate were poorly placed for intramolecular proton transfer. Involvement of a water molecule coordinated to sulfonate provides a low-energy pathway to the palladacycle. The relative reactivity of substituted acetanilides and arylureas according to this model fits well with existing literature. General-base catalysis as described here has broader potential. PMID:27184358

  14. Sensitive assay of hexythiazox residue in citrus fruits using gold nanoparticles-catalysed luminol-H2O2 chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Khajvand, Tahereh; Chaichi, Mohammad Javad; Colagar, Abasalt Hosseinzadeh

    2015-04-15

    A new sensitive chemiluminescence (CL) procedure for the detection of hexythiazox (HXTZ) is presented, based on the quenching effect of the HXTZ in the luminol-H2O2 system using gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as a catalyst. The Box-Behnken design matrix and response surface methodology (RSM) have been applied in designing the experiments for studying the interactive effects of the three most important variables pH, luminol, and H2O2 concentrations on the CL intensity of luminol catalysed by GNPs. Under the optimal conditions, the CL intensity was linear with HXTZ concentration in the range of 0.017-0.42 μg mL(-1), and the limit of detection (LoD) was 0.011 μg mL(-1). The procedure has been successfully applied to the detection of HXTZ residues in citrus fruits and water samples at trace levels. Mean recoveries obtained were between 84.0% and 95.3%, with a repeatability precision of <6%. Meanwhile, the possible mechanism of the inhibited CL intensity was discussed. PMID:25466053

  15. Arabidopsis IRE1 catalyses unconventional splicing of bZIP60 mRNA to produce the active transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Yukihiro; Mishiba, Kei-ichiro; Suzuki, Eiji; Shimada, Yukihisa; Iwata, Yuji; Koizumi, Nozomu

    2011-01-01

    IRE1 plays an essential role in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response in yeast and mammals. We found that a double mutant of Arabidopsis IRE1A and IRE1B (ire1a/ire1b) is more sensitive to the ER stress inducer tunicamycin than the wild-type. Transcriptome analysis revealed that genes whose induction was reduced in ire1a/ire1b largely overlapped those in the bzip60 mutant. We observed that the active form of bZIP60 protein detected in the wild-type was missing in ire1a/ire1b. We further demonstrated that bZIP60 mRNA is spliced by ER stress, removing 23 ribonucleotides and therefore causing a frameshift that replaces the C-terminal region of bZIP60 including the transmembrane domain (TMD) with a shorter region without a TMD. This splicing was detected in ire1a and ire1b single mutants, but not in the ire1a/ire1b double mutant. We conclude that IRE1A and IRE1B catalyse unconventional splicing of bZIP60 mRNA to produce the active transcription factor. PMID:22355548

  16. Decolourization of the azo dye Orange G in aqueous solution via a heterogeneous Fenton-like reaction catalysed by goethite.

    PubMed

    Wu, Honghai; Dou, Xiaowen; Deng, Dayi; Guan, Yufeng; Zhang, Liguo; He, Guangping

    2012-01-01

    Decolourization of the azo dye Orange G (OG) was investigated by using goethite/H2O2 as a heterogeneous Fenton-like reagent. Five principle operational parameters, namely pH, ion strength, concentrations ofgoethite (alpha-FeOOH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and reaction temperature, were taken into account to investigate how these controlling factors mediated OG decolourization. Goethite surfaces catalysed a Fenton-like reaction responsible for decolourizing OG following pseudo-first-order kinetics (R2 > 0.964). This process was effective but seriously impacted by the medium pH and the dosages of both alpha-FeOOH and H2O2. The decolourization efficiencies of OG increased with the decrease of solution pH and NaCl (chloride ion) concentration and/or the increase of H2O2. The acidic aqueous medium conditions were likely favourable due to the surface adsorption of the negatively charged OG leading to the promotion of decolourizing OG. The apparent activation energy (E) for this reaction was 42.18 kJ mol(-1), a relatively low value. This is consistent with the OG decolourization being enhanced with the reaction temperature increase. PMID:22988614

  17. Sn-Beta zeolites with borate salts catalyse the epimerization of carbohydrates via an intramolecular carbon shift

    PubMed Central

    Gunther, William R.; Wang, Yuran; Ji, Yuewei; Michaelis, Vladimir K.; Hunt, Sean T.; Griffin, Robert G.; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrate epimerization is an essential technology for the widespread production of rare sugars. In contrast to other enzymes, most epimerases are only active on sugars substituted with phosphate or nucleotide groups, thus drastically restricting their use. Here we show that Sn-Beta zeolite in the presence of sodium tetraborate catalyses the selective epimerization of aldoses in aqueous media. Specifically, a 5 wt% aldose (for example, glucose, xylose or arabinose) solution with a 4:1 aldose:sodium tetraborate molar ratio reacted with catalytic amounts of Sn-Beta yields near-equilibrium epimerization product distributions. The reaction proceeds by way of a 1,2 carbon shift wherein the bond between C-2 and C-3 is cleaved and a new bond between C-1 and C-3 is formed, with C-1 moving to the C-2 position with an inverted configuration. This work provides a general method of performing carbohydrate epimerizations that surmounts the main disadvantages of current enzymatic and inorganic processes. PMID:23047667

  18. Identification and characterization of two families of F420H2-dependent reductases from Mycobacteria that catalyse aflatoxin degradation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Matthew C; Jackson, Colin J; Tattersall, David B; French, Nigel; Peat, Thomas S; Newman, Janet; Briggs, Lyndall J; Lapalikar, Gauri V; Campbell, Peter M; Scott, Colin; Russell, Robyn J; Oakeshott, John G

    2010-01-01

    Aflatoxins are polyaromatic mycotoxins that contaminate a range of food crops as a result of fungal growth and contribute to serious health problems in the developing world because of their toxicity and mutagenicity. Although relatively resistant to biotic degradation, aflatoxins can be metabolized by certain species of Actinomycetales. However, the enzymatic basis for their breakdown has not been reported until now. We have identified nine Mycobacterium smegmatis enzymes that utilize the deazaflavin cofactor F420H2 to catalyse the reduction of the α,β-unsaturated ester moiety of aflatoxins, activating the molecules for spontaneous hydrolysis and detoxification. These enzymes belong to two previously uncharacterized F420H2 dependent reductase (FDR-A and -B) families that are distantly related to the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) dependent pyridoxamine 5′-phosphate oxidases (PNPOxs). We have solved crystal structures of an enzyme from each FDR family and show that they, like the PNPOxs, adopt a split barrel protein fold, although the FDRs also possess an extended and highly charged F420H2 binding groove. A general role for these enzymes in xenobiotic metabolism is discussed, including the observation that the nitro-reductase Rv3547 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis that is responsible for the activation of bicyclic nitroimidazole prodrugs belongs to the FDR-A family. PMID:20807200

  19. Identification of Dehalobacter reductive dehalogenases that catalyse dechlorination of chloroform, 1,1,1-trichloroethane and 1,1-dichloroethane

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shuiquan; Edwards, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Two novel reductive dehalogenases (RDases) that are highly similar to each other but catalyse distinct dechlorination reactions were identified from Dehalobacter-containing mixed cultures. These two RDases were partially purified from crude protein extracts of anaerobic dechlorinating enrichment cultures using blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Gel slices were assayed for dechlorinating activity, and associated proteins were identified using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with the metagenome of the parent culture as the reference database. The two RDases identified, annotated as CfrA and DcrA, share an amino acid identity of 95.2 per cent, but use different substrates: CfrA dechlorinates chloroform (CF) and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA), but not 1,1-dichloroethane; DcrA dechlorinates 1,1-dichloroethane, but not CF or 1,1,1-TCA. These two novel RDases share no more than 40 per cent amino acid identity to any other known or putative RDases, but both have a twin-arginine motif and two iron–sulfur binding motifs conserved in most RDases. Peptides specific to two putative membrane anchor proteins, annotated as CfrB and DcrB, were also detected in gel slices. PMID:23479748

  20. The carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase CCD2 catalysing the synthesis of crocetin in spring crocuses and saffron is a plastidial enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ahrazem, Oussama; Rubio-Moraga, Angela; Berman, Judit; Capell, Teresa; Christou, Paul; Zhu, Changfu; Gómez-Gómez, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    The apocarotenoid crocetin and its glycosylated derivatives, crocins, confer the red colour to saffron. Crocetin biosynthesis in saffron is catalysed by the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase CCD2 (AIG94929). No homologues have been identified in other plant species due to the very limited presence of crocetin and its derivatives in the plant kingdom. Spring Crocus species with yellow flowers accumulate crocins in the stigma and tepals. Four carotenoid CCDs, namely CaCCD1, CaCCD2 and CaCCD4a/b and CaCCD4c were first cloned and characterized. CaCCD2 was localized in plastids, and a longer CCD2 version, CsCCD2L, was also localized in this compartment. The activity of CaCCD2 was assessed in Escherichia coli and in a stable rice gene function characterization system, demonstrating the production of crocetin in both systems. The expression of all isolated CCDs was evaluated in stigma and tepals at three key developmental stages in relation with apocarotenoid accumulation. CaCCD2 expression parallels crocin accumulation, but C14 apocarotenoids most likely are associated to the CaCCD1 activity in Crocus ancyrensis flowers. The specific CCD2 localization and its membrane interaction will contribute to the development of a better understanding of the mechanism of crocetin biosynthesis and regulation in the chromoplast. PMID:26377696

  1. Atypical kinetics of cytochromes P450 catalysing 3'-hydroxylation of flavone from the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Noriyuki; Ikushiro, Shinichi; Hirosue, Shinji; Arisawa, Akira; Ichinose, Hirofumi; Uchida, Yujirou; Wariishi, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Miho; Sakaki, Toshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    We cloned full-length cDNAs of 130 cytochrome P450s (P450s) derived from Phanerochaete chrysosporium and successfully expressed 70 isoforms in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To elucidate substrate specificity of P. chrysosporium P450s, we examined various substrates including steroid hormones, several drugs, flavonoids and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using the recombinant S. cerevisiae cells. Of these P450s, two CYPs designated as PcCYP50c and PcCYP142c with 14% identity in their amino acid sequences catalyse 3'-hydroxylation of flavone and O-deethylation of 7-ethoxycoumarin. Kinetic data of both enzymes on both reactions fitted not to the Michaelis-Menten equation but to Hill's equation with a coefficient of 2, suggesting that two substrates bind to the active site. Molecular modelling of PcCYP50c and a docking study of flavone to its active site supported this hypothesis. The enzymatic properties of PcCYP50c and PcCYP142c resemble mammalian drug-metabolizing P450s, suggesting that their physiological roles are metabolism of xenobiotics. It is noted that these unique P. chrysosporium P450s have a potential for the production of useful flavonoids. PMID:19819902

  2. Enzyme reaction engineering: synthesis of antibiotics catalysed by stabilized penicillin G acylase in the presence of organic cosolvents.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Lafuente, R; Rosell, C M; Guisán, J M

    1991-11-01

    By using very active and very stable penicillin G acylase (PGA)--agarose derivatives we have studied the industrial design of equilibrium-controlled synthesis of lactamic antibiotics. In the presence of high concentrations of organic cosolvents we have carried out the direct enzymatic condensation of phenylacetic acid and 6-aminopenicillanic acid to yield the model antibiotic penicillin G. We have mainly studied the integrated effect of different variables that define the reaction medium on a number of parameters of industrial interest:time course of antibiotic synthesis, highest synthetic yields, stability of the catalyst, and solubility and stability of substrates and products. The main variables tested were the nature and concentration of the organic cosolvent, pH, and temperature. The effects of the variables tested on different parameters were quite different and sometimes opposite. Hence, the optimal experimental conditions for antibiotic synthesis catalysed by PGA were established, as a compromise solution, in order to obtain good values for every parameter of industrial interest. These conditions seem to be important parameters for scale-up (e.g. we have been able to reach more than 95% of synthetic yields with productivities around 0.5 tons of model antibiotic per year per liter of catalyst). PMID:1368000

  3. Oxidation and β-Alkylation of Alcohols Catalysed by Iridium(I) Complexes with Functionalised N-Heterocyclic Carbene Ligands.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, M Victoria; Fernández-Tornos, Javier; Modrego, F Javier; Pérez-Torrente, Jesús J; Oro, Luis A

    2015-12-01

    The borrowing hydrogen methodology allows for the use of alcohols as alkylating agents for CC bond forming processes offering significant environmental benefits over traditional approaches. Iridium(I)-cyclooctadiene complexes having a NHC ligand with a O- or N-functionalised wingtip efficiently catalysed the oxidation and β-alkylation of secondary alcohols with primary alcohols in the presence of a base. The cationic complex [Ir(NCCH3 )(cod)(MeIm(2- methoxybenzyl))][BF4 ] (cod=1,5-cyclooctadiene, MeIm=1-methylimidazolyl) having a rigid O-functionalised wingtip, shows the best catalyst performance in the dehydrogenation of benzyl alcohol in acetone, with an initial turnover frequency (TOF0 ) of 1283 h(-1) , and also in the β-alkylation of 2-propanol with butan-1-ol, which gives a conversion of 94 % in 10 h with a selectivity of 99 % for heptan-2-ol. We have investigated the full reaction mechanism including the dehydrogenation, the cross-aldol condensation and the hydrogenation step by DFT calculations. Interestingly, these studies revealed the participation of the iridium catalyst in the key step leading to the formation of the new CC bond that involves the reaction of an O-bound enolate generated in the basic medium with the electrophilic aldehyde. PMID:26493780

  4. Differential Distortion of Purine Substrates by Human and Plasmodium falciparum Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase to Catalyse the Formation of Mononucleotides.

