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Sample records for embedded ffpe tissue

  1. Detection of alpha human papillomaviruses in archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens.

    PubMed

    Kocjan, Boštjan J; Hošnjak, Lea; Poljak, Mario

    2016-03-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens stored in pathology departments worldwide are an invaluable source for diagnostic purposes when fresh clinical material is unavailable as well as for retrospective molecular and epidemiological studies, especially when dealing with rare clinical conditions for which prospective collection is not feasible. Accurate detection of HPV infection in these specimens is particularly challenging because nucleic acids are often degraded and therefore, not suitable for amplification of larger fragments of the viral genome or viral gene transcripts. This review provides a brief summary of molecular methods for detecting alpha-HPV DNA/RNA in FFPE tissue specimens. We specifically address the key procedural and environmental factors that have the greatest impact on the quality of nucleic acids extracted from FFPE tissue specimens, and describe some solutions that can be used to increase their integrity and/or amplifiability. Moreover, commonly used methods for HPV DNA/RNA detection in FFPE tissue specimens are presented and discussed, focusing on studies using polymerase chain reaction as an HPV detection method and published after 1999. Finally, we briefly summarize our 22 years of experience with HPV detection in FFPE tissue specimens. PMID:26514313

  2. Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissues (FFPE) as a Robust Source for the Profiling of Native and Protease-Generated Protein Amino Termini.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zon Weng; Weisser, Juliane; Nilse, Lars; Costa, Fabrizio; Keller, Eva; Tholen, Martina; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Biniossek, Martin; Bronsert, Peter; Schilling, Oliver

    2016-06-01

    Dysregulated proteolysis represents a hallmark of numerous diseases. In recent years, increasing number of studies has begun looking at the protein termini in hope to unveil the physiological and pathological functions of proteases in clinical research. However, the availability of cryopreserved tissue specimens is often limited. Alternatively, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues offer an invaluable resource for clinical research. Pathologically relevant tissues are often stored as FFPE, which represent the most abundant resource of archived human specimens. In this study, we established a robust workflow to investigate native and protease-generated protein N termini from FFPE specimens. We demonstrate comparable N-terminomes of cryopreserved and formalin-fixed tissue, thereby showing that formalin fixation/paraffin embedment does not proteolytically damage proteins. Accordingly, FFPE specimens are fully amenable to N-terminal analysis. Moreover, we demonstrate feasibility of FFPE-degradomics in a quantitative N-terminomic study of FFPE liver specimens from cathepsin L deficient or wild-type mice. Using a machine learning approach in combination with the previously determined cathepsin L specificity, we successfully identify a number of potential cathepsin L cleavage sites. Our study establishes FFPE specimens as a valuable alternative to cryopreserved tissues for degradomic studies. PMID:27087653

  3. Evaluation of five DNA extraction methods for detection of H. pylori in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) liver tissue from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rabelo-Gonçalves, Elizabeth; Roesler, Bruna; Guardia, Ana Carolina; Milan, Arlete; Hara, Natalicia; Escanhoela, Cecília; Almeida, Jazon; Boin, Ilka; Zeitune, José Murilo

    2014-03-01

    Since Helicobacter spp. DNA was identified in liver tissue resected from patients with hepatocelullar carcinoma (HCC), researchers have suggested a role of this bacterium in hepatic carcinogenesis. Archives of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues represent an extraordinary source for clinical studies providing many advantages. However, DNA extraction from FFPE tissues is laborious, time-consuming and still remains a challenge. The aim of this study was to evaluate five protocols for DNA extraction from FFPE liver obtained from patients with HCC in order to detect Helicobacter pylori DNA. These methods were: (1) QIAamp FFPE Tissue Kit, (2) QIAamp DNA Mini Kit, (3) Wizard SV Genomic DNA Purification System, (4) RealiaPrep FFPE gDNA Miniprep System and (5) phenol-chloroform. H. pylori detection was performed using 16S rRNA gene amplification by PCR. The highest total amount of DNA was obtained using the phenol-chloroform method. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene amplification did not show statistically significant differences among the methods (p=0.466), although the highest percentage of positive cases (70%) was found in samples extracted with phenol-chloroform. We suggest that of the five methods evaluated, phenol/chloroform is the most suitable for detection of H. pylori in FFPE liver from patients with HCC. PMID:24355442

  4. The influence of DNA degradation in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue on locus-specific methylation assessment by MS-HRM.

    PubMed

    Daugaard, Iben; Kjeldsen, Tina E; Hager, Henrik; Hansen, Lise Lotte; Wojdacz, Tomasz K

    2015-12-01

    Readily accessible formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues are a highly valuable source of genetic material for molecular analyses in both research and in vitro diagnostics but frequently genetic material in those samples is highly degraded. With locus-specific methylation changes being widely investigated for use as biomarkers in various aspects of clinical disease management, we aimed to evaluate to what extent standard laboratory procedures can approximate the quality of the DNA extracted from FFPE samples prior to methylation analyses. DNA quality in 107 FFPE non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) samples was evaluated using spectrophotometry and gel electrophoresis. Subsequently, the quality assessment results were correlated with the results of locus specific methylation assessment with methylation sensitive high resolution melting (MS-HRM). The correlation of template quality with PCR amplification performance and HRM based methylation detection indicated a significant influence of DNA quality on PCR amplification but not on methylation assessment. In conclusion, standard laboratory procedures fairly well approximate DNA degradation of FFPE samples and DNA degradation does not seem to considerably affect locus-specific methylation assessment by MS-HRM. PMID:26551081

  5. Evaluation of Protein Profiles From Treated Xenograft Tumor Models Identifies an Antibody Panel for Formalin-fixed and Paraffin-embedded (FFPE) Tissue Analysis by Reverse Phase Protein Arrays (RPPA).

    PubMed

    Bader, Sabine; Zajac, Magdalena; Friess, Thomas; Ruge, Elisabeth; Rieder, Natascha; Gierke, Berthold; Heubach, Yvonne; Thomas, Marlene; Pawlak, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA) are an established tool for measuring the expression and activation status of multiple proteins in parallel using only very small amounts of tissue. Several studies have demonstrated the value of this technique for signaling pathway analysis using proteins extracted from fresh frozen (FF) tissue in line with validated antibodies for this tissue type; however, formalin fixation and paraffin embedding (FFPE) is the standard method for tissue preservation in the clinical setting. Hence, we performed RPPA to measure profiles for a set of 300 protein markers using matched FF and FFPE tissue specimens to identify which markers performed similarly using the RPPA technique in fixed and unfixed tissues. Protein lysates were prepared from matched FF and FFPE tissue specimens of individual tumors taken from three different xenograft models of human cancer. Materials from both untreated mice and mice treated with either anti-HER3 or bispecific anti-IGF-1R/EGFR monoclonal antibodies were analyzed. Correlations between signals from FF and FFPE tissue samples were investigated. Overall, 60 markers were identified that produced comparable profiles between FF and FFPE tissues, demonstrating significant correlation between the two sample types. The top 25 markers also showed significance after correction for multiple testing. The panel of markers covered several clinically relevant tumor signaling pathways and both phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated proteins were represented. Biologically relevant changes in marker expression were noted when RPPA profiles from treated and untreated xenografts were compared. These data demonstrate that, using appropriately selected antibodies, RPPA analysis from FFPE tissue is well feasible and generates biologically meaningful information. The identified panel of markers that generate similar profiles in matched fixed and unfixed tissue samples may be clinically useful for pharmacodynamic studies of drug effect

  6. Quantification of HER2 by Targeted Mass Spectrometry in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE) Breast Cancer Tissues.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Carine; Tille, Jean-Christophe; Lamerz, Jens; Kux van Geijtenbeek, Sabine; McKee, Thomas A; Venturi, Miro; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Hochstrasser, Denis; Cutler, Paul; Lescuyer, Pierre; Ducret, Axel

    2015-10-01

    The ability to accurately quantify proteins in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues using targeted mass spectrometry opens exciting perspectives for biomarker discovery. We have developed and evaluated a selectedreaction monitoring assay for the human receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-2 (HER2) in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded breast tumors. Peptide candidates were identified using an untargeted mass spectrometry approach in relevant cell lines. A multiplexed assay was developed for the six best candidate peptides and evaluated for linearity, precision and lower limit of quantification. Results showed a linear response over a calibration range of 0.012 to 100 fmol on column (R(2): 0.99-1.00).The lower limit of quantification was 0.155 fmol on column for all peptides evaluated. The six HER2 peptides were quantified by selected reaction monitoring in a cohort of 40 archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissues from women with invasive breast carcinomas, which showed different levels of HER2 gene amplification as assessed by standard methods used in clinical pathology. The amounts of the six HER2 peptides were highly and significantly correlated with each other, indicating that peptide levels can be used as surrogates of protein amounts in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. After normalization for sample size, selected reaction monitoring peptide measurements were able to correctly predict 90% of cases based on HER2 amplification as defined by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and College of American Pathologists. In conclusion, the developed assay showed good analytical performance and a high agreement with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization data. This study demonstrated that selected reaction monitoring allows to accurately quantify protein expression in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues and represents therefore a powerful approach for biomarker discovery studies. The untargeted mass spectrometry

  7. Molecular identification of Coccidioides immitis in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues from a Colombian patient.

    PubMed

    Canteros, Cristina E; Vélez H, Alejandro; Toranzo, Adriana I; Suárez-Alvarez, Roberto; Tobón O, Ángela; Jimenez A, María del Pilar; Restrepo M, Ángela

    2015-06-01

    Coccidioides immitis and C. posadasii are the etiologic agents of coccidioidomycosis, an endemic fungal disease of the Americas. In Colombia, this mycosis is uncommon, and only five cases, two of them imported, have been documented.By means of DNA sequencing, C. immitis was identified in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded archival tissues samples from the 5th Colombian patient diagnosed in 1997. The patient was born in Pinto, Department of Magdalena, and had never visited other geographic regions, a reason to consider that the mycosis had been acquired locally.This species is primarily found in California although it has been occasionally reported in other geographic areas such as Mexico and Brazil. This is the first indigenous report of C. immitis-associated coccidioidomycosis in a Colombian patient. PMID:25908652

  8. Over-expression of miR-675 in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues of breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Ling-Ling; Wang, Peng; Zhou, Ling-Yu; Yin, Jia-Yu; Tang, Qin; Zhang, Tin-Juan; Wang, Yu-Xin; Yang, Dong-Qin; Lin, Jiang; Deng, Zhao-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dysregulation of miR-675 has been found in a variety of solid tumors. MiR-675 has been suggested as having both oncogenic and tumor suppression properties in cancer. However, there is no evidence whether miR-675 is involved in breast cancer. The objective of this study was to evaluate the expression status of miR-675 and its clinical relevance in breast cancer patients. Methods: The expression level of miR-675 was detected in 100 breast cancer patients and 38 cancer-free controls using real-time quantitative PCR. The clinicopathological characteristics of miR-675 in breast cancer were also investigated. All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 20.0. Results: The study showed that miR-675 was significantly up-regulated in breast cancer patients compared with controls (P < 0.01). There was no significant difference in age, lymph nodes stage, ER status and PR status between patients with and without miR-675 over-expression (P > 0.05). The frequency of miR-675 over-expression was higher in the patients of histological grade I-II than in others (50% versus 9%, P = 0.011). The expression level of miR-675 had a high correlation with miR-24/93/98/378 in breast cancer patients. Conclusions: Taken together, our study demonstrated that miR-675 in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues might serve as a good source for biomarker discovery and breast cancer validation. PMID:26379923

  9. Discrepancies between VEGF −1154 G>A Polymorphism Analysis Performed in Peripheral Blood Samples and FFPE Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Marisi, Giorgia; Passardi, Alessandro; Calistri, Daniele; Zoli, Wainer; Amadori, Dino; Ulivi, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may be associated with the response or toxicity to different types of treatment. Although SNP analysis is usually performed on DNA from peripheral blood, formalin fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is often used for retrospective studies. We analyzed VEGF (−2578C>A, −1498C>T, −1154G>A, −634C>G, +936C>T) and eNOS (+894G>T, −786T>C, VNTR (variable number of tandem repeats) 27bp intron 4) polymorphisms by direct sequencing or Real Time PCR in 237 patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Peripheral blood was used for 153 patients, whereas only FFPE tumor tissue was available for 84 patients. All SNP frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE), with the exception of VEGF −1154, which was only in HWE in peripheral blood specimens. We therefore analyzed this SNP in DNA extracted from FFPE tumor tissue compared to FFPE healthy tissue and peripheral blood from 20 patients. Numerous heterozygous patients in peripheral blood DNA were homozygous for the A-allele in both tumor and healthy FFPE tissues. Our findings indicate that, although FFPE tissue might be a suitable specimen for genotyping, VEGF −1154 does not give reliable results on this type of material. As other SNPs may also have this limitation, genotype concordance should first be confirmed by comparing results obtained from FFPE and fresh sample analyses. PMID:25079441

  10. High-Throughput Profiling of FFPE Tissue Using Parallel Electrophoresis and MALDI MS

    PubMed Central

    Aerni, Hans-Rudolf; Cornett, Dale S.

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues (FFPE) is increasingly recognized as a strategy for the discovery and validation of clinically useful biomarker candidates. Large tissue collections including tissue microarrays (TMA) are available but current analytical strategies for their characterization have limited throughput. In this report, we describe a workflow for rapid analysis of hundreds of FFPE tissue specimens. The strategy combines parallel sample processing and on-chip electrophoresis with automated MALDI MS analysis. The method is optimized for small quantities of clinically valuable tissues allowing detection of hundreds of peptides from a single core in a TMA section. We describe results from the optimization of the method and apply it for the analysis of tissue microarrays containing formalin fixed tissue specimens from human kidney. PMID:19650658

  11. A laser microdissection-based workflow for FFPE tissue microproteomics: Important considerations for small sample processing.

