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Sample records for elutriation

  1. An elutriation apparatus for macroinvertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Worswick, Joseph M., Jr.; Barbour, Michael T.

    1974-01-01

    An inexpensive hydropneumatic apparatus screens macroinvertebrates from bottom samples containing silt, mud, or clay. The elutriator, an acrylic cylinder with screened windows, cemented on an upright plastic funnel, retains benthic fauna while the sediment is washed away. The apparatus yields clean samples and has reduced the time required to sort benthos samples by more than 80%.

  2. Isolation of symbiotic dinoflagellates by centrifugal elutriation

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, A.E.; Quinn, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Centrifugal elutriation, a method combining centripetal liquid flow with centrifugal force, has been used to isolate symbiotic dinoflagellates from a cnidarian host. The elutriated cells were shown to be viable by photosynthetic incorporation of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and low release of photosynthetic products into the incubation medium. The level of contamination by clinging debris was low and by host solids was negligible.

  3. ELUTRIATOR/MICROCOSM SYSTEM PILOT MODEL AND TEST

    EPA Science Inventory

    An effective technique is described for transferring soft benthic sediments with their resident infauna intact into special holding systems (elutriator/microcosms) which permitted the study under controlled conditions of both nutrient exchange from the sediments and the activitie...

  4. Comparison of bulk sediment and sediment elutriate toxicity testing methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elutriate bioassays are among numerous methods that exist for assessing the potential toxicity of sediments in aquatic systems. In this study, interlaboratory results were compared from 96-hour Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas static-renewal acute toxicity tests conduct...

  5. Evaluation of elutriation and magnetic microbead purification of canine monocytes.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Camila Miranda; Bonnefont-Rebeix, Catherine; Picandet, Stephanie; Bernaud, Janine; Phothirath, Phoukham; Chabanne, Luc; Marchal, Thierry; Magnol, Jean-Pierre; Rigal, Dominique

    2004-10-01

    An elutriation technique was developed to obtain large quantities of pure canine monocytes. Firstly, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from whole blood by Ficoll gradient. Then, the PBMC were separated by an elutriation procedure. We demonstrated that these techniques allow the isolation of canine peripheral blood monocytes with a purity of 64% +/- 7.9 when labelled with anti-CD14 antibody. This purity increased to 83% +/- 2.2 after separation by magnetic anti-CD14 microbeads. The cell viability was more than 95% and apoptotic cells were less than 10%. The monocytes purified by these methods were functionally active in a mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR). A lymphocyte fraction was obtained directly only by elutriation with an average of 79.9% +/- 10.7 of CD5+, 7.9% +/- 3.5 of CD21+ and 1.78% +/- 2.53 of CD14+. Our results indicate that this elutriation procedure is a safe method to purify monocytes as well as lymphocytes, useful in MLR. PMID:15350747

  6. ELUTRIATE TEST EVALUATION OF CHEMICALLY STABILIZED WASTE MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A distilled water shake test, the elutriate test, was developed and tested to provide a fast, simple, procedure for predicting the escape of pollutants from treated and untreated sludges. The preliminary test consisted of subjecting various treated and untreated flue gas desulfur...

  7. Multiple feed point catalytic cracking process using elutriable catalyst mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, J.A.; Owen, H.; Schipper, P.H.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) process. It comprises: a source of hot, regenerated cracking catalyst having a settling velocity contacts a heavy hydrocarbon feed in a vertical riser reactor adapted to maintain the catalyst and the heavy feed as a dilute phase, the reactor having a cross-sectional area and a base, to produce a mixture of cracked products and spent catalyst, wherein spent catalyst is stripped and charged to a catalyst regeneration zone to produce the hot, regenerated catalyst characterized by use of an elutriable mixture of conventionally sized FCC catalyst and a separate additive catalyst having a higher settling velocity than the conventionally sized FCC catalyst and comprising a shape selective zeolite having a Constraint Index of about 1--12 in a riser having a lower and an upper elutriating section of increased cross-sectional area relative to the riser.

  8. Elutriation for Cell Cycle Synchronization in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Kume, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Cell synchronization is a powerful technique for studying the eukaryotic cell cycle events precisely. The fission yeast is a rod-shaped cell whose growth is coordinated with the cell cycle. Monitoring the cellular growth of fission yeast is a relatively simple way to measure the cell cycle stage of a cell. Here, we describe a detailed method of unperturbed cell synchronization, named centrifugal elutriation, for fission yeast. PMID:26254921

  9. In-Tank Elutriation Test Report And Independent Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, H. H.; Adamson, D. J.; Qureshi, Z. H.; Steeper, T. J.

    2011-04-13

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) funded Technology Development and Deployment (TDD) to solve technical problems associated with waste tank closure for sites such as Hanford Site and Savannah River Site (SRS). One of the tasks supported by this funding at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNNL) was In-Tank Elutriation. Elutriation is the process whereby physical separation occurs based on particle size and density. This report satisfies the first phase of Task WP_1.3.1.1 In-Tank Elutriation, which is to assess the feasibility of this method of separation in waste tanks at Hanford Site and SRS. This report includes an analysis of scoping tests performed in the Engineering Development Laboratory of SRNL, analysis of Hanford's inadvertent elutriation, the viability of separation methods such as elutriation and hydrocyclones and recommendations for a path forward. This report will demonstrate that the retrieval of Hanford salt waste tank S-112 very successfully decreased the tank's inventories of radionuclides. Analyses of samples collected from the tank showed that concentrations of the major radionuclides Cs-136 and Sr-90 were decreased by factors of 250 and 6 and their total curie tank inventories decreased by factors of 60,000 and 2000. The total tank curie loading decreased from 300,000 Ci to 55 Ci. The remaining heel was nearly all innocuous gibbsite, Al(OH){sub 3}. However, in the process of tank retrieval approximately 85% of the tank gibbsite was also removed. Significant amounts of money and processing time could be saved if more gibbsite could be left in tanks while still removing nearly all of the radionuclides. There were factors which helped to make the elutriation of Tank S-112 successful which would not necessarily be present in all salt tanks. 1. The gibbsite particles in the tank were surprisingly large, as much as 200 {micro}m. The gibbsite crystals had probably grown in

  10. Microplastics elutriation from sandy sediments: A granulometric approach.

    PubMed

    Kedzierski, Mikaël; Le Tilly, Véronique; Bourseau, Patrick; Bellegou, Hervé; César, Guy; Sire, Olivier; Bruzaud, Stéphane

    2016-06-15

    Although relatively easy to extract in the marine environment, microplastics are very difficult to recover when they are trapped in sediments. The elutriation column is one of the best tools currently available for extracting plastics from sediment, but with a high sand recovery yield. This study aims to address the following questions: (i) is it possible to use a sedimentological approach to limit the sand recovery? (ii) does the extraction velocity of the sand and plastic particles vary according to density and granulometry? (iii) what is the relative recovery efficiency obtained for dense polymer particles mixed with marine sand? Based on a new granulometric classification, different plastic particle-size fractions are defined. Their extraction velocities are experimentally determined on particles of sediment and different plastics (PA, PVC). The particle recovery experiments indicate that it is possible to extract >90% of dense plastic particles in cases of negligible sand recovery. PMID:27053014

  11. An interlaboratory comparison of sediment elutriate preparation and toxicity test methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elutriate bioassays are among numerous methods that exist for assessing the potential toxicity of sediments in aquatic systems. In this study, interlaboratory results were compared from 96-hour Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas static-renewal acute toxicity tests conduct...

  12. CELL CYCLE SYNCHRONIZATION OF MOUSE LIVER EPITHELIAL CELLS BY ELUTRIATION CENTRIFUGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlman, Andrew L.; Bartholomew, James C.

    1980-06-01

    Detailed methods are described for the sorting and cell cycle synchronization by means of centrifugal elutriation of an established mouse liver epithelial cell line(NMuLi). In a comparison between three different elutriation media and between two different temperatures(4° and 20° C), the NMuLi cells were found to be most reproducibly sorted in the cell cycle when run in growth medium in the absence of serum and at the lower temperature. Under these conditions. and using decrements of rotor speed calculated from an empirically derived algorithm as described in the text an initially asynchronous population (38% G{sub 1}, 36% S, and 28% G{sub 2}M) was sorted into fractions enriched to 60% G{sub 1}, 75% S, and 50% G{sub 2}M. Of the cells loaded into the rotor, 30% were lost in the elutriation process, and about 20% recovered as aggregates. The remainder appeared in the various synchronized fractions. Epithelial cells sorted in this manner demonstrated no loss of viability, and upon replating showed significant movement in the cell cycle by 6 hrs post elutriation. The degree of synchronous movement through the cell cycle achieved by elutriation depended on the part of the cell cycle from which the original elutriated fraction came. Cells collected as late S and G{sub 2}M moved through the cell cycle with the tightest sychrony.

  13. Characterization of bottom-sediment, water, and elutriate chemistry at selected stations at Reelfoot Lake, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broshears, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    To better-understand and predict the potential effect of dredging on water quality at Reelfoot Lake, chemical analyses were conducted on samples of lake water, bottom sediment, and elutriate water. Chemical analyses were conducted on samples of lake water, bottom sediment, and elutriate water collected at five stations in the lake during November 1988. Lake water was of the calcium magnesium bicarbonate type with an average dissolved-solids concentration of 120 milligrams per liter. Trace constituents were present in bottom sediments at concentrations representative of their average relative abundance in the earth?s crust. Elutriate waters prepared by mixing bottom sediment and lake water had suspended-solids concentrations as high as 2,000 milligrams per liter which exerted significant oxygen demand Trace constituents in the unfiltered elutriate waters were elevated with respect to lake water; elevated concentrations were attributable to the increased suspended-solids concentrations. Concentrations of total-recoverable copper, lead., and zinc in many elutriate waters exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s water-quality criteria for the protection of freshwater aquatic life. The toxicity of elutriate waters, as measured by a 48-hour bioassay with Ceriodaphnia dubia, was low.

  14. Ecological assessment of soil using a soil elutriate and the perennial ryegrass, Lolium perenne

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, C.; Meyers-Shone, L.; Duh, D.

    1995-12-31

    A 28-day plant bioassay using the perennial ryegrass, Lolium perenne, was utilized for an ecological assessment of soil from a hazardous waste site. An elutriate of the test soil was prepared and nutrients added, so that the seedlings would have direct exposure via uptake and to control for poor plant growth due to a lack of nutrients or proper soil profile characteristics. Use of an elutriate as the exposure medium assumes that those contaminants that can become waterborne for uptake by plants in the site conditions is the same as those which can be separated from adsorption to soil particulates during elutriate preparation. The ryegrass seeds were planted in a hydroponic system consisting of an upper chamber with an inert soil for a growth matrix and a lower reservoir with the nutrient and soil elutriate. Polyester cords were used to continuously wick the solution up to the inert soil and the chambers were drenched twice daily with the solution in the reservoir. At the conclusion of the study the plants` shoot length and dry weight (biomass) were measured to assess phytotoxicity of constituents in soil. The results of the test plants parameters were statistically compared to control plants to determine if test soil elutriates caused a measurable effect on ryegrass, The results of this plant bioassay provided additional and useful information for assessment of test soil.

  15. Recovery of valuable materials from spent NIMH batteries using spouted bed elutriation.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Eduardo H; Schlemmer, Diego F; Aguiar, Mônica L; Dotto, Guilherme L; Bertuol, Daniel A

    2016-04-15

    In recent years, a great increase in the generation of spent batteries occurred. Then, efficient recycling ways and correct disposal of hazardous wastes are necessary. An alternative to recover the valuable materials from spent NiMH batteries is the spouted bed elutriation. The aim of this study was to apply the mechanical processing (grinding and sieving) followed by spouted bed elutriation to separate the valuable materials present in spent NiMH batteries. The results of the manual characterization showed that about 62 wt.% of the batteries are composed by positive and negative electrodes. After the mechanical separation processes (grinding, sieving and spouted bed elutriation), three different fractions were obtained: 24.21 wt.% of metals, 28.20 wt.% of polymers and 42.00 wt.% of powder (the positive and negative electrodes). It was demonstrated that the different materials present in the spent NiMH batteries can be efficiently separated using a simple and inexpensive mechanical processing. PMID:26895722

  16. Separation of fiber from distillers dried grains (DDG) using sieving and elutriation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We recently developed a new process that combined sieving and elutriation (upward air flow) to separate fiber from distillers dried grains and solubles (DDGS). The current study was designed to evaluate the elusieve process for the first time using distillers dried grains (DDG) instead of DDGS. Be...

  17. Elutriation study of Willamette River bottom material and Willamette-Columbia River water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rinella, Joseph F.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1977-01-01

    Bottom material from the Willamette River was collected and mixed with Willamette and Columbia River waters on May 17, 1977. The elutriate, as well as each sample, was analyzed for selected nutrients, metals, and pesticides. Results show that the average dissolved ammonia, manganese, and zinc concentrations would require dilution by receiving water to achieve aquatic-life criteria levels. 

  18. Analysis of native water, bed material, and elutriate samples of major Louisiana waterways, 1975

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demas, Charles R.

    1976-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, conducted a series of elutriate studies in selected reaches of major navigable waterways of Louisiana. As defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, an elutriate is the supernatant resulting from the vigorous 30-minute shaking of one part bottom sediment from the dredging site with four parts water (vol/vol) collected from the dredging site followed by one hour settling time and appropriate centrifugation and a 0.45-micron filtration. The elutriate studies were initiated to evaluate possible environmental effects of proposed dredging activities in selected reaches of Louisiana waterways. The waterways investigated were the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet, Breton Sound, Mississippi River downstream from Baton Rouge, Bayou Long, Intracoastal Waterway (east and west of the Harvey Canal), Three Rivers area, Ouachita River, Barataria Bay, Houma Navigation Canal, Atchafalaya Bay (Ship Channel), Berwick Bay, Intracoastal Waterway (Port Allen to Morgan City), Petite Anse area, and Calcasieu River and Ship Channel. The Geological Survey collected 227 samples of native water and bed (bottom) material from 130 different sites. These samples (as well as elutriates prepared from mixtures of native water and bed material) were analyzed for selected metal, pesticide, nutrient, and organic constituents. An additional 116 bed samples collected at 58 sites were analyzed for selected pesticides; and 4 additional native-water samples from 2 sites were analyzed for selected metal pesticide, nutrient, and organic constituents. (Woodard-USGS)

  19. Bivalve larvae testing of ocean and in-bay sediments using porewater and elutriates

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, D.; Targgart, L.

    1995-12-31

    Toxicity of marine sediments is commonly tested using bivalve larval tests. The tests are performed on elutriates, which are prepared by mixing the sediment sample with seawater, and allowing the mixture to settle. The supernatant is separated and tested. Test results appeared to vary depending on the grain-size of the sediments. A study was performed to compare the effects of sediment grain-size on elutriate and porewater toxicity using the bivalve larvae test. Sediments were sampled from two sites: one in San Francisco Bay and one off the coast of San Francisco in the open ocean. From each site, two areas were sampled, one that was potentially impacted by a point-source discharge and another that was free from any discharge impacts. The bay sediments were fine-grained, and the ocean sediments were coarse grained. Porewater from each sample was extracted by centrifugation, and elutriates were prepared using a 4:1 sediment: seawater ratio. Each of the porewater and elutriate samples were tested using the ASTM Standard Guide for Conducting Static Acute Toxicity Tests with Saltwater Bivalves. The results show differences in toxicity that appear to be related to sediment grain-size. The results of this study further imply that dredge material test results should be interpreted with caution when fine-grained sediments are tested. Normalization of the results to grain-size may be appropriate.

  20. An elutriation device to measure particle settling velocity in urban runoff.

    PubMed

    Hettler, Eric N; Gulliver, John S; Kayhanian, Masoud

    2011-11-15

    Urban runoff is primarily treated by settling particles. One important parameter in the design of these settling basins is particle settling velocity. Yet, this parameter is rarely measured. A modified elutriation device is developed to measure particle settling velocity distribution for use in stormwater runoff treatment design and performance evaluation. The elutriation device has distinct advantages over settling column measurement, including (1) less time requirement to make measurements, and (2) flexibility to operate at various flow rates to cover wide ranges of particle settling velocity. Major modifications of the existing elutriation devices include using a variable speed pump, changing the glass column to plastic, and adding screens at the flow inlet for more uniform velocity distribution while making the column shorter. The results of the experiments showed that the particles retained in each column of the modified elutriation device could be predicted by assuming a fully-developed, laminar velocity profile across the cross-section of each column. Operation of the device under two flow rates and multiple columns increased the range of settling velocities measured. The information presented in this paper may be used to develop standard protocols for the evaluation of particle settling velocity in stormwater. PMID:21959249

  1. Application of spouted bed elutriation in the recycling of lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertuol, Daniel A.; Toniasso, Camila; Jiménez, Bernardo M.; Meili, Lucas; Dotto, Guilherme L.; Tanabe, Eduardo H.; Aguiar, Mônica L.

    2015-02-01

    The growing environmental concern, associated with the continuous increase in electronic equipment production, has induced the development of new technologies to recycle the large number of spent batteries generated in recent years. The amount of spent lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) tends to grow over the next years. These batteries are composed by valuable metals, such as Li, Co, Cu and Al, which can be recovered. Thus, the present work is carried out in two main steps: In the first step, a characterization of the LIBs is performed. Batteries from different brands and models are dismantled and their components characterized regarding to the chemical composition and main phases. In the second step, a sample of LIBs is shredded and the different materials present are separated by spouted bed elutriation. The results show that spouted bed elutriation is a simple and inexpensive way to obtain the separation of the different materials (polymers, metals, active electrode materials) present in spent LIBs.

  2. Analyses of native water, bottom material, and elutriate samples of southern Louisiana waterways, 1977-78

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dupuy, Alton J.; Couvillion, Nolan P.

    1979-01-01

    From March 1977 to July 1978 the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers conducted a series of elutriate studies to determine water quality in selected reaches of major navigable waterways of southern Louisiana. Sample were collected from the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet areas; Mississippi River, South Pass; Baptiste Collette Bayou; Tiger Pass area; Baou Long; Bayou Barataria and Barataria Bay Waterway area (gulf section); Bayou Segnette Waterway, Lake Pontchartrain near Tangipahoa River mouth; Bayou Grand Caillou; Bayou la Carpe at Homa; Houma Navigation Canal and Terrebonne Bay; Bayou Boeuf, Bayou Chene, and Baou Black, Atchafalaya River Channel, Atchafalaya Bay; Old River Lock tailbay; Red River below mouth of Black River; Freshwaer Canal; Mermentau River and Lake Arthur Mermentau River outlet; and Calcasieu Ship Channel. The studies were initiated at the request of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to evaluate possible environmental effects of proposed dredging activities in those waterways. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and U.S. Geological Survey collected 189 samples of native water and 172 samples of bottom (bed) material from 163 different sites. A total of 117 elutriates (Mixtures of native water and bottom material) were prepared. The native water and elutriate samples were analyzed for selected metals, pesticides, nutrients organics, and pysical constituents. Particle-size determinations were made on bottom-material samples. (Kosco-USGS)

  3. Geochemical investigations of metals release from submerged coal fly ash using extended elutriate tests.

    PubMed

    Bednar, A J; Chappell, M A; Seiter, J M; Stanley, J K; Averett, D E; Jones, W T; Pettway, B A; Kennedy, A J; Hendrix, S H; Steevens, J A

    2010-12-01

    A storage pond dike failure occurred at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant that resulted in the release of over 3.8 million cubic meters (5 million cubic yards) of fly ash. Approximately half of this material deposited in the main channel of the Emory River, 3.5 km upstream of the confluence of the Emory and Clinch Rivers, Tennessee, USA. Remediation efforts to date have focused on targeted removal of material from the channel through hydraulic dredging, as well as mechanical excavation in some areas. The agitation of the submerged fly ash during hydraulic dredging introduces river water into the fly ash material, which could alter the redox state of metals present in the fly ash and thereby change their sorption and mobility properties. A series of extended elutriate tests were used to determine the concentration and speciation of metals released from fly ash. Results indicated that arsenic and selenium species released from the fly ash materials during elutriate preparation were redox stable over the course of 10d, with dissolved arsenic being present as arsenate, and dissolved selenium being present as selenite. Concentrations of certain metals, such as arsenic, selenium, vanadium, and barium, increased in the elutriate waters over the 10d study, whereas manganese concentrations decreased, likely due to oxidation and precipitation reactions. PMID:20943255

  4. Analyses of water, core material, and elutriate samples collected near Yazoo City, Mississippi (Yazoo Headwater Project)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leone, Harold L.; Dupuy, Alton J.

    1978-01-01

    Five core-material-sampling sites near Yazoo City, Miss., were chosen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to represent areas of proposed dredging activity. Four receiving-water sites also were selected to represent the water that will contact the proposed dredged material. Chemical and physical analyses were performed upon core material and native-water samples from these sites as well as upon elutriate samples of specific sediment-receiving water systems. The results of these analyses are presented without interpretation. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Fiber separation from distillers dried grains with solubles using a larger elutriation apparatus and use of fiber as a feedstock for corn fiber gum production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an earlier study, the combination of sieving and elutriation (air flow) was found to be effective in separating fiber from distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS); the elutriation column diameter used was 63 mm. Larger quantities of fractions were needed for carrying out studies on producti...

  6. Use of population modeling to interpret a 21-day sediment elutriate bioassay with Daphnia magna

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, T.S.; Gibson, A.B.; Wright, R.B.; Gray, B.R.; Gamble, V.E.

    1994-12-31

    Sediment contamination was evaluated in 17 Great Lakes sediments using a 21-day sediment elutriate bioassay with D. magna. Sediment type had a significant effect on survival at the conclusion of the test, age at first reproduction, the number of broods produced, and the total number of young produced per adult. Sediments producing low survivorship also had negative effects on reproduction. However, a broad range of reproductive responses were found among sediments with high survivorship. To integrate all of these results a stochastic matrix population model was constructed for each of the sediment treatments. Survivorship, age at first reproduction, and total fecundity were all important determinants of population growth. However, modeling results indicated that independent examination of the endpoints measured during the test does not accurately reflect effects at the population level; i.e., no one endpoint appeared to have an overriding effect on population growth. The amount of total suspended solids (TSS) in the elutriates had a strong effect on the reproductive endpoints measured; TSS was negatively correlated with age at first reproduction and positively correlated with per brood fecundity and measures of population growth. Demographic modeling appears to be a useful method for integrating the effects of multiple endpoints and for providing ecologically relevant interpretive guidance.

  7. Cell Cycle Synchronization of Schizosaccharomyces pombe by Centrifugal Elutriation of Small Cells.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Iain M; Grallert, Agnes; Simanis, Viesturs

    2016-01-01

    Division of Schizosaccharomyces pombe by medial fission produces identically sized daughter cells that grow by tip extension until their own division is prompted by reaching the same critical size for division as the parental cell. The fidelity of this size control in the absence of perturbation means that cells of the same size are at the same point in the cell cycle. Size selection of small cells from an asynchronous culture by centrifugal elutriation permits generation of synchronous cultures large enough for biochemical analysis. The changes observed in the synchronized cell cycle progression of such cultures are representative of those that accompany cell cycle progression of individual cells. Here, we describe how size selection with the Beckman Coulter JE-5.0 rotor can be used to generate synchronized cultures. Because of the continuous passage of medium through the rotor throughout the procedure, elutriation is considered to have less impact on the integrity of the cell cycle than other approaches. Two protocols are presented here: The first generates a 2-L culture ideal for detailed biochemical analysis, whereas the second allows rapid generation and simultaneous analysis of three smaller (200-mL) cultures. PMID:27250944

  8. ENERGY DISPERSIVE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS OF DUST COLLECTED USING A VERTICAL ELUTRIATOR COTTON DUST SAMPLER

    EPA Science Inventory

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy has been used to analyze trace element concentrations in cotton dusts collected on verticle elutriator filter media. Twenty-three samples collected from ten bales of cotton processed in a model card room have been analyzed. The major elements...

  9. Liver histological changes and lipid peroxidation in the amphibian Ambystoma mexicanum induced by sediment elutriates from the Lake Xochimilco.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Ordoñez, Esperanza; López-López, Eugenia; Sedeño-Díaz, Jacinto Elías; Uría, Esther; Morales, Ignacio Andrés; Pérez, María Estela; Shibayama, Mineko

    2016-08-01

    Lacustrine sediments accumulate pollutants that input from the lake watershed and can be released to the water column by sediment resuspension; thus, pollutants can change their bioavailability and exert adverse effects to aquatic biota. Shallow-urban lakes are particularly susceptible to receive pollutants from urban discharges and sediment resuspension. Lake Xochimilco, in Mexico City, an urban-shallow lake, faces multiple problems: urban sprawl, overexploitation of aquifers, drying of springs, discharge of wastewater from treatment plants, and sediment resuspension. The aquatic biota living in this ecosystem is continuously exposed to the release of pollutants from the sediments. We assessed the risk that pollutants released from sediments from Lake Xochimilco, Touristic (TZ) and Agriculture zone (AZ), can exert on a native amphibian species of the lake (Ambystoma mexicanum) through exposure bioassays to sediment elutriates. We evaluate alterations in the amphibian by three approaches: biochemical (level of lipid peroxidation, LPO), cellular (ultrastructure) and the liver histology of A. mexicanum and we compare them with a batch control. Additionally, we assessed heavy metals (Pb, Cd and Hg) in elutriates. Elutriates from TZ showed the highest concentrations of the metals assessed. Organisms exposed to sediment elutriates from either study sites showed higher LPO values than control organisms (p<0.05). Organisms exposed to elutriates from the TZ showed the most conspicuous damages: hepatic vasodilation of sinusoids, capillaries with erythrocytes, leukocyte infiltration and cytoplasmic vacuolation in hepatocytes. The biological responses assessed reflected the risk that faces A. mexicanum when is exposed for prolonged periods to sediment resuspension in Lake Xochimilco. PMID:27521947

  10. Analyses of elutriates, native water, and bottom material in selected rivers and estuaries in western Oregon and Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuhrer, Gregory J.; Rinella, Frank A.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical analyses of elutriates, bottom sediment and water samples for selected metals, nutrients and organic compounds including insecticides and herbicides have been made to provide data to determine short-term water quality conditions associated with dredging operations in rivers and estuaries. Between May and December 1980 data were collected as far south as the Coos River in Western Oregon, as far north as Baker Bay in Southwestern Washington and as far inland as Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River. In an elutriation test, bottom material from a dredging site is mixed with native water and the filtrate is analysed. Elutriation test results showed variability in concentrates of dissolved chemicals as follows: in micrograms per liter (micro g/l), manganese ranged from 0 to 10,000, iron from 10 to 4300, zinc from 1 to 90, and phenols from 9 to 420; in milligrams per liter (mg/l), ammonia as nitrogen ranged from 0.03 to 46 and organic carbon from 0.5 to 45. (USGS)

  11. Particle Size Characterization of Water-Elutriated Libby Amphibole 2000 and RTI International Amosite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowers, Heather; Bern, Amy M.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents data on particle characterization analyzed by scanning electron microscopy on Libby amphibole collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in 2000 (LA2000) and amosite material collected by RTI International (RTI amosite). The particle characterization data were generated to support a portion of the Libby Action Plan. Prior to analysis, the raw LA2000 and RTI amosite materials were subjected to a preparation step. Each sample was water-elutriated by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Office of Research and Development, Research Triangle Park using the methods generally described in another published report and then delivered to the U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Microbeam Laboratory for analysis. Data presented here represent analyses performed by the U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Microbeam Laboratory and USEPA National Enforcement Investigations Center. This report consists of two Excel spreadsheet files developed by USEPA, Region 8 Superfund Technical Assistance Unit and describe the particle size characterization of the LA2000 and RTI amosite, respectively. Multiple tabs and data entry cells exist in each spreadsheet and are defined herein.

  12. Analyses of water, core material, and elutriate samples collected near Buras, Louisiana (New Orleans to Venice, Louisiana, Hurricane Protection Project)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leone, Harold A.

    1977-01-01

    Eight core-material-sampling sites were chosen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as possible borrow areas for fill material to be used in levee contruction near Buras, La. Eleven receiving-water sites also were selected to represent the water that will contact the porposed levees. Analyses of selected nutrients, metals, pesticides, and other organic constitutents were performed upon these bed-material and native-water samples as well as upon elutriate samples of specific core material-receiving water systems. The results of these analyses are presented without interpretation. (Woodard-USGS)

  13. Analyses of water, bank material, bottom material, and elutriate samples collected near Belzoni, Mississippi (upper Yazoo projects)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brightbill, David B.; Treadway, Joseph B.

    1980-01-01

    Four core-material-sampling sites and one bottom-material site were chosen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to represent areas of proposed dredging activity along a 24.9-mile reach of the upper Yazoo River. Five receiving-water sites also were selected to represent the water that will contact the proposed dredged material. Chemical and physical analyses were performed upon core or bottom material and native-water (receiving-water) samples from these sites as well as upon elutriate samples of the mixture of sediment and receiving water. The results of these analyses are presented without interpertation. (USGS)

  14. Analyses of water, core material, and elutriate samples collected near Sicily Island, Louisiana (Sicily Island area levee project)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demcheck, Dennis K.; Dupuy, Alton J.

    1980-01-01

    Samples consisting of composited core material were collected from five areas by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and analyzed by the U.S. Geological Survey to provide data on the impact of proposed channel excavation and levee construction in the Sicily Island area, Louisiana. Samples of receiving water from the five areas, selected to represent the water that will contact the proposed dredged material of the levee fill material, also were collected. Chemical and physical analyses were performed on samples of core material and native water and on elutriate samples of specific core material-receiving water mixtures. The results of these analyses are presented without interpretation. (USGS)

  15. Analyses of water, core material, and elutriate samples collected near Galliano, Louisiana: Larose to Golden Meadow, Louisiana, Hurricane Protection Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leone, Harold L.

    1977-01-01

    Seven core-material-sampling sites were chosen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as possible borrow areas for fill material to be used in levee construction near Galliano La. Four receiving-water sites also were selected to represent the water that will contact the proposed levees. Analyses of selected nutrients, metals, pesticides, and other organic constituents were performed upon these bed-material and native-water samples as well as upon elutriate samples of specific core material-receiving water systems. The results of these analyses are presented without interpretation. (Woodard-USGS)

  16. Sediment quality in the Douro river estuary based on trace metal contents, macrobenthic community and elutriate sediment toxicity test (ESTT).

    PubMed

    Mucha, Ana P; Bordalo, Adriano A; Vasconcelos, M Teresa S D

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sediment quality in the mesotidal Douro River estuarine environment, in order to identify areas where sediment contamination could cause ecosystem degradation. Samples were obtained in five locations and sediment characterised for grain size, total organic matter, total-recoverable metals (Al, Fe, Cu, Pb, Cr, Ni, Cd, Zn and Mn), as well as acid volatile sulfide (AVS) and simultaneously extracted metals (SEM). In situ effects were evaluated by examining the macrobenthic community structure. An elutriate sediment toxicity test (ESTT) was used to estimate the amount of metals and nutrients that could be exchanged with the water column through resuspension, and its positive or negative effects on the growth of the micro-alga Emiliania huxleyi in a 10 day test. Anthropogenic metal contamination was identified at the north bank of the Douro estuary, with deleterious effects on the macrobenthic community, namely decrease in number of species and diversity. This contamination could possibly also be toxic for water column organisms, in case of resuspension, as shown by the ESTT. Sediments from the salt marsh at the south bank showed an impoverished macrobenthic community and elutriate toxicity, which appeared to be due to anaerobic conditions. This study clearly shows the usefulness of the ESST approach to assess the biological effect of resuspension of estuarine sediments. PMID:15237288

  17. Phosphogypsum as a soil fertilizer: Ecotoxicity of amended soil and elutriates to bacteria, invertebrates, algae and plants.

    PubMed

    Hentati, Olfa; Abrantes, Nelson; Caetano, Ana Luísa; Bouguerra, Sirine; Gonçalves, Fernando; Römbke, Jörg; Pereira, Ruth

    2015-08-30

    Phosphogypsum (PG) is a metal and radionuclide rich-waste produced by the phosphate ore industry, which has been used as soil fertilizer in many parts of the world for several decades. The positive effects of PG in ameliorating some soil properties and increasing crop yields are well documented. More recently concerns are emerging related with the increase of metal/radionuclide residues on soils and crops. However, few studies have focused on the impact of PG applications on soil biota, as well as the contribution to soils with elements in mobile fractions of PG which may affect freshwater species as well. In this context the main aim of this study was to assess the ecotoxicity of soils amended with different percentages of Tunisian phosphogypsum (0.0, 4.9, 7.4, 11.1, 16.6 and 25%) and of elutriates obtained from PG - amended soil (0.0, 6.25, 12.5 and 25% of PG) to a battery of terrestrial (Eisenia andrei, Enchytraeus crypticus, Folsomia candida, Hypoaspis aculeifer, Zea mays, Lactuca sativa) and aquatic species (Vibrio fischeri, Daphnia magna, Raphidocelis subcapitata, Lemna minor). Both for amended soils and elutriates, invertebrates (especially D. magna and E. andrei) were the most sensitive species, displaying acute (immobilization) and chronic (reproduction inhibition) effects, respectively. Despite the presence of some concerning metals in PG and elutriates (e.g., zinc and cadmium), the extremely high levels of calcium found in both test mediums, suggest that this element was the mainly responsible for the ecotoxicological effects observed. Terrestrial and aquatic plants were the most tolerant species, which is in line with studies supporting the application of PG to increase crop yields. Nevertheless, no stimulatory effects on growth were observed for any of the species tested despite the high levels of phosphorus added to soils by PG. Given the importance of soil invertebrates for several soil functions and services, this study gives rise to new serious

  18. Accumulation of trace metals in sediments in a Mediterranean Lagoon: Usefulness of metal sediment fractionation and elutriate toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Zaaboub, Noureddine; Martins, Maria Virgínia Alves; Dhib, Amel; Béjaoui, Béchir; Galgani, François; El Bour, Monia; Aleya, Lotfi

    2015-12-01

    The authors investigated sediment quality in Bizerte Lagoon (Tunisia) focusing on geochemical characteristics, metal sediment fractionation and elutriate toxicity assessment. Nickel, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cr and Cd partitioning in sediments was studied; accumulation and bioavailability were elucidated using enrichment factors, sequential extractions, redox potential, acid volatile sulfide and biotest procedures in toxicity evaluation. Results revealed an accumulation for Pb and Zn, reaching 99 and 460 mg kg(-1) respectively. In addition, the acid volatile sulfide values were high in both eastern and western lagoon areas, thus affecting metal availability. Mean enrichment factor values for Pb and Zn were 4.8 and 4.9, respectively, with these elements as the main contributors to the lagoon's moderate enrichment level. Toxicity levels were influenced by accumulation of Zn in different surface sediment areas. Core sediments were investigated in areas with the highest metal concentrations; metal fractionation and biotest confirmed that Zn contributes to sediment toxicity. PMID:26412262

  19. Analyses of native water, core material, and elutriate samples collected from the Atchafalaya River and Atchafalaya Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demas, Charles R.

    1977-01-01

    During October and November 1976 the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, collected native water and core material from 14 sites along the Atchafalya River in Louisiana (from the head of Whiskey Bay Pilot Channel to American Pass) and 5 sites in Atchafalya Bay for evaluation of possible environmental effects of a proposed channel-enlargement project. Core material from all river sites and one bay site was collected to a depth of 50 feet (15 meters). At the remaining bay sites, samples were collected to a depth of less than 6 inches (15 centimeters) using a pipe dredge. Core material and native water were analyzed (separately and as elutriate samples prepared from mixtures) for selected metals, nutrients, organic compounds, and physical characteristics. No interpretation of the data is given. (Woodard-USGS)

  20. A whole sample toxicity assessment to evaluate the sub-lethal toxicity of water and sediment elutriates from a lake exposed to diffuse pollution.

    PubMed

    Abrantes, N; Pereira, R; de Figueiredo, D R; Marques, C R; Pereira, M J; Gonçalves, F

    2009-06-01

    The impact of diffuse pollution in aquatic systems is of great concern due to the difficult to measure and regulate it. As part of an ecological risk assessment (ERA), this study aims to use a whole sample toxicity assessment to evaluate the toxicity of water and sediment from Lake Vela, a lake that has been exposed to diffuse pollution. In this way, standard (algae: Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata; cladoceran: Daphnia magna) and local species (algae: Aphanizomenon flos-aquae; cladoceran: Daphnia longispina) were exposed to surface water, and sediment elutriates were collected seasonally from two sites at Lake Vela: one near the east bank (ES), surrounded by agricultural lands; and the other near the west bank (WS), surrounded by a forest. The results confirmed the seasonal contamination of both environmental compartments by pesticides, including organochlorine pesticides, and the presence of high concentrations of nutrients. Although both sites were contaminated, higher levels of pesticides and nutrients were detected in ES, particularly in the sediments. Bioassays showed that water samples (100% concentration) collected in summer and autumn significantly affected the growth rate of P. subcapitata, which could be attributed to the presence of pesticides. Likewise, they revealed an apparent toxicity of elutriates for P. subcapitata and for both daphnids, in summer and autumn. In fact, although pesticides were not detected in elutriates, high levels of un-ionized ammonia were recorded, which is considered highly toxic to aquatic life. By comparing the several species, P. subcapitata was revealed to be the most sensitive one, followed by the daphnids, and then by A. flos-aquae. Results obtained in this study underlined the importance of whole samples toxicity assessment for characterizing the ecological effects of complex mixtures from diffuse inputs, in the ERA processes. PMID:18655178

  1. The use of percoll gradients, elutriator rotor elution, and mithramycin staining for the isolation and identification of intraerythrocytic stages of plasmodium berghei.

    PubMed

    Rüssmann, L; Jung, A; Heidrich, H G

    1982-01-01

    Intraerythrocytic parasites of Plasmodium vinckei and Plasmodium berghei were separated according to their developmental stages using discontinuous Percoll gradients. Contaminating nucleated blood cells such as leukocytes were removed by elutriation centrifugation. The stages were unequivocally identified in smears using a newly developed DNA-specific staining procedure with mithramycin and fluorescence microscopy. This stain can also be used to detect parasites in human blood of very low parasitemias. The combination of methods described has many possible applications in immunologic and biochemical parasite research. PMID:6177116

  2. Toxicity assessment of diesel- and metal-contaminated soils through elutriate and solid phase assays with the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ruiz, Amaia; Dondero, Francesco; Viarengo, Aldo; Marigómez, Ionan

    2016-06-01

    A suite of organisms from different taxonomical and ecological positions is needed to assess environmentally relevant soil toxicity. A new bioassay based on Dictyostelium is presented that is aimed at integrating slime molds into such a testing framework. Toxicity tests on elutriates and the solid phase developmental cycle assay were successfully applied to a soil spiked with a mixture of Zn, Cd, and diesel fuel freshly prepared (recently contaminated) and after 2 yr of aging. The elutriates of both soils provoked toxic effects, but toxicity was markedly lower in the aged soil. In the D. discoideum developmental cycle assay, both soils affected amoeba viability and aggregation, with fewer multicellular units, smaller fruiting bodies and, overall, inhibition of fruiting body formation. This assay is quick and requires small amounts of test soil, which might facilitate its incorporation into a multispecies multiple-endpoint toxicity bioassay battery suitable for environmental risk assessment in soils. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1413-1421. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26450765

  3. Analyses of native water, bottom material, elutriate samples, and dredged material from selected southern Louisiana waterways and selected areas in the Gulf of Mexico, 1979-81

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lurry, Dee L.

    1983-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey was requested by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New Orleans District, to provide water-quality data to evaluate environmental effects of dredging activities in selected reaches of the Calcasieu River in southwestern Louisiana. Samples were collected from the upper and lower Calcasieu River between January 1980 and March 1981. Thirty-three samples (22 native-water and 11 effluent) were collected from eleven dredging sites. In addition, a series of elutriate studies were conducted between July 1979 and July 1981 to determine water quality as a basis for assessing possible environmental effects of proposed dredging activities in the following areas: Grand Bayou and Martins Canal near Happy Jack, unnamed bayou near Port Sulphur, Grand Bayou and Pipeline Canal near Port Sulphur and Bayou des Plantins near Empire; Mississippi River Gulf Outlet and Inner Harbor Navigation Canal; Southwest Pass; Barataria Bay; Atchafalaya Bay at Eugene Island; Calcasieu Ship Channel. Samples of native water and samples of bottom material were collected from 22 different sites and elutriate (mixtures of native water and bottom material) samples were prepared and analyzed. Four proposed ocean-disposal sites were sampled for bottom material only. Samples were analyzed for selected chemical and biological constituents and physical properties. (USGS)

  4. Analyses of water, core material, and elutriate samples collected near New Orleans, Louisiana (Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, and vicinity hurricane protection project)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leone, Harold L.

    1976-01-01

    When a hurricane approaches the New Orleans, Louisiana area, the accompanying tides and heavy rainfall increase the level of water in Lake Borgne, Mississippi Sound, and Lake Pontchartrain and pose a major threat of water damage to the populated areas. During Hurricane Betsy (1965), for example, the level of Lake Pontchartrain rose as much as 13 feet. Nineteen core-material-sampling sites were chosen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as possible borrow areas for fill material to be used in levee construction for flood protection around Lake Pontchartrain. Twenty-three receiving-water sites were also selected to represent the water that will contact the proposed levees. Selected nutrients, metals, pesticides, and other organic constituents were analyzed from bed-material and native-water samples as well as upon elutriate samples of specific core material-receiving water systems. The results of these analyses are presented without interpretation. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Identification and Isolation of Small CD44-Negative Mesenchymal Stem/Progenitor Cells From Human Bone Marrow Using Elutriation and Polychromatic Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sean R.R.; Jiang, Yajuan; Leary, Elizabeth; Yavanian, Greg; Eminli, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    The method of isolation of bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) is a limiting factor in their study and therapeutic use. MSCs are typically expanded from BM cells selected on the basis of their adherence to plastic, which results in a heterogeneous population of cells. Prospective identification of the antigenic profile of the MSC population(s) in BM that gives rise to cells with MSC activity in vitro would allow the preparation of very pure populations of MSCs for research or clinical use. To address this issue, we used polychromatic flow cytometry and counterflow centrifugal elutriation to identify a phenotypically distinct population of mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSPCs) within human BM. The MSPC activity resided within a population of rare, small CD45−CD73+CD90+CD105+ cells that lack CD44, an antigen that is highly expressed on culture-expanded MSCs. In culture, these MSPCs adhere to plastic, rapidly proliferate, and acquire CD44 expression. They form colony forming units-fibroblast and are able to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes under defined in vitro conditions. Their acquired expression of CD44 can be partially downregulated by treatment with recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, a response not found in BM-MSCs derived from conventional plastic adherence methods. These observations indicate that MSPCs within human BM are rare, small CD45−CD73+CD90+CD105+ cells that lack expression of CD44. These MSPCs give rise to MSCs that have phenotypic and functional properties that are distinct from those of BM-MSCs purified by plastic adherence. PMID:23847000

  6. New Bedford Harbor Superfund Project, Acushnet River Estuary engineering feasibility study of dredging and dredged-material disposal alternatives. Report 3. Characterization and elutriate testing of Acushnet River Estuary sediment. Technical report, August 1985-March 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Averett, D.E.

    1989-03-01

    Several of the alternatives being considered for the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Project involve dredging of contaminated sediment from the Acushnet River Estuary and placement of the contaminated dredged material in confined disposal areas. Evaluation of these alternatives requires testing sediment from the site to determine chemical and physical characteristics, settling properties, contaminant releases for various migration pathways, and treatment requirements for disposal area effluent. The purpose of this report is to describe the estuary composite sediment sample and the hot-spot-sediment sample tested at the US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station as part of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Acushnet River Estuary Engineering Feasibility Study of Dredging and Dredged Material Disposal Alternatives. Bulk sediment chemistry, physical characteristics, and elutriate testing for the sediments are included.

  7. COPPER UPTAKE BY LOBSTER HEPATOPANCREATIC CELLS ISOLATED BY A CENTRIFUGAL ELUTRIATION TECHNIQUE. (R823068)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  8. A COMPARISON OF BULK SEDIMENT TOXICITY TESTING METHODS AND SEDIMENT ELUTRIATE TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bulk sediment toxicity tests are routinely used to assess the level and extent of contamination in natural sediments. While reliable, these tests can be resource intensive, requiring significant outlays of time and materials. The purpose of this study was to compare the results ...

  9. Recirculating elutriator for extracting gastrointestinal nematode larvae from pasture herbage samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastrointestinal nematode parasites present an important limitation to ruminant production worldwide. Methods for quantifying infective larvae of GIN on pastures are generally tedious, time-consuming, and require bulky equipment set-ups. This limitation to expedient data collection is a bottleneck...

  10. A CENTRIFUGAL ELUTRIATION METHOD TO ISOLATE AND PURIFY DISTINCT CELL POPULATIONS FROM A HETEROGENEOUS INVERTEBRATE GASTROINTESTINAL ORGAN FOR PHYSIOLOGICAL STUDIES. (R823068)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  11. Evaluation of the toxicity of marine sediments and dredge spoils with the MicrotoxR bioassay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ankley, G.T.; Hoke, R.A.; Giesy, J.P.; Winger, P.V.

    1989-01-01

    The MicrotoxR bioassay was used to evaluate the toxicity of sediment and dredge spoil elutriates from several potentially-contaminated sites in Mobile and Pascagoula Bays. Elutriates were prepared using either local seawater or distilled deionized water (osmotically adjusted with NaCl prior to testing), and MicrotoxR assays were performed with the elutriates and three reference toxicants. There were marked differences in the toxicity of several elutriates and reference toxicants in the two different waters, with the seawater generally resulting in the same or lesser toxicity than the osmotically-adjusted distilled deionized water.

  12. Comparison of soil toxicity estimates using lettuce seeds and soil ciliates

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, J.R.; Bowers, N.J.; Beeson, D.; Lewis, M.

    1995-12-31

    Contaminants in soils affect microbes, fungi, animals and plants, yet few tests species are available to assess soil toxicity. Many soil microbes are adapted to grow rapidly after wetting and can be used to assess contaminants in the soil solution. The authors compared the growth of the soil ciliate, Colpoda inflata, to germination and growth of lettuce (Lactuca saliva) seeds exposed to water elutriate from twenty-five soil samples suspected of being toxic. Exposure to full strength elutriate resulted in significant (p < 0.05) reduction in seed germination in 15 of 25 elutriates, five of which produced no germination. Growth (total dry weight) of the seeds that germinated was unaffected. Growth of C. inflata was reduced by more than 70% in 12 of 25 elutriates. All C. inflata were killed following exposure to the same five elutriates that resulted in no seed germination. The ciliate growth test identified three elutriates as toxic that were not identified as toxic by the seed germination test. Conversely, the seed germination test identified seven elutriates as toxic that were not toxic in the ciliate growth test. Stepwise regression using concentrations of nine metals in the soil elutriates indicated that cadmium, copper, and arsenic significantly reduced C. inflata growth (r{sup 2} = 0.77), whereas copper, arsenic, and lead significantly reduced lettuce seed germination (r{sup 2} = 0.61). The plant and microbe models showed different responses, and there was a greater correspondence between elutriate chemistry and ciliate response than in the plant tests.

  13. Separation of organic ion exchange resins from sludge -- engineering study

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, J.B.

    1998-08-25

    This engineering study evaluates the use of physical separation technologies to separate organic ion exchange resin from KE Basin sludge prior to nitric acid dissolution. This separation is necessitate to prevent nitration of the organics in the acid dissolver. The technologies under consideration are: screening, sedimentation, elutriation. The recommended approach is to first screen the Sludge and resin 300 microns then subject the 300 microns plus material to elutriation.

  14. Comparative evaluation of soil toxicity using lettuce seeds and soil ciliates

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, N.; Pratt, J.R.; Beeson, D.; Lewis, M.

    1997-02-01

    The toxicity of elutriates from 25 putatively contaminated soils was evaluated using the standard seed (Lactuca sativa) germination test and a recently developed soil ciliate (Colpoda inflata) growth test. Correspondence in the identification of presence or absence of toxicity in the 25 soil elutriates between the two tests was 60% and concordance in ranking of toxicity between the two tests was significant (p < 0.05) using Spearman`s rank correlation test (r{sub s} = 0.3831). Stepwise multiple regression analysis of toxicity results against soil elutriate chemistry indicated that pH explained the greatest amount of variation in response in both tests, despite high concentrations of several metals in the elutriates. For the germination test, a multiple regression model that included pH and cadmium explained 58.5% of response variation, whereas over 83% of response variation in the ciliate growth test could be explained by pH, copper, and cadmium. Differences in the response of the plant and protozoan models appeared to be due primarily to differences in their sensitivity to elutriate pH. In addition to better correspondence between elutriate chemistry and ciliate response compared to the seed germination test, lower response variability associated with the measure of ciliate growth compared with seed germination provided greater statistical sensitivity for detecting toxic effects.

  15. Toxicological evaluation of the effects of waste-to-energy ash-concrete on two marine species

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, K.L.; Nelson, W.G.; Curley, J.L. )

    1993-10-01

    The toxicological effects of waste-to-energy ash-concrete on survivorship, growth, and fecundity (end-point parameters) of Mysidopsis bahia and on survivorship and growth of Menidia beryllina were evaluated with the 7-d static-renewal toxicity test. Leachate and elutriate solutions were prepared from experimental ash-concrete test cylinders constructed from concrete with additions of either bottom ash (mix BA), mixed bottom ash and scrubber residue, or mixed bottom ash and fly ash (60:40%, mix BA:FA). Control experiments with concrete (without ash) and pH (7-9.5) were conducted to assess any toxic effects of the stabilization process. pH did not affect end-point parameters of Mysidopsis bahia or Menidia beryllina. However, the 100% elutriate solution made from concrete reduced survivorship of Mysidopsis bahia. For experiments with ash-concrete test cylinders with the BA mixture, 10-d leachate solution reduced survivorship of Mysidopsis bahia and the 100% elutriate solutions reduced survivorship of Mysidopsis bahia and Manidia beryllina. With the BA:SR mixture, the 100 and 50% elutriate solutions reduced survivorship of Menidia beryllina. The BA:FA 10- and 5-d leachate solutions and the 100, 50, and 25% elutriate solutions reduced survivorship of Menidia beryllina. The BA:FA 10- and 5-d leachate solutions and the 100, 50, 25% elutriate solutions reduced survivorship of Mysidopsis bahia.