    PubMed

    Karnawat, Vishakha; Gogia, Spriha; Balaram, Hemalatha; Puranik, Mrinalini

    2015-07-20

    Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) is a potential therapeutic target. Compared to structurally homologous human enzymes, it has expanded substrate specificity. In this study, 9-deazapurines are used as in situ probes of the active sites of human and Pf HGPRTs. Through the use of these probes it is found that non-covalent interactions stabilise the pre-transition state of the HGPRT-catalysed reaction. Vibrational spectra reveal that the bound substrates are extensively distorted, the carbonyl bond of nucleobase moiety is weakened and the substrate is destabilised along the reaction coordinate. Raman shifts of the human and Pf enzymes are used to quantify the differing degrees of hydrogen bonding in the homologues. A decreased Raman cross-section in enzyme-bound 9-deazaguanine (9DAG) shows that the phenylalanine residue (Phe186 in human and Phe197 in Pf) of HGPRT stacks with the nucleobase. Differential loss of the Raman cross-section suggests that the active site is more compact in human HGPRT as compared to the Pf enzyme, and is more so in the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRPP) complex 9DAG-PRPP-HGPRT than in 9-deazahypoxanthine (9DAH)-PRPP-HGPRT. PMID:25944719

  5. Box C/D snoRNP catalysed methylation is aided by additional pre-rRNA base-pairing

    PubMed Central

    van Nues, Robert Willem; Granneman, Sander; Kudla, Grzegorz; Sloan, Katherine Elizabeth; Chicken, Matthew; Tollervey, David; Watkins, Nicholas James

    2011-01-01

    2′-O-methylation of eukaryotic ribosomal RNA (r)RNA, essential for ribosome function, is catalysed by box C/D small nucleolar (sno)RNPs. The RNA components of these complexes (snoRNAs) contain one or two guide sequences, which, through base-pairing, select the rRNA modification site. Adjacent to the guide sequences are protein-binding sites (the C/D or C′/D′ motifs). Analysis of >2000 yeast box C/D snoRNAs identified additional conserved sequences in many snoRNAs that are complementary to regions adjacent to the rRNA methylation site. This ‘extra base-pairing' was also found in many human box C/D snoRNAs and can stimulate methylation by up to five-fold. Sequence analysis, combined with RNA–protein crosslinking in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, identified highly divergent box C′/D′ motifs that are bound by snoRNP proteins. In vivo rRNA methylation assays showed these to be active. Our data suggest roles for non-catalytic subunits (Nop56 and Nop58) in rRNA binding and support an asymmetric model for box C/D snoRNP organization. The study provides novel insights into the extent of the snoRNA–rRNA interactions required for efficient methylation and the structural organization of the snoRNPs. PMID:21556049

  6. Operational strategies to achieve and maintain malaria elimination

    PubMed Central

    Moonen, Bruno; Cohen, Justin M; Snow, Robert W; Slutsker, Laurence; Drakeley, Chris; Smith, David L; Abeyasinghe, Rabindra R; Rodriguez, Mario Henry; Maharaj, Rajendra; Tanner, Marcel; Targett, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    Summary Present elimination strategies are based on recommendations derived during the Global Malaria Eradication Program of the 1960s. However, many countries considering elimination nowadays have high intrinsic transmission potential and, without the support of a regional campaign, have to deal with the constant threat of imported cases of the disease, emphasising the need to revisit the strategies on which contemporary elimination programmes are based. To eliminate malaria, programmes need to concentrate on identification and elimination of foci of infections through both passive and active methods of case detection. This approach needs appropriate treatment of both clinical cases and asymptomatic infections, combined with targeted vector control. Draining of infectious pools entirely will not be sufficient since they could be replenished by imported malaria. Elimination will thus additionally need identification and treatment of incoming infections before they lead to transmission, or, more realistically, embarking on regional initiatives to dry up importation at its source. PMID:21035841

  7. Bubble Eliminator Based on Centrifugal Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Lee, Wenshan

    2004-01-01

    The fluid bubble eliminator (FBE) is a device that removes gas bubbles from a flowing liquid. The FBE contains no moving parts and does not require any power input beyond that needed to pump the liquid. In the FBE, the buoyant force for separating the gas from the liquid is provided by a radial pressure gradient associated with a centrifugal flow of the liquid and any entrained bubbles. A device based on a similar principle is described in Centrifugal Adsorption Cartridge System (MSC- 22863), which appears on page 48 of this issue. The FBE was originally intended for use in filtering bubbles out of a liquid flowing relatively slowly in a bioreactor system in microgravity. Versions that operate in normal Earth gravitation at greater flow speeds may also be feasible. The FBE (see figure) is constructed as a cartridge that includes two concentric cylinders with flanges at the ends. The outer cylinder is an impermeable housing; the inner cylinder comprises a gas-permeable, liquid-impermeable membrane covering a perforated inner tube. Multiple spiral disks that collectively constitute a spiral ramp are mounted in the space between the inner and outer cylinders. The liquid enters the FBE through an end flange, flows in the annular space between the cylinders, and leaves through the opposite end flange. The spiral disks channel the liquid into a spiral flow, the circumferential component of which gives rise to the desired centrifugal effect. The resulting radial pressure gradient forces the bubbles radially inward; that is, toward the inner cylinder. At the inner cylinder, the gas-permeable, liquid-impermeable membrane allows the bubbles to enter the perforated inner tube while keeping the liquid in the space between the inner and outer cylinders. The gas thus collected can be vented via an endflange connection to the inner tube. The centripetal acceleration (and thus the radial pressure gradient) is approximately proportional to the square of the flow speed and

  8. Variable-capacitance tachometer eliminates troublesome magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Dual variable-capacitance tachometer measures angular speed and sense of rotation without magnetic components. Thus it eliminates magnetic flux interference with associated instrumentation in an electromechanical system.

  9. Par Pond vegetation status Summer 1995 -- June survey descriptive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Riley, R.S.

    1995-06-01

    The water level of Par Pond was lowered approximately 20 feet in mid-1991 in order to protect downstream residents from possible dam failure suggested by subsidence on the downstream slope of the dam and to repair the dam. This lowering exposed both emergent and nonemergent macrophyte beds to drying conditions resulting in extensive losses. A survey of the shoreline aquatic plant communities in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet above mean sea level, indicated that much of the original plant communities and the intermediate shoreline communities present on the exposed sediments have been lost. The extensive old-field and emergent marsh communities that were present on the exposed shoreline during the drawdown have been flooded and much of the pre-drawdown Par Pond aquatic plant communities have not had sufficient time for re-establishment. The shoreline does, however, have extensive beds of maidencane which extend from the shoreline margin to areas as deep as 2 and perhaps 3 meters. Scattered individual plants of lotus and watershield are common and may indicate likely directions of future wetland development in Par Pond. In addition, within isolated coves, which apparently received ground water seepage and/or stream surface flows during the period of the Par Pond draw down, extensive beds of waterlilies and spike rush are common. Invasion of willow and red maple occurred along the lake shoreline as well. Although not absent from this survey, evidence of the extensive redevelopment of the large cattail and eel grass beds was not observed in this first survey of Par Pond. Future surveys during the growing seasons of 1995, 1996, and 1997 along with the evaluation of satellite date to map the areal extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond are planned.

  10. Pars Planitis: Epidemiology, Clinical Characteristics, Management and Visual Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Ozdal, Pinar Cakar; Berker, Nilufer; Tugal-Tutkun, Ilknur

    2015-01-01

    Pars planitis is an idiopathic chronic intermediate uveitis which predominantly affects children and adolescents, and accounts for 5-26.7% of pediatric uveitis. Although an autoimmune process with a genetic predisposition has been suggested, its etiology still remains unknown. The most common presenting symptoms are floaters and blurred vision. Diffuse vitreous cells, haze, snowballs and snowbanks are typical findings of pars planitis. Peripheral retinal vasculitis, optic disc edema and anterior segment inflammation are other well-known findings. Although pars planitis is known to be a benign form of uveitis in most cases, it may become a potentially blinding disease due to complications including cataract, cystoid macular edema, vitreous opacities and optic disc edema. Cystoid macular edema is the most common cause of visual morbidity. Band keratopathy, epiretinal membrane formation, vitreous condensation, neovascularizations, vitreous hemorrhage, retinal detachment, cyclitic membranes, glaucoma and amblyopia may develop as a consequence of the chronic course of the disease. Exclusion of infectious and non-infectious causes which may present with intermediate uveitis is of utmost importance before starting treatment. Treatment of pars planitis has been a controversial issue. There is no consensus specifically for treatment of cases with minimal inflammation and relatively good visual acuity. However, current experience shows that pars planitis may cause severe inflammation and needs an aggressive treatment. A stepladder approach including corticosteroids, immunosupressive agents, anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha and pars plana vitrectomy and/or laser photocoagulation is the most commonly used method for treatment of pars planitis. Adequate control of inflammation and prompt detection of associated complications are crucial in order to improve the overall prognosis of the disease. PMID:27051493

  11. Combined pars plana vitrectomy-scleral buckle versus pars plana vitrectomy for proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Lai, Frank H P; Lo, Ernie C F; Chan, Vesta C K; Brelen, Mårten; Lo, Wai Ling; Young, Alvin L

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the surgical outcomes of combined pars plana vitrectomy-scleral buckle (PPV-SB) versus pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment complicated with proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). One thousand one hundred and seventy four patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment surgery between January 2002 and December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with grade C PVR treated with either combined PPV-SB or PPV alone were included in the study. Study outcomes included single surgery anatomic success rate and postoperative visual outcome at 12 months postoperatively. Seventy-seven patients with grade C PVR were identified for analysis. At the end of 12-month follow-up, 80.5 % eyes (33/41) in the PPV-SB group and 58.3 % eyes (21/36) in the PPV group achieved single surgery anatomical success. In a multiple logistic regression model, none of the baseline variables (age, gender, macula status, grade of PVR, extent of detachment, presence of vitreous hemorrhage, lens status, status of high myopia) nor types of retinal detachment surgery (use of scleral buckle, barrier endolaser, 360 degree endolaser, cryopexy, retinectomy, tamponade agent, phacoemulsification) had significant effect on single surgery anatomical success. The post-treatment mean logMAR visual acuity of the PPV-SB group was 1.58 ± 0.58 and the PPV group was 1.57 ± 0.61. There was no significant difference in the postoperative visual acuity between the two groups (P = 0.849). For patients with grade C PVR, PPV-SB did not demonstrate a superiority over PPV alone in achieving single surgery anatomical success. PMID:26260357

  12. Gains and Pitfalls of Quantifier Elimination as a Teaching Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oldenburg, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Quantifier Elimination is a procedure that allows simplification of logical formulas that contain quantifiers. Many mathematical concepts are defined in terms of quantifiers and especially in calculus their use has been identified as an obstacle in the learning process. The automatic deduction provided by quantifier elimination thus allows…

  13. 10 CFR 52.8 - Combining licenses; elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. 52.8... NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.8 Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. (a) An applicant for a license under this part may combine in its application several applications for...

  14. Industrial solution contaminated by polyacrylates: their elimination by electrochemical combustion.

    PubMed

    Masci, M; Chiti, L; De Lorenzo, A; Mantione, D; De Battisti, A; Vatistas, N

    2001-01-01

    The electrochemical combustion of polyacrylates was studied through both direct and indirect oxidation. The obtained results indicate the non elimination of the polyacrylates with the direct oxidation, while the indirect oxidation with NaCl completely eliminates these organic compounds. In the last case the effects of different initial concentrations of NaCl, anode materials and current densities was studied. PMID:11381543

  15. 10 CFR 63.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 63.23 Section 63.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses License Application § 63.23 Elimination of repetition. In...

  16. 10 CFR 63.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 63.23 Section 63.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses License Application § 63.23 Elimination of repetition. In...

  17. 10 CFR 63.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 63.23 Section 63.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses License Application § 63.23 Elimination of repetition. In...

  18. 10 CFR 63.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 63.23 Section 63.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses License Application § 63.23 Elimination of repetition. In...

  19. 10 CFR 63.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 63.23 Section 63.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses License Application § 63.23 Elimination of repetition. In...

  20. 36 CFR 293.5 - Establishment, modification, or elimination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.5 Establishment, modification, or elimination. National Forest Wilderness will be established, modified, or eliminated in accordance with the provisions of sections 3(b), (d), and (e) of the Wilderness Act. The Chief, Forest Service, shall arrange for issuing...

  1. 36 CFR 293.5 - Establishment, modification, or elimination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.5 Establishment, modification, or elimination. National Forest Wilderness will be established, modified, or eliminated in accordance with the provisions of sections 3(b), (d), and (e) of the Wilderness Act. The Chief, Forest Service, shall arrange for issuing...

  2. 36 CFR 293.5 - Establishment, modification, or elimination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.5 Establishment, modification, or elimination. National Forest Wilderness will be established, modified, or eliminated in accordance with the provisions of sections 3(b), (d), and (e) of the Wilderness Act. The Chief, Forest Service, shall arrange for issuing...

  3. 36 CFR 293.5 - Establishment, modification, or elimination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.5 Establishment, modification, or elimination. National Forest Wilderness will be established, modified, or eliminated in accordance with the provisions of sections 3(b), (d), and (e) of the Wilderness Act. The Chief, Forest Service, shall arrange for issuing...

  4. 36 CFR 293.5 - Establishment, modification, or elimination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.5 Establishment, modification, or elimination. National Forest Wilderness will be established, modified, or eliminated in accordance with the provisions of sections 3(b), (d), and (e) of the Wilderness Act. The Chief, Forest Service, shall arrange for issuing...

  5. Making Career Decisions--A Sequential Elimination Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gati, Itamar

    1986-01-01

    Presents a model for career decision making based on the sequential elimination of occupational alternatives, an adaptation for career decisions of Tversky's (1972) elimination-by-aspects theory of choice. The expected utility approach is reviewed as a representative compensatory model for career decisions. Advantages, disadvantages, and…

  6. 29 CFR 452.61 - Elimination contests-local unions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... procedure in a local under which nominees compete in an elimination process to reduce the number of candidates in the final balloting is also part of the election process and must be conducted by secret ballot. (b) When such an elimination process is used it would be unreasonable for some nominees, such...

  7. 10 CFR 60.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 60.23 Section 60.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Licenses License Applications § 60.23 Elimination of repetition. In its application,...

  8. 10 CFR 60.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 60.23 Section 60.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Licenses License Applications § 60.23 Elimination of repetition. In its application,...

  9. 10 CFR 60.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 60.23 Section 60.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Licenses License Applications § 60.23 Elimination of repetition. In its application,...

  10. 10 CFR 60.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 60.23 Section 60.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Licenses License Applications § 60.23 Elimination of repetition. In its application,...

  11. 10 CFR 60.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 60.23 Section 60.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Licenses License Applications § 60.23 Elimination of repetition. In its application,...

  12. 10 CFR 52.8 - Combining licenses; elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. 52.8 Section 52.8 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.8 Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. (a)...

  13. 10 CFR 52.8 - Combining licenses; elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. 52.8 Section 52.8 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.8 Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. (a)...

  14. 10 CFR 52.8 - Combining licenses; elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. 52.8 Section 52.8 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.8 Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. (a)...

  15. 10 CFR 52.8 - Combining licenses; elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. 52.8 Section 52.8 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.8 Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. (a)...

  16. 3 CFR - Implementing the Prison Rape Elimination Act

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Implementing the Prison Rape Elimination Act Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of May 17, 2012 Implementing the Prison Rape... victim, is an assault on human dignity and an affront to American values. The Prison Rape Elimination...

  17. Par Pond vegetation status Summer 1995 -- September survey descriptive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Riley, R.S.

    1995-09-01

    The water level of Par Pond was lowered approximately 20 feet in mid-1991 in order to protect downstream residents from possible dam failure suggested by subsidence on the downstream slope of the dam and to repair the dam. This lowering exposed both emergent and nonemergent macrophyte beds to drying conditions resulting in extensive losses. A survey of the emergent shoreline aquatic plant communities began in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet above mean sea level and continued with this mid-September survey. Communities similar to the pre-drawdown Par Pond aquatic plant communities are becoming re-established; especially, beds of maidencane, lotus, waterlily, and watershield are now extensive and well established. Cattail occurrence continues to increase, but large beds common to Par Pond prior to the drawdown have not formed. Future surveys during the late growing seasons of 1995, and throughout 1996 and 1997, along with the evaluation of satellite data to map the areal extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond, are planned.

  18. Par Pond vegetation status Summer 1995 -- October survey descriptive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Riley, R.S.

    1995-11-01

    The water level of Par Pond was lowered approximately 20 feet in mid-1991 in order to protect downstream residents from possible dam failure suggested by subsidence on the downstream slope of the dam and to repair the dam. This lowering exposed both emergent and nonemergent macrophyte beds to drying conditions resulting in extensive losses. A survey of the emergent shoreline aquatic plant communities began in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet above mean sea level and continued with this late October survey. Communities similar to the pre-drawdown Par Pond aquatic plant communities are becoming re-established; especially, beds of maiden cane, lotus, waterlily, and watershield are now extensive and well established. Cattail occurrence continues to increase, but large beds common to Par Pond prior to the drawdown have not formed. Future surveys throughout 1996 and 1997, along with the continued evaluation of satellite data to map the areal extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond, are planned.