    PubMed

    Longuespée, Rémi; Alberts, Deborah; Pottier, Charles; Smargiasso, Nicolas; Mazzucchelli, Gabriel; Baiwir, Dominique; Kriegsmann, Mark; Herfs, Michael; Kriegsmann, Jörg; Delvenne, Philippe; De Pauw, Edwin

    2016-07-15

    Proteomic methods are today widely applied to formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples for several applications in research, especially in molecular pathology. To date, there is an unmet need for the analysis of small tissue samples, such as for early cancerous lesions. Indeed, no method has yet been proposed for the reproducible processing of small FFPE tissue samples to allow biomarker discovery. In this work, we tested several procedures to process laser microdissected tissue pieces bearing less than 3000 cells. Combined with appropriate settings for liquid chromatography mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis, a citric acid antigen retrieval (CAAR)-based procedure was established, allowing to identify more than 1400 proteins from a single microdissected breast cancer tissue biopsy. This work demonstrates important considerations concerning the handling and processing of laser microdissected tissue samples of extremely limited size, in the process opening new perspectives in molecular pathology. A proof of the proposed method for biomarker discovery, with respect to these specific handling considerations, is illustrated using the differential proteomic analysis of invasive breast carcinoma of no special type and invasive lobular triple-negative breast cancer tissues. This work will be of utmost importance for early biomarker discovery or in support of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging for microproteomics from small regions of interest. PMID:26690073

  12. Dose-Response Analysis of RNA-Seq Profiles in Archival Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) Samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples provide a vast untapped resource for chemical safety and translational science. To date, genomic profiling of FFPE samples has been limited by poor RNA quality and inconsistent results with limited utility in dose-response assessmen...

  13. Comparison of Nanostring nCounter® Data on FFPE Colon Cancer Samples and Affymetrix Microarray Data on Matched Frozen Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Deane, Natasha G.; Lewis, Keeli B.; Li, Jiang; Zhu, Jing; Washington, M. Kay; Beauchamp, R. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) stage II and III patients remains a challenge due to the difficulties of finding robust biomarkers suitable for testing clinical samples. The majority of published gene signatures of CRC have been generated on fresh frozen colorectal tissues. Because collection of frozen tissue is not practical for routine surgical pathology practice, a clinical test that improves prognostic capabilities beyond standard pathological staging of colon cancer will need to be designed for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. The NanoString nCounter® platform is a gene expression analysis tool developed for use with FFPE-derived samples. We designed a custom nCounter® codeset based on elements from multiple published fresh frozen tissue microarray-based prognostic gene signatures for colon cancer, and we used this platform to systematically compare gene expression data from FFPE with matched microarray array data from frozen tissues. Our results show moderate correlation of gene expression between two platforms and discovery of a small subset of genes as candidate biomarkers for colon cancer prognosis that are detectable and quantifiable in FFPE tissue sections. PMID:27176004

  14. Post-mortem testing; germline BRCA1/2 variant detection using archival FFPE non-tumor tissue. A new paradigm in genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Annabeth Høgh; Aagaard, Mads Malik; Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Steffensen, Karina Dahl; Waldstrøm, Marianne; Bojesen, Anders

    2016-08-01

    Accurate estimation of cancer risk in HBOC families often requires BRCA1/2 testing, but this may be impossible in deceased family members. Previous, testing archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue for germline BRCA1/2 variants was unsuccessful, except for the Jewish founder mutations. A high-throughput method to systematically test for variants in all coding regions of BRCA1/2 in archival FFPE samples of non-tumor tissue is described, using HaloPlex target enrichment and next-generation sequencing. In a validation study, correct identification of variants or wild-type was possible in 25 out of 30 (83%) FFPE samples (age range 1-14 years), with a known variant status in BRCA1/2. No false positive was found. Unsuccessful identification was due to highly degraded DNA or presence of large intragenic deletions. In clinical use, a total of 201 FFPE samples (aged 0-43 years) were processed. Thirty-six samples were rejected because of highly degraded DNA or failed library preparation. Fifteen samples were investigated to search for a known variant. In the remaining 150 samples (aged 0-38 years), three variants known to affect function and one variant likely to affect function in BRCA1, six variants known to affect function and one variant likely to affect function in BRCA2, as well as four variants of unknown significance (VUS) in BRCA1 and three VUS in BRCA2 were discovered. It is now possible to test for germline BRCA1/2 variants in deceased persons, using archival FFPE samples from non-tumor tissue. Accurate genetic counseling is achievable in families where variant testing would otherwise be impossible. PMID:26733283

  15. MALDI mass spectrometry imaging of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Gorzolka, Karin; Walch, Axel

    2014-11-01

    The molecular investigation of archived formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples provides the chance to obtain molecular patterns as indicatives for treatment and clinical end points. MALDI mass spectrometry imaging is capable of localizing molecules like proteins and peptides in tissue sections and became a favorite platform for the targeted and non-targeted approaches, especially in clinical investigations for biomarker research. In FFPE tissues the recovery of proteomic information is constrained by fixation-induced cross-links of proteins. The promising new insights obtained from FFPE in combination with the comprehensive patients' data caused much progress in the optimization of MS imaging protocols to investigate FFPE samples. This review presents the past and current research in MALDI MS imaging of FFPE tissues, demonstrating the improvement of analyses, their actual limitations, but also the promising future perspectives for histopathological and tissue-based research. PMID:24838644

  16. Proteomic analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue by MALDI imaging mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Casadonte, Rita; Caprioli, Richard M

    2012-01-01

    Archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue collections represent a valuable informational resource for proteomic studies. Multiple FFPE core biopsies can be assembled in a single block to form tissue microarrays (TMAs). We describe a protocol for analyzing protein in FFPE -TMAs using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MAL DI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). The workflow incorporates an antigen retrieval step following deparaffinization, in situ trypsin digestion, matrix application and then mass spectrometry signal acquisition. The direct analysis of FFPE -TMA tissue using IMS allows direct analysis of multiple tissue samples in a single experiment without extraction and purification of proteins. The advantages of high speed and throughput, easy sample handling and excellent reproducibility make this technology a favorable approach for the proteomic analysis of clinical research cohorts with large sample numbers. For example, TMA analysis of 300 FFPE cores would typically require 6 h of total time through data acquisition, not including data analysis. PMID:22011652

  17. The effects of age-in-block on RNA-seq analysis of archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    Archival samples represent a vast resource for identification of chemical and pharmaceutical targets. Previous use of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples has been limited due to changes in RNA introduced by fixation and embedding procedures. Recent advances in RNA-seq...

  18. Molecular characterisation of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) breast tumour specimens using a custom 512-gene breast cancer bead array-based platform

    PubMed Central

    Abramovitz, M; Barwick, B G; Willis, S; Young, B; Catzavelos, C; Li, Z; Kodani, M; Tang, W; Bouzyk, M; Moreno, C S; Leyland-Jones, B

    2011-01-01

    Background: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumour tissue represents an immense but mainly untapped resource with respect to molecular profiling. The DASL (cDNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension, and Ligation) assay is a recently described, RT–PCR-based, highly multiplexed high-throughput gene expression platform developed by Illumina specifically for fragmented RNA typically obtained from FFPE specimens, which enables expression profiling. In order to extend the utility of the DASL assay for breast cancer, we have custom designed and validated a 512-gene human breast cancer panel. Methods: The RNA from FFPE breast tumour specimens were analysed using the DASL assay. Breast cancer subtype was defined from pathology immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. Differentially expressed genes between the IHC-defined subtypes were assessed by prediction analysis of microarrays (PAM) and then used in the analysis of two published data sets with clinical outcome data. Results: Gene expression signatures on our custom breast cancer panel were very reproducible between replicates (average Pearson's R2=0.962) and the 152 genes common to both the standard cancer DASL panel (Illumina) and our breast cancer DASL panel were similarly expressed for samples run on both panels (average R2=0.877). Moreover, expression of ESR1, PGR and ERBB2 corresponded well with their respective pathology-defined IHC status. A 30-gene set indicative of IHC-defined breast cancer subtypes was found to segregate samples based on their subtype in our data sets and published data sets. Furthermore, several of these genes were significantly associated with overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) in these previously published data sets, indicating that they are biomarkers of the different breast cancer subtypes and the prognostic outcomes associated with these subtypes. Conclusion: We have demonstrated the ability to expression profile degraded RNA transcripts derived from FFPE

  19. High Fidelity Copy Number Analysis of Formalin-Fixed and Paraffin-Embedded Tissues Using Affymetrix Cytoscan HD Chip

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yan P.; Michalopoulos, Amantha; Ding, Ying; Tseng, George; Luo, Jian-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Detection of human genome copy number variation (CNV) is one of the most important analyses in diagnosing human malignancies. Genome CNV detection in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues remains challenging due to suboptimal DNA quality and failure to use appropriate baseline controls for such tissues. Here, we report a modified method in analyzing CNV in FFPE tissues using microarray with Affymetrix Cytoscan HD chips. Gel purification was applied to select DNA with good quality and data of fresh frozen and FFPE tissues from healthy individuals were included as baseline controls in our data analysis. Our analysis showed a 91% overlap between CNV detection by microarray with FFPE tissues and chromosomal abnormality detection by karyotyping with fresh tissues on 8 cases of lymphoma samples. The CNV overlap between matched frozen and FFPE tissues reached 93.8%. When the analyses were restricted to regions containing genes, 87.1% concordance between FFPE and fresh frozen tissues was found. The analysis was further validated by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization on these samples using probes specific for BRAF and CITED2. The results suggested that the modified method using Affymetrix Cytoscan HD chip gave rise to a significant improvement over most of the previous methods in terms of accuracy in detecting CNV in FFPE tissues. This FFPE microarray methodology may hold promise for broad application of CNV analysis on clinical samples. PMID:24699316

  20. Utility of different massive parallel sequencing platforms for mutation profiling in clinical samples and identification of pitfalls using FFPE tissue.

    PubMed

    Fassunke, Jana; Haller, Florian; Hebele, Simone; Moskalev, Evgeny A; Penzel, Roland; Pfarr, Nicole; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine; Endris, Volker

    2015-11-01

    In the growing field of personalised medicine, the analysis of numerous potential targets is becoming a challenge in terms of work load, tissue availability, as well as costs. The molecular analysis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has shifted from the analysis of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status to the analysis of different gene regions, including resistance mutations or translocations. Massive parallel sequencing (MPS) allows rapid comprehensive mutation testing in routine molecular pathological diagnostics even on small formalin-fixed, paraffin‑embedded (FFPE) biopsies. In this study, we compared and evaluated currently used MPS platforms for their application in routine pathological diagnostics. We initiated a first round‑robin testing of 30 cases diagnosed with NSCLC and a known EGFR gene mutation status. In this study, three pathology institutes from Germany received FFPE tumour sections that had been individually processed. Fragment libraries were prepared by targeted multiplex PCR using institution‑specific gene panels. Sequencing was carried out using three MPS systems: MiSeq™, GS Junior and PGM Ion Torrent™. In two institutes, data analysis was performed with the platform-specific software and the Integrative Genomics Viewer. In one institute, data analysis was carried out using an in-house software system. Of 30 samples, 26 were analysed by all institutes. Concerning the EGFR mutation status, concordance was found in 26 out of 26 samples. The analysis of a few samples failed due to poor DNA quality in alternating institutes. We found 100% concordance when comparing the results of the EGFR mutation status. A total of 38 additional mutations were identified in the 26 samples. In two samples, minor variants were found which could not be confirmed by qPCR. Other characteristic variants were identified as fixation artefacts by reanalyzing the respective sample by Sanger sequencing. Overall, the results of this study

  1. Utility of different massive parallel sequencing platforms for mutation profiling in clinical samples and identification of pitfalls using FFPE tissue

    PubMed Central

    FASSUNKE, JANA; HALLER, FLORIAN; HEBELE, SIMONE; MOSKALEV, EVGENY A.; PENZEL, ROLAND; PFARR, NICOLE; MERKELBACH-BRUSE, SABINE; ENDRIS, VOLKER

    2015-01-01

    In the growing field of personalised medicine, the analysis of numerous potential targets is becoming a challenge in terms of work load, tissue availability, as well as costs. The molecular analysis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has shifted from the analysis of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status to the analysis of different gene regions, including resistance mutations or translocations. Massive parallel sequencing (MPS) allows rapid comprehensive mutation testing in routine molecular pathological diagnostics even on small formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) biopsies. In this study, we compared and evaluated currently used MPS platforms for their application in routine pathological diagnostics. We initiated a first round-robin testing of 30 cases diagnosed with NSCLC and a known EGFR gene mutation status. In this study, three pathology institutes from Germany received FFPE tumour sections that had been individually processed. Fragment libraries were prepared by targeted multiplex PCR using institution-specific gene panels. Sequencing was carried out using three MPS systems: MiSeq™, GS Junior and PGM Ion Torrent™. In two institutes, data analysis was performed with the platform-specific software and the Integrative Genomics Viewer. In one institute, data analysis was carried out using an in-house software system. Of 30 samples, 26 were analysed by all institutes. Concerning the EGFR mutation status, concordance was found in 26 out of 26 samples. The analysis of a few samples failed due to poor DNA quality in alternating institutes. We found 100% concordance when comparing the results of the EGFR mutation status. A total of 38 additional mutations were identified in the 26 samples. In two samples, minor variants were found which could not be confirmed by qPCR. Other characteristic variants were identified as fixation artefacts by reanalyzing the respective sample by Sanger sequencing. Overall, the results of this study