  16. Screening evaluation of the ecotoxicity and genotoxicity of soils contaminated with organic and inorganic nanoparticles: the role of ageing.

    PubMed

    Pereira, R; Rocha-Santos, T A P; Antunes, F E; Rasteiro, M G; Ribeiro, R; Gonçalves, F; Soares, A M V M; Lopes, I

    2011-10-30

    This study aimed to evaluate the toxicity and genotoxicity of soils, and corresponding elutriates, contaminated with aqueous suspensions of two organic (vesicles of sodium dodecyl sulphate/didodecyl dimethylammonium bromide and of monoolein and sodium oleate) and five inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) (TiO(2), TiSiO(4), CdSe/ZnS quantum dots, Fe/Co magnetic fluid and gold nanorods) to Vibrio fischeri and Salmonella typhimurium (TA98 and TA100 strains). Soil samples were tested 2h and 30 days after contamination. Suspensions of NPs were characterized by Dynamic Light Scattering. Soils were highly toxic to V. fischeri, especially after 2h. After 30 days toxicity was maintained only for soils spiked with suspensions of more stable NPs (zeta potential>30 mV or <-30 mV). Elutriates were particularly toxic after 2h, except for soil spiked with Fe/Co magnetic fluid, suggesting that ageing may have contributed for degrading the organic shell of these NPs, increasing the mobility of core elements and the toxicity of elutriates. TA98 was the most sensitive strain to the mutagenic potential of soil elutriates. Only elutriates from soils spiked with gold nanorods, quantum dots (QDs) and TiSiO(4) induced mutations in both strains of S. typhimurium, suggesting more diversified mechanisms of genotoxicity. PMID:21871729

  17. Impact of contaminated-sediment resuspension on phytoplankton in the Biguglia lagoon (Corsica, Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafabrie, Céline; Garrido, Marie; Leboulanger, Christophe; Cecchi, Philippe; Grégori, Gérald; Pasqualini, Vanina; Pringault, Olivier

    2013-09-01

    In shallow human-impacted systems, sediment resuspension events can result in pulsed exposures of pelagic organisms to multiple contaminants. Here, we examined the impact of the resuspension of contaminated sediment on phytoplankton in the Biguglia lagoon (Corsica, Mediterranean Sea), by conducting an in situ microcosm experiment over a 96-h period. Natural phytoplankton was exposed to elutriates prepared from a contaminated-sediment resuspension simulating process, and its functional and structural responses were compared with those of non-exposed phytoplankton. The elutriates displayed moderate multiple contamination by trace metals and PAHs. Our results show that elutriate exposure induced both functional and structural phytoplankton changes. Elutriates strongly stimulated phytoplankton growth after 24 h of exposure. They also enhanced phytoplankton photosynthetic performance during the first hours of exposure (up to 48 h), before reducing it toward the end of the experiment. Elutriates were also found to slightly stimulate Bacillariophyceae and conversely to slightly inhibit Dinophyceae in the short term. Additionally, they were found to stimulate phycocyanin-rich picocyanobacteria in the short term (8-48 h) before inhibiting it in the longer term (72-96 h), and to inhibit eukaryotic nanophytoplankton in the short term (8-48 h) before stimulating it in the longer term (72-96 h). Sediment resuspensions are thus likely to have significant effects on the global dynamics and functions of phytoplankton in contaminated coastal environments.

  18. A new activated primary tank developed for recovering carbon source and its application.

    PubMed

    Jin, Pengkang; Wang, Xianbao; Zhang, Qionghua; Wang, Xiaochang; Ngo, Huu Hao; Yang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    A novel activated primary tank process (APT) was developed for recovering carbon source by fermentation and elutriation of primary sludge. The effects of solids retention time (SRT), elutriation intensity (G) and return sludge ratio (RSR) on this recovery were evaluated in a pilot scale reactor. Results indicated that SRT significantly influenced carbon source recovery, and mechanical elutriation could promote soluble COD (SCOD) and VFA yields. The optimal conditions of APT were SRT=5d, G=152s(-1) and RSR=10%, SCOD and VFA production were 57.0mg/L and 21.7mg/L. Particulate organic matter in sludge was converted into SCOD and VFAs as fermentative bacteria were significantly enriched in APT. Moreover, the APT process was applied in a wastewater treatment plant to solve the problem of insufficient carbon source. The outcomes demonstrated that influent SCOD of biological tank increased by 31.1%, which improved the efficiency of removing nitrogen and phosphorus. PMID:26562688

  19. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Buttermilk Channel, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Antrim, L.D; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q.; Tokos, J.J.S.

    1996-08-01

    Buttermilk Channel was one of seven waterways that was sampled and evaluated for dredging and sediment disposal. Sediment samples were collected and analyses were conducted on sediment core samples. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the channel included bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of site water and elutriate, water column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Individual sediment core samples were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon. A composite sediment samples, representing the entire area proposed for dredging, was analyzed for bulk density, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Site water and elutriate were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBs.

  20. Effect of barley roller milling on fractionation of flour using sieving and air classification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Separation of hulls prior to fermentation of barley flour could increase fuel ethanol productivity and the hulls would be an additional coproduct. In a recent study, it was found that the Elusieve process, a combination of sieving and elutriation (air classification) was effective in separating hul...

  1. Utilization of a duckweed bioassay to evaluate leaching of heavy metals in smelter contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Youngman, A.L.; Lydy, M.J.; Williams, T.L.

    1998-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a duckweed bioassay could be used to evaluate the downward migration of heavy metals in smelter soils. The duckweed bioassay was initially used to evaluate elutriates prepared from samples of smelter soils. These initial tests verified that the elutriates would elicit toxic responses. Elutriate testing was followed with an evaluation of leachate from untreated soil cores or soil cores that had been amended with organic matter either unplanted or planted to a grass-forb seed mixture. There was an inverse linear relationship between heavy-metal concentrations in leachate and NOEC and IC{sub 50} values expressed as percentages among all soil cores. Based on these preliminary duckweed bioassays, there were no differences between soil types or organic amended or non-amended soil, but leachate from vegetated soil cores were less toxic than were leachates from non-vegetated soil cores. Overall, the duckweed bioassays were useful in detecting heavy metal availability in elutriate and leachate samples from smelter soils.

  2. Cellular and inflammatory responses in bronchoalveolar lavage and lungs in rats after intratracheal instillation of Libby amphibole or amosite asbestos

    EPA Science Inventory

    The high incidence of asbestos-related disease in residents of Libby, Montana, is associated with the mining of asbestos-contaminated vermiculite, but the etiology of disease related to Libby amphibole asbestos (LA) exposure is unclear. In this study, water elutriation was used t...

  3. FIBER SEPARATED FROM DISTILLERS DRIED GRAINS WITH SOLUBLES AS A FEEDSTOCK FOR ETHANOL PRODUCTION TO INCREASE OUTPUT FROM DRY GRIND CORN PLANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the dry grind process, corn starch is converted into sugars which are fermented into ethanol. The remaining corn components (protein, fiber, fat, and ash) form coproduct, distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS). The combination of sieving and elutriation (air classification), known as elus...

  4. Consequences of contaminant mixture on the dynamics and functional diversity of bacterioplankton in a southwestern Mediterranean coastal ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Pringault, Olivier; Lafabrie, Céline; Avezac, Murielle; Bancon-Montigny, Chrystelle; Carre, Claire; Chalghaf, Mohamed; Delpoux, Sophie; Duvivier, Adrien; Elbaz-Poulichet, Françoise; Gonzalez, Catherine; Got, Patrice; Leboulanger, Christophe; Spinelli, Sylvie; Hlaili, Asma Sakka; Bouvy, Marc

    2016-02-01

    Contamination of coastal environments is often due to a complex mixture of pollutants, sometimes in trace levels, that may have significant effects on diversity and function of organisms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the short-term dynamics of bacterioplankton exposed to natural and artificial mixtures of contaminants. Bacterial communities from a southwestern Mediterranean ecosystem, lagoon and the bay (offshore) of Bizerte were exposed to i) elutriate from resuspension of contaminated sediment, and ii) an artificial mixture of metals and herbicides mimicking the contamination observed during sediment resuspension. Elutriate incubation as well as artificial spiking induced strong enrichments in nutrients (up to 18 times), metals (up to six times) and herbicides (up to 20 times) relative to the in situ concentrations in the offshore station, whereas the increases in contaminants were less marked in the lagoon station. In the offshore waters, the artificial mixture of pollutants provoked a strong inhibition of bacterial abundance, production and respiration and significant modifications of the potential functional diversity of bacterioplankton with a strong decrease of the carbohydrate utilization. In contrast, incubation with elutriate resulted in a stimulation of bacterial activities and abundances, suggesting that the toxic effects of pollutants were modified by the increase in nutrient and DOM concentrations due to the sediment resuspension. The effects of elutriate and the artificial mixture of pollutants on bacterial dynamics and the functional diversity were less marked in the lagoon waters, than in offshore waters, suggesting a relative tolerance of lagoon bacteria against contaminants. PMID:26451655

  5. Electronic scraps - Recovering of valuable materials from parallel wire cables

    SciTech Connect

    Pinheiro Bezerra de Araujo, Mishene Christie; Pinto Chaves, Arthur; Crocce Romano Espinosa, Denise; Tenorio, Jorge Alberto Soares

    2008-11-15

    Every year, the number of discarded electro-electronic products is increasing. For this reason recycling is needed, to avoid wasting non-renewable natural resources. The objective of this work is to study the recycling of materials from parallel wire cable through unit operations of mineral processing. Parallel wire cables are basically composed of polymer and copper. The following unit operations were tested: grinding, size classification, dense medium separation, electrostatic separation, scrubbing, panning, and elutriation. It was observed that the operations used obtained copper and PVC concentrates with a low degree of cross contamination. It was concluded that total liberation of the materials was accomplished after grinding to less than 3 mm, using a cage mill. Separation using panning and elutriation presented the best results in terms of recovery and cross contamination.

  6. Contribution of ammonia, metals, and nonpolar organic compounds to the toxicity of sediment interstitial water from an Illinois River tributary

    SciTech Connect

    Schubauer-Berigan, M.K.; Ankley, G.T.

    1991-01-01

    Toxicity of Illinois River bulk sediment, sediment interstitial (pore) water and elutriates to the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus, fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and the amphipod Hyalella azteca was compared to determine the most representative aqueous fraction for toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) studies. Toxicity of pore water corresponded better than elutriates to bulk sediment toxicity. Subsequent TIE procedures conducted with the cladoceran Ceriodaphnia dubia indicated that ammonia, metals and nonpolar organic compounds (nonylphenols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, benzenes, long-chain hydrocarbons) were responsible for toxicity of the sediment pore water. Results of TIE manipulations also suggested that methods for recovering pore water that include filtration may eliminate, a priori, a major component of the sediment contaminants responsible for toxicity.

  7. Fines in fluidized bed silane pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G.; Hogle, R.; Rohatgi, N.; Morrison, A.

    1984-01-01

    Silicon deposition on silicon seed particles by silane pyrolysis in a fluidized-bed reactor is investigated as a low-cost, high-throughput method to produce high-purity polysilicon for solar-cell applications. Studies of fines, particles 0.1-10 microns diam, initiated from homogeneous decomposition in the reactor were conducted using 2 and 6-in-diam fluidized beds. The studies show functional dependences of fines elutriation on silane feed concentration, temperature, gas velocity, and bubble size. The observation that the fines elutriation is generally below 10 percent of the silicon-in-silane feed is attributed to scavenging by large particles in an environment of less free space for homogeneous nucleation. Preliminary results suggest that, with proper conditions and distributor design, high-silane-concentration (over 50 percent SiH4 in H2) feed may be used.

  8. Results of bulk sediment analysis and bioassay testing on selected sediments from Oakland Inner Harbor and Alcatraz disposal site, San Francisco, California

    SciTech Connect

    Word, J Q; Ward, J A; Woodruff, D L

    1990-09-01

    The Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) was contracted by the US Army Corps of Engineers, San Francisco District, to perform bulk sediment analysis and oyster larvae bioassays (elutriate) on sediments from Inner Oakland Harbor, California. Analysis of sediment characteristics by MSL indicated elevated priority pollutants, PAHs, pesticides, metals, organotins, and oil and grease concentrations, when compared to Alcatraz Island Dredged Material Disposal Site sediment concentrations. Larvae of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, were exposed to seawater collected from the Alcatraz Island Site water, and a series of controls using water and sediments collected from Sequim Bay, Washington. Exposure of larvae to the Alcatraz seawater and the 50% and 100% elutriate concentrations from each Oakland sediment resulted in low survival and a high proportion of abnormal larvae compared to Sequim Bay control exposures. MSL identified that field sample collection, preservation, and storage protocols used by Port of Oakland contractors were inconsistent with standard accepted practices. 23 refs., 10 figs., 40 tabs.

  9. Mathematical modelling of coal fired fluidized bed combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Selcuk, N.; Siddall, R.G.; Sivrioglu, U.

    1980-12-01

    A system model of continuous fluidized bed combustors burning coal of wide size distribution has been derived, and applied to the investigation of the effect of excess air and recycle on bed concentration and temperature profiles and combustion efficiency of a pilot scale coal fired fluidized combustor. To demonstrate the effect of recycling, the behaviour of the fluidized combustor has been predicted for two extreme cases of recycle: complete and no recycle of elutriated char particles, the former was chosen to determine the behaviour of the model in the absence of elutriation, and the latter corresponds to the actual operating conditions of the fluidized combustor. Expected trends for concentration and temperature profiles and combustion efficiency are predicted correctly for both cases. The predictive ability and the flexibility of the model for incorporation of refinements such as a correlation for bubble growth and a detailed combustion mechanism, makes the model a promising one for the evaluation of performance of the fluid bed industrial boilers.

  10. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Shark River Project area

    SciTech Connect

    Antrim, L.D.; Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B.

    1996-09-01

    The objective of the Shark River Project was to evaluate proposed dredged material to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Tests and analyses were conducted on the Shark River sediments. The evaluation of proposed dredged material consisted of bulk sediment chemical and physical analysis, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation tests. Individual sediment core samples collected from the Shark River were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). One sediment composite was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate, prepared from suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the Shark River sediment composite, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBs. Benthic acute toxicity tests and bioaccumulation tests were performed.

  11. Relationship between fluid bed aerosol generator operation and the aerosol produced

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, R.L.; Yerkes, K.

    1980-12-01

    The relationships between bed operation in a fluid bed aerosol generator and aerosol output were studied. A two-inch diameter fluid bed aerosol generator (FBG) was constructed using stainless steel powder as a fluidizing medium. Fly ash from coal combustion was aerosolized and the influence of FBG operating parameters on aerosol mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD), geometric standard deviation (sigma/sub g/) and concentration was examined. In an effort to extend observations on large fluid beds to small beds using fine bed particles, minimum fluidizing velocities and elutriation constant were computed. Although FBG minimum fluidizing velocity agreed well with calculations, FBG elutriation constant did not. The results of this study show that the properties of aerosols produced by a FBG depend on fluid bed height and air flow through the bed after the minimum fluidizing velocity is exceeded.

  12. Nuclear waste solidification

    DOEpatents

    Bjorklund, William J.

    1977-01-01

    High level liquid waste solidification is achieved on a continuous basis by atomizing the liquid waste and introducing the atomized liquid waste into a reaction chamber including a fluidized, heated inert bed to effect calcination of the atomized waste and removal of the calcined waste by overflow removal and by attrition and elutriation from the reaction chamber, and feeding additional inert bed particles to the fluidized bed to maintain the inert bed composition.

  13. Toxicity of sediment-bound pollutants in the Seine estuary, France, using a Eurytemora affinis larval bioassay.

    PubMed

    Lesueur, Teddy; Boulangé-Lecomte, Céline; Restoux, Gwendal; Deloffre, Julien; Xuereb, Benoît; Le Menach, Karyn; Budzinski, Hélène; Petrucciani, Nathalie; Marie, Sabine; Petit, Fabienne; Forget-Leray, Joëlle

    2015-03-01

    Coastal urbanisation exposes surrounding estuarine environments to urban-related contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) and pesticide mixtures. Hydrophobic contaminants can adsorb on estuarine sediments. They can subsequently be released on a massive scale in the aquatic environment due to artificial or natural phenomena (e.g. dredging, tides), thereby threatening living organisms. The contamination of sediment is a significant ecological issue in the Seine estuary, France. However, few relevant methods have been developed to assess sediment toxicity and its ecological impacts in a cost-effective way. In this context, we aimed to assess the toxicity of natural sediments from the Seine estuary on the development of the calanoid copepod Eurytemora affinis using a previously developed larval bioassay. This assay involves direct exposure of nauplii to elutriates of sediments for six days. Sediments were collected along the Seine estuary from six polluted sites and one reference site. Pollutants in this estuary included PAHs, PCBs and OCPs (organochlorine pesticides). Nauplius survival was significantly more affected by exposure to all contaminated sediment elutriates, than by exposure to sediment from Yville-sur-Seine (the reference site), whereas nauplius growth was significantly reduced after exposure to contaminated sediment elutriates from four of the six contaminated sites. We identified two distinct site clusters, one including both the sand-rich and the least polluted sediments (Oissel, Quillebeuf-sur-Seine, Caudebec-en-Caux) and the other including both the clay- and silt-rich, and the most polluted sediments (La Bouille, Poses, Pont de Normandie). As expected, survival was significantly more impacted after exposure to elutriates from the second cluster than from the first. This work enables (i) assessment of the toxicity of natural sediments in the Seine estuary and (ii) validation of the larval bioassay

  14. Impurities in pretreated biowaste for co-digestion: A determination approach.

    PubMed

    Jank, Anna; Müller, Wolfgang; Waldhuber, Sebastian; Gerke, Frédéric; Ebner, Christian; Bockreis, Anke

    2016-06-01

    Although the mechanical treatment of source separated organic waste typically includes processing steps to remove impurities like plastic bags, smaller particles like glass, stones or sand are often not sufficiently removed. These particles lead to plant malfunctions, increased equipment abrasion and accumulation in the digester. It is possible to remove these small impurities before or during the fermentation process but this requires additional equipment at the waste treatment facilities. For pretreated biowaste with fairly low concentrations of impurities and small particle sizes no appropriate method was found in literature to determine these particles. Therefore various approaches to develop an appropriate method were tested and finally one method was selected. Sample mass calculation showed that for the determination of impurities >2mm a sample mass of about 6kg is required to receive statistically sound result. Firstly an elutriation step is used to concentrate the impurities in a sinking fraction, still containing some organic material. The elutriated material is then dried. After drying the elutriated material, impurities can be fairly easily sorted manually. The elutriation process is applicable for the determination of impurities >1mm. Due to the difficult manual sorting of particles <2mm and the reduced sample mass required for the determination of particles <2mm, these particles are determined by a different procedure: A sample mass of about 1kg is dried and combusted in a muffle furnace. The remaining ashes are sieved from 2 to 0.06mm. Particles <0.06mm were not considered as impurities. The data regarding the impurities content and particle size distribution in food- and biowaste are required for assessing separation options as well as the behavior of stones or sand in the digester. This allows describing the quality of the pretreated biowaste. Furthermore the need to adopt or improve the existing pretreatment can be identified and the impact to the

  15. Water quality, organic chemistry of sediment, and biological conditions of streams near an abandoned wood-preserving plant site at Jackson, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradfield, A.D.; Flexner, N.M.; Webster, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation of water quality, organic sediment chemistry, and biological conditions of streams near an abandoned wood-preserving plant site at Jackson, Tennessee, was conducted during December 1990. The study was designed to assess the extent of possible contamination of water and biota in the streams from creosote-related discharge originating at this Superfund site. Central Creek, adjacent to the plant, had degraded water quality and biological conditions. Water samples from the most downstream station on Central Creek contained 30 micrograms per liter of pentachlorophenol, which exceeds the State's criterion maximum concentrations of 9 micrograms per liter for fish and aquatic life. Bottom-sediment samples from stations on Central Creek contained concentrations of acenaphthene, napthalene, and phenanthrene ranging from 1,400 to 2,500 micrograms per kilogram. Chronic or acute toxicity resulted during laboratory experiments using test organisms exposed to creosote-related contaminants. Sediment elutriate samples from Central Creek caused slightly to highly toxic effects on Ceriodaphnia dubia. Pimephales promelas, and Photobacterium phosphoreum. Fish-tissue samples from this station contained concentrations of naphthalene. dibenzofuran, fluorene, and phenanthrene ranging from 1.5 to 3.9 micrograms per kilogram Blue-green algae at this station represented about 79 percent of the organisms counted, whereas diatoms accounted for only 11 percent. Benthic invertebrate and fish samples from Central Creek had low diversity and density. Sediment samples from a station on the South Fork Forked Deer River downstream from its confluence with Central Creek contained concentrations of acenaphthene, anthracene, chrysene, fluoranthene, fluorene, pyrere, and phenanthrene ranging from 2,800 to 69,000 micrograms per kilogram. Sediment elutriate samples using water as elutriate from this station contained concentrations of extractable organic compounds ranging from an estimated

  16. Fluidized bed boiler feed system

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Brian C.

    1981-01-01

    A fluidized bed boiler feed system for the combustion of pulverized coal. Coal is first screened to separate large from small particles. Large particles of coal are fed directly to the top of the fluidized bed while fine particles are first mixed with recycled char, preheated, and then fed into the interior of the fluidized bed to promote char burnout and to avoid elutriation and carryover.

  17. Effect of the size distribution of coal on fluidized-bed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Hirama, T.; Hosoda, H.; Nishizaki, H.; Chiba, T.; Kobayashi, H.

    1984-07-01

    To study the effect of the particle-size distribution on its combustion characteristics, coal was burned in a 0.25 m-square fluidized-bed combustor with a 3-m freeboard. A higher fines content increased the loss of unburned coal by elutriation, but reduced the loss from overflow from the bed surface. The overall combustion efficiency varied only slightly with the size distribution; the efficiency of combustion within the bed was reduced, but more combustion took place in the freeboard, both for 9.5-25 mm particles, owing to segregation in the bed, and for <2 mm particles, owing to elutriation. NO/SUB/x emission for two-stage combustion with these two size ranges was considerably higher than for particles within the broader range <25 mm. Since segregation of coarse particles and elutriation of unburned finer particles increase NO/SUB/x emission and reduced the bed combustion efficiency, it is desirable to use coal with a broad particle-size distribution.

  18. An integrated system for synchronous culture of animal cells under controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Pérez, Elena; Hernández, Vanessa; Palomares, Laura A; Serrato, José A

    2016-01-01

    The cell cycle has fundamental effects on cell cultures and their products. Tools to synchronize cultured cells allow the study of cellular physiology and metabolism at particular cell cycle phases. However, cells are most often arrested by methods that alter their homeostasis and are then cultivated in poorly controlled environments. Cell behavior could then be affected by the synchronization method and culture conditions used, and not just by the particular cell cycle phase under study. Moreover, only a few viable cells are recovered. Here, we designed an integrated system where a large number of cells from a controlled bioreactor culture is separated by centrifugal elutriation at high viabilities. In contrast to current elutriation methods, cells are injected directly from a bioreactor into an injection loop, allowing the introduction of a large number of cells into the separation chamber without stressful centrifugation. A low pulsation peristaltic pump increases the stability of the elutriation chamber. Using this approach, a large number of healthy cells at each cell cycle phase were obtained, allowing their direct inoculation into fully instrumented bioreactors. Hybridoma cells synchronized and cultured in this system behaved as expected for a synchronous culture. PMID:27625207

  19. Potential impacts of water injection dredging on water quality and ecotoxicity in Limehouse Basin, River Thames, SE England, UK.

    PubMed

    Spencer, K L; Dewhurst, R E; Penna, P

    2006-04-01

    The use of water injection dredging (WID) is increasing in the UK's inland waterways and marinas. Jets of water are injected under low pressure directly into bottom sediment creating a turbulent water-sediment mixture that flows under the influence of gravity. Many of these sediments are highly contaminated and little is known of the effects of contaminant release on water quality or the risk to biota living in both the sediment and the water column. Sediment cores were collected from Limehouse Basin, a proposed WID site in SE England and current sediment toxicity was assessed using a number of techniques. Comparison of metal data to US sediment quality guidelines indicated intermediate levels of toxicity while, calculation of acid volatile sulphide to simultaneously extracted metal ratios underestimated the potential toxicity to sediment dwelling organisms. In contrast, porewater ammonia concentrations were in excess of all published ecotoxicological guidelines and indicate serious risk to biota. Re-suspension experiments were used to mimic the effects of WID on overlying water quality and ecotoxicity tests were carried out on elutriates using Daphnia magna to examine the impacts on biota. Concentrations of a range of metals in the elutriates predict that adverse biological effects would be observed during WID, however only 10% of the elutriate samples caused an adverse effect on Daphnia. Limehouse Basin is a complex aquatic environment receiving predominantly fresh waters while the sediments have high porewater chloride concentrations reminiscent of previous tidal inputs to the basin, making the choice of test organism problematic. PMID:16271380

  20. Toxicity assessment of contaminated soils from an antitank firing range.

    PubMed

    Robidoux, Pierre Yves; Gong, Ping; Sarrazin, Manon; Bardai, Ghalib; Paquet, Louise; Hawari, Jalal; Dubois, Charles; Sunahara, Geoffrey I

    2004-07-01

    Explosives are released into the environment at production and processing facilities, as well as through field use. These compounds may be toxic at relatively low concentrations to a number of ecological receptors. A toxicity assessment was carried out on soils from an explosive-contaminated site at a Canadian Forces Area Training Center. Toxicity studies on soil organisms using endpoints such as microbial processes (potential nitrification activity, dehydrogenase activity, substrate-induced respiration, basal respiration), plant seedling and growth (Lactuca sativa and Hordeum vulgare), and earthworm (Eisenia andrei) growth and reproduction were carried out. Results showed that 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazacyclooctane (HMX) was the principal polynitro-organic compound measured in soils. Soils from the contaminated site decreased microbial processes and earthworm reproduction; whereas plant growth was not significantly reduced. Toxicity to aquatic organisms and genotoxicity were also assessed on soil elutriates using Microtox (Vibrio fischeri), growth inhibition of algae (Selenastrum capricornutum), and SOS Chromotest (Escherichia coli). Results indicated that soil elutriates were generally not toxic to bacteria (Microtox) and algae. However, genotoxicity was found in a number of soil elutriate samples. Thus, the explosive-contaminated soils from the antitank firing range may represent a hazard for the soil organisms. Nevertheless, the global toxicity might have partially resulted from HMX as well as from other (not identified) contaminants such as heavy metals. PMID:15223256

  1. Influence of size-fractioning techniques on concentrations of selected trace metals in bottom materials from two streams in northeastern Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koltun, G.F.; Helsel, Dennis R.

    1986-01-01

    Identical stream-bottom material samples, when fractioned to the same size by different techniques, may contains significantly different trace-metal concentrations. Precision of techniques also may differ, which could affect the ability to discriminate between size-fractioned bottom-material samples having different metal concentrations. Bottom-material samples fractioned to less than 0.020 millimeters by means of three common techniques (air elutriation, sieving, and settling) were analyzed for six trace metals to determine whether the technique used to obtain the desired particle-size fraction affects the ability to discriminate between bottom materials having different trace-metal concentrations. In addition, this study attempts to assess whether median trace-metal concentration in size-fractioned bottom materials of identical origin differ depending on the size-fractioning technique used. Finally, this study evaluates the efficiency of the three size-fractioning techniques in terms of time, expense, and effort involved. Bottom-material samples were collected at two sites in northeastern Ohio: One is located in an undeveloped forested basin, and the other is located in a basin having a mixture of industrial and surface-mining land uses. The sites were selected fir their close physical proximity, similar contributing drainage areas, and the likelihood that trace-metal concentrations in the bottom materials would be significantly different. Statistically significant differences in the concentrations of trace metals were detected between bottom-material samples collected at the two sites when the samples had been size-fractioned by means of air elutriation or sieving. Statistical analyses of samples that had been size fractioned by settling in native water were not measurably different in any of the six trace metals analyzed. Results of multiple comparison tests suggest that differences related to size-fractioning technique were evident in median copper, lead, and

  2. Ecotoxicological evaluation of the bioleaching treatment of sewage sludges contaminated with heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Renoux, A.Y.; Tyagi, R.D.; Paquette, L.; Samson, R.

    1995-12-31

    A new decontamination technology of sewage sludge, the bioleaching of heavy metals, was assessed using ecotoxicity bioassays. Sewage sludges, treated or non-treated, were mixed with a non-contaminated soil used as a negative control at a rate of 1 to 100 g per liter of soil. Aqueous elutriates (TCLP) of the sludges were used for the aqueous bioassays. The bioleaching of metals reduced the toxic effects associated with sludge for most of the bioassays, although the sludge after treatment exhibited an inherent level of toxicity at high loading rates. With respect to seed germination, bioleached sludge was less toxic (EC50 barley: 53 g/L; lettuce: 13.6) than the non-treated (72; 16.8 g/L). The treated sludge stimulated the barley growth at > 5 6 g/L. The non-treated causes an inhibition at 100 g/L. Earthworms survived in up to 56 g/L of bioleached sludge, compared to 32 g/L of the non-treated. The Microtox{reg_sign} EC50s were 4.0% and 8.4% for nontreated and treated sludges respectively. No genotoxicity (SOS Chromotest) in the sludge elutriates was detected, and no significant treatment effects were noticeable using the lettuce root elongation bioassay. The Daphnia magna mortality of the elutriate was increased with sludge treatment. However, the lettuce root elongation and D. magna mortality bioassay results were difficult to interpret due to variability in standard deviations. This study demonstrated that the ecotoxicological battery of bioassays, and particularly direct contact bioassays, can be used to assess sewage sludge remediation technologies.

  3. Acute aquatic toxicity of tire and road wear particles to alga, daphnid, and fish.

    PubMed

    Marwood, Christopher; McAtee, Britt; Kreider, Marisa; Ogle, R Scott; Finley, Brent; Sweet, Len; Panko, Julie

    2011-11-01

    Previous studies have indicated that tire tread particles are toxic to aquatic species, but few studies have evaluated the toxicity of such particles using sediment, the likely reservoir of tire wear particles in the environment. In this study, the acute toxicity of tire and road wear particles (TRWP) was assessed in Pseudokirchneriella subcapita, Daphnia magna, and Pimephales promelas using a sediment elutriate (100, 500, 1000 or 10000 mg/l TRWP). Under standard test temperature conditions, no concentration response was observed and EC/LC(50) values were greater than 10,000 mg/l. Additional tests using D. magna were performed both with and without sediment in elutriates collected under heated conditions designed to promote the release of chemicals from the rubber matrix to understand what environmental factors may influence the toxicity of TRWP. Toxicity was only observed for elutriates generated from TRWP leached under high-temperature conditions and the lowest EC/LC(50) value was 5,000 mg/l. In an effort to identify potential toxic chemical constituent(s) in the heated leachates, toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) studies and chemical analysis of the leachate were conducted. The TIE coupled with chemical analysis (liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry [LC/MS/MS] and inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry [ICP/MS]) of the leachate identified zinc and aniline as candidate toxicants. However, based on the high EC/LC(50) values and the limited conditions under which toxicity was observed, TRWP should be considered a low risk to aquatic ecosystems under acute exposure scenarios. PMID:21789673

  4. Ecotoxicological analysis during the removal of carbofuran in fungal bioaugmented matrices.

    PubMed

    Ruíz-Hidalgo, Karla; Masís-Mora, Mario; Barbieri, Edison; Carazo-Rojas, Elizabeth; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Carlos E

    2016-02-01

    Biomixtures are used for the removal of pesticides from agricultural wastewater. As biomixtures employ high content of lignocellulosic substrates, their bioaugmentation with ligninolytic fungi represents a novel approach for their enhancement. Nonetheless, the decrease in the concentration of the pesticide may result in sublethal concentrations that still affect ecosystems. Two matrices, a microcosm of rice husk (lignocellulosic substrate) bioaugmented with the fungus Trametes versicolor and a biomixture that contained fungally colonized rice husk were used in the degradation of the insecticide/nematicide carbofuran (CFN). Elutriates simulating lixiviates from these matrices were used to assay the ecotoxicological effects at sublethal level over Daphnia magna (Straus) and the fish Oreochromis aureus (Steindachner) and Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum). Elutriates obtained after 30 d of treatment in the rice husk microcosms at dilutions over 2.5% increased the offspring of D. magna as a trade-off stress response, and produced mortality of neonates at dilutions over 5%. Elutriates (dilution 1:200) obtained during a 30 d period did not produce alterations on the oxygen consumption and ammonium excretion of O. mykiss, however these physiological parameters were affected in O. aureus at every time point of treatment, irrespective of the decrease in CFN concentration. When the fungally colonized rice husk was used to prepare a biomixture, where more accelerated degradation is expected, similar alterations on the responses by O. aureus were achieved. Results suggest that despite the good removal of the pesticide, it is necessary to optimize biomixtures to minimize their residual toxicity and potential chronic effects on aquatic life. PMID:26421626

  5. The vertical distribution of selected trace metals and organic compounds in bottom materials of the proposed lower Columbia River export channel, Oregon, 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuhrer, Gregory J.; Horowitz, Arthur J.

    1989-01-01

    A proposal to deepen the lower Columbia River navigation channel in Oregon prompted a study of the vertical distribution of selected trace metals and organic compounds in bottom sediments. These data are needed to evaluate the effects of dredging and disposal operations. Elutriation testing of bottom material indicated chemical concentrations as large as 900 ug/L for barium, 6,500 ug/L for manganese, and 14 ug/L for nickel. The amount of oxygen present during elutriation testing of reduced bottom material was shown to have a negligble effect on manganese elutriate-test concentrations, but it did affect barium and iron concentrations. Sediment-associated organochlorine compounds detected in bottom-sediment core samples were as large as 0.1 ug/kg (micrograms/kilogram) for aldrin, 2.0 ug/kg for chlordane, 27 ug/kg for DDD, 5.0 ug/kg for DDE, 0.2 ug/kg for DDT, 0.2 ug/kg for dieldrin, 37 ug/kg for PCB 's 1.0 ug/kg for PCN 's and 1.0 ug/kg for heptachlor epoxide. Concentrations of cadmium, lead, and zinc in selected cores were found to exceed those of local basalts. Concentrations of cadmium, lead, and zinc were as large as 3.6 ug/g, 26 ug/g, and 210 ug/g respectively. Bottom-sediment concentrations of cadmium , chromium, copper, iron, and zinc associated with the less-than-100-micrometer size fraction are larger than those associated with the greater-than-100-micrometer fraction. (USGS)

  6. Lethal effects on different marine organisms, associated with sediment-seawater acidification deriving from CO2 leakage.

    PubMed

    Basallote, M D; Rodríguez-Romero, A; Blasco, J; DelValls, A; Riba, I

    2011-08-01

    CO(2) leakages during carbon capture and storage in sub-seabed geological structures could produce potential impacts on the marine environment. To study lethal effects on marine organisms attributable to CO(2) seawater acidification, a bubbling CO(2) system was designed enabling a battery of different tests to be conducted, under laboratory conditions, employing various pH treatments (8.0, 7.5, 7.0, 6.5, 6.0, and 5.5). Assays were performed of three exposure routes (seawater, whole sediment, and sediment elutriate). Individuals of the clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) and early-life stages of the gilthead seabream, Sparus aurata, were exposed for 10 days and 72 h, respectively, to acidified clean seawater. S. aurata larvae were also exposed to acidified elutriate samples, and polychaete organisms of the specie Hediste diversicolor and clams R. philippinarum were also exposed for 10 days to estuarine whole sediment. In the fish larvae elutriate test, 100 % mortality was recorded at pH 6.0, after 48 h of exposure. Similar results were obtained in the clam sediment exposure test. In the other organisms, significant mortality (p < 0.05) was observed at pH values lower than 6.0. Very high lethal effects (calculating L[H(+)]50, defined as the H(+) concentration that causes lethal effects in 50 % of the population exposed) were detected in association with the lowest pH treatment for all the species. The implication of these results is that a severe decrease of seawater pH would cause high mortality in marine organisms of several different kinds and life stages. The study addresses the potential risks incurred due to CO(2) leakages in marine environments. PMID:22828884

  7. Understanding the behavior of Australian black coals in pressurized fluidized bed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Stubington, J.F.; Wang, A.L.T.; Cui, Y.

    1999-07-01

    Ultimately, this study aims to predict the coal combustion efficiency in an industrial pressurized fluidized bed combustor (PFBC) for Australian black coals. This combustion efficiency depends predominantly upon the rate of elutriation of fine carbon particles, which is proportional to bed carbon loading in atmospheric experiments. The bed carbon loading is, in turn, dependent upon the rate of combustion of char particles within the PFBC. A novel batch-fed reactor has been designed, constructed and commissioned to enable separation and study of the mechanisms of coal devolatilization, char combustion and fine carbon particle elutriation in a PFBC and extraction of coal-specific parameters to describe these processes. The attrition and char combustion rates can only be determined experimentally and it is essential to match the environment around each coal particle, so that the results may be translated to the industrial scale. Therefore, the rig was designed for identical conditions of pressure, temperature, particle size and fluidizing velocity within the bed to those used industrially. The exhaust gas is analyzed continuously for oxygen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons as a function of time after coal injection, allowing separation and identification of the devolatilization and char combustion stages as well as measurement of the combustion rates. The elutriated carbon particles undergo minimal freeboard combustion and are collected in a cyclone and an in-line filter over any period of time during the experiment, for subsequent analysis. The sand bed containing the rig for collection and characterization of the partially burnt char particles. The rig is mostly computer-controlled and the design was subjected to a hazards analysis before construction. Results from the rig will be used in a mathematical model to predict the performance of the coals in industrial-scale PFBC.

  8. Cyclic-radiation response of murine fibrosarcoma cells grown as pulmonary nodules

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J.; Hunter, N.

    1982-10-01

    The radiation age response of murine fibrosarcoma (FSa) cells grown as pulmonary nudules in C/sub 3/Hf/Kam mice was determined. FSa cells were irradiated in vivo either with 10 Gy as 14 day-old lung tumors (i.e., artifical micrometastases) following cell separation and synchronization by centrifugal elutriation. Flow microfluorometry (FMF) was used to determine cell-cycle parameters and the relative synchrony of the separated populations, as well as the percent contamination of normal diploid cells in each of the tumor cells populations. Tumor populations containing up to 90% G/sub 1/-, 60% S-, and 75% G/sub 2/+M-phase tumor cells were obtained. Cell clonogenicity, determined using a lung colony assay, ranged from 0.7 to 6% for control FSa cells from the various elutriator fractions. The radiation sensitivity of these separated cell populations varied by a factor of 6, regardless of whether the cells were irradiated as artifical micro or macro-metastases. In each experiment, tumor population most enriched in S-phase cells exhibited the greatest radiation sensitivity. To confirm that these populations were highly enriched in S-phase cells and to demonstrate that they were more radiosensitive than FSa cells in other parts of the cell cycle, the elutriated tumor population were exposed to either suicide labeling by high specific activity tritated thymidine or hydroxyurea. The resultant age response curves were qualitatively similar to those obtained following irradiation and reflected the S-phase sensitivity of FSa cells to these agents.

  9. Cyclic-radiation response of murine fibrosarcoma cells grown as pulmonary nodules

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J.; Hunter, N.

    1982-10-01

    The radiation age response of murine fibrosarcoma (FSa) cells grown as pulmonary nodules in C/sub 3/Hf/Kam mice was determined. FSa cells were irradiated in vivo either with 10 Gy as 14 day-old lung tumors (i.e., artificial macrometastases) prior to cell separation or with 5 Gy as single cells trapped in the lungs of recipient mice (i.e., artificial micrometastases) following cell separation and synchronization by centrifugal elutriation. Flow microfluorometry (FMF) was used to determine cell-cycle parameters and the relative synchrony of the separated populations, as well as the percent contamination of normal diploid cells in each of the tumor cell populations. Tumor populations containing up to 90% G/sub 1/, 60% S-, and 75% G/sub 2/+M-phase tumor cells were obtained. Cell clonogenicity, determined using a lung colony assay, ranged from 0.7 to 6% for control FSa cells from the various elutriator fractions. The radiation sensitivity of these separated cell populations varied by a factor of 6, regardless of whether the cells were irradiated as artificial micro or macro-metastases. In each experiment, tumor populations most enriched in s-phase cells exhibited the greatest radiation sensitivity. To confirm that these populations were highly enriched in S-phase cells and to demonstrate that they were more radiosensitive than FSa cells in other parts of the cell cycle, the elutriated tumor populations were exposed to either suicide labeling by high specific activity tritiated thymidine or hydroxyurea. The resultant age response curves were qualitatively similar to those obtained following irradiation and reflected the S-phase sensitivity of FSa cells to these agents.

  10. Comparative evaluation of techniques for the manufacturing of dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Dohnal, Alexander Michael; Graffi, Sebastian; Witt, Volker; Eichstill, Christina; Wagner, Dagmar; Ul-Haq, Sidrah; Wimmer, Doris; Felzmann, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Manufacturing procedures for cellular therapies are continuously improved with particular emphasis on product safety. We previously developed a dendritic cell (DC) cancer vaccine technology platform that uses clinical grade lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon (IFN)-y for the maturation of monocyte derived DCs. DCs are frozen after 6 hrs exposure at a semi-mature stage (smDCs) retaining the capacity to secret interleukin (IL)-12 and thus support cytolytic T-cell responses, which is lost at full maturation. We compared closed systems for monocyte enrichment from leucocyte apheresis products from healthy individuals using plastic adherence, CD14 selection, or CD2/19 depletion with magnetic beads, or counter flow centrifugation (elutriation) using a clinical grade in comparison to a research grade culture medium for the following DC generation. We found that elutriation was superior compared to the other methods showing 36 ± 4% recovery, which was approximately 5-fold higher as the most frequently used adherence protocol (8 ± 1%), and a very good purity (92 ± 5%) of smDCs. Immune phenotype and IL-12 secretion (adherence: 1.4 ± 0.4; selection: 20 ± 0.6; depletion: 1 ±0.5; elutriation: 3.6 ± 1.5 ng/ml) as well as the potency of all DCs to stimulate T cells in an allogeneic mixed leucocyte reaction did not show statistically significant differences. Research grade and clinical grade DC culture media were equally potent and freezing did not impair the functions of smDCs. Finally, we assessed the functional capacity of DC cancer vaccines manufactured for three patients using this optimized procedure thereby demonstrating the feasibility of manufacturing DC cancer vaccines that secret IL-12 (9.4 ± 6.4 ng/ml). We conclude that significant steps were taken here towards clinical grade DC cancer vaccine manufacturing. PMID:18363835

  11. Exploratory and basic fluidized-bed combustion studies. Quarterly report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, I.; Myles, K.M.; Swift, W.M.

    1980-12-01

    This work supports development studies for both atmospheric and pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion. Laboratory and process development studies are aimed at providing needed information on limestone utilization, removal of particulates and alkali metal compounds from the flue gas, control of SO/sub 2/ and trace pollutants emissions, and other aspects of fluidized-bed combustion. This report presents information on: (1) the development of a limestone utilization predictive methodology, (2) studies of particle breakup and elutriation, (3) basic studies on limestone sulfation enhancement by hydration, (4) studies of the kinetics of the hydration process, and (5) an investigation of various hydration process concepts.

  12. Simulation of fluidized bed coal combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajan, R.

    1979-01-01

    The many deficiencies of previous work on simulation of fluidized bed combustion (FBC) processes are presented. An attempt is made to reduce these deficiencies, and to formulate a comprehensive FBC model taking into account the following elements: (1) devolatilization of coal and the subsequent combustion of volatiles and residual char; (2) sulfur dioxide capture by limestone; (3) NOx release and reduction of NOx by char; (4) attrition and elutriation of char and limestone; (5) bubble hydrodynamics; (6) solids mixing; (7) heat transfer between gas and solid, and solid and heat exchange surfaces; and (8) freeboard reactions.

  13. Hybrid fluidized bed combuster

    DOEpatents

    Kantesaria, Prabhudas P.; Matthews, Francis T.

    1982-01-01

    A first atmospheric bubbling fluidized bed furnace is combined with a second turbulent, circulating fluidized bed furnace to produce heat efficiently from crushed solid fuel. The bed of the second furnace receives the smaller sizes of crushed solid fuel, unreacted limestone from the first bed, and elutriated solids extracted from the flu gases of the first bed. The two-stage combustion of crushed solid fuel provides a system with an efficiency greater than available with use of a single furnace of a fluidized bed.

  14. Short term chronic and acute toxicity screening of water and sediment using fathead minnows, daphnids, rotifers (Rotox[reg sign]) and light emitting bacteria (Microtox[reg sign]), Ambient Stream Monitoring, summers of 1990 and 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, J.; Wade, D.C.

    1992-07-01

    Toxicological evaluation of water column and sediment samples from six locations in the Ambient Stream Monitoring fixed station network was initiated in 1986 using short-term chronic bioassay methods. Toxicological evaluation of six additional stations was initiated in 1990. Chronic studies were conducted at one of these new stations and acute screening methods were used at all twelve locations now included in the activity. This report provides results from studies conducted during the summers of 1990 and 1991. The 1990--91 studies evaluated toxicity of stream water and porewater extracted from sediments as test media, whereas previous studies evaluated water and sediment elutriate samples.

  15. Devolatilization and ash comminution of two different sewage sludges under fluidized bed combustion conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Solimene, R.; Urciuolo, M.; Cammarota, A.; Chirone, R.; Salatino, P.; Damonte, G.; Donati, C.; Puglisi, G.

    2010-04-15

    Two different wet sewage sludges have been characterized under fluidized bed combustion conditions with reference to their devolatilization behavior and ash comminution with the aid of different and complementary experimental protocols. Analysis of the devolatilization process allowed to determine the size of fuel particle able to achieve effective lateral spreading of the volatile matter across the cross-section of medium-scale combustors. Primary fragmentation and primary ash particle characterization pointed out the formation of a significant amount of relatively large fragments. The mechanical properties of these fragments have been characterized by means of elutriation/abrasion tests using both quartz and sludge ash beds. (author)

  16. Obtaining growth hormone from calf blood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalchev, L. A.; Ralchev, K. K.; Nikolov, I. T.

    1979-01-01

    The preparation of a growth hormone from human serum was used for the isolation of the hormone from calf serum. The preparation was biologically active - it increased the quantity of the free fatty acids released in rat plasma by 36.4 percent. Electrophoresis in Veronal buffer, ph 8.6, showed the presence of a single fraction having mobility intermediate between that of alpha and beta globulins. Gel filtration through Sephadex G 100 showed an elutriation curve identical to that obtained by the growth hormone prepared from pituitary glands.

  17. Fission Yeast Cell Cycle Synchronization Methods.

    PubMed

    Tormos-Pérez, Marta; Pérez-Hidalgo, Livia; Moreno, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Fission yeast cells can be synchronized by cell cycle arrest and release or by size selection. Cell cycle arrest synchronization is based on the block and release of temperature-sensitive cell cycle mutants or treatment with drugs. The most widely used approaches are cdc10-129 for G1; hydroxyurea (HU) for early S-phase; cdc25-22 for G2, and nda3-KM311 for mitosis. Cells can also be synchronized by size selection using centrifugal elutriation or a lactose gradient. Here we describe the methods most commonly used to synchronize fission yeast cells. PMID:26519320

  18. Decontamination of Dissolved Salt Solution from Tank 19F Using Duolite CS-100 and Amberlite IRC-718 Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, L.M.

    2001-10-17

    In this study actual Savannah River Plant liquid supernate solutions were processed to refine and verify these synthetic solution studies. The main objectives were: (1) confirm high decontamination factors (DFs) for cesium-137 and strontium-90 using Duolite CS-100 and Amberlite IRC-718 ion exchange resins, (2) obtain DFs for other minor radioactive isotopes such as plutonium, technetium and ruthenium, (3) provide ion exchange elutriant containing cesium-137, strontium-90 and other radioactive isotopes for ''hot'' melter studies, (4) determine the quality of the decontaminated salt solution, and (5) provide actual decontaminated salt solution for saltcrete development programs.

  19. Deflocculation of clay suspensions using sodium polyacrylates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlicka, P.

    1984-01-01

    Rheological properties of elutriated kaolin suspensions deflocculated by Na polyacrylate (DAC 3 and DAC 4) were studied and compared to those deflocculated by the conventional Na2CO3 water and glass and imported Dispex N40. The deflocculating effect of Na polyacrylate was comparable to that of Dispex N40. The optimum amounts of Na polyacrylate were determined for suspensions based on 5-type kaolin. The Na polyacrylate can be successfully used for decreasing the water content of ceramic slips for casting and spray drying.

  20. Exploratory and basic fluidized-bed combustion studies. Quarterly report, April-June 1980. [Limestone and dolomite; USA

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, I.; Myles, K.M.; Swift, W.M.

    1980-12-01

    This work supports the development studies for both atmospheric and pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion. Laboratory and process development studies are aimed at providing needed information on limestone utilization, removal of particles and alkali metal compounds from the flue gas, control of SO/sub 2/ and trace pollutant emissions, and other aspects of fluidized-bed coal combustion. This report presents information on: (1) the development of a sorbent utilization prediction methodology, (2) studies of factors which affect limestone breakup and elutriation, (3) basic studies of limestone sulfation under combustion conditions, and (4) studies of the kinetics of the hydration of spent limestone.