  19. Implementation of steady state approximation for modelling of reaction kinetic of UV catalysed hydrogen peroxide oxidation of starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumoro, Andri Cahyo; Retnowati, Diah Susetyo; Ratnawati, Budiyati, Catarina Sri

    2015-12-01

    With regard to its low viscosity, high stability, clarity, film forming and binding properties, oxidised starch has been widely used in various applications specifically in the food, paper, textile, laundry finishing and binding materials industries. A number of methods have been used to produce oxidised starch through reactions with various oxidizing agents, such as hydrogen peroxide, air oxygen, ozone, bromine, chromic acid, permanganate, nitrogen dioxide and hypochlorite. Unfortunately, most of previous works reported in the literatures were focused on the study of reaction mechanism and physicochemical properties characterization of the oxidised starches produced without investigation of the reaction kinetics of the oxidation process. This work aimed to develop a simple kinetic model for UV catalysed hydrogen peroxide oxidation of starch through implementation of steady state approximation for the radical reaction rates. The model was then verified using experimental data available in the literature. The model verification revealed that the proposed model shows its good agreement with the experimental data as indicated by an average absolute relative error of only 2.45%. The model also confirmed that carboxyl groups are oxidised further by hydroxyl radical. The carbonyl production rate was found to follow first order reaction with respect to carbonyl concentration. Similarly, carboxyl production rate also followed first order reaction with respect to carbonyl concentration. The apparent reaction rate constant for carbonyl formation and oxidation were 6.24 × 104 s-1 and 1.01 × 104 M-1.s-1, respectively. While apparent reaction rate constant for carboxyl oxidation was 4.86 × 104 M-1.s-1.

  20. Enzyme-catalysed [4+2] cycloaddition is a key step in the biosynthesis of spinosyn A.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak Joong; Ruszczycky, Mark W; Choi, Sei-hyun; Liu, Yung-nan; Liu, Hung-wen

    2011-05-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction is a [4+2] cycloaddition reaction in which a cyclohexene ring is formed between a 1,3-diene and an electron-deficient alkene via a single pericyclic transition state. This reaction has been proposed as a key transformation in the biosynthesis of many cyclohexene-containing secondary metabolites. However, only four purified enzymes have thus far been implicated in biotransformations that are consistent with a Diels-Alder reaction, namely solanapyrone synthase, LovB, macrophomate synthase, and riboflavin synthase. Although the stereochemical outcomes of these reactions indicate that the product formation could be enzyme-guided in each case, these enzymes typically demonstrate more than one catalytic activity, leaving their specific influence on the cycloaddition step uncertain. In our studies of the biosynthesis of spinosyn A, a tetracyclic polyketide-derived insecticide from Saccharopolyspora spinosa, we identified a cyclase, SpnF, that catalyses a transannular [4+2] cycloaddition to form the cyclohexene ring in spinosyn A. Kinetic analysis demonstrates that SpnF specifically accelerates the ring formation reaction with an estimated 500-fold rate enhancement. A second enzyme, SpnL, was also identified as responsible for the final cross-bridging step that completes the tetracyclic core of spinosyn A in a manner consistent with a Rauhut-Currier reaction. This work is significant because SpnF represents the first example characterized in vitro of a stand-alone enzyme solely committed to the catalysis of a [4+2] cycloaddition reaction. In addition, the mode of formation of the complex perhydro-as-indacene moiety in spinosyn A is now fully established. PMID:21544146

  1. Hierarchically structured meso-macroporous aluminosilicates with high tetrahedral aluminium content in acid catalysed esterification of fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Arnaud; Wang, Quan-Yi; Wei, Yingxu; Liu, Zhongmin; Su, Bao-Lian

    2011-11-15

    A simple synthesis pathway has been developed for the design of hierarchically structured spongy or spherical voids assembled meso-macroporous aluminosilicates with high tetrahedral aluminium content on the basis of the aqueous polymerisation of new stabilized alkoxy-bridged single molecular precursors. The intimate mixing of an aluminosilicate ester (sec-BuO)(2)-Al-O-Si(OEt)(3) and a silica co-reactant (tetramethoxysilane, TMOS) with variable ratios and the use of alkaline solutions (pH 13.0 and 13.5) improve significantly the heterocondensation rates between the highly reactive aluminium alkoxide part of the single precursor and added silica co-reactant, leading to aluminosilicate materials with high intra-framework aluminium content and low Si/Al ratios. The spherically-shaped meso-macroporosity was spontaneously generated by the release of high amount of liquid by-products (water/alcohol molecules) produced during the rapid hydrolysis and condensation processes of this double alkoxide and the TMOS co-reactant. It has been observed that both pH value and Al-Si/TMOS molar ratio can strongly affect the macroporous structure formation. Increasing pH value, even slightly from 13 to 13.5, can significantly favour the incorporation of Al atoms in tetrahedral position of the framework. After the total ionic exchange of Na(+) compensating cations, catalytic tests of obtained materials were realised in the esterification reaction of high free fatty acid (FFA) oils, showing their higher catalytic activity compared to commercial Bentonite clay, and their potential applications as catalyst supports in acid catalysed reactions. PMID:21875708

  2. The Oxidative State of LDL is the Major Determinant of Anti/Prooxidant Effect of Coffee on Cu Catalysed Peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Carru, Ciriaco; Pasciu, Valeria; Sotgia, Salvatore; Zinellu, Angelo; Nicoli, Maria Cristina; Deiana, Luca; Tadolini, Bruna; Sanna, Bastiano; Masala, Bruno; Pintus, Gianfranco

    2011-01-01

    Antioxidants exert contrasting effect on low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation catalysed by metals, acting as pro-oxidants under select in vitro conditions. Through our study on the effect of coffee on LDL oxidation, we identified the parameters governing this phenomenon, contributing to the comprehension of its mechanism and discovering significant implications for correct alimentary recommendations. By measuring conjugated diene formation, we have analysed the quantitative and qualitative effects exerted by an extract of roasted coffee on LDL oxidation triggered by copper sulphate. When the relative effects of different coffee concentrations were plotted against the lag time (LT) of control LDL (C-LDL), the apparently random experimental data arranged in sensible patterns: by increasing the LT the antioxidant activity of coffee decreased progressively to become prooxidant. The critical LT, at which coffee switches from antioxidant to prooxidant, increased by increasing coffee concentration. Also the contrasting results obtained following a delayed addition of coffee to the assay, arranged in a simple pattern when referred to the LT of C-LDL: the prooxidant effect decreased to become antioxidant as the LT of C-LDL increased. The dependence of coffee effect on the LT of C-LDL was influenced by LDL but not by metal catalyst concentration. These novel findings point to the oxidative state of LDL as a major parameter controlling the anti/prooxidant effect of coffee and suggest the LT of C-LDL as a potent analytical tool to express experimental data when studying the action exerted by a compound on LDL oxidation. PMID:21633665

  3. Protein C-Mannosylation Is Enzyme-catalysed and Uses Dolichyl-Phosphate-Mannose as a Precursor

    PubMed Central

    Doucey, Marie-Agnès; Hess, Daniel; Cacan, René; Hofsteenge, Jan

    1998-01-01

    C-mannosylation of Trp-7 in human ribonuclease 2 (RNase 2) is a novel kind of protein glycosylation that differs fundamentally from N- and O-glycosylation in the protein-sugar linkage. Previously, we established that the specificity determinant of the acceptor substrate (RNase 2) consists of the sequence W-x-x-W, where the first Trp becomes C-mannosylated. Here we investigated the reaction with respect to the mannosyl donor and the involvement of a glycosyltransferase. C-mannosylation of Trp-7 was reduced 10-fold in CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) Lec15 cells, which are deficient in dolichyl-phosphate-mannose (Dol-P-Man) synthase activity, compared with wild-type cells. This was not a result of a decrease in C-mannosyltransferase activity. Rat liver microsomes were used to C-mannosylate the N-terminal dodecapeptide from RNase 2 in vitro, with Dol-P-Man as the donor. This microsomal transferase activity was destroyed by heat and protease treatment, and displayed the same acceptor substrate specificity as the in vivo reaction studied previously. The C-C linkage between the indole and the mannosyl moiety was demonstrated by tandem electrospray mass spectrometry analysis of the product. GDP-Man, in the presence of Dol-P, functioned as a precursor in vitro with membranes from wild-type but not CHO Lec15 cells. In contrast, with Dol-P-Man both membrane preparations were equally active. It is concluded that a microsomal transferase catalyses C-mannosylation of Trp-7, and that the minimal biosynthetic pathway can be defined as: Man –> –> GDP-Man –> Dol-P-Man –> (C2-Man-)Trp. PMID:9450955

  4. Catalytic and substrate promiscuity: distinct multiple chemistries catalysed by the phosphatase domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bharath; Marks, Hanna; Mitra, Sreyoshi; Smalley, David M; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-07-15

    The presence of latent activities in enzymes is posited to underlie the natural evolution of new catalytic functions. However, the prevalence and extent of such substrate and catalytic ambiguity in evolved enzymes is difficult to address experimentally given the order-of-magnitude difference in the activities for native and, sometimes, promiscuous substrate/s. Further, such latent functions are of special interest when the activities concerned do not fall into the domain of substrate promiscuity. In the present study, we show a special case of such latent enzyme activity by demonstrating the presence of two mechanistically distinct reactions catalysed by the catalytic domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase isoform δ (PTPRδ). The primary catalytic activity involves the hydrolysis of a phosphomonoester bond (C─O─P) with high catalytic efficiency, whereas the secondary activity is the hydrolysis of a glycosidic bond (C─O─C) with poorer catalytic efficiency. This enzyme also displays substrate promiscuity by hydrolysing diester bonds while being highly discriminative for its monoester substrates. To confirm these activities, we also demonstrated their presence on the catalytic domain of protein tyrosine phosphatase Ω (PTPRΩ), a homologue of PTPRδ. Studies on the rate, metal-ion dependence, pH dependence and inhibition of the respective activities showed that they are markedly different. This is the first study that demonstrates a novel sugar hydrolase and diesterase activity for the phosphatase domain (PD) of PTPRδ and PTPRΩ. This work has significant implications for both understanding the evolution of enzymatic activity and the possible physiological role of this new chemistry. Our findings suggest that the genome might harbour a wealth of such alternative latent enzyme activities in the same protein domain that renders our knowledge of metabolic networks incomplete. PMID:27208174

  5. PAR-1 phosphorylates Mind bomb to promote vertebrate neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ossipova, Olga; Ezan, Jerome; Sokol, Sergei Y.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Generation of neurons in the vertebrate central nervous system requires complex transcriptional regulatory network and signaling processes in polarized neuroepithelial progenitor cells. Here we demonstrate that neurogenesis in the Xenopus neural plate in vivo and mammalian neural progenitors in vitro involves intrinsic antagonistic activities of the polarity proteins PAR-1 and aPKC. Furthermore, we show that Mind bomb (Mib), a ubiquitin ligase that promotes Notch ligand trafficking and activity, is a crucial molecular substrate for PAR-1. The phosphorylation of Mib by PAR-1 results in Mib degradation, repression of Notch signaling and stimulation of neuronal differentiation. These observations suggest a conserved mechanism for neuronal fate determination that might operate during asymmetric divisions of polarized neural progenitor cells. PMID:19686683

  6. Bacterial actin: architecture of the ParMRC plasmid DNA partitioning complex.

    PubMed

    Salje, Jeanne; Löwe, Jan

    2008-08-20

    The R1 plasmid employs ATP-driven polymerisation of the actin-like protein ParM to move newly replicated DNA to opposite poles of a bacterial cell. This process is essential for ensuring accurate segregation of the low-copy number plasmid and is the best characterised example of DNA partitioning in prokaryotes. In vivo, ParM only forms long filaments when capped at both ends by attachment to a centromere-like region parC, through a small DNA-binding protein ParR. Here, we present biochemical and electron microscopy data leading to a model for the mechanism by which ParR-parC complexes bind and stabilise elongating ParM filaments. We propose that the open ring formed by oligomeric ParR dimers with parC DNA wrapped around acts as a rigid clamp, which holds the end of elongating ParM filaments while allowing entry of new ATP-bound monomers. We propose a processive mechanism by which cycles of ATP hydrolysis in polymerising ParM drives movement of ParR-bound parC DNA. Importantly, our model predicts that each pair of plasmids will be driven apart in the cell by just a single double helical ParM filament. PMID:18650930

  7. [Synapse elimination and functional neural circuit formation in the cerebellum].

    PubMed

    Kano, Masanobu

    2013-06-01

    Neuronal connections are initially redundant, but unnecessary connections are eliminated subsequently during postnatal development. This process, known as 'synapse elimination', is thought to be crucial for establishing functionally mature neural circuits. The climbing fiber (CF) to the Purkinje cell (PC) synapse in the cerebellum is a representative model of synapse elimination. We disclose that one-to-one connection from CF to PC is established through four distinct phases: (1) strengthening of a single CF among multiple CFs in each PC at P3-P7, (2) translocation of a single strengthened CF to PC dendrites from around P9, and (3) early phase (P7 to around P11) and (4) late phase (around P12 to P17) of elimination of weak CF synapses from PC somata. Mice with PC-selective deletion of P/Q-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel (VDCC) exhibit severe defects in strengthening of single CFs, dendritic translocation of single CFs and CF elimination from P7. In contrast, mice with a mutation of a single allele for the GABA-synthesizing enzyme GAD67 have a selective impairment of CF elimination from P10 due to reduced inhibition and elevated Ca2+ influx to PC somata. Thus, regulation of Ca2+ influx to PCs is crucial for the four phases of CF synapse elimination. PMID:25069248

  8. Intestinal elimination of sparfloxacin, fleroxacin, and ciprofloxacin in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, E; Dautrey, S; Farinoti, R; St Julien, L; Ramon, J; Carbon, C

    1995-01-01

    The intestinal transepithelial elimination of sparfloxacin and fleroxacin was compared with that of ciprofloxacin in a rat model following a single parenteral administration of 25 mg of each of the antibiotics per kg of body weight. All three fluoroquinolones were eliminated through the small intestine. Ciprofloxacin was eliminated in the proximal jejunum at a rate of 1.97 +/- 0.70 micrograms/cm2, while the elimination rates of fleroxacin and sparfloxacin were 0.64 +/- 026 and 0.21 +/- 0.10 micrograms/cm2, respectively, over a 90-min collection period. In the ileum, the elimination rates of ciprofloxacin, fleroxacin, and sparfloxacin over the same period were 1.44 +/- 0.77, 1.00 +/- 0.33, and 0.41 +/- 0.26 micrograms/mc2, respectively. These data suggest that these fluoroquinolones undergo a transepithelial elimination process in the small intestine. This route of elimination may be important in the therapy of bacterial diarrhea. PMID:7695338

  9. Time to set the agenda for schistosomiasis elimination.

    PubMed

    Rollinson, David; Knopp, Stefanie; Levitz, Sarah; Stothard, J Russell; Tchuem Tchuenté, Louis-Albert; Garba, Amadou; Mohammed, Khalfan A; Schur, Nadine; Person, Bobbie; Colley, Daniel G; Utzinger, Jürg

    2013-11-01

    It is time to raise global awareness to the possibility of schistosomiasis elimination and to support endemic countries in their quest to determine the most appropriate approaches to eliminate this persistent and debilitating disease. The main interventions for schistosomiasis control are reviewed, including preventive chemotherapy using praziquantel, snail control, sanitation, safe water supplies, and behaviour change strategies supported by information, education and communication (IEC) materials. Differences in the biology and transmission of the three main Schistosoma species (i.e. Schistosoma haematobium, S. mansoni and S. japonicum), which impact on control interventions, are considered. Sensitive diagnostic procedures to ensure adequate surveillance in areas attaining low endemicity are required. The importance of capacity building is highlighted. To achieve elimination, an intersectoral approach is necessary, with advocacy and action from local communities and the health community to foster cooperative ventures with engineers, the private sector, governments and non-governmental organizations specialized in water supply and sanitation. Examples of successful schistosomiasis control programmes are reviewed to highlight what has been learnt in terms of strategy for control and elimination. These include St. Lucia and other Caribbean islands, Brazil and Venezuela for S. mansoni; Saudi Arabia and Egypt for both S. mansoni and S. haematobium; Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria, Mauritius and the Islamic Republic of Iran for S. haematobium; Japan and the People's Republic of China for S. japonicum. Additional targets for elimination or even eradication could be the two minor human schistosome species S. guineenisis and S. intercalatum, which have a restricted distribution in West and Central Africa. The examples show that elimination of schistosomiasis is an achievable and desirable goal requiring full integration of preventive chemotherapy with the tools of transmission