  2. Rates of MAGE-A3 and PRAME expressing tumors in FFPE tissue specimens from bladder cancer patients: potential targets for antigen-specific cancer immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Lerut, Evelyne; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Joniau, Steven; Gruselle, Olivier; Coche, Thierry; Therasse, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Antigen-specific active immunotherapy is an investigational therapeutic approach of potential interest for bladder cancer regardless of disease stage. Clinical development of antigen-specific immunotherapeutics against bladder cancer must be preceded by assessment of the expression of relevant genes in bladder tumors. The objectives of this study (NCT01706185) were to assess the rate of expression of the MAGE-A3 and PRAME genes in bladder tumors and to investigate the feasibility of using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor tissues for testing. Materials and methods: Archived FFPE bladder tumor specimens (any stage) were tested for mRNA expression of MAGE-A3 and PRAME using antigen-specific quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays. Data on patients and tumor characteristics were obtained from hospital records to investigate these characteristics’ possible association with the antigen expression. Results: Over 92% of the 156 tumors examined gave valid antigen test results. Of the tumors with a valid test, 46.5% were MAGE-A3-positive, 32.2% were PRAME-positive and 59.7% positive for at least one of them. Exploratory analyses of possible associations between antigen expression and patient or tumor characteristics did not identify clear associations between antigen expression and any of the variables investigated. Conclusions: Assessment of tumor antigen mRNA expression by using FFPE bladder tissues was feasible. The rates of MAGE-A3-positive and PRAME-positive tumors indicate that both antigens may be interesting targets for immunotherapeutics against bladder cancer. PMID:26464715

  3. Validation of targeted next-generation sequencing for RAS mutation detection in FFPE colorectal cancer tissues: comparison with Sanger sequencing and ARMS-Scorpion real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Wu, Huanwen; Wang, Li; Zhang, Hui; Duan, Huanli; Lu, Junliang; Liang, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To validate the targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) platform-Ion Torrent PGM for KRAS exon 2 and expanded RAS mutations detection in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) colorectal cancer (CRC) specimens, with comparison of Sanger sequencing and ARMS-Scorpion real-time PCR. Setting Beijing, China. Participants 51 archived FFPE CRC samples (36 men, 15 women) were retrospectively randomly selected and then checked by an experienced pathologist for sequencing based on histological confirmation of CRC and availability of sufficient tissue. Methods RAS mutations were detected in the 51 FFPE CRC samples by PGM analysis, Sanger sequencing and the Therascreen KRAS assay, respectively. Agreement among the 3 methods was assessed. Assay sensitivity was further determined by sequencing serially diluted DNA from FFPE cell lines with known mutation statuses. Results 13 of 51 (25.5%) cases had a mutation in KRAS exon 2, as determined by PGM analysis. PGM analysis showed 100% (51/51) concordance with Sanger sequencing (κ=1.000, 95% CI 1 to 1) and 98.04% (50/51) agreement with the Therascreen assay (κ=0.947, 95% CI 0.844 to 1) for detecting KRAS exon 2 mutations, respectively. The only discrepant case harboured a KRAS exon 2 mutation (c.37G>T) that was not covered by the Therascreen kit. The dilution series experiment results showed that PGM was able to detect KRAS mutations at a frequency of as low as 1%. Importantly, RAS mutations other than KRAS exon 2 mutations were also detected in 10 samples by PGM. Furthermore, mutations in other CRC-related genes could be simultaneously detected in a single test by PGM. Conclusions The targeted NGS platform is specific and sensitive for KRAS exon 2 mutation detection and is appropriate for use in routine clinical testing. Moreover, it is sample saving and cost-efficient and time-efficient, and has great potential for clinical application to expand testing to include mutations in RAS and other CRC-related genes. PMID

  4. Comparison of Accuracy of Whole-Exome Sequencing with Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded and Fresh Frozen Tissue Samples

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Mi Jeong; Kim, Ryong Nam; Kim, Yu Jin; Song, Ji-Young; Jung, Kyung Soo; Shin, Young Kee

    2015-01-01

    Formalin fixing with paraffin embedding (FFPE) has been a standard sample preparation method for decades, and archival FFPE samples are still very useful resources. Nonetheless, the use of FFPE samples in cancer genome analysis using next-generation sequencing, which is a powerful technique for the identification of genomic alterations at the nucleotide level, has been challenging due to poor DNA quality and artificial sequence alterations. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing of matched frozen samples and FFPE samples of tissues from 4 cancer patients and compared the next-generation sequencing data obtained from these samples. The major differences between data obtained from the 2 types of sample were the shorter insert size and artificial base alterations in the FFPE samples. A high proportion of short inserts in the FFPE samples resulted in overlapping paired reads, which could lead to overestimation of certain variants; >20% of the inserts in the FFPE samples were double sequenced. A large number of soft clipped reads was found in the sequencing data of the FFPE samples, and about 30% of total bases were soft clipped. The artificial base alterations, C>T and G>A, were observed in FFPE samples only, and the alteration rate ranged from 200 to 1,200 per 1M bases when sequencing errors were removed. Although high-confidence mutation calls in the FFPE samples were compatible to that in the frozen samples, caution should be exercised in terms of the artifacts, especially for low-confidence calls. Despite the clearly observed artifacts, archival FFPE samples can be a good resource for discovery or validation of biomarkers in cancer research based on whole-exome sequencing. PMID:26641479

  5. Comparison of Accuracy of Whole-Exome Sequencing with Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded and Fresh Frozen Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ensel; Choi, Yoon-La; Kwon, Mi Jeong; Kim, Ryong Nam; Kim, Yu Jin; Song, Ji-Young; Jung, Kyung Soo; Shin, Young Kee

    2015-01-01

    Formalin fixing with paraffin embedding (FFPE) has been a standard sample preparation method for decades, and archival FFPE samples are still very useful resources. Nonetheless, the use of FFPE samples in cancer genome analysis using next-generation sequencing, which is a powerful technique for the identification of genomic alterations at the nucleotide level, has been challenging due to poor DNA quality and artificial sequence alterations. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing of matched frozen samples and FFPE samples of tissues from 4 cancer patients and compared the next-generation sequencing data obtained from these samples. The major differences between data obtained from the 2 types of sample were the shorter insert size and artificial base alterations in the FFPE samples. A high proportion of short inserts in the FFPE samples resulted in overlapping paired reads, which could lead to overestimation of certain variants; >20% of the inserts in the FFPE samples were double sequenced. A large number of soft clipped reads was found in the sequencing data of the FFPE samples, and about 30% of total bases were soft clipped. The artificial base alterations, C>T and G>A, were observed in FFPE samples only, and the alteration rate ranged from 200 to 1,200 per 1M bases when sequencing errors were removed. Although high-confidence mutation calls in the FFPE samples were compatible to that in the frozen samples, caution should be exercised in terms of the artifacts, especially for low-confidence calls. Despite the clearly observed artifacts, archival FFPE samples can be a good resource for discovery or validation of biomarkers in cancer research based on whole-exome sequencing. PMID:26641479

  6. High quality copy number and genotype data from FFPE samples using Molecular Inversion Probe (MIP) microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuker; Carlton, Victoria E.H.; Karlin-Neumann, George; Sapolsky, Ronald; Zhang, Li; Moorhead, Martin; Wang, Zhigang C.; Richardson, Andrea L.; Warren, Robert; Walther, Axel; Bondy, Melissa; Sahin, Aysegul; Krahe, Ralf; Tuna, Musaffe; Thompson, Patricia A.; Spellman, Paul T.; Gray, Joe W.; Mills, Gordon B.; Faham, Malek

    2009-02-24

    A major challenge facing DNA copy number (CN) studies of tumors is that most banked samples with extensive clinical follow-up information are Formalin-Fixed Paraffin Embedded (FFPE). DNA from FFPE samples generally underperforms or suffers high failure rates compared to fresh frozen samples because of DNA degradation and cross-linking during FFPE fixation and processing. As FFPE protocols may vary widely between labs and samples may be stored for decades at room temperature, an ideal FFPE CN technology should work on diverse sample sets. Molecular Inversion Probe (MIP) technology has been applied successfully to obtain high quality CN and genotype data from cell line and frozen tumor DNA. Since the MIP probes require only a small ({approx}40 bp) target binding site, we reasoned they may be well suited to assess degraded FFPE DNA. We assessed CN with a MIP panel of 50,000 markers in 93 FFPE tumor samples from 7 diverse collections. For 38 FFPE samples from three collections we were also able to asses CN in matched fresh frozen tumor tissue. Using an input of 37 ng genomic DNA, we generated high quality CN data with MIP technology in 88% of FFPE samples from seven diverse collections. When matched fresh frozen tissue was available, the performance of FFPE DNA was comparable to that of DNA obtained from matched frozen tumor (genotype concordance averaged 99.9%), with only a modest loss in performance in FFPE. MIP technology can be used to generate high quality CN and genotype data in FFPE as well as fresh frozen samples.

  7. Accuracy of Molecular Data Generated with FFPE Biospecimens: Lessons from the Literature.

    PubMed

    Greytak, Sarah R; Engel, Kelly B; Bass, B Paige; Moore, Helen M

    2015-04-15

    Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue biospecimens are a valuable resource for molecular cancer research. Although much can be gained from their use, it remains unclear whether the genomic and expression profiles obtained from FFPE biospecimens accurately reflect the physiologic condition of the patient from which they were procured, or if such profiles are confounded by biologic effects from formalin fixation and processing. To assess the physiologic accuracy of genomic and expression data generated with FFPE specimens, we surveyed the literature for articles investigating genomic and expression endpoints in case-matched FFPE and fresh or frozen human biospecimens using the National Cancer Institute's Biospecimen Research Database (http://biospecimens.cancer.gov/brd). Results of the survey revealed that the level of concordance between differentially preserved biospecimens varied among analytical parameters and platforms but also among reports, genes/transcripts of interest, and tumor status. The identified analytical techniques and parameters that resulted in strong correlations between FFPE and frozen biospecimens may provide guidance when optimizing molecular protocols for FFPE use; however, discrepancies reported for similar assays also illustrate the importance of validating protocols optimized for use with FFPE specimens with a case-matched fresh or frozen cohort for each platform, gene or transcript, and FFPE processing regime. On the basis of evidence published to date, validation of analytical parameters with a properly handled frozen cohort is necessary to ensure a high degree of concordance and confidence in the results obtained with FFPE biospecimens. PMID:25836717

  8. High-mass-resolution MALDI mass spectrometry imaging of metabolites from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Ly, Alice; Buck, Achim; Balluff, Benjamin; Sun, Na; Gorzolka, Karin; Feuchtinger, Annette; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Kuppen, Peter J K; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Weirich, Gregor; Erlmeier, Franziska; Langer, Rupert; Aubele, Michaela; Zitzelsberger, Horst; McDonnell, Liam; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel

    2016-08-01

    Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens are the gold standard for histological examination, and they provide valuable molecular information in tissue-based research. Metabolite assessment from archived tissue samples has not been extensively conducted because of a lack of appropriate protocols and concerns about changes in metabolite content or chemical state due to tissue processing. We present a protocol for the in situ analysis of metabolite content from FFPE samples using a high-mass-resolution matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-FT-ICR-MSI) platform. The method involves FFPE tissue sections that undergo deparaffinization and matrix coating by 9-aminoacridine before MALDI-MSI. Using this platform, we previously detected ∼1,500 m/z species in the mass range m/z 50-1,000 in FFPE samples; the overlap compared with fresh frozen samples is 72% of m/z species, indicating that metabolites are largely conserved in FFPE tissue samples. This protocol can be reproducibly performed on FFPE tissues, including small samples such as tissue microarrays and biopsies. The procedure can be completed in a day, depending on the size of the sample measured and raster size used. Advantages of this approach include easy sample handling, reproducibility, high throughput and the ability to demonstrate molecular spatial distributions in situ. The data acquired with this protocol can be used in research and clinical practice. PMID:27414759

  9. Comparison of eight commercially available kits for DNA extraction from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Janecka, Anna; Adamczyk, Agnieszka; Gasińska, Anna

    2015-05-01

    A proper extraction method from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) blocks is essential to obtain DNA of satisfactory quality/quantity. We compared the effectiveness of eight commercially available kits for DNA extraction based on 10 FFPE tissues. Kits differed significantly in terms of DNA yield, purity, and quality. Using the QIAamp DNA FFPE Tissue Kit (Qiagen) and the ReliaPrep FFPE gDNA Miniprep System (Promega), we obtained DNA of the highest quality and acceptable quantity. We also demonstrated that overnight digestion of samples usually improved DNA yield and/or purity. For precious or limited material, double elution is recommended for obtaining up to 42% higher amount of DNA. PMID:25640584

  10. The paraffin-embedded RNA metric (PERM) for RNA isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Chung, Joon-Yong; Cho, Hanbyoul; Hewitt, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    RNA isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is commonly evaluated in both investigative and diagnostic pathology. However, the quality of the data is directly impacted by RNA quality. The RNA integrity number (RIN), an algorithm based on a combination of electrophoretic features, is widely applied to RNA isolated from paraffin-embedded tissue, but it is a poor indicator of the quality of that RNA. Here we describe the novel paraffin-embedded RNA metric (PERM) for quantifying the quality of RNA from FFPE tissue. The PERM is based on a formula that approximates a weighted area-under-the-curve analysis of an electropherogram of the extracted RNA. Using biochemically degraded RNAs prepared from experimentally fixed mouse kidney specimens, we demonstrate that PERM values correlate with mRNA transcript measurements determined using the QuantiGene system. Furthermore, PERM values correlate with real-time PCR data. Our results demonstrate that the PERM can be used to qualify RNA for different end-point studies and may be a valuable tool for molecular studies using RNA extracted from FFPE tissue. PMID:27177816

  11. Optimization of gene expression microarray protocol for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Belder, Nevin; Coşkun, Öznur; Erdoğan, Beyza Doğanay; Savaş, Berna; Ensari, Arzu; Özdağ, Hilal

    2016-03-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is a widely available clinical specimen for retrospective studies. The possibility of long-term clinical follow-up of FFPE samples makes them a valuable source to evaluate links between molecular and clinical information. Working with FFPE samples in the molecular research area, especially using high-throughput molecular techniques such as microarray gene expression profiling, has come into prominence. Because of the harmful effects of formalin fixation process such as degradation of nucleic acids, cross-linking with proteins, and chemical modifications on DNA and RNA, there are some limitations in gene expression profiling studies using FFPE samples. To date many studies have been conducted to evaluate gene expression profiling using microarrays (Thomas et al., Thomas et al. (2013) [1]; Scicchitano et al., Scicchitano et al. (2006) [2]; Frank et al., Frank et al. (2007) [3]; Fedorowicz et al., Fedorowicz et al. (2009) [4]). However, there is still no generally accepted, efficient and standardized procedure for microarray analysis of FFPE samples. This paper describes the microarray data presented in our recently accepted to be published article showing a standard protocol from deparaffinization of FFPE tissue sections and RNA extraction to microarray gene expression analysis. Here we represent our data in detail, deposited in the gene expression omnibus (GEO) database with the accession number GSE73883. Four combinations of two different cRNA/cDNA preparation and labeling protocols with two different array platforms (Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 and U133_X3P) were evaluated to determine which combination gives the best percentage of present call. The study presents a dataset for comparative analysis which has a potential in terms of providing a robust protocol for gene expression profiling with FFPE tissue samples. PMID:26981433