  1. Fluidized Bed Asbestos Sampler Design and Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Karen E. Wright; Barry H. O'Brien

    2007-12-01

    A large number of samples are required to characterize a site contaminated with asbestos from previous mine or other industrial operations. Current methods, such as EPA Region 10’s glovebox method, or the Berman Elutriator method are time consuming and costly primarily because the equipment is difficult to decontaminate between samples. EPA desires a shorter and less costly method for characterizing soil samples for asbestos. The objective of this was to design and test a qualitative asbestos sampler that operates as a fluidized bed. The proposed sampler employs a conical spouted bed to vigorously mix the soil and separate fine particulate including asbestos fibers on filters. The filters are then analyzed using transmission electron microscopy for presence of asbestos. During initial testing of a glass prototype using ASTM 20/30 sand and clay fines as asbestos surrogates, fine particulate adhered to the sides of the glass vessel and the tubing to the collection filter – presumably due to static charge on the fine particulate. This limited the fines recovery to ~5% of the amount added to the sand surrogate. A second prototype was constructed of stainless steel, which improved fines recovery to about 10%. Fines recovery was increased to 15% by either humidifying the inlet air or introducing a voltage probe in the air space above the sample. Since this was not a substantial improvement, testing using the steel prototype proceeded without using these techniques. Final testing of the second prototype using asbestos suggests that the fluidized bed is considerably more sensitive than the Berman elutriator method. Using a sand/tremolite mixture with 0.005% tremolite, the Berman elutriator did not segregate any asbestos structures while the fluidized bed segregated an average of 11.7. The fluidized bed was also able to segregate structures in samples containing asbestos at a 0.0001% concentration, while the Berman elutriator method did not detect any fibers at this

  2. Preliminary comparison of theory and experiment for a conical, pressurized-fluidized-bed coal combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patch, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    A published model was used for a comparison of theory with an actual combustor burning caking bituminous coal and using limestone to reduce sulfur dioxide emission. Theoretical bed pressure drop was in good agreement with experiment. The burnable carbon elutriated was not in agreement with experiment, at least partly because the exhaust port was apparently below the transport disengaging height. The observed nitrogen oxides emission rate was about half the theoretical value. There was order-or-magnitude agreement of sulfur dioxide emission rates.

  3. Chronic toxicity of tire and road wear particles to water- and sediment-dwelling organisms.

    PubMed

    Panko, Julie M; Kreider, Marisa L; McAtee, Britt L; Marwood, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Tire and road wear particles (TRWP) consist of a complex mixture of rubber, and pavement released from tires during use on road surfaces. Subsequent transport of the TRWP into freshwater sediments has raised some concern about the potential adverse effects on aquatic organisms. Previous studies have shown some potential for toxicity for tread particles, however, toxicity studies of TRWP collected from a road simulator system revealed no acute toxicity to green algae, daphnids, or fathead minnows at concentrations up to 10,000 mg/kg under conditions representative of receiving water bodies. In this study, the chronic toxicity of TRWP was evaluated in four aquatic species. Test animals were exposed to whole sediment spiked with TRWP at concentrations up to 10,000 mg/kg sediment or elutriates from spiked sediment. Exposure to TRWP spiked sediment caused mild growth inhibition in Chironomus dilutus but had no adverse effect on growth or reproduction in Hyalella azteca. Exposure to TRWP elutriates resulted in slightly diminished survival in larval Pimephales promelas but had no adverse effect on growth or reproduction in Ceriodaphnia dubia. No other endpoints in these species were affected. These results, together with previous studies demonstrating no acute toxicity of TRWP, indicate that under typical exposure conditions TRWP in sediments pose a low risk of toxicity to aquatic organisms. PMID:23001428

  4. Study of the influence of different organic pollutants on Cu accumulation by Halimione portulacoides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, C. Marisa R.; Claúdia Dias, A.; Mucha, Ana P.; Bordalo, A. A.; Vasconcelos, M. Teresa S. D.

    2009-12-01

    The influence of each of four organic pollutants selected from among those commonly found in coastal areas, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl) ethylene (DDE), monobutyltin (MBT), Triton X-100 and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), on Cu accumulation by Halimione portulacoides was investigated. Experiments were carried out in a laboratory setting, either in hydroponics (sediment elutriate) or in a salt marsh sediment ( Cávado River, NW Portugal) soaked in elutriate. Groups of H. portulacoides were exposed to media for 6 days spiked with 10 mg/L Cu(II) and with one of the selected pollutants, at an environmentally realistic concentration. DDE and MBT did not cause any major change on Cu accumulation by H. portulacoides, whereas PAHs slightly increased accumulation only in hydroponics i.e. in the absence of sediment. On the other hand, the non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 markedly favoured Cu accumulation on plant roots both in the presence and absence of sediment. The addition of DDE, MBT and Triton X-100 also favoured Cu solubility from sediments. Therefore, the simultaneous presence of pollutants from different nature (inorganic and organic) in the estuarine environment may result in a composition of water column, pore water, sediment or biota different of that expected considering the effect of each individual pollutant.

  5. Toxicity assessment through multiple endpoint bioassays in soils posing environmental risk according to regulatory screening values.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Ruiz, A; Asensio, V; Zaldibar, B; Soto, M; Marigómez, I

    2014-01-01

    Toxicity profiles of two soils (a brownfield in Legazpi and an abandoned iron mine in Zugaztieta; Basque Country) contaminated with several metals (As, Zn, Pb and Cu in Legazpi; Zn, Pb, Cd and Cu in Zugaztieta) and petroleum hydrocarbons (in Legazpi) were determined using a multi-endpoint bioassay approach. Investigated soils exceeded screening values (SVs) of regulatory policies in force (Basque Country; Europe). Acute and chronic toxicity bioassays were conducted with a selected set of test species (Vibrio fischeri, Dictyostelium discoideum, Lactuca sativa, Raphanus sativus and Eisenia fetida) in combination with chemical analysis of soils and elutriates, as well as with bioaccumulation studies in earthworms. The sensitivity of the test species and the toxicity endpoints varied depending on the soil. It was concluded that whilst Zugaztieta soil showed very little or no toxicity, Legazpi soil was toxic according to almost all the toxicity tests (solid phase Microtox, D. discoideum inhibition of fruiting body formation and developmental cycle solid phase assays, lettuce seed germination and root elongation test, earthworm acute toxicity and reproduction tests, D. discoideum cell viability and replication elutriate assays). Thus, albeit both soils had similar SVs, their ecotoxicological risk, and therefore the need for intervening, was different for each soil as unveiled after toxicity profiling based on multiple endpoint bioassays. Such a toxicity profiling approach is suitable to be applied for scenario-targeted soil risk assessment in those cases where applicable national/regional soil legislation based on SVs demands further toxicity assessment. PMID:24819436

  6. Bioassays on Illinois waterway dredged material. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.W.; Gibson, A.B.; Dillon, T.M.

    1992-12-01

    Sediment from the Illinois Waterway navigation channel is hydraulically dredged by the US Army Engineer District, Rock Island, and placed in the nearshore environment via pipeline. Water returning to the river can have a high-suspended solids load approaching fluid mud consistency. There is a concern that this return water may exceed the State of Illinois water quality standards for ammonia and have adverse effects on aquatic life. To address these concerns, composite sediment samples and site water collected from selected sites in the Illinois Waterway were evaluated in toxicity tests. Acute (48-hr) toxicity tests were conducted with two species, Pimephales promelas (the fathead minnow) and Daphnia magna (a freshwater cladoceran). A chronic (21-day) toxicity test was also conducted using Daphnia magna. Animals were exposed separately to different concentrations of filtered and unfiltered elutriates prepared from Acute, Cadmium, Daphnia magna, Pimephales promela, Ammonia, Chronic, Elutriate, Sediment, Bioassay, Cladoceran, Fathead minnow. Illinois Waterway edged material. Total ammonia concentrations were measured in all tests and the un-ionized fraction was calculated by adjusting for temperature and pH. Tests were conducted at the US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS. In addition, as part of an interlaboratory effort, a 48-hr acute toxicity test with Pimephales pomelas fry was conducted concurrently by the Hygienic Laboratory of the University of Iowa, Des Moines, IA.

  7. Bivalve embryo bioassay to assess the potential toxicity of dredged material before dumping

    SciTech Connect

    Quiniou, F.

    1995-12-31

    Dredged harbor sediments frequently contain a wide spectrum of contaminants in addition to a significant percentage of organic matter. Also, dredging and dumping activities into sea water, of these highly contaminated soil may induce a harmful effect on the environment. In France, in accordance with Oslo convention guidelines, a working group on dredging activities and environment (GEODE) created since 1991 decided to set up a pilot research program to assess the intrinsic toxicity of four harbor sludges. Intrinsic toxicity of harbor muds were tested by solid phase (whole sediment) and aqueous extract bioassays (sea water elutriates) using the sublethal toxicity test bivalve embryo bioassay (Crassostrea gigas). Elutriates enable them to detect the toxicity of contaminants which may be released in the soluble form into the water column during dredging operations. While, whole sediment integrate the synergistic effects of all the contaminants (hydrophilic and hydrophobic) including pore water. Bioassays results, correlated to chemical analysis, are compared to contaminant levels determined by French working group GEODE and Canadian sediment quality criteria.

  8. Application of new technologies to radiation biodosimetry in mammalian systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, R. M.; Lord, E. M.; Keng, P. C.

    1986-02-01

    Mononuclear cells from peripheral blood are presently the best candidates for a space radiation biodosimeter for man because they are easily obtained, and are among the most radiosensitive cells in the body. They are, however, members of a highly heterogeneous population of cell subtypes potentially differing in radiosensitivities. To study the cell subpopulation holding the greatest potential for use as a biodosimeter, the cell types must be uniquely identified, and/or separated so that subtle effects on radiosensitive cells are not masked by non-effects on relatively radioresistant cells present in a mixed population. Flow cytometry and centrifugal elutriation are proving to be useful for identifying and separating individual subpopulations from heterogeneous mixtures of cells. Flow cytometry uses fluorescent antibodies to label and sort the cells of interest, while centrifugal elutriation utilizes counterbalanced centrifugal and fluid flow forces to separate cells by size. In combination with two analytical procedures (premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and alkaline elution), these two techniques have been applied to study radiation effects on mononuclear cells from mouse peripheral blood irradiated in vivo, and cell cycle phase specific repair of single-strand breaks in cellular deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) fibroblast cell line irradiated in vitro.

  9. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from South Brother Island Channel, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Barrows, E.S.; Gardiner, W.W.; Antrim, L.D.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q.; Tokos, J.J.S.

    1996-09-01

    South Brother Island Channel was one of seven waterways that the US Army Crops of Engineers-New York District requested the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal. Tests and analyses were conducted on South Brother Island Channel sediment core samples and evaluations were performed. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from South Brother Island Channel included bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of site water and elutriate, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Individual sediment core samples collected from Souther Brother Island Channel were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon. a composite sediment sample, representing the entire area proposed for dredging, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl congers, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Site water and elutriate water, prepared from the suspended-particle phase of South Brother Island Channel sediment, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBs.

  10. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Westchester Creek project area, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Pinza, M.R.; Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B.

    1996-11-01

    The objective of the Westchester Creek project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from this area to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Westchester Creek was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers- New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in May 1995. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Westchester Creek project area consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, benthic acute and water-column toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Thirteen individual sediment core samples were collected from this area and analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). One composite sediment sample representing the Westchester Creek area to be dredged, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which is prepared from the suspended- particulate phase (SPP) of the Westchester Creek sediment composite, was analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS.

  11. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean Disposal from Shoal Harbor/Compton Creek Project Area

    SciTech Connect

    Gardiner, W.W.; Borde, A.B.; Nieukirk, S.L.; Barrows, E.S.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q.

    1996-10-01

    The objective of the Shoal Harbor/Compton Creek Project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from the Shoal harbor/Compton Creek Project Area in Belford and Monmouth, New Jersey to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. This was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers- New York District requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in May 1995. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Shoal Harbor/Compton Creek Project area consisted of bulk chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, benthic and water-column acute toxicity tests and bioaccumulation studies. Eleven core samples were analyzed or grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon. Other sediments were evaluated for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congers, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBs.

  12. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Bronx River Project Area, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Gruendell, B.D.; Gardiner, W.W.; Antrim, L.D.; Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B.

    1996-12-01

    The objective of the Bronx River project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from the Bronx River project area in Bronx, New York, to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Bronx River was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USAGE-NYD) requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and to evaluate for dredging and disposal. Sediment samples were submitted for physical and chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, benthic and water-column acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Fifteen individual sediment core samples collected from the Bronx River project area were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). One composite sediment sample, representing the entire reach of the area proposed for dredging, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which was prepared from the suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the Bronx River sediment composite, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS.

  13. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Hudson River, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Antrim, L.D.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q.; Tokos, J.J.S.

    1996-09-01

    The Hudson River (Federal Project No. 41) was one of seven waterways that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in March 1994. Sediment samples were collected from the Hudson River. Tests and analyses were conducted on Hudson River sediment core samples. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Hudson River included bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of site water and elutriate, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Individual sediment core samples collected from Hudson River were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). A composite sediment sample, representing the entire area proposed for dredging, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Site water and elutriate water, prepared from the suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of Hudson River sediment, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS. Water-column or SPP toxicity tests were performed with three species. Benthic acute toxicity tests were performed. Bioaccumulation tests were also conducted.

  14. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Red Hook/Bay Ridge project areas, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B.

    1996-09-01

    The objective of the Red HookIBay Ridge project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from these two areas to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Sediment samples were collected from the Red Hook/Bay Ridge project areas. Tests and analyses were conducted. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Red Hook/Bay Ridge project areas consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests. Twenty-four individual sediment core samples were collected from these two areas and analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). Three composite sediment samples, representing Red Hook Channel and the two Bay Ridge Reaches to be dredged, were analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which is prepared from the suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the three Red Hook Bay Ridge sediment composites, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS. Benthic acute toxicity tests were performed. Water-column or SPP toxicity tests were performed. Bioaccumulation tests were also conducted.

  15. Endocrinological control and cellular localization of rat testicular angiotensin-converting enzyme (EC 3. 4. 15. 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Velletri, P.A.; Aquilano, D.R.; Bruckwick, E.; Tsai-Morris, C.H.; Dufau, M.L.; Lovenberg, W.

    1985-06-01

    Hypophysectomy of prepubescent (3-week-old) rats prevented the pubertal development of testicular, but not pulmonary, angiotensin-converting enzyme (EC 3.4.15.1). Additionally, hypophysectomy resulted in a loss of testicular converting enzyme activity in 10-week-old rats that had achieved puberty and had developed enzyme activity. Hormone regimens consisting of FSH/LH (7.5 U/rat X day), hCG (10 U/rat X day), or testosterone (1 mg/rat X day) were employed to ascertain their ability to maintain activity in hypophysectomized rats. All three of the above hormone regimens, if initiated on the first day after hypophysectomy of 10-week-old rats, were capable of maintaining testicular converting enzyme activity. Centrifugal elutriation of dispersed testicular cells indicated that the majority of enzyme activity in mature rats was associated with the germinal cells, a result consistent with the data accumulated from the hormonal studies. Lastly, (/sup 3/H)captopril bound specifically to cellular fractions enriched in germinal cells. The above studies suggest that the pituitary gland is required for the development and maintenance of testicular angiotensin-converting enzyme in the rat by stimulating steroidogenesis in the testes. Furthermore, the sensitivity of converting enzyme activity to androgen coupled with the centrifugal elutriation and (/sup 3/H) captopril binding studies strongly support the notion that testicular converting enzyme is associated with germinal cells.

  16. Assessment of toxicity reduction after metal removal in bioleached sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Renoux, A Y; Tyagi, R D; Samson, R

    2001-04-01

    Sewage sludge can be applied to land to supply and recycle organic matter and nutrients. Trace elements in sludge, however, may accumulate in the soil with repeated sludge applications. Reducing metal content may therefore reduce the adverse effects of sludge application. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of bioleaching technology in reducing metal content and toxicity as measured by a battery of terrestrial and liquid-phase bioassays. Sludge-soil mixtures simulating the application of sludge to land were tested by means of terrestrial bioassays, barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seed germination (5 d) and sprout growth (14 d), lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seed germination (5 d), and worm (Eisenia andrei) mortality (14 d). Liquid-phase bioassays, Microtox (Vibrio fischeri, 15 min), lettuce root elongation (L. sativa, 5 d), cladoceran mortality (Daphnia magna, 48 h), and SOS Chromotest (Escherichia coli) were used after elutriation of the sludge. Comparison of the bioassay results (except for D. magna) before and after treatment demonstrated that this bioleaching process reduced both sludge toxicity and metal content. In addition, lower Cu and Zn concentrations found in barley sprouts following treatment supported the assumption that the bioleaching process, by decreasing metal content and bioavailability, reduced sewage sludge toxicity. This study also emphasized the interest of using ecotoxicological bioassays for testing biosolids. In particular, the terrestrial bioassays after simulation of land application and the Microtox test after sludge elutriation proved to be the most appropriate procedures. PMID:11317888

  17. Phase-specific cytotoxicity in vivo of hydroxyurea on murine fibrosarcoma pulmonary nodules.

    PubMed Central

    Grdina, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    The cytotoxic effects in vivo of hydroxyurea (HU) on murine fibrosarcoma (FSa) cells grown as pulmonary tumours were determined. Tumour cells from 13-day-old nodules were made into suspension and separated on the basis of cell size by centrifugal elutriation. Flow microfluorometry (FMF) was used to determine the cell-cycle parameters and the relative synchrony of the separated populations, as well as the degree of contamination by normal diploid cells in each of the tumour-cell populations. HU cytotoxicity was tested by administering both a single 1 mg/g i.p. dose into mice that had been injected i.v. 20 min earlier with known numbers of synchronized viable FSa cells, and i.p. doses of 1 mg/g each into mice bearing 13-day-old pulmonary nodules. In the latter experiments, animals were killed 1 h after the last dose, and the tumour nodules were excised and made into a single-cell suspension and elutriated. Known numbers of cells from each fraction were injected into recipient mice to determine survival. In both sets of experiments, cell killing by HU correlated with the percentage of S-phase cells. The treatment of 13-day-old pulmonary nodules with 3 doses of HU also depleted the (G2+M) phase tumour cells and increased the heterogeneity between tumour subpopulations, as determined by FMF analysis. PMID:7073937

  18. Optimisation of sludge line management to enhance phosphorus recovery in WWTP.

    PubMed

    Marti, N; Ferrer, J; Seco, A; Bouzas, A

    2008-11-01

    The management of the sludge treatment line can be optimized to reduce uncontrolled phosphorus precipitation in the anaerobic digester and to enhance phosphorus recovery in WWTP. In this paper, four operational strategies, which are based on the handling of the prefermented primary sludge and the secondary sludge from an EBPR process, have been tested in a pilot plant. The separated or mixed sludge thickening, the use of a stirred contact tank and the elutriation of the thickened sludge are the main strategies studied. Both the reduction of phosphorus precipitation in the digester and the supernatant suitability for a struvite crystallization process were assessed in each configuration. The mixed sludge thickening combined with a high flowrate elutriation stream reduced the phosphorus precipitation in the digester by 46%, with respect to the separate sludge thickening configuration (common practice in WWTP). Moreover, in this configuration, 68% of the soluble phosphorus in the system is available for a possible phosphorus recovery process by crystallization (not studied in this work). However, a high Ca/P molar ratio was detected in the resultant supernatant which is pointed out as a problem for the efficiency of struvite crystallization. PMID:18786693

  19. Combustion rates of chars from high-volatile fuels for FBC application

    SciTech Connect

    Masi, S.; Salatino, P.; Senneca, O.

    1997-12-31

    The fluidized bed combustion of high volatile fuels is often associated with huge occurrence of comminution phenomena. These result into in-bed generation of substantial amounts of carbon fines which further undergo competitive processes of combustion and elutriation. The small size of carbon fines generated by comminution is such that their further combustion is largely controlled by the intrinsic kinetics of carbon oxidation, alone or in combination with intraparticle diffusion. The competition between fine combustion and elutriation strongly affects the efficiency of fixed carbon conversion and calls for thorough characterization of the combustion kinetics and of residence times of fines in a fluidized bed of coarse solids. In this paper a collection of intrinsic combustion kinetic and porosimetric data for chars from three high-volatile fuels suitable for FBC application is presented. Chars from a Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF), a Tyre Derived Fuel (TDF) and a biomass (Robinia Pseudoacacia) are obtained from devolatilization, in fluidized bed, of fuel samples. Thermogravimetric analysis, mercury porosimetry and helium pycnometry are used to characterize the reactivity and the pore structure of the chars. Combustion rates are characterized over a wide range of temperatures (320--850 C) and oxygen partial pressures, covering the entire range of interest in fluidized bed combustion. Analysis of thermogravimetric and porosimetric data is directed to obtaining the parameters (pre-exponential factors, reaction orders, activation energies, intraparticle diffusivities) of combustion kinetic submodels for application in fluidized bed combustor modeling.

  20. The impact of microbial ecology and chemical profile on the enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process: a case study of Northern Wastewater Treatment Works, Johannesburg.

    PubMed

    Kamika, Ilunga; Coetzee, Martie; Mamba, Bhekie Brilliance; Msagati, Titus; Momba, Maggy N B

    2014-03-01

    The impact of polyphosphate-accumulating organism (PAO) and glycogen-accumulating organism (GAO) populations as well as of the chemical profile on the performance of Unit-3 (open elutriation tanks) and Unit-5 (covered elutriation tank) of the City of Johannesburg Northern Wastewater Treatment Works was determined. Physicochemical parameters of wastewater samples were measured using standard methods. Bacterial diversity was determined using 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing of the variable region V1-3. Results showed soluble COD concentrations from settled sewage for Unit-3 at 192.8 mg COD/L and for Unit-5 at 214.6 mg COD/L, which increased to 301.8 mg COD/L and 411.6 mg COD/L in the overflow from elutriation tanks and decreased to 170.9 mg COD/L and 256.3 mg COD/L at the division boxes, respectively. Both long-chain volatile fatty acids (heptanoic acid, isobutyric acid, 3-methylbutanoic acid, pentanoic acid, 4-methylpentanoic acid, methylheptanoic acid) and short-chain volatile fatty acids (acetic acid, propionic acid, isobutyric acid) were present within concentration ranges of 17.19 mg/L to 54.98 mg/L and 13.64 mg/L to 87.6 mg/L for Unit 3 and 38.61 mg/L to58.85 mg/L and 21.63 mg/L to 92.39 mg/L for Unit 5, respectively. In the secondary settling tanks, the phosphate-removal efficiency in Unit-5 appeared to be slightly higher (0.08 mg P/L) compared to that of Unit-3 (0.11 mg P/L). The average DO concentrations (2.1 mg/L and 2.2 mg/L) as well as the pH values (pH 7 to pH 7.5) were found to be slightly higher in Unit-5 in the aerobic zones. The high presence of PAOs in the bioreactors (Unit-5: Dechloromonas (14.96%), Acinetobacter (6.3%), Zoogloea (4.72%) in the anaerobic zone and Dechloromonas (22.37 %) in the aerobic zone; Unit-3: Dechloromonas (37.25%) in the anaerobic zone and Dechloromonas (23.97%) in the aerobic zone) confirmed the phosphate-removal efficiencies of both units. Negligible GAOs were found in the aerobic zones (Defluviicoccus spp.: 0.33% for

  1. K Basin sludge/resin bead separation test report

    SciTech Connect

    Squier, D.M.

    1998-08-25

    The K Basin sludge is an accumulation of fuel element corrosion products, organic and inorganic ion exchange materials, canister gasket materials, iron and aluminum corrosion products, sand, dirt and minor amounts of other organic material. The sludge will be collected and treated for storage and eventual disposal. This process will remove the large solid materials by a 1/4 inch screen. The screened material will be subjected to nitric acid in a chemical treatment process. The organic ion exchange resin beads produce undesirable chemical reactions with the nitric acid. The resin beads must be removed from the bulk material and treated by another process. An effective bead separation method must extract 95% of the resin bead mass without entraining more than 5% of the other sludge component mass. The test plan I-INF-2729, ``Organic Ion Exchange Resin Separation Methods Evaluation,`` proposed the evaluation of air lift, hydro cyclone, agitated slurry and elutriation resin bead separation methods. This follows the testing strategy outlined in section 4.1 of BNF-2574, ``Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basins Sludge Treatment Process``. Engineering study BNF-3128, ``Separation of Organic Ion Exchange Resins from Sludge,`` Rev. 0, focused the evaluation tests on a method that removed the fine sludge particles by a sieve and then extracted the beads by means of a elutriation column. Ninety-nine percent of the resin beads are larger than 125 microns and 98.5 percent are 300 microns and larger. Particles smaller than 125 microns make up the largest portion of sludge in the K Basins. Eliminating a large part of the sludge`s non-bead component will reduce the quantity that is lifted with the resin beads in the elutriation column. Resin bead particle size distribution measurements are given in Appendix A The Engineering Testing Laboratory conducted measurements of a elutriation column`s ability to extract resin beads from a sieved, non-radioactive sludge

  2. The Impact of Microbial Ecology and Chemical Profile on the Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (EBPR) Process: A Case Study of Northern Wastewater Treatment Works, Johannesburg

    PubMed Central

    Kamika, Ilunga; Coetzee, Martie; Mamba, Bhekie Brilliance; Msagati, Titus; Momba, Maggy N. B.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of polyphosphate-accumulating organism (PAO) and glycogen-accumulating organism (GAO) populations as well as of the chemical profile on the performance of Unit-3 (open elutriation tanks) and Unit-5 (covered elutriation tank) of the City of Johannesburg Northern Wastewater Treatment Works was determined. Physicochemical parameters of wastewater samples were measured using standard methods. Bacterial diversity was determined using 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing of the variable region V1-3. Results showed soluble COD concentrations from settled sewage for Unit-3 at 192.8 mg COD/L and for Unit-5 at 214.6 mg COD/L, which increased to 301.8 mg COD/L and 411.6 mg COD/L in the overflow from elutriation tanks and decreased to 170.9 mg COD/L and 256.3 mg COD/L at the division boxes, respectively. Both long-chain volatile fatty acids (heptanoic acid, isobutyric acid, 3-methylbutanoic acid, pentanoic acid, 4-methylpentanoic acid, methylheptanoic acid) and short-chain volatile fatty acids (acetic acid, propionic acid, isobutyric acid) were present within concentration ranges of 17.19 mg/L to 54.98 mg/L and 13.64 mg/L to 87.6 mg/L for Unit 3 and 38.61 mg/L to58.85 mg/L and 21.63 mg/L to 92.39 mg/L for Unit 5, respectively. In the secondary settling tanks, the phosphate-removal efficiency in Unit-5 appeared to be slightly higher (0.08 mg P/L) compared to that of Unit-3 (0.11 mg P/L). The average DO concentrations (2.1 mg/L and 2.2 mg/L) as well as the pH values (pH 7 to pH 7.5) were found to be slightly higher in Unit-5 in the aerobic zones. The high presence of PAOs in the bioreactors (Unit-5: Dechloromonas (14.96%), Acinetobacter (6.3%), Zoogloea (4.72%) in the anaerobic zone and Dechloromonas (22.37 %) in the aerobic zone; Unit-3: Dechloromonas (37.25%) in the anaerobic zone and Dechloromonas (23.97%) in the aerobic zone) confirmed the phosphate-removal efficiencies of both units. Negligible GAOs were found in the aerobic zones (Defluviicoccus spp.: 0.33% for

  3. Effects of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharides on mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, F A; Richardson, G J; Michalek, S M

    1997-01-01

    The mononuclear phagocyte plays an important role in the regulation of microbe-induced inflammation, in part through its ability to secrete mediators, particularly cytokines, in response to microorganisms and their products. To evaluate the effects of the microbial flora associated with chronic adult periodontitis on cytokine induction, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from the periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis was used to stimulate naive and phorbol ester-primed U937 monocytic cells, as well as elutriated human peripheral blood monocytes. We assessed the effect of this LPS, in comparison to that of LPS from Escherichia coli, on cell proliferation, cytokine induction, and surface expression of the LPS receptor CD14. P. gingivalis LPS stimulated proliferation of U937 cells at concentrations of greater than 1 ng/ml, while E. coli LPS inhibited proliferation. Phorbol myristic acid (PMA)-treated U937 cells and elutriated monocytes responded to E. coli LPS activation by producing tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA and protein; however, P. gingivalis LPS induced greater numbers of TNF-alpha mRNA-positive cells and higher (P < 0.05) levels of protein than did E. coli LPS. Both cell types expressed interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta) mRNA and protein in response to either LPS treatment. Compared with E. coli LPS, P. gingivalis LPS induced significantly (P < 0.05) higher numbers of IL-1 mRNA-positive U937 cells and elutriated monocytes, as well as production of significantly more (P < 0.05) IL-1 protein by the monocytes. The PMA-treated U937 cells and the monocytes produced high levels of IL-1 receptor antagonist mRNA and protein which were only marginally affected by the LPS preparations. While E. coli LPS induced expression of CD 14 on the surface of PMA-primed U937 cells and monocytes, P. gingivalis LPS exhibited a significantly (P < 0.05) greater ability to enhance receptor levels. Our results indicate that P. gingivalis LPS can activate the mononuclear phagocyte

  4. Dynamics and Deposits of Coignimbrite Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engwell, Samantha; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Esposti Ongaro, Tomaso; Neri, Augusto

    2014-05-01

    Fine ash in the atmosphere poses a significant hazard, with potentially disastrous consequences for aviation and, on deposition, health and infrastructure. Fine-grained particles form a large proportion of ejecta in Plinian volcanic clouds. However, another common, but poorly studied phenomena exists whereby large amounts of fine ash are injected into the atmosphere. Coignimbrite plumes form as material is elutriated from the top of pyroclastic density currents. The ash in these plumes is considerably finer grained than that in Plinian plumes and can be distributed over thousands of kilometres in the atmosphere. Despite their significance, very little is known regarding coignimbrite plume formation and dispersion, predominantly due to the poor preservation of resultant deposits. As a result, consequences of coignimbrite plume formation are usually overlooked when conducting hazard and risk analysis. In this study, deposit characteristics and numerical models of plumes are combined to investigate the conditions required for coignimbrite plume formation. Coignimbrite deposits from the Campanian Ignimbrite eruption (Magnitude 7.7, 39 ka) are well sorted and very fine, with a mode of between 30 and 50 microns, and a significant component of respirable ash (less than 10 microns). Analogous distributions are found for coignimbrite deposits from Tungurahua 2006 and Volcan de Colima (2004-2006), amongst others, regardless of magnitude, type or chemistry of eruption. These results indicate that elutriation processes are the dominant control on coignimbrite grainsize distribution. To further investigate elutriation and coignimbrite plume dynamics, the numerical plume model of Bursik (2001) is applied. Model sensitivity analysis demonstrates that neutral buoyancy conditions (required for the formation of the plume) are controlled by a balance between temperature and gas mass flux in the upper most parts of the pyroclastic density current. In addition, results emphasize the

  5. Assessment of sediment toxicity in the Lagoon of Venice (Italy) using a multi-species set of bioassays.

    PubMed

    Picone, Marco; Bergamin, Martina; Losso, Chiara; Delaney, Eugenia; Arizzi Novelli, Alessandra; Ghirardini, Annamaria Volpi

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of a Weight of Evidence (WoE) approach, a set of four toxicity bioassays involving the amphipod Corophium volutator (10 d lethality test on whole sediment), the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus (fertilization and embryo toxicity tests on elutriate) and the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (embryo toxicity test on elutriate) was applied to sediments from 10 sampling sites of the Venice Lagoon (Italy). Sediments were collected during three campaigns carried out in May 2004 (spring campaign), October 2004 (autumn campaign) and February 2005 (winter campaign). Toxicity tests were performed on all sediment samples. Sediment grain-size and chemistry were measured during spring and autumn campaigns. This research investigated (i) the ability of toxicity tests in discriminating among sites with different contamination level, (ii) the occurrence of a gradient of effect among sampling sites, (iii) the possible correlation among toxicity tests, sediment chemistry, grain size and organic carbon, and (iv) the possible occurrence of toxicity seasonal variability. Sediment contamination levels were from low to moderate. No acute toxicity toward amphipods was observed, while sea urchin fertilization was affected only in few sites in just a single campaign. Short-term effects on larval development of sea urchin and oyster evidenced a clear spatial trend among sites, with increasing effects along the axis connecting the sea-inlets with the industrial area. The set of bioassays allowed the identification of a spatial gradient of effect, with decreasing toxicity from the industrial area toward the sea-inlets. Multivariate data analysis showed that the malformations of oyster embryos were significantly correlated to the industrial contamination (metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, hexachlorobenzene and polychlorinated biphenyls), while sea urchin development to sediment concentrations of As, Cr and organic carbon. Both embryo toxicity tests were

  6. Betulinol and wood sterols in sediments contaminated by pulp and paper mill effluents: dissolution and spatial distribution.

    PubMed

    Ratia, H; Rämänen, H; Lensu, A; Oikari, A

    2013-07-01

    The goal was to determine dissolution potency of betulinol and wood sterols (WSs) from pulp and paper mill-contaminated sediments and the current stratification for assessment the load due to potential erosion in the river-like watercourse. Both compounds are wood extractives, which may be toxic to benthos and fish. This research continues a study in which other wood extractives, resin acids and their derivative, retene, were analysed. Sediments were collected from 1, 3.5, 12, 15, and 33 km downstream from the pulp and paper mills, and from 2 upstream reference sites. The dissolution potency into sediment-water elutriates (1 + 4 v/v) was studied by two agitation times and temperatures. The vertical amounts of extractives were determined from the uppermost 20 cm of sediment. The amounts of extractives potentially released were estimated from the sediment layers 0-2 and 2-5 cm by using spatial interpolation. According to the interpolation, the total amount of betulinol and β-sitosterol was calculated as kg/ha in the whole sediment area. Significant concentrations of betulinol (1,666 μg/g, dw) and WSs (2,886 μg/g, dw) were measured from the sediments. According spatial interpolation, the highest calculated amount of betulinol (4,726 kg/ha) and that of the most abundant WS, β-sitosterol (3,571 kg/ha), were in the lake where the effluents were discharged. In the dissolution experiment, the highest concentration of betulinol in sediment (0-10 cm) and elutriate was 412 μg/g (dw) and 165 μg/l, respectively. For WSs, concentrations were 768 μg/g (dw) in sediment and 273 μg/l in elutriate. In a worst-case scenario, betulinol may be desorbed to water in concentrations which are hazardous to aquatic animals. Instead WSs are not a risk in this study area. The amount of desorption varied depending on the concentration of contaminants in sediment, the nature of disturbance, and the sediment organic carbon content. PMID:23263757

  7. H₂-rich syngas production by fluidized bed gasification of biomass and plastic fuel.

    PubMed

    Ruoppolo, G; Ammendola, P; Chirone, R; Miccio, F

    2012-04-01

    This paper reports the results of gasification tests using a catalytic fluidized bed gasifier to obtain a H(2)-rich stream by feeding different pellets made of wood, biomass/plastic and olive husks to the gasifier. The effects of both the steam supply and an in-bed catalyst on gasifier performance have been investigated. In general, pelletization was an effective pre-treatment for improving the homogeneity of the fuel and the reliability of the feeding devices. The use of biomass/plastic pellets in a catalyst bed yielded good results in terms of the hydrogen concentration (up to 32%vol.), even if an increase in tar production and in the fine/carbon elutriation rate was observed in comparison with wood pellets. PMID:22248676

  8. Distillation fraction-specific ecotoxicological evaluation of a paraffin-rich crude oil.

    PubMed

    Erlacher, Elisabeth; Loibner, Andreas P; Kendler, Romana; Scherr, Kerstin E

    2013-03-01

    Crude oil is a complex mixture of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) with distinct chemical, physical and toxicological properties relevant for contaminated site risk assessment. Ecotoxicological effects of crude oil distillation fractions on luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), earthworms (Dendrobaena hortensis) and invertebrates (Heterocypris incongruens) were tested using two spiked soils and their elutriates. Fraction 2 (F2) had an equivalent carbon number (ECN) range of >10 to 16, and F3 from >16 to 39. F2 showed a substantially higher ecotoxicological effect than F3 for Vibrio and Dendrobaena. In contrast, severe inhibition of Heterocypris by the poorly soluble F3 is attributed to mechanical organ blockage. Immediate sequestration of PHC to the organic matter-rich soil effected reduced toxicity for all organisms. This study indicates that a more differentiated consideration (i) of PHC mixtures based on ECN range and (ii) of model soil properties employed for ecotoxicity testing should be included into PHC-contaminated site risk assessment. PMID:23287074

  9. Exploratory and basic fluidized-bed combustion studies. Quarterly report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, I.; Myles, K.M.; Swift, W.M.

    1980-11-01

    These laboratory- and process-development-scale studies support the Fossil Energy development program for atmospheric and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion. The objective of the current program is to investigate methods for improving the utilization of limestone for SO/sub 2/ emission control in FBCs and to develop a method for predicting the performance in AFBC's and PFBC's of limestones from different sources. This report presents results from (1) an investigation of the use of water treatment of spent partially sulfated limestone to enhance its SO/sub 2/ capture capacity, (2) studies of the kinetics of the hydration of spent limestone, and (3) studies of the attrition and elutriation of limestones in fluidized beds. Results of studies of the particle-removal efficiency of the TAN-JET cyclone are also reported.

  10. Characterization of the Particle Size Fraction associated with Heavy Metals in Suspended Sediments of the Yellow River

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Qingzhen; Wang, Xiaojing; Jian, Huimin; Chen, Hongtao; Yu, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Variations in the concentrations of particulate heavy metals and fluxes into the sea in the Yellow River were examined based on observational and measured data from January 2009 to December 2010. A custom-built water elutriation apparatus was used to separate suspended sediments into five size fractions. Clay and very fine silt is the dominant fraction in most of the suspended sediments, accounting for >40% of the samples. Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Fe and Mn are slightly affected by anthropogenic activities, while Cd is moderate affected. The concentrations of heavy metals increased with decrease in particle size. For suspended sediments in the Yellow River, on average 78%–82% of the total heavy metal loading accumulated in the <16 μm fraction. About 43% and 53% of heavy metal in 2009 and 2010 respectively, were readily transported to the Bohai Sea with “truly suspended” particles, which have potentially harmful effects on marine organisms. PMID:26083999

  11. Methods to assess airborne concentrations of cotton dust.

    PubMed

    Corn, M

    1987-01-01

    Assessment of concentrations of airborne cotton dust in the factory is necessary to determine adherence to applicable Permissible Exposure Limits (PELs) on a day-to-day basis, as well as for investigatory studies of an epidemiological nature. The latter are required on an ongoing basis to determine the adequacy of PELs to prevent disease in the exposed population. A strategy of sampling includes considerations of the numbers of samples to be obtained for statistical validity and the locations of samples. Current practice is to obtain more "personal samples" of exposure wherever possible, but with regard to cotton dust, instrumentation is not available for such sampling. In the U.S., the vertical elutriator is the instrument of choice for determining the concentrations of cotton dust in air. Results are expressed as milligrams of airborne particulate (cotton dust) per cubic meter. PMID:3434562

  12. Characterization of the Particle Size Fraction associated with Heavy Metals in Suspended Sediments of the Yellow River.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingzhen; Wang, Xiaojing; Jian, Huimin; Chen, Hongtao; Yu, Zhigang

    2015-06-01

    Variations in the concentrations of particulate heavy metals and fluxes into the sea in the Yellow River were examined based on observational and measured data from January 2009 to December 2010. A custom-built water elutriation apparatus was used to separate suspended sediments into five size fractions. Clay and very fine silt is the dominant fraction in most of the suspended sediments, accounting for >40% of the samples. Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Fe and Mn are slightly affected by anthropogenic activities, while Cd is moderate affected. The concentrations of heavy metals increased with decrease in particle size. For suspended sediments in the Yellow River, on average 78%-82% of the total heavy metal loading accumulated in the <16 μm fraction. About 43% and 53% of heavy metal in 2009 and 2010 respectively, were readily transported to the Bohai Sea with "truly suspended" particles, which have potentially harmful effects on marine organisms. PMID:26083999

  13. Airstream Fractionation of Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi: Concentration and Enumeration of Propagules

    PubMed Central

    Tommerup, Inez C.

    1982-01-01

    Spores and fragments of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in dry soils were concentrated up to 100-fold when the soils were partitioned by fluidization and elutriation with a series of upward airstreams at progressively increasing velocities. The propagules were transported with the finer soil particles according to their equivalent spherical diameters. The system was used to predict the transport of propagules by wind. Concentrated propagules were rapidly separated from the soil particles in each soil fraction by an aqueous flotation method. The technique is proposed as a quantitative method for estimating the numbers of spores and fragments of mycorrhizae. The scheme includes a viability test that was used to differentiate between potentially infective propagules and those that were either dormant or incapable of regrowth. PMID:16346086

  14. Anion-exchange separation of Pt and Pd using perchloric and hydrochloric acid solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petrie, R.K.; Morgan, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    On Biorad Ag-1X8 anion-exchange resin (200-400 mesh), Pd and Pt may be separated from one another by elution with 0.2M HClO4, and 5M HClO4, respectively. If present, Au may be retained by making the elutriants 0.003M in HCl. Alternatively, reduction by H2SO3 enables elution of Pt2+ with 6M HCl before recovery of Pd2+ with 0.2M HClO4??Ir4+ is reduced to Ir3+ by H2SO3 and may be eluted ahead of Pt2+ by 2M HCl. ?? 1982 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  15. Benchmarking of a Markov multizone model of contaminant transport.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rachael M; Nicas, Mark

    2014-10-01

    A Markov chain model previously applied to the simulation of advection and diffusion process of gaseous contaminants is extended to three-dimensional transport of particulates in indoor environments. The model framework and assumptions are described. The performance of the Markov model is benchmarked against simple conventional models of contaminant transport. The Markov model is able to replicate elutriation predictions of particle deposition with distance from a point source, and the stirred settling of respirable particles. Comparisons with turbulent eddy diffusion models indicate that the Markov model exhibits numerical diffusion in the first seconds after release, but over time accurately predicts mean lateral dispersion. The Markov model exhibits some instability with grid length aspect when turbulence is incorporated by way of the turbulent diffusion coefficient, and advection is present. However, the magnitude of prediction error may be tolerable for some applications and can be avoided by incorporating turbulence by way of fluctuating velocity (e.g. turbulence intensity). PMID:25143517

  16. Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal from Port Chester, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Barrows, E.S.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Tokos, J.J.S.

    1996-08-01

    Port Chester was one of seven waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers-New York District requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in March 1994. Tests and analyses were conducted on Port Chester sediment core samples. Because the Port Chester area is located on the border between New York and southeast Connecticut, its dredged material may also be considered for disposal at the Central Long Island Sound Disposal Site. The sediment evaluation consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of site water and dredged material elutriate preparations, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Individual sediment core samples collected from Port Chester were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon. In addition, sediment was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl congers, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and 1,4-dichlorobenzene.

  17. Utilizing FUCCI reporters to understand pluripotent stem cell biology.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amar M; Trost, Robert; Boward, Benjamin; Dalton, Stephen

    2016-05-15

    The fluorescence ubiquitination cell cycle indicator (FUCCI) system provides a powerful method to evaluate cell cycle mechanisms associated with stem cell self-renewal and cell fate specification. By integrating the FUCCI system into human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) it is possible to isolate homogeneous fractions of viable cells representative of all cell cycle phases. This method avoids problems associated with traditional tools used for cell cycle analysis such as synchronizing drugs, elutriation and temperature sensitive mutants. Importantly, FUCCI reporters allow cell cycle events in dynamic systems, such as differentiation, to be evaluated. Initial reports on the FUCCI system focused on its strengths in reporting spatio-temporal aspects of cell cycle events in living cells and developmental models. In this report, we describe approaches that broaden the application of FUCCI reporters in PSCs through incorporation of FACS. This approach allows molecular analysis of the cell cycle in stem cell systems that were not previously possible. PMID:26404921

  18. Application of Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) procedures for the characterization and management of dredged harbor sediments.

    PubMed

    Montero, N; Belzunce-Segarra, M J; Gonzalez, J-L; Menchaca, I; Garmendia, J M; Etxebarria, N; Nieto, O; Franco, J

    2013-06-15

    This study refers to the performance of Phase I Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) procedures to identify the contaminants (i.e. organic compounds, metals and ammonia) exerting toxicity in marine sediments from the Pasaia harbor (Oiartzun estuary, northern Spain). The effectiveness of the manipulations to reduce toxicity was proved with the marine amphipod survival test (whole-sediment) and the sea urchin embryo-larval assay (elutriates). By means of TIEs it was concluded that organic compounds were the major contaminants exerting toxicity, although toxic effects by metals was also demonstrated. Additionally, the combination of Phase I treatments allowed to investigate the toxicity changes associated to the mobility of contaminants during dredging activities. Therefore, the performance of TIE procedures as another line of evidence in the decision-making process is recommended. They show a great potential to be implemented at different steps of the characterization and management of dredged harbor sediments. PMID:23465571

  19. Melting behavior and phase relations of lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    An attempt was made to show that feldspar would float during melting. Large anorthite crystals were placed beneath a silicate glass representative of liquid in which plagioclase accumulation is thought to have occurred. In less than 3 hours at 1,300 C, the crystals rose to the top in a Pt crucible 3 cm deep equilibrated in air and in a Mo crucible 1.5 cm deep equilibrated in an H2/CO2 gas stream of log PO2 = -10.9 (below Fe/FeO). These results suggest that lunar crustal formation by feldspar flotation is possible without special recourse to differential sinking of plagioclase versus mafic minerals or selective elutriation of plagioclase.

  20. Enhancement of heat transfer in waste-heat heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeffler, R. C.

    1980-07-01

    The Fluidfire shallow fluidized bed heat transfer facility was modified to give increased air flow capacity and to allow testing with different distributor plates and with two stage heat exchangers. The effect of reduced distributor plate pressure loss and amount and type of bed material on the heat transfer performance of a single stage fluidized bed heat exchanger is explored. Elutriation from the bed was measured for different bed materials and distributor plates; alternate heat exchanger surfaces having different fin spacings were also tested. Two types of two stage fluidized bed heat exchangers were tested: one having a baffle (having almost no pressure loss) located between the stages and which allowed bed material to recirculate between upper and lower beds; the second having two distributor plates in series with no recirculation of the bed material.

  1. Germination and root elongation bioassays in six different plant species for testing Ni contamination in soil.

    PubMed

    Visioli, Giovanna; Conti, Federica D; Gardi, Ciro; Menta, Cristina

    2014-04-01

    In vitro short-term chronic phytotoxicity germination and root elongation test were applied to test the effects of nickel (Ni) in seed germination and root elongation in six plants species: Cucumis sativus (Cucurbitaceae), Lepidium sativum and Brassica nigra (Brassicaceae), Trifolium alexandrinum and Medicago sativa (Fabaceae), Phacelia tanacetifolia (Boraginaceae). A naturally Ni rich soil was used to compare the results obtained. Unlike root elongation, germination was not affected by Ni in any of the six species tested. EC50 values, calculated on the root elongation, showed that Ni toxicity decreases in the following order: P. tanacetifolia > B. nigra > C. sativus > L. sativum > M. sativa > T. alexandrinum. The test conducted using soil elutriate revealed a significantly lower effect in both seed germination and root elongation when compared to the results obtained using untreated soil. Conversely, the test performed on soil confirmed the high sensitivity of C. sativus, P. tanacetifolia and L. sativum to Ni. PMID:24288040

  2. Growth-regulated synthesis and secretion of biologically active nerve growth factor by human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Di Marco, E; Marchisio, P C; Bondanza, S; Franzi, A T; Cancedda, R; De Luca, M

    1991-11-15

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) transcripts were identified in normal human keratinocytes in primary and secondary culture. The expression of the NGF mRNA was strongly down-regulated by corticosteroids and was maximal when keratinocytes were in the exponential phase of growth. Immunofluorescence studies on growing keratinocytes colonies and on elutriated keratinocytes obtained from growing colonies and mature stratified epithelium showed specific staining of the Golgi apparatus only in basal keratinocytes in the exponential phase of growth. The keratinocyte-derived NGF was secreted in a biologically active form as assessed by neurite induction in sensory neurons obtained from chick embryo dorsal root ganglia. Based on these data we suggest that the basal keratinocyte is the cell synthesizing and secreting NGF in the human adult epidermis. The paracrine secretion of NGF by keratinocytes might have a major role in regulating innervation, lymphocyte function, and melanocyte growth and differentiation in epidermal morphogenesis as well as during wound healing. PMID:1718982

  3. An experimental investigation of gas-particle flows through diffusers in the freeboard region of fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, S.R.; Eaton, J.K.

    1985-09-01

    Results reported in Kale and Eaton showed that very-wide-angle diffusers located in the freeboard above a fluidized bed substantially reduce elutriation--a resul that was contrary to intuition. The present experiment was designed to explain these results. One set of measurements was made with the bed in place and a second set with the bed material removed. The flow structure was drastically altered by the presence of the fluidized bed below the diffuser. A simple analysis suggests that suspended particles in the diffuser flow are responsible for the change in the flow structure. Momentum loss from the gas to the suspended particles reduces the pressure gradient, thereby eliminating the tendency to separate.