  10. La projection par plasma : une revue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchais, P.; Grimaud, A.; Vardelle, A.; Vardelle, M.

    are presented in the fields of aeronautics and mechanics. La qualité d'un dépôt projete par plasma dépend de nombreux paramètres que l'on commence à mieux appréhender du fait des progrès de la modélisation et de la métrologie tant des écoulements plasmas que des transferts plasma-particules ou que des conditions d'écrasement et de refroidissement des particules lors de leur impact sur le substrat ou les couches déjà déposées. Les techniques de mesure utilisdes et leurs limitations sont d'abord rappelées tant pour les jets de plasma que pour les particules en vol et l'importance des différents phénomènes intervenant dans les transferts plasma-particules est soulignée : gradients de température et de concentration d'espèces chimiques très élevés autour des particules, effets de propagation de la chaleur, notamment pour les particules céramiques, effet d'évaporation, effet de raréfaction sensible dès la pression atmosphérique. Les problèmes de distribution de taille et de vitesse d'injection des particules sont également abordés car ils conditionnent les distributions de trajectoires et donc le traitement des particules dans le jet de plasma. La génération du plasma montre d'une part 1'influence considérable de l'injection du gaz, de sa nature, du dessin de la chambre d'arc et de la tuyère ainsi que du pompage de l'air ambiant sur la longueur des jets de plasma d'arc et d'autre part les problèmes d'injection pour éviter le couplage avec la décharge dans les jets de plasmas R.E Tout ceci est illustré avec des exemples de dépôt d'alumine, de zircone, de cermet carbure et de nickel. L'écrasement des particules est ensuite abordé avec les problèmes de réactions chimiques, de trempe ultra-rapide et donc de structure cristalline des dépôts, d'adhdsion mais aussi de containtes résiduelles et de leur contrôle via les gradients de température dans les dépôts pendant le tir. Enfin quelques applications actuelles sont pr

  11. Cutaneous tuberculosis with a difference: Documenting transfollicular elimination of granulomas.

    PubMed

    Desai, Chirag A; Khopkar, Uday

    2016-01-01

    A patient presented with a an asymptomatic brown to erythematous, scaly indurated solitary plaque on his elbow. The lesion was diagnosed as lupus vulgaris on the basis of clinical features and biopsy findings. The histopathology further revealed a granuloma within the follicular infundibulum, which was possibly being expelled out. The phenomenon of transepidermal elimination has been described previously in many conditions, including cutaneous tuberculosis; however, transfollicular elimination of the granuloma has not been reported. We report this unusual phenomenon as a possible mode of elimination of the granuloma. PMID:27559508

  12. Cutaneous tuberculosis with a difference: Documenting transfollicular elimination of granulomas

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Chirag A.; Khopkar, Uday

    2016-01-01

    A patient presented with a an asymptomatic brown to erythematous, scaly indurated solitary plaque on his elbow. The lesion was diagnosed as lupus vulgaris on the basis of clinical features and biopsy findings. The histopathology further revealed a granuloma within the follicular infundibulum, which was possibly being expelled out. The phenomenon of transepidermal elimination has been described previously in many conditions, including cutaneous tuberculosis; however, transfollicular elimination of the granuloma has not been reported. We report this unusual phenomenon as a possible mode of elimination of the granuloma. PMID:27559508

  13. Do Protozoa Control the Elimination of Vibrio choleraein Brackish Water?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Pérez, María Elena; Macek, Miroslav; Castro Galván, María Teresa

    2004-05-01

    Elimination of inoculated Vibrio cholerae (107 cells ml-1) within a brackish water bacteria assemblage (Mecoacán Lagoon, State of Tabasco, Mexico) was studied in laboratory microcosms with filtration-fractionated water. Feeding of a ciliate, Cyclidium glaucoma was evaluated using fluorescently labelled V. cholerae o1. Even though V. cholerae was not exploited as the major food source, ciliates were able to eliminate it efficiently. An addition of chitin directly supported the growth of bacteria, although not so much of V. cholerae, and indirectly the growth of the protistan assemblage. Generally, the changes in a bacterial assemblage structure were the most important in V. cholerae elimination.

  14. Catalysis in the Service of Green Chemistry: Nobel Prize-Winning Palladium-Catalysed Cross-Couplings, Run in Water at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Lipshutz, Bruce H.; Taft, Benjamin R.; Abela, Alexander R.; Ghorai, Subir; Krasovskiy, Arkady; Duplais, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Palladium-catalysed cross-couplings, in particular Heck, Suzuki-Miyaura and Negishi reactions developed over three decades ago, are routinely carried out in organic solvents. However, alternative media are currently of considerable interest given an increasing emphasis on making organic processes ‘greener’; for example, by minimising organic waste in the form of organic solvents. Water is the obvious leading candidate in this regard. Hence, this review focuses on the application of micellar catalysis, in which a ‘designer’ surfactant enables these award-winning coupling reactions to be run in water at room temperature. PMID:23555153

  15. The copper-catalysed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of alkylboron reagents: disproportionation of anionic (alkyl)(alkoxy)borates to anionic dialkylborates prior to transmetalation.

    PubMed

    Basnet, Prakash; Thapa, Surendra; Dickie, Diane A; Giri, Ramesh

    2016-09-25

    We report the first example of Cu(I)-catalysed coupling of alkylboron reagents with aryl and heteroaryl iodides that affords products in good to excellent yields. Preliminary mechanistic studies with alkylborates indicate that the anionic (alkoxy)(alkyl)borates, generated from alkyllithium and alkoxyboron reagents, undergo disproportionation to anionic dialkylborates and that both anionic alkylborates are active for transmetalation to a Cu(I)-catalyst. Results from a radical clock experiment and the Hammett plot imply that the reaction likely proceeds via a non-radical pathway. PMID:27540605

  16. Enzyme-substrate complementarity governs access to a cationic reaction manifold in the P450(BM3)-catalysed oxidation of cyclopropyl fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Cryle, Max J; Hayes, Patricia Y; De Voss, James J

    2012-12-01

    The products of cytochrome P450(BM3)-catalysed oxidation of cyclopropyl-containing dodecanoic acids are consistent with the presence of a cationic reaction intermediate, which results in efficient dehydrogenation of the rearranged probes by the enzyme. These results highlight the importance of enzyme-substrate complementarity, with a cationic intermediate occurring only when the probes used begin to diverge from ideal substrates for this enzyme. This also aids in reconciling literature reports supporting the presence of cationic intermediates with certain cytochrome P450 enzyme/substrate pairs. PMID:23109039

  17. NMR studies on mechanism of isomerisation of fructose 6-phosphate to glucose 6-phosphate catalysed by phosphoglucose isomerase from Thermococcus kodakarensis.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Shahzada Nadeem; Mok, Kenneth Hun; Rashid, Naeem; Xie, Yongjing; Ruether, Manuel; O'Brien, John; Akhtar, Muhammad

    2016-06-01

    The fate of hydrogen atoms at C-2 of glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) and C-1 of fructose 6-phosphate (F6P) was studied in the reaction catalysed by phosphoglucose isomerase from Thermococcus kodakarensis (TkPGI) through 1D and 2D NMR methods. When the reaction was performed in (2)H2O the hydrogen atoms in the aforementioned positions were exchanged with deuterons indicating that the isomerization occurred by a cis-enediol intermediate involving C-1 pro-R hydrogen of F6P. These features are similar to those described for phosphoglucose isomerases from rabbit muscle and Pyrococcus furiosus. PMID:27014866

  18. MALLEABLE INSPECTION STATION WHERE WORKERS ELIMINATE MALFORMED CASTINGS AND SEPARATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MALLEABLE INSPECTION STATION WHERE WORKERS ELIMINATE MALFORMED CASTINGS AND SEPARATED GOOD CASTINGS PRIOR TO ANNEALING. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Malleable Annealing Building, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  19. Adhesive-backed terminal board eliminates mounting screws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Low-profile terminal board is used in dense electronic circuits where mounting and working space is limited. The board has a thin layer of pressure-sensitive adhesive backing which eliminates the need for mounting screws.

  20. Saturation current spikes eliminated in saturable core transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, F. C.

    1971-01-01

    Unsaturating composite magnetic core transformer, consisting of two separate parallel cores designed so impending core saturation causes signal generation, terminates high current spike in converter primary circuit. Simplified waveform, demonstrates transformer effectiveness in eliminating current spikes.

  1. Interference effects eliminated in random oriented space station antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reilly, R. R.

    1967-01-01

    System eliminates destructive interference effects among multiple omnidirectional or semi-omnidirctional antennas on a large space vehicle that is either spin-stabilized or randomly oriented relative to the ground station with which communication is necessary.

  2. SORPTION ON WASTEWATER SOLIDS: ELIMINATION OF BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption was found to be greatly affected by the biological activity in wastewater solids. wo experimental techniques, cyanide treatment and pasteurization, were developed for eliminating the biological activity during isotherm measurements. oth methods are effective; however, pa...

  3. Diffusion filter eliminates fringe effects of coherent laser light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsasky, M. J.

    1970-01-01

    Diffusion filter comprised of small particles in colloidal suspension reduces the coherence of a laser beam used as a photographic light source. Interference patterns which obscure details in photographic film are eliminated, the intensity and collimation are moderately affected.

  4. Elimination of spurious eigenvalues in the Chebyshev tau spectral method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfadden, G. B.; Murray, B. T.; Boisvert, R. F.

    1990-01-01

    A very simple modification is presented for the Chebyshev tau method which can eliminate spurious eigenvalues, proceeding from a consideration of the vorticity-streamfunction reformulation of the Chebyshev tau method and the Chebyshev-Galerkin method, which have no spurious modes. Consideration of a model problem indicates that these two approaches are equivalent, and that they reduce to the present modification of the tau method. This modified tau method also eliminates spurious eigenvalues from the Orr-Sommerfeld equation.

  5. PH motifs in PAR1&2 endow breast cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Kancharla, A.; Maoz, M.; Jaber, M.; Agranovich, D.; Peretz, T.; Grisaru-Granovsky, S.; Uziely, B.; Bar-Shavit, R.

    2015-01-01

    Although emerging roles of protease-activated receptor1&2 (PAR1&2) in cancer are recognized, their underlying signalling events are poorly understood. Here we show signal-binding motifs in PAR1&2 that are critical for breast cancer growth. This occurs via the association of the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain with Akt/PKB as a key signalling event of PARs. Other PH-domain signal-proteins such as Etk/Bmx and Vav3 also associate with PAR1 and PAR2 through their PH domains. PAR1 and PAR2 bind with priority to Etk/Bmx. A point mutation in PAR2, H349A, but not in R352A, abrogates PH-protein association and is sufficient to markedly reduce PAR2-instigated breast tumour growth in vivo and placental extravillous trophoblast (EVT) invasion in vitro. Similarly, the PAR1 mutant hPar1-7A, which is unable to bind the PH domain, reduces mammary tumours and EVT invasion, endowing these motifs with physiological significance and underscoring the importance of these previously unknown PAR1 and PAR2 PH-domain-binding motifs in both pathological and physiological invasion processes. PMID:26600192

  6. PH motifs in PAR1&2 endow breast cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Kancharla, A; Maoz, M; Jaber, M; Agranovich, D; Peretz, T; Grisaru-Granovsky, S; Uziely, B; Bar-Shavit, R

    2015-01-01

    Although emerging roles of protease-activated receptor1&2 (PAR1&2) in cancer are recognized, their underlying signalling events are poorly understood. Here we show signal-binding motifs in PAR1&2 that are critical for breast cancer growth. This occurs via the association of the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain with Akt/PKB as a key signalling event of PARs. Other PH-domain signal-proteins such as Etk/Bmx and Vav3 also associate with PAR1 and PAR2 through their PH domains. PAR1 and PAR2 bind with priority to Etk/Bmx. A point mutation in PAR2, H349A, but not in R352A, abrogates PH-protein association and is sufficient to markedly reduce PAR2-instigated breast tumour growth in vivo and placental extravillous trophoblast (EVT) invasion in vitro. Similarly, the PAR1 mutant hPar1-7A, which is unable to bind the PH domain, reduces mammary tumours and EVT invasion, endowing these motifs with physiological significance and underscoring the importance of these previously unknown PAR1 and PAR2 PH-domain-binding motifs in both pathological and physiological invasion processes. PMID:26600192

  7. Aqueous misdirection following pars plana vitrectomy and silicone oil injection

    PubMed Central

    Ghoraba, Hammouda H; Ghali, Ali Ahmed; Mansour, Hosam Othman

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report a retrospective series of seven phakic eyes of seven patients suffering from a malignant glaucoma-like syndrome following pars plana vitrectomy and silicone oil (SO) injection. Materials and methods Seven eyes with retinal detachment treated with pars plana vitrectomy with or without scleral buckling with SO tamponade. This was followed by cataract extraction to manage the elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). Results This was a retrospective review of seven cases that received pars plana vitrectomy and SO with or without scleral buckling for different causes of retinal detachment (three were rhegmatogenous and four were tractional). After a period ranging from 1 week to 1 month, they presented with malignant glaucoma-like manifestations; high IOP, shallow axial anterior chamber, and remarkable decrease of visual acuity. Atropine eye drops and anti-glaucoma medical treatment (topical and systemic) had been tried but failed to improve the condition. Dramatic decrease of IOP and deepening of the axial anterior chamber was observed in all cases in the first postoperative day after phacoemulsification and posterior chamber foldable intraocular lens implantation with posterior capsulotomy. Conclusion Aqueous misdirection syndrome may be observed following pars plana vitrectomy and SO tamponade. This must be differentiated from other causes of post vitrectomy glaucoma. Cataract extraction with posterior capsulotomy controls the condition. PMID:26056429

  8. The Pars Triangularis in Dyslexia and ADHD: A Comprehensive Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibby, Michelle Y.; Kroese, Judith M.; Krebbs, Hillery; Hill, Crystal E.; Hynd, George W.

    2009-01-01

    Limited research has been conducted on the structure of the pars triangularis (PT) in dyslexia despite functional neuroimaging research finding it may play a role in phonological processing. Furthermore, research to date has not examined PT size in ADHD even though the right inferior frontal region has been implicated in the disorder. Hence, one…

  9. Radiological impact of Par Pond drawdown from liquid effluent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, W.H.; Hamby, D.M.

    1991-10-25

    The water level of Par Pond has been lowered over the past several months to reduce the effects in the event of catastrophic dam failure while assessing the condition of the dam and determining if repairs are necessary. In lowering the level of Par Pond, 60 billion liters of water containing low levels of tritium and cesium-137 were discharged to several onsite streams. SRS surface streams flow to the Savannah River. An assessment made to determine the total amount of tritium and Cs-137 discharged and to estimate the consequences to downstream Savannah River users. It is estimated that a total of 160 curies of tritium were displaced from Par Pond to the Savannah River between June 28, 1991 and September 19, 1991. This release could hypothetically result in a maximum individual dose of 3. 2{times}10{sup {minus}4} mrem and a total (80-km and drinking water populations) population dose of 1.4{times}10{sup {minus}2} person-rem. Likewise, a maximum individual dose of 5.0{times}10{sup {minus}2} mrem and a total population dose of 1.7{times}10{sup {minus}1} person- rem are predicted as a result of an estimated 0.21 curies of Cs-137 being discharged from Par Pond to the Savannah River.

  10. Par Pond vegetation status summer 1995 - July survey descriptive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Riley, R.S.