  12. Optimization of gene expression microarray protocol for formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues

    PubMed Central

    Belder, Nevin; Coşkun, Öznur; Erdoğan, Beyza Doğanay; Savaş, Berna; Ensari, Arzu; Özdağ, Hilal

    2016-01-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is a widely available clinical specimen for retrospective studies. The possibility of long-term clinical follow-up of FFPE samples makes them a valuable source to evaluate links between molecular and clinical information. Working with FFPE samples in the molecular research area, especially using high-throughput molecular techniques such as microarray gene expression profiling, has come into prominence. Because of the harmful effects of formalin fixation process such as degradation of nucleic acids, cross-linking with proteins, and chemical modifications on DNA and RNA, there are some limitations in gene expression profiling studies using FFPE samples. To date many studies have been conducted to evaluate gene expression profiling using microarrays (Thomas et al., Thomas et al. (2013) [1]; Scicchitano et al., Scicchitano et al. (2006) [2]; Frank et al., Frank et al. (2007) [3]; Fedorowicz et al., Fedorowicz et al. (2009) [4]). However, there is still no generally accepted, efficient and standardized procedure for microarray analysis of FFPE samples. This paper describes the microarray data presented in our recently accepted to be published article showing a standard protocol from deparaffinization of FFPE tissue sections and RNA extraction to microarray gene expression analysis. Here we represent our data in detail, deposited in the gene expression omnibus (GEO) database with the accession number GSE73883. Four combinations of two different cRNA/cDNA preparation and labeling protocols with two different array platforms (Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 and U133_X3P) were evaluated to determine which combination gives the best percentage of present call. The study presents a dataset for comparative analysis which has a potential in terms of providing a robust protocol for gene expression profiling with FFPE tissue samples. PMID:26981433

  13. Unrestricted modification search reveals lysine methylation as major modification induced by tissue formalin fixation and paraffin embedding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Muller, Markus; Xu, Bo; Yoshida, Yutaka; Horlacher, Oliver; Nikitin, Frederic; Garessus, Samuel; Magdeldin, Sameh; Kinoshita, Naohiko; Fujinaka, Hidehiko; Yaoita, Eishin; Hasegawa, Miki; Lisacek, Frederique; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2015-08-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is considered as an appropriate alternative to frozen/fresh tissue for proteomic analysis. Here we study formalin-induced alternations on a proteome-wide level. We compared LC-MS/MS data of FFPE and frozen human kidney tissues by two methods. First, clustering analysis revealed that the biological variation is higher than the variation introduced by the two sample processing techniques and clusters formed in accordance with the biological tissue origin and not with the sample preservation method. Second, we combined open modification search and spectral counting to find modifications that are more abundant in FFPE samples compared to frozen samples. This analysis revealed lysine methylation (+14 Da) as the most frequent modification induced by FFPE preservation. We also detected a slight increase in methylene (+12 Da) and methylol (+30 Da) adducts as well as a putative modification of +58 Da, but they contribute less to the overall modification count. Subsequent SEQUEST analysis and X!Tandem searches of different datasets confirmed these trends. However, the modifications due to FFPE sample processing are a minor disturbance affecting 2-6% of all peptide-spectrum matches and the peptides lists identified in FFPE and frozen tissues are still highly similar. PMID:25825003

  14. Absolute Quantitation of Met Using Mass Spectrometry for Clinical Application: Assay Precision, Stability, and Correlation with MET Gene Amplification in FFPE Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Catenacci, Daniel V. T.; Liao, Wei-Li; Thyparambil, Sheeno; Henderson, Les; Xu, Peng; Zhao, Lei; Rambo, Brittany; Hart, John; Xiao, Shu-Yuan; Bengali, Kathleen; Uzzell, Jamar; Darfler, Marlene; Krizman, David B.; Cecchi, Fabiola; Bottaro, Donald P.; Karrison, Theodore; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Hembrough, Todd; Burrows, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Background Overexpression of Met tyrosine kinase receptor is associated with poor prognosis. Overexpression, and particularly MET amplification, are predictive of response to Met-specific therapy in preclinical models. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues is currently used to select for ‘high Met’ expressing tumors for Met inhibitor trials. IHC suffers from antibody non-specificity, lack of quantitative resolution, and, when quantifying multiple proteins, inefficient use of scarce tissue. Methods After describing the development of the Liquid-Tissue-Selected Reaction Monitoring-mass spectrometry (LT-SRM-MS) Met assay, we evaluated the expression level of Met in 130 FFPE gastroesophageal cancer (GEC) tissues. We assessed the correlation of SRM Met expression to IHC and mean MET gene copy number (GCN)/nucleus or MET/CEP7 ratio by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Results Proteomic mapping of recombinant Met identified 418TEFTTALQR426 as the optimal SRM peptide. Limits of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) for this peptide were 150 and 200 amol/µg tumor protein, respectively. The assay demonstrated excellent precision and temporal stability of measurements in serial sections analyzed one year apart. Expression levels of 130 GEC tissues ranged (<150 amol/µg to 4669.5 amol/µg. High correlation was observed between SRM Met expression and both MET GCN and MET/CEP7 ratio as determined by FISH (n = 30; R2 = 0.898). IHC did not correlate well with SRM (n = 44; R2 = 0.537) nor FISH GCN (n = 31; R2 = 0.509). A Met SRM level of ≥1500 amol/µg was 100% sensitive (95% CI 0.69–1) and 100% specific (95% CI 0.92–1) for MET amplification. Conclusions The Met SRM assay measured the absolute Met levels in clinical tissues with high precision. Compared to IHC, SRM provided a quantitative and linear measurement of Met expression, reliably distinguishing between non-amplified and amplified MET

  15. Factors influencing the degradation of archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ran; Chung, Joon-Yong; Ylaya, Kris; Williams, Reginald L; Guerrero, Natalie; Nakatsuka, Nathan; Badie, Cortessia; Hewitt, Stephen M

    2011-04-01

    The loss of antigenicity in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections negatively affects both diagnostic histopathology and advanced molecular studies. The mechanisms underlying antigenicity loss in FFPE tissues remain unclear. The authors hypothesize that water is a crucial contributor to protein degradation and decrement of immunoreactivity in FFPE tissues. To test their hypothesis, they examined fixation time, processing time, and humidity of storage environment on protein integrity and antigenicity by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and protein extraction. This study revealed that inadequate tissue processing, resulting in retention of endogenous water in tissue sections, results in antigen degradation. Exposure to high humidity during storage results in significant protein degradation and reduced immunoreactivity, and the effects of storage humidity are temperature dependent. Slides stored under vacuum with desiccant do not protect against the effects of residual water from inadequate tissue processing. These results support that the presence of water, both endogenously and exogenously, plays a central role in antigenicity loss. Optimal tissue processing is essential. The parameters of optimal storage of unstained slides remain to be defined, as they are directly affected by preanalytic variables. Nevertheless, minimization of exposure to water is required for antigen preservation in FFPE tissue sections. PMID:21411807

  16. Robustness of Next Generation Sequencing on Older Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Carrick, Danielle Mercatante; Mehaffey, Michele G.; Sachs, Michael C.; Altekruse, Sean; Camalier, Corinne; Chuaqui, Rodrigo; Cozen, Wendy; Das, Biswajit; Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Lih, Chih-Jian; Lynch, Charles F.; Makhlouf, Hala; McGregor, Paul; McShane, Lisa M.; Phillips Rohan, JoyAnn; Walsh, William D.; Williams, Paul M.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Mechanic, Leah E.; Schully, Sheri D.

    2015-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies are used to detect somatic mutations in tumors and study germ line variation. Most NGS studies use DNA isolated from whole blood or fresh frozen tissue. However, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues are one of the most widely available clinical specimens. Their potential utility as a source of DNA for NGS would greatly enhance population-based cancer studies. While preliminary studies suggest FFPE tissue may be used for NGS, the feasibility of using archived FFPE specimens in population based studies and the effect of storage time on these specimens needs to be determined. We conducted a study to determine whether DNA in archived FFPE high-grade ovarian serous adenocarcinomas from Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registries Residual Tissue Repositories (RTR) was present in sufficient quantity and quality for NGS assays. Fifty-nine FFPE tissues, stored from 3 to 32 years, were obtained from three SEER RTR sites. DNA was extracted, quantified, quality assessed, and subjected to whole exome sequencing (WES). Following DNA extraction, 58 of 59 specimens (98%) yielded DNA and moved on to the library generation step followed by WES. Specimens stored for longer periods of time had significantly lower coverage of the target region (6% lower per 10 years, 95% CI: 3-10%) and lower average read depth (40x lower per 10 years, 95% CI: 18-60), although sufficient quality and quantity of WES data was obtained for data mining. Overall, 90% (53/59) of specimens provided usable NGS data regardless of storage time. This feasibility study demonstrates FFPE specimens acquired from SEER registries after varying lengths of storage time and under varying storage conditions are a promising source of DNA for NGS. PMID:26222067

  17. Three Dimensional Imaging of Paraffin Embedded Human Lung Tissue Samples by Micro-Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Anna E.; Vasilescu, Dragos M.; Seal, Katherine A. D.; Keyes, Samuel D.; Mavrogordato, Mark N.; Hogg, James C.; Sinclair, Ian; Warner, Jane A.; Hackett, Tillie-Louise; Lackie, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding the three-dimensional (3-D) micro-architecture of lung tissue can provide insights into the pathology of lung disease. Micro computed tomography (µCT) has previously been used to elucidate lung 3D histology and morphometry in fixed samples that have been stained with contrast agents or air inflated and dried. However, non-destructive microstructural 3D imaging of formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues would facilitate retrospective analysis of extensive tissue archives of lung FFPE lung samples with linked clinical data. Methods FFPE human lung tissue samples (n = 4) were scanned using a Nikon metrology µCT scanner. Semi-automatic techniques were used to segment the 3D structure of airways and blood vessels. Airspace size (mean linear intercept, Lm) was measured on µCT images and on matched histological sections from the same FFPE samples imaged by light microscopy to validate µCT imaging. Results The µCT imaging protocol provided contrast between tissue and paraffin in FFPE samples (15mm x 7mm). Resolution (voxel size 6.7 µm) in the reconstructed images was sufficient for semi-automatic image segmentation of airways and blood vessels as well as quantitative airspace analysis. The scans were also used to scout for regions of interest, enabling time-efficient preparation of conventional histological sections. The Lm measurements from µCT images were not significantly different to those from matched histological sections. Conclusion We demonstrated how non-destructive imaging of routinely prepared FFPE samples by laboratory µCT can be used to visualize and assess the 3D morphology of the lung including by morphometric analysis. PMID:26030902

  18. Robustness of Next Generation Sequencing on Older Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissue.

    PubMed

    Carrick, Danielle Mercatante; Mehaffey, Michele G; Sachs, Michael C; Altekruse, Sean; Camalier, Corinne; Chuaqui, Rodrigo; Cozen, Wendy; Das, Biswajit; Hernandez, Brenda Y; Lih, Chih-Jian; Lynch, Charles F; Makhlouf, Hala; McGregor, Paul; McShane, Lisa M; Phillips Rohan, JoyAnn; Walsh, William D; Williams, Paul M; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Mechanic, Leah E; Schully, Sheri D

    2015-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies are used to detect somatic mutations in tumors and study germ line variation. Most NGS studies use DNA isolated from whole blood or fresh frozen tissue. However, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues are one of the most widely available clinical specimens. Their potential utility as a source of DNA for NGS would greatly enhance population-based cancer studies. While preliminary studies suggest FFPE tissue may be used for NGS, the feasibility of using archived FFPE specimens in population based studies and the effect of storage time on these specimens needs to be determined. We conducted a study to determine whether DNA in archived FFPE high-grade ovarian serous adenocarcinomas from Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registries Residual Tissue Repositories (RTR) was present in sufficient quantity and quality for NGS assays. Fifty-nine FFPE tissues, stored from 3 to 32 years, were obtained from three SEER RTR sites. DNA was extracted, quantified, quality assessed, and subjected to whole exome sequencing (WES). Following DNA extraction, 58 of 59 specimens (98%) yielded DNA and moved on to the library generation step followed by WES. Specimens stored for longer periods of time had significantly lower coverage of the target region (6% lower per 10 years, 95% CI: 3-10%) and lower average read depth (40x lower per 10 years, 95% CI: 18-60), although sufficient quality and quantity of WES data was obtained for data mining. Overall, 90% (53/59) of specimens provided usable NGS data regardless of storage time. This feasibility study demonstrates FFPE specimens acquired from SEER registries after varying lengths of storage time and under varying storage conditions are a promising source of DNA for NGS. PMID:26222067

  19. A well-based reverse-phase protein array of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Chung, Joon-Yong; Hewitt, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers from tissue-based proteomic studies directly contribute to defining disease states as well as promise to improve early detection or provide for further targeted therapeutics. In the clinical setting, tissue samples are preserved as formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue blocks for histological examination. However, proteomic analysis of FFPE tissue is complicated due to the high level of covalently cross-linked proteins arising from formalin fixation. To address these challenges, we developed well-based reverse-phase protein array (RPPA). This approach is a robust protein isolation methodology (29.44 ± 7.8 μg per 1 mm(3) of FFPE tissue) paired with a novel on electrochemiluminescence detection system. Protein samples derived from FFPE tissue by means of laser capture dissection, with as few as 500 shots, demonstrate measurable signal differences for different proteins. The lysates coated to the array plate, dried up and vacuum-sealed, remain stable up to 2 months at room temperature. This methodology is directly applicable to FFPE tissue and presents the direct opportunity of addressing hypothesis within clinical trials and well-annotated clinical tissue repositories. PMID:26043998