  4. Behavior of suspended particles in the Changjiang Estuary: Size distribution and trace metal contamination.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingzhen; Wang, Xiaojing; Jian, Huimin; Chen, Hongtao; Yu, Zhigang

    2016-02-15

    Suspended particulate matter (SPM) samples were collected along a salinity gradient in the Changjiang Estuary in June 2011. A custom-built water elutriation apparatus was used to separate the suspended sediments into five size fractions. The results indicated that Cr and Pb originated from natural weathering processes, whereas Cu, Zn, and Cd originated from other sources. The distribution of most trace metals in different particle sizes increased with decreasing particle size. The contents of Fe/Mn and organic matter were confirmed to play an important role in increasing the level of heavy metal contents. The Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cd contents varied significantly with increasing salinity in the medium-low salinity region, thus indicating the release of Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cd particles. Thus, the transfer of polluted fine particles into the open sea is probably accompanied by release of pollutants into the dissolved compartment, thereby amplifying the potential harmful effects to marine organisms. PMID:26743609

  5. Fluidized bed combustor modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horio, M.; Rengarajan, P.; Krishnan, R.; Wen, C. Y.

    1977-01-01

    A general mathematical model for the prediction of performance of a fluidized bed coal combustor (FBC) is developed. The basic elements of the model consist of: (1) hydrodynamics of gas and solids in the combustor; (2) description of gas and solids contacting pattern; (3) kinetics of combustion; and (4) absorption of SO2 by limestone in the bed. The model is capable of calculating the combustion efficiency, axial bed temperature profile, carbon hold-up in the bed, oxygen and SO2 concentrations in the bubble and emulsion phases, sulfur retention efficiency and particulate carry over by elutriation. The effects of bed geometry, excess air, location of heat transfer coils in the bed, calcium to sulfur ratio in the feeds, etc. are examined. The calculated results are compared with experimental data. Agreement between the calculated results and the observed data are satisfactory in most cases. Recommendations to enhance the accuracy of prediction of the model are suggested.

  6. Generation rates and emission factors of particulate matter and particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of incense sticks.

    PubMed

    Lung, Shih-Chun Candice; Hu, Shu-Chuan

    2003-02-01

    The generation rates and emission factors of particulate matter and associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from incense burning were assessed in a laboratory setting. The differences among different segments of the same stick, among different sticks of the same kind of incense, and between two kinds of manually made Chih-Chen incense sticks (A and B) were evaluated. Joss sticks were burned inside a 44 cm long elutriator; personal environmental monitors fitted into the top of the elutriator were used to take PM2.5 and PM10 samples of incense smoke. Samples were analyzed for PAHs by gas chromatography-flame ionization Detector. It was found that particle and associated PAHs were generated approximately at 561 microg/min (geometric standard deviation (GSD) = 1.1) and 0.56 microg/min (GSD = 1.1) from Incense A, and at 661 microg/min (GSD = 1.7) and 0.46 microg/min (GSD = 1.3) from Incense B, respectively. One gram of Incense A emitted about 19.8 mg (GSD = 1.1) particulate matter and 17.1 microg (GSD = 1.2) particulate-phase PAHs, while one gram of Incense B produced around 43.6 mg (GSD = 1.1) of particles and 25.2 microg (GSD = 1.2) of particle-bound PAHs. There were significant differences in emissions between Incenses A and B, although they belong to the same class of incense. A 10-20% variability in emissions was observed in the main part of the manually produced stick, and a larger variation was found at both tips of the combustible part. PMID:12685744

  7. Modeling of combustion of low grade lignites in fluidized beds with heat extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Mancuhan, E.; Oezyl, E.

    1999-07-01

    A computerized model was developed for any low rank coal with a known particle size distribution and mass fraction. When the coal is fed into the bed, the volatile matter is assumed to be released instantaneously and a new particle size distribution is achieved within the bed. The effect of elutriation and chemical reactions are also taken into account. The model developed investigates the effect of excess air on elutriation, particle size distribution of the semi-coke, and the mass fraction values within the bed at steady state conditions. The excess air ranged from 1 to 1.48. The model also takes into account the effect of coal type on the bed temperature. As is already known, temperature may vary significantly from type to type in the low quality coal range, much more than in the high quality coal types. The results of the model simulation studies are compared with a limited amount of experimental work available for Turkish lignites. The agreement between the model prediction and the experimental data is reasonably good. Closer to the distributor plate, the bed temperature prediction of the model is low, but agreement improves as the active bed surface is reached. The results obtained from the model are presented for feed air temperatures of 300, 400, and 500 K for Seyitoemer lignite. If 60% of the desired heat is extracted from the active bed, the optimum results can be obtained. Under optimum conditions, 70% of the volatile matter is burned within the active bed and the remainder of the freeboard.

  8. Investigation of Depth Distribution of Radionuclides in Soil Contaminated by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Haruo; Niizato, Tadafumi; Tanaka, Shingo; Abe, Hironobu; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2014-05-01

    This work was conducted as one of the researches relating to distribution maps of radiation dose rate etc. which the government has promoted as one of the counter-measures to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in March 2011, and the 2nd investigation on the depth distribution of radionuclides (RNs) in soil was conducted after about 1 year from the accident, succeedingly to the 1st investigation which was conducted after about 3 months from the accident. Soil core samples to about 50cm deep were taken at 11 locations in Nihonmatsu-city, Kawamata-town and Namie-town. Sorption-desorption experiments of Cs-137 and I-131, CEC and AEC measurements and mineralogical analyses by XRD were conducted for 3 types of soils (sandy, clayey, organic) and those elutriated components (clay, silt, sand). Radiocaesium (Cs-134 and Cs-137) and Ag-110m were detected at all locations investigated and only at locations where radiation dose rate is high, respectively. Radiocaesium more than 95% and 99% of the inventory distributed within 5cm and 10cm deep in soil in the surface layer (mainly sandy soil), respectively, and distributed within 16cm and 20cm deep in organic soil and soil at locations where are supposed to have been used as farmland, respectively. Radiocaesium tended to extend to deeper parts in soil that organic and clayey soils are the support layer, particularly in organic soil, compared with the 1st investigation. Distribution coefficients of Cs-137 onto organic soil and its elutriated components were also lower than that onto other soils. This is consistent with trend of penetration profile.

  9. Can Physiological Endpoints Improve the Sensitivity of Assays with Plants in the Risk Assessment of Contaminated Soils?

    PubMed Central

    Gavina, Ana; Antunes, Sara C.; Pinto, Glória; Claro, Maria Teresa; Santos, Conceição; Gonçalves, Fernando; Pereira, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Site-specific risk assessment of contaminated areas indicates prior areas for intervention, and provides helpful information for risk managers. This study was conducted in the Ervedosa mine area (Bragança, Portugal), where both underground and open pit exploration of tin and arsenic minerals were performed for about one century (1857 – 1969). We aimed at obtaining ecotoxicological information with terrestrial and aquatic plant species to integrate in the risk assessment of this mine area. Further we also intended to evaluate if the assessment of other parameters, in standard assays with terrestrial plants, can improve the identification of phytotoxic soils. For this purpose, soil samples were collected on 16 sampling sites distributed along four transects, defined within the mine area, and in one reference site. General soil physical and chemical parameters, total and extractable metal contents were analyzed. Assays were performed for soil elutriates and for the whole soil matrix following standard guidelines for growth inhibition assay with Lemna minor and emergence and seedling growth assay with Zea mays. At the end of the Z. mays assay, relative water content, membrane permeability, leaf area, content of photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls and carotenoids), malondialdehyde levels, proline content, and chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm and ΦPSII) parameters were evaluated. In general, the soils near the exploration area revealed high levels of Al, Mn, Fe and Cu. Almost all the soils from transepts C, D and F presented total concentrations of arsenic well above soils screening benchmark values available. Elutriates of several soils from sampling sites near the exploration and ore treatment areas were toxic to L. minor, suggesting that the retention function of these soils was seriously compromised. In Z. mays assay, plant performance parameters (other than those recommended by standard protocols), allowed the identification of more phytotoxic soils. The

  10. Marked Dependence on Growth State of Backup Pathways of NHEJ

    SciTech Connect

    Windhofer, Frank; Wu Wenqi; Wang, Minli; Singh, Satyendra K.; Saha, Janapriya; Rosidi, Bustanur; Iliakis, George . E-mail: Georg.Iliakis@uk-essen.de

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: Backup pathways of nonhomologous end joining (B-NHEJ) enable cells to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) when DNA-PK-dependent NHEJ (D-NHEJ) is compromised. Recent evidence implicates growth signaling in the regulation of D-NHEJ. This study was intended to determine whether the ability to repair DSBs by B-NHEJ also depends on growth state. Methods and Materials: LIG4 {sup -/-} and wild type (WT) mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) were used. Repair of DSBs was measured by pulsed-field agarose gel electrophoresis. G1 cells were selected by centrifugal elutriation. A plasmid assay was used to measure DNA end-joining activity in whole cell extracts. Results: Wild-type MEFs efficiently repaired DSBs by D-NHEJ in either the exponential or plateau phase of growth. Because of their defect in ligase IV, which compromises D-NHEJ, LIG4 {sup -/-} MEFs showed reduced repair capacity but were slowly able to rejoin a large proportion of DSBs via B-NHEJ. B-NHEJ was markedly reduced in the plateau phase of growth or at high radiation doses. Elutriated G1 cells from exponentially growing or plateau-phase LIG4 {sup -/-} cultures showed a response similar to nonelutriated cells, ruling out that the effect simply reflects redistribution in the cell cycle. An in vitro assay, gauging the activity of B-NHEJ, showed a reduction in DNA end joining during the plateau phase that could be corrected by recombinant DNA ligase III{alpha}. Conclusions: Suppression of growth signaling markedly compromises DSB repair by B-NHEJ. This effect is associated with a reduction in DNA ligase III mediated DNA end joining.

  11. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Eastchester Project Area, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Antrim, L.D.; Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, E.S.; Gardiner, W.W.; Tokos, J.J.S.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q.

    1996-07-01

    The objective of the Eastchester project (Federal Project [FP] No. 6) was to evaluate proposed dredged material from the Eastchester project area in the Hutchinson River to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Eastchester was one of seven waterways that the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in March 1994. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Eastchester project area consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, water- column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Eighteen individual sediment core samples collected from the Eastchester project area were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). Two composite sediment samples, representing the upstream and lower reaches of the area proposed for dredging, were analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which is prepared from the suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the two Eastchester sediment composites, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS. An additional 1 1 composite samples were created for the USACE-New England Division (USACE-NED) using the same 18 Eastchester core samples but combined into different composites. These composites were analyzed for metals, chlorinated pesticides, PCB congeners, PAHS, and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Water-column or SPP toxicity tests were performed along with bioaccumulation tests.

  12. Removal of mercury from powder river basin coal by low-temperature thermal treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Merriam, N.W.

    1993-07-01

    This report describes work conducted at Western Research Institute (WRI) to remove mercury from Powder River Basin (PRB) coal as part of the research performed under Task 2.1, Development and Optimization of a Process for the Production of a Premium Solid Fuel from Western US Coals, of the 1993 Annual Project Plan. In the tests minus 16 mesh PRB coal was fed to a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor where it was heated by contact with carbon dioxide fluidizing gas. A side stream of the gas from the reactor was passed through traps containing activated carbon where mercury driven from the coal was collected. The feed coal (which contains about 0.062 milligrams of mercury/kilogram of coal), the fines elutriated from the reactor, the activated carbon, and the condensed water from the reactor were analyzed for mercury. The solid products were analyzed using cold vapor atomic adsorption spectroscopy (ASTM D3684) while the water was analyzed using US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 245.1 which is based upon reduction of mercury to elemental form followed by adsorption at a wave length of 253.7 nanometers. The results of these tests show that about 70 to 80 wt % of the mercury is removed from the coal when the temperature is raised from about 300{degree}F (149{degree}C) to about 550{degree}F (288{degree}C). The remaining 20 wt % of the mercury remains in the char at temperatures up to about 1100{degree}F (593{degree}C). About 0.5 wt % of the mercury in the feed coal is condensed with water recovered from the coal. Nearly all of the mercury driven from the coal remains in the gas stream. Fines elutriated from the reactor contain about the same concentration of mercury as the feed coal.

  13. A geochemical investigation of fragmentation and physical fractionation in pyroclastic flows from the Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwell, C. J.; Braña, L. P.; Sparks, R. S. J.; Murphy, M. D.; Hards, V. L.

    2001-09-01

    Geochemical analysis is used to investigate fragmentation and physical fractionation in pyroclastic flows. Bulk analyses of the matrices (<4 mm) and individual size fractions in pyroclastic flow deposits formed in the eruption of the Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat, West Indies are compared with analyses of associated ash fall deposits formed from lofting plumes above the flows, and with bulk lava analyses. Within the flow matrices intermediate grain size fractions (<4 mm to 125 μm) are depleted in the groundmass component of the lava (principally glass and micro-crystalline silica) and enriched in phenocryst components. Fine-grained size fractions (<125 μm) are enriched in groundmass components. Crushing of the lava in the laboratory with analysis of grain size fractions shows the same relationship, but enrichment and depletions are less pronounced. Comparison of the bulk compositions of matrices, ash fall deposits and lava show that the finest fractions, enriched in the groundmass component, have been selectively removed from the flows into the lofting ash plumes. Mass balance calculations indicate that typically about 10% of the mass of the pyroclastic flows are elutriated into lofting ash plumes to form ash fall deposits, which is consistent with data on relative volumes of the deposits. Three factors influence fragmentation and fractionation. First, the initial size distribution of crystals influences fragmentation with phenocrysts resisting break up, whereas fine groundmass minerals (mostly feldspar, glass and micro-crystalline silica) are preferentially fragmented to form the finest ash fractions. Second, the mineral phases and groundmass glass vary in strength so that vesicular glass fragments more rapidly than other silicate minerals. This interpretation is supported by crushing experiments on different rock types. Third, only the finest fractions are elutriated into the lofting ash plume from the pyroclastic flows. Description of the natural size

  14. Ecotoxicity of selected nano-materials to aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Blaise, C; Gagné, F; Férard, J F; Eullaffroy, P

    2008-10-01

    Present knowledge concerning the ecotoxic effects of nano-materials is very limited and merits to be documented more fully. For this purpose, we appraised the toxicity of nine metallic nano-powders (copper zinc iron oxide, nickel zinc iron oxide, yttrium iron oxide, titanium dioxide, strontium ferrite, indium tin oxide, samarium oxide, erbium oxide, and holmium oxide) and of two organic nano- powders (fullerene-C60 and single-walled carbon nanotube or SWCNT). After a simple process where nano-powders (NPs) were prepared in aqueous solution and filtered, they were then bioassayed across several taxonomic groups including decomposers (bacteria), primary producers (micro-algae), as well as primary and secondary consumers (micro-invertebrates and fish). Toxicity data generated on the 11 NPs reflected a wide spectrum of sensitivity that was biological level-, test-, and endpoint-specific. With all acute and chronic tests confounded for these 11 NPs, toxicity responses spanned over three orders of magnitude: >463 mg/L (24 h LC50 of the invertebrate Thamnoplatyurus platyurus for fullerene-C60) / 0.3 mg/L (96 h EC50 of the invertebrate Hydra attenuata for indium tin oxide), that is a ratio of 1543. On the basis of the MARA (Microbial Array for Risk Assessment) assay toxic fingerprint concept, it is intimated that NPs may have different modes of toxic action. When mixed in a 1:1 ratio with a certified reference material (CRM) sediment, two solid phase assays and an elutriate assay, respectively, showed that five NPs (copper zinc iron oxide, samarium oxide, erbium oxide, holmium oxide, and SWCNT) were able to increase both CRM sediment toxicity and its elutriate toxicity. This initial investigation suggests that chemicals emerging from nanotechnology may pose a risk to aquatic life in water column and sediment compartments and that further studies on their adverse effects are to be encouraged. PMID:18528913

  15. Reduced bed agglomeration by co-combustion biomass with peat fuels in a fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Karin Lundholm; Anders Nordin; Marcus Oehman; Dan Bostroem

    2005-12-01

    Fluidized bed combustion is an energy conversion technology that is very suitable for biomass combustion because of its fuel flexibility and low process temperatures. However, agglomeration of bed material may cause severe operating problems. To prevent or at least reduce this, peat has been suggested as an additive to the main fuels. Nevertheless, the characteristics of peat fuels vary and there is limited information of the effect of different peat fuels and of the mechanisms behind the agglomeration prevention. The objectives of the present work were therefore to: (I) quantify the potential positive effect by co-combustion peat with forest fuels in terms of initial agglomeration temperatures; (ii) determine the amount of peat fuel that is needed to significantly reduce the agglomeration tendencies; and, if possible, (iii) elucidate the governing mechanisms. The results showed that all peat fuels prevented agglomeration in the studied interval of 760-1020{sup o}C and even as little as 5% peat fuel was found to have significant effects. The results also indicated that the mechanism of the agglomeration prevention varies between different peat fuels. Possible mechanisms are the minerals in the peat fuel retain alkali, which then is either elutriated up from the bed or captured in the bed; calcium and other refractory elements increase the melting temperature and thereby counteract the melting of alkali; and sulfur reacts with alkali metals and the alkali sulfates is either elutriated up from the bed or prevents agglomeration by increased melting temperature and lowered viscosity. Results from elemental analysis of the coating on bed particles showed that all mixtures with peat fuel resulted in a decreased or unchanged fraction of potassium and an increased fraction of aluminum in the coatings. The results also indicated a complex relationship between the fuel inorganic contents and the agglomeration process. 21 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Flow-permeability feedbacks and the development of segregation pipes in volcanic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, Alison

    2014-05-01

    Flow and transformation in volcanic porous media is important for the segregation of melts and aqueous fluids from magmas as well as elutriation of fine ash from pyroclastic flows and vents. The general topic will be discussed in the framework of understanding sets of vertical pipes found in two very different types of volcanic deposits: 1) vesicular (bubbly) cylinders in basalt lava flows and 2) gas escape pipes in pyroclastic flow deposits. In both cases the cylinders can be explained by a flow-permeability feedback where perturbations in porosity and thus permeability cause locally higher flow speeds that in turn locally increase the permeability. For vesicular cylinders in lava flows, the porous medium is a framework of crystals within the magma. Above a critical crystallinity, which depends on the shape and size distribution of the crystals, the crystals form a touching framework. As the water-saturated magma continues to cool, it crystallizes anhydrous minerals, resulting in the exsolution of water vapour bubbles that can drive flow of bubbly melt through the crystal network. It is common to find sets of vertical cylinders of bubby melt in solidified lava flows, with compositions that match the residual melt from 35-50% crystallization of the host basalt. These cylinders resemble chimneys in experiments of crystallising ammonium chloride solution that are explained by reactive flow with porous medium convection. The Rayleigh number for the magmatic case is too low for convection but the growth of steam bubbles as the magma crystallizes induces pore fluid flow up through the permeable crystal pile even if there is no convective instability. This bubble-growth-driven upward flow is reactive and can lead to channelization because of a feedback between velocity and permeability. For the gas escape pipes in pyroclastic flows, the porous medium is a very poorly sorted granular material composed of fragments of solid magma with a huge range of grain sizes from ash

  17. Guidelines for the processing and quality assurance of benthic invertebrate samples collected as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cuffney, T.F.; Gurtz, M.E.; Meador, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Benthic invertebrate samples are collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. This is a perennial, multidisciplinary program that integrates biological, physical, and chemical indicators of water quality to evaluate status and trends and to develop an understanding of the factors controlling observed water quality. The Program examines water quality in 60 study units (coupled ground- and surface-water systems) that encompass most of the conterminous United States and parts of Alaska and Hawaii. Study-unit teams collect and process qualitative and semi-quantitative invertebrate samples according to standardized procedures. These samples are processed (elutriated and subsampled) in the field to produce as many as four sample components: large-rare, main-body, elutriate, and split. Each sample component is preserved in 10-percent formalin, and two components, large-rare and main-body, are sent to contract laboratories for further processing. The large-rare component is composed of large invertebrates that are removed from the sample matrix during field processing and placed in one or more containers. The main-body sample component consists of the remaining sample materials (sediment, detritus, and invertebrates) and is subsampled in the field to achieve a volume of 750 milliliters or less. The remaining two sample components, elutriate and split, are used for quality-assurance and quality-control purposes. Contract laboratories are used to identify and quantify invertebrates from the large-rare and main-body sample components according to the procedures and guidelines specified within this document. These guidelines allow the use of subsampling techniques to reduce the volume of sample material processed and to facilitate identifications. These processing procedures and techniques may be modified if the modifications provide equal or greater levels of accuracy and precision. The intent of sample processing is to

  18. Methods for Isolation and Purification of Murine Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Jeremy; Gonelle-Gispert, Carmen; Morel, Philippe; Bühler, Léo

    2016-01-01

    To study the biological functions of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) and to identify their interplay with blood or liver cells, techniques allowing for the isolation and purification of LSEC have been developed over the last decades. The objective of the present review is to summarize and to compare the efficiency of existing methods for isolating murine LSEC. Toward this end, the MEDLINE database was searched for all original articles describing LSEC isolation from rat and mouse livers. Out of the 489 publications identified, 23 reported the main steps and outcomes of the procedure and were included in our review. Here, we report and analyse the technical details of the essential steps of the techniques used for LSEC isolation. The correlations between the prevalence of some steps and the efficiency of LSEC isolation were also identified. We found that centrifugal elutriation, selective adherence and, more recently, magnetic-activated cell sorting were used for LSEC purification. Centrifugal elutriation procured high yields of pure LSEC (for rats 30–141.9 million cells for 85–98% purities; for mice 9–9.25 million cells for >95% purities), but the use of this method remained limited due to its high technical requirements. Selective adherence showed inconsistent results in terms of cell yields and purities in rats (5–100 million cells for 73.7–95% purities). In contrast, magnetic-activated cell sorting allowed for the isolation of highly pure LSEC, but overall lower cell yields were reported (for rats 10.7 million cells with 97.6% purity; for mice 0.5–9 million cells with 90–98% purities). Notably, the controversies regarding the accuracy of several phenotypic markers for LSEC should be considered and their use for both magnetic sorting and characterization remain doubtful. It appears that more effort is needed to refine and standardize the procedure for LSEC isolation, with a focus on the identification of specific antigens. Such a procedure

  19. A nylon wool filter coated with human immunoglobulin for rapid depletion of monocytes and myeloid cells from peripheral blood stem cell transplants.

    PubMed

    Kwekkeboom, J; Buurman, D E; Ploemacher, R E; Baars, J W; Loos, H A; Slaper-Cortenbach, I C

    1998-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an inexpensive method for reducing the number of differentiated cells from granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized leukocytapheresis products (LPs) containing peripheral blood stem cells. Analysis of LPs showed the presence of significant numbers of monocytes and myeloid cells. The myeloid cells represented largely immature stages of the granulocyte lineage (myelocytes and metamyelocytes). We investigated whether these cells could be selectively depleted by filtration over nylon wool. Filtration of LP samples over nylon wool in a medium containing fetal calf serum resulted in variable but on average low yields of CD34+ cells (48 +/- 30%; n=13) and strongly variable depletions of myeloid cells. The adherence of CD34+ cells to the polyamide fiber was partially mediated by activated platelets that were present in the LPs. Removal of platelets by counterflow centrifugal elutriation before filtration resulted in increased yields of CD34+ cells in the filtrates (65 +/- 13%; n=10). The yield of progenitor cells was similarly enhanced when trisodium citrate, a chelating substance, was added to the filtration medium. Adherence of the myeloid cells to the nylon fiber was promoted by preincubation of the columns with human immunoglobulin (Ig) (2 mg/mL). Small-scale filtrations of LP samples in the presence of trisodium citrate over columns with Ig-coated nylon wool resulted in removal of 96 +/- 4% of the monocytes and 74 +/- 18% of the myeloid cells, with a yield of 71 +/- 15% CD34+ cells and 67 +/- 10% granulocyte-monocyte colony-forming units (CFU-GM) (n=23). There was no loss of primitive stem cells during the procedure: the yield of late-appearing cobblestone area-forming cells (CAFCs, week 6) was 110 +/- 30% (n=4). CFU-GM production per CAFC-derived clone was unchanged upon filtration, indicating that the quality of stem cells was not affected. Moreover, the proportions of CD34+ cells expressing a primitive immunophenotype (CD

  20. Experiments on chemical looping combustion of coal with a NiO based oxygen carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Laihong; Wu, Jiahua; Xiao, Jun

    2009-03-15

    A chemical looping combustion process for coal using interconnected fluidized beds with inherent separation of CO{sub 2} is proposed in this paper. The configuration comprises a high velocity fluidized bed as an air reactor, a cyclone, and a spout-fluid bed as a fuel reactor. The high velocity fluidized bed is directly connected to the spout-fluid bed through the cyclone. Gas composition of both fuel reactor and air reactor, carbon content of fly ash in the fuel reactor, carbon conversion efficiency and CO{sub 2} capture efficiency were investigated experimentally. The results showed that coal gasification was the main factor which controlled the contents of CO and CH{sub 4} concentrations in the flue gas of the fuel reactor, carbon conversion efficiency in the process of chemical looping combustion of coal with NiO-based oxygen carrier in the interconnected fluidized beds. Carbon conversion efficiency reached only 92.8% even when the fuel reactor temperature was high up to 970 C. There was an inherent carbon loss in the process of chemical looping combustion of coal in the interconnected fluidized beds. The inherent carbon loss was due to an easy elutriation of fine char particles from the freeboard of the spout-fluid bed, which was inevitable in this kind of fluidized bed reactor. Further improvement of carbon conversion efficiency could be achieved by means of a circulation of fine particles elutriation into the spout-fluid bed or the high velocity fluidized bed. CO{sub 2} capture efficiency reached to its equilibrium of 80% at the fuel reactor temperature of 960 C. The inherent loss of CO{sub 2} capture efficiency was due to bypassing of gases from the fuel reactor to the air reactor, and the product of residual char burnt with air in the air reactor. Further experiments should be performed for a relatively long-time period to investigate the effects of ash and sulfur in coal on the reactivity of nickel-based oxygen carrier in the continuous CLC reactor

  1. Methods for Isolation and Purification of Murine Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Jeremy; Gonelle-Gispert, Carmen; Morel, Philippe; Bühler, Léo

    2016-01-01

    To study the biological functions of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) and to identify their interplay with blood or liver cells, techniques allowing for the isolation and purification of LSEC have been developed over the last decades. The objective of the present review is to summarize and to compare the efficiency of existing methods for isolating murine LSEC. Toward this end, the MEDLINE database was searched for all original articles describing LSEC isolation from rat and mouse livers. Out of the 489 publications identified, 23 reported the main steps and outcomes of the procedure and were included in our review. Here, we report and analyse the technical details of the essential steps of the techniques used for LSEC isolation. The correlations between the prevalence of some steps and the efficiency of LSEC isolation were also identified. We found that centrifugal elutriation, selective adherence and, more recently, magnetic-activated cell sorting were used for LSEC purification. Centrifugal elutriation procured high yields of pure LSEC (for rats 30-141.9 million cells for 85-98% purities; for mice 9-9.25 million cells for >95% purities), but the use of this method remained limited due to its high technical requirements. Selective adherence showed inconsistent results in terms of cell yields and purities in rats (5-100 million cells for 73.7-95% purities). In contrast, magnetic-activated cell sorting allowed for the isolation of highly pure LSEC, but overall lower cell yields were reported (for rats 10.7 million cells with 97.6% purity; for mice 0.5-9 million cells with 90-98% purities). Notably, the controversies regarding the accuracy of several phenotypic markers for LSEC should be considered and their use for both magnetic sorting and characterization remain doubtful. It appears that more effort is needed to refine and standardize the procedure for LSEC isolation, with a focus on the identification of specific antigens. Such a procedure is required

  2. More on the dynamics of dust generation: the effects of mixing and sanding chrysotile, calcium carbonate, and other components on the characteristics of joint-compound dusts.

    PubMed

    Berman, D Wayne; Brorby, Gregory P; Sheehan, Patrick J; Bogen, Kenneth T; Holm, Stewart E

    2012-08-01

    An ongoing research effort designed to reconstruct the character of historical exposures associated with use of chrysotile-containing joint compounds naturally raised questions concerning how the character (e.g. particle size distributions) of dusts generated from use of recreated materials compares to dusts from similar materials manufactured historically. This also provided an opportunity to further explore the relative degree that the characteristics of dusts generated from a bulk material are mediated by the properties of the bulk material versus the mechanical processes applied to the bulk material by which the dust is generated. In the current study, the characteristics of dusts generated from a recreated ready mix and recreated dry mix were compared to each other, to dusts from a historical dry mix, and to dusts from the commercial chrysotile fiber (JM 7RF3) used in the recreated materials. The effect of sanding on the character of dusts generated from these materials was also explored. Dusts from the dry materials studied were generated and captured for analysis in a dust generator-elutriator. The recreated and historical joint compounds were also prepared, applied to drywall, and sanded inside sealed bags so that the particles produced from sanding could be introduced into the elutriator and captured for analysis. Comparisons of fiber size distributions in dusts from these materials suggest that dust from commercial fiber is different from dusts generated from the joint compounds, which are mixtures, and the differences persist whether the materials are sanded or not. Differences were also observed between sanded recreated ready mix and either the recreated dry mix or a historical dry mix, again whether sanded or not. In all cases, however, such differences disappeared when variances obtained from surrogate data were used to better represent the 'irreducible variation' of these materials. Even using the smaller study-specific variances, no differences were

  3. Safety characteristics of a suspended-pellet fission reactor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingdon, David Ross

    A new fission reactor system with passive safety characteristics to eliminate the occurrence of loss-of-coolant accidents, reduce reactivity excursion effects, and which also provides for closure of the nuclear fuel cycle through on-site spent fuel management is examined. The concept uses multi-coated fuel pellets which are suspended by an upward moving coolant in vertical columns of the reactor core and electro-refining elemental separation to remove selected fission products prior to actinide recycling. The possibility of fuel melt following a loss-of-coolant is avoided as a decrease in coolant flow results in the removal of fuel from the core through the action of gravity alone. Average fluid velocities in the columns which are necessary to suspend the pellets are calculated and found to be consistent with the necessary heat extraction to yield ˜1--10 Wth per column. The total output power of such suspended pellet-type reactors is compared to the power necessary to provide the suspending fluid flow, yielding favourable ratios of ˜102--103. The reduction of reactivity excursion tendencies is envisaged through an ablative layer of material in the pellets which sublimates at temperatures above normal operating conditions. In the event of a power or temperature increase the particles fragment and thereby change their hydrodynamic drag characteristics, thus leading to fuel removal from the core by elutriation. Comparison of nuclear-to-thermal response times and elutriation rates for limiting power transients indicate that the present design assists in reactivity excursion mitigation. Closure of the nuclear fuel cycle is attained through a spent fuel management strategy which requires only on-site storage of a fraction of the fission products produced during reactor operation. Electro-refining separation of selected fission products combined with complete actinide recycling yields no isolation of plutonium or highly enriched uranium during the procedure. The out

  4. Experimental investigation into the incineration of wool scouring sludges in a novel rotating fluidised bed.

    PubMed

    Wong, W Y; Lu, Y; Nasserzadeh, V S; Swithenbank, J; Shaw, T; Madden, M

    2000-04-01

    The main purpose of this research was to investigate the possibility of incineration of wool scouring sludges in a novel vertical axis rotating fluidized bed (RFB). A small-scale RFB was designed and constructed with an internal diameter (ID) of 200 mm and height of 50 mm to carry out the experiments. In phase one of the experiments, a cold test was conducted to investigate the fluidization performance of the RFB, which eventually led to the optimisation of the operating parameters, i.e., sand particle size, rotation speed and bed loading (bed thickness) which ensures complete fluidization and minimum particle elutriation. Sand particle size of 0.5 to 0.6 mm, rotation speed of 200 to 400 rpm and bed loading of 1 kg (equivalent to bed thickness of 27 mm) were found optimal. These information generated were useful for the second phase of the experiments, which was the hot test, in investigating the possibility of incinerating wool scouring sludges in the RFB. Nine wool sludges from different process routes generated from the wool scouring industries were analysed for their compositions. Most of these sludges were highly moist, had high volatile matter and high ash content with low level of fixed carbon. These characteristics made incineration difficult. Hence, the effect of varying the moisture content, rotation speed and sludge feed rate on the incineration of the three selected sludges were studied in the hot test. With 5% support methane, all sludges with a maximum moisture up to 70% as-received could be successfully burned in the RFB at rotating speeds of 200 and 300 rpm. The combustion was found to be intense with a high efficiency due to the good turbulence and mixing in the RFB. The combustion gases produced, i.e., CO, CO(2) and NO(x) were reasonably low due to the high combustion intensity and efficiency. To study the dynamics of the bed and freeboard region in the RFB, the velocity flow field was simulated using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to

  5. Fine ash enrichment of fall deposits from explosive eruptions by co-PF ash: nature, significance and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eychenne, Julia; Engwell, Samantha; Cashman, Katharine; Rust, Alison; Durant, Adam; Le Pennec, Jean-Luc

    2014-05-01

    Most highly explosive volcanic eruptions (Violent Strombolian, Subplinian to Plinian) are accompanied by the emplacement of pyroclastic flows (PF) and consequently the formation of co-pyroclastic flow (co-PF) elutriation plumes (Campanian Ignimbrite (39 ka BP), Pinatubo (15 June, 1991), Mount St Helens (18 May, 1980), Tungurahua (16 August 2006)). Similar to explosive plumes (i.e. produced at the vent), co-PF plumes can rise through the atmosphere to high altitudes (one of the 18 May, 1980 Mount St Helens co-PF plumes rose up to 30 km a.s.l.) and be transported downwind great distances (more than 2000 km for the Campanian Ignimbrite). Detailed analyses of the componentry and the morphology of the ash fractions (<90 µm) of Mount St Helens (18 May 1980) fall deposit and Tungurahua (16 August 2006) fall and co-PF deposits have been carried out in order to describe the nature of the ash entrained in co-PF plumes and to advance our understanding of the secondary fragmentation mechanisms leading to the formation of elutriated ash. The componentry distribution of the 18 May 1980 Mount St Helens fall deposit samples indicates that a substantial amount of the distal ash (> 150 km from the vent) comprises edifice-derived particles which were produced during the early stage of the eruption (blast and consecutive landslides) and consequently transported in co-PF plumes. Detailed grain size analyses of the August 2006 Tungurahua and Campanian Ignimbrite fall and co-PF deposits, along with a thorough compilation of published data from well constrained explosive eruptions, provide strong evidence that the fine ash enrichment of fall deposits from magmatic eruptions is related to synchronous sedimentation of co-PF ash. These data allow us to demonstrate the significant impact of fine ash incorporation on the physical characteristics of fall deposits (isopach shapes, grain size, density, volume, etc.) and hence on the determination of the style, magnitude and intensity of

  6. Mesenchymal precursor cells in the blood of normal individuals.

    PubMed

    Zvaifler, N J; Marinova-Mutafchieva, L; Adams, G; Edwards, C J; Moss, J; Burger, J A; Maini, R N

    2000-01-01

    STATEMENT OF FINDINGS: Mesenchymal precursor cells found in the blood (BMPCs) of normal persons adhere to plastic and glass and proliferate logarithmically in DMEM-20% fetal calf serum (FCS) without growth factors. They form cells with fibroblast-like and stromal morphology, which is not affected by eliminating CD34, CD3, or CD14 cells. Osteogenic supplements (dexamethasone, ascorbic acid, and beta-glycerophosphate) added to the culture inhibited fibroblast formation, and BMPCs assumed the cuboidal shape of osteoblasts. After 5 days in supplemented medium, the elutriated cells displayed alkaline phosphatase (AP), and the addition of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)2 (1 ng) doubled AP production (P < 0.04). Two weeks later, 30% of the cells were very large and reacted with anti-osteocalcin antibody. The same cultures also contained sudanophlic adipocytes and multinucleated giant cells that stained for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and vitronectin receptors. Cultured BMPCs immunostain with antibodies to vimentin, type I collagen, and BMP receptors, heterodimeric structures expressed on mesenchymal lineage cells. In addition, BMPCs stain with anti-CD105 (endoglin), a putative marker for bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). PMID:11056678

  7. Fate of gamma-interferon-activated killer blood monocytes adoptively transferred into the abdominal cavity of patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, H.C.; Keenan, A.M.; Woodhouse, C.; Ottow, R.T.; Miller, P.; Steller, E.P.; Foon, K.A.; Abrams, P.G.; Beman, J.; Larson, S.M.

    1987-11-15

    Five patients with colorectal cancer widely metastatic to peritoneal surfaces have been treated i.p. with infusions of autologous blood monocytes made cytotoxic by in vitro incubation with human gamma-interferon. The monocytes were purified by a combination of cytapheresis and counter-current centrifugal elutriation procedures; each week approximately 350 million activated monocytes were given to patients as adoptive immunotherapy by a single i.p. instillation. On the eighth cycle of treatment the trafficking of i.p. infused blood monocytes was studied in two patients by prelabeling the cells with /sup 111/In. These activated cells became distributed widely within the peritoneal cavity. Two and 5 days after infusion their position within the peritoneum had not changed. When peritoneal specimens were obtained 36 h after /sup 111/In-labeled monocyte infusion, labeled monocytes were demonstrated to be associated with the serosal surfaces by autoradiographic analysis. Scintiscanning structures outside the abdominal cavity revealed that /sup 111/In-labeled monocytes infused i.p. did not traffic to other organs during the 5 days of the study. We conclude that i.p. adoptive transfer of autologous killer blood monocytes is an effective way of delivering these cytotoxic cells to sites of tumor burden on peritoneal surfaces in these cancer patients.

  8. Microbiological community analysis of vermicompost tea and its influence on the growth of vegetables and cereals.

    PubMed

    Fritz, J I; Franke-Whittle, I H; Haindl, S; Insam, H; Braun, R

    2012-07-01

    Vermicompost, the digestion product of organic material by earthworms, has been widely reported to have a more positive effect on plant growth and plant health than conventional compost. A study was conducted to investigate the effects of different vermicompost elutriates (aerated compost teas) on soils and plant growth. The teas were analyzed by chemical, microbiological, and molecular methods accompanied by plant growth tests at laboratory and field scale. The number of microorganisms in the teas increased during the extraction process and was affected by substrate addition. The vermicompost tea found to increase plant growth best under laboratory tests was applied to cereals (wheat and barley) and vegetables (Raphanus sativus, Rucola selvatica, and Pisum sativum) in a field study. The results revealed no effects of tea application on plant yield; however, sensoric tests indicated an improvement in crop quality. The soils from laboratory and field studies were investigated to detect possible microbial or chemical changes. The results indicated that minor changes to the soil microbial community occurred following tea application by foliar spray in both the laboratory-scale and field-scale experiments. PMID:22712623

  9. Status and applications of echinoid (phylum echinodermata) toxicity test methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bay, S.; Burgess, R.; Nacci, D.

    1993-01-01

    The use of echinoderms for toxicity testing has focused primarily on sea urchins and sand dollars (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, Arbacia punctulata, Lytechinus pictus, and Dendraster excentricus, for example). The status and relative sensitivity of various test methods are described. The most frequently used test methods consist of short-term exposures of sea urchin sperm or embryos; these tests can be easily conducted at all times of the year by using species with complementary spawning cycles or laboratory conditioned populations of a single species. Data from reference toxicant and effluent toxicity tests are summarized. Information on the precision and sensitivity of echinoid test methods are limited and preclude rigorous comparisons with other test methods. The available data indicate that the sensitivity and precision of these methods are comparable to short-term chronic methods for other marine invertebrates and fish. Recent application of the sperm test in toxicity identification evaluations (TIEs) and studies of effluent toxicity decay and sediment toxicity illustrate the versatility of this rapid (10 to 60 min exposure) test method. Embryo tests typically use a 48 to 96 h exposure period and measure the occurrence of embryo malformations. Most recent applications of the embryo test have been for the assessment of sediment elutriate toxicity. Adult echinoderms are not frequently used to assess effluent or receiving water toxicity. Recent studies have had success in using the adult life stage of urchins and sand dollars to assess the effects of contaminated sediment on growth, behavior, and bioaccumulation.

  10. Induction of TRAIL- and TNF-α-dependent Apoptosis in Human Monocyte-derived Dendritic Cells by Microfilariae of Brugia Malayi1

    PubMed Central

    Semnani, Roshanak Tolouei; Venugopal, Priyanka Goel; Mahapatra, Lily; Skinner, Jason; Meylan, Francoise; Chien, Daniel; Dorward, David; Chaussabel, Damien; Siegel, Richard M.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Dysregulation of professional APC has been postulated as a major mechanism underlying Ag-specific T cell hyporesponsiveness in patients with patent filarial infection. To address the nature of this dysregulation, dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages (MΦ) generated from elutriated monocytes were exposed to live microfilariae (mf), the parasite stage that circulates in blood and is responsible for most immune dysregulation in filarial infections. DC exposed to mf for 24–96 h showed a marked increase in cell death and caspase-positive cells compared with unexposed DC, while mf exposure did not induce apoptosis in MΦ. Interestingly, 48 h exposure of DC to mf induced mRNA expression of the pro-apoptotic gene TRAIL and both mRNA and protein expression of TNF-α. mAb to TRAIL-R2, TNF-R1, or TNF-α partially reversed mf-induced cell death in DC, as did knocking down the receptor for TRAIL-R2 using small interfering RNA. Mf also induced gene expression of BH3-interacting domain death agonist (Bid) and protein expression of cytochrome c in DC; mf-induced cleavage of Bid could be shown to induce release of cytochrome c, leading to activation of caspase 9. Our data suggest that mf induce DC apoptosis in a TRAIL- and TNF-α-dependent fashion. PMID:18981128

  11. Assessment of the effects of Cr, Cu, Ni and Pb soil contamination by ecotoxicological tests.

    PubMed

    Maisto, Giulia; Manzo, Sonia; De Nicola, Flavia; Carotenuto, Rita; Rocco, Annamaria; Alfani, Anna

    2011-11-01

    This study aimed to assess soil quality by chemical and ecotoxicological investigations and to check the correspondence between soil metal concentrations and ecotoxicity. For these purposes, surface soils collected at four adjacent roadside urban parks and at a former industrial area were characterized for C/N, organic matter content, texture, and pH. Cr, Cu, Ni and Pb, chosen among the most representative soil metal contaminants, were measured as total content and as available and water soluble fractions. In addition, the total concentrations of the investigated metals were used to calculate two chemical indices: the contamination and the potential ecological risk factors. The toxicity of the investigated soils was evaluated by an ecotoxicity test battery carried out on both soil samples (Vibrio fischeri, Heterocypris incongruens and Sinapis alba) and elutriates (Vibrio fischeri, Daphnia magna and Selenastrum capricornutum). The findings, both by the chemical and ecotoxicological approaches, would suggest that the soils with high metal contamination pose ecological risks. On the other hand, moderately metal contaminated soils did not exclude soil ecotoxicity. In fact, toxic effects were also highlighted in soils with low metal content, toxicity being affected by metal availability and soil characteristics. Moreover, the results suggest the importance of using a battery of tests to assess soil ecotoxicity. PMID:21918769

  12. Biostimulation of the autochthonous bacterial community and bioaugmentation of selected bacterial strains for the depletion of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in a historically contaminated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiGregorio, Simona; Ruffini Castglione, Monica; Gentini, Alessandro; Lorenzi, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a large group of organic contaminants causing hazards to organisms including humans. The objective of the study was (1) to validate the biostimulation of the autochthonous bacterial population by the amendment of lignocellulosic matrices inoculated with white rot fungi, to be exploited for the depletion of PAHs (5687 ppm) in a historical contaminated soil. (2) to validate the isolation of autochthonous bacterial strains capable to use PAHs as sole carbon source and their massive bioaugmentation for PAH depletion in a historical contaminated soil. The validation has been performed at mesocosm and pilot scale (7 tons of soil in a biopile). The two approaches end up with the complete depletion of the PAHs. A genotoxicological assessment of the process and of the soil at the end of the process of decontamination has been performed. The process of soil decontamination showed an increase in the genotoxicity of either the soil and the deriving elutriates. The bioaugmetation of selected bacterial strains determined the complete detoxification of the decontaminated soil after 21 weeks. The microbial ecology of the system during the process of decontamination has been monitored.

  13. Steaming of cotton to prevent byssinosis—a plant study

    PubMed Central

    Imbus, Harold R.; Suh, Moon W.

    1974-01-01

    Imbus, H. R. and Suh, M. W. (1974).British Journal of Industrial Medicine,31, 209-219. Steaming of cotton to prevent byssinosis—a plant study. Pulmonary function tests, respiratory questionnaires, and dust measurements were made in a cotton spinning plant during the processing of steamed cotton and after its discontinuance. During steaming the average drop in FEV1 (Δ FEV1) from the beginning to six hours into the work shift was 19 ml, and after steaming was discontinued 62 ml. In addition, the FEV1 measurements, before work on the first day of the work week, were 60 to 100 ml higher during the time of steaming. The improvement in Δ FEV1 with steaming was much greater for males than for females. Improvement was greatest in the higher dust areas, namely, opening, picking, blending, and carding, and less in spinning, winding, and twisting. Questionnaire results did not reveal any significant difference in the incidence of symptoms of byssinosis during the two periods, the reasons for which are not clear. There was an approximately 30% reduction in elutriated and total dust. PMID:4415886

  14. A novel method for extraction of a proteinous coagulant from Plantago ovata seeds for water treatment purposes.

    PubMed

    Ramavandi, Bahman; Hashemi, Seyedenayat; Kafaei, Raheleh

    2015-01-01

    Several chemicals have been applied in the process of coagulant extraction from herbal seeds, and the best extraction has been obtained in the presence of KCl or NaNO3[1-3], and NaCl [4]. However, the main challenge posed to these methods of coagulant extraction is their relatively low efficiency for water treatment purposes and the formation of dissolved organic matter during the treatment process. In these methods the salts, which have a one-valance metal (Na(+) and K(+)), are deposited in the internal structure and the pore of the coagulant, and may be useful for the coagulation/flocculation process. In this research, we found that modified methods produced more dense protein. Therefore, the modified procedure was better than the older one for removal of turbidity and harness from the contaminated water. Here we describe a method where: •According to the Hardy-Schulze rule, we applied the Fe(3+) ions instead of Na(+) and K(+) for the extraction of protein from Plantago ovata seeds.•The method was narrowed to extract protein by ethanol (defatting) and ammonium acetate and CM-Sepharose (protein extraction).•Two consecutive elutriations of crude extract was directly performed using 0.025-M FeCl3 and 0.05-M FeCl3 according to the basis of the ion-exchange processes. PMID:26150999

  15. Silicon production in a fluidized bed reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, N. K.

    1986-01-01

    Part of the development effort of the JPL in-house technology involved in the Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project was the investigation of a low-cost process to produce semiconductor-grade silicon for terrestrial photovoltaic cell applications. The process selected was based on pyrolysis of silane in a fluidized-bed reactor (FBR). Following initial investigations involving 1- and 2-in. diameter reactors, a 6-in. diameter, engineering-scale FBR was constructed to establish reactor performance, mechanism of silicon deposition, product morphology, and product purity. The overall mass balance for all experiments indicates that more than 90% of the total silicon fed into the reactor is deposited on silicon seed particles and the remaining 10% becomes elutriated fines. Silicon production rates were demonstrated of 1.5 kg/h at 30% silane concentration and 3.5 kg/h at 80% silane concentration. The mechanism of silicon deposition is described by a six-path process: heterogeneous deposition, homogeneous decomposition, coalescence, coagulation, scavenging, and heterogeneous growth on fines. The bulk of the growth silicon layer appears to be made up of small diameter particles. This product morphology lends support to the concept of the scavenging of homogeneously nucleated silicon.

  16. NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) testimony to DOL (Department of Labor) on proposed standard for occupational exposure to cotton dust, by R. Lemen, September 21, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-21

    Testimony was presented to support the need for a cotton dust standard to cover the waste-utilization industry and cottonseed oil mills. The following steps were presented to protect against diseases caused by exposure to cotton dust: worker exposure to cotton dust was to be reduced to the lowest level feasible; medical monitoring was to be undertaken and workers who were particularly susceptible to cotton-dust diseases were to be removed from contact with the dust; smoking was to be discouraged. A series of cross-sectional respiratory morbidity studies was conducted to determine the existence of byssinosis and other pulmonary disease among individuals involved with nontextile industrial exposure to cotton dust. Vertical elutriators were used to provide correlation of dust concentrations in the work environment and the rest of the results of the medical survey tests. Workers in the waste-utilization industry had a higher prevalence of bronchitis and results in pulmonary function tests which indicated lung damage. In cottonseed oil mill workers, an increased number of adverse respiratory effects were noted with decreased pulmonary function test results. While there were no data regarding dose response relationships for these industries, NIOSH recommended the institution of a sound prevention strategy.

  17. The Performance of Available Approaches for Quantifying Airborne Exposure to Asbestos Generated from Natural Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, D.

    2012-12-01

    General options for quantifying airborne (exposure) concentrations to asbestos include (1) direct measurement, (2) simulation, and (3) emission/dispersion modeling (of measured asbestos concentrations in the source material). Suitable options for particular applications depend on whether one is evaluating current or future and short-term episodic or long-term average exposures. Moreover, because the character and the magnitude of exposure must both be determined for many applications, methods suitable for air- or bulk-phase measurements must exhibit appropriate performance. After all, it is only when we understand precisely what exposure estimates represent that we can interpret them meaningfully. What is known about the suitability and performance of various options for quantifying asbestos exposures generated from natural deposits will be reviewed in this talk with particular emphasis on an approach in which emission and dispersion of asbestos-containing dusts are modeled from bulk-phase measurements collected using the modified elutriator method (a method designed explicitly for this particular application).

  18. Chemistry and toxicity of sediments from San Diego Bay, including a biomarker (P450 RGS) response

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.W.; Newton, F.C.; Hardin, J.; Tukey, R.H.; Richter, K.E.