    1995-07-01

    A survey of the emergent shoreline aquatic plant, communities began in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet (61 meters) above mean sea level, and continued with this July survey. Aquatic plant communities, similar to the pre-drawdown Par Pond communities, are becoming reestablished. Beds of maidencane (Panicum hemitomon), lotus (Nelumbo lutea), water lily (Nymphaea odorata), and watershield (Brasenia schreberi) are now extensive and well established. In addition, within isolated coves, extensive beds of water lilies and spike-rush (Eleocharis sp.) are common. Cattail occurrence has increased since refill, but large beds common to Par Pond prior to the drawdown have not formed. Invasion of willow (Salix sp.) and red maple (Acer rubrum) occurred along the lake shoreline during drawdown. The red maples along the present shoreline are beginning to show evidence of stress and mortality from flooding over the past four months. Some of the willows appear to be stressed as well. The loblolly pines (Pinus taeda), which were flooded in all but the shallow shoreline areas, are now dead. Future surveys are planned for the growing seasons of 1995, 1996, and 1997, along with the evaluation of satellite data for mapping the areal extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond.

  11. BOREAS RSS-10 TOMS Circumpolar One-Degree PAR Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, Dennis G.; Holben, Brent; Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Remote Sensing Science (RSS)-10 team investigated the magnitude of daily, seasonal, and yearly variations of Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) from ground and satellite observations. This data set contains satellite estimates of surface-incident PAR (400-700 nm, MJ/sq m) at one-degree spatial resolution. The spatial coverage is circumpolar from latitudes of 41 to 66 degrees north. The temporal coverage is from May through September for years 1979 through 1989. Eleven-year statistics are also provided: (1) mean, (2) standard deviation, and (3) coefficient of variation for 1979-89. The PAR estimates were derived from the global gridded ultraviolet reflectivity data product (average of 360, 380 nm) from the Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). Image mask data are provided for identifying the boreal forest zone, and ocean/land and snow/ice-covered areas. The data are available as binary image format data files. The PAR data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  12. Slow Reductive Elimination from Arylpalladium Parent Amido Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.; Hartwig, John F.

    2010-01-01

    We report reductive eliminations of primary arylamines from a series of bisphosphine-ligated arylpalladium(II) parent amido complexes that counter several established trends. In contrast to arylamido and alkylamido complexes of the aromatic bisphosphines DPPF and BINAP, parent amido complexes, do not form or undergo reductive elimination of monoarylamines. However, arylpalladium parent amido complexes ligated by the alkylbisphosphine CyPF-t-Bu form in good yield and undergo reductive elimination. Despite the basicity of parent amido ligand and the typically faster reductive elimination from complexes containing more basic amido ligands, the CyPF-t-Bu-ligated arylpalladium parent amido complexes undergo reductive elimination much more slowly than the analogous complexes containing arylamido or alkylamido ligands. Moreover, the parent amido complexes form more rapidly and are more stable thermodynamically in a series of exchange processes than the arylamido complexes. Computational studies support the overriding influence of steric effects on the stability and reactivity of the parent amido complex. The slow rate of reductive elimination causes the arylpalladium amido complex to be the resting state of the coupling of aryl halides with ammonia catalyzed by CyPF-t-Bu-ligated palladium, and this resting state contrasts the Pd(0) or arylpalladium(II) resting states of reactions of aryl halides with amines catalyzed by most palladium complexes. PMID:20695642

  13. Leprosy: too complex a disease for a simple elimination paradigm.

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Diana N. J.; Suneetha, Sujai

    2005-01-01

    Can leprosy be eliminated? This paper considers the question against the background of the WHO programme to eliminate leprosy. In 1991 the World Health Assembly set a target of eliminating leprosy as a public health problem by 2000. Elimination was defined as reaching a prevalence of < 1 case per 10 000 people. The elimination programme has been successful in delivering highly effective antibiotic therapy worldwide. However, despite this advance, new-case detection rates remain stable in countries with the highest rates of endemic leprosy, such as Brazil and India. This suggests that infection has not been adequately controlled by antibiotics alone. Leprosy is perhaps more appropriately classed as a chronic stable disease than as an acute infectious disease responsive to elimination strategies. In many countries activities to control and treat leprosy are being integrated into the general health-care system. This reduces the stigma associated with leprosy. However, leprosy causes long-term immunological complications, disability and deformity. The health-care activities of treating and preventing disabilities need to be provided in an integrated setting. Detecting new cases and monitoring disability caused by leprosy will be a challenge. One solution is to implement long-term surveillance in selected countries with the highest rates of endemic disease so that an accurate estimate of the burden of leprosy can be determined. It is also critical that broad-based research into this challenging disease continues until the problems are truly solved. PMID:15798849

  14. Elimination diets in the treatment of secretory otitis media.

    PubMed

    Ruokonen, J; Paganus, A; Lehti, H

    1982-03-01

    The significance of elimination diets in the treatment of secretory otitis media (SOM) and the usefulness of the cytotoxic leucocyte test (CLT) in the planning of elimination diets were investigated. Sixty-seven children with SOM were tested with CLT and treated with or without elimination diets in addition to the established SOM-treatment. After two years of observation in patients with multiple CLT-reactions (50) there was an almost significant difference (P less than 0.06) in the cure rates and a significant difference (P less than 0.02) in the percentages of therapeutic failures between those treated with (32) and those treated without (18) elimination diets. No marked difference was found between patients, who did not have multiple CLT-reactions (17) and were treated without diets and patients who were treated with diets for multiple CLT-reactions (32). It was concluded that elimination diets are needed in the treatment of SOM for those patients who have multiple reactions in the CLT and that the CLT is useful in the planning of these elimination diets. PMID:7201458

  15. Can ivermectin mass treatments eliminate onchocerciasis in Africa?

    PubMed Central

    Winnen, M.; Plaisier, A. P.; Alley, E. S.; Nagelkerke, N. J. D.; van Oortmarssen, G.; Boatin, B. A.; Habbema, J. D. F.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To elucidate the conditions in which mass treatment with ivermectin reduces the transmission of Onchocerca volvulus sufficiently to eliminate infection from an African community. METHODS: ONCHOSIM, a microsimulation model for onchocerciasis transmission, was used to explore the implications of different treatment intervals, coverage levels and precontrol endemicities for the likelihood of elimination. FINDINGS: Simulations suggested that control strategies based exclusively on ivermectin mass treatments could eliminate onchocerciasis. The duration of treatment required to eliminate infection depended heavily on the treatment programme and precontrol endemicity. In areas with medium to high levels of infection, annual mass treatments with 65% coverage for at least 25 years were necessary. Model predictions suggested that durations exceeding 35 years would be required if there were much heterogeneity in exposure to vector bites and, consequently, wide individual variation in microfilaria counts. If the treatment interval were reduced from 12 to 6 months the time for completion of the programme could be more than halved and elimination could be accomplished in areas of hyperendemicity, provided that the effects of each treatment would be the same as with annual treatments. However, it was doubtful whether high coverage levels could be sustained long enough to achieve worldwide eradication. CONCLUSION: Elimination of onchocerciasis from most endemic foci in Africa appears to be possible. However, the requirements in terms of duration, coverage, and frequency of treatment may be prohibitive in highly endemic areas. PMID:12077614

  16. PAR-1 activation by thrombin is protective in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells if endothelial protein C receptor is occupied by its natural ligand

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jong-Sup; Rezaie, Alireza R.

    2008-01-01

    Summary We recently demonstrated that the occupancy of endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) by its natural ligand activated protein C (APC)/protein C switches the protease activated receptor 1 (PAR-1)-dependent signaling specificity of thrombin from a disruptive to a protective effect in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Given the phenotypic differences between endothelial cells in venular and arterial beds, in this study we evaluated the signaling function of thrombin in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) before and after treating them with PC-S195A which lacks catalytic activity but exhibits a normal affinity for EPCR. As expected, both thrombin and thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP) enhanced the permeability barrier of HPAECs, however, both PAR-1 agonists exhibited a potent barrier protective effect when the cells were treated with PC-S195A prior to stimulation by the agonists. Interestingly, similar to APC, thrombin exhibited a potent cytoprotective activity in the LPS-induced permeability and TNF-α-induced apoptosis and adhesion assays in the PC-S195A treated HPAECs. Treatment of HPAECs with the cholesterol depleting molecule methyl-β-cyclodextrin eliminated the protective effect of both APC and thrombin. These results suggest that the occupancy of EPCR by its natural ligand recruits PAR-1 to a protective signaling pathway within lipid rafts of HPAECs. Based on these results we conclude that the activation of PAR-1 by thrombin would initiate a protective response in intact arterial vascular cells expressing EPCR. These findings may have important ramifications for understanding the mechanism of the participation of the vascular PAR-1 in pathophysiology of the inflammatory disorders. PMID:18612544

  17. Environmental assessment for the natural fluctuation of water level in Par Pond and reduced water flow in Steel Creek below L-Lake at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The Savannah River Operations Office Strategic Plan directs Savannah River Site (SRS) to find ways to reduce operating costs, and to determine what site infrastructure must be maintained and what infrastructure is surplus. Because of the mission change, L-Lake, Par Pond, and the river water system are no longer needed to support current missions and therefore provide an opportunity for operating cost reduction. If SRS determines that L-Lake, Par Pond, and the river water system are no longer needed to support future missions and are considered surplus, appropriate NEPA documentation will be prepared. The purpose of the proposed action in this Environmental Assessment is to begin an examination of the need for the Site`s river water system by (1) developing data needed to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of further reducing or eliminating the flow demands from the Site`s river water system and; (2) evaluating the potential of reducing operating costs by allowing the water level in Par Pond to fluctuate naturally through reduced pumping. This action also includes reducing the current flow rates from L-Lake to Steel Creek to natural stream flows while maintaining full pool. The recently approved Par Pond CERCLA Interim Action Proposed Plan (IAPP) committed to evaluate in a NEPA document the environmental consequences of this proposed action. This document evaluated the remediation of human health and ecological risks associated with the three year drawdown of Par Pond. Should any of the parameters sampled in the reservoir and streams (e.g., water quality, biota, etc.) exceed established threshold levels during the implementation of the proposed action, water would again be pumped into the reservoir to minimize any impacts by bringing the water level back to an appropriate level about 58.2 m (195 ft).

  18. Quinoprotein-catalysed reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, C

    1996-01-01

    This review is concerned with the structure and function of the quinoprotein enzymes, sometimes called quinoenzymes. These have prosthetic groups containing quinones, the name thus being analogous to the flavoproteins containing flavin prosthetic groups. Pyrrolo-quinoline quinone (PQQ) is non-covalently attached, whereas tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ), topaquinone (TPQ) and lysine tyrosylquinone (LTQ) are derived from amino acid residues in the backbone of the enzymes. The mechanisms of the quinoproteins are reviewed and related to their recently determined three-dimensional structures. As expected, the quinone structures in the prosthetic groups play important roles in the mechanisms. A second common feature is the presence of a catalytic base (aspartate) at the active site which initiates the reactions by abstracting a proton from the substrate, and it is likely to be involved in multiple reactions in the mechanism. A third common feature of these enzymes is that the first part of the reaction produces a reduced prosthetic group; this part of the mechanism is fairly well understood. This is followed by an oxidative phase involving electron transfer reactions which remain poorly understood. In both types of dehydrogenase (containing PQQ and TTQ), electrons must pass from the reduced prosthetic group to redox centres in a second recipient protein (or protein domain), whereas in amine oxidases (containing TPQ or LTQ), electrons must be transferred to molecular oxygen by way of a redox-active copper ion in the protein. PMID:9003352

  19. Results of peripheral laser photocoagulation in pars planitis.

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, J S; Mieler, W F; Walton, D; Kuhn, E; Postel, E; Hartz, A; Jampol, L M; Weinberg, D V; Logani, S

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the effect of peripheral retinal laser photocoagulation (PLP) on visual acuity, intraocular inflammation, and other ocular findings, including retinal neovascularization in eyes with pars planitis. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of eyes with pars planitis that had undergone PLP. RESULTS: Twenty-two eyes in 17 patients with pars planitis had undergone treatment with PLP at 2 centers. The mean age at the time of treatment was 19.3 years. Following treatment, mean follow-up was 16.3 months (range, 6 to 37 months). Mean visual acuity was 20/60 preoperatively and 20/50 postoperatively. This level of improvement was not statistically significant (P > .10), but there was a statistically significant decrease in the use of corticosteroids between the preoperative examination and the last postoperative examination (86% versus 27%, P < .05). There was also a statistically significant decrease in vitritis at the last follow-up (P = .0008) and a decrease in neovascularization of the vitreous base (P = .03) and in clinically apparent cystoid macular edema (P = .02). Epiretinal membranes were noted in 23% of eyes preoperatively and in 45% of eyes postoperatively. Only one of these epiretinal membranes was considered to be visually significant. One eye developed a tonic dilated pupil, which slowly improved. CONCLUSIONS: Although the long-term natural history of clinical findings in pars planitis is not well documented, PLP appears to decrease the need for corticosteroids while stabilizing visual acuity. It also appears to decrease vitreous inflammation. PLP has few complications and should be considered in patients with pars planitis who are unresponsive or have adverse reactions to corticosteroids. PMID:10360286

  20. The role of pars flaccida in human middle ear sound transmission.

    PubMed

    Aritomo, H; Goode, R L; Gonzalez, J

    1988-04-01

    The role of the pars flaccida in middle ear sound transmission was studied with the use of twelve otoscopically normal, fresh, human temporal bones. Peak-to-peak umbo displacement in response to a constant sound pressure level at the tympanic membrane was measured with a noncontacting video measuring system capable of repeatable measurements down to 0.2 micron. Measurements were made before and after pars flaccida modifications at 18 frequencies between 100 and 4000 Hz. Four pars flaccida modifications were studied: (1) acoustic insulation of the pars flaccida to the ear canal with a silicone rubber baffle, (2) stiffening the pars flaccida with cyanoacrylate cement, (3) decreasing the tension of the pars flaccida with a nonperforating incision, and (4) perforation of the pars flaccida. All of the modifications (except the perforation) had a minimal effect on umbo displacement; this seems to imply that the pars flaccida has a minor acoustic role in human beings. PMID:3132684

  1. A potential role of a substrate as a base for the deprotonation pathway in Rh-catalysed C-H amination of heteroarenes: DFT insights.

    PubMed

    Ajitha, Manjaly J; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Kwak, Jaesung; Kim, Hyun Jin; Chang, Sukbok; Jung, Yousung

    2016-05-10

    The possibility of direct introduction of a new functionality through C-H bond activation is an attractive strategy in covalent synthesis. Here, we investigated the mechanism of Rh-catalysed C-H amination of the heteroaryl substrate (2-phenylpyridine) using phenyl azide as a nitrogen source by density functional theory (DFT). For the deprotocyclometallation and protodecyclometallation processes of the title reaction, we propose a stepwise base-assisted mechanism (pathway I) instead of the previously reported concerted mechanism (pathway II). In the new mechanism proposed here, 2-phenylpyridine acts as a base in the initial deprotonation step (C-H bond cleavage) and transports the proton towards the final protonation step. In fact, the N-H bond of the strong conjugate acid (formed during the initial C-H bond cleavage) considered in pathway I (via) is more acidic than the C-H bond of the neutral substrate considered in pathway II (via). The higher activation barrier of mainly originates from the ring strain of the four-membered cyclic transition state. The vital role of the base, as disclosed here, can potentially have broader mechanistic implications for the development of reaction conditions of transition metal-catalysed reactions. PMID:27071025

  2. Glucose and fructose to platform chemicals: understanding the thermodynamic landscapes of acid-catalysed reactions using high-level ab initio methods.