  20. Comparison of multiple protein extraction buffers for GeLC-MS/MS proteomic analysis of liver and colon formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Broeckx, Valérie; Boonen, Kurt; Pringels, Lentel; Sagaert, Xavier; Prenen, Hans; Landuyt, Bart; Schoofs, Liliane; Maes, Evelyne

    2016-02-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens represent a potential valuable source of samples for clinical research. Since these specimens are banked in hospital archives, large cohorts of samples can be collected in short periods of time which can all be linked with a patients' clinical history. Therefore, the use of FFPE tissue in protein biomarker discovery studies gains interest. However, despite the growing number of FFPE proteome studies in the literature, there is a lack of a FFPE proteomics standard operating procedure (SOP). One of the challenging steps in the development of such a SOP is the ability to obtain an efficient and repeatable extraction of full length FFPE proteins. In this study, the protein extraction efficiency of eight protein extraction buffers is critically compared with GeLC-MS/MS (1D gel electrophoresis followed by in-gel digestion and LC-MS/MS). The data variation caused by using these extraction buffers was investigated since the variation is a very important aspect when using FFPE tissue as a source for biomarker detection. In addition, a qualitative comparison was made between the protein extraction efficiency and repeatability for FFPE tissue and fresh frozen tissue. PMID:26676081

  1. Genome-wide detection of DNase I hypersensitive sites in single cells and FFPE tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wenfei; Tang, Qingsong; Wan, Mimi; Cui, Kairong; Zhang, Yi; Ren, Gang; Ni, Bing; Sklar, Jeffrey; Przytycka, Teresa M; Childs, Richard; Levens, David; Zhao, Keji

    2015-12-01

    DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) provide important information on the presence of transcriptional regulatory elements and the state of chromatin in mammalian cells. Conventional DNase sequencing (DNase-seq) for genome-wide DHSs profiling is limited by the requirement of millions of cells. Here we report an ultrasensitive strategy, called single-cell DNase sequencing (scDNase-seq) for detection of genome-wide DHSs in single cells. We show that DHS patterns at the single-cell level are highly reproducible among individual cells. Among different single cells, highly expressed gene promoters and enhancers associated with multiple active histone modifications display constitutive DHS whereas chromatin regions with fewer histone modifications exhibit high variation of DHS. Furthermore, the single-cell DHSs predict enhancers that regulate cell-specific gene expression programs and the cell-to-cell variations of DHS are predictive of gene expression. Finally, we apply scDNase-seq to pools of tumour cells and pools of normal cells, dissected from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue slides from patients with thyroid cancer, and detect thousands of tumour-specific DHSs. Many of these DHSs are associated with promoters and enhancers critically involved in cancer development. Analysis of the DHS sequences uncovers one mutation (chr18: 52417839G>C) in the tumour cells of a patient with follicular thyroid carcinoma, which affects the binding of the tumour suppressor protein p53 and correlates with decreased expression of its target gene TXNL1. In conclusion, scDNase-seq can reliably detect DHSs in single cells, greatly extending the range of applications of DHS analysis both for basic and for translational research, and may provide critical information for personalized medicine. PMID:26605532

  2. Efficient method for the proteomic analysis of fixed and embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Palmer-Toy, Darryl Erik; Krastins, Bryan; Sarracino, David A; Nadol, Joseph B; Merchant, Saumil N

    2005-01-01

    Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues present a particular challenge for proteomic analysis. Yet, most of the archived tissues in hospitals and tissue banks worldwide are only available in this form. We have developed conditions for removal of the embedding medium and protein digestion, such that informative tryptic peptides are released from fixed proteins which are suitable for analysis by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). We demonstrate that the peptide identifications made by this approach compare favorably to those made from matched fresh frozen tissue. Moreover, we demonstrate that a high level of sequence coverage can be observed for proteins of interest. PMID:16335994

  3. Optimized protocol for quantitative multiple reaction monitoring-based proteomic analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Jacob J.; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Schoenherr, Regine M.; Yan, Ping; Allison, Kimberly; Shipley, Melissa; Lerch, Melissa; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Baird, Geoffrey Stuart; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2016-01-01

    Despite a clinical, economic, and regulatory imperative to develop companion diagnostics, precious few new biomarkers have been successfully translated into clinical use, due in part to inadequate protein assay technologies to support large-scale testing of hundreds of candidate biomarkers in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues. While the feasibility of using targeted, multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) for quantitative analyses of FFPE tissues has been demonstrated, protocols have not been systematically optimized for robust quantification across a large number of analytes, nor has the performance of peptide immuno-MRM been evaluated. To address this gap, we used a test battery approach coupled to MRM-MS with the addition of stable isotope labeled standard peptides (targeting 512 analytes) to quantitatively evaluate the performance of three extraction protocols in combination with three trypsin digestion protocols (i.e. 9 processes). A process based on RapiGest buffer extraction and urea-based digestion was identified to enable similar quantitation results from FFPE and frozen tissues. Using the optimized protocols for MRM-based analysis of FFPE tissues, median precision was 11.4% (across 249 analytes). There was excellent correlation between measurements made on matched FFPE and frozen tissues, both for direct MRM analysis (R2 = 0.94) and immuno-MRM (R2 = 0.89). The optimized process enables highly reproducible, multiplex, standardizable, quantitative MRM in archival tissue specimens. PMID:27462933

  4. Optimized Protocol for Quantitative Multiple Reaction Monitoring-Based Proteomic Analysis of Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Jacob J; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R; Schoenherr, Regine M; Yan, Ping; Allison, Kimberly; Shipley, Melissa; Lerch, Melissa; Hoofnagle, Andrew N; Baird, Geoffrey Stuart; Paulovich, Amanda G

    2016-08-01

    Despite a clinical, economic, and regulatory imperative to develop companion diagnostics, precious few new biomarkers have been successfully translated into clinical use, due in part to inadequate protein assay technologies to support large-scale testing of hundreds of candidate biomarkers in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. Although the feasibility of using targeted, multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) for quantitative analyses of FFPE tissues has been demonstrated, protocols have not been systematically optimized for robust quantification across a large number of analytes, nor has the performance of peptide immuno-MRM been evaluated. To address this gap, we used a test battery approach coupled to MRM-MS with the addition of stable isotope-labeled standard peptides (targeting 512 analytes) to quantitatively evaluate the performance of three extraction protocols in combination with three trypsin digestion protocols (i.e., nine processes). A process based on RapiGest buffer extraction and urea-based digestion was identified to enable similar quantitation results from FFPE and frozen tissues. Using the optimized protocols for MRM-based analysis of FFPE tissues, median precision was 11.4% (across 249 analytes). There was excellent correlation between measurements made on matched FFPE and frozen tissues, both for direct MRM analysis (R(2) = 0.94) and immuno-MRM (R(2) = 0.89). The optimized process enables highly reproducible, multiplex, standardizable, quantitative MRM in archival tissue specimens. PMID:27462933

  5. Deparaffinization of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks using hot water instead of xylene.

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Narges; Bayani, Masomeh; Ghaffari, Taraneh

    2016-08-15

    This study aimed to deparaffinize formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues using hot water instead of xylene and measuring the quantity and quality of the extracted DNA from the respective tissues. To deparaffinize the tissue sections with hot water, small sections were exposed to 90 °C distilled sterile water. After 25 FFPE tissue samples were deparaffinized with the hot water method, DNA was then extracted. The mean of optical density and the ratio of absorbance of the DNA solution were 220.01 ± 36.1 ng/μl and 1.65 ± 0.1, respectively. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of the toll-like receptor 4(TLR4) gene showed that the method can be used as a tool for different applications. PMID:27287960

  6. Detection of Newcastle disease virus RNA by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue and comparison with immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The usefulness of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues was examined and compared to the immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in situ hybridization (ISH) assays for detection of Newcastle disease virus (NDV). Spleen and lung tissues...

  7. Proteomic analysis of neurons microdissected from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded Alzheimer’s disease brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Eleanor S; Nayak, Shruti; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of human tissue specimens are formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) archival samples, making this type of tissue a potential gold mine for medical research. It is now accepted that proteomics can be done using FFPE tissue and can generate similar results as snap-frozen tissue. However, the current methodology requires a large amount of starting protein, limiting the questions that can be answered in these types of proteomics studies and making cell-type specific proteomics studies difficult. Cell-type specific proteomics has the potential to greatly enhance understanding of cell functioning in both normal and disease states. Therefore, here we describe a new method that allows localized proteomics on individual cell populations isolated from FFPE tissue sections using laser capture microdissection. To demonstrate this technique we microdissected neurons from archived tissue blocks of the temporal cortex from patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Using this method we identified over 400 proteins in microdissected neurons; on average 78% that were neuronal and 50% that were associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Therefore, this technique is able to provide accurate and meaningful data and has great potential for any future study that wishes to perform localized proteomics using very small amounts of archived FFPE tissue. PMID:26487484

  8. Tissue fixed with formalin and processed without paraffin embedding is suitable for imaging of both peptides and lipids by MALDI-IMS.

    PubMed

    Pietrowska, Monika; Gawin, Marta; Polańska, Joanna; Widłak, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    Type and quality of sample preparation have significant impact on imaging mass spectrometry results. Though imaging of fresh-frozen tissues is considered to give the best results, they are incompatible with clinical practice, since routine diagnostics is most frequently performed using formalin-fixed tissues, and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded material is a gold standard in histopathology. We aimed to assess utility of formalin-fixed tissue specimen processed without paraffin embedding (i.e., deep-frozen and cryo-sectioned) for MALDI imaging of both peptides and lipids. Peptide and lipid imaging was performed in fresh-frozen, FFPE and formalin-fixed/frozen samples of a mouse kidney, then composition of the resulting spectra was compared. We demonstrated similarity of spectra registered during peptide imaging in FFPE and formalin-fixed/frozen tissues, and similarity of spectra registered during lipid imaging in fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed/frozen material. Furthermore, molecular images of formalin-fixed/frozen tissue resembled the features of both fresh-frozen and FFPE tissue in the case of peptide imaging, and the features of fresh-frozen tissue in the case of lipid imaging. We conclude that tissue preserved by formalin fixation and processed without paraffin embedding can be considered as an alternative to both fresh-frozen and FFPE material. PMID:27001204

  9. High-resolution MALDI-FT-ICR MS imaging for the analysis of metabolites from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded clinical tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Buck, Achim; Ly, Alice; Balluff, Benjamin; Sun, Na; Gorzolka, Karin; Feuchtinger, Annette; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Kuppen, Peter J K; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Weirich, Gregor; Erlmeier, Franziska; Langer, Rupert; Aubele, Michaela; Zitzelsberger, Horst; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel

    2015-09-01

    We present the first analytical approach to demonstrate the in situ imaging of metabolites from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human tissue samples. Using high-resolution matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-FT-ICR MSI), we conducted a proof-of-principle experiment comparing metabolite measurements from FFPE and fresh frozen tissue sections, and found an overlap of 72% amongst 1700 m/z species. In particular, we observed conservation of biomedically relevant information at the metabolite level in FFPE tissues. In biomedical applications, we analysed tissues from 350 different cancer patients and were able to discriminate between normal and tumour tissues, and different tumours from the same organ, and found an independent prognostic factor for patient survival. This study demonstrates the ability to measure metabolites in FFPE tissues using MALDI-FT-ICR MSI, which can then be assigned to histology and clinical parameters. Our approach is a major technical, histochemical, and clinicopathological advance that highlights the potential for investigating diseases in archived FFPE tissues. PMID:25965788

  10. An Optimized Method of Metabolite Extraction from Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissue for GC/MS Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wojakowska, Anna; Marczak, Łukasz; Jelonek, Karol; Polanski, Krzysztof; Widlak, Piotr; Pietrowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens constitute a highly valuable source of clinical material for retrospective molecular studies. However, metabolomic assessment of such archival material remains still in its infancy. Hence, there is an urgent need for efficient methods enabling extraction and profiling of metabolites present in FFPE tissue specimens. Here we demonstrate the methodology for isolation of primary metabolites from archival tissues; either fresh-frozen, formalin-fixed or formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded specimens of mouse kidney were analysed and compared in this work. We used gas chromatography followed by mass spectrometry (GC/MS approach) to identify about 80 metabolites (including amino acids, saccharides, carboxylic acids, fatty acids) present in such archive material. Importantly, about 75% of identified compounds were detected in all three types of specimens. Moreover, we observed that fixation with formalin itself (and their duration) did not affect markedly the presence of particular metabolites in tissue-extracted material, yet fixation for 24h could be recommended as a practical standard. Paraffin embedding influenced efficiency of extraction, which resulted in reduced quantities of several compounds. Nevertheless, we proved applicability of FFPE specimens for non-targeted GS/MS-based profiling of tissue metabolome, which is of great importance for feasibility of metabolomics studies using retrospective clinical material. PMID:26348873

  11. An Optimized Method of Metabolite Extraction from Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissue for GC/MS Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wojakowska, Anna; Marczak, Łukasz; Jelonek, Karol; Polanski, Krzysztof; Widlak, Piotr; Pietrowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens constitute a highly valuable source of clinical material for retrospective molecular studies. However, metabolomic assessment of such archival material remains still in its infancy. Hence, there is an urgent need for efficient methods enabling extraction and profiling of metabolites present in FFPE tissue specimens. Here we demonstrate the methodology for isolation of primary metabolites from archival tissues; either fresh-frozen, formalin-fixed or formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded specimens of mouse kidney were analysed and compared in this work. We used gas chromatography followed by mass spectrometry (GC/MS approach) to identify about 80 metabolites (including amino acids, saccharides, carboxylic acids, fatty acids) present in such archive material. Importantly, about 75% of identified compounds were detected in all three types of specimens. Moreover, we observed that fixation with formalin itself (and their duration) did not affect markedly the presence of particular metabolites in tissue-extracted material, yet fixation for 24h could be recommended as a practical standard. Paraffin embedding influenced efficiency of extraction, which resulted in reduced quantities of several compounds. Nevertheless, we proved applicability of FFPE specimens for non-targeted GS/MS-based profiling of tissue metabolome, which is of great importance for feasibility of metabolomics studies using retrospective clinical material. PMID:26348873