    1996-12-31

    Thirty sediment samples were collected from the vicinity of the Naval Docking Facility in San Diego Bay and used to conduct bioassays with amphipods, oyster larvae, Microtox, and a new rapid screening test called the cytochrome P450 Reporter Gene System (RGS). This RGS cell line, from a human liver cancer cell, has been engineered to produce luciferase, when the CYP1A1 gene on the chromosome is induced by toxic and carcinogenic organics (dioxin, coplanar PCBs, PAHs). Elutriates were tested with both Microtox and oyster larvae, and organic extracts of sediments were tested with Microtox and the P450 RGS assay. Chemical analyses included total organic carbon (TOC), and acid volatile sulfides (AVS) along with a wide range of metals and organic chemicals. The simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) to AVS ratio was compared to the toxic response of oyster larvae and amphipods. Along each of the piers sampled, contaminant concentrations decreased with distance from shore. A correlation matrix analysis of all biological and chemical data was conducted. The strongest correlation between a chemical measurement and a biological response was that of total PAH versus the P450 RGS response. The use of P450 RGS as a screening tool to assess the relative risk of contaminants on sediments is biologically meaningful, and is a rapid and inexpensive means of determining which samples require complete chemical characterization.

  19. Radionuclide Leaching from Organic Ion Exchange Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.; Rinehart, D.E.

    1999-04-02

    Laboratory tests were performed to examine the efficacy of leach treatments for decontaminating organic ion exchange resins (OIER), which have been found in a number of samples retrieved from K East Basin sludge. Based on process records, the OIER found in the K Basins is a mixed-bet strong acid/strong base material marketed as Purolite{trademark} NRW-037. Radionuclides sorbed or associated with the OIER can restrict its disposal to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The need for testing to support development of a treatment process for K Basin sludge has been described in Section 4.2 of ''Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basins Sludge Treatment Process'' (Flament 1998). To help understand the effects of anticipated OIER elutriation and washing, tests were performed with well-rinsed OIER material from K East Basin floor sludge (sample H-08 BEAD G) and with well-rinsed OIER having approximately 5% added K East canister composite sludge (sample KECOMP). The rinsed resin-bearing material also contained the inorganic ion exchanger Zeolon-900{trademark}, a zeolite primarily composed of the mineral mordenite. The zeolite was estimated to comprise 27 weight percent of the dry H-08 BEAD G material.

  20. Cell Cycle- and Vpr-Mediated Regulation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Expression in Primary and Transformed T-Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Gummuluru, Suryaram; Emerman, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Viral protein R (Vpr) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transiently arrests cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle and is a weak transcriptional transactivator. We found that Vpr increased HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) activity in all cells examined but, when expressed at high levels, decreased HIV-1 LTR expression due to cytotoxic effects. Moreover, Vpr-mediated enhancement of HIV-1 LTR-driven transcription was observed in cycling primary human CD4+ T cells but not in terminally differentiated, noncycling primary human macrophages. In single-round infection experiments using primary human CD4+ T cells, proviral clones expressing either wild-type Vpr or Vpr mutants that retained the ability to cause a G2 arrest replicated to higher levels than proviruses lacking Vpr or expressing mutants of Vpr that did not cause an arrest. In support of the hypothesis that enhancement of HIV-1 LTR transcription by Vpr is an indirect effect of the ability of Vpr to delay cells in G2, counterflow centrifugal elutriation of cells into different phases of the cell cycle demonstrated that HIV-1 LTR expression was highest in G2. Finally, the ability of Vpr to upregulate viral transcription was dependent on a minimal promoter containing a functional TATA box and an enhancer. PMID:10364289

  1. Environmental assessment of the compounds from creosote-treated pilings in marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Jop, K.M.; Butala, J.H.; Webb, D.A.; Wade, T.L.

    1995-12-31

    A comprehensive ecological risk assessment was conducted to evaluate the environmental impact of creosote-treated pilings in the marine environment at Moss Landing Harbor, Moss Landing, California. The chemical composition of creosote is critical to its fate and effects in the environment. Therefore, a multiple-stage methodology utilizing column gas chromatography with mass spectrometer detector was used for the identification and quantification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in neat creosote and environmental samples. The risk assessment of 46 PAHs (water soluble fraction) in the marine environment was based on bioaccumulation studies with caged mussels Mytilus californianus and a testing program with the surface sheen, water column, sediment elutriate, pore waters and bulk sediment. Water samples were evaluated using 7-day chronic exposures with Mysidopsis bahia, while bulk sediments were evaluated with 10-day tests with Ampelisca abdita. Testing program included exposure to normal and UV fluorescent lights. The results of this environmental assessment program allow to characterize the extent and magnitude of toxicity of PAHs released from creosote treated pilings and the risk associated with using creosote in marine environment.

  2. The use of cryopreserved sea urchin embryos (Paracentrotus lividus) in marine quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Paredes, E; Bellas, J

    2015-06-01

    We have established for first time an ecotoxicological bioassay using cryopreserved sea urchin embryos (Paracentotus lividus) and provided a comparison to the already standardized sea urchin embryo-larval bioassay, using selected (organic and inorganic) pollutants and sediment elutriates from 4 different locations from Ria de Vigo harbour (Galicia, NW Iberian Peninsula). A cryopreservation protocol was designed in order to enable the successful cryopreservation and cryobanking of gametes and embryos to be used for marine quality assessment and ensure the accessibility to high quality reproductive material all year round, as an option to conditioning adults for out of season reproduction. The calculated EC50 using the cryopreserved blastula was 53.7 μg L(-1) for copper, 81.0 μg L(-1) for lead, 300.6 μg L(-1) for BP-3 and 300.6 μg L(-1) for 4-MBC. The sensitivity of the classic sea urchin embryo-larval bioassay was compared with the bioassay conducted with cryopreserved blastula. The results showed that the use of cryopreserved blastula bioassay allows detecting lower concentrations of pollutants in comparison with the classic bioassay. PMID:25725396

  3. Single-step enrichment of basophils from human peripheral blood by a novel method using a Percoll density gradient.

    PubMed

    Shiono, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Takuya; Okada, Tadashi; Ito, Yoichiro

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a novel continuous flow-through cell separation method using a Percoll density gradient. This method can continuously separate a large number of cells into five fractions according to their densities. To apply this method to the separation of basophils, Percoll density gradients were modified to improve basophil enrichment. When a set of Percoll density gradients was prepared (1.071, 1.075, 1.080, 1.084, and 1.090 g/mL) the basophils in a healthy volunteer were enriched by an average of 23.1 and 63.5% at Percoll densities of 1.075 (fraction 3) and 1.080 g/mL (fraction 4), respectively. On average, the yield of basophils was 1.66 × 10(5) cells in fraction 3 and 1.61 × 10(5) cells in fraction 4 from 9 mL of peripheral blood. The expression of CD203c (cluster of differentiation 203c) on separated basophils was upregulated by anti-immunoglobulin E stimulation similar to basophils in whole blood. Histamine release induced by calcium ionophore was also observed in the separated basophils. The present method will be useful for basophil enrichment since it preserves their function without using counterflow elutriation and immunological reagents, and this method will be effective as a preparative separation for cell purification by flow cytometry. PMID:27293108

  4. Methods Development for Blood Borne Macrophage Carriage of Nanoformulated Antiretroviral Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Upal; Martinez-Skinner, Andrea; McMillan, JoEllyn; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2010-01-01

    Nanoformulated drugs can improve pharmacodynamics and bioavailability while serving also to reduce drug toxicities for antiretroviral (ART) medicines. To this end, our laboratory has applied the principles of nanomedicine to simplify ART regimens and as such reduce toxicities while improving compliance and drug pharmacokinetics. Simple and reliable methods for manufacturing nanoformulated ART (nanoART) are shown. Particles of pure drug are encapsulated by a thin layer of surfactant lipid coating and produced by fractionating larger drug crystals into smaller ones by either wet milling or high-pressure homogenization. In an alternative method free drug is suspended in a droplet of a polymer. Herein, drug is dissolved within a polymer then agitated by ultrasonication until individual nanosized droplets are formed. Dynamic light scattering and microscopic examination characterize the physical properties of the particles (particle size, charge and shape). Their biologic properties (cell uptake and retention, cytotoxicity and antiretroviral efficacy) are determined with human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). MDM are derived from human peripheral blood monocytes isolated from leukopacks using centrifugal elutriation for purification. Such blood-borne macrophages may be used as cellular transporters for nanoART distribution to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected organs. We posit that the repackaging of clinically available antiretroviral medications into nanoparticles for HIV-1 treatments may improve compliance and positively affect disease outcomes. PMID:21178968

  5. Lime-based sorbents for high-temperature CO2 capture--a review of sorbent modification methods.

    PubMed

    Manovic, Vasilije; Anthony, Edward J

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents a review of the research on CO(2) capture by lime-based looping cycles undertaken at CanmetENERGY's (Ottawa, Canada) research laboratories. This is a new and very promising technology that may help in mitigation of global warming and climate change caused primarily by the use of fossil fuels. The intensity of the anticipated changes urgently requires solutions such as more cost-effective technologies for CO(2) capture. This new technology is based on the use of lime-based sorbents in a dual fluidized bed combustion (FBC) reactor which contains a carbonator-a unit for CO(2) capture, and a calciner-a unit for CaO regeneration. However, even though natural materials are cheap and abundant and very good candidates as solid CO(2) carriers, their performance in a practical system still shows significant limitations. These limitations include rapid loss of activity during the capture cycles, which is a result of sintering, attrition, and consequent elutriation from FBC reactors. Therefore, research on sorbent performance is critical and this paper reviews some of the promising ways to overcome these shortcomings. It is shown that reactivation by steam/water, thermal pre-treatment, and doping simultaneously with sorbent reforming and pelletization are promising potential solutions to reduce the loss of activity of these sorbents over multiple cycles of use. PMID:20948952

  6. Increased metallothionein gene expression, zinc, and zinc-dependent resistance to apoptosis in circulating monocytes during HIV viremia

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Andrea D.; Gekonge, Bethsebah; Giri, Malavika S.; Hancock, Aidan; Papasavvas, Emmanouil; Chehimi, Jihed; Kossevkov, Andrew V.; Nicols, Calen; Yousef, Malik; Mounzer, Karam; Shull, Jane; Kostman, Jay; Showe, Louise; Montaner, Luis J.

    2010-01-01

    Circulating monocytes exhibit an apoptotic resistance phenotype during HIV viremia in association with increased MT expression. MTs are known to play an important role in zinc metabolism and immune function. We now show, in a cross-sectional study using peripheral monocytes, that expression of MT1 isoforms E, G, H, and X is increased significantly in circulating monocyte cells from HIV+ subjects during chronic viremic episodes as compared with uninfected subjects. This increase in expression is also observed during acute viremia following interruption of suppressive ART. Circulating monocytes from HIV+ donors were also found to have elevated zinc importer gene Zip8 expression in conjunction with elevated intracellular zinc levels in contrast to CD4+T-lymphocytes. In vitro HIV-1 infection studies with elutriated MDM confirm a direct relation between HIV-1 infection and increased MDM MT1 (isoform G) gene expression and increased intracellular zinc levels. A direct link between elevated zinc levels and apoptosis resistance was established using a cell-permeable zinc chelator TPEN, which reversed apoptosis resistance effectively in monocytes from HIV-infected to levels comparable with uninfected controls. Taken together, increases in MT gene expression and intracellular zinc levels may contribute directly to maintenance of an immune-activated monocyte by mediating an increased resistance to apoptosis during active HIV-1 viremia. PMID:20551211

  7. An assessment of injury to sediments and sediment-dwelling organisms in the Grand Calumet River and Indiana Harbor Area of Concern, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacDonald, D.D.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Smorong, D.E.; Lindskoog, R.A.; Sparks, D.W.; Smith, J.R.; Simon, T.P.; Hanacek, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    This article is the first in a series of three that describe the results of a Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) conducted in the Grand Calumet River and Indiana Harbor Area of Concern (IHAOC). The assessment area is located in northwest Indiana and was divided into nine reaches to facilitate the assessment. This component of the NRDA was undertaken to determine if sediments and sediment-dwelling organisms have been injured due to exposure to contaminants that have accumulated in sediments as a result of discharges of oil or releases of other hazardous substances from industrial, municipal, and nonpoint sources. To support this assessment, information was compiled on the chemical composition of sediment and pore water; on the toxicity of whole sediments, pore water, and elutriates; and on the status of benthic invertebrate communities. The data on each of these indicators were compared to regionally relevant benchmarks to assess the presence and extent of injury to surface water resources (i.e., sediments) or biological resources (i.e., sediment-dwelling organisms). The results of this assessment indicate that sediment injury has occurred throughout the assessment area, with up to four distinct lines of evidence demonstrating injury within the various reaches. The primary contaminants of concern (i.e., those substances that are present at concentrations that are sufficient to cause or substantially contribute to sediment injury) include metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and total polychlorinated biphenyls.

  8. Influence of starch on microalgal biomass recovery, settleability and biogas production.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Raquel; Ferrer, Ivet; García, Joan; Uggetti, Enrica

    2015-06-01

    In the context of wastewater treatment with microalgae cultures, coagulation-flocculation followed by sedimentation is one of the suitable options for microalgae harvesting. This process is enabled by the addition of chemicals (e.g. iron). However, in a biorefinery perspective, it is important to avoid possible contamination of downstream products caused by chemicals addition. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of potato starch as flocculant for microalgal biomass coagulation-flocculation and sedimentation. The optimal flocculant dose (25mg/L) was determined with jar tests. Such a concentration led to more than 95% biomass recovery (turbidity<9NTU). The settleability of flocs was studied using an elutriation apparatus measuring the settling velocities distribution. This test underlined the positive effect of starch on the biomass settling velocity, increasing to >70% the percentage of particles with settling velocities >6.5m/h. Finally, biochemical methane potential tests showed that starch biodegradation increased the biogas production from harvested biomass. PMID:25795448

  9. Overview of processes affecting contaminant release from confined disposal facilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.L.; McCutcheon, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    Confined disposal facilities (CDFs) are widely used for the disposal of dredged material from Corps of Engineers maintenance dredging projects along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts and waterways and harbors in the Great Lakes. CDFs are a less common disposal alternative along the Pacific coast and inland river systems. When contaminated dredged material is placed in the CDF, there is a potential for contaminant mobilization and release from the CDF by a variety of physical, chemical, and biological processes. This report provides an overview of the processes affecting mobilization and release of contaminants from CDFs and the potential applicability of multimedia models for prediction of contaminant release. Processes affecting release from in-water CDFs are emphasized, although many of the processes discussed are applicable to nearshore and upland CDFs. Processes affecting contaminant release are complex, involving a variety of chemicals and operational and design considerations. Many of the important processes are reasonably well known. Laboratory column settling and elutriate techniques have been developed to estimate solids and contaminant concentration in water directly released during hydraulic disposal operations. Predictive techniques for other processes are not as available.

  10. Analysis of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Iain M; Grallert, Agnes; Simanis, Viesturs

    2016-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells are rod shaped, and they grow by tip elongation. Growth ceases during mitosis and cell division; therefore, the length of a septated cell is a direct measure of the timing of mitotic commitment, and the length of a wild-type cell is an indicator of its position in the cell cycle. A large number of documented stage-specific changes can be used as landmarks to characterize cell cycle progression under specific experimental conditions. Conditional mutations can permanently or transiently block the cell cycle at almost any stage. Large, synchronously dividing cell populations, essential for the biochemical analysis of cell cycle events, can be generated by induction synchrony (arrest-release of a cell cycle mutant) or selection synchrony (centrifugal elutriation or lactose-gradient centrifugation). Schizosaccharomyces pombe cell cycle studies routinely combine particular markers, mutants, and synchronization procedures to manipulate the cycle. We describe these techniques and list key landmarks in the fission yeast mitotic cell division cycle. PMID:27587785

  11. Ecotoxicological effects of sediments from Mar Piccolo, South Italy: toxicity testing with organisms from different trophic levels.

    PubMed

    Costa, Elisa; Piazza, Veronica; Gambardella, Chiara; Moresco, Roberto; Prato, Ermelinda; Biandolino, Francesca; Cassin, Daniele; Botter, Margherita; Maurizio, Daniela; D'Adamo, Raffaele; Fabbrocini, Adele; Faimali, Marco; Garaventa, Francesca

    2016-07-01

    The Mar Piccolo of Taranto (Ionian Sea, Southern Italy) is a semi-enclosed and strongly polluted basin. For decades, it has been subjected to different anthropogenic impacts. These stressors caused severe sediments contamination with high concentration of different pollutants (PAHs, PCB, heavy metals). In order to assess the current status of sediments contamination, an ecotoxicological investigation combined with chemical analysis (heavy metals, PAH, and PCB) has been performed. In order to derive ecologically relevant conclusions, a multiorganisms and multiend-points approach has been applied, exposing organisms from different trophic levels to elutriate and whole sediment. The battery of bioassays consists of a microalgal growth inhibition test (Dunaliella tertiolecta), acute and sublethal assays (end-points: mortality, immobilization and swimming speed alteration) on crustaceans larvae and juveniles, and rotifers (Amphibalanus amphitrite, Artemia salina, Corophium insidiosum and Brachionus plicatilis), and embryotoxicity test on echinoderms (Paracentrotus lividus). Considering the high levels of sediment contamination highlighted from chemical analysis, an unexpected very low toxic effect was observed, even considering the sublethal end-point (larval swimming speed alteration). The results of this study suggest a very complex contaminants dynamic in the Mar Piccolo sediments that, despite a strong level of contamination, seems to not affect in a proportional manner the biological compartment. PMID:26423289

  12. Substrate inhibition and control for high rate biogas production

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, H.S.

    1982-01-01

    This research addresses a critical aspect of the technical feasibility of biogas recovery with poultry manure using anaerobic digestion, namely, inhibition and toxicity factors limiting methane generation under high rate conditions. The research was designed to identify the limiting factors and to examine alternative pretreatment and in situ control methods for the anaerobic digestion of poultry manure as an energy producing system. Biogas production was indicated by the daily gas volume produced per unit digester capacity. Enhanced biogas generation from the anaerobic digester systems using poultry manure was studied in laboratory- and pilot-scale digester operations. It was found that ammonia nitrogen concentration above 4000 mg/l was inhibitory to biogas production. Pretreatment of the manure by elutriation was effective for decreasing inhibitory/toxic conditions. Increased gas production resulted without an indication of serious inhibition by increased volatile acids, indicating a limitation of available carbon sources. For poultry manure digestion, the optimum pH range was 7.1 to 7.6. Annual costs for pretreatment/biogas systems for 10,000, 30,000 and 50,000 birds were estimated and compared with annual surplus energy produced. The economic break-even point was achieved in digesters for greater than 30,000 birds. Capital cost of the digester system was estimated to be $18,300 with annual costs around $4000. It is anticipated that the digester system could be economically applied to smaller farms as energy costs increase.

  13. In situ fluidization for peat bed rupture, and preliminary economic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niven, R. K.; Khalili, N.

    2002-11-01

    This study concerns in situ fluidization (ISF), a new remediation method with potential application to the remediation of NAPL and heavy metal contaminants, by their release from the fluidized zone generated by a water jet. The present study examines the effect of ISF on layers of peat, of significance owing to its role as an important NAPL and metal contaminant trap. Once trapped, such contaminants are not readily accessible by most remedial methods, due to the low permeability and diffusivity of the peat. A simple tank experiment is used to demonstrate rupture of a peat layer by ISF, with removal of the peat as elutriated fines and segregated peat chunks. The application of ISF in the field is then examined by three field trials in uncontaminated sands, in both saturated and unsaturated conditions. Fluidized depths of up to 1.9 m in the saturated zone (with refusal on a peat layer) and 2.5 m in the unsaturated zone (no refusal) were attained, using a 1.9-m-long, 50 mm diameter jet operated at 5-13 l s -1. Pulses of dark turbidity and shell fragments in the effluent indicated the rupture of peat and shelly layers. The experiments demonstrate the hydraulic viability of ISF in the field, and its ability to remove peat-based contaminants. The issues of appropriate jet design and water generation during ISF are discussed, followed by a preliminary economic analysis of ISF relative to existing remediation methods.

  14. Endothelial cell subpopulations in vitro: cell volume, cell cycle, and radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, D.B.; Drab, E.A.; Bauer, K.D. )

    1989-10-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (EC) are important clinical targets of radiation and other forms of free radical/oxidant stresses. In this study, we found that the extent of endothelial damage may be determined by the different cytotoxic responses of EC subpopulations. The following characteristics of EC subpopulations were examined: (1) cell volume; (2) cell cycle position; and (3) cytotoxic indexes for both acute cell survival and proliferative capacity after irradiation (137Cs, gamma, 0-10 Gy). EC cultured from bovine aortas were separated by centrifugal elutriation into subpopulations of different cell volumes. Through flow cytometry, we found that cell volume was related to the cell cycle phase distribution. The smallest EC were distributed in G1 phase and the larger cells were distributed in either early S, middle S, or late S + G2M phases. Cell cycle phase at the time of irradiation was not associated with acute cell loss. However, distribution in the cell cycle did relate to cell survival based on proliferative capacity (P less than 0.01). The order of increasing radioresistance was cells in G1 (D0 = 110 cGy), early S (135 cGy), middle S (145 cGy), and late S + G2M phases (180 cGy). These findings (1) suggest an age-related response to radiation in a nonmalignant differentiated cell type and (2) demonstrate EC subpopulations in culture.

  15. Results of chemical, toxicological, and bioaccumulation evaluations of dioxins, furans, and guaicol/organic acids in sediments from the Grays Harbor/Chehalis River area

    SciTech Connect

    Word, J.Q.; Ward, J.A.; Squires, A.L.

    1990-09-01

    The Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) was requested by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Seattle District, to assist in planning and conducting sampling, toxicological tests, and chemistry evaluations on sediment samples collected from the Chehalis River in Grays Harbor, Washington. The objectives of the study were to investigate the toxicity and biological effects of sediments that might potentially contain dioxins, furans, and organic acids, as a result of industrial practices in the Grays Harbor area, on sensitive marine species. In addition to the toxicological tests conducted using standard bioassays, sediment chemistry tests were performed to determine levels of selected chemicals, and elutriates of sediments were tested chemically and biologically to determine contaminant mobility in water. Also, bioaccumulation measurements were made to determine chemical mobility in animal tissue. A joint task group, including representatives from the USACE, Washington Department of Ecology (WDOE), Washington Department of Natural Resources (WDNR), Washington Department of Fisheries (WDOF), and Region 9 of the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) participated in designing the testing program and reviewing data produced by MSL. The results of this analysis will be included in a supplemental Environmental Assessment (EA) prepared by the USACE for the Grays Harbor Dredging Program, beginning in early 1990. 13 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. TELEOST FISH (Solea solea): A NOVEL MODEL FOR ECOTOXICOLOGICAL ASSAY OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    PubMed Central

    Ribecco, C; Hardiman, G; Sásik, R; Vittori, S; Carnevali, O

    2012-01-01

    Chemical analysis of sediment is not indicative of the downstream biological effects on aquatic organisms. In this study, the biological effects of sediment were examined using: Teleost fish, (Solea solea), Artemia and rotifers. Although chemicals levels were below the limits permissible by Italian law, S. solea juveniles exposed to sediment (0.3% w/v) for 96 hours, revealed significant induction in the expression levels of HSP70, ERα, TRα, RXRα, PPARα, β, CYP4501A1 and CYP3A mRNAs, suggesting the utility of this species as a novel biosensor. The bio-toxicity of the sediment was further validated by exposing Artemia and rotifers to concentrations of elutriate (derived from the sediment) from 10 to 100 % v/v (with a 50% mortality rate). These results suggest that sediment defined as moderately contaminated, solely on the basis of the chemical profile, may in fact cause harmful effects to aquatic organisms. This study highlights the need for biological approaches in the establishment of sediment toxicity levels. PMID:22217502

  17. Characterization and localization of in vivo phospholipid methylation in the hamster testis

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, P.N.; Wright, W.W.; Chang, T.S.

    1989-06-01

    Although previous studies have demonstrated that phospholipid methylation occurs in the testis and may be involved in Leydig cell function, phospholipid methylation in spermatogenic cells has not been characterized. In this study we describe the occurrence, time course, and localization of phospholipid methylation in the hamster testis following intratesticular injection of radioactive methyl precursor. Adult and pubertal (seven day old) hamsters were injected intratesticularly with (/sup 3/H-methyl)-methionine and sacrificed 10 min. to 31 hours thereafter. The testes were then removed and homogenized or dispersed into cell suspensions. Spermatogenic cell and Leydig cell enriched preparations were isolated from the dispersed cell preparations using elutriation and Percoll gradient centrifugation and assayed for methylated phospholipids and proteins. These experiments demonstrated that (1) phospholipid methylation occurs in the hamster testis at a level seven-fold greater than protein methylation, (2) the incorporation of radioactivity associated with phospholipid methylation is progressive over time, and (3) in vivo, spermatogenic cell preparations enriched with pachytene spermatocytes have an almost four-fold higher level of measurable phospholipid methylation when compared to whole testis preparations. Taken together, these results suggest that phospholipid methylation may play an important stage-specific role in spermatogenesis.

  18. The use of sediment sampling to evaluate the success of hydrologic reclamation

    SciTech Connect

    Liddle, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    Surface water monitoring efforts usually involve random, infrequent, grab sampling of the water column. This method may not detect irregular or infrequent pulses of pollutants and may be ineffective in assessing the physical and chemical quality of the benthic zone. The benthic zone can accumulate metals and often supports the aquatic insects essential to a healthy aquatic ecosystem. Sediment analysis was conducted on two mine-project sites in Kentucky and Tennessee to supplement existing chemical and biological sampling of streams and lakes. Sediments were analyzed for 15 metals and trace elements (Al, Sb, Ar, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mn, Ni, Se, Ag, Tl, and Zn) and fine-particle size analysis was done using air elutriation methods. Each sediment sample was analyzed using total metal extraction, EPA`s Toxicity Characteristic Leachate Procedure (TCLP), and a four-step sequential extraction procedure. The four-step sequential extraction procedure provided the most meaningful indication of metals and trace elements that could be of concern. The results showed distinct sediment chemistry and particle-size distribution between mined and unmined streams. Sediment chemistry mirrored pore-water chemistry and aided interpretation of the stream water and biological data in mined and unmined streams that was not otherwise apparent by sampling the water column alone. Sequential sediment analysis and fine-particle size analysis shows promise in assessing the success of hydrologic reclamation at mined sites.

  19. A novel method for extraction of a proteinous coagulant from Plantago ovata seeds for water treatment purposes

    PubMed Central

    Ramavandi, Bahman; Hashemi, Seyedenayat; Kafaei, Raheleh

    2015-01-01

    Several chemicals have been applied in the process of coagulant extraction from herbal seeds, and the best extraction has been obtained in the presence of KCl or NaNO3[1], [2], [3], and NaCl [4]. However, the main challenge posed to these methods of coagulant extraction is their relatively low efficiency for water treatment purposes and the formation of dissolved organic matter during the treatment process. In these methods the salts, which have a one-valance metal (Na+ and K+), are deposited in the internal structure and the pore of the coagulant, and may be useful for the coagulation/flocculation process. In this research, we found that modified methods produced more dense protein. Therefore, the modified procedure was better than the older one for removal of turbidity and harness from the contaminated water. Here we describe a method where: • According to the Hardy–Schulze rule, we applied the Fe3+ ions instead of Na+ and K+ for the extraction of protein from Plantago ovata seeds. • The method was narrowed to extract protein by ethanol (defatting) and ammonium acetate and CM-Sepharose (protein extraction). • Two consecutive elutriations of crude extract was directly performed using 0.025-M FeCl3 and 0.05-M FeCl3 according to the basis of the ion-exchange processes. PMID:26150999

  20. Porous structured vanadium oxide electrode material for electrochemical capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Ravinder N.; Reddy, Ramana G.

    A nano porous vanadium oxide (V 2O 5) was prepared by sol-gel method. The preparation involved elutriation of aqueous sodium meta vanadate over a cation exchange resin. The product was characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, surface area analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. Electrochemical characterization was done using cyclic voltammetry in a three electrode system consisting of a saturated calomel electrode as reference electrode, platinum mesh as a counter electrode, and V 2O 5 mounted on Ti mesh as the working electrode. Two molars of aqueous KCl, NaCl and LiCl were used as electrolytes. A maximum capacitance of 214 F g -1 was obtained at a scan rate of 5 mV s -1 in 2 M KCl. The effect of different electrolytes and the effect of concentration of KCl on the specific capacitance of V 2O 5 were studied. Specific capacitance faded rapidly over 100 cycles in 2 M KCl at a 5 mV s -1 scan rate.

  1. Laboratory processing and characterization of waste materials from manganese nodules. Report of Investigations/1985

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, B.W.; Barron, D.C.; Kramer, G.W.; Maeda, R.; Magyar, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines report describes the laboratory processing of manganese nodules and the results of tailings characterization obtained during the cooperative program with the Department of Commerce's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Bureau. Five technically feasible first-generation nodule-processing methods were operated at bench scale to generate sufficient tailings and slags for physical and chemical analyses. A description is given for the laboratory operation of the individual unit operations of each process. The laboratory-generated tailings and slags were tested for physical properties, mineral content, elemental and ion content, and leachability for all five processes. The results of leachate testing using the Environmental Protection Agency extraction procedure (EP) toxicity test, the American Society for Testing and Materials shake extraction test, and the EPA-U.S. Army Corps of Engineers seawater elutriant test showed very low to negligible leaching of metals from the tailings and slags. Results of the EP toxicity test demonstrated that the wastes are nonhazardous as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (Public Law 94-580).

  2. Changes in the activities of key enzymes of glycolysis during the cell cycle in yeast: a rectification.

    PubMed

    de Koning, W; Groeneveld, K; Oehlen, L J; Berden, J A; van Dam, K

    1991-04-01

    Activities of glycolytic enzymes were determined in elutriation fractionated cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown on different carbon sources. Almost pure fractions of single cells at the G1 state of cell division were obtained for some of the growth conditions tested, whereas other stages were enriched in particular fractions. Specific activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase were found to be constant during the cell cycle, as reported by van Doorn et al. (1988a), Journal of Bacteriology 170, 4808-4815, and (1988b), Journal of General Microbiology 134, 785-790. In contrast to the earlier reports, the activities of hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase and trehalase were also constant in different states of the cell cycle. For hexokinase and phosphofructokinase it was shown that the apparent specific activity in a cell-free extract strongly diminished when extracts contained less that 0.5-1 mg protein ml-1. In the experiments of van Doorn et al. (1988a) the protein content of the outer fractions was up to 20 times lower than that of the central fractions, suggesting an alternative explanation for the observed changes in enzyme activities during the cell cycle. Therefore, we want to rectify the observations presented by van Doorn et al. (1988a), and conclude that the activities of the glycolytic enzymes do not vary greatly during the cell cycle of S. cervisiae. PMID:1856683

  3. Endocytosis of heat-denatured albumin by cultured rat Kupffer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brouwer, A.; Knook, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Purified Kupffer cells were obtained by centrifugal elutriation of sinusoidal cells isolated by pronase treatment of the rat liver. The endocytosis of radioactively labeled heat-aggregated colloidal albumin (CA /sup 125/I) was investigated in maintenance cultures of the purified Kupffer cells. The endocytic capacity of the cells was studied during 4 days of culture. Maximum uptake was observed after 24 hr of culture, with a gradual decline during the following days. When the uptake was measured after incubation with increasing concentrations of CA /sup 125/I, a saturation effect was observed. This finding and the observed high rate of uptake are strong indications that receptor sites on the cell membrane are involved in the mechanism of endocytosis. The uptake of CA /sup 125/I by Kupffer cells was inhibited by the metabolic inhibitors fluoride and antimycin A, indicating that endocytosis of CA /sup 125/I is dependent on energy derived from both glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. The mechanism of internalization may also require the action of microfilaments as well as intact microtubules, since both cytochalasin B and colchicine inhibited the uptake of CA /sup 125/I. The intracellular degradation of CA /sup 125/I by Kupffer cells was strongly inhibited by chloroquine but not by colchicine. The degradation of ingested CA /sup 125/I occurred within the Kupffer cell lysosomes.

  4. The remedial investigation of marine sediment at the United Heckathorn Superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    White, P.J.; Kohn, N.P.; Gardiner, W.W.; Word, J.Q.

    1994-02-01

    The former United Heckathom site in Richmond, California, was used to process and package chlorinated pesticides from the 1940s to the mid-1960s. These activities resulted in the contamination of upland soils and marine sediment in the adjacent waterways. Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) was requested by USEPA to conduct a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS). of the marine portion of the site. The objectives of this RI are to determine the extent of pesticide contamination in inner Richmond Harbor, estimate the total volume of contaminated sediment, characterize the subsurface geology; characterize the biological effects of contaminated sediment; and characterize the quality of effluent derived from dewatered sediment through treatability testing. Sediment cores were collected from 53 stations. Vertical subsamples from each sediment core were analyzed for chlorinated pesticides. Sediment from selected cores was also analyzed for other contaminants. Younger Bay Mud (YBM) sediment from multiple stations was mixed to form composite samples representing various segments of the study area. These composites were used for solid-phase toxicity and bioaccumulation tests, and the preparation of liquid-phase samples for treatability testing. The probable quality of effluent produced by dewatering sediment was evaluated by chemical and toxicological testing of suspended-particulate-phase (SPP) and elutriate samples.

  5. Generation of leukotrienes by purified human lung mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    MacGlashan, D W; Schleimer, R P; Peters, S P; Schulman, E S; Adams, G K; Newball, H H; Lichtenstein, L M

    1982-01-01

    Although mediator release from mast cells and basophils plays a central role in the pathogenesis of human allergic disease, biochemical studies have been restricted to rat peritoneal mast cells and basophilic leukemia cells because they could be easily purified. We have used two new techniques of cell separation to purify human lung mast cells to 98% homogeneity. Lung cell suspensions were obtained by dispersion of chopped lung tissue with proteolytic enzymes. Mast cells were then purified from the suspensions by countercurrent centrifugal elutriation and affinity chromatography. The purified mast cells released both histamine and slow-reacting substance of anaphylaxis (SRS-A) (leukotriene C and D) during stimulation with goat anti-human IgE antibody. Moreover, these preparations were able to generate significant quantities of SRS-A (32 +/- 7 x 10(-17) LTD mole-equivalents/mast cell) at all stages of purification, indicating that a secondary cell is not necessary for the antigen-induced release of SRS. Images PMID:7119113

  6. Study of heavy metals in some environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Imtiaz; Rashid, Haroon; Rehman, Zia Ur

    2009-11-01

    Fuels like coal and rubber are frequently used for brick burning. However, both coal and rubber contain heavy metals. These heavy metals may elutriate in the wake of fly ash or may adsorb or absorb in the product. The present work deals with the analysis of heavy metals in some samples collected from brick burning industries located in the vicinity of a metropolitan city, Peshawar, Pakistan. Samples from raw clay, product, chimney scale and fossil fuel & rubber were collected and leached with acid mixture. The leachates were concentrated and analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometer for the determination of chromium (Cr), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and antimony (Sb). It was observed that heavy metals are present in clay, brick and chimney scale. However, significant amount of these metals was observed in chimney scale. It is inferred that such emanations laden with heavy metals are accompanying the stack gases which are being dumped in to the environment. In order to avoid environmental problems, strict environmental regulations shall be enforced and a constant check on these emanations to the environment must be made to ensure clean air act. PMID:18853266

  7. Lime-Based Sorbents for High-Temperature CO2 Capture—A Review of Sorbent Modification Methods

    PubMed Central

    Manovic, Vasilije; Anthony, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the research on CO2 capture by lime-based looping cycles undertaken at CanmetENERGY’s (Ottawa, Canada) research laboratories. This is a new and very promising technology that may help in mitigation of global warming and climate change caused primarily by the use of fossil fuels. The intensity of the anticipated changes urgently requires solutions such as more cost-effective technologies for CO2 capture. This new technology is based on the use of lime-based sorbents in a dual fluidized bed combustion (FBC) reactor which contains a carbonator—a unit for CO2 capture, and a calciner—a unit for CaO regeneration. However, even though natural materials are cheap and abundant and very good candidates as solid CO2 carriers, their performance in a practical system still shows significant limitations. These limitations include rapid loss of activity during the capture cycles, which is a result of sintering, attrition, and consequent elutriation from FBC reactors. Therefore, research on sorbent performance is critical and this paper reviews some of the promising ways to overcome these shortcomings. It is shown that reactivation by steam/water, thermal pre-treatment, and doping simultaneously with sorbent reforming and pelletization are promising potential solutions to reduce the loss of activity of these sorbents over multiple cycles of use. PMID:20948952

  8. Characterization of hydrodynamics and solids mixing in fluidized beds involving biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotovat, Farzam

    of biomass particles at U=0.36 m/s and U=0.64 m/s. In this regard, an active biomass particle is tracked for a long period of time and its instantaneous position is recorded. The acquired data is then processed to achieve the time-averaged concentration profile of biomass particles. This profile represents the segregation of biomass particles, which tend to accumulate in the upper levels of the bed. Changes in the fraction of biomass with increasing gas velocity are inferred from the local changes of the time-averaged pressure drop values at the top of the bed. To determine the parameters affecting the movement and segregation of biomass particles, their circulatory motion is also scrutinized using the RPT data. The circulation of biomass is impeded when the load of biomass rises at U=0.36 m/s, resulting in a more pronounced segregation of sand and biomass. The opposite trend is observed at U=0.64 m/s. This prompts a more uniform distribution of particles along the bed and brings about a higher degree of mixing. The average rise velocity of biomass is 0.2 times the bubble velocity, regardless of the biomass load or fluidization velocity. A one-dimensional model is proposed to predict the volume fraction of biomass along the bed. Some of the terms of this model are linked to the fluidizing behavior of biomass particles as deduced from the RPT findings. The fluidization of sand and cylindrical biomass particles is also simulated using the BARRACUDA CPFD software, which is based on the Lagrangian-Eulerian approach. Simulation and experimental results are compared in order to evaluate the capability of the numerical approach to predict the bubbling characteristics of the sand-biomass mixture for systems differing in composition and fluidization velocity. The last part of this thesis is devoted to the separation of the main components of the shredded bulky waste. A step-wise process has been developed based on the elutriation and density segregation techniques. After

  9. Determination of volatile fatty acids in wastewater by solvent extraction and gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkhize, Nontando T.; Msagati, Titus A. M.; Mamba, Bhekie B.; Momba, Maggy

    The purpose of this study was to develop a liquid-liquid extraction method for the analysis of volatile fatty acids collected at the elutriation units of Unit 3, 4 and 5 at Johannesburg Water-Northern Works Wastewater Treatment Plant. Liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) method employing dichloromethane (DCM) and methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE) as extracting solvents was used during the quantitative analysis of volatile fatty acids namely acetic, propionic, butyric, isobutyric, valeric, isovaleric and heptanoic acid. The detection of the extracts was by gas chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometer operating under electron ionization mode (GC-EI-MS). The results showed that MTBE was a better extraction solvent than DCM as it gave much higher recoveries (>5 folds). On the other hand, the overall reactor performance for all the three units in the period when the samples were collected, which was measured by the ratio of propionic to acetic acid was good since the ratio o did not exceed 1.4 with the exception of the samples collected on the 3rd of October where the ratio exceeded 1.4 significantly. The concentration of acetic acid, another indicator for the reactor performance in all three units was way below 800 mg/L thus the digester balance was on par.

  10. Study on the property of the production for Fengdongyan kiln in Early Ming dynasty by INAA and EDXRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Huang, Y.; Sun, H. Y.; Yan, L. T.; Feng, S. L.; Xu, Q.; Feng, X. Q.

    2016-08-01

    A lot of official wares carved "Guan" or the dragon patterns were excavated on the strata of Ming dynasty of the Fengdongyan kiln site at Dayao County. The imperial porcelain was fired in Hongwu and Yongle eras. However, the emergence of this imperial porcelain has triggered academic debate about the property of Fengdongyan kiln in the Early Ming dynasty. Based on the differences of the official kiln management, some scholars have determined that the property of the production for this kiln was the civilian kiln. According to the historical textural records and typology, others preliminary confirmed that Fengdongyan kiln was the official kiln. In this paper, the elemental compositions of body and glaze in imperial and civilian porcelain are study by INAA and EDXRF for determining the property of the production for this kiln in Early Ming dynasty. After the processing of experimental data by geochemical analysis and principal component analysis, the result show that the raw materials for making body and glaze in imperial porcelain are similar with those of the civilian porcelain and the degrees of elutriation for body can be slightly different in HW-M period of Ming dynasty. The analytical results support the view that the Fengdongyan kiln is civilian not official.

  11. Experimental and predicted approaches for biomass gasification with enriched air-steam in a fluidised bed.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qirang; Huang, Yaji; Niu, Miaomiao; Yang, Gaoqiang; Shao, Zhiwei

    2014-10-01

    Thermo-chemical gasification of sawdust refuse-derived fuel was performed on a bench-scale fluidised bed gasifier with enriched air and steam as fluidising and oxidising agents. Dolomite as a natural mineral catalyst was used as bed material to reform tars and hydrocarbons. A series of experiments were carried out under typical operating conditions for gasification, as reported in the article. A modified equilibrium model, based on equilibrium constants, was developed to predict the gasification process. The sensitivity analysis of operating parameters, such as the fluidisation velocity, oxygen percentage of the enriched air and steam to biomass ratios on the produced gas composition, lower heating value, carbon conversion and cold gas efficiency was investigated. The results showed that the predicted syngas composition was in better agreement with the experimental data compared with the original equilibrium model. The higher fluidisation velocity enhanced gas-solid mixing, heat and mass transfers, and carbon fines elutriation, simultaneously. With the increase of oxygen percentage from 21% to 45%, the lower heating value of syngas increased from 5.52 MJ m(-3) to 7.75 MJ m(-3) and cold gas efficiency from 49.09% to 61.39%. The introduction of steam improved gas quality, but a higher steam to biomass ratio could decrease carbon conversion and gasification efficiency owing to a low steam temperature. The optimal value of steam to biomass ratio in this work was 1.0. PMID:25265865

  12. Characterization of chemical waste site contamination and its extent using bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.M.; Callahan, C.A.; Cline, J.F.; Greene, J.C.; McShane, M.C.; Miller, W.E.; Peterson, S.A.; Simpson, J.C.; Skalski, J.R.

    1984-12-01

    Bioassays were used in a three-phase research project to assess the comparative sensitivity of test organisms to known chemicals, determine if the chemical components in field soil and water samples containing unknown contaminants could be inferred from our laboratory studies using known chemicals, and to investigate kriging (a relatively new statistical mapping technique) and bioassays as methods to define the areal extent of chemical contamination. The algal assay generally was most sensitive to samples of pure chemicals, soil elutriates and water from eight sites with known chemical contamination. Bioassays of nine samples of unknown chemical composition from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) site showed that a lettuce seed soil contact phytoassay was most sensitive. In general, our bioassays can be used to broadly identify toxic components of contaminated soil. Nearly pure compounds of insecticides and herbicides were less toxic in the sensitive bioassays than were the counterpart commercial formulations. This finding indicates that chemical analysis alone may fail to correctly rate the severity of environmental toxicity. Finally, we used the lettuce seed phytoassay and kriging techniques in a field study at RMA to demonstrate the feasibility of mapping contamination to aid in cleanup decisions. 25 references, 9 figures, 9 tables.

  13. Lobster hepatopancreatic epithelial single cell suspensions as models for electrogenic sodium-proton exchange.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Prabir K

    2004-03-01

    Sodium-proton antiporters, also called Na+/H+ exchangers (NHE), are vital transmembrane proteins involved in multiple cellular functions including transepithelial ion transport and Na+ homeostasis of cells throughout the biological kingdom. Na+/H+ exchange is accelerated by cytosolic acidification and also by osmotically induced cell shrinking, thereby promoting recovery of the physiological pHi and volume. Eight isoforms of Na+/H+ exchangers have been cloned and characterized to date and share the same overall structure, but exhibit differences with respect to cellular localization, kinetic variables and plasma membrane targeting, in polarized epithelial cells. The electrogenic Na+ absorption across tight epithelia from invertebrates follow significantly different principles from the electroneutral Na+/H+ antiporter found in vertebrates. In all invertebrate cells examined, the antiporter displayed a 2Na+/1H+ transport stoichiometry and this transport was markedly inhibited by exogenous calcium and zinc. Na+/H+ exchangers (NHE) are present in crustacean hepatopancreatic cell type suspensions and are believed to function in acid-base regulation by driving the extrusion of protons across the hepatopancreatic epithelium in exchange for Na+ in the sea water. A brief review of current knowledge about Na+/H+ exchangers has been presented. In addition, understanding of hepatopancreatic Na+/H+ exchange is described as obtained after isolation of purified E-, R-, F- and B-cell suspensions from the whole organ by centrifugal elutriation. PMID:15123186

  14. A proteomic chronology of gene expression through the cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Tony; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Shlien, Adam; Soroka, Dominique; Mills, Allie; Emanuele, Michael J; Stratton, Michael R; Lamond, Angus I

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances have enabled the analysis of cellular protein and RNA levels with unprecedented depth and sensitivity, allowing for an unbiased re-evaluation of gene regulation during fundamental biological processes. Here, we have chronicled the dynamics of protein and mRNA expression levels across a minimally perturbed cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells using centrifugal elutriation combined with mass spectrometry-based proteomics and RNA-Seq, avoiding artificial synchronization procedures. We identify myeloid-specific gene expression and variations in protein abundance, isoform expression and phosphorylation at different cell cycle stages. We dissect the relationship between protein and mRNA levels for both bulk gene expression and for over ∼6000 genes individually across the cell cycle, revealing complex, gene-specific patterns. This data set, one of the deepest surveys to date of gene expression in human cells, is presented in an online, searchable database, the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd/). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01630.001 PMID:24596151

  15. Fluidized-bed reactor modeling for production of silicon by silane pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudukovic, M. P.; Ramachandran, P. A.; Lai, S.

    1986-01-01

    An ideal backmixed reactor model (CSTR) and a fluidized bed bubbling reactor model (FBBR) were developed for silane pyrolysis. Silane decomposition is assumed to occur via two pathways: homogeneous decomposition and heterogeneous chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Both models account for homogeneous and heterogeneous silane decomposition, homogeneous nucleation, coagulation and growth by diffusion of fines, scavenging of fines by large particles, elutriation of fines and CVD growth of large seed particles. At present the models do not account for attrition. The preliminary comparison of the model predictions with experimental results shows reasonable agreement. The CSTR model with no adjustable parameter yields a lower bound on fines formed and upper estimate on production rates. The FBBR model overpredicts the formation of fines but could be matched to experimental data by adjusting the unkown jet emulsion exchange efficients. The models clearly indicate that in order to suppress the formation of fines (smoke) good gas-solid contacting in the grid region must be achieved and the formation of the bubbles suppressed.

  16. Exploratory studies of extended storage of apheresis platelets in a platelet additive solution (PAS).

    PubMed

    Slichter, Sherrill J; Corson, Jill; Jones, Mary Kay; Christoffel, Todd; Pellham, Esther; Bailey, S Lawrence; Bolgiano, Doug

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the poststorage viability of apheresis platelets stored for up to 18 days in 80% platelet additive solution (PAS)/20% plasma, 117 healthy subjects donated platelets using the Haemonetics MCS+, COBE Spectra (Spectra), or Trima Accel (Trima) systems. Control platelets from the same subjects were compared with their stored test PAS platelets by radiolabeling their stored and control platelets with either (51)chromium or (111)indium. Trima platelets met Food and Drug Administration poststorage platelet viability criteria for only 7 days vs almost 13 days for Haemonetics platelets; ie, platelet recoveries after these storage times averaged 44 ± 3% vs 49 ± 3% and survivals were 5.4 ± 0.3 vs 4.6 ± 0.3 days, respectively. The differences in storage duration are likely related to both the collection system and the storage bag. The Spectra and Trima platelets were hyperconcentrated during collection, and PAS was added, whereas the Haemonetics platelets were elutriated with PAS, which may have resulted in less collection injury. When Spectra and Trima platelets were stored in Haemonetics' bags, poststorage viability was significantly improved. Platelet viability is better maintained in vitro than in vivo, allowing substantial increases in platelet storage times. However, implementation will require resolution of potential bacterial overgrowth during storage. PMID:24258816

  17. Viable seed banks under grazing and exclosure conditions in montane mesic grasslands of Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loydi, Alejandro; Zalba, Sergio M.; Distel, Roberto A.

    2012-08-01

    Grazing by large herbivores affects the composition of established vegetation and seed banks. Montane Pampas grasslands are highly productive and have evolved with the influence of grazing by native herbivores. Thus we proposed, firstly that grazing by feral horses would increase seed bank diversity, without changing seed density in grazed areas and secondly that there is a greater similarity between the seed bank and aboveground vegetation in exclosure areas. The study area is located in sub-humid montane grassland in mid-eastern Argentina. Sampling took place at the beginning and end of summer in 2008 and 2009, in three one-year-old exclosures and grazed areas. Soil and litter samples were collected and established vegetation cover was visually recorded in every area. Each sample was elutriated and sieved. Seed composition was recorded using a dissecting microscope. Seed density and species richness of the samples was analyzed using ANOVA and species composition was analyzed by multivariate analysis. Grazing reduces the seed density and richness of grasses, but forb species are not affected. The seed density of grasses increases in soil samples at the end of summer, while the density of forb species does not change. Similarity between the established vegetation and the seed bank was low. Grazing affects seed bank composition which could limit restoration time after the removal of herbivores. However, grass seed availability increases considerably during a short period after exclosure establishment, showing high potential for recovery in sub-humid grasslands.