    PubMed

    Assary, Rajeev S; Kim, Taejin; Low, John J; Greeley, Jeff; Curtiss, Larry A

    2012-12-28

    Molecular level understanding of acid-catalysed conversion of sugar molecules to platform chemicals such as hydroxy-methyl furfural (HMF), furfuryl alcohol (FAL), and levulinic acid (LA) is essential for efficient biomass conversion. In this paper, the high-level G4MP2 method along with the SMD solvation model is employed to understand detailed reaction energetics of the acid-catalysed decomposition of glucose and fructose to HMF. Based on protonation free energies of various hydroxyl groups of the sugar molecule, the relative reactivity of gluco-pyranose, fructo-pyranose and fructo-furanose are predicted. Calculations suggest that, in addition to the protonated intermediates, a solvent assisted dehydration of one of the fructo-furanosyl intermediates is a competing mechanism, indicating the possibility of multiple reaction pathways for fructose to HMF conversion in aqueous acidic medium. Two reaction pathways were explored to understand the thermodynamics of glucose to HMF; the first one is initiated by the protonation of a C2-OH group and the second one through an enolate intermediate involving acyclic intermediates. Additionally, a pathway is proposed for the formation of furfuryl alcohol from glucose initiated by the protonation of a C2-OH position, which includes a C-C bond cleavage, and the formation of formic acid. The detailed free energy landscapes predicted in this study can be used as benchmarks for further exploring the sugar decomposition reactions, prediction of possible intermediates, and finally designing improved catalysts for biomass conversion chemistry in the future. PMID:22932938

  3. pH-Dependent isotope exchange and hydrogenation catalysed by water-soluble NiRu complexes as functional models for [NiFe]hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Kure, Bunsho; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Ichikawa, Koji; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Yagi, Tatsuhiko; Ogo, Seiji

    2008-09-21

    The pH-dependent hydrogen isotope exchange reaction between gaseous isotopes and medium isotopes and hydrogenation of the carbonyl compounds have been investigated with water-soluble bis(mu-thiolate)(mu-hydride)NiRu complexes, Ni(II)(mu-SR)(2)(mu-H)Ru(II) {(mu-SR)(2) = N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-propanediamine}, as functional models for [NiFe]hydrogenases. In acidic media (at pH 4-6), the mu-H ligand of the Ni(II)(mu-SR)(2)(mu-H)Ru(II) complexes has H(+) properties, and the complexes catalyse the hydrogen isotope exchange reaction between gaseous isotopes and medium isotopes. A mechanism of the hydrogen isotope exchange reaction between gaseous isotopes and medium isotopes through a low-valent Ni(I)(mu-SR)(2)Ru(I) complex is proposed. In contrast, in neutral-basic media (at pH 7-10), the mu-H ligand of the Ni(II)(mu-SR)(2)(mu-H)Ru(II) complexes acts as H(-), and the complexes catalyse the hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds. PMID:18728883

  4. Efficient one-pot enzymatic synthesis of alpha-(1-->4)-glucosidic disaccharides through a coupled reaction catalysed by Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM maltose phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Hiroyuki; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2010-05-27

    Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM maltose phosphorylase (LaMalP) of glycoside hydrolase family 65 catalysed enzymatic synthesis of alpha-(1-->4)-glucosidic disaccharides from maltose and five monosaccharides in a coupled phosphorolysis/reverse phosphorolysis one-pot reaction. Thus phosphorolysis of maltose to beta-glucose 1-phosphate circumvented addition of costly beta-glucose 1-phosphate for reverse phosphorolysis with different monosaccharide acceptors, resulting in 91%, 89%, 88%, 86% and 84% yield of alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminopyranose [N-acetyl-maltosamine], alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-D-glucosaminopyranose [maltosamine], alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-D-mannopyranose, alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-L-fucopyranose and alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-D-xylopyranose, respectively, from 0.1M maltose, 0.5M N-acetyl glucosamine, 0.1M glucosamine, 0.1M mannose, 1M L-fucose and 0.5M xylose in 0.2M phosphate-citrate pH 6.2. These current yields of 0.27-0.34 g of disaccharide products from 10 mL reaction mixtures are easy to scale up and moreover the strategy can be applied to large-scale production of other oligosaccharides from low-cost disaccharides as catalysed by phosphorylases with different substrate specificities. PMID:20392438

  5. The Role of Prostate Apoptosis Response-4 (Par-4) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infected Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Han, Ji-Ye; Lim, Yun-Ji; Choi, Ji-Ae; Lee, Jung-Hwan; Jo, Sung-Hee; Oh, Sung-Man; Song, Chang-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Prostate apoptosis response-4 (Par-4) is a tumor suppressor protein that forms a complex with glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) to induce apoptosis. Previously, we reported that ER stress-induced apoptosis is a critical host defense mechanism against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We sought to understand the role of Par-4 during ER stress-induced apoptosis in response to mycobacterial infection. Par-4 and GRP78 protein levels increased in response Mtb (strain: H37Ra) infection. Furthermore, Par-4 and GRP78 translocate to the surface of Mtb H37Ra-infected macrophages and induce apoptosis via caspase activation. NF-κB activation, Mtb-mediated ER stress, and Par-4 production were significantly diminished in macrophages with inhibited ROS production. To test Par-4 function during mycobacterial infection, we analyzed intracellular survival of Mtb H37Ra in macrophages with Par-4 overexpression or knockdown. Mtb H37Ra growth was significantly reduced in Par-4 overexpressing macrophages and increased in knockdown macrophages. We also observed increased Par-4, GRP78, and caspases activation in Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-infected prostate cancer cells. Our data demonstrate that Par-4 is associated with ER stress-induced apoptosis resulting in reduced intracellular survival of mycobacteria. BCG treatment increases Par-4-dependent caspase activation in prostate cancer cells. These results suggest ER stress-induced Par-4 acts as an important defense mechanism against mycobacterial infection and regulates cancer. PMID:27552917

  6. The Role of Prostate Apoptosis Response-4 (Par-4) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ji-Ye; Lim, Yun-Ji; Choi, Ji-Ae; Lee, Jung-hwan; Jo, Sung-Hee; Oh, Sung-Man; Song, Chang-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Prostate apoptosis response-4 (Par-4) is a tumor suppressor protein that forms a complex with glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) to induce apoptosis. Previously, we reported that ER stress-induced apoptosis is a critical host defense mechanism against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We sought to understand the role of Par-4 during ER stress-induced apoptosis in response to mycobacterial infection. Par-4 and GRP78 protein levels increased in response Mtb (strain: H37Ra) infection. Furthermore, Par-4 and GRP78 translocate to the surface of Mtb H37Ra-infected macrophages and induce apoptosis via caspase activation. NF-κB activation, Mtb-mediated ER stress, and Par-4 production were significantly diminished in macrophages with inhibited ROS production. To test Par-4 function during mycobacterial infection, we analyzed intracellular survival of Mtb H37Ra in macrophages with Par-4 overexpression or knockdown. Mtb H37Ra growth was significantly reduced in Par-4 overexpressing macrophages and increased in knockdown macrophages. We also observed increased Par-4, GRP78, and caspases activation in Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-infected prostate cancer cells. Our data demonstrate that Par-4 is associated with ER stress-induced apoptosis resulting in reduced intracellular survival of mycobacteria. BCG treatment increases Par-4-dependent caspase activation in prostate cancer cells. These results suggest ER stress-induced Par-4 acts as an important defense mechanism against mycobacterial infection and regulates cancer. PMID:27552917

  7. Is There an "F" in Your PAR? Understanding, Teaching and Doing Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzetti, Liza; Walsh, Christine Ann

    2014-01-01

    Participatory Action Research (PAR) is increasingly recognized within academic research and pedagogy. What are the benefits of including feminism within participatory action research and teaching? In responding to this question, we discuss the similarities and salient differences between PAR and feminist informed PAR (FPAR). There are eight themes…

  8. ParA resolvase catalyzes site-specific excision of DNA from the Arabidopsis genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The small serine resolvase ParA from bacterial plasmids RK2 and RP4 catalyzes the recombination of two identical 133 bp recombination sites known as MRS. Previously, we reported that ParA is active in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In this work, the parA recombinase gene was placed un...

  9. Detection of suPAR in the Saliva of Healthy Young Adults: Comparison with Plasma Levels

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Anna; Ajeti, Vjosa; Ljunggren, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    The soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) has been detected in blood, plasma, serum, urine, ovarian cystic fluid, and cerebrospinal fluid. Elevated suPAR levels in plasma have been associated with negative outcomes in various diseases, such as bacteremia, sepsis, SIRS, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and tuberculosis. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether suPAR can be detected in saliva from healthy individuals and thus, if saliva suPAR can be related to plasma suPAR, CRP, BMI, or gender. Blood and unstimulated whole saliva was collected from 20 healthy individuals (10 female and 10 male, median age of 28 years; range 21–41). CRP and suPAR were measured with ELISA in saliva and serum/plasma. suPAR was detected in all saliva samples in the 5.2–28.1 ng/mL range, with a median value of 17.1 ng/mL. Saliva suPAR was significantly higher (P < 0.001) but not correlated to plasma suPAR in healthy young adults with normal plasma suPAR levels. suPAR and CRP levels were correlated in blood but not in saliva. No correlation was found between BMI, age, or gender and suPAR in saliva. PMID:22084570

  10. In vitro toxicokinetic studies of cyclosarin: molecular mechanisms of elimination.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Georg; Müller, Susanne; Koller, Marianne; Thiermann, Horst; Worek, Franz

    2014-05-16

    The toxicokinetics of in vitro elimination of highly toxic cyclosarin (GF) in biological systems revealed striking stereoselective differences in the range of 0.01μM to 1mM GF. While weak concentration dependency was detected for elimination of the toxic (-)-enantiomer indicating catalytic processes, elimination of less toxic (+)-GF followed unusual kinetics with relatively high concentration dependency. Fast initial GF binding in human heparinised plasma increased only at lower initial GF concentrations while (+)-GF binding strongly increased with decreasing GF concentration. In displacement experiments it was shown for the first time that GF binding on plasma components in rats and mice plasma was reversible. Investigations with human plasma require further methodical improvement. GF elimination by diisopropylfluorophosphatase (DFPase) wildtype as phosphotriesterase (PTE) model showed some similarities compared to human heparinised plasma. Impact of human serum albumin is negligible. When comparing kinetics of GF elimination with metabolite formation (fluoride and cyclohexyl methyl phosphonic acid, CHMPA), marked differences were detected. From the results a model was postulated illustrating possible steps of molecular mechanisms of GF interaction with plasma proteins including high affine fast initial binding followed by formation of metastable phosphonylated plasma proteins with subsequent hydrolysis and release of metabolites. PMID:24641973

  11. Effective Program Management: A Cornerstone of Malaria Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Gosling, Jonathan; Case, Peter; Tulloch, Jim; Chandramohan, Daniel; Wegbreit, Jennifer; Newby, Gretchen; Gueye, Cara Smith; Koita, Kadiatou; Gosling, Roly

    2015-01-01

    Effective program management is essential for successful elimination of malaria. In this perspective article, evidence surrounding malaria program management is reviewed by management science and malaria experts through a literature search of published and unpublished gray documents and key informant interviews. Program management in a malaria elimination setting differs from that in a malaria control setting in a number of ways, although knowledge and understanding of these distinctions are lacking. Several core features of successful health program management are critical to achieve elimination, including effective leadership and supervision at all levels, sustained political and financial commitment, reliable supply and control of physical resources, effective management of data and information, appropriate incentives, and consistent accountability. Adding to the complexity, the requirements of an elimination program may conflict with those of a control regimen. Thus, an additional challenge is successfully managing program transitions along the continuum from control to elimination to prevention of reintroduction. This article identifies potential solutions to these challenges by exploring managerial approaches that are flexible, relevant, and sustainable in various cultural and health system contexts. PMID:26013372

  12. Effective program management: a cornerstone of malaria elimination.

    PubMed

    Gosling, Jonathan; Case, Peter; Tulloch, Jim; Chandramohan, Daniel; Wegbreit, Jennifer; Newby, Gretchen; Gueye, Cara Smith; Koita, Kadiatou; Gosling, Roly

    2015-07-01

    Effective program management is essential for successful elimination of malaria. In this perspective article, evidence surrounding malaria program management is reviewed by management science and malaria experts through a literature search of published and unpublished gray documents and key informant interviews. Program management in a malaria elimination setting differs from that in a malaria control setting in a number of ways, although knowledge and understanding of these distinctions are lacking. Several core features of successful health program management are critical to achieve elimination, including effective leadership and supervision at all levels, sustained political and financial commitment, reliable supply and control of physical resources, effective management of data and information, appropriate incentives, and consistent accountability. Adding to the complexity, the requirements of an elimination program may conflict with those of a control regimen. Thus, an additional challenge is successfully managing program transitions along the continuum from control to elimination to prevention of reintroduction. This article identifies potential solutions to these challenges by exploring managerial approaches that are flexible, relevant, and sustainable in various cultural and health system contexts. PMID:26013372

  13. Progress toward regional measles elimination--worldwide, 2000-2013.

    PubMed

    Perry, Robert T; Gacic-Dobo, Marta; Dabbagh, Alya; Mulders, Mick N; Strebel, Peter M; Okwo-Bele, Jean-Marie; Rota, Paul A; Goodson, James L

    2014-11-14

    In 2012, the World Health Assembly endorsed the Global Vaccine Action Plan with the objective to eliminate measles in four World Health Organization (WHO) regions by 2015. Member states of all six WHO regions have adopted measles elimination goals. In 2010, the World Health Assembly established three milestones for 2015: 1) increase routine coverage with the first dose of measles-containing vaccine (MCV1) for children aged 1 year to ≥90% nationally and ≥80% in every district; 2) reduce global annual measles incidence to <5 cases per million; and 3) reduce global measles mortality by 95% from the 2000 estimate. This report updates the 2000-2012 report and describes progress toward global control and regional measles elimination during 2000-2013. During this period, annual reported measles incidence declined 72% worldwide, from 146 to 40 per million population, and annual estimated measles deaths declined 75%, from 544,200 to 145,700. Four of six WHO regions have established regional verification commissions (RVCs); in the European (EUR) and Western Pacific regions (WPR), 19 member states successfully documented the absence of endemic measles. Resuming progress toward 2015 milestones and elimination goals will require countries and their partners to raise the visibility of measles elimination, address barriers to measles vaccination, and make substantial and sustained additional investments in strengthening health systems. PMID:25393223

  14. Surveillance and response to drive the national malaria elimination program.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin-Yu; Xia, Zhi-Gui; Vong, Sirenda; Yang, Wei-Zhong; Zhou, Shui-Sen

    2014-01-01

    The national action plan for malaria elimination in China (2010-2020) was issued by the Chinese Ministry of Health along with other 13 ministries and commissions in 2010. The ultimate goal of the national action plan was to eliminate local transmission of malaria by the end of 2020. Surveillance and response are the most important components driving the whole process of the national malaria elimination programme (NMEP), under the technical guidance used in NMEP. This chapter introduces the evolution of the surveillance from the control to the elimination stages and the current structure of national surveillance system in China. When the NMEP launched, both routine surveillance and sentinel surveillance played critical role in monitoring the process of NMEP. In addition, the current response strategy of NMEP was also reviewed, including the generally developed "1-3-7 Strategy". More effective and sensitive risk assessment tools were introduced, which cannot only predict the trends of malaria, but also are important for the design and adjustment of the surveillance and response systems in the malaria elimination stage. Therefore, this review presents the landscape of malaria surveillance and response in China as well as their contribution to the NMEP, with a focus on activities for early detection of malaria cases, timely control of malaria foci and epidemics, and risk prediction. Furthermore, challenges and recommendations for accelerating NMEP through surveillance are put forward. PMID:25476882

  15. Lymphocyte migration in the spleen: the effect of macrophage elimination.

    PubMed Central

    Kraal, G; Rodrigues, H; Hoeben, K; Van Rooijen, N

    1989-01-01

    To study the influence of macrophages on the migration and distribution of lymphocytes in the spleen, macrophages were eliminated from the spleen of mice by injection of liposomes in which DMDP was encapsulated. This leads to an elimination of macrophages in both the red pulp and marginal zone of the spleen within 1-2 days. In these animals the distribution of lymphocytes was determined by transfer of either syngeneic fluoresceinated or Ly 5 congeneic cells. It was found that after elimination of the macrophages the number of lymphocytes immigrating into the spleen had decreased, although a comparable mode of compartimentalization was found with an initial localization in the marginal zone and a subsequent distribution into the white pulp. After this elimination spleen macrophage subsets return with different kinetics, and in this way the influence of the red pulp macrophages, the marginal zone macrophages and the marginal metallophilic macrophages on lymphocyte immigration and redistribution could be investigated. A quantitative decrease of immigration was still found when red pulp and marginal metallophilic macrophages had repopulated their compartments, but was only fully restored when the last population to repopulate the spleen after treatment with DMDP-liposomes, the marginal zone macrophages, had returned. Experiments with isolated T and B cells showed that the elimination of macrophages had a profound effect on the localization of B cells in the white pulp, whereas it hardly affected T cells. Images Figure 2 PMID:2807380

  16. ParCAT: A Parallel Climate Analysis Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugen, B.; Smith, B.; Steed, C.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Thornton, P. E.; Shipman, G.