  12. Multiplexed miRNA Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Renwick, Neil; Cekan, Pavol; Bognanni, Claudia; Tuschl, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Multiplexed miRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (miRNA FISH) is an advanced method for visualizing differentially expressed miRNAs, together with other reference RNAs, in archival tissues. Some miRNAs are excellent disease biomarkers due to their abundance and cell-type specificity. However, these short RNA molecules are difficult to visualize due to loss by diffusion, probe mishybridization, and signal detection and signal amplification issues. Here, we describe a reliable and adjustable method for visualizing and normalizing miRNA signals in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections. PMID:25218385

  13. A pressure cooking-based DNA extraction from archival formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Joon-Yong; Yi, Joo Mi; Xie, Ran; Brown, Victoria; Lee, Olivia; Ahuja, Nita; Braunschweig, Till; Hewitt, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    As emerging novel DNA-based methodologies are adopted, nucleic acid-based assays depend critically on the quality and quantity of extracted DNA. Formalin fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue samples provide an invaluable resource for subsequent molecular studies of clinical phenotypes, but high quality DNA extraction from archival FFPE tissue specimen remains complex and time consuming. To address this challenge, we have developed a reliable rapid DNA extraction method for FFPE tissue specimens. It is based on deparaffinization at high temperature coupled with relieving crosslink in a pressure cooker. The DNA yield by this rapid method resulted in an average 1.8-fold increase in comparison with the commercial kit; O.D 260/280 ratios between 1.87 and 1.95. The DNA obtained by the rapid method was suitable for methylation analyses in colon cancer patients. These data suggest that this new DNA extraction method coupled with MSP can be used for epigenetic studies with the advantages of rapidity and high quality, and may contribute to the development of biomarkers in clinical studies. PMID:22449494

  14. Two methods for proteomic analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded tissue result in differential protein identification, data quality, and cost.

    PubMed

    Luebker, Stephen A; Wojtkiewicz, Melinda; Koepsell, Scott A

    2015-11-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is a rich source of clinically relevant material that can yield important translational biomarker discovery using proteomic analysis. Protocols for analyzing FFPE tissue by LC-MS/MS exist, but standardization of procedures and critical analysis of data quality is limited. This study compared and characterized data obtained from FFPE tissue using two methods: a urea in-solution digestion method (UISD) versus a commercially available Qproteome FFPE Tissue Kit method (Qkit). Each method was performed independently three times on serial sections of homogenous FFPE tissue to minimize pre-analytical variations and analyzed with three technical replicates by LC-MS/MS. Data were evaluated for reproducibility and physiochemical distribution, which highlighted differences in the ability of each method to identify proteins of different molecular weights and isoelectric points. Each method replicate resulted in a significant number of new protein identifications, and both methods identified significantly more proteins using three technical replicates as compared to only two. UISD was cheaper, required less time, and introduced significant protein modifications as compared to the Qkit method, which provided more precise and higher protein yields. These data highlight significant variability among method replicates and type of method used, despite minimizing pre-analytical variability. Utilization of only one method or too few replicates (both method and technical) may limit the subset of proteomic information obtained. PMID:26306679

  15. Comparison of Different Buffers for Protein Extraction from Formalin-Fixed and Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Kaini; Sun, Jian; Cao, Xinxin; Zhou, Daobin; Li, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We determined the best extraction buffer for proteomic investigation using formalin-fixation and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens. A Zwittergent 3–16 based buffer, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-containing buffer with/without polyethylene glycol 20000 (PEG20000), urea-containing buffer, and FFPE-FASP protein preparation kit were compared for protein extraction from different types of rat FFPE tissues, including the heart, brain, liver, lung, and kidney. All of the samples were divided into two groups of laser microdissected (LMD) and non-LMD specimens. For both kinds of specimens, Zwittergent was the most efficient buffer for identifying peptides and proteins, was broadly applicable to different tissues without impairing the enzymatic digestion, and was well compatible with mass spectrometry analysis. As a high molecular weight carrier substance, PEG20000 improved the identification of peptides and proteins; however, such an advantage is limited to tissues containing submicrograms to micrograms of protein. Considering its low lytic strength, urea-containing buffer would not be the first alternative for protein recovery. In conclusion, Zwittergent 3–16 is an effective buffer for extracting proteins from FFPE specimens for downstream proteomics analysis. PMID:26580073

  16. Comparison of Different Buffers for Protein Extraction from Formalin-Fixed and Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Specimens.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kaini; Sun, Jian; Cao, Xinxin; Zhou, Daobin; Li, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We determined the best extraction buffer for proteomic investigation using formalin-fixation and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens. A Zwittergent 3-16 based buffer, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-containing buffer with/without polyethylene glycol 20000 (PEG20000), urea-containing buffer, and FFPE-FASP protein preparation kit were compared for protein extraction from different types of rat FFPE tissues, including the heart, brain, liver, lung, and kidney. All of the samples were divided into two groups of laser microdissected (LMD) and non-LMD specimens. For both kinds of specimens, Zwittergent was the most efficient buffer for identifying peptides and proteins, was broadly applicable to different tissues without impairing the enzymatic digestion, and was well compatible with mass spectrometry analysis. As a high molecular weight carrier substance, PEG20000 improved the identification of peptides and proteins; however, such an advantage is limited to tissues containing submicrograms to micrograms of protein. Considering its low lytic strength, urea-containing buffer would not be the first alternative for protein recovery. In conclusion, Zwittergent 3-16 is an effective buffer for extracting proteins from FFPE specimens for downstream proteomics analysis. PMID:26580073

  17. Molecular profiling of signalling pathways in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Berg, Daniela; Hipp, Susanne; Malinowsky, Katharina; Böllner, Claudia; Becker, Karl-Friedrich

    2010-01-01

    In most hospitals word-wide, histopathological cancer diagnosis is currently based on formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. In the last few years new approaches and developments in patient-tailored cancer therapy have raised the need to select more precisely those patients, who will respond to personalised treatments. The most efficient way for optimal therapy and patient selection is probably to provide a tumour-specific protein network portrait prior to treatment. The discovery and characterisation of deregulated signalling molecules (e.g. human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, mitogen-activated protein kinases) are very promising candidates for the identification of new suitable therapy targets and for the selection of those patients who will receive the greatest benefit from individualised treatments. The reverse phase protein array (RPPA) is a promising new technology that allows quick, precise and simultaneous analysis of many components of a network. Importantly it requires only limited amounts of routine clinical material (e.g. FFPE biopsies) and can be used for absolute protein measurements. We and other research groups have described successful protein extraction from routine FFPE tissues. In this manuscript we show how these recent developments might facilitate the implementation of RPPA in clinical trials and routine settings. PMID:19914823

  18. Improving Molecular Detection of Fungal DNA in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues: Comparison of Five Tissue DNA Extraction Methods Using Panfungal PCR▿

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Cadavid, C.; Rudd, S.; Zaki, S. R.; Patel, M.; Moser, S. A.; Brandt, M. E.; Gómez, B. L.

    2010-01-01

    DNA extraction from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues is difficult and requires special protocols in order to extract small amounts of DNA suitable for amplification. Most described methods report an amplification success rate between 60 and 80%; therefore, there is a need to improve molecular detection and identification of fungi in FFPE tissue. Eighty-one archived FFPE tissues with a positive Gomori methenamine silver (GMS) stain were evaluated using five different commercial DNA extraction kits with some modifications. Three different panfungal PCR assays were used to detect fungal DNA, and two housekeeping genes were used to assess the presence of amplifiable DNA and to detect PCR inhibitors. The sensitivities of the five extraction protocols were compared, and the quality of DNA detection (calculated for each kit as the number of housekeeping gene PCR-positive samples divided by the total number of samples) was 60 to 91% among the five protocols. The efficiencies of the three different panfungals used (calculated as the number of panfungal-PCR-positive samples divided by the number of housekeeping gene PCR-positive samples) were 58 to 93%. The panfungal PCR using internal transcribed spacer 3 (ITS3) and ITS4 primers yielded a product in most FFPE tissues. Two of the five DNA extraction kits (from TaKaRa and Qiagen) showed similar and promising results. However, one method (TaKaRa) could extract fungal DNA from 69 of the 74 FFPE tissues from which a housekeeping gene could be amplified and was also cost-effective, with a nonlaborious protocol. Factors such as sensitivity, cost, and labor will help guide the selection of the most appropriate method for the needs of each laboratory. PMID:20392915

  19. Fusion Transcript Discovery in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Human Breast Cancer Tissues Reveals a Link to Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Ambannavar, Ranjana; Stephans, James; Jeong, Jennie; Dei Rossi, Andrew; Liu, Mei-Lan; Friedman, Adam J.; Londry, Jason J.; Abramson, Richard; Beasley, Ellen M.; Baker, Joffre; Levy, Samuel; Qu, Kunbin

    2014-01-01

    The identification of gene fusions promises to play an important role in personalized cancer treatment decisions. Many rare gene fusion events have been identified in fresh frozen solid tumors from common cancers employing next-generation sequencing technology. However the ability to detect transcripts from gene fusions in RNA isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor tissues, which exist in very large sample repositories for which disease outcome is known, is still limited due to the low complexity of FFPE libraries and the lack of appropriate bioinformatics methods. We sought to develop a bioinformatics method, named gFuse, to detect fusion transcripts in FFPE tumor tissues. An integrated, cohort based strategy has been used in gFuse to examine single-end 50 base pair (bp) reads generated from FFPE RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) datasets employing two breast cancer cohorts of 136 and 76 patients. In total, 118 fusion events were detected transcriptome-wide at base-pair resolution across the 212 samples. We selected 77 candidate fusions based on their biological relevance to cancer and supported 61% of these using TaqMan assays. Direct sequencing of 19 of the fusion sequences identified by TaqMan confirmed them. Three unique fused gene pairs were recurrent across the 212 patients with 6, 3, 2 individuals harboring these fusions respectively. We show here that a high frequency of fusion transcripts detected at the whole transcriptome level correlates with poor outcome (P<0.0005) in human breast cancer patients. This study demonstrates the ability to detect fusion transcripts as biomarkers from archival FFPE tissues, and the potential prognostic value of the fusion transcripts detected. PMID:24727804

  20. Technical Reproducibility of Single-Nucleotide and Size-Based DNA Biomarker Assessment Using DNA Extracted from Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shenli; Tan, Iain B.; Sapari, Nur S.; Grabsch, Heike I.; Okines, Alicia; Smyth, Elizabeth C.; Aoyama, Toru; Hewitt, Lindsay C.; Inam, Imran; Bottomley, Dan; Nankivell, Matthew; Stenning, Sally P.; Cunningham, David; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Tsuburaya, Akira; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Soong, Richie; Tan, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues has been used in the past to analyze genetic polymorphisms. We evaluated the technical reproducibility of different types of assays for gene polymorphisms using DNA extracted from FFPE material. By using the MassARRAY iPLEX system, we investigated polymorphisms in DPYD (rs1801159 and rs3918290), UMPS (rs1801019), ERCC1 (rs11615), ERCC1 (rs3212986), and ERCC2 (rs13181) in 56 FFPE DNA samples. By using PCR, followed by size-based gel electrophoresis, we also examined TYMS 5′ untranslated region 2R/3R repeats and GSTT1 deletions in 50 FFPE DNA samples and 34 DNAs extracted from fresh-frozen tissues and cell lines. Each polymorphism was analyzed by two independent runs. We found that iPLEX biomarker assays measuring single-nucleotide polymorphisms provided consistent concordant results. However, by using FFPE DNA, size-based PCR biomarkers (GSTT1 and TYMS 5′ untranslated region) were discrepant in 32.7% (16/49, with exact 95% CI, 19.9%–47.5%; exact binomial confidence limit test) and 4.2% (2/48, with exact 95% CI, 0.5%–14.3%) of cases, respectively, whereas no discrepancies were observed using intact genomic DNA. Our findings suggest that DNA from FFPE material can be used to reliably test single-nucleotide polymorphisms. However, results based on size-based PCR biomarkers, and particularly GSTT1 deletions, using FFPE DNA need to be interpreted with caution. Independent repeated assays should be performed on all cases to assess potential discrepancies. PMID:25746798

  1. Mining the Archives: A Cross-Platform Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles in Archival Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues.