  18. A Novel System to Generate WTC Dust Particles for Inhalation Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Joshua M.; Garrett, Brittany; Prophete, Colette; Horton, Lori; Sisco, Maureen; Soukup, Joleen M.; Zelikoff, Judith; Ghio, Andrew; Peltier, Richard E.; Asgharian, Bahman; Chen, Lung-Chi; Cohen, Mitchell D.

    2014-01-01

    First Responders (FR) present at Ground Zero within the first 72-hr after the WTC (World Trade Center) collapse have progressively exhibited significant respiratory injury. The majority (>96%) of WTC dusts were >10 μm and no studies have examined potential health effects of this size fraction. This study sought to develop a system to generate and deliver supercoarse (10–53 μm) WTC particles to a rat model in a manner that mimicked FR exposure scenarios. A modified Fishing Line generator was integrated onto an intratracheal inhalation (ITIH) system that allowed for a bypassing of the nasal passages so as to mimic FR exposures. Dust concentrations were measured gravimetrically; particle size distribution was measured via elutriation. Results indicate that the system could produce dusts with 23 μm MMAD at levels up to ≥ 1200 mg/m3. To validate system utility, F344 rats were exposed for 2-hr to ≈100 mg WTC dust/m3. Exposed rats had significantly increased lung weight and levels of select tracer metals 1-hr post-exposure. Using this system, it is now possible to conduct relevant inhalation exposures to determine adverse WTC dusts impacts on the respiratory system. Furthermore, this novel integrated Fishing Line-ITIH system could potentially be used in the analyses of a wide spectrum of other dusts/pollutants of sizes previously untested or delivered to the lungs in ways that did not reflect realistic exposure scenarios. PMID:24220216

  19. Interactions between salt marsh plants and Cu nanoparticles - Effects on metal uptake and phytoremediation processes.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Federico; Mucha, Ana Paula; Caetano, Cátia; Rodrigues, Paula; Rocha Gomes, Carlos; Almeida, C Marisa R

    2015-10-01

    The increased use of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) raises the probability of finding NPs in the environment. A lot of information exists already regarding interactions between plants and metals, but information regarding interactions between metallic NPs and plants, including salt marsh plants, is still lacking. This work aimed to study interactions between CuO NPs and the salt marsh plants Halimione portulacoides and Phragmites australis. In addition, the potential of these plants for phytoremediation of Cu NPs was evaluated. Plants were exposed for 8 days to sediment elutriate solution doped either with CuO or with ionic Cu. Afterwards, total metal concentrations were determined in plant tissues. Both plants accumulated Cu in their roots, but this accumulation was 4 to 10 times lower when the metal was added in NP form. For P. australis, metal translocation occurred when the metal was added either in ionic or in NP form, but for H. portulacoides no metal translocation was observed when NPs were added to the medium. Therefore, interactions between plants and NPs differ with the plant species. These facts should be taken in consideration when applying these plants for phytoremediation of contaminated sediments in estuaries, as the environmental management of these very important ecological areas can be affected. PMID:26094036

  20. Integrated ecotoxicological assessment of marine sediments affected by land-based marine fish farm effluents: physicochemical, acute toxicity and benthic community analyses.

    PubMed

    Silva, C; Yáñez, E; Martín-Díaz, M L; Riba, I; DelValls, T A

    2013-08-01

    An integrated ecotoxicological assessment of marine sediments affected by land-based marine fish farm effluents was developed using physicochemical and benthic community structure analyses and standardised laboratory bioassays with bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), amphipods (Ampelisca brevicornis) and sea urchin larvae (Paracentrotus lividus). Intertidal sediment samples were collected at five sites of the Rio San Pedro (RSP) creek, from the aquaculture effluent to a clean site. The effective concentration (EC50) from bacterial bioluminescence and A. brevicornis survival on whole sediments and P. lividus larval developmental success on sediment elutriates were assessed. Numbers of species, abundance and Shannon diversity were the biodiversity indicators measured in benthic fauna of sediment samples. In parallel, redox potential, pH, organic matter and metal levels (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in the sediment and dissolved oxygen in the interstitial water were measured in situ. Water and sediment physicochemical analysis revealed the exhibition of a spatial gradient in the RSP, evidenced by hypoxia/anoxia, reduced and acidic conditions, high organic enrichment and metal concentrations at the most contaminated sites. Whereas, the benthic fauna biodiversity decreased the bioassays depicted decreases in EC50, A. brevicornis survival, P. lividus larval success at sampling sites closer to the studied fish farms. This study demonstrates that the sediments polluted by fish farm effluents may lead to alterations of the biodiversity of the exposed organisms. PMID:23681739

  1. The Repopulation Potential of Hepatocyte Populations Differing in Size and Prior Mitotic Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Overturf, Ken; Al-Dhalimy, Muhsen; Finegold, Milton; Grompe, Markus

    1999-01-01

    Recently the stem cell-like regenerative potential of adult liver cells was demonstrated by serial transplantation. This repopulation capacity could be useful for the treatment of genetic liver diseases by cell transplantation and/or expansion of genetically manipulated cells. However, previous experiments used unfractionated populations of liver cells, and therefore it remained undetermined whether all hepatocytes or only a subpopulation (stem cells) possessed this high regenerative ability. To address this question we used centrifugal elutriation to separate hepatocytes by cell density. Unexpectedly, small hepatocytes (16 μm) had lower repopulation capacity during the first round of transplantation when compared with both the medium-sized (21 μm) and large (27 μm) cells. We also compared the repopulation capacity of hepatocytes that had undergone different degrees of in vivo expansion. Previous cell division neither reduced nor increased the repopulation capacity of transplanted liver cells. Finally, retroviral tagging experiments demonstrated that liver-repopulating cells occur at a frequency of >1:10,000. We conclude that short-term therapeutic liver repopulation does not require progenitor or stem cells. PMID:10595942

  2. Are WWTPs effluents responsible for acute toxicity? Seasonal variations of sediment quality at the Bay of Cádiz (SW, Spain).

    PubMed

    Maranho, L A; Garrido-Pérez, M C; Baena-Nogueras, R M; Lara-Martín, P A; Antón-Martín, R; DelValls, T A; Martín-Díaz, M L

    2015-03-01

    Adverse effects of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) on sediment quality at the Bay of Cádiz (SW, Spain) were evaluated by a battery of acute bioassays and chemical contamination. Five sites directly affected by WWTPs effluents and one control site were chosen. Results evidenced clear deterioration of ecological sediment quality parameters and possible effects on aquatic communities towards WWTPs areas. Acute toxicity and chemical contamination varied significantly across the studied sites and differed between winter and summer seasons. The Bay of Cádiz is contaminated by PAHs, metals, detergents (SAS) and pharmaceutical products. Principal Component Analyses indicated metals, SAS and pharmaceutical products as the major environmental stresses. Sea-urchin embryo-larval and microalgae growth rate were the most sensitive bioassays to evaluate resuspension of contaminants (elutriate) from bulk sediment. Amphipods mortality and Microtox(®) solid phase test bioassays were recommended to evaluate bulk sediment quality. Therefore, the use of multiple-bioassays, sensitive to sediment pollution, may provide complementary information to diagnose environmental factors that can impair aquatic communities. The battery of bioassays is recommended to assess and monitor marine sediments directly affected by a mixture of contaminants released from WWTPs. PMID:25410810

  3. Enhanced treatment of refinery soils with open-system slurry reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, J.W.; Lee, M.K.; Horn, W.C.

    1995-12-31

    Refinery site cleanups of residual hydrocarbons arising from long-term operations have become a concern. Because contaminated soil has been generated over many years from spills of many types of materials, it is often difficult to identify the actual spilled material. Because many of these materials are weathered, the less degradable fractions can predominate, creating a challenge for bioremedial process solutions. Open-system slurry reactors were run with an aged refinery soil after a 6-month period of field bioremediation in which 23% TPH removal resulted. The open system (a system where the liquid medium was replaced daily and the solids were retained in the reactor for 2 weeks) achieved 60 to 80% total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) removal based on the initial, prefield bioremediation soil concentration. A process concept twice as effective as other bioremediation schemes has been devised that takes advantage of the formation and removal of small black particulate solids in an open or continuous slurry reactor configuration. These small black particles are chemically or biologically produced in the open system and with their small size and low density are easily elutriated from the bioreactor as the liquid medium is changed. A statistically designed experiment has determined optimal values of nutrients, temperature, and mixing.

  4. AFRRI (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute) reports, January-March 1985. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This volume contains AFRRI Scientific Reports SR85-1 through 85-16, and Contract Report CR85-1, for Jan-Mar, 1985. Scientific reports included in this volume follow: Isolation of cellular membranes from rat mast cells; Effect of proteases on the Beta thromboglobulin radioimmunoassay; Effect of gamma irradiation on the healing of gastric biopsy sites in monkeys; Calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channels in human macrophages; Radiation abrogation of myelopoietic inhibitors found in thymus-conditioned medium; Cell proliferation kinetics analyzed with BrdU and near-UV light treatment; Special techniques for the separation of hemopoietic cells. Elutriation; Hematopoietic colony-forming cells from mice after wound trauma; The macrophage colony-forming cell; Early kinetics of Ca/sup 2 +/ fluxes and histamine release in rat mast cells stimulated with compound 48/80; Hexose regulation of sodium-hexose transport in LLC-PK1 epithelia: The nature of the signal; Plasma histamine and hemodynamic responses following administration of nalbuphine and morphine; Actions of ethanol on voltage-sensitive sodium channels: Effects on neurotoxin-stimulated sodium uptake in synaptosomes; Soluble polyglycans enhance recovery from cobalt-60-induced hemopoietic injury; Effects of pre- and post-irradiation glucan treatment on pluripotent stem cells, granulocyte, macrophage and erythroid progenitor cells, and hemopoietic stromal cells; Alterations in gastric mucus secretion in rhesus monkeys after exposure to ionizing radiation.

  5. Tennessee Valley Authority atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor simulation interim annual report, January 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, J.W.; Krishnan, R.P.

    1980-10-01

    This report contains a detailed description of the work performed during 1979 for the Tennessee Valley Authority in support of the TVA Fluidized-Bed Combustor (FBC) Demonstration Plant Program. The work was carried out under task 4, modeling and simulation of atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) systems. The overall objective of this task is to develop a steady-state mathematical model with the capability of predicting trends in bed performance under various feed and operating conditions. As part of this effort, three predictive subprograms (subcodes) were developed during 1979: (1) bubble-growth subcode, (2) sorbent-coal ash elutriation and attrition subcode, and (3) coal combustion subcode. These codes, which are currently being tested with experimental data, are capable of predicting how some of the important operating variables in the AFBC affect its performance. After testing against field data, these subcodes will be incorporated into an overall AFBC system code, which was developed earlier at ORNL for analysis of the Department of Energy (DOE) Component Test and Integration Unit (CTIU) at Morgantown, West Virginia. In addition to these predictive subcodes, the overall system code previously developed for the CTIU is described. The material balance is closed, based on vendor-supplied data. This balance is then used to predict the heat transfer characteristics of the surfaces (submerged and freeboard) in the AFBC. Existing correlations for heat transfer in AFBC are used in the code along with thermophysical properties of the various streams.

  6. Improved silicon nitride for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. C.; Wimmer, J. M.; Huang, H. H.; Rorabaugh, M. E.; Schienle, J.; Styhr, K. H.

    1985-01-01

    The AiResearch Casting Company baseline silicon nitride (92 percent GTE SN-502 Si sub 3 N sub 4 plus 6 percent Y sub 2 O sub 3 plus 2 percent Al sub 2 O sub 3) was characterized with methods that included chemical analysis, oxygen content determination, electrophoresis, particle size distribution analysis, surface area determination, and analysis of the degree of agglomeration and maximum particle size of elutriated powder. Test bars were injection molded and processed through sintering at 0.68 MPa (100 psi) of nitrogen. The as-sintered test bars were evaluated by X-ray phase analysis, room and elevated temperature modulus of rupture strength, Weibull modulus, stress rupture, strength after oxidation, fracture origins, microstructure, and density from quantities of samples sufficiently large to generate statistically valid results. A series of small test matrices were conducted to study the effects and interactions of processing parameters which included raw materials, binder systems, binder removal cycles, injection molding temperatures, particle size distribution, sintering additives, and sintering cycle parameters.

  7. Modelacio de sedimentadors en plantes de tractament d'aigues residuals. Aplicacio al proces de fermentacio - elutracio de fangs primaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribes Bertomeu, Josep

    the development and validation of a general settling model that allows simulating the main settling operations taking place in a WWTP, considering both primary and secondary settlers and thickeners. It consists in a one-dimensional model based on the flux theory of Kynch and the double-exponential settling function of Takacs that takes into account flocculation, hindered settling and compression processes. The model has been applied to simulation of settlers and thickeners by means of splitting the system into several horizontal layers, all of them considered as completely mixed reactors which are interconnected by mass flux obtained from the settling model. In order to simulate the conversion processes taking place during sedimentation, the general quality model BNRM1 has been added, and it has been proposed an iterative procedure for solving the equations for each layer in which the settler has been divided. The settling flux model validation, along with the quality model, has been carried out by applying them to a simulation of primary sludge fermentation - elutriation process. This process has been studied on a pilot plant located in the Carraixet WWTP in Alboraia (Valencia). In order to simulate the observed decrease in solids separation efficiency in the studied fermentation - elutriation process, the quality model has been modified with the addition of a new process called "disintegration of complex particulate material". This process influences the settleability of the sludge because it is considered that the disintegrated solids become non-settleable solids. This modification implies the addition of two new kinetic parameters (the specific disintegration velocity for volatile particulate material and the specific disintegration velocity for non volatile particulate material). However, the settling parameter that represents the non-settleable fraction of total suspended solids is eliminated from the model and it has been transformed into an experimental

  8. Dissolution-replacement textures in Hopi Buttes diatreme deposits indicate that primary deposits had a fine-ash matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, N.; White, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Textural studies of diatreme deposits are important for interpretation of eruption processes. High primary porosities, are inferred for some southern African kimberlite diatreme deposits, with subsequent addition of pore-filling cements. Where cement in diatreme deposits is interpreted to reflect primary void space, a range of 20-50 vol% porosity is implied, and has been inferred to reflect mechanical processes, specifically fluidization, which elutriate fines from the system during eruption. We have studied the texture of unbedded lower-diatreme deposits at Standing Rocks West, in the Hopi Buttes volcanic field. The interstitial material now comprises varied proportions of matrix and cement. Non-cemented pore space is rare, and there does not appear to be a relationship between the presence of cement vs. matrix and lithofacies or units within the diatreme. The matrix consists of juvenile pyroclasts, sandstone, siltstone and mudstone lithic clasts, detrital quartz grains, and single clinopyroxene, olivine and spinel crystals. In most lapilli tuff, juvenile clasts can be resolved to sizes less than 1 μm, and are typically the dominant matrix component. At least six different cement types are apparent, but the cemented deposits show similar textural relationships. The most common paragenetic sequence, seen in rocks throughout the lower diatreme deposit is, from texturally older to younger, an early phyllosilicate, a later phyllosilicate, calcite, and zeolite. There is evidence for dissolution: 1. Matrix and cement are unevenly distributed on a mm- to cm-scale, and where matrix is low to absent, the framework clast distribution within the cement remains similar and is still poorly sorted. 2. Cement cross-cuts pyroclasts, especially those that are smaller and glassier, resulting in skeletal pyroclast remnants. 3. Where interstitial material is dominantly cement, matrix is preserved locally within pyroclast embayments and around coarser clasts, especially where they

  9. Timing, Distribution, and Character of Tephra Fall from the 2005-2006 Eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, K. L.; Neal, C.; McGimsey, G.

    2006-12-01

    clast types as the January 13-14 events, with proportionally more white high-silica andesite that ranges to higher vesicularities and only rare accidental lithic clasts. On January 27-28, four explosions produced plumes to 3-9 km ASL, that dispersed to the SE and S-SW leading into the continuous phase (January 28 - February 2), characterized by constant low-level ash emissions punctuated by discrete explosions of tephra to 3-8 km ASL. The plume was dispersed to the S depositing ~1mm of ash on Afognak and Kodiak Islands (January 27-February 2). No correlative proximal coarse-grained fall deposits have been identified. Fine to very fine light gray, massive ash deposits are perhaps the most common fall fraction on the island and likely represent elutriation from pyroclastic flows generated during this time interval (from high-silica andesite dome collapse). The effusive phase (February 2-late March) produced a low-silica andesite lava dome and flows. Very fine, pinkish massive ash deposits on the N, W and E sectors overlie other fall deposits and are likely elutriate from small block and ash flows associated with growth of steep-sided lava flows. No significant tephra plumes occurred during this time, although a small volume tephra deposit of mostly black, dense, low-silica andesite overlies pyroclastic-flow deposits from mid January and likely represents a small explosion which is corroborated by infrasound sensor data during this phase.

  10. Long Focal Length Large Mirror Fabrication System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, H. E.

    2003-01-01

    The goals of this ambitious program are (1) to develop systems to make large superpolished optical mirrors, (2) to develop low scatter polishing techniques using centrifugal elutriation, (3) to develop a means of measuring scatter at any point on the mirror, (4) to polish a Hindle sphere to measure the optical figure of a one meter diameter convex mandrel, and (5) to fabricate low scatter, large adaptive optic graphite filled, cyanate ester replica transfer mirrors using these mandrels. Deliverables are a 30 cm diameter superpolished composite AO mirror. We fabricated a 1/3rd meter superpolished zerodur flat mandrel and with the support of our major subcontractor, Composite Mirror Applications Inc (CMA) we have demonstrated a 30 cm lightweight cyanate ester mirror with an rms microroughness between 0.6 and 0.8 nm and 8 faceplate influence function of 5 cm. The influence function was chosen to be comparable to the atmospheric correlation coefficient r(sub 0) which is about 5 cm at sea level. There was no print-thru of the graphite fibers in the cyanate ester surface (the bane of many previous efforts to use cyanate ester mirrors). Our subcontractor has devised a means for developing a 30-50 nm thick layer of graphite free pure ester resin on the surface of the mirrors. This graphite fiber filled material has a thermal expansion coefficient in the 10(exp -8) centimeter per Kelvin range (the same range of expansion coefficient as Zerodur and ULE glasses) and does not take up water and swell, so it is a nearly ideal mirror material in these areas. Unfortunately for these 0.8mm thick faceplates, the number of plies is not enough to result in isometric coverage. Isolated figure irregularities can appear, making it necessary to go to thicker faceplates. The influence function will then only approximate the length of r(sub 0), at higher altitudes or longer wavelengths. The influence function goes as the cube of the thickness, so we are now making a faceplate optimized for

  11. Solid waste management of a chemical-looping combustion plant using Cu-based oxygen carriers.

    PubMed

    García-Labiano, Francisco; Gayán, Pilar; Adánez, Juan; De Diego, Luis F; Forero, Carmen R

    2007-08-15

    Waste management generated from a Chemical-Looping Combustion (CLC) plant using copper-based materials is analyzed by two ways: the recovery and recycling of the used material and the disposal of the waste. A copper recovery process coupled to the CLC plant is proposed to avoid the loss of active material generated by elutriation from the system. Solid residues obtained from a 10 kWth CLC prototype operated during 100 h with a CuO-Al2O3 oxygen carrier prepared by impregnation were used as raw material in the recovery process. Recovering efficiencies of approximately 80% were obtained in the process, where the final products were an eluate of Cu(NO3)2 and a solid. The eluate was used for preparation of new oxygen carriers by impregnation, which exhibited high reactivity for reduction and oxidation reactions as well as adequate physical and chemical properties to be used in a CLC plant. The proposed recovery process largely decreases the amount of natural resources (Cu and Al203) employed in a CLC power plant as well as the waste generated in the process. To determine the stability of the different solid streams during deposition in a landfill, these were characterized with respect to their leaching behavior according to the European Union normative. The solid residue finally obtained in the CLC plant coupled to the recovery process (composed by Al2O3 and CuAl2O4) can be classified as a stable nonreactive hazardous waste acceptable at landfills for nonhazardous wastes. PMID:17874801

  12. The status of toxicity tests with sediment in Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Araujo, R.P.A.

    1995-12-31

    The earliest studies in Brazil aiming to evaluate sediment quality through toxicity tests started in the beginning of the 80`s. These were developed by the Environmental Sanitation Agency of Sao Paulo State (CETESB) in Cubatao River and Billings Reservoir, which are located in industrialized and populous regions. Elutriate phase sediment toxicity tests were run with Daphnia similis. In the Cubatao River Basin the combination of toxicity, chemistry data and benthic community structure provided clear indications of sites with different levels of pollution. At this time there was a consensus that the study of a complex compartment such as sediment needed improvements in sampling and analysis procedures. Only in the 90`s the investigations involving sediment toxicity assessment were resumed by CETESB, and it was clear that integrative studies were needed in order to make environmental quality assessment. This kind of studies were conducted by CETESB in some highly polluted areas of Sao Paulo State, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Photobacterium phosphoreum interstitial water tests and Hyalella sp whole sediment tests were run, and the results correlated with several sediment organic and inorganic contaminants. The Sediment Quality Triad proposed by Chapman was applied in one of these studies. This approach was extremely useful in interpreting the data. At the same time marine sediment toxicity tests were developed by CETESB in collaboration with Sao Paulo University, and tests were run with the amphipods Tiburonella viscana, Battyporeiapus bisetosus; tanaidacean Kalliapseudes shubarti and the echinoderm Lytechinus variegatus. The embryo test with L. variegatus was the most adequate in these studies. Nowadays there are other groups in some universities developing sediment toxicity tests with Hyalella and Chironomus in response to a growing concern in Brazil to establish adequate sediment quality assessment guidelines.

  13. Monocyte to Macrophage Differentiation Goes along with Modulation of the Plasmalogen Pattern through Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Stefan; Grandl, Margot; Konovalova, Tatiana; Sigrüner, Alexander; Kopf, Thomas; Peer, Markus; Orsó, Evelyn; Liebisch, Gerhard; Schmitz, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Background Dysregulation of monocyte-macrophage differentiation is a hallmark of vascular and metabolic diseases and associated with persistent low grade inflammation. Plasmalogens represent ether lipids that play a role in diabesity and previous data show diminished plasmalogen levels in obese subjects. We therefore analyzed transcriptomic and lipidomic changes during monocyte-macrophage differentiation in vitro using a bioinformatic approach. Methods Elutriated monocytes from 13 healthy donors were differentiated in vitro to macrophages using rhM-CSF under serum-free conditions. Samples were taken on days 0, 1, 4 and 5 and analyzed for their lipidomic and transcriptomic profiles. Results Gene expression analysis showed strong regulation of lipidome-related transcripts. Enzymes involved in fatty acid desaturation and elongation were increasingly expressed, peroxisomal and ER stress related genes were induced. Total plasmalogen levels remained unchanged, while the PE plasmalogen species pattern became more similar to circulating granulocytes, showing decreases in PUFA and increases in MUFA. A partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS/DA) revealed that PE plasmalogens discriminate the stage of monocyte-derived macrophage differentiation. Partial correlation analysis could predict novel potential key nodes including DOCK1, PDK4, GNPTAB and FAM126A that might be involved in regulating lipid and especially plasmalogen homeostasis during differentiation. An in silico transcription analysis of lipid related regulation revealed known motifs such as PPAR-gamma and KLF4 as well as novel candidates such as NFY, RNF96 and Zinc-finger proteins. Conclusion Monocyte to macrophage differentiation goes along with profound changes in the lipid-related transcriptome. This leads to an induction of fatty-acid desaturation and elongation. In their PE-plasmalogen profile macrophages become more similar to granulocytes than monocytes, indicating terminal phagocytic differentiation

  14. Scenario-targeted toxicity assessment through multiple endpoint bioassays in a soil posing unacceptable environmental risk according to regulatory screening values.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Ruiz, A; Etxebarria, J; Boatti, L; Marigómez, I

    2015-09-01

    Lanestosa is a chronically polluted site (derelict mine) where the soil (Lanestosa (LA) soil) exceeds screening values (SVs) of regulatory policies in force (Basque Country; Europe) for Zn, Pb and Cd. A scenario-targeted toxicity assessment was carried out on the basis of a multi-endpoint bioassay approach. Acute and chronic toxicity bioassays were conducted with selected test species (Vibrio fischeri, Dictyostelium discoideum, Lactuca sativa, Raphanus sativus and Eisenia fetida) in combination with chemical analysis of soils and elutriates and with bioaccumulation studies in earthworms. Besides, the toxicity profile was compared with that of the mine runoff (RO) soil and of a fresh artificially polluted soil (LAAPS) resembling LA soil pollutant profile. Extractability studies in LA soil revealed that Pb, Zn and Cd were highly available for exchange and/or release into the environment. Indeed, Pb and Zn were accumulated in earthworms and LA soil resulted to be toxic. Soil respiration, V. fischeri, vegetative and developmental cycles of D. discoideum and survival and juvenile production of E. fetida were severely affected. These results confirmed that LA soil had unacceptable environmental risk and demanded intervention. In contrast, although Pb and Zn concentrations in RO soil revealed also unacceptable risk, both metal extractability and toxicity were much lower than in LA soil. Thus, within the polluted site, the need for intervention varied between areas that posed dissimilar risk. Besides, since LAAPS, with a high exchangeable metal fraction, was the most toxic, ageing under in situ natural conditions seemingly contributed to attenuate LA soil risk. As a whole, combining multi-endpoint bioassays with scenario-targeted analysis (including leaching and ageing) provides reliable risk assessment in soils posing unacceptable environmental risk according to SVs, which is useful to optimise the required intervention measures. PMID:25940475

  15. BENZO[a]PYRENE DIOL EPOXIDE PERTURBATION OF CELL CYCLE KINETICS OF SYNCHRONIZED MOUSE LIVER EPITHELIAL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlman, A.L.; Navsky, B.N.; Bartholomew, J.C

    1980-07-01

    A cell cycle synchronization system is described for the analysis of the perturbation of cell cycle kinetics and the cycle-phase specificity of chemicals and other agents. We used the system to study the effects of ({+-})r-7, t-8-dihydroxy-t-9, 10-oxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BaP diol epoxide) upon the cell cycle of mouse liver epithelial cells(NMuLi). BaP diol epoxide(0.6 uM) was added to replated cultures of NMuLi cells that had been synchronized in various stages of the cell cycle by centrifugal elutriation. DNA histograms were obtained by flow cytometry as a function of time after replating. The data were analyzed by a computer modeling routine and reduced to a few graphs illustrating the 'net effects' of the BaP diol epoxide relative to controls. BaP diol epoxide slowed S-phase traversal in all samples relative to their respective control. Traversal through G{sub 2}M was also slowed by at least 50%. BaP diol epoxide had no apparent effect upon G{sub 1} traversal by cycling cells, but delayed the recruitment of quiescent G{sub 0} cells by about 2 hrs. The methods described constitute a powerful new approach for probing the cell cycle effects of a wide variety of agents. The present system appears to be extremely sensitive and capable of characterizing the action of agents on each phase of the cell cycle. The methods are automatable and would allow for the assay and possible differential characterization of mutagens and carcinogens.

  16. Cotton dust and endotoxin exposure-response relationships in cotton textile workers

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, S.M.; Christiani, D.C.; Eisen, E.A.; Wegman, D.H.; Greaves, I.A.; Olenchock, S.A.; Ye, T.T.; Lu, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    Endotoxin exposure has been implicated in the etiology of lung disease in cotton workers. We investigated this potential relationship in 443 cotton workers from 2 factories in Shanghai and 439 control subjects from a nearby silk mill. A respiratory questionnaire was administered and pre- and postshift forced expiratory volume (FVC) and flow in one second (FEV1) were determined for each worker. Multiple area air samples were analyzed for total elutriated dust concentration (range: 0.15 to 2.5 mg/m3) and endotoxin (range: 0.002 to 0.55 microgram U.S. Reference Endotoxin/m3). The cotton worker population was stratified by current and cumulative dust or endotoxin exposure. Groups were compared for FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC%, % change in FEV1 over the shift (delta FEV1%), and prevalences of chronic bronchitis and byssinosis, and linear and logistic regression models were constructed. No dose-response relationships were demonstrated comparing dust concentration to any pulmonary function or symptom variable. A dose-response trend was seen with the current endotoxin level and FEV1, delta FEV1%, and the prevalence of byssinosis and chronic bronchitis, except for the highest exposure level group in which a reversal of the trend was seen. The regression coefficients for current endotoxin exposure were significant (p less than 0.05) in the models for FEV1 and chronic bronchitis but not in the models for delta FEV1% (i.e., acute change in FEV1) or byssinosis prevalence. The coefficient for dust level was never significant in the models.

  17. Radon (222Rn) in ground water of fractured rocks: a diffusion/ion exchange model.

    PubMed

    Wood, Warren W; Kraemer, Thomas F; Shapiro, Allen

    2004-01-01

    Ground waters from fractured igneous and high-grade sialic metamorphic rocks frequently have elevated activity of dissolved radon (222Rn). A chemically based model is proposed whereby radium (226Ra) from the decay of uranium (238U) diffuses through the primary porosity of the rock to the water-transmitting fracture where it is sorbed on weathering products. Sorption of 226Ra on the fracture surface maintains an activity gradient in the rock matrix, ensuring a continuous supply of 226Ra to fracture surfaces. As a result of the relatively long half-life of 226Ra (1601 years), significant activity can accumulate on fracture surfaces. The proximity of this sorbed 226Ra to the active ground water flow system allows its decay progeny 222Rn to enter directly into the water. Laboratory analyses of primary porosity and diffusion coefficients of the rock matrix, radon emanation, and ion exchange at fracture surfaces are consistent with the requirements of a diffusion/ion-exchange model. A dipole-brine injection/withdrawal experiment conducted between bedrock boreholes in the high-grade metamorphic and granite rocks at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, Grafton County, New Hampshire, United States (42 degrees 56'N, 71 degrees 43'W) shows a large activity of 226Ra exchanged from fracture surfaces by a magnesium brine. The 226Ra activity removed by the exchange process is 34 times greater than that of 238U activity. These observations are consistent with the diffusion/ion-exchange model. Elutriate isotopic ratios of 223Ra/226Ra and 238U/226Ra are also consistent with the proposed chemically based diffusion/ion-exchange model. PMID:15318778

  18. Sediment and water toxicity evaluations for the Clinch River ecological risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, A.M.; Phipps, T.L.; Kszos, L.A.

    1995-12-31

    The sediment and surface water at three sites in the Clinch River and six sites in Poplar Creek were evaluated by means of toxicity tests with aquatic organisms. The results of these tests were used as one of the lines of evidence in an assessment of ecological risk due to contaminants, transported from the Oak Ridge Reservation, to the off-site sediment and water environment. Results from a suite of six whole sediment, elutriate and pore water toxicity tests were summarized in terms of survival (Hyalella azteca, Daphnia magna, Anodonta imbecillis, Ceriodaphnia dubia), fecundity (Daphnia magna) or light output reduction (Microtox{reg_sign}). Results from the water toxicity tests were summarized in terms of reduction in survival or fecundity of C. dubia, and survival or growth of Pimephales promelas. Toxicity test results (covering a period of about 1 6 months) showed little difference between reference site media and media from sites of concern. They also showed no strong spatial or temporal response pattern. These results are further supported by the presence of indigenous Chironomus and Hexagenia spp. in the sediment samples. Toxicity results will be discussed with respect to three issues. Two criteria were used to define significant differences between reference sites and sites of concern: a difference of 20%, and statistical significance at a = 0.05. Secondly, the relevance of comparing mean responses to control vs. reference site will be discussed. Lastly, toxicity results are consistent with site characterization information which suggest that contaminants of concern in sediment are buried under clean sediment, effectively isolating the material from potential human or ecological exposure.

  19. Cell Cycle-Dependent Mechanisms Underlie Vincristine-Induced Death of Primary Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Anisha; Hittelman, Walter N; Chambers, Timothy C

    2016-06-15

    Microtubule-targeting agents (MTA), such as the taxanes and vinca alkaloids, are used to treat a variety of cancers due to their ability to perturb microtubule dynamics. In cell culture, MTAs exert their anticancer effects primarily by causing mitotic arrest and cell death. However, accumulating indirect evidence suggests that MTAs may exert their cytotoxicity in human tumors by interfering with interphase microtubules. In this study, we sought to develop and characterize an experimental system in which to test the hypothesis that MTAs induce cell death during interphase. Primary adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells treated with vincristine only weakly exhibited colocalization between mitotic and apoptotic markers and major characteristics of mitotic death, such as an increase in cells with 4N DNA content before the appearance of cells with <2N DNA content, suggesting a mixed response. Therefore, we separated ALL cells into distinct phases of the cell cycle by centrifugal elutriation, labeled cells with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU), and then treated each population with vincristine. Cells isolated during G1 underwent cell death without evidence of EdU uptake, indicating that the cytotoxic effects of vincristine took place during G1 Conversely, cells isolated during S or G2-M phases underwent death following mitotic arrest. Thus, vincristine induces distinct death programs in primary ALL cells depending on cell-cycle phase, and cells in G1 are particularly susceptible to perturbation of interphase microtubules. Primary ALL cells may therefore provide a powerful model system in which to study the multimodal mechanisms underlying MTA-induced cell death. Cancer Res; 76(12); 3553-61. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197148

  20. Semipermeable-membrane devices as an in situ and laboratory testing chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gardiner, W.W.; Word, J.Q.

    1995-12-31

    The use of semipermeable-membrane devices (SPMDs) to measure the bioavailability of dissolved (< 10{angstrom}) hydrophobic-organic-compounds has recently been established. These low-density polyethylene bags are effective and relatively easy in situ devices for evaluating bioaccumulation potentials of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and dioxins. The authors believe SPMDs may also be effective in situ and laboratory testing chambers for evaluating dissolved contaminant effects on sensitive life stages of freshwater/marine fish and invertebrates. Applications may include dissolved contaminant toxicity of effluents, porewater, water-column, and surface microlayer. In laboratory tests, the applicability of SPMD-testing chambers was explored with marine bivalve larvae (Mytilus galloprovincialis). Test solutions were filtered seawater, dissolved copper, ammonia, and an elutriate preparation that included both organic and inorganic contaminants. SPMDs were filled with seawater, immersed in test solutions for 24-h, then spiked with fertilized M. galloprovincialis embryos. Following 48-h exposures, >90% survival and normal development was observed in the controls, indicating that incubation in the SPMDs did not adversely affect larval development. Incubation in test treatments resulted in slight, but not significantly different, reductions in normal development, relative to the controls. The authors believe longer SPMD immersion prior to testing will likely be required to allow SPMD contents to reach equilibrium with test solutions before eliciting a significant toxicological response. While this may limit the application of SPMDs for short term in situ exposures, they may be used for field/laboratory exposures of a week or more or for collecting equilibrated field samples for laboratory testing.

  1. Emplacement of the Cabezo María lamproite volcano (Miocene, SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gernon, Thomas M.; Spence, Samuel; Trueman, Clive N.; Taylor, Rex N.; Rohling, Eelco; J. Hatter, Stuart; Harding, Ian C.

    2015-06-01

    Lamproite volcanoes are uncommon in the geological record but are exceptionally well preserved in the Betic Cordilleras of SE Spain, where they erupted during the Late Miocene (Tortonian to Messinian stages). The parent melts are thought to have been channelled through major lithospheric faults to erupt at or near the faulted margins of Neogene sedimentary basins. Lamproite magmas are thought to be relatively CO2-poor (<1 wt %) and are typically characterised by an effusive eruption style and the development of lava lakes and scoria cones. Cabezo María is a relatively small (˜550 m diameter) lamproite volcano that was emplaced within the shallow-water marine-influenced Vera Basin. The lamproites are compositionally similar to those of the Roman Province and generally less potassic (K2O<5 wt%) than other (ultra-) potassic rocks in SE Spain (e.g. Cancarix, Fortuna). The initial eruption stages were dominated by explosive magma-water interactions and the formation of peperites. These are characterised by angular fragments of glassy lamproite lavas (and isolated lobes) incorporated in sediments, locally showing the effects of thermal metamorphism. Further, elutriation pipes and `jigsaw-fit' textures are observed in the peperites. The lavas and peperites are overlain by outward-dipping well-stratified scoria deposits defining part of a cinder cone, which is inferred to have emerged above sea level. Steep internal contacts with inward-dipping, structureless breccias likely represent the inner wall deposits of a central conduit. The deposits are cross-cut by late-stage dykes, which supplied fissure eruptions of geochemically similar lavas capping the scoria cone. The transition from explosive to effusive behaviour may reflect the decreased availability of water, possibly due to downward migration of the feeder conduit below the level of water-saturated sediments.

  2. Use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (fish) to study chromosomal damage induced by radiation and bromodeoxyuridine in human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wilt, S.R.; Burgess, A.C.; Lawrence, T.S.

    1994-11-15

    Although the thymidine analog radiation sensitizer bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) increases radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations, it is not known whether these aberrations are uniformly distributed among chromosomes. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we carried out a study to test the hypothesis that BrdUrd-induced radiosensitization may be mediated by nonuniform chromsomal damage. Log phase HT29 human colon cancer cells were exposed to 10 {mu}M BrdUrd (or media alone) for one cell cycle, and the G1 cells were separated by centrifugal elutriation. Half of the control and BrdUrd samples were irradiated with 8 Gy. Cells were then incubated for 24-28 h, and metaphase spreads were prepared. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed using paint probes for chromosomes 1 and 4. We found that radiation induced 0.20 aberrations per chromosome in chromosome 4. Based on the ratio of the relative lengths of chromosome 1-4(1.34), it was predicted that chromosome 1 would have {approx}0.26 aberrations per chromosome. However, we observed 0.39 aberrations per chromosome 1, which was significantly greater than the predicted (p<0.001 by chi-square). Incubation with BrdUrd prior to irradiation significantly increased the aberrations found in chromosome 1 (by a factor of 1.4) and chromosome 4 (by a factor of 1.9) compared to radiation alone (p<0.001 for both chromosome 1 and 4). This study demonstrates that individual chromosomes in human colon cancer cells show significantly different rates of aberration after irradiation. Furthermore, the BrdUrd-mediated increase in radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations may not be uniform among chromosomes. 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Risk factors for lymphoproliferative disorders after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Ethel S.; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Socié, Gérard; Banks, Peter M.; Sobocinski, Kathleen A.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Kingma, Douglas W.; Travis, Lois B.; Flowers, Mary E.; Martin, Paul J.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Curtis, Rochelle E.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated 26 901 patients who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) at 271 centers worldwide to define patterns of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs). PTLDs developed in 127 recipients, with 105 (83%) cases occurring within 1 year after transplantation. In multivariate analyses, we confirmed that PTLD risks were strongly associated (P < .001) with T-cell depletion of the donor marrow, antithymocyte globulin (ATG) use, and unrelated or HLA-mismatched grafts (URD/HLA mismatch). Significant associations were also confirmed for acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease. The increased risk associated with URD/HLA-mismatched donors (RR = 3.8) was limited to patients with T-cell depletion or ATG use (P = .004). New findings were elevated risks for age 50 years or older at transplantation (RR = 5.1; P < .001) and second transplantation (RR = 3.5; P < .001). Lower risks were found for T-cell depletion methods that remove both T and B cells (alemtuzumab and elutriation, RR = 3.1; P = .025) compared with other methods (RR = 9.4; P = .005 for difference). The cumulative incidence of PTLDs was low (0.2%) among 21 686 patients with no major risk factors, but increased to 1.1%, 3.6%, and 8.1% with 1, 2, and more than 3 major risk factors, respectively. Our findings identify subgroups of patients who underwent allogeneic HCT at elevated risk of PTLDs for whom prospective monitoring of Epstein-Barr virus activation and early treatment intervention may be particularly beneficial. PMID:19264919

  4. Bioassays and selected chemical analysis of biocide-free antifouling coatings.

    PubMed

    Watermann, B T; Daehne, B; Sievers, S; Dannenberg, R; Overbeke, J C; Klijnstra, J W; Heemken, O

    2005-09-01

    Over the years several types of biocide-free antifouling paints have entered the market. The prohibition of biocidal antifouling paints in special areas of some European countries such as Sweden, Denmark and Germany has favoured the introduction of these paints to the market. Several types of biocide-free antifouling paints were subjected to bioassays and selected chemical analysis of leachate and incorporated substances. Both non-eroding coatings (silicones, fibre coats, epoxies, polyurethane, polyvinyl) and eroding coatings (SPCs, ablative) were tested to exclude the presence of active biocides and dangerous compounds. The paints were subjected to the luminescent bacteria test and the cypris larvae settlement assay, the latter delivering information on toxicity as well as on efficacy. The following chemical analyses of selected compounds of dry-film were performed: The results of the bioassays indicated that none of the coatings analysed contained leachable biocides. Nevertheless, some products contained or leached dangerous compounds. The analyses revealed leaching of nonylphenol (up to 74.7 ng/cm2/d after 48 h) and bisphenol A (up to 2.77 ng/cm2/d after 24 h) from epoxy resins used as substitutes for antifouling paints. The heavy metal, zinc, was measured in dry paint film in quantities up to 576,000 ppm in erodable coatings, not incorporated as a biocide but to control the rate of erosion. Values for TBT in silicone elutriates were mostly below the detection limit of 0.005 mg/kg. Values for DBT ranged between <0.005 and 6.28 mg/kg, deriving from catalysts used as curing agents. Some biocide-free paints contained leachable, toxic and dangerous compounds in the dry film, some of which may act as substitutes for biocides or are incorporated as plasticizers or catalysts. Implications to environmental requirements and legislation are discussed. PMID:15878605

  5. Monocyte-endothelial adhesion in chronic rheumatoid arthritis. In situ detection of selectin and integrin-dependent interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Grober, J S; Bowen, B L; Ebling, H; Athey, B; Thompson, C B; Fox, D A; Stoolman, L M

    1993-01-01

    Blood monocytes are the principal reservoir for tissue macrophages in rheumatoid synovitis. Receptor-mediated adhesive interactions between circulating cells and the synovial venules initiate recruitment. These interactions have been studied primarily in cultured endothelial cells. Thus the functional activities of specific adhesion receptors, such as the endothelial selectins and the leukocytic integrins, have not been evaluated directly in diseased tissues. We therefore examined monocyte-microvascular interactions in rheumatoid synovitis by modifying the Stamper-Woodruff frozen section binding assay initially developed to study lymphocyte homing. Specific binding of monocytes to venules lined by low or high endothelium occurred at concentrations as low as 5 x 10(5) cells/ml. mAbs specific for P-selectin (CD62, GMP-140/PADGEM) blocked adhesion by > 90% in all synovitis specimens examined. In contrast, P-selectin-mediated adhesion to the microvasculature was either lower or absent in frozen sections of normal foreskin and placenta. mAbs specific for E-selectin (ELAM-1) blocked 20-50% of monocyte attachment in several RA synovial specimens but had no effect in others. mAbs specific for LFA-1, Mo1/Mac 1, the integrin beta 2-chain, and L-selectin individually inhibited 30-40% of adhesion. An mAb specific for the integrin beta 1-chain inhibited the attachment of elutriated monocytes up to 20%. We conclude that P-selectin associated with the synovial microvasculature initiates shear-resistant adhesion of monocytes in the Stamper-Woodruff assay and stabilizes bonds formed by other selectins and the integrins. Thus the frozen section binding assay permits direct evaluation of leukocyte-microvascular adhesive interactions in inflamed tissues and suggests a prominent role for P-selectin in monocyte recruitment in vivo. Images PMID:7685772

  6. Reburning Characteristics of Residual Carbon in Fly Ash from CFB Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. H.; Luo, H. H.; Chen, H. P.; Yang, H. P.; Wang, X. H.

    The content of residual carbon in fly ash of CFB boilers is a litter high especially when low-grade coal, such as lean coal, anthracite coal, gangue, etc. is in service, which greatly influences the efficiency of boilers and fly ash further disposal. Reburn of fly ash through collection, recirculation in CFB furnace or external combustor is a possibly effective strategy to decrease the carbon content, mainly depending on the residual carbon reactivity. In this work, the combustion properties of residual carbon in fly ash and corresponding original coal from large commercial CFB boilers (Kaifeng (440t/h), and Fenyi (410t/h), all in china) are comparably investigated through experiments. The residual carbon involved was firstly extracted and enriched from fly ash by means of floating elutriation to mitigate the influence of ash and minerals on the combustion behavior of residual carbon. Then, the combustion characteristic of two residual carbons and the original coal particles was analyzed with thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA, STA409C from Nestch, Germany). It was observed that the ignition temperature of the residual carbon is much higher than that of original coal sample, and the combustion reactivity of residual carbon is not only dependent on the original coal property, but also the operating conditions. The influence of oxygen content and heating rate was also studied in TGA. The O2 concentration is set as 20%, 30%, 40% and 70% respectively in O2/N2 gas mixture with the flow rate of 100ml/min. It was found that higher oxygen content is favor for decreasing ignition temperature, accelerating the combustion rate of residual carbon. And about 40% of oxygen concentration is experimentally suggested as an optimal value when oxygen-enriched combustion is put into practice for decreasing residual carbon content of fly ash in CFB boilers.

  7. Estimation of total discharged mass from the phreatic eruption of Ontake Volcano, central Japan, on September 27, 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takarada, Shinji; Oikawa, Teruki; Furukawa, Ryuta; Hoshizumi, Hideo; Itoh, Jun'ichi; Geshi, Nobuo; Miyagi, Isoji

    2016-08-01

    The total mass discharged by the phreatic eruption of Ontake Volcano, central Japan, on September 27, 2014, was estimated using several methods. The estimated discharged mass was 1.2 × 106 t (segment integration method), 8.9 × 105 t (Pyle's exponential method), and varied from 8.6 × 103 to 2.5 × 106 t (Hayakawa's single isopach method). The segment integration and Pyle's exponential methods gave similar values. The single isopach method, however, gave a wide range of results depending on which contour was used. Therefore, the total discharged mass of the 2014 eruption is estimated at between 8.9 × 105 and 1.2 × 106 t. More than 90 % of the total mass accumulated within the proximal area. This shows how important it is to include a proximal area field survey for the total mass estimation of phreatic eruptions. A detailed isopleth mass distribution map was prepared covering as far as 85 km from the source. The main ash-fall dispersal was ENE in the proximal and medial areas and E in the distal area. The secondary distribution lobes also extended to the S and NW proximally, reflecting the effects of elutriation ash and surge deposits from pyroclastic density currents during the phreatic eruption. The total discharged mass of the 1979 phreatic eruption was also calculated for comparison. The resulting volume of 1.9 × 106 t (using the segment integration method) indicates that it was about 1.6-2.1 times larger than the 2014 eruption. The estimated average discharged mass flux rate of the 2014 eruption was 1.7 × 108 kg/h and for the 1979 eruption was 1.0 × 108 kg/h. One of the possible reasons for the higher flux rate of the 2014 eruption is the occurrence of pyroclastic density currents at the summit area.

  8. Environmental assessment of creosote-treated pilings in the marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Butala, J.H.; Webb, D.A.; Jop, K.M.; Putt, A.E.

    1995-12-31

    A comprehensive ecological risk assessment was conducted to evaluate the environmental impact of creosote-treated pilings in the marine environment at Moss Landing Harbor, Moss Landing, California. Four areas of investigation comprising the risk assessment were (1) evaluation of environmental conditions around existing creosote-treated pilings (2) investigating effects related to restoration of pilings (3) assessing creosote migration into surrounding environment, one year after pile-driving and (4) confirmation of creosote toxicity in laboratory studies. Biological and chemical evaluation of the impact of creosote-treated pilings was conducted on surface sheen, water column and sediment samples collected at Moss Landing Harbor. Water samples (surface sheen, water column and sediment pore water) were evaluated using short-term chronic exposures with Mysidopsis bahia, while bulk sediment samples were evaluated with 10-day sediment toxicity tests with Ampelisca abdita. Samples of surface, column water and sediment were analyzed for the constituents of creosote by GC mass spectrometry. In addition, a sample of neat material used to preserve treated pilings represented a reference for the polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Verification of organism response and analyses of field collected samples was performed by conducting 10-day A. abdita sediment and 7-day M. bahia elutriate exposures with creosote applied to clean sediment collected at Moss Landing, Evaluations were also performed to determine the effects of photoinduced toxicity on test organisms exposed to PAHs. The biological and analytical results of the field and laboratory exposures are being used to evaluate and determine risk of creosote-treated pilings on the marine environment.