    2012-12-01

    Climate science has employed increasingly complex models and simulations to analyze the past and predict the future of our climate. The size and dimensionality of climate simulation data has been growing with the complexity of the models. This growth in data is creating a widening gap between the data being produced and the tools necessary to analyze large, high dimensional data sets. With single run data sets increasing into 10's, 100's and even 1000's of gigabytes, parallel computing tools are becoming a necessity in order to analyze and compare climate simulation data. The Parallel Climate Analysis Toolkit (ParCAT) provides basic tools that efficiently use parallel computing techniques to narrow the gap between data set size and analysis tools. ParCAT was created as a collaborative effort between climate scientists and computer scientists in order to provide efficient parallel implementations of the computing tools that are of use to climate scientists. Some of the basic functionalities included in the toolkit are the ability to compute spatio-temporal means and variances, differences between two runs and histograms of the values in a data set. ParCAT is designed to facilitate the "heavy lifting" that is required for large, multidimensional data sets. The toolkit does not focus on performing the final visualizations and presentation of results but rather, reducing large data sets to smaller, more manageable summaries. The output from ParCAT is provided in commonly used file formats (NetCDF, CSV, ASCII) to allow for simple integration with other tools. The toolkit is currently implemented as a command line utility, but will likely also provide a C library for developers interested in tighter software integration. Elements of the toolkit are already being incorporated into projects such as UV-CDAT and CMDX. There is also an effort underway to implement portions of the CCSM Land Model Diagnostics package using ParCAT in conjunction with Python and gnuplot. Par

  17. Elimination kinetic model for organic chemicals in earthworms.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, N; Dimitrov, S; Georgieva, D; Van Gestel, C A M; Hankard, P; Spurgeon, D; Li, H; Mekenyan, O

    2010-08-15

    Mechanistic understanding of bioaccumulation in different organisms and environments should take into account the influence of organism and chemical depending factors on the uptake and elimination kinetics of chemicals. Lipophilicity, metabolism, sorption (bioavailability) and biodegradation of chemicals are among the important factors that may significantly affect the bioaccumulation process in soil organisms. This study attempts to model elimination kinetics of organic chemicals in earthworms by accounting for the effects of both chemical and biological properties, including metabolism. The modeling approach that has been developed is based on the concept for simulating metabolism used in the BCF base-line model developed for predicting bioaccumulation in fish. Metabolism was explicitly accounted for by making use of the TIMES engine for simulation of metabolism and a set of principal transformations. Kinetic characteristics of transformations were estimated on the basis of observed kinetics data for the elimination of organic chemicals from earthworms. PMID:20185163

  18. Substitution and elimination of CFCs at the Pantex Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Mings, S.; Kohn, E.

    1993-11-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are categorized as Class I Ozone Depleting Solvents (ODSs). Due to the detrimental effects which these have on the ozone layer of the stratosphere, current federal legislation mandates their eliminated production. As part of this mandate, President Bush ordered the production of CFCs to cease by 1995. Facilities are, therefore, striving to eliminate the use of CFCs by this time. In the past, large quantities of CFCs were used at the Pantex Plant as fire suppressants, as solvents, and as refrigerants. The solvents were primarily used for cleaning weapon components, as well as various other applications. The Mason & Hanger has been very successful in its efforts to reduce the discharge of CFCs to the environment. This has been accomplished by initiating elimination, substitution, and recycling practices, as well as by instituting new technologies, such as waterjet machining.

  19. Reductive elimination of chlorinated ethylenes by zero-valent metals

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, A.L.; Totten, L.A.; Arnold, W.A.; Burris, D.R.; Campbell, T.J.

    1996-08-01

    To date it does not appear to have been demonstrated in the literature that halogenated ethylenes can undergo reductive {beta}-elimination to alkynes under environmental conditions. The purpose of this paper is to provide experimental evidence that such pathways may be involved in the reaction of chloroethylenes with zero-valent metals as well as to speculate on the significance of the products that may result. Calculations indicate that reductive {beta}-elimination reactions of chloroethylenes are in fact comparable energetically to hydrogenolysis at neutral pH. Experiments were therefore initiated to assess whether {beta}-elimination reactions of chlorinated ethylenes could occur in the presence of two zero-valent metals, Fe and Zn. 76 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Eliminating the Neglected Tropical Diseases: Translational Science and New Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Hotez, Peter J.; Pecoul, Bernard; Rijal, Suman; Boehme, Catharina; Aksoy, Serap; Malecela, Mwelecele; Tapia-Conyer, Roberto; Reeder, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Today, the World Health Organization recognizes 17 major parasitic and related infections as the neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). Despite recent gains in the understanding of the nature and prevalence of NTDs, as well as successes in recent scaled-up preventive chemotherapy strategies and other health interventions, the NTDs continue to rank among the world’s greatest global health problems. For virtually all of the NTDs (including those slated for elimination under the auspices of a 2012 London Declaration for NTDs and a 2013 World Health Assembly resolution [WHA 66.12]), additional control mechanisms and tools are needed, including new NTD drugs, vaccines, diagnostics, and vector control agents and strategies. Elimination will not be possible without these new tools. Here we summarize some of the key challenges in translational science to develop and introduce these new technologies in order to ensure success in global NTD elimination efforts. PMID:26934395

  1. Ligand coordination modulates reductive elimination from aluminium(iii).

    PubMed

    Urwin, Stephanie J; Rogers, David M; Nichol, Gary S; Cowley, Michael J

    2016-09-21

    Oxidative addition of inert bonds at low-valent main-group centres is becoming a major class of reactivity for these species. The reverse reaction, reductive elimination, is possible in some cases but far rarer. Here, we present a mechanistic study of reductive elimination from Al(iii) centres and unravel ligand effects in this process. Experimentally determined activation and thermodynamic parameters for the reductive elimination of Cp*H from Cp*2AlH are reported, and this reaction is found to be inhibited by the addition of Lewis bases. We find that C-H oxidative addition at Al(i) centres proceeds by initial protonation at the low-valent centre. PMID:27530604

  2. Modeling Selective Elimination of Quiescent Cancer Cells from Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Cavnar, Stephen P.; Rickelmann, Andrew D.; Meguiar, Kaille F.; Xiao, Annie; Dosch, Joseph; Leung, Brendan M.; Cai Lesher-Perez, Sasha; Chitta, Shashank; Luker, Kathryn E.; Takayama, Shuichi; Luker, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with many types of malignancy commonly harbor quiescent disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow. These cells frequently resist chemotherapy and may persist for years before proliferating as recurrent metastases. To test for compounds that eliminate quiescent cancer cells, we established a new 384-well 3D spheroid model in which small numbers of cancer cells reversibly arrest in G1/G0 phase of the cell cycle when cultured with bone marrow stromal cells. Using dual-color bioluminescence imaging to selectively quantify viability of cancer and stromal cells in the same spheroid, we identified single compounds and combination treatments that preferentially eliminated quiescent breast cancer cells but not stromal cells. A treatment combination effective against malignant cells in spheroids also eliminated breast cancer cells from bone marrow in a mouse xenograft model. This research establishes a novel screening platform for therapies that selectively target quiescent tumor cells, facilitating identification of new drugs to prevent recurrent cancer. PMID:26408255

  3. Determinants of Human African Trypanosomiasis Elimination via Paratransgenesis.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jennifer A; Medlock, Jan; Townsend, Jeffrey P; Aksoy, Serap; Ndeffo Mbah, Martial; Galvani, Alison P

    2016-03-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), transmitted by tsetse flies, has historically infected hundreds of thousands of individuals annually in sub-Saharan Africa. Over the last decade, concerted control efforts have reduced reported cases to below 10,000 annually, bringing complete elimination within reach. A potential technology to eliminate HAT involves rendering the flies resistant to trypanosome infection. This approach can be achieved through the introduction of transgenic Sodalis symbiotic bacteria that have been modified to produce a trypanocide, and propagated via Wolbachia symbionts, which confer a reproductive advantage to the paratransgenic tsetse. However, the population dynamics of these symbionts within tsetse flies have not yet been evaluated. Specifically, the key factors that determine the effectiveness of paratransgenesis have yet to be quantified. To identify the impact of these determinants on T.b. gambiense and T.b. rhodesiense transmission, we developed a mathematical model of trypanosome transmission that incorporates tsetse and symbiont population dynamics. We found that fecundity and mortality penalties associated with Wolbachia or recombinant Sodalis colonization, probabilities of vertical transmission, and tsetse migration rates are fundamental to the feasibility of HAT elimination. For example, we determined that HAT elimination could be sustained over 25 years when Wolbachia colonization minimally impacted fecundity or mortality, and when the probability of recombinant Sodalis vertical transmission exceeded 99.9%. We also found that for a narrow range of recombinant Sodalis vertical transmission probability (99.9-90.6% for T.b. gambiense and 99.9-85.8% for T.b. rhodesiense), cumulative HAT incidence was reduced between 30% and 1% for T.b. gambiense and between 21% and 3% for T.b. rhodesiense, although elimination was not predicted. Our findings indicate that fitness and mortality penalties associated with paratransgenic symbionts, as well

  4. Tissue distribution and elimination of rotenone in rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gingerich, W.H.

    1986-01-01

    The fate of a single i.v. dose (120 μg/kg) of the piscicide [14C]rotenone was evaluated in rainbow trout for periods up to 72 h after dosing. Rotenone was rapidly cleared from the plasma; less than 2% of the dose remained in the plasma compartment after 20 min. The highest concentrations of rotenone residues (% dose/g tissue) were in the hepatobiliary system, bile, intestine, and in heart, lateral line swimming muscle, and posterior kidney; tissues that are highly dependent on oxidative metabolism. Although rotenone activity was present in all cell fractions examined, greater than 40% was associated with the mitochondrial fraction of liver, kidney, and muscle. More than 85% of the activity extracted from these tissues, except the liver, was parent rotenone. Elimination from whole body and major tissue depots conformed to simple first-order kinetics; the estimated half-life from whole body was 68.5 h. Branchial elimination accounted for 5% of the injected dose over a 4-h period, and urinary elimination was less than 2% over a 48-h period. Rotenone was eliminated essentially unchanged across the gills; however, parent rotenone was not found in either urine or bile. More than 80% of the activity in both urine and bile eluted from HPLC chromatographs as a highly polar fraction that was not hydrolyzed by incubation with either β-glucuronidase or sulfatase. The results imply that hepatobiliary excretion is the major route of elimination for rotenone residues in the trout and that metabolism to a more polar form is a prerequisite for elimination in both the bile and the urine

  5. Identifying Malaria Transmission Foci for Elimination Using Human Mobility Data.

    PubMed

    Ruktanonchai, Nick W; DeLeenheer, Patrick; Tatem, Andrew J; Alegana, Victor A; Caughlin, T Trevor; Zu Erbach-Schoenberg, Elisabeth; Lourenço, Christopher; Ruktanonchai, Corrine W; Smith, David L

    2016-04-01

    Humans move frequently and tend to carry parasites among areas with endemic malaria and into areas where local transmission is unsustainable. Human-mediated parasite mobility can thus sustain parasite populations in areas where they would otherwise be absent. Data describing human mobility and malaria epidemiology can help classify landscapes into parasite demographic sources and sinks, ecological concepts that have parallels in malaria control discussions of transmission foci. By linking transmission to parasite flow, it is possible to stratify landscapes for malaria control and elimination, as sources are disproportionately important to the regional persistence of malaria parasites. Here, we identify putative malaria sources and sinks for pre-elimination Namibia using malaria parasite rate (PR) maps and call data records from mobile phones, using a steady-state analysis of a malaria transmission model to infer where infections most likely occurred. We also examined how the landscape of transmission and burden changed from the pre-elimination setting by comparing the location and extent of predicted pre-elimination transmission foci with modeled incidence for 2009. This comparison suggests that while transmission was spatially focal pre-elimination, the spatial distribution of cases changed as burden declined. The changing spatial distribution of burden could be due to importation, with cases focused around importation hotspots, or due to heterogeneous application of elimination effort. While this framework is an important step towards understanding progressive changes in malaria distribution and the role of subnational transmission dynamics in a policy-relevant way, future work should account for international parasite movement, utilize real time surveillance data, and relax the steady state assumption required by the presented model. PMID:27043913

  6. Identifying Malaria Transmission Foci for Elimination Using Human Mobility Data

    PubMed Central

    Ruktanonchai, Nick W.; DeLeenheer, Patrick; Tatem, Andrew J.; Alegana, Victor A.; Caughlin, T. Trevor; zu Erbach-Schoenberg, Elisabeth; Lourenço, Christopher; Ruktanonchai, Corrine W.; Smith, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Humans move frequently and tend to carry parasites among areas with endemic malaria and into areas where local transmission is unsustainable. Human-mediated parasite mobility can thus sustain parasite populations in areas where they would otherwise be absent. Data describing human mobility and malaria epidemiology can help classify landscapes into parasite demographic sources and sinks, ecological concepts that have parallels in malaria control discussions of transmission foci. By linking transmission to parasite flow, it is possible to stratify landscapes for malaria control and elimination, as sources are disproportionately important to the regional persistence of malaria parasites. Here, we identify putative malaria sources and sinks for pre-elimination Namibia using malaria parasite rate (PR) maps and call data records from mobile phones, using a steady-state analysis of a malaria transmission model to infer where infections most likely occurred. We also examined how the landscape of transmission and burden changed from the pre-elimination setting by comparing the location and extent of predicted pre-elimination transmission foci with modeled incidence for 2009. This comparison suggests that while transmission was spatially focal pre-elimination, the spatial distribution of cases changed as burden declined. The changing spatial distribution of burden could be due to importation, with cases focused around importation hotspots, or due to heterogeneous application of elimination effort. While this framework is an important step towards understanding progressive changes in malaria distribution and the role of subnational transmission dynamics in a policy-relevant way, future work should account for international parasite movement, utilize real time surveillance data, and relax the steady state assumption required by the presented model. PMID:27043913

  7. Progress toward regional measles elimination - worldwide, 2000-2014.

    PubMed

    Perry, Robert T; Murray, Jillian S; Gacic-Dobo, Marta; Dabbagh, Alya; Mulders, Mick N; Strebel, Peter M; Okwo-Bele, Jean-Marie; Rota, Paul A; Goodson, James L