    PubMed

    Webster, A Francina; Zumbo, Paul; Fostel, Jennifer; Gandara, Jorge; Hester, Susan D; Recio, Leslie; Williams, Andrew; Wood, Charles E; Yauk, Carole L; Mason, Christopher E

    2015-12-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples represent a potentially invaluable resource for transcriptomic research. However, use of FFPE samples in genomic studies has been limited by technical challenges resulting from nucleic acid degradation. Here we evaluated gene expression profiles derived from fresh-frozen (FRO) and FFPE mouse liver tissues preserved in formalin for different amounts of time using 2 DNA microarray protocols and 2 whole-transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) library preparation methodologies. The ribo-depletion protocol outperformed the other methods by having the highest correlations of differentially expressed genes (DEGs), and best overlap of pathways, between FRO and FFPE groups. The effect of sample time in formalin (18 h or 3 weeks) on gene expression profiles indicated that test article treatment, not preservation method, was the main driver of gene expression profiles. Meta- and pathway analyses indicated that biological responses were generally consistent for 18 h and 3 week FFPE samples compared with FRO samples. However, clear erosion of signal intensity with time in formalin was evident, and DEG numbers differed by platform and preservation method. Lastly, we investigated the effect of time in paraffin on genomic profiles. Ribo-depletion RNA-seq analysis of 8-, 19-, and 26-year-old control blocks resulted in comparable quality metrics, including expected distributions of mapped reads to exonic, untranslated region, intronic, and ribosomal fractions of the transcriptome. Overall, our results indicate that FFPE samples are appropriate for use in genomic studies in which frozen samples are not available, and that ribo-depletion RNA-seq is the preferred method for this type of analysis in archival and long-aged FFPE samples. PMID:26361796

  2. Analytical Validation of AmpliChip p53 Research Test for Archival Human Ovarian FFPE Sections.

    PubMed

    Marton, Matthew J; McNamara, Andrew R; Nikoloff, D Michele; Nakao, Aki; Cheng, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene (TP53) is reported to be mutated in nearly half of all tumors and plays a central role in genome integrity. Detection of mutations in p53 can be accomplished by many assays, including the AmpliChip p53 Research Test. The AmpliChip p53 Research Test has been successfully used to determine p53 status in hematologic malignancies and fresh frozen solid tissues but there are few reports of using the assay with formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. The objective of this study was to describe analytical performance characterization of the AmpliChip p53 Research Test to detect p53 mutations in genomic DNA isolated from archival FFPE human ovarian tumor tissues. Method correlation with sequencing showed 96% mutation-wise agreement and 99% chip-wise agreement. We furthermore observed 100% agreement (113/113) of the most prevalent TP53 mutations. Workflow reproducibility was 96.8% across 8 samples, with 2 operators, 2 reagent lots and 2 instruments. Section-to-section reproducibility was 100% for each sample across a 60 μm region of the FFPE block from ovarian tumors. These data indicate that the AmpliChip p53 Research Test is an accurate and reproducible method for detecting mutations in TP53 from archival FFPE human ovarian specimens. PMID:26125596

  3. Critical comparison of sample preparation strategies for shotgun proteomic analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples: insights from liver tissue

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The growing field of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue proteomics holds promise for improving translational research. Direct tissue trypsinization (DT) and protein extraction followed by in solution digestion (ISD) or filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) are the most common workflows for shotgun analysis of FFPE samples, but a critical comparison of the different methods is currently lacking. Experimental design DT, FASP and ISD workflows were compared by subjecting to the same label-free quantitative approach three independent technical replicates of each method applied to FFPE liver tissue. Data were evaluated in terms of method reproducibility and protein/peptide distribution according to localization, MW, pI and hydrophobicity. Results DT showed lower reproducibility, good preservation of high-MW proteins, a general bias towards hydrophilic and acidic proteins, much lower keratin contamination, as well as higher abundance of non-tryptic peptides. Conversely, FASP and ISD proteomes were depleted in high-MW proteins and enriched in hydrophobic and membrane proteins; FASP provided higher identification yields, while ISD exhibited higher reproducibility. Conclusions These results highlight that diverse sample preparation strategies provide significantly different proteomic information, and present typical biases that should be taken into account when dealing with FFPE samples. When a sufficient amount of tissue is available, the complementary use of different methods is suggested to increase proteome coverage and depth. PMID:25097466

  4. Straightforward and sensitive RT-qPCR based gene expression analysis of FFPE samples

    PubMed Central

    Zeka, Fjoralba; Vanderheyden, Katrien; De Smet, Els; Cuvelier, Claude A.; Mestdagh, Pieter; Vandesompele, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Fragmented RNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is a known obstacle to gene expression analysis. In this study, the impact of RNA integrity, gene-specific reverse transcription and targeted cDNA preamplification was quantified in terms of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) sensitivity by measuring 48 protein coding genes on eight duplicate cultured cancer cell pellet FFPE samples and twenty cancer tissue FFPE samples. More intact RNA modestly increased gene detection sensitivity by 1.6 fold (earlier detection by 0.7 PCR cycles, 95% CI = 0.593–0.850). Application of gene-specific priming instead of whole transcriptome priming during reverse transcription further improved RT-qPCR sensitivity by a considerable 4.0 fold increase (earlier detection by 2.0 PCR cycles, 95% CI = 1.73–2.32). Targeted cDNA preamplification resulted in the strongest increase of RT-qPCR sensitivity and enabled earlier detection by an average of 172.4 fold (7.43 PCR cycles, 95% CI = 6.83–7.05). We conclude that gene-specific reverse transcription and targeted cDNA preamplification are adequate methods for accurate and sensitive RT-qPCR based gene expression analysis of FFPE material. The presented methods do not involve expensive or complex procedures and can be easily implemented in any routine RT-qPCR practice. PMID:26898768

  5. Analysis of iron, zinc, selenium and cadmium in paraffin-embedded prostate tissue specimens using inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sarafanov, A.G.; Todorov, T.I.; Kajdacsy-Balla, A.; Gray, Michael A.; MacIas, V.; Centeno, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens represent a valuable and abundant resource of pathologic material for various biomedical studies. In the present study, we report the application of high-resolution inductively coupled mass-spectrometry (ICP-MS) for quantification of Fe, Zn, Se and Cd in FFPE prostate tissue. These elements have a possible role in the development of prostate diseases: while Zn and Se are needed for a healthy prostate, Cd shows multiple toxic and carcinogenic effects. Excessive accumulation of Fe induces the production of highly reactive hydroxyl radical species, which may play a role in cancer etiopathogenesis. To assess whether the levels of these metals in the FFPE prostate tissue represent their original content, we compared their levels with those in the fresh tissue (on dry weight basis) in samples obtained from 15 patients. We found that in FFPE tissue, the recoveries of Se, Fe, Cd and Zn were progressively decreased, 97??11% (r=0.88), 82??22% (r=0.86), 59??23% (r=0.69) and 24??11% (r=0.38), respectively. Thus, the use of correction factors, determined as k=0.16 for Se, k=0.20 for Fe, k=0.27 for Cd and k=0.67 for Zn, is required to estimate the retrospective levels of these elements in the parental non-processed fresh (wet) prostate tissue. The technique used in this study enables the analysis of archival FFPE prostate tissue for the concentrations of Fe, Zn, Se and Cd to study association between the levels of these metals and prostate disease. ?? 2008.

  6. Genomic DNA extraction methods using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Potluri, Keerti; Mahas, Ahmed; Kent, Michael N; Naik, Sameep; Markey, Michael

    2015-10-01

    As new technologies come within reach for the average cytogenetic laboratory, the study of chromosome structure has become increasingly more sophisticated. Resolution has improved from karyotyping (in which whole chromosomes are discernible) to fluorescence in situ hybridization and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH, with which specific megabase regions are visualized), array-based CGH (aCGH, examining hundreds of base pairs), and next-generation sequencing (providing single base pair resolution). Whole genome next-generation sequencing remains a cost-prohibitive method for many investigators. Meanwhile, the cost of aCGH has been reduced during recent years, even as resolution has increased and protocols have simplified. However, aCGH presents its own set of unique challenges. DNA of sufficient quantity and quality to hybridize to arrays and provide meaningful results is required. This is especially difficult for DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. Here, we compare three different methods for acquiring DNA of sufficient length, purity, and "amplifiability" for aCGH and other downstream applications. Phenol-chloroform extraction and column-based commercial kits were compared with adaptive focused acoustics (AFA). Of the three extraction methods, AFA samples showed increased amplicon length and decreased polymerase chain reaction (PCR) failure rate. These findings support AFA as an improvement over previous DNA extraction methods for FFPE tissues. PMID:26126956

  7. MicroRNA Stability in Postmortem FFPE Tissues: Quantitative Analysis Using Autoptic Samples from Acute Myocardial Infarction Patients.

    PubMed

    Kakimoto, Yu; Kamiguchi, Hiroshi; Ochiai, Eriko; Satoh, Fumiko; Osawa, Motoki

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are very short (18-24 nucleotides) nucleic acids that are expressed in a number of biological tissues and have been shown to be more resistant to extreme temperatures and pH compared to longer RNA molecules, like mRNAs. As miRNAs contribute to diverse biological process and respond to various kinds of cellular stress, their utility as diagnostic biomarkers and/or therapeutic targets has recently been explored. Here, we have evaluated the usefulness of miRNA quantification during postmortem examination of cardiac tissue from acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients. Cardiac tissue was collected within one week of the patient's death and either frozen (19 samples) or fixed in formalin for up to three years (36 samples). RNA integrity was evaluated with an electropherogram, and it appears that longer RNAs are fragmented after death in the long-term fixed samples. Quantitative PCR was also performed for seven miRNAs and three other small RNAs in order to determine the appropriate controls for our postmortem analysis. Our data indicate that miR-191 and miR-26b are more suitable than the other types of small RNA molecules as they are stably detected after death and long-term fixation. Further, we also applied our quantitation method, using these endogenous controls, to evaluate the expression of three previously identified miRNA biomarkers, miR-1, miR-208b, and miR-499a, in formalin-fixed tissues from AMI patients. Although miR-1 and miR-208b decreased (1.4-fold) and increased (1.2-fold), respectively, in the AMI samples compared to the controls, the significance of these changes was limited by our sample size. In contrast, the relative level of miR-499a was significantly decreased in the AMI samples (2.1-fold). This study highlights the stability of miRNAs after death and long-term fixation, validating their use as reliable biomarkers for AMI during postmortem examination. PMID:26046358

  8. [Clinical applications of MALDI imaging using sliced sections of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues and longitudinal sliced hairs].

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Toyofumi; Ito, Minako; Ueda, Kazuhito; Wada, Shinichi; Fujioka, Shigekazu; Tsuji, Motomu; Takubo, Takayuki

    2012-02-01

    MALDI-imaging MS (IMS) with MSMS analysis is a new powerful tool for the identification of not only disease-related proteins in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections but also protein/peptides/drugs/medicine in fresh-frozen tissues. IMS is used to reveal the mass profiles and spatial distribution of proteins in tissue sections and/or digested peptides derived from deposited protein in pathologic organs and then MSMS analysis identifies the amino acid sequence of the detected proteins in the tissue section. Moreover, on-tissue digestion combined with the MALDI-IM-TOF-IMS approach allows a proteomics "bottom-up" strategy with clinical samples, especially perioperative isolated tissues and FFPE tissues conserved for a long time in a clinical sample bank. The mass barcode-like image (MBI) on a longitudinal sliced hair by IMS is used in the selected reaction monitoring mode for serially chronological monitoring and traceability every few hours after drug and medicine intake. The advances of quantitative MBI for sliced sections of hair allow a new universal standardized assessment of drugs and medicines throughout the drug history. PMID:22568093

  9. The expression of MMP-14 and microRNA-410 in FFPE tissues of human endometrial adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rak, Beata; Garbicz, Filip; Paskal, Wiktor; Pełka, Kacper; Marczewska, Janina Maja; Wołosz, Dominika; Włodarski, Paweł

    2016-08-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the most common gynecological malignancy in Europe and North America. It is classified into two types exhibiting different characteristics and prognosis. Type I is an estrogen-dependent tumor, histologically classified as low grade and low stage, usually with an excellent prognosis. Type II EC is unrelated to estrogen stimulation and is characterized by a poor prognosis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) are small non-coding RNA polynucleotides that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. Various dysregulations in microRNA expression are often considered to have an impact on the diagnosis, prognosis and overall survival in patients diagnosed with different types of cancers. Recent data suggest that microRNAs play an important role in the pathogenesis of EC. The aim of the study was to evaluate the involvement of matrix metaloprotease 14 (MMP-14) and microRNA-410 in formation of the EC tumor. To this end expression of MMP-14 and microRNA-410 was assessed within the cancer, transient and healthy zones in the histological sections of tumours using immunohistochemical staining and laser capture microdissection (LCM) followed by a quantitative real-time PCR. The results revealed significantly higher expression of MMP-14 in the cancer tissue zone in comparison to the healthy tissue zone, as well as a lower expression of microRNA-410 in the cancer zone compared with the healthy zone. This reverse correlation may suggest a regulatory role of miRNA-410 in modulating levels of MMP-14 in EC. This is the first report on such regulation in human endometrial cancer. PMID:26842619

  10. PCR for the Diagnosis of Abdominal Angiostrongyliasis in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Human Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Rubens; da Silva, Ana Cristina Aramburú; Müller, Carla Aristonara; Alves, Silvana Lunardini; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos; Fornari, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    To date the diagnosis of abdominal angiostrongyliasis (AA) depends on the histological identification of Angiostrongylus costaricensis (AC) in surgical specimens. However, microscopic evaluation is time consuming and often fails in identifying the parasite. We tested whether PCR might help in the diagnosis of AA by identifying parasite DNA in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. We used primers based on DNA from Angiostrongilus cantonensis. Four groups of FFPE intestinal tissue were tested: (1) confirmed cases (n = 20), in which AC structures were present in the target tissue; (2) presumptive cases (n = 20), containing changes secondary to AC infection in the absence of AC structures; (3) negative controls (n = 3), consisting of normal colonic tissue; and (4) tissue affected by other parasitoses (n = 7), including strongyloidiasis, ascaridiasis, schistosomiasis, and enterobiasis. Most lesions of confirmed cases were located in small and/or large bowel (90%), as compared with presumptive cases, in which 70% of lesions were in appendix (P = 0.0002). When confronted with cases of other parasitoses, PCR showed sensitivity of 55%, specificity of 100% and positive predictive value of 100%. In presumptive cases PCR was positive in 4 (20%). All specimens from negative controls and other parasitoses were negative. In conclusion, the PCR technique showed intermediate sensitivity and optimal specificity, being clinically relevant when positive for abdominal angiostrongyliasis. It allowed a 20% gain in diagnosis of presumptive cases. PCR might help in the diagnosis of abdominal angiostrongyliasis, particularly when the pathologists are not experienced with such disease. PMID:24705328

  11. Whole-exome sequencing and clinical interpretation of FFPE tumor samples to guide precision cancer medicine

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Eliezer M. Van; Wagle, Nikhil; Stojanov, Petar; Perrin, Danielle L.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Marlow, Sara; Jane-Valbuena, Judit; Friedrich, Dennis C.; Kryukov, Gregory; Carter, Scott L.; McKenna, Aaron; Sivachenko, Andrey; Rosenberg, Mara; Kiezun, Adam; Voet, Douglas; Lawrence, Michael; Lichtenstein, Lee T.; Gentry, Jeff G.; Huang, Franklin W.; Fostel, Jennifer; Farlow, Deborah; Barbie, David; Gandhi, Leena; Lander, Eric S.; Gray, Stacy W.; Joffe, Steven; Janne, Pasi; Garber, Judy; MacConaill, Laura; Lindeman, Neal; Rollins, Barrett; Kantoff, Philip; Fisher, Sheila A.; Gabriel, Stacey; Getz, Gad; Garraway, Levi A.