  9. Spatial distribution of trace elements and ecotoxicity of bottom sediments in Rybnik reservoir, Silesian-Poland.

    PubMed

    Baran, Agnieszka; Tarnawski, Marek; Koniarz, Tomasz

    2016-09-01

    The aim of study was to integrate chemical analyses and toxicity bioassays in order to assess the environmental risk connected with the presence of trace elements in the sediments. This study examined the ecological significance of trace elements in bottom sediments by applying a set of complementary sediment quality assessment methods sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) (mean probable effect concentration quotient (PECQ)), potential ecological risk index (PERI), contamination degree (C d) and two bioassays: the bacterial luminescence inhibition test with Vibrio fischeri on sediment elutriates and the direct contact test with the ostracod crustacean Heterocypris incongruens. The samples were collected from 50 stations of Rybnik reservoir. The reservoir is a region with enormous concentration of industry, mainly hard coal mining, electric power industry, and transportation. Despite the high diversity in metal concentration in the sediments, the spatial distribution of trace elements in the sediments was very similar. Moreover, the strong positive correlations between individual pairs of trace elements indicate that they may derive from a similar source and move together. According to mean PECQs, 68 % of the samples were potentially non-toxic and 32 % of the samples were potentially toxic. PERI values suggested that 70 % of the sediment sampling sites exhibited low ecological risk from metal pollution while 24 % of the samples had severe and serious risk. Based on our combined evaluation, we believe that Cd and Cu in the sediment samples frequently caused adverse biological effects. Higher toxic responses were observed in the Microtox test than in the Ostracodtoxkit test. All the sediment samples were found toxic to V. fischeri, and 96 % of the samples had effect percentages >50 %. For H. incongruens, 12 % of the sediments were not toxic and 44 % had effect percentages >50 %. In order to perform a complex assessment of the environmental impact of metal

  10. A novel system to generate WTC dust particles for inhalation exposures.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Joshua M; Garrett, Brittany J; Prophete, Colette; Horton, Lori; Sisco, Maureen; Soukup, Joleen M; Zelikoff, Judith T; Ghio, Andrew; Peltier, Richard E; Asgharian, Bahman; Chen, Lung-Chi; Cohen, Mitchell D

    2014-01-01

    First responders (FRs) present at Ground Zero within the critical first 72 h after the World Trade Center (WTC) collapse have progressively exhibited significant respiratory injury. The majority (>96%) of WTC dusts were >10 μm and no studies have examined potential health effects of this size fraction. This study sought to develop a system to generate and deliver supercoarse (10-53 μm) WTC particles to a rat model in a manner that mimicked FR exposure scenarios. A modified Fishing Line generator was integrated onto an intratracheal inhalation (ITIH) system that allowed for a bypassing of the nasal passages so as to mimic FR exposures. Dust concentrations were measured gravimetrically; particle size distribution was measured via elutriation. Results indicate that the system could produce dusts with 23 μm mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) at levels up to ≥1200 mg/m(3). To validate system utility, F344 rats were exposed for 2 h to ≈100 mg WTC dust/m(3). Exposed rats had significantly increased lung weight and levels of select tracer metals 1 h after exposure. Using this system, it is now possible to conduct relevant inhalation exposures to determine adverse WTC dusts impacts on the respiratory system. Furthermore, this novel integrated Fishing Line-ITIH system could potentially be used in the analyses of a wide spectrum of other dusts/pollutants of sizes previously untested or delivered to the lungs in ways that did not reflect realistic exposure scenarios. PMID:24220216

  11. In-duct removal of mercury from coal-fired power plant flue gas by activated carbon: assessment of entrained flow versus wall surface contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Scala, F.; Chirone, R.; Lancia, A.

    2008-12-15

    In-duct mercury capture efficiency by activated carbon from coal-combustion flue gas was investigated. To this end, elemental mercury capture experiments were conducted at 100 C in a purposely designed 65-mm ID labscale pyrex apparatus operated as an entrained flow reactor. Gas residence times were varied between 0.7 and 2.0 s. Commercial-powdered activated carbon was continuously injected in the reactor and both mercury concentration and carbon elutriation rate were followed at the outlet. Transient mercury concentration profiles at the outlet showed that steady-state conditions were reached in a time interval of 15-20 min, much longer than the gas residence time in the reactor. Results indicate that the influence of the walls is non-negligible in determining the residence time of fine carbon particles in the adsorption zone, because of surface deposition and/or the establishment of a fluid-dynamic boundary layer near the walls. Total mercury capture efficiencies of 20-50% were obtained with carbon injection rates in the range 0.07-0.25 g/min. However, only a fraction of this capture was attributable to free-flowing carbon particles, a significant contribution coming from activated carbon staying near the reactor walls. Entrained bed experiments at lab-scale conditions are probably not properly representative of full-scale conditions, where the influence of wall interactions is lower. Moreover, previously reported entrained flow lab-scale mercury capture data should be reconsidered by taking into account the influence of particle-wall interactions.

  12. Purified murine granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cells express a high-affinity receptor for recombinant murine granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.E.; Bicknell, D.C.; Park, L.S.; Straneva, J.E.; Cooper, S.; Broxmeyer, H.E.

    1988-01-01

    Purified recombinant murine granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was labeled with /sup 125/I and used to examine the GM-CSF receptor on unfractionated normal murine bone marrow cells, casein-induced peritoneal exudate cells, and highly purified murine granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cells (CFU-GM). CFU-GM were isolated from cyclophosphamide-treated mice by Ficoll-Hypaque density centrifugation followed by counterflow centrifugal elutriation. The resulting population had a cloning efficiency of 62-99% in cultures containing conditioned medium from pokeweed mitogen-stimulated spleen cells and 55-86% in the presence of a plateau concentration of purified recombinant murine GM-CSF. Equilibrium binding studies with /sup 125/I-labeled GM-CSF showed that normal bone marrow cells, casein-induced peritoneal exudate cells, and purified CFU-GM had a single class of high-affinity receptor. Affinity crosslinking studies demonstrated that /sup 125/I-labeled GM-CSF bound specifically to two species of M/sub r/ 180,000 and 70,000 on CFU-GM, normal bone marrow cells, and peritoneal exudate cells. The M/sub r/ 70,000 species is thought to be a proteolytic fragment of the intact M/sub r/ 180,000 receptor. The present studies indicate that the GM-CSF receptor expressed on CFU-GM and mature myeloid cells are structurally similar. In addition, the number of GM-CSF receptors on CFU-GM is twice the average number of receptors on casein-induced mature myeloid cells, suggesting that receptor number may decrease as CFU-GM mature.

  13. Bed hydrodynamics and heat transfer to tubes in the freeboard region of a pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Sellakumar, K.M.

    1988-01-01

    Various modes of Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor part-load operation are analyzed. Bed change is considered to be the most effective of these methods. The need to understand the variation in heat absorption by exposed in-bed tubes immediately above the reducing or increasing bed height has resulted in the pursuit for a clearer understanding of the particle concentration profile and heat transfer mechanisms to the referred tubes. Bubble characteristics in a PFBC with internals are studied in depth. A model for gas flow through dense and bubble phases is developed. Model results are compared with the limited experimental results available in literature. For both atmospheric and pressurized fluidized bed combustors, the deviation from the two phase theory is highlighted; and this simple model approach has evolved a procedure to quantify gas flows in different streams which was thus far available only qualitatively. The dense phase velocity is found to be much more than the minimum fluidization velocity. A theoretical model for particle efflux from the bed top surface has been evolved. An empirical model has also been developed for elutriant flux above the Transport Disengagement Height, the concentration of fines in the efflux material, superficial velocity in the freeboard, and mean particle terminal velocity have appeared to be the major factors influencing the carry over. The model developed using the data form a smaller rectangular rest rig was tested satisfactorily with the limited data from a larger as well as a similar size circular unit. If the particulate loading profile above the bed surface is known, then the heat transfer to the heat exchanger surfaces may be obtained from the available correlations.

  14. Extensive soft-sediment deformation and peperite formation at the base of a rhyolite lava: Owyhee Mountains, SW Idaho, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Charlotte E.; Brown, David J.; Rawcliffe, Heather J.

    2016-06-01

    In the Northern Owyhee Mountains (SW Idaho), a >200-m-thick flow of the Miocene Jump Creek Rhyolite was erupted on to a sequence of tuffs, lapilli tuffs, breccias and lacustrine siltstones of the Sucker Creek Formation. The rhyolite lava flowed over steep palaeotopography, resulting in the forceful emplacement of lava into poorly consolidated sediments. The lava invaded this sequence, liquefying and mobilising the sediment, propagating sediment subvertically in large metre-scale fluidal diapirs and sediment injectites. The heat and the overlying pressure of the thick Jump Creek Rhyolite extensively liquefied and mobilised the sediment resulting in the homogenization of the Sucker Creek Formation units, and the formation of metre-scale loading structures (simple and pendulous load casts, detached pseudonodules). Density contrasts between the semi-molten rhyolite and liquefied sediment produced highly fluidal Rayleigh-Taylor structures. Local fluidisation formed peperite at the margins of the lava and elutriation structures in the disrupted sediment. The result is a 30-40-m zone beneath the rhyolite lava of extremely deformed stratigraphy. Brittle failure and folding is recorded in more consolidated sediments, indicating a differential response to loading due to the consolidation state of the sediments. The lava-sediment interaction is interpreted as being a function of (1) the poorly consolidated nature of the sediments, (2) the thickness and heat retention of the rhyolite lava, (3) the density contrast between the lava and the sediment and (4) the forceful emplacement of the lava. This study demonstrates how large lava bodies have the potential to extensively disrupt sediments and form significant lateral and vertical discontinuities that complicate volcanic facies architecture.

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soils: bioaugmentation of autochthonous bacteria and toxicological assessment of the bioremediation process by means of Vicia faba L.

    PubMed

    Ruffini Castiglione, Monica; Giorgetti, Lucia; Becarelli, Simone; Siracusa, Giovanna; Lorenzi, Roberto; Di Gregorio, Simona

    2016-04-01

    Two bacterial strains, Achromobacter sp. (ACH01) and Sphingomonas sp. (SPH01), were isolated from a heavily polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil (5431.3 ± 102.3 ppm) for their capacity to use a mixture of anthracene, pyrene, phenanthrene and fluorene as sole carbon sources for growth and for the capacity to produce biosurfactants. The two strains were exploited for bioaugmentation in a biopile pilot plant to increase the bioavailability and the degradation of the residual PAH contamination (99.5 ± 7.1 ppm) reached after 9 months of treatment. The denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE) profile of the microbial ecology of the soil during the experimentation showed that the bioaugmentation approach was successful in terms of permanence of the two strains in the soil in treatment. The bioaugmentation of the two bacterial isolates positively correlated with the PAH depletion that reached 7.9 ± 2 ppm value in 2 months of treatment. The PAH depletion was assessed by the loss of the phyto-genotoxicity of soil elutriates on the model plant Vicia faba L., toxicological assessment adopted also to determine the minimum length of the decontamination process for obtaining both the depletion of the PAH contamination and the detoxification of the soil at the end of the process. The intermediate phases of the bioremediation process were the most significant in terms of toxicity, inducing genotoxic effects and selective DNA fragmentation in the stem cell niche of the root tip. The selective DNA fragmentation can be related to the selective induction of cell death of mutant stem cells that can compromise offsprings. PMID:26769476

  16. Rate and topography of peptidoglycan synthesis during cell division in Escherichia coli: Concept of a leading edge

    SciTech Connect

    Wientjes, F.B.; Nanninga, N. )

    1989-06-01

    The rate at which the peptidoglycan of Escherichia coli is synthesized during the division cycle was studied with two methods. One method involved synchronization of E. coli MC4100 lysA cultures by centrifugal elutriation and subsequent pulse-labeling of the synchronously growing cultures with (meso-{sup 3}H)diaminopimelic acid (({sup 3}H)Dap). The second method was autoradiography of cells pulse-labeled with ({sup 3}H)Dap. It was found that the peptidoglycan is synthesized at a more or less exponentially increasing rate during the division cycle with a slight acceleration in this rate as the cells start to constrict. Apparently, polar cap formation requires synthesis of extra surface components, presumably to accommodate for a change in the surface-to-volume ratio. Furthermore, it was found that the pool size of Dap was constant during the division cycle. Close analysis of the topography of ({sup 3}H)Dap incorporation at the constriction site revealed that constriction proceeded by synthesis of peptidoglycan at the leading edge of the invaginating cell envelope. During constriction, no reallocation of incorporation occurred, i.e., the incorporation at the leading edge remained high throughout the process of constriction. Impairment of penicillin-binding protein 3 by mutation or by the specific {beta}-lactam antibiotic furazlocillin did not affect ({sup 3}H)Dap incorporation during initiation of constriction. However, the incorporation at the constriction site was inhibited in later stages of the constriction process. It is concluded that during division at least two peptidoglycan-synthesizing systems are operating sequentially.

  17. Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal from Federal Projects in New York and New Jersey and the Military Ocean Terminal (MOTBY)

    SciTech Connect

    Barrows, E.S.; Antrim, L.D.; Pinza, M.R.; Gardiner, W.W.; Kohn, N.P.; Gruendell, B.D.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Rosman, L.B.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is authorized by Section 103 of the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (MPRSA), Public Law 92-532, and by the Clean Water Act of 1972 (CWA) and Amendments of 1977 to permit, evaluate, and regulate the disposal of dredged material in ocean waters to minimize adverse environmental effects. Compliance with the regulations of the MPRSA calls for physical and biological testing of sediment proposed for dredging prior to its disposal in ocean waters. The testing required by the MPRSA criteria is conducted under a testing manual developed by the USACE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal (Testing Manual), commonly referred to as the `Green Book.` Testing protocols in the Green Book include bulk sediment analysis, grain size analysis, elutriate testing, and biological testing. The biological testing includes bioassays for acute toxicity as well as analysis to determine bioaccumulation of certain contaminants by marine organisms. The objective of the USACE-NYD Federal Projects Program was to evaluate sediment proposed for dredging and unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. The results of analytical measurements and bioassays performed on the test sediments were compared with analyses of sediment from the Mud Dump Reference Site to determine whether the test sediments were acutely toxic to marine organisms or resulted in statistically significantly greater bioaccumulation of contaminants in marine organisms, relative to the reference sediment. Testing for the federal project areas was performed according to the requirements.

  18. Distribution of Components in Ion Exchange Materials Taken from the K East Basin and Leaching of Ion Exchange Materials by Nitric/Hydrofluoric Acid and Nitric/Oxalic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, C.H.; Rinehart, D.E.; Hoopes, F.V.

    1999-04-02

    Laboratory tests were performed to examine the efficacy of mixed nitric/hydrofluoric acid followed by mixed nitric/oxalic acid leach treatments to decontaminate ion exchange materials that have been found in a number of samples retrieved from K East (KE)Basin sludge. The ion exchange materials contain organic ion exchange resins and zeolite inorganic ion exchange material. Based on process records, the ion exchange resins found in the K Basins is a mixed-bed, strong acid/strong base material marketed as Purolite NRW-037. The zeolite material is Zeolon-900, a granular material composed of the mineral mordenite. Radionuclides sorbed or associated with the ion exchange material can restrict its disposal to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The need for testing to support development of a treatment process for K Basin sludge has been described in Section 4.2 of ''Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basins Sludge Treatment Process'' (Flament 1998). Elutriation and washing steps are designed to remove the organic resins from the K Basin sludge. To help understand the effects of the anticipated separation steps, tests were performed with well-rinsed ion exchange (IX) material from KE Basin floor sludge (sample H-08 BEAD G) and with well-rinsed IX having small quantities of added KE canister composite sludge (sample KECOMP). Tests also were performed to determine the relative quantities of organic and inorganic IX materials present in the H-08 K Basin sludge material. Based on chemical analyses of the separated fractions, the rinsed and dry IX material H-08 BEAD G was found to contain 36 weight percent inorganic material (primarily zeolite). The as-received (unrinsed) and dried H-08 material was estimated to contain 45 weight percent inorganic material.

  19. A preliminary study on gram-negative bacteria (GNB) and their endotoxins in a gin house in India.

    PubMed

    Doctor, P B; Bhagia, L J; Derasari, A Y; Vyas, J B; Amin, R J; Ghosh, S K

    2006-12-01

    The presence of byssinosis, an occupational disease found among cotton mill workers, has been well documented in different parts of the world. The disease develops due to exposure to environmental cotton dust. Evidence suggests that the causative agent for the disease is gram-negative bacteria (GNB) and their endotoxins present on the cotton fibers. An investigation was carried out in a gin house in western India. Environmental dust samples were collected by vertical elutriator (VE). Airborne dust concentrations were very high in the working environment: 2.11 mg/m3 in ginning and 0.95 mg/m3 in the press department (p < 0.05), which was higher than the threshold limit value collected by VE (0.2 mg/m3), and higher than the permissible exposure limit for respirable dust (0.5 mg/m3 for nontextile industries using cotton). In the office control site, the dust concentration was 0.31 mg/m3. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration's cotton dust standard permissible exposure limit for respirable dust is 0.2 mg/m3 in yarn manufacturing, 0.75 mg/m3 in slashing and weaving, and 0.5 mg/m3 in nontextile industries using cotton. These samples also showed high concentrations of airborne endotoxin (p < 0.001) in ginning and pressing (2.77 and 1.52 micro g/m3) compared with the office control site (0.009 micro g/m3 measured by Limulus amoebocyte lysate technique). Total enumeration of airborne GNB was carried out qualitatively by the petri plate exposure method and quantitatively by an Andersen 6-stage viable sampler and VE. GNB were recovered in quite high numbers. Among all the GNB, Enterobacter agglomerans were the dominant bacterial flora. Results indicate that gin workers are occupationally exposed to airborne GNB and endotoxins, and require masks. PMID:17133691

  20. Mechanisms Controlling Subcellular Localization of the G1 Cyclins Cln2p and Cln3p in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mary E.; Cross, Frederick R.

    2001-01-01

    Different G1 cyclins confer functional specificity to the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) Cdc28p in budding yeast. The Cln3p G1 cyclin is localized primarily to the nucleus, while Cln2p is localized primarily to the cytoplasm. Both binding to Cdc28p and Cdc28p-dependent phosphorylation in the C-terminal region of Cln2p are independently required for efficient nuclear depletion of Cln2p, suggesting that this process may be physiologically regulated. The accumulation of hypophosphorylated Cln2 in the nucleus is an energy-dependent process, but may not involve the RAN GTPase. Phosphorylation of Cln2p is inefficient in small newborn cells obtained by elutriation, and this lowered phosphorylation correlates with reduced Cln2p nuclear depletion in newborn cells. Thus, Cln2p may have a brief period of nuclear residence early in the cell cycle. In contrast, the nuclear localization pattern of Cln3p is not influenced by Cdk activity. Cln3p localization requires a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) located at the C terminus of the protein. This sequence is required for nuclear localization of Cln3p and is sufficient to confer nuclear localization to green fluorescent protein in a RAN-dependent manner. Mislocalized Cln3p, lacking the NLS, is much less active in genetic assays specific for Cln3p, but more active in assays normally specific for Cln2p, consistent with the idea that Cln3p localization explains a significant part of Clnp functional specificity. PMID:11509671

  1. Tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 alpha stimulate late shedding of p75 TNF receptors but not p55 TNF receptors from human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Joyce, D A; Steer, J H

    1995-11-01

    Soluble receptors for TNF (sTNF-R) are present at elevated concentrations in the synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. They are presumably released by cells of the synovial membrane, including the monocyte-derived synovial macrophages. Cytokines from the synovium, including IL-1 and TNF-alpha, may stimulate release. We therefore examined the release of sTNF-R from monocytes exposed to IL-1 and TNF-alpha. Elutriator-purified human blood monocytes spontaneously released both the p75 and the p55 sTNF-R (1011 +/- 199 and 177 +/- 20 pg/10(6) cells, respectively, mean +/- SEM) during 48 h of in vitro culture. TNF-alpha and IL-1 alpha induced time- and concentration-dependent increases in the release of sTNF-R75 from monocytes, but neither had a measurable effect on the release of sTNF-R55. The release of sTNF-R75 was inhibited by cycloheximide. Neither lymphocytes nor polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) released measurable sTNF-R spontaneously or in response to stimulation with IL-1 alpha, but TNF-alpha stimulated the release of small amounts of sTNF-R75 by PMN. The timing, cycloheximide sensitivity, and selectivity of stimulated release of TNF-R75 by monocytes are consistent with previous observations on other cell types of late (8-20 h) increased synthesis and turnover of cell surface TNF-R75, but not TNF-R55, after stimulation with TNF-alpha or IL-1. These observations help to explain why elevated levels of sTNF-R in synovial fluid coexist with enhanced expression of cell surface TNF-R on synovial macrophages in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:8590306

  2. Evaluation of toxicity of polluted marine sediments from Bahia Salina Cruz, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Lozano, Maria Cristina; Mendez-Rodriguez, Lia C; Maeda-Martinez, Alejandro M; Murugan, Gopal; Vazquez-Botello, Alfonso

    2010-01-01

    Bahia Salina Cruz, Oaxaca, Mexico is a major center of oil and refined product distribution on the Mexican Pacific coast. From the start of oil industry operations in 1979, negative effects from discharges of treated effluents in the bay have been a constant concern for local communities. We analyzed 28 surface sediment samples obtained in June, 2002 to evaluate the level of toxicity in the littoral zone, port-harbor, and La Ventosa estuary in Bahia Salina Cruz. The extractable organic matter concentration was high (1,213 to 7,505 micro g g(-1)) in 5 of 7 stations from the port and harbor, whereas it was low in 12 of 16 stations in the littoral zone (36 to 98 micro g g(-1)). The total aromatic hydrocarbon concentration was highest (57 to 142 micro g g(-1)) in the port and harbor compared to the La Ventosa estuary and the littoral zone. Among the heavy metals analyzed, cadmium exceeded the effects range-low values associated with adverse biological effects. The geo-accumulation index of sediments was moderate to strong contamination at 5 stations in the nonlittoral and 6 stations in the littoral zone. The enrichment of lead, zinc, and cadmium at 5 stations from the littoral, port, and harbor suggest that these metals are of anthropogenic origin. Bioassay tests of elutriates of sediments on nauplii of Artemia franciscana and Artemia sp. showed that the port and harbor were more toxic than the La Ventosa estuary and the coastal zone. The Microtox test (Vibrio fischeri) did not show a similar response with the solid phase of the sediments. The results of this study indicate that the high levels of organic content and metals in the sediments of port-harbor and the La Ventosa estuary are mainly caused by anthropogenic activities. PMID:20390851

  3. Rapid screening for soil ecotoxicity with a battery of luminescent bacteria tests.

    PubMed

    Heinlaan, Margit; Kahru, Anne; Kasemets, Kaja; Kurvet, Imbi; Waterlot, Cristophe; Sepp, Kalev; Dubourguier, Henri-Charles; Douay, Francis

    2007-03-01

    A bacterial test battery, involving i) Microtox, an aquatic test, ii) the Flash assay, a soil-suspension test (with Vibrio fischeri as the test organism), and iii) the Metal Detector assay, a semi-specific aquatic test for heavy metals (with recombinant luminescent Escherichia coli), was used in a combined toxicological and chemical hazard assessment of Estonian soils sampled from a former Soviet military airfield (13 samples) and from traffic-influenced roadsides (5 samples). The soils showed slightly elevated levels of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), but not of heavy metals. In most of the samples, the levels of TPH did not exceed the Estonian permitted limit values set for residential areas. Toxicity testing was performed on both fresh and dried soils, after aqueous extraction for 1 hour and 24 hours. The toxicity results obtained with the Microtox test did not significantly differ in all of the sample treatment schemes; however, it appeared that the drying and sieving of the soils increased the bioavailability of toxicants, probably due to an enlarged reactive soil surface area. According to chemical analysis of the soils and the data from the Microtox test and the Metal Detector assay (performed on aqueous elutriates of the soils), these soils would not be considered to be hazardous. In contrast, the Flash assay performed on soil-water suspensions of dried soils, showed that most of the soils were toxic and thus probably contained undetermined particle-bound bioavailable toxicants. The photobacterial toxicity test (the Flash assay) can be recommended for the rapid screening of soils, as it is sensitive, cheap and inexpensive, and provides valuable information on particle-bound bioavailable toxicants, useful for complementing a chemical analysis and for assessing the risks originating from polluted soils. PMID:17411358

  4. Late Miocene ignimbrites at the southern Puna-northern Sierras Pampeanas border (˜27°S): Stratigraphic correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero-López, Carolina; Guzmán, Silvina; Barrios, Fabiola

    2015-10-01

    New field observations and petrographic and geochemical data of pyroclastic deposits exposed along the Las Papas valley (border between southern Puna and northern Sierras Pampeanas, Argentina) and further north, lead us to propose a new stratigraphic correlation and classification of the late Miocene volcanism in this area. We redefine the Las Papas, Las Juntas, Aguada Alumbrera and Rosada ignimbrites and define the Agua Caliente and Del Medio ignimbrites. The whole set of ignimbrites are rhyolites and less frequently dacites of calc-alkaline affinity. In the present contribution we divide ignimbrites into the Agua Negra and Rincón groups, based mainly on their geochemical signature. The Agua Negra Group is formed by the Las Papas and Las Juntas ignimbrites, indurated and welded, lithic-rich, with crystal-poor pumices and crystal-rich matrix. The Rincón Group comprises the Agua Caliente, Aguada Alumbrera, Rosada and Del Medio ignimbrites, with variable welding degrees, lithic and crystal content. The greater enrichment of crystals in the matrix in comparison with the crystal content in pumices indicates significant elutriation during flow transport and thus volume estimations are to be considered lower bounds for the actual erupted volume. The total minimum estimated volume for the ignimbrites of the Agua Negra and Rincón groups is 2.8 km3 (2.3 km3 DRE). Field relationships and new analytical data indicate that the different acid ignimbrites that crop out in this small area are related to at least two different magma chambers. The widespread Quaternary volcanism in this area covers the older deposits, thus making it difficult to recognize the volcanic centers that produced these late Miocene ignimbrites.

  5. Murine acute leukemia cell line with megakaryocytic differentiation (MK-8057) induced by whole-body irradiation in C sup 3 H/He mice: Cytological properties and kinetics of its leukemic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hirabayashi, Y.; Inoue, T.; Yoshida, K.; Sasaki, H.; Kubo, S.; Kanisawa, M.; Seki, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Five cases of murine leukemia with megakaryocytic differentiation were observed among the 417 cases of radiation-induced leukemias which developed in 30% of C{sup 3}H/HeMs mice exposed at 8 to 10 weeks to 0.5 to 5 gy total body irradiation. Cells from individual leukemic colonies in the spleen of the irradiated mice, and cells from colonies in methylcellulose (MC) culture in vitro, derived from one of these leukemias, MK-8057, were injected into mice; both types of cells caused the deaths of the recipient mice by inducing the same type of leukemia. MK-8057 can be maintained in Dexter-type liquid culture with a feeder layer of irradiated bone marrow cells. There was a linear reciprocal relationship between the increasing number of MK-8057 cells injected versus the survival of the recipient mice. A reciprocal relationship also was seen between an increasing number of leukemic stem cells, corresponding to the number of MK-8057 cells, and the survival of mice injected with MK-8057. Giant nuclear megakaryocytes developed during the course of colony growth in the spleen as they did in the MC culture. Such megakaryocytes were acetylcholinesterase positive, whereas leukemic cells in the peripheral blood showed no sign of platelet production nor of a positive reaction to acetylcholinesterase. Cells maintained in culture were entirely positive in platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa when anti-human antibody was used. The larger cells in a splenic cell suspension derived from a moribund mouse were separated and enriched by velocity sedimentation using centrifugal elutriation (CE), and then subjected to flow cytometry using propidium iodide staining. Cells with up to 32N-DNA content were detected. After separating MK-8057 by counter-flow CE, the larger cell fraction produced more leukemic colonies when injected into irradiated mice than did the small cell fraction.

  6. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of fluidized-bed polymerization reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rokkam, Ram

    2012-01-01

    Polyethylene is one of the most widely used plastics, and over 60 million tons are produced worldwide every year. Polyethylene is obtained by the catalytic polymerization of ethylene in gas and liquid phase reactors. The gas phase processes are more advantageous, and use fluidized-bed reactors for production of polyethylene. Since they operate so close to the melting point of the polymer, agglomeration is an operational concern in all slurry and gas polymerization processes. Electrostatics and hot spot formation are the main factors that contribute to agglomeration in gas-phase processes. Electrostatic charges in gas phase polymerization fluidized bed reactors are known to influence the bed hydrodynamics, particle elutriation, bubble size, bubble shape etc. Accumulation of electrostatic charges in the fluidized-bed can lead to operational issues. In this work a first-principles electrostatic model is developed and coupled with a multi-fluid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to understand the effect of electrostatics on the dynamics of a fluidized-bed. The multi-fluid CFD model for gas-particle flow is based on the kinetic theory of granular flows closures. The electrostatic model is developed based on a fixed, size-dependent charge for each type of particle (catalyst, polymer, polymer fines) phase. The combined CFD model is first verified using simple test cases, validated with experiments and applied to a pilot-scale polymerization fluidized-bed reactor. The CFD model reproduced qualitative trends in particle segregation and entrainment due to electrostatic charges observed in experiments. For the scale up of fluidized bed reactor, filtered models are developed and implemented on pilot scale reactor.

  7. Cell cycle-dependence of HL-60 cell deformability.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, M A; Waugh, R E; Keng, P C

    1996-01-01

    In this study, the role of cytoskeleton in HL-60 deformability during the cell cycle was investigated. G1, S, and G2/M cell fractions were separated by centrifugal elutriation. Cell deformability was evaluated by pipette aspiration. Tested at the same aspiration pressures, S cells were found to be less deformable than G1 cells. Moreover, HL-60 cells exhibited power-law fluid behavior: mu = mu c(gamma m/ gamma c)-b, where mu is cytoplasmic viscosity, gamma m is mean shear rate, mu c is the characteristic viscosity at the characteristic shear rate gamma c, and b is a material constant. At a given shear rate, S cells (mu c = 276 +/- 14 Pa.s, b = 0.51 +/- 0.03) were more viscous than G1 cells (mu c = 197 +/- 25, b = 0.53 +/- 0.02). To evaluate the relative importance of different cytoskeletal components in these cell cycle-dependent properties, HL-60 cells were treated with 30 microM dihydrocytochalasin B (DHB) to disrupt F-actin or 100 microM colchicine to collapse microtubules. DHB dramatically softened both G1 and S cells, which reduced the material constants mu c by approximately 65% and b by 20-30%. Colchicine had a limited effect on G1 cells but significantly reduced mu c of S cells (approximately 25%). Thus, F-actin plays the predominate role in determining cell mechanical properties, but disruption of microtubules may also influence the behavior of proliferating cells in a cell cycle-dependent fashion. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8785361

  8. Bulk enrichment of transplantable hemopoietic stem cell subsets from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine spleen.

    PubMed

    Ploemacher, R E; Brons, R H; Leenen, P J

    1987-02-01

    Counterflow centrifugal elutriation (CCE) in combination with density flotation centrifugation and fluorescence-activated cell sorting on wheat-germ agglutinin-FITC(WGA)-binding cells within the light-scatter "blast window" were used consecutively to enrich pluripotent hemopoietic stem cells (HSC) in bulk from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse spleen. The medium-to-strong WGA + ve fraction contained 3.10(6) cells isolated from 3-4 X 10(9) spleen cells, with an average of 126% day-12 CFU-S and 65% day-8 CFU-S as calculated on the basis of their seeding fraction, suggesting that virtually all cells represented in vivo macroscopic colony formers. In view of the large differences reported elsewhere between stem cell subsets differing in reconstitutive capacity and secondary stem cell generation ability, we also studied various isolated cell fractions with respect to spleen colony formation, radioprotective ability, and spleen- and marrow- repopulating ability. Day-8 and day-12 CFU-S copurified when isolated by CCE. Cells from a fraction with high affinity for WGA were most highly enriched for their radioprotective ability (RPA) and their ability to repopulate the cellularity of the spleen and femur of irradiated recipients. This fraction contained virtually pure day-12 CFU-S. However, the ability to generate secondary day-12 CFU-S and CFU-GM in irradiated organs was enriched most in the medium WGA + ve cell fraction. MRA and SRA, according to the latter criteria, could therefore be partly separated from day-12 CFU-S and RPA on the basis of affinity for WGA. The data strongly suggest that at least part of all day-12 CFU-S have a high potential to proliferate and differentiate into mature progeny, but a relatively low self-renewal ability, and may therefore not be representative of the genuine stem cell. PMID:2880746

  9. Synthesis and secretion of interleukin-1 alpha and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist during differentiation of cultured keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Corradi, A; Franzi, A T; Rubartelli, A

    1995-04-01

    Keratinocytes produce interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) and the epithelial variant of its inhibitor, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (icIL-1ra). Both IL-1 alpha and icIL-1ra lack a secretory signal peptide; however, some icIL-1ra is found in the supernatants of cultured keratinocytes. The lack of correlation with the release of the cytosolic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase suggests that icIL-1ra can be actively secreted. Brefeldin A fails to block icIL-1ra release, suggesting that this protein may be externalized by keratinocytes through a leaderless pathway of secretion. Only minute amounts of soluble extracellular IL-1 alpha are detected: however, both IL-1 alpha and icIL-1ra can be released from the external face of the keratinocyte plasma membrane by mild acidic treatment, suggesting that IL-1 alpha can also be secreted by keratinocytes. The observation of membrane-associated IL-1 alpha and icIL-1ra might reflect an autocrine loop of regulation. Support for this hypothesis comes from the finding that keratinocytes, when exposed to exogenous recombinant IL-1 alpha, increase their content in both IL-1 alpha and IL-1ra mRNA. When keratinocytes are subjected to counterflow centrifugal elutriation, three major cell populations are obtained, representing three different degrees of keratinocyte differentiation. Cells from all populations synthesize IL-1 alpha and IL-1ra: however, while IL-1 alpha is uniformly distributed in cells from all maturational stages, IL-1ra accumulates in large, more differentiated keratinocytes. Changes in the ratio of IL-1ra to IL-1 alpha production and secretion by keratinocytes at different degrees of maturation might contribute to the control of growth and differentiation of human skin. PMID:7698236

  10. Stratification of yeast cells during chronological aging by size points to the role of trehalose in cell vitality.

    PubMed

    Svenkrtova, Andrea; Belicova, Lenka; Volejnikova, Andrea; Sigler, Karel; Jazwinski, S Michal; Pichova, Alena

    2016-04-01

    Cells of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergo a process akin to differentiation during prolonged culture without medium replenishment. Various methods have been used to separate and determine the potential role and fate of the different cell species. We have stratified chronologically-aged yeast cultures into cells of different sizes, using centrifugal elutriation, and characterized these subpopulations physiologically. We distinguish two extreme cell types, very small (XS) and very large (L) cells. L cells display higher viability based on two separate criteria. They respire much more actively, but produce lower levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). L cells are capable of dividing, albeit slowly, giving rise to XS cells which do not divide. L cells are more resistant to osmotic stress and they have higher trehalose content, a storage carbohydrate often connected to stress resistance. Depletion of trehalose by deletion of TPS2 does not affect the vital characteristics of L cells, but it improves some of these characteristics in XS cells. Therefore, we propose that the response of L and XS cells to the trehalose produced in the former differs in a way that lowers the vitality of the latter. We compare our XS- and L-fraction cell characteristics with those of cells isolated from stationary cultures by others based on density. This comparison suggests that the cells have some similarities but also differences that may prove useful in addressing whether it is the segregation or the response to trehalose that may play the predominant role in cell division from stationary culture. PMID:26614086

  11. Application of a toxicity test battery integrated index for a first screening of the ecotoxicological threat posed by ports and harbors in the southern Adriatic Sea (Italy).

    PubMed

    Manzo, Sonia; Schiavo, Simona; Aleksi, Pellumb; Tabaku, Afrim

    2014-11-01

    Ports and harbors may represent a threat for coastal ecosystems due to pollutant inputs, especially those derived from maritime activities. In this study, we report a first assessment of the ecotoxicological threat posed by six ports and harbors of opposite coastal regions, Apulia and Albania, in the southern Adriatic Sea (Italy). A bioassay battery consisting of four different species representing different trophic levels, algae Dunaliella tertiolecta, bacteria Vibrio fischeri, crustacean Artemia salina, and echinoids Paracentrotus lividus, has been used to assess sediment elutriates, pore waters, and sediment suspensions. Two different approaches of toxicity data integration, worst case and integrated index, have been used to determine the most appropriate procedure for the investigated sites. All sites with the worst case approach showed high toxicity levels. The chronic test with algae was the most sensitive identifying the highest effects in the battery. This effect can be attributable to contaminants derived from antifouling paints. The sediments, evaluated with V. fischeri test, often showed toxicity not found in the aqueous matrices of the same sites and that can be mainly linked to organic compounds. The test battery used in this study allowed us to perform a preliminary screening of the ecotoxicological risk of the studied area. In fact, the species utilized for toxicity tests responded differently to the investigated samples, showing different sensitivity. The test battery integrated index did not allow highlighting the differences among the sites and showed a general high ecotoxicological risk. A larger number of tests with higher sensitivity together with a tailored attribution of weights to endpoints and matrices will improve the final site evaluation. PMID:25012145

  12. Radon (222Rn) in ground water of fractured rocks: A diffusion/ion exchange model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, W.W.; Kraemer, T.F.; Shapiro, A.

    2004-01-01

    Ground waters from fractured igneous and high-grade sialic metamorphic rocks frequently have elevated activity of dissolved radon (222Rn). A chemically based model is proposed whereby radium (226Ra) from the decay of uranium (238U) diffuses through the primary porosity of the rock to the water-transmitting fracture where it is sorbed on weathering products. Sorption of 226Ra on the fracture surface maintains an activity gradient in the rock matrix, ensuring a continuous supply of 226Ra to fracture surfaces. As a result of the relatively long half-life of 226Ra (1601 years), significant activity can accumulate on fracture surfaces. The proximity of this sorbed 226Ra to the active ground water flow system allows its decay progeny 222Rn to enter directly into the water. Laboratory analyses of primary porosity and diffusion coefficients of the rock matrix, radon emanation, and ion exchange at fracture surfaces are consistent with the requirements of a diffusion/ion- exchange model. A dipole-brine injection/withdrawal experiment conducted between bedrock boreholes in the high-grade metamorphic and granite rocks at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, Grafton County, New Hampshire, United States (42??56???N, 71??43???W) shows a large activity of 226Ra exchanged from fracture surfaces by a magnesium brine. The 226Ra activity removed by the exchange process is 34 times greater than that of 238U activity. These observations are consistent with the diffusion/ion-exchange model. Elutriate isotopic ratios of 223Ra/226Ra and 238U/226Ra are also consistent with the proposed chemically based diffusion/ion-exchange model.

  13. A study of direct analysis of solid samples using spark ablation combined with excitation in an inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, A.; Broekaert, J. A. C.; Laqua, K.; Leis, F.

    A medium-voltage spark was used for the direct nebulization of compact metallic samples and non-conducting powders and the elutriated material was excited in a high-power argon/nitrogen inductively coupled plasma (ICP). After optimization of the spark parameters (voltage: 1 kV, capacity: 6 μF, repetition rate: 25 s -1), the carrier gas flow (1.71 argon/min) and the operating power of the ICP (3 kW), detection limits for magnesium, copper and iron in aluminium were found to be 1, 26 and 29 μ/g respectively. The length of the transport tube may be increased from 0.5 to 6 m without deteriorating the power of detection by more than a factor of 2. From a characterization of the aerosol, it was found that the power of detection limitations were due to the low number of small particles arriving in the ICP. The method was applied to the direct analysis of various types of aluminium samples. For Al, AIMn, AlMgSi, AlSiCuNi and AlSiCu alloys the same calibration curves could be used. In the case of non-conducting powders pellets are briquetted after mixing the sample 1+4 with copper powder. The detection limits for a series of elements in Al 2O 3 (Fe, Mg, Mn, Pb, Si, Sr, V and Zn) range from 0.6 to 265 sm/g and are of the same range as would be obtained with ICP-OES of the dissolved samples (5 g/1). The standard error of estimate ( sr( cX)) at a concentration level of 50 mg/g is 0.05 when a copper line is taken as reference. However, as shown at the example of Al 2O 3 and CaCO 3 also then calibration curves differ from one matrix to another.

  14. Physical and chemical characterization of pulverized granite from a shallow drill along the San Andreas Fault, Little Rock, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wechsler, N.; Allen, E. E.; Rockwell, T. K.; Chester, J. S.; Girty, G. H.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2008-12-01

    We present results from a continuous 42 meter deep core through damaged granitoids adjacent to the San Andreas fault near Little Rock Creek. We employed several methods to measure particle size distribution (pipette, elutriator, laser particle analyzer), as well as x-ray diffraction and fluorescence (XRD, XRF) methods to investigate the relation between depth, pulverization and chemical processes that may affect the degree of damage. The drill site is characterized by extensive outcrops of granitic rocks with varying degrees of damage at distances of up to a few hundreds of meters from the fault's primary active strand. The drill core is composed mainly of pulverized granite and granodiorite, and crosses several high clay content secondary shears. Results of particle size distributions measured using standard sieving and pipette methods indicate that medium to coarse silt and fine sand are the dominant particle size range in the cored section, similar to pulverized granitic rocks analyzed by Rockwell et al. (2008). Very few clay-size particles were observed, but minor amounts of clay weathering products are present. We observe a minor shift in the particle size distribution towards finer sizes with depth, in agreement with the results of Anderson et al. (1980), and find somewhat different distributions for different lithologies. Several zones displaying significant chemical alteration were captured over the cored interval, but XRF data indicate that there is no systematic change in chemical alteration with depth. Where substantial chemical alterations do occur, different lithologies show different weathering trends. Those chemical alterations occur in proximity to secondary shears, suggesting fluid induced mass transfer.

  15. Validation of Microtox as a first screening tool for waste classification.

    PubMed

    Weltens, R; Deprez, K; Michiels, L

    2014-12-01

    The Waste Framework Directive (WFD; 2008/98/EG) describes how waste materials are to be classified as hazardous or not. For complex waste materials chemical analyses are often not conclusive and the WFD provides the possibility to assess the hazardous properties by testing on the waste materials directly. As a methodology WFD refers to the protocols described in the CLP regulation (regulation on Classification, Labeling and Packaging of chemicals) but the toxicity tests on mammals are not acceptable for waste materials. The DISCRISET project was initiated to investigate the suitability of alternative toxicity tests that are already in use in pharmaceutical applications, for the toxicological hazard assessment of complex waste materials. Results indicated that Microtox was a good candidate as a first screening test in a tiered approached hazard assessment. This is now further validated in the present study. The toxic responses measured in Microtox were compared to biological responses in other bioassays for both organic and inorganic fractions of the wastes. Both fractions contribute to the toxic load of waste samples. Results show that the Microtox test is indeed a good and practical screening tool for the organic fraction. A screening threshold (ST) of 5 geq/l as the EC50 value in Microtox is proposed as this ST allows to recognize highly toxic samples in the screening test. The data presented here show that the Microtox toxicity response at this ST is not only predictive for acute toxicity in other organisms but also for sub lethal toxic effects of the organic fraction. This limit value has to be further validated. For the inorganic fraction no specific biotest can be recommended as a screening test, but the use of direct toxicity assessment is also preferable for this fraction as metal speciation is an important issue to define the toxic load of elutriate fractions. A battery of 3 tests (Microtox, Daphnia and Algae) for direct toxicity assessment of this

  16. Development of a Low-Cost Particulate Matter Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    White, Richard M.; Apte, Michael G.; Gundel, Lara A.; Black, Justin

    2008-08-01

    We describe a small, inexpensive portable monitor for airborne particulates, composed of the following elements: a. A simple size-selective inlet (vertical elutriator) that permits only particles below a pre-set diameter to pass and enter the measurement section; b. A measurement section in which passing particles are deposited thermophoretically on a micro-fabricated resonant piezoelectric mass sensor; c. An optical characterization module co-located with the mass sensor module that directs infrared and ultraviolet beams through the deposit. The emergent optical beams are detected by a photodiode. The optical absorption of the deposit can be measured in order to characterize the deposit, and determine how much is due to diesel exhaust and/or environmental tobacco smoke; and d. A small pump that moves air through the device, which may also be operated in a passive mode. The component modules were designed by the project team, and fabricated at UCB andLBNL. Testing and validation were performed in a room-sized environmental chamber at LBNL in to which was added either environmental tobacco smoke (ETS, produced by a cigarette smoking machine) or diesel exhaust (from a conventional diesel engine). Two pilot field tests in a dwelling compared the monitor with existing aerosol instruments during exposure to infiltrated ambient air to which cigarette smoke, diesel exhaust, wood smoke and cooking fumes were added. The limit of detection (LOD) derived from statistical analysis of field data is 18 mu g m-3, at the 99percent confidence level. The monitor weighs less than 120 g and has a volume of roughly 250 cm3. Power consumption is approximately 100 milliwatts. During this study, the optical component of the device was not fully implemented and has been left for future efforts. Suggested improvements in the current prototype include use of integrated thermal correction, reconfiguration of the resonator for increased particle collection area, increased thermophoretic

  17. Development of lightweight mirror elements for the Euro50 mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Harold E.; Romeo, Robert C.; Shaffer, Joseph J.; Chen, Peter C.

    2004-07-01

    New, very large telescopes with apertures of 30, 50, and 100 meters are being proposed by the astronomical community. Superpolished or ultrapolished mirrors with low scattered light levels and the use of adaptive optics for near-diffraction-limited performance would make such large telescopes a turning point in astronomy. The secondary mirror for the Euro50 will be a four meter adaptive optic made of a low expansion graphite-filled cyanate ester resin composite produced using a replica transfer technique. We have made three 1/3rd meter diameter prototype composite adaptive optic mirrors of this cyanate ester composite material. Because of the embedded graphite fibers, the composite material has a measured expansion coefficient in the 10-8 range, as has Zerodur or ULE glass. It is very much lighter, more rugged and more economical than Zerodur or ULE, and can be fabricated in weeks, not months. The Zerodur mandrels upon which these replica transfer mirrors are made are superpolished using centrifugal elutriation, so the replica surface has an rms roughness of 0.6 to 0.8 nm. It thus scatters about an order of magnitude less light than typical conventionally polished astronomical mirrors. In adaptive optic mirrors with sub-mm thick faceplates the number of plies used is insufficient to produce an isotropic surface. For mirrors 2 mm thick, with more plies, the surfaces are isotropic, and the slight astigmatism sometimes resulting from the mesh in the ply can be corrected by actuators to make them attractive mirrors. They must be supported to maintain a good optical figure over a meter diameter mirror. The support requirement may be met by using a new type of mechanical/piezoelectric actuator adjustable to a fraction of a wavelength. The mechanical actuators have a coarse adjust of over an mm and a fine adjust of less than a wavelength of light. They can be used in series with a novel type of piezoelectric actuator for final static adjustment. The low voltage, up to 2

  18. Modulation of a Glycoprotein Recognition System on Rat Hepatic Endothelial Cells by Glucose and Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Summerfield, John A.; Vergalla, John; Jones, E. Anthony

    1982-01-01

    The cellular location and carbohydrate specificities of a glycoprotein recognition system on rat hepatic sinusoidal cells have been determined. Purified preparations of endothelial, Kupffer, and parenchymal cells were prepared by collagenase liver perfusion, centrifugation on Percoll gradients, and centrifugal elutriation. 125I-labeled agalactoorosomucoid, an N-acetylglucosamine-terminated glycoprotein, was selectively taken up in vitro by endothelial cells. Uptake was shown to be protein dependent, calcium ion dependent, and saturable, and could be described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics (apparent Km 0.29 μM; apparent maximum velocity 4.8 pmol/h per 5 × 106 cells). Uptake was inhibited not only by N-acetylglucosamine, mannose, and mannan but also by glucose, fructose, and a glucose-albumin conjugate. Inhibition by glucose was competitive over a wide range of concentrations and was almost 100% at a glucose concentration of 56 mM. Fasting and the induction of diabetes mellitus prior to isolation of cells was associated with 60% reductions in the recovery of endothelial cells. Uptake by cells isolated from fasted rats was enhanced (apparent maximum velocity 14.3 pmol/h per 5 × 106 cells without change in the apparent Km). These observations suggest that fasting is associated with a marked increase in the mean number of glycoprotein receptors per endothelial cell isolated from normal rats. This effect of fasting could be due to upregulation of glycoprotein receptors on endothelial cells or to the selective isolation of a subpopulation of endothelial cells from fasted animals that bears more glycoprotein receptors per cell than does another subpopulation of these cells. In addition, in vivo studies of the fate of intravenously administered 125I-agalactoorosomucoid indicated that its rate of disappearance from plasma, hepatic accumulation, and catabolism were slower in diabetic than in normal rats. The results suggest that modulation of a carbohydrate

  19. Effects of aqueous soil-biochar extracts on representative aquatic organisms: a first evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, A. C.; Abrantes, N.; Prodana, M.; Verheijen, F.; Keizer, J. J.; Soares, A. M. V. M.; Loureiro, S.

    2012-04-01

    Increasing considerations of biochar application to soils has raised concerns over implications to overall environmental quality, associated to some of its components. The heterogeneity of biochar composition is well documented in relation to co-existing chemical species, as a function of feedstock and pyrolysis conditions. Robust ecotoxicology studies with focus on bioavailable biochar components in soil remain scarce and have only started to emerge. This pilot study provides an insight into the potential ecotoxicological effects of aqueous extracts of biochar-amended soil on a range of aquatic organisms (Vibrio fischeri, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Daphnia magna), using a battery of standard aquatic bioassays. The use of such bioassays in environmental risk assessment of soil-biochar elutriates is here suggested as a crucial tool, to bridge the gap between biochar's 'inert' fraction in soil and that bioavailable to edaphic organisms. Aqueous extracts were obtained from LUFA 2.2 standard soil (control) and following amendment with pine biochar at common field application rates (80 ton ha-1). Acute exposure to soil-biochar extracts allowed estimating toxicity parameters and developing dose-response curves for all tested species, through well-established methodological guidelines. The bioluminescent bacteria V. fischeri showed negligible EC50 (effect concentration corresponding to 50% luminescence decline) values in the MICROTOX® basic test (independent of exposure time), suggesting low susceptibility to soil-biochar extracts. Mild toxicity was also observed in the microalgae P. subcapitata growth inhibition test, where significant deleterious effects on growth rate occurred only at the highest (100%) extract concentration (p<0.05). Among the tested species, toxicity was generally more marked in the primary consumer D. magna, with an EC50 (effect concentration corresponding to 50% immobilisation) of 2.95%. The pattern and extent of observed effects were

  20. Calculation of Decompression Rates for the Initial Explosive Phase of the 2010 Merapi Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, E.; Genareau, K. D.