    2015-11-13

    In 2000, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Millennium Development Goals (MDG), with MDG4 being a two-thirds reduction in child mortality by 2015, and with measles vaccination coverage being one of the three indicators of progress toward this goal.* In 2010, the World Health Assembly established three milestones for measles control by 2015: 1) increase routine coverage with the first dose of measles-containing vaccine (MCV1) for children aged 1 year to ≥90% nationally and ≥80% in every district; 2) reduce global annual measles incidence to fewer than five cases per million population; and 3) reduce global measles mortality by 95% from the 2000 estimate (1).† In 2012, the World Health Assembly endorsed the Global Vaccine Action Plan§ with the objective to eliminate measles in four World Health Organization (WHO) regions by 2015. WHO member states in all six WHO regions have adopted measles elimination goals. This report updates the 2000–2013 report (2) and describes progress toward global control and regional measles elimination during 2000–2014. During this period, annual reported measles incidence declined 73% worldwide, from 146 to 40 cases per million population, and annual estimated measles deaths declined 79%, from 546,800 to 114,900. However, progress toward the 2015 milestones and elimination goals has slowed markedly since 2010. To resume progress toward milestones and goals for measles elimination, a review of current strategies and challenges to improving program performance is needed, and countries and their partners need to raise the visibility of measles elimination, address barriers to measles vaccination, and make substantial and sustained additional investments in strengthening health systems. PMID:26562349

  8. Global control and regional elimination of measles, 2000-2012.

    PubMed

    Perry, Robert T; Gacic-Dobo, Marta; Dabbagh, Alya; Mulders, Mick N; Strebel, Peter M; Okwo-Bele, Jean-Marie; Rota, Paul A; Goodson, James L

    2014-02-01

    In 2010, the World Health Assembly established three milestones toward global measles eradication to be reached by 2015: 1) increase routine coverage with the first dose of measles-containing vaccine (MCV1) for children aged 1 year to ≥90% nationally and ≥80% in every district, 2) reduce and maintain annual measles incidence at <5 cases per million, and 3) reduce measles mortality by 95% from the 2000 estimate. After the adoption by member states of the South-East Asia Region (SEAR) of the goal of measles elimination by 2020, elimination goals have been set by member states of all six World Health Organization (WHO) regions, and reaching measles elimination in four WHO regions by 2015 is an objective of the Global Vaccine Action Plan (GVAP). This report updates the previous report for 2000-2011 and describes progress toward global control and regional elimination of measles during 2000-2012. During this period, increases in routine MCV coverage, plus supplementary immunization activities (SIAs) reaching 145 million children in 2012, led to a 77% decrease worldwide in reported measles annual incidence, from 146 to 33 per million population, and a 78% decline in estimated annual measles deaths, from 562,400 to 122,000. Compared with a scenario of no vaccination, an estimated 13.8 million deaths were prevented by measles vaccination during 2000-2012. Achieving the 2015 targets and elimination goals will require countries and their partners to raise the visibility of measles elimination and make substantial and sustained additional investments in strengthening health systems. PMID:24500289

  9. Determinants of Human African Trypanosomiasis Elimination via Paratransgenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Jennifer A.; Medlock, Jan; Townsend, Jeffrey P.; Aksoy, Serap

    2016-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), transmitted by tsetse flies, has historically infected hundreds of thousands of individuals annually in sub-Saharan Africa. Over the last decade, concerted control efforts have reduced reported cases to below 10,000 annually, bringing complete elimination within reach. A potential technology to eliminate HAT involves rendering the flies resistant to trypanosome infection. This approach can be achieved through the introduction of transgenic Sodalis symbiotic bacteria that have been modified to produce a trypanocide, and propagated via Wolbachia symbionts, which confer a reproductive advantage to the paratransgenic tsetse. However, the population dynamics of these symbionts within tsetse flies have not yet been evaluated. Specifically, the key factors that determine the effectiveness of paratransgenesis have yet to be quantified. To identify the impact of these determinants on T.b. gambiense and T.b. rhodesiense transmission, we developed a mathematical model of trypanosome transmission that incorporates tsetse and symbiont population dynamics. We found that fecundity and mortality penalties associated with Wolbachia or recombinant Sodalis colonization, probabilities of vertical transmission, and tsetse migration rates are fundamental to the feasibility of HAT elimination. For example, we determined that HAT elimination could be sustained over 25 years when Wolbachia colonization minimally impacted fecundity or mortality, and when the probability of recombinant Sodalis vertical transmission exceeded 99.9%. We also found that for a narrow range of recombinant Sodalis vertical transmission probability (99.9–90.6% for T.b. gambiense and 99.9–85.8% for T.b. rhodesiense), cumulative HAT incidence was reduced between 30% and 1% for T.b. gambiense and between 21% and 3% for T.b. rhodesiense, although elimination was not predicted. Our findings indicate that fitness and mortality penalties associated with paratransgenic symbionts, as

  10. Minimally invasive pars approach for foraminal disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Hitchon, Patrick W; Awe, Olatilewa O; Close, Liesl; Sukkarieh, Hamdi G

    2015-07-01

    We present a retrospective cohort study on the outcome of patients with foraminal disc herniations (FDH) treated with partial pars resections using minimally invasive surgery (MIS) through a tube. FDH present a challenge due to the more lateral trajectory needed for their excision and thereby more muscle dissection and possibly facet resection. Forty patients, 19 women and 21 men with a mean age ± standard deviation of 58 ± 12 years, underwent MIS for FDH. Data on length of hospital stay, body mass index and outcomes were collected prospectively and reviewed retrospectively. Average length of stay following surgery was 1 ± 1 days. There was one wound infection and four unsatisfactory results. Using the Macnab score, good to excellent results were achieved in 89% of the patients. Based on these results, MIS surgery with partial pars resection is an attractive option in the treatment of FDH with low morbidity and short hospital stays. PMID:25882259

  11. Une alternative au cobalt pour la synthese de nanotubes de carbone monoparoi par plasma inductif thermique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, Jean-Francois

    Les nanotubes de carbone de type monoparoi (C-SWNT) sont une classe recente de nanomateriaux qui ont fait leur apparition en 1991. L'interet qu'on leur accorde provient des nombreuses proprietes d'avant-plan qu'ils possedent. Leur resistance mecanique serait des plus rigide, tout comme ils peuvent conduire l'electricite et la chaleur d'une maniere inegalee. Non moins, les C-SWNT promettent de devenir une nouvelle classe de plateforme moleculaire, en servant de site d'attache pour des groupements reactifs. Les promesses de ce type particulier de nanomateriau sont nombreuses, la question aujourd'hui est de comment les realiser. La technologie de synthese par plasma inductif thermique se situe avantageusement pour la qualite de ses produits, sa productivite et les faibles couts d'operation. Par contre, des recherches recentes ont permis de mettre en lumiere des risques d'expositions reliees a l'utilisation du cobalt, comme catalyseur de synthese; son elimination ou bien son remplacement est devenu une preoccupation importante. Quatre recettes alternatives ont ete mises a l'essai afin de trouver une alternative plus securitaire a la recette de base; un melange catalytique ternaire, compose de nickel, de cobalt et d'oxyde d'yttrium. La premiere consiste essentiellement a remplacer la proportion massique de cobalt par du nickel, qui etait deja present dans la recette de base. Les trois options suivantes contiennent de nouveaux catalyseurs, en remplacement au Co, qui sont apparus dans plusieurs recherches scientifiques au courant des dernieres annees: le dioxyde de zircone (ZrO2), dioxyde de manganese (MnO2) et le molybdene (Mo). La methode utilisee consiste a vaporiser la matiere premiere, sous forme solide, dans un reacteur plasma a haute frequence (3 MHz) a paroi refroidi. Apres le passage dans le plasma, le systeme traverse une section dite de "croissance", isolee thermiquement a l'aide de graphite, afin de maintenir une certaine plage de temperature favorable a la

  12. The elimination of building vibration in an optical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Slaymaker, F H

    1966-11-01

    The elimination of vibration is a straightforward engineering job that is analogous to the design of an electrical filter. The building vibration, which was so intense that no serious interferometry was possible, was measured using a commercial vibration meter. A simple, single-mesh mechanical filter was designed to remove the existing frequencies of vibration. The filter was constructed and its performance measured. As a practical test of the performance of the vibration elimination, a hologram was made on the vibration isolated granite slab. PMID:20057623

  13. Elimination of clock errors in a GPD based tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J.-T.

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses the estimation problem for a GPS based tracking system which is used for low earth satellite orbit determination and for geodynamic research. The clock errors involved in the measurements are eliminated in order to obtain a solution. Two methods used to eliminate the clock errors, the double differencing method and the linear combination method are discussed and compared. The accuracy of the solution, the redundancy and the correlation of the differenced or the combined data are investigated. Numerical results of the two methods are presented.

  14. Electrostatic mirror objective with eliminated spherical and axial chromatic aberrations.

    PubMed

    Bimurzaev, Seitkerim B; Serikbaeva, Gulnur S; Yakushev, Evgeniy M

    2003-01-01

    Computational formulae for the coefficients of the third-order spherical aberration and the second-order axial chromatic aberration are presented for an axially symmetric electrostatic electron mirror. A technique for eliminating the high-order derivatives of the potential axial distribution in mirror systems from the integrands is described. Conditions for elimination of spherical and axial chromatic aberrations, either separately or simultaneously, are found for a three-electrode axially symmetric mirror composed of coaxial cylinders of the same diameter. A principal scheme of the transmission electron microscope, where an electrostatic electron mirror serves as its objective, is presented. PMID:14599097

  15. Accumulation, elimination, and metabolism of dichlorobenzidine in the bluegill sunfish

    SciTech Connect

    Appleton, H.T.; Sikka, H.C.

    1980-01-01

    The bioconcentration, elimination, and metabolism of 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine (DCB, a suspected human carcinogen) in bluegill sunfish were studied. Radioactively labeled DCB at 5 ppb in water was rapidly accumulated in the fish. Bioconcentration factors of 495-507 occurred in whole fish after equilibrium (96-168 hr). DCB residues were present in both edible and nonedible portions. DCB or DCB metabolites were not completely eliminated after transfer of fish to clean water. Concentration of DCB in fish may be a human health hazard if fish are eaten. (22 references, 6 tables)

  16. Traumatismes Oculaires par Petards: Bilan sur Trois Annees

    PubMed Central

    Zouaoui-Kesraoui, N.; Derdour, A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Les accidents dus aux pétards sont des accidents graves. Leur recrudescence ces dernières années en Algérie, essentiellement durant les fêtes du Mawlid Ennabaoui (fête de la naissance du prophète), mérite à notre sens d'entreprendre des bilans exhaustifs dont celui-ci dans le but d'une sensibilisation de toutes les compétences concernées. Nous avons réuni sur trois années consécutives (2002, 2003, 2004) 60 dossiers de malades ayant subi des accidents oculaires par pétards. Nos patients sont répartis en 42 consultations pour blessures légères et 18 hospitalisations pour blessures graves. Parmi ces derniers, neuf ont présenté des complications et séquelles graves (cinq cas de cécité par atrophie du globe oculaire, trois cas de cécité cornéenne et un cas de cécité par trou maculaire). Dans tous ces cas l'incapacité permanente partielle est au minimum de 30%. Au vu de ces données nous proposons des mesures d'éducation sanitaire et une sensibilisation du grand public aux traumatismes oculaires, par le biais de mé dias appropriés: radio, télévision, affiches. PMID:21991157

  17. The Pars Interarticularis Stress Reaction, Spondylolysis, and Spondylolisthesis Progression

    PubMed Central

    Motley, Gina; Nyland, John; Jacobs, Jake; Caborn, David N. M.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To review the classification, etiology, clinical and radiologic evaluation, and management of the pars interarticularis stress reaction, spondylolysis, and spondylolisthesis progression. Data Sources: Grateful Med was searched from 1980 to 1998 using the terms “spondylolysis,” “spondylolisthesis,” “female athlete” “spondylogenic,” and “pars interarticularis.” Data Synthesis: The progression from pars interarticularis stress reaction through spondylolysis to spondylolisthesis is common in adolescent athletes, and, because of hormonal influences and cheerleading and gymnastic maneuvers, females are particularly at risk. Proper diagnosis and management include a thorough evaluation, radiographs (possibly with technetium bone scan or single-photon emission computed tomography), activity modification, dietary counseling, a therapeutic exercise program focusing on proper trunk and hip muscle strength and extensibility balances, and education regarding proper back postures, positioning, lifting mechanics, and jump landings. Conclusions/Recommendations: The athletic trainer plays an integral part in managing this injury progression, particularly with identifying at-risk individuals and intervening appropriately. ImagesFigure 4. PMID:16558534

  18. ParB Partition Proteins: Complex Formation and Spreading at Bacterial and Plasmid Centromeres

    PubMed Central

    Funnell, Barbara E.

    2016-01-01

    In bacteria, active partition systems contribute to the faithful segregation of both chromosomes and low-copy-number plasmids. Each system depends on a site-specific DNA binding protein to recognize and assemble a partition complex at a centromere-like site, commonly called parS. Many plasmid, and all chromosomal centromere-binding proteins are dimeric helix-turn-helix DNA binding proteins, which are commonly named ParB. Although the overall sequence conservation among ParBs is not high, the proteins share similar domain and functional organization, and they assemble into similar higher-order complexes. In vivo, ParBs “spread,” that is, DNA binding extends away from the parS site into the surrounding non-specific DNA, a feature that reflects higher-order complex assembly. ParBs bridge and pair DNA at parS and non-specific DNA sites. ParB dimers interact with each other via flexible conformations of an N-terminal region. This review will focus on the properties of the HTH centromere-binding protein, in light of recent experimental evidence and models that are adding to our understanding of how these proteins assemble into large and dynamic partition complexes at and around their specific DNA sites. PMID:27622187

  19. Dynamic Filament Formation by a Divergent Bacterial Actin-Like ParM Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brzoska, Anthony J.; Jensen, Slade O.; Barton, Deborah A.; Davies, Danielle S.; Overall, Robyn L.; Skurray, Ronald A.; Firth, Neville

    2016-01-01

    Actin-like proteins (Alps) are a diverse family of proteins whose genes are abundant in the chromosomes and mobile genetic elements of many bacteria. The low-copy-number staphylococcal multiresistance plasmid pSK41 encodes ParM, an Alp involved in efficient plasmid partitioning. pSK41 ParM has previously been shown to form filaments in vitro that are structurally dissimilar to those formed by other bacterial Alps. The mechanistic implications of these differences are not known. In order to gain insights into the properties and behavior of the pSK41 ParM Alp in vivo, we reconstituted the parMRC system in the ectopic rod-shaped host, E. coli, which is larger and more genetically amenable than the native host, Staphylococcus aureus. Fluorescence microscopy showed a functional fusion protein, ParM-YFP, formed straight filaments in vivo when expressed in isolation. Strikingly, however, in the presence of ParR and parC, ParM-YFP adopted a dramatically different structure, instead forming axial curved filaments. Time-lapse imaging and selective photobleaching experiments revealed that, in the presence of all components of the parMRC system, ParM-YFP filaments were dynamic in nature. Finally, molecular dissection of the parMRC operon revealed that all components of the system are essential for the generation of dynamic filaments. PMID:27310470

  20. ParB Partition Proteins: Complex Formation and Spreading at Bacterial and Plasmid Centromeres.

    PubMed

    Funnell, Barbara E

    2016-01-01

    In bacteria, active partition systems contribute to the faithful segregation of both chromosomes and low-copy-number plasmids. Each system depends on a site-specific DNA binding protein to recognize and assemble a partition complex at a centromere-like site, commonly called parS. Many plasmid, and all chromosomal centromere-binding proteins are dimeric helix-turn-helix DNA binding proteins, which are commonly named ParB. Although the overall sequence conservation among ParBs is not high, the proteins share similar domain and functional organization, and they assemble into similar higher-order complexes. In vivo, ParBs "spread," that is, DNA binding extends away from the parS site into the surrounding non-specific DNA, a feature that reflects higher-order complex assembly. ParBs bridge and pair DNA at parS and non-specific DNA sites. ParB dimers interact with each other via flexible conformations of an N-terminal region. This review will focus on the properties of the HTH centromere-binding protein, in light of recent experimental evidence and models that are adding to our understanding of how these proteins assemble into large and dynamic partition complexes at and around their specific DNA sites. PMID:27622187