    2015-12-01

    The 2010 eruption of Merapi (Java, Indonesia) initiated with an uncharacteristic explosion, followed by rapid lava dome growth and collapse, all of which generated deadly pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). PDC samples from the initial explosion on October 26th were collected from several locations surrounding the edifice. Plagioclase phenocrysts represent the primary component of the dominant ash mode due to the elutriation of the finer ash fraction during PDC transport. Secondary electron images of 45 phenocrysts were taken using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) to examine preserved glass coatings on phenocrysts, which represent the interstitial melt within the magma at the point of fragmentation. Using these images, the bubble number densities (BNDs) were determined, and the decompression rate meter of Toramaru (2006) was used to calculate the decompression rate during the initial explosion of the 2010 Merapi eruption. Calculated decompression rates range from 6.08x10^7 Pa/s to 1.4x10^8 Pa/s. Decompression rates have shown to correlate with eruption column height; therefore Merapi's rates should be similar to those of other Vulcanian explosions, because the eruption column was 8-9 km in height. The decompression rates acquired for Merapi using Toramaru's BND meter are higher than the rates calculated with other methods such as microlite number density and extension cracks in crystals. Sakurajima volcano (Japan) experienced decompression rates from 7.0 × 10^3 to 7.8 × 10^4 Pa/s during the later phase of the fall 2011 Vulcanian explosions. Plinian explosions, such as at the 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo and the 1980 eruption of St. Helens had much higher column heights compared to the initial 2010 Merapi explosion; 35 km, 19 km, and 8-9 km, respectively, but decompression rates in a comparative range (10^8 Pa/s). Higher decompression rates during the 2010 initial explosion at Merapi likely resulted from increased overpressure in the shallow conduit, the

  1. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) inhibits the intestinal-like differentiation of monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Spoettl, T; Hausmann, M; Herlyn, M; Gunckel, M; Dirmeier, A; Falk, W; Herfarth, H; Schoelmerich, J; Rogler, G

    2006-01-01

    Monocytes (MO) migrating into normal, non-inflamed intestinal mucosa undergo a specific differentiation resulting in a non-reactive, tolerogenic intestinal macrophage (IMAC). Recently we demonstrated the differentiation of MO into an intestinal-like macrophage (MAC) phenotype in vitro in a three-dimensional cell culture model (multi-cellular spheroid or MCS model). In the mucosa of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in addition to normal IMAC, a reactive MAC population as well as increased levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) is found. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of MCP-1 on the differentiation of MO into IMAC. MCS were generated from adenovirally transfected HT-29 cells overexpressing MCP-1, macrophage inflammatory protein 3 alpha (MIP-3α) or non-transfected controls and co-cultured with freshly elutriated blood MO. After 7 days of co-culture MCS were harvested, and expression of the surface antigens CD33 and CD14 as well as the intracellular MAC marker CD68 was determined by flow-cytometry or immunohistochemistry. MCP-1 and MIP-3α expression by HT-29 cells in the MCS was increased by transfection at the time of MCS formation. In contrast to MIP-3α, MCP-1 overexpression induced a massive migration of MO into the three-dimensional aggregates. Differentiation of IMAC was disturbed in MCP-1-transfected MCS compared to experiments with non-transfected control aggregates, or the MIP-3α-transfected MCS, as indicated by high CD14 expression of MO/IMAC cultured inside the MCP-1-transfected MCS, as shown by immunohistochemistry and FACS analysis. Neutralization of MCP-1 was followed by an almost complete absence of monocyte migration into the MCS. MCP-1 induced migration of MO into three-dimensional spheroids generated from HT-29 cells and inhibited intestinal-like differentiation of blood MO into IMAC. It may be speculated that MCP-1 could play a role in the disturbed IMAC differentiation in IBD mucosa. PMID

  2. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) inhibits the intestinal-like differentiation of monocytes.

    PubMed

    Spoettl, T; Hausmann, M; Herlyn, M; Gunckel, M; Dirmeier, A; Falk, W; Herfarth, H; Schoelmerich, J; Rogler, G

    2006-07-01

    Monocytes (MO) migrating into normal, non-inflamed intestinal mucosa undergo a specific differentiation resulting in a non-reactive, tolerogenic intestinal macrophage (IMAC). Recently we demonstrated the differentiation of MO into an intestinal-like macrophage (MAC) phenotype in vitro in a three-dimensional cell culture model (multi-cellular spheroid or MCS model). In the mucosa of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in addition to normal IMAC, a reactive MAC population as well as increased levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) is found. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of MCP-1 on the differentiation of MO into IMAC. MCS were generated from adenovirally transfected HT-29 cells overexpressing MCP-1, macrophage inflammatory protein 3 alpha (MIP-3alpha) or non-transfected controls and co-cultured with freshly elutriated blood MO. After 7 days of co-culture MCS were harvested, and expression of the surface antigens CD33 and CD14 as well as the intracellular MAC marker CD68 was determined by flow-cytometry or immunohistochemistry. MCP-1 and MIP-3alpha expression by HT-29 cells in the MCS was increased by transfection at the time of MCS formation. In contrast to MIP-3alpha, MCP-1 overexpression induced a massive migration of MO into the three-dimensional aggregates. Differentiation of IMAC was disturbed in MCP-1-transfected MCS compared to experiments with non-transfected control aggregates, or the MIP-3alpha-transfected MCS, as indicated by high CD14 expression of MO/IMAC cultured inside the MCP-1-transfected MCS, as shown by immunohistochemistry and FACS analysis. Neutralization of MCP-1 was followed by an almost complete absence of monocyte migration into the MCS. MCP-1 induced migration of MO into three-dimensional spheroids generated from HT-29 cells and inhibited intestinal-like differentiation of blood MO into IMAC. It may be speculated that MCP-1 could play a role in the disturbed IMAC differentiation in IBD mucosa

  3. Fluidized bed combustion of pelletized biomass and waste-derived fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Chirone, R.; Scala, F.; Solimene, R.; Salatino, P.; Urciuolo, M.

    2008-10-15

    The fluidized bed combustion of three pelletized biogenic fuels (sewage sludge, wood, and straw) has been investigated with a combination of experimental techniques. The fuels have been characterized from the standpoints of patterns and rates of fuel devolatilization and char burnout, extent of attrition and fragmentation, and their relevance to the fuel particle size distribution and the amount and size distribution of primary ash particles. Results highlight differences and similarities among the three fuels tested. The fuels were all characterized by limited primary fragmentation and relatively long devolatilization times, as compared with the time scale of particle dispersion away from the fuel feeding ports in practical FBC. Both features are favorable to effective lateral distribution of volatile matter across the combustor cross section. The three fuels exhibited distinctively different char conversion patterns. The high-ash pelletized sludge burned according to the shrinking core conversion pattern with negligible occurrence of secondary fragmentation. The low-ash pelletized wood burned according to the shrinking particle conversion pattern with extensive occurrence of secondary fragmentation. The medium-ash pelletized straw yielded char particles with a hollow structure, resembling big cenospheres, characterized by a coherent inorganic outer layer strong enough to prevent particle fragmentation. Inert bed particles were permanently attached to the hollow pellets as they were incorporated into ash melts. Carbon elutriation rates were very small for all the fuels tested. For pelletized sludge and straw, this was mostly due to the shielding effect of the coherent ash skeleton. For the wood pellet, carbon attrition was extensive, but was largely counterbalanced by effective afterburning due to the large intrinsic reactivity of attrited char fines. The impact of carbon attrition on combustion efficiency was negligible for all the fuels tested. The size

  4. Fate of fine basaltic ash from subplinian eruptions of Fuego, Guatemala 1973- 74

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, W. I.; Durant, A. J.; Horwell, C. J.

    2006-12-01

    Subplinian eruptions of VEI 2-4 produced fallout blankets over distances up to about 100 km around Fuego in 1973 and 74. Ash was sampled 0-3 days after fall. We determined size distributions using a Malvern Mastersizer over the range of 2 mm to 0.2 μm. Of 106 samples studied, more than half had >30% of the mass of their pyroclasts <60 μm in diameter, which means that if considered as simple particles they would fall very slowly in the laminar flow regime. The new data demonstrate no simple relationship between distance and GSD where pyroclasts <60 μm are involved. Fine particles fall out much more quickly than their size would suggest. Most ashfall samples fall into three categories based on their GSD: 1. A single coarse size peak at >.25 mm; 2. two peaks with one larger (.25-.5 mm) and the other smaller (8-60 μm); 3. A single fine peak (8-60 μm) and a wider variance. A few samples showed multiple size peaks in the fine region (<60 μm). Overall the locations of fallout samples is related to winds at different levels as determined using the HYSPLIT trajectory model (Draxler & Hess, 1997, NOAA Tech Memo ERL ARL 224). At Fuego, fine ash is apparently produced in major amounts by milling in block and ash flows and subsequent elutriation. In Fuego`s 1973-4 eruptions this fine ash is convected aloft into wind fields that are not as high as the fields reached by mostly coarser ash rising in the eruption column. Winds blowing in different directions at different altitudes affect the ash distribution. Coarse pyroclasts may scavenge finer pyroclasts as they fall rapidly (<30 min) resulting in bimodal ash. Alternatively coarse ash may fall through air where fine ash is absent because of wind shear. Fine ash also falls by aggregation without coarse ash being present resulting in falls (2-4 hrs after eruption) with GSDs that have size peaks that would suggest much longer atmospheric residence if aggregation did not occur. Overall the forecasts of where fine ash is

  5. The formation and fate of fine volcanic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, W. I.; Durant, A. J.; Horwell, C. J.

    2006-12-01

    Volcanic ash is fragmental magma and occurs in size ranges from the lapilli boundary (2 mm) to less than 0.1 μm in diameter. Satellite remote sensing measurements show that ash with diameter <100 μm falls out much faster than it could fall as simple particles. We applied laser diffraction methods to determine the grain size distribution (GSD) of an archive of more than 200 samples of fine-grained ashfalls from plinian, subplinian and peleean eruptions of the past 40 years which range from basalt to dacite. The samples were collected days after eruption and fall. Results show that fine ash fell largely at distances which, based on atmospheric trajectory analyses, represent one to several hours of atmospheric residence, far less than their GSD would suggest based on diameter and fall as simple particles. Many samples show bimodal GSD with larger pyroclasts possibly capturing smaller ones during fall. A large number of samples from all the volcanoes studied have unimodal GSD with Mdφ of 4-7 (8-63 μm diameter) and have fine tails. These samples generally do not contain pyroclasts which could have fallen as simple particles. There is no simple relationship between GSD and distance among these samples. Ice generated from the convective eruption column is strongly suspected to play an important role in the fallout of fine ash, especially in more intense eruptions which reach the upper troposphere or stratosphere because the residence of fine ash matches the residence time of ice, which is unstable in the dry atmosphere. Among important issues that need clarification are: What processes cause fine ash to form? What controls the locations of fall? We found abundant evidence that one process which generates fine ash is milling by pyroclastic flows and elutriation of resulting fines. We also can show that fine ash falls out in a pattern that differs markedly from coarser ash that falls in the turbulent flow regime and that this pattern seems to be related to wind fields

  6. Assessment of injury to fish and wildlife resources in the Grand Calumet River and Indiana Harbor Area of Concern, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacDonald, D.D.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Smorong, D.E.; Lindskoog, R.A.; Sparks, D.W.; Smith, J.R.; Simon, T.P.; Hanacek, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    This article is the second in a series of three that describes the results of a Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) conducted in the Grand Calumet River and Indiana Harbor Area of Concern (IHAOC). The assessment area is located in northwest Indiana and was divided into nine reaches to facilitate the assessment. This component of the NRDA was undertaken to determine if fish and wildlife resources have been injured due to exposure to contaminants that are associated with discharges of oil or releases of other hazardous substances. To support this assessment, information was compiled on the chemical composition of sediment and tissues; on the toxicity of whole sediments, pore water, and elutriates to fish; on the status of fish communities; and on fish health. The data on each of these indicators were compared to regionally relevant benchmarks to assess the presence and extent of injury to fish and wildlife resources. The results of this assessment indicate that injury to fish and wildlife resources has occurred throughout the assessment area, with up to five distinct lines of evidence demonstrating injury within the various reaches. Based on the frequency of exceedance of the benchmarks for assessing sediment and tissue chemistry data, total polychlorinated biphenyls is the primary bioaccumulative contaminant of concern in the assessment area. It is important to note, however, that this assessment was restricted by the availability of published bioaccumulation-based sediment quality guidelines, tissue residue guidelines, and other benchmarks of sediment quality conditions. The availability of chemistry data for tissues also restricted this assessment in certain reaches of the assessment area. Furthermore, insufficient information was located to facilitate identification of the substances that are causing or substantially contributing to effects on fish (i.e., sediment toxicity, impaired fish health, or impaired fish community structure). Therefore, substances

  7. A multidisciplinary effort to assign realistic source parameters to models of volcanic ash-cloud transport and dispersion during eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, L.G.; Guffanti, M.; Servranckx, R.; Webley, P.; Barsotti, S.; Dean, K.; Durant, A.; Ewert, J.W.; Neri, A.; Rose, William I., Jr.; Schneider, D.; Siebert, L.; Stunder, B.; Swanson, G.; Tupper, A.; Volentik, A.; Waythomas, C.F.

    2009-01-01

    During volcanic eruptions, volcanic ash transport and dispersion models (VATDs) are used to forecast the location and movement of ash clouds over hours to days in order to define hazards to aircraft and to communities downwind. Those models use input parameters, called "eruption source parameters", such as plume height H, mass eruption rate ???, duration D, and the mass fraction m63 of erupted debris finer than about 4??{symbol} or 63????m, which can remain in the cloud for many hours or days. Observational constraints on the value of such parameters are frequently unavailable in the first minutes or hours after an eruption is detected. Moreover, observed plume height may change during an eruption, requiring rapid assignment of new parameters. This paper reports on a group effort to improve the accuracy of source parameters used by VATDs in the early hours of an eruption. We do so by first compiling a list of eruptions for which these parameters are well constrained, and then using these data to review and update previously studied parameter relationships. We find that the existing scatter in plots of H versus ??? yields an uncertainty within the 50% confidence interval of plus or minus a factor of four in eruption rate for a given plume height. This scatter is not clearly attributable to biases in measurement techniques or to well-recognized processes such as elutriation from pyroclastic flows. Sparse data on total grain-size distribution suggest that the mass fraction of fine debris m63 could vary by nearly two orders of magnitude between small basaltic eruptions (??? 0.01) and large silicic ones (> 0.5). We classify eleven eruption types; four types each for different sizes of silicic and mafic eruptions; submarine eruptions; "brief" or Vulcanian eruptions; and eruptions that generate co-ignimbrite or co-pyroclastic flow plumes. For each eruption type we assign source parameters. We then assign a characteristic eruption type to each of the world's ??? 1500

  8. Widespread differentiation stage-specific expression of the gene encoding phosphoprotein p19 (metablastin) in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Schubart, U K; Xu, J; Fan, W; Cheng, G; Goldstein, H; Alpini, G; Shafritz, D A; Amat, J A; Farooq, M; Norton, W T

    1992-09-01

    p19 is a highly conserved 19 kD cytosolic protein that undergoes phosphorylation in response to diverse extracellular factors in mammalian cells. Its expression is abundant in brain and testis and is developmentally regulated. To gain insights regarding its function, we analyzed the expression of p19 mRNA in a variety of cell types during induction of differentiation. Murine erythroleukemia cells showed a moderate increase followed by a marked decrease in the abundance of p19 mRNA during induction of differentiation. In murine C2 myoblasts and primary fetal rat osteoblasts, p19 mRNA was abundant in replicating cells and decreased to undetectable levels during differentiation. In resting human peripheral blood lymphocytes, p19 mRNA was virtually undetectable but was strongly induced during blast transformation of both B and T cells. In rat liver, p19 mRNA was abundant on embryonic day 17 and decreased during early postnatal development. Upon fractionation of adult rat liver cells by centrifugal elutriation, p19 mRNA was not detected in hepatocytes while a low level was observed in a fraction enriched in non-parenchymal epithelial cells. CCl4-induced liver regeneration resulted in induction of p19 mRNA in hepatocytes. Primary cultures of embryonic and neonatal rat brain were analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence using co-staining with stage-specific markers. p19 expression was restricted to immature neurons and oligodendrocyte precursors. In contrast to the other cell types examined, the neuronal and glial precursors that express p19 were shown, using BrdU labeling, to be postmitotic both in primary culture and in vivo. The data demonstrate widespread, stage-specific expression of p19 and suggest that the protein exerts a general, lineage-independent function during induction of differentiation of mammalian cells. In view of the available evidence on the stimulation of serine phosphorylation of p19 by several growth factors, our working hypothesis is that

  9. Murine pulmonary responses after sub-chronic exposure to aluminum oxide-based nanowhiskers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aluminum oxide-based nanowhiskers (AO nanowhiskers) have been used in manufacturing processes as catalyst supports, flame retardants, adsorbents, or in ceramic, metal and plastic composite materials. They are classified as high aspect ratio nanomaterials. Our aim was to assess in vivo toxicity of inhaled AO nanowhisker aerosols. Methods Primary dimensions of AO nanowhiskers specified by manufacturer were 2–4 nm x 2800 nm. The aluminum content found in this nanomaterial was 30% [mixed phase material containing Al(OH)3 and AlOOH]. Male mice (C57Bl/6 J) were exposed to AO nanowhiskers for 4 hrs/day, 5 days/wk for 2 or 4 wks in a dynamic whole body exposure chamber. The whiskers were aerosolized with an acoustical dry aerosol generator that included a grounded metal elutriator and a venturi aspirator to enhance deagglomeration. Average concentration of aerosol in the chamber was 3.3 ± 0.6 mg/m3 and the mobility diameter was 150 ± 1.6 nm. Both groups of mice (2 or 4 wks exposure) were necropsied immediately after the last exposure. Aluminum content in the lung, heart, liver, and spleen was determined. Pulmonary toxicity assessment was performed by evaluation of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid (enumeration of total and differential cells, total protein, activity of lactate dehydrogenase [LDH] and cytokines), blood (total and differential cell counts), lung histopathology and pulmonary mechanics. Results Following exposure, mean Al content of lungs was 0.25, 8.10 and 15.37 μg/g lung (dry wt) respectively for sham, 2 wk and 4 wk exposure groups. The number of total cells and macrophages in BAL fluid was 2-times higher in animals exposed for 2 wks and 6-times higher in mice exposed for 4 wks, compared to shams (p < 0.01, p < 0.001, respectively). However no neutrophilic inflammation in BAL fluid was found and neutrophils were below 1% in all groups. No significant differences were found in total protein, activity of LDH, or

  10. What is the role of pyroclastic density currents in volcanic ash aggregation? Perspectives from a phreatoplinian eruption deposit, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eaton, A. R.; Wilson, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    This study documents the processes and products of volcanic ash aggregation within individual phases of the 25.4 ka Oruanui super-eruption from Taupo volcano, New Zealand. Textural and stratigraphic relationships of aggregates are examined in seven of the ten erupted units, which range from relatively dry styles of eruption and deposition (fall units 2, 5) to mixed (units 6, 7, 8) and dominantly wet (unit 3). Aggregate structures and grain size distributions shift abruptly over vertical scales of cm to dm within and between eruptive units, providing diagnostic features that identify deposits emplaced as vertical fallout or pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). The six categories of ash aggregates documented here are used to infer distinct volcanic and meteorological interactions in the eruption cloud related to dispersal characteristics and mode of emplacement. Our field observations support the notion that deposits bearing matrix-supported accretionary lapilli with complex internal layering and abundant rim fragments are associated with emplacement of PDCs. However, on the basis of grain size distributions and field relationships, it is inferred that these types of ash aggregates formed their ultrafine (<10 μm ash) outer layers in the overriding fine ash cloud elutriated from PDCs, not during transport within the basal portion of ground-hugging currents. The propagation of voluminous PDCs beneath an overriding buoyant plume - whether coignimbrite or vent-derived in origin - is proposed to generate the observed, concentrically layered accretionary lapilli by producing wedge-like updrafts of convectively unstable, ash-laden air. The apparent coarsening of mean grain size with distance from source, which is observed in the aggregate-bearing fall deposits, reflects a combination of multi-level plume transport and preferential scavenging of fine ash <250 μm. Proximal fallout and melting of ice in the clouds was likely to have contributed a key source of liquid water

  11. Gdnf-Gfra1 pathway is expressed in a spermatogenetic-dependent manner and is regulated by Fsh in a fish testis.

    PubMed

    Bellaïche, Johanna; Goupil, Anne-Sophie; Sambroni, Elisabeth; Lareyre, Jean-Jacques; Le Gac, Florence

    2014-10-01

    What makes the spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) self-renew or differentiate to produce spermatozoa is barely understood, in particular in nonmammalian species. Our research explores possible regulations of the SSC niche in teleost, locally by paracrine factors and peripherally by hormonal regulation. In the present study, we focus on the Gdnf-Gfra1 pathway that plays a major role in the regulation of SSC self-renewal in mammals. We describe a complex evolution of the genes encoding for Gdnf and Gfra1 proteins in trout with the emergence of three gdnf and two gfra1 paralogs. Using quantitative PCR measurements in isolated testicular cell populations, the gdnfb paralog was found expressed in A-spermatogonia and probably in another testicular cell type. In contrast, the transcript of gfra1a, the Gdnf receptor, was preferentially expressed in a population of undifferentiated A-spermatogonia (und A-Spg) separated by centrifugal elutriation. These und A-Spg also demonstrated high stemness potential in transplantation studies and preferentially expressed nanos2, a putative SSC marker in trout (Bellaiche et al., Biol Reprod 2014; 90:79). Flow cytometer experiments demonstrate that only a subfraction of und A-Spg express Gfra1. In trout, spermatogenesis develops along a strict annual cycle, and gdnfb and its receptor were expressed in a spermatogenetic activity-dependent manner. In particular, a dramatic increase of the gdnfb transcript coincided with the progressive cessation of rapid spermatogonial proliferation and of meiosis toward the end of the reproductive cycle. Together these results suggest that, in trout, Gdnfb is involved in the repression of und A-Spg differentiation. Fsh is an endocrine regulator of SSCs self-renewal through the up-regulation of Gdnf in rodents. We demonstrate that in trout, in vitro Fsh treatment stimulated the expression of the gfra1a1 but not of its ligand, gdnfb. Fsh treatment also stimulated the proliferation of und A-Spg cocultured with

  12. A new high-performance 3D multiphase flow code to simulate volcanic blasts and pyroclastic density currents: example from the Boxing Day event, Montserrat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongaro, T. E.; Clarke, A.; Neri, A.; Voight, B.; Widiwijayanti, C.

    2005-12-01

    For the first time the dynamics of directed blasts from explosive lava-dome decompression have been investigated by means of transient, multiphase flow simulations in 2D and 3D. Multiphase flow models developed for the analysis of pyroclastic dispersal from explosive eruptions have been so far limited to 2D axisymmetric or Cartesian formulations which cannot properly account for important 3D features of the volcanic system such as complex morphology and fluid turbulence. Here we use a new parallel multiphase flow code, named PDAC (Pyroclastic Dispersal Analysis Code) (Esposti Ongaro et al., 2005), able to simulate the transient and 3D thermofluid-dynamics of pyroclastic dispersal produced by collapsing columns and volcanic blasts. The code solves the equations of the multiparticle flow model of Neri et al. (2003) on 3D domains extending up to several kilometres in 3D and includes a new description of the boundary conditions over topography which is automatically acquired from a DEM. The initial conditions are represented by a compact volume of gas and pyroclasts, with clasts of different sizes and densities, at high temperature and pressure. Different dome porosities and pressurization models were tested in 2D to assess the sensitivity of the results to the distribution of initial gas pressure, and to the total mass and energy stored in the dome, prior to 3D modeling. The simulations have used topographies appropriate for the 1997 Boxing Day directed blast on Montserrat, which eradicated the village of St. Patricks. Some simulations tested the runout of pyroclastic density currents over the ocean surface, corresponding to observations of over-water surges to several km distances at both locations. The PDAC code was used to perform 3D simulations of the explosive event on the actual volcano topography. The results highlight the strong topographic control on the propagation of the dense pyroclastic flows, the triggering of thermal instabilities, and the elutriation

  13. Plinian and co-ignimbrite tephra fall from the

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigurdsson, Haraldur; Carey, Steven

    1989-06-01

    A study of pyroclastic deposits from the 1815 Tambora eruption reveals two distinct phases of activity, i.e., four initial tephra falls followed by generation of pyroclastic flows and the production of major co-ignimbrite ash fall. The first explosive event produced minor ash fall from phreatomagmatic explosions (F-1 layer). The second event was a Plinian eruption (F-2) correlated to the large explosion of 5 April 1815, which produced a column height of 33 km with an eruption rate of 1.1 × 108 kg/s. The third event occurred during the lull in major activity from 5 to 10 April and produced minor ash fall (F-3). The fourth event produced a 43-km-high Plinian eruption column with an eruption rate of 2.8 × 108 kg/s during the climax of activity on 10 April. Although very energetic, the Plinian events were of short duration (2.8 h each) and total erupted volume of the early (F-1 to F-4) fall deposits is only 1.8 km3 (DRE, dense rock equivalent). An abrupt change in style of activity occurred at end of the second Plinian event with onset of pyroclastic flow and surge generation. At least seven pyroclastic flows were generated, which spread over most of the volcano and Sanggar peninsula and entered the ocean. The volume of pyroclastic flow deposits on land is 2.6 km3 DRE. Coastal exposures show that pyroclastic flows entering the sea became highly fines depleted, resulting in mass loss of about 32%, in addition to 8% glass elutriation, as indicated by component fractionation. The subaqueous pyroclastic flows have thus lost about 40% of mass compared to the original erupted mixture. Pyroclastic flows and surges from this phase of the eruption are stratigraphically equivalent to a major ash fall deposit (F-5) present beyond the flow and surge zone at 40 km from the source and in distal areas. The F-5 fall deposit forms a larger proportion of the total tephra fall with increasing distance from source and represents about 80% of the total at a distance of 90 km and 92% of

  14. Effects of slope on the formation of dunes in dilute, turbulent pyroclastic currents: May 18th, 1980 Mt. St. Helens eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendana, Sylvana; Brand, Brittany D.; Self, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    The flanks of Mt St Helens volcano (MSH) are draped with thin, cross-stratified and stratified pyroclastic density current (PDC) deposits. These are known as the proximal bedded deposits produced during the May 18th, 1980 eruption of MSH. While the concentrated portions of the afternoon PDCs followed deep topographic drainages down the steep flanks of the volcano, the dilute overriding cloud partially decoupled to develop fully dilute, turbulent PDCs on the flanks of the volcano (Beeson, D.L. 1988. Proximal Flank Facies of the May 18, 1980 Ignimbrite: Mt. St. Helens, Washington.). The deposits along the flank thus vary greatly from those found in the pumice plain, which are generally thick, massive, poorly-sorted, block-rich deposits associated with the more concentrated portions of the flow (Brand et al, accepted. Dynamics of pyroclastic density currents: Conditions that promote substrate erosion and self-channelization - Mount St Helens, Washington (USA). JVGR). We explore the influence of topography on the formation of these dilute currents and influence of slope on the currents transport and depositional mechanisms. The deposits on steeper slopes (>15°) are fines depleted relative to the proximal bedded deposits on shallower slopes (<15°). Bedform amplitude and wavelength increase with increasing slope, as does the occurrence of regressive dunes. Increasing slope causes an increase in flow velocity and thus an increase in flow turbulence. The fines depleted deposits suggest that fine ash elutriation is more efficient in flows with stronger turbulence. The longer wavelength and amplitudes suggest that bedform morphology is directly related to flow velocity, an important finding since the controls on bedform wavelength and amplitude in density stratified flows remains poorly constrained. The occurrence of regressive dunes, often interpreted as high flow-regime bedforms, on steeper slopes relative to progressive dunes on shallower slopes further attests to the

  15. A multidisciplinary effort to assign realistic source parameters to models of volcanic ash-cloud transport and dispersion during eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastin, L. G.; Guffanti, M.; Servranckx, R.; Webley, P.; Barsotti, S.; Dean, K.; Durant, A.; Ewert, J. W.; Neri, A.; Rose, W. I.; Schneider, D.; Siebert, L.; Stunder, B.; Swanson, G.; Tupper, A.; Volentik, A.; Waythomas, C. F.

    2009-09-01

    During volcanic eruptions, volcanic ash transport and dispersion models (VATDs) are used to forecast the location and movement of ash clouds over hours to days in order to define hazards to aircraft and to communities downwind. Those models use input parameters, called "eruption source parameters", such as plume height H, mass eruption rate Ṁ, duration D, and the mass fraction m63 of erupted debris finer than about 4ϕ or 63 μm, which can remain in the cloud for many hours or days. Observational constraints on the value of such parameters are frequently unavailable in the first minutes or hours after an eruption is detected. Moreover, observed plume height may change during an eruption, requiring rapid assignment of new parameters. This paper reports on a group effort to improve the accuracy of source parameters used by VATDs in the early hours of an eruption. We do so by first compiling a list of eruptions for which these parameters are well constrained, and then using these data to review and update previously studied parameter relationships. We find that the existing scatter in plots of H versus Ṁ yields an uncertainty within the 50% confidence interval of plus or minus a factor of four in eruption rate for a given plume height. This scatter is not clearly attributable to biases in measurement techniques or to well-recognized processes such as elutriation from pyroclastic flows. Sparse data on total grain-size distribution suggest that the mass fraction of fine debris m63 could vary by nearly two orders of magnitude between small basaltic eruptions (˜ 0.01) and large silicic ones (> 0.5). We classify eleven eruption types; four types each for different sizes of silicic and mafic eruptions; submarine eruptions; "brief" or Vulcanian eruptions; and eruptions that generate co-ignimbrite or co-pyroclastic flow plumes. For each eruption type we assign source parameters. We then assign a characteristic eruption type to each of the world's ˜ 1500 Holocene

  16. Role of Water and Ice in Ash Aggregation: Constraints from the Upper Scoriae 1 Deposit, Santorini, Greece.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durant, A. J.; Ernst, G. G.

    2001-12-01

    Volcanic eruption clouds can disperse ash over large areas, posing hazards on the ground and for air traffic. One distant goal is to develop much needed risk models of ash fallout. This however, is hindered by incompletely understood aspects, one of which is ash aggregation and especially the role of liquid water and ice. We analysed accretionary lapilli-rich fall deposits from Santorini, interpreted here to have formed from eruption clouds elutriated from energetic base surges rich in water, which condensed and froze during rise while interacting with ash. Investigation methods included fieldwork, hand sample binocular microscopy, lapilli and particle size analysis, SEM, EPMA and basic modelling of aggregate settling. Field data indicate both ductile and brittle deformation of aggregates during deposition. Lapilli size distributions peak sharply at 2.5 mm with few aggregates ~10 mm, but most <4.5 mm. Lapilli display a volumetrically-dominant, poorly sorted, coarse-grained core and a thin, fine-grained rim. Particle size distributions in the core and rim peak at 45-70 microns and 10-30 microns (MALVERN and SEM data), with a sharp grain size break. This is consistent with growth by wet collection where aggregate size is limited by `drop break-up'. Fine ash rims imply freezing halts wet accretion, and lapilli >4.5 mm indicate accretion proceeds similar to hailstone growth. Insights from hailstone studies and experiments of Gilbert & Lane (1994) suggest that a liquid skin is needed to aggregate fine rim ash, thus constraining rimming processes to approximately 5-8 km asl. Multiple fine rims indicate recycling of frozen accretionary lapilli. Close association of fine vesiculated ash and large lapilli (i.e. contrasting Vt) in the deposit suggests that fallout of lapilli and mud rain was coeval, perhaps due to a settling-driven instability at the umbrella base. A new conceptual model accounting for all data observations is summarised. The new constraints will be useful

  17. Altering recharge dynamics through woody vegetation removal: a study on the Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer of south Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattox, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    initial steps to determining if ground water recharge may be increased through brush management. Rooting depth and volumetric water content were determined in the Chacon clay loam, Webb sandy loam and Antosa-Bobillo loamy sands. Two soil cores were taken to depths of 2 m in each of the 1/4 acre plots in each of the treated and untreated plots for a total of 54 cores. Rooting depths were determined through a combination of hydro-pneumatic root elutriation, comparison of soil water profiles in treated and untreated plots, as well as stem and soil water isotope analysis. Initial data indicates hydraulic redistribution is occurring in the loamy sand as well as the clay loam soils. Neutron probe measurements suggest that vegetation may be facilitating the movement of water into deeper soil horizons in the clay loam soils. In addition to improving our understanding of the relationships between vegetation structure and vadose zone hydrology, our results will be useful for managing water resources under increasing demand, climate change, and varied priorities for entities tasked with managing water resources.

  18. Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) Input Coal Analyses and Off-Gass Filter (OGF) Content Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Missimer, David M.; Guenther, Chris P.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; VanEssendelft, Dirk T.; Means, Nicholas C.

    2015-04-23

    in process piping and materials, in excessive off-gas absorbent loading, and in undesired process emissions. The ash content of the coal is important as the ash adds to the DMR and other vessel products which affect the final waste product mass and composition. The amount and composition of the ash also affects the reaction kinetics. Thus ash content and composition contributes to the mass balance. In addition, sodium, potassium, calcium, sulfur, and maybe silica and alumina in the ash may contribute to wall-scale formation. Sodium, potassium, and alumina in the ash will be overwhelmed by the sodium, potassium, and alumina from the feed but the impact from the other ash components needs to be quantified. A maximum coal particle size is specified so the feed system does not plug and a minimum particle size is specified to prevent excess elutriation from the DMR to the Process Gas Filter (PGF). A vendor specification was used to procure the calcined coal for IWTU processing. While the vendor supplied a composite analysis for the 22 tons of coal (Appendix A), this study compares independent analyses of the coal performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Three supersacks a were sampled at three different heights within the sack in order to determine within bag variability and between bag variability of the coal. These analyses were also compared to the vendor’s composite analyses and to the coal specification. These analyses were also compared to historic data on Bestac coal analyses that had been performed at Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) between 2004-2011.

  19. Fluidization and multiphase transport of particulate cometary material as an explanation of the smooth terrains and repetitive outbursts on 9P/Tempel 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belton, Michael J. S.; Melosh, Jay

    2009-03-01

    outbursts require a gas-laden reservoir to have formed in the vicinity of the phase change boundary well below their preferred location. We visualize the outbursts to be the result of either spouting or bubble transport to the surface where the release of gas is diurnally modulated by either thermal stresses or H 2O sublimation back pressure. The source region for the i2 smooth terrain is found to coincide with an H 2O-ice rich area and we propose that the process of elutriation, i.e., the separation of different classes of particulates depending on their drag properties, occurs in the fluidized material as it flows up to and through the surface. In this way the material becomes enhanced in H 2O crystals relative to siliceous and carbonaceous particulates.

  20. Characterizing toxicity of metal-contaminated sediments from mining areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, John M.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews methods for testing the toxicity of metals associated with freshwater sediments, linking toxic effects with metal exposure and bioavailability, and developing sediment quality guidelines. The most broadly applicable approach for characterizing metal toxicity is whole-sediment toxicity testing, which attempts to simulate natural exposure conditions in the laboratory. Standard methods for whole-sediment testing can be adapted to test a wide variety of taxa. Chronic sediment tests that characterize effects on multiple endpoints (e.g., survival, growth, and reproduction) can be highly sensitive indicators of adverse effects on resident invertebrate taxa. Methods for testing of aqueous phases (pore water, overlying water, or elutriates) are used less frequently. Analysis of sediment toxicity data focuses on statistical comparisons between responses in sediments from the study area and responses in one or more uncontaminated reference sediments. For large or complex study areas, a greater number of reference sediments is recommended to reliably define the normal range of responses in uncontaminated sediments – the ‘reference envelope’. Data on metal concentrations and effects on test organisms across a gradient of contamination may allow development of concentration-response models, which estimate metal concentrations associated with specified levels of toxic effects (e.g. 20% effect concentration or EC20). Comparisons of toxic effects in laboratory tests with measures of impacts on resident benthic invertebrate communities can help document causal relationships between metal contamination and biological effects. Total or total-recoverable metal concentrations in sediments are the most common measure of metal contamination in sediments, but metal concentrations in labile sediment fractions (e.g., determined as part of selective sediment extraction protocols) may better represent metal bioavailability. Metals released by the weak-acid extraction

  1. The vadose zone as a geoindicator of environmental change and groundwater quality in water-scarce areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmunds, W. M.; Baba Goni, I.; Gaye, C. B.; Jin, L.

    2013-12-01

    Inert and reactive tracers in moisture profiles provide considerable potential for the vadose zone to be used as an indicator of rapid environmental change. This indicator is particularly applicable in areas of water stress where long term (decade to century) scale records may be found in deep unsaturated zones in low rainfall areas and provide insights into recent recharge, climate variation and water-rock interactions which generate groundwater quality. Unsaturated zone Cl records obtained by elutriation of moisture are used widely for estimating recharge and water balance studies; isotope profiles (3H, δ2H, δ18O) from total water extraction procedures are used for investigation of residence times and hydrological processes. Apart from water taken using lysimeters, little work has been conducted directly on the geochemistry of pore fluids. This is mainly due to the difficulties of extraction of moisture from unsaturated material with low water contents (typically 2-6 wt%) and since dilution methods can create artifacts. Using immiscible liquid displacement techniques it is now possible to directly investigate the geochemistry of moisture from unsaturated zone materials. Profiles up to 35m from Quaternary sediments from dryland areas of the African Sahel (Nigeria, Senegal) as well as Inner Mongolia, China are used to illustrate the breadth of information obtainable from vadose zone profiles. Using pH, major and trace elements and comparing with isotopic data, a better understanding is gained of timescales of water movement, aquifer recharge, environmental records and climate history as well as water-rock interaction and contaminant behaviour. The usefulness of tritium as residence time indicator has now expired following cessation of atmospheric thermonuclear testing and through radioactive decay. Providing the rainfall Cl, moisture contents and bulk densities of the sediments are known, then Cl accumulation can be substituted to estimate timescales. Profiles

  2. Pyroclastic flow generated by crater-wall collapse and outpouring of the lava pool of Arenal Volcano, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, Guillermo E.; Soto, Gerardo J.

    2002-01-01

    The pyroclastic flow that issued from the Arenal summit crater on 28 August 1993 came from the collapse of the crater wall of the cone and the drainage of a lava pool. The 3-km-long pyroclastic flow, 2.2±0.8×106 m3 in volume, was confined to narrow valleys (30-100 m wide). The thickness of the pyroclastic deposit ranged from 1 to 10 m, and its temperature was about 400 °C, although single bombs were up to 1,000 °C. The deposit is clast-supported, has a bimodal grain size distribution, and consists of an intimate mixture of finely pulverized rock ash, lapilli, small blocks, and cauliflower bread-crusted bombs, in which are set meter-size lava fragments and juvenile and non-juvenile angular blocks, and bombs up to 7 m in diameter. Large faceted blocks make up 50% of the total volume of the deposit. The cauliflower bombs have deep and intricate bread-crust texture and post-depositional vesiculation. It is proposed that the juvenile material was produced entirely from a lava pool, whereas faceted non-juvenile blocks come from the crater-wall collapse. The concentration and maximum diameter of cauliflower bread-crusted bombs increases significantly from the base (rockslide + pyroclastic flow) to the top (the pyroclastic flow) of the deposit. An ash cloud deposited accretionary lapilli in the proximal region (outside of the pyroclastic flow deposit), and very fine ash fell in the distal region (between 5 and 30 km). The accretionary lapilli deposit is derived from the fine, elutriated products of the flow as it moved. A turbulent overriding surge blew down the surrounding shrubbery in the flow direction. The pyroclastic flow from August 1993, similar to the flows of June 1975, May 1998, August 2000, and March 2001, slid and rolled rather than being buoyed up by gas. They grooved, scratched, and polished the surfaces over which they swept, similar to a Merapi-type pyroclastic flow. However, the mechanism of the outpouring of a lava pool and the resulting flows

  3. Generation and Characterization of Nanoaerosols Using a Portable Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer and Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marty, Adam J.

    The purpose of this research is to demonstrate the ability to generate and characterize a nanometer sized aerosol using solutions, suspensions, and a bulk nanopowder, and to research the viability of using an acoustic dry aerosol generator/elutriator (ADAGE) to aerosolize a bulk nanopowder into a nanometer sized aerosol. The research compares the results from a portable scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) to the more traditional method of counting and sizing particles on a filter sample using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sodium chloride aerosol was used for the comparisons. The sputter coating thickness, a conductive coating necessary for SEM, was measured on different sizes of polystyrene latex spheres (PSLS). Aluminum oxide powder was aerosolized using an ADAGE and several different support membranes and sound frequency combinations were explored. A portable SMPS was used to determine the size distributions of the generated aerosols. Polycarbonate membrane (PCM) filter samples were collected for subsequent SEM analysis. The particle size distributions were determined from photographs of the membrane filters. SMPS data and membrane samples were collected simultaneously. The sputter coating thicknesses on four different sizes of PSLS, range 57 nanometers (nm) to 220 nm, were measured using transmission electron microscopy and the results from the SEM and SMPS were compared after accounting for the sputter coating thickness. Aluminum oxide nanopowder (20 nm) was aerosolized using a modified ADAGE technique. Four different support membranes and four different sound frequencies were tested with the ADAGE. The aerosol was collected onto PCM filters and the samples were examined using SEM. The results indicate that the SMPS and SEM distributions were log-normally distributed with a median diameter of approximately 42 nm and 55 nm, respectively, and geometric standard deviations (GSD) of approximately 1.6 and 1.7, respectively. The two methods yielded similar

  4. Vent Processes and Deposits of a Hiatus in a Violent Eruption: Quilotoa Volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, J. A.; Bustillos, J.; Ort, M. H.; Cashman, K. V.; Mothes, P. A.; di Muro, A.; Rosi, M.

    2010-12-01

    , with the simultaneous milling of the weakened material producing the orange dust. We interpret the dense vitric lapilli ≥ -2.0 φ of U2c as being from an explosion through a lava dome, and thus they indicate that the eruption was continuous from U2c through U3. Our current hypothesis is that, as the U1 eruption ended, magma stalled deep in the conduit and degassed hot acidic gas that streamed through the material clogging the vent. This elutriated vitric material that eventually formed a cap on the system. As the U3 magma began its ascent, gas flux increased, leading to explosions that gradually removed the vitric cap and deposited the vitric U2a. Then, more continuous gas streaming led to the development of a pulsatory eruption column that carried hot crystals and vitric grains from the vent clog into a convecting column and eventual deposition as U2b fallout, which was then followed by the establishment of the U3 eruption column.

  5. Vent Processes and Deposits of a Hiatus in a Violent Eruption: Quilotoa Volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, J. A.; Bustillos, J.; Ort, M. H.; Cashman, K. V.; Mothes, P. A.; di Muro, A.; Rosi, M.

    2009-12-01

    high proportion of stained fragments in U2b requires a different, possibly hydrothermal, source. We interpret the lava lapilli of U2c and U3 as being from a single explosion, perhaps the opening of a new vent, and thus they indicate that the eruption was continuous from U2b through U3. Our current hypothesis is that, as the U1 eruption ended, acidic gas streamed through the material clogging the vent. This elutriated vitric material that eventually formed a cap on the system. As the U3 magma began its ascent, gas flux increased, leading to explosions that gradually removed the vitric cap and depositing the vitric U2a. Then, more continuous gas streaming led to the development of an pulsatory eruption column that carried the hot stained crystals and lithic fragments into a convecting column and eventual deposition as fallout of U2b, which was then followed by the establishment of the U3 eruption column.

  6. Dynamics of pyroclastic density currents: Conditions that promote substrate erosion and self-channelization - Mount St Helens, Washington (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, B. D.; Pollock, N. M.; Mackaman-Lofland, C. A.; Bendana, S.

    2013-12-01

    elutriation or segregation of lithics and pumice, suggesting a highly concentrated current where size-density segregation was suppressed. Unit IV shows similar depositional features but typically has a basal lithic region, is variably fines-depleted and contains pumice lobes, suggesting density segregation in a less concentrated current relative to Unit III. Deep, erosive channels cut by the Unit III current and thick lithic levee deposits within Unit IV occur in an area where debris avalanche relief is limited, suggesting self-channelization developed as a function of internal flow dynamics. Finally, the combination of thick, massive deposits with a high percentage of fine ash within Unit III and in the medial-distal depositional regions of Units II-IV suggests the PDCs developed and maintained a high internal pore pressure during transport and deposition. Thus the most important results of this work include our ability to understand the role of internal pore pressure on current mobility, the influence of self-channelization on carrying capacity of the currents and the influence of surface roughness on substrate erosion. These observations have critical consequences for understanding the flow dynamics and hazard potential of PDCs.

  7. Dynamics of pyroclastic density currents: Conditions that promote substrate erosion and self-channelization - Mount St Helens, Washington (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Brittany D.; Mackaman-Lofland, Chelsea; Pollock, Nicholas M.; Bendaña, Sylvana; Dawson, Blaine; Wichgers, Pamela

    2014-04-01

    The May 18th, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH) produced multiple pyroclastic density currents (PDCs), burying the area north of the volcano under 10s of meters of deposits. Detailed measurements of recently exposed strata from these PDCs provide substantial insight into the dynamics of concentrated currents including inferences on particle-particle interactions, current mobility due to sedimentation fluidization and internal pore pressure, particle support mechanisms, the influence of surface roughness and the conditions that promote substrate erosion and self-channelization. Four primary flow units are identified along the extensive drainage system north of the volcano. Each flow unit has intricate vertical and lateral facies changes and complex cross-cutting relationships away from source. Each flow unit is an accumulation from an unsteady but locally sustained PDC or an amalgamation of several PDC pulses. The PDCs associated with Units I and II likely occurred during the pre-climactic, waxing phase of the eruption. These currents flowed around and filled in the hummocky topography, leaving the massive to diffusely-stratified deposits of Units I and II. The deposits of both Units I and II are generally more massive in low lying areas and more stratified in areas of high surface roughness, suggesting that surface roughness enhanced basal shear stress within the flow boundary. Units III and IV are associated with the climactic phase of the eruption, which produced the most voluminous and wide-spread PDCs. Both flow units are characteristically massive and enriched in vent-derived lithic blocks. These currents flowed over and around the debris avalanche deposits, as evidenced by the erosion of blocks from the hummocks. Unit III is massive, poorly sorted, and shows little to no evidence of elutriation or segregation of lithics and pumice, suggesting a highly concentrated current where size-density segregation was suppressed. Unit IV shows similar depositional

  8. Experimental methods to determine inhalability and personal sampler performance for aerosols in ultra-low windspeed environments.

    PubMed

    Schmees, Darrah K; Wu, Yi-Hsuan; Vincent, James H

    2008-12-01

    Most previous experiments of aerosol inhalability as it relates to particle aerodynamic diameter were conducted in wind tunnels for windspeeds greater than 0.5 m s(-1). While that body of work was used to establish an inhalable aerosol convention, results from studies in calm air chambers (for essentially zero windspeed) are being discussed as the basis of a modified criterion. Meanwhile, however, information is lacking for windspeeds in the intermediate range, which--it so happens--pertain to most actual workplaces. With this in mind, we have developed a new experimental system to assess inhalability and personal sampler performance for aerosols with particle aerodynamic diameter within the range from 6 to 90 microm for ultra-low windspeed environments from about 0.1 to 0.5 m s(-1). In this range of conditions for particle size and windspeed, controlled aerosol experiments are very difficult to perform, most notably with respect to the problem of achieving uniform spatial distributions of both test aerosols and air velocity. In the work reported in this paper, we have addressed these difficulties in a new, custom-designed experimental facility. It is a novel wind tunnel design that provides stable and controllable low-turbulence air movement, and allows for the delivery of test aerosol to the working section both from upstream (as in conventional wind tunnel experiments) and from above (as in calm air studies). In this system, losses by elutriation of particles that are being convected in the horizontal aerosol flow are compensated by particles entering from above by gravitational settling. An important feature of the new facility is the life-size, breathing mannequin that contains physical means to achieve any combination of mouth and nasal inspiration and expiration, and allows any desired relevant breathing flowrate and pattern by means of an external computer-controlled breathing simulator. Special steps were taken in the detailed design to ensure that

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED PARTIAL GASIFICATION MODULE (PGM)

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-07-10

    sequestration of stack gas carbon dioxide gases for a 100% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. The amount of syngas and char produced by the PGM can be tailored to fit the production objectives of the overall plant, i.e., power generation, clean liquid fuel production, chemicals production, etc. Hence, PGM is a robust building block that offers all the advantages of coal gasification but in a more user friendly form; it is also fuel flexible in that it can use alternative fuels such as biomass, sewerage sludge, etc. The PGM consists of a pressurized circulating fluidized bed (PCFB) reactor together with a recycle cyclone and a particulate removing barrier filter. Coal, air, steam, and possibly sand are fed to the bottom of the PCFB reactor and establish a relatively dense bed of coal/char in the bottom section. As these constituents react, a hot syngas is produced which conveys the solids residue vertically up through the reactor and into the recycle cyclone. Solids elutriated from the dense bed and contained in the syngas are collected in the cyclone and drain via a dipleg back to the dense bed at the bottom of the PCFB reactor. This recycle loop of hot solids acts as a thermal flywheel and promotes efficient solid-gas chemical reaction.

  10. Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicity Hazard Assessments (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, B. L.; McKay, D. S.; Taylor, L. A.; Wallace, W. T.; James, J.; Riofrio, L.; Gonzalez, C. P.

    2009-12-01

    was developed for this task. The dust separation system includes a fluidized bed, an elutriation flask, and a cyclone. The product dust is collected on a membrane filter with 0.45 micrometer pore size. Collection and separation efficiencies, and particle size distribution measurements of the material retained in the various components are tracked as development and tests proceed. Calculations show that respirable-sized particles, if released in a habitat, would remain suspended in the air for extended periods of time. Without active dust control, most of this fine dust would end up in the crew’s lungs. Dust exposure standards, similar to those established for quartz on Earth, will determine the design, mass, power, and cost of dust control systems incorporated into lunar habitats and pressurized rovers.