    2013-01-01

    Translating whole exome sequencing (WES) for prospective clinical use may impact the care of cancer patients; however, multiple innovations are necessary for clinical implementation. These include: (1) rapid and robust WES from formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tumor tissue, (2) analytical output similar to data from frozen samples, and (3) clinical interpretation of WES data for prospective use. Here, we describe a prospective clinical WES platform for archival FFPE tumor samples. The platform employs computational methods for effective clinical analysis and interpretation of WES data. When applied retrospectively to 511 exomes, the interpretative framework revealed a “long tail” of somatic alterations in clinically important genes. Prospective application of this approach identified clinically relevant alterations in 15/16 patients. In one patient, previously undetected findings guided clinical trial enrollment leading to an objective clinical response. Overall, this methodology may inform the widespread implementation of precision cancer medicine. PMID:24836576

  12. Bisulfite-Based DNA Methylation Analysis from Recent and Archived Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin Embedded Colorectal Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Kalmár, Alexandra; Péterfia, Bálint; Hollósi, Péter; Wichmann, Barnabás; Bodor, András; Patai, Árpád V; Schöller, Andrea; Krenács, Tibor; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2015-09-01

    We aimed to test the applicability of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples for gene specific DNA methylation analysis after using two commercially available DNA isolation kits. Genomic DNA was isolated from 5 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 5 normal adjacent tissues from "recent", collected within 6 months, and "archived", collected more than 5 years ago, FFPE tissues using either High Pure FFPET DNA Isolation kit or QIAamp DNA FFPE Tissue kit. DNA methylation analysis of MAL, SFRP1 and SFRP2 genes, known to be hypermethylated in CRC, was performed using methylation-sensitive high resolution melting (MS-HRM) analysis and sequencing. QIAamp (Q) method resulted in slightly higher recovery in archived (HP: 1.22 ± 3.18 μg DNA; Q: 3.00 ± 4.04 μg DNA) and significantly (p < 0.05) higher recovery in recent samples compared to High Pure method (HP) (HP: 4.10 ± 2.91 μg DNA; Q: 11.51 ± 7.50 μg DNA). Both OD260/280 and OD260/230 ratios were lower, but still high in the High Pure isolated archived and recent samples compared to those isolated with QIAamp. Identical DNA methylation patterns were detected for all 3 genes tested by MS-HRM with both isolation kits in the recent group. However, despite of higher DNA recovery in QIAamp slightly more reproducible methylation results were obtained from High Pure isolated archived samples. Sequencing confirmed DNA hypermethylation in CRCs. In conclusion, reproducible DNA methylation patterns were obtained from recent samples using both isolation kits. However, long term storage may affect the reliability of the results leading to moderate differences between the efficiency of isolation kits. PMID:25991403

  13. Use of Sequenom Sample ID Plus® SNP Genotyping in Identification of FFPE Tumor Samples

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jessica K.; Buchner, Nicholas; Timms, Lee; Tam, Shirley; Luo, Xuemei; Brown, Andrew M. K.; Pasternack, Danielle; Bristow, Robert G.; Fraser, Michael; Boutros, Paul C.; McPherson, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) analysis, such as the AmpFlSTR® Identifiler® Plus kit, is a standard, PCR-based human genotyping method used in the field of forensics. Misidentification of cell line and tissue DNA can be costly if not detected early; therefore it is necessary to have quality control measures such as STR profiling in place. A major issue in large-scale research studies involving archival formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues is that varying levels of DNA degradation can result in failure to correctly identify samples using STR genotyping. PCR amplification of STRs of several hundred base pairs is not always possible when DNA is degraded. The Sample ID Plus® panel from Sequenom allows for human DNA identification and authentication using SNP genotyping. In comparison to lengthy STR amplicons, this multiplexing PCR assay requires amplification of only 76–139 base pairs, and utilizes 47 SNPs to discriminate between individual samples. In this study, we evaluated both STR and SNP genotyping methods of sample identification, with a focus on paired FFPE tumor/normal DNA samples intended for next-generation sequencing (NGS). The ability to successfully validate the identity of FFPE samples can enable cost savings by reducing rework. PMID:24551080

  14. Molecular differential diagnosis of follicular thyroid carcinoma and adenoma based on gene expression profiling by using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Differential diagnosis between malignant follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) and benign follicular thyroid adenoma (FTA) is a great challenge for even an experienced pathologist and requires special effort. Molecular markers may potentially support a differential diagnosis between FTC and FTA in postoperative specimens. The purpose of this study was to derive molecular support for differential post-operative diagnosis, in the form of a simple multigene mRNA-based classifier that would differentiate between FTC and FTA tissue samples. Methods A molecular classifier was created based on a combined analysis of two microarray datasets (using 66 thyroid samples). The performance of the classifier was assessed using an independent dataset comprising 71 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples (31 FTC and 40 FTA), which were analysed by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). In addition, three other microarray datasets (62 samples) were used to confirm the utility of the classifier. Results Five of 8 genes selected from training datasets (ELMO1, EMCN, ITIH5, KCNAB1, SLCO2A1) were amplified by qPCR in FFPE material from an independent sample set. Three other genes did not amplify in FFPE material, probably due to low abundance. All 5 analysed genes were downregulated in FTC compared to FTA. The sensitivity and specificity of the 5-gene classifier tested on the FFPE dataset were 71% and 72%, respectively. Conclusions The proposed approach could support histopathological examination: 5-gene classifier may aid in molecular discrimination between FTC and FTA in FFPE material. PMID:24099521

  15. Comparison of five protocols to extract DNA from paraffin-embedded tissues for the detection of human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Aldana, Adalucy; Martínez, José William; Sepúlveda-Arias, Juan C

    2015-02-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues are a valuable source of DNA with which to perform large retrospective studies on the epidemiology of HPV infection. Five different DNA extraction protocols were carried out to evaluate the DNA obtained from FFPE samples with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using two primer sets to amplify a constitutive human gene, β-globin, and two primer sets to detect the L1 and E6 HPV genes. From the five DNA extraction protocols evaluated, the best results were obtained with protocol A, corresponding to a crude extract from the sample. With the procedures described herein, we were able to amplify DNA extracted from archival paraffin blocks stored for six years. However, the amplification products were more efficiently obtained with primers that amplified shorter fragments. This result indicates that a major factor limiting the extraction process in these samples is DNA fragmentation, a factor that will naturally vary between the different specimens evaluated. Also, depending upon the extraction method, PCR amplification of a human gene does not necessarily guarantee the successful extraction of viral DNA. In conclusion, different DNA and HPV detection methods can significantly influence the results. Therefore, the DNA extraction methods and primers used for DNA amplification in fixed tissues need to be chosen carefully, depending on the specific requirements of the study being carried out. PMID:25444238

  16. Reliability of differential PCR for the detection of EGFR and MDM2 gene amplification in DNA extracted from FFPE glioma tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, S.B.; Abbott, K.; Varma, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    A series of 43 human gliomas, consisting of 30 glioblastomas, 7 anaplastic astrocytomas, 3 low grade astrocytomas, 2 ependymomas, and 1 oligodendroglioma, was studied for amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) genes. DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections was analyzed by differential PCR and the results were compared with slot blot examination of DNA extracted from frozen tissue from the same neoplasms. Twelve glioblastomas (40%) showed amplification of the EGFR gene, and overexpression of EGFR was evident in each of these tumors as indicated by the immunoperoxidase technique. Two of the tumors with EGFR gene amplification also revealed amplification of the MDM2 gene, while one additional glioblastoma revealed MDM2 amplification only. A 100% concordance in the detection of amplification was observed between differential PCR and slot blot analysis; consequently these results indicate that differential PCR using DNA extracted front archival tissue sections is a reliable method of demonstrating gene amplifications in glial tumors. 29 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. A simple and cost-effective method of DNA extraction from small formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue for molecular oncologic testing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Extraction of DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is a critical step in molecular oncologic testing. As molecular oncology testing becomes more important for prognostic and therapeutic decision making and tissue specimens become smaller due to earlier detection of suspicious lesions and the use of fine needle aspiration methods for tissue collection, it becomes more challenging for the typical molecular pathology laboratory to obtain reliable test results. We developed a DNA extraction method to obtain sufficient quantity and high quality genomic DNA from limited FFPE tissue for molecular oncology testing using a combination of H&E stained slides, a matrix capture method and the Qiagen DNA column. Methods Three DNA extraction methods were compared: our standard procedure of manually scraping tissue from unstained slides followed by DNA extraction using the QIAamp FFPE column (Qiagen, Valencia, CA), a glue capture method (Pinpoint Solution, Zymo Research Corp, Inc) on H&E stained slides followed by DNA extraction using either the QIAamp column or the column included with the Pinpoint kit (Zymo Research). The DNA extraction protocol was optimized. Statistical analysis was performed using the paired two-sample student’s t-test. Results The combination of the matrix capture method with the QIAamp column gave an equivalent amount of DNA as our standard extraction method using the unstained slides and a 4.6-fold higher DNA yield than using the Zymo column included in the Pinpoint Slide Solution kit. Several molecular tests were performed and DNA purified using the new method gave the same results as for the previous methods. Conclusions Using H&E stained slides allows visual confirmation of tumor cells during microdissection. The Pinpoint solution made removal of specific tissue from the slides easier and reduced the risk of contamination and tissue loss. This DNA extraction method is simple, cost-effective, and blends with our current

  18. HPV16 detection by qPCR method in relation to quantity and quality of DNA extracted from archival formalin fixed and paraffin embedded head and neck cancer tissues by three commercially available kits.

    PubMed

    Biesaga, Beata; Janecka, Anna; Mucha-Małecka, Anna; Adamczyk, Agnieszka; Szostek, Sława; Słonina, Dorota; Halaszka, Krzysztof; Przewoźnik, Marcin

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare HPV16 detection by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in relation to the quantity and quality of DNA isolated from 21 formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) head and neck cancer tissues by three commercially available kits: EX-WAX™ DNA Extraction Kit (M) (Merck Millipore, Darmstadt, Germany), QIAamp(®) DNA FFPE Tissue (Q) (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany) and ReliaPrep™ FFPE gDNA Miniprep System (P) (Promega, Madison, USA). Quantity of extracted DNA was assessed spectrophometrically and fluorometrically. Its quality was analyzed using A260/280 and A260/230 ratios and the β-actin fragment amplifiability in qPCR. HPV16 presence was detected by qPCR, using specific primers and TaqMan probe. HPV infection was found in 8 DNA samples extracted with M kit (38.1%) and in 7 (33.3%) isolated with Q and P kits. Three samples from M and Q kits were characterized by HPV16 positivity and lack of β-actin amplifiability. They had significantly lower A260/280 ratio (M: 1.6±0.0, p=0.044 and Q: 1.7±0.0, p=0.016) compared to samples with both fragments amplification (M: 1.7±0.0 and Q: 1.9±0.0). Therefore, for HPV detection by qPCR in FFPE tissues we recommend ReliaPrep™ FFPE gDNA Miniprep System. PMID:27456982

  19. Phage display-based on-slide selection of tumor-specific antibodies on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human tissue biopsies.

    PubMed

    Ten Haaf, Andre; Pscherer, Sibylle; Fries, Katharina; Barth, Stefan; Gattenlöhner, Stefan; Tur, Mehmet Kemal

    2015-08-01

    Phage display is an effective method for the generation of target-specific human antibodies. Standard phage display panning use purified proteins, antigen-transfected cells or tumor cell lines as target structure to generate specific antibodies. However, recombinant proteins can be difficult to express and purify in their native conformation and suitable cell lines are not always available. Additionally the antigen expression profile may change during cultivation and thus differ from the malignant cells in patient. Here we describe a method for the selection of specific antibodies from phage display libraries by panning against formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue biopsies immobilized on glass slides, using small cell lung cancer (SCLC) as a case study. The human Tomlinson single-chain variable fragment (scFv) phage libraries I and J were panned against SCLC FFPE tissue slides for positive selection and healthy lung tissue for subtraction. The specificity of the selected scFv antibodies was confirmed in vitro by ELISA on immobilized SCLC cell membranes, by flow cytometry using the SCLC cell lines NCI-H69, NCI-H82 and DMS 273, and ex vivo against tissue microarrays containing 35 different SCLC samples and 20 types of normal organs. We monitored the internalization of three selected scFv antibodies and fused them with Pseudomonas exotoxin A (ETA') to produce immunotoxins whose cytotoxicity was confirmed by cell viability and apoptosis assays on different SCLC cell lines, achieving IC50 values of up to 23nM. The selection of SCLC-specific scFv antibodies by panning against FFPE tissue slides circumvents the challenges of using purified antigens or cell lines for antibody selection. PMID:26045318

  20. Revealing the Molecular Portrait of Triple Negative Breast Tumors in an Understudied Population through Omics Analysis of Formalin-Fixed and Paraffin-Embedded Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Vaca-Paniagua, Felipe; Alvarez-Gomez, Rosa María; Maldonado-Martínez, Hector Aquiles; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos; Fragoso-Ontiveros, Veronica; Lasa-Gonsebatt, Federico; Herrera, Luis Alonso; Cantú, David; Bargallo-Rocha, Enrique; Mohar, Alejandro; Durand, Geoffroy; Forey, Nathalie; Voegele, Catherine; Vallée, Maxime; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; McKay, James; Ardin, Maude; Villar, Stéphanie; Zavadil, Jiri; Olivier, Magali

    2015-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), defined by the lack of expression of the estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal receptor 2, is an aggressive form of breast cancer that is more prevalent in certain populations, in particular in low- and middle-income regions. The detailed molecular features of TNBC in these regions remain unexplored as samples are mostly accessible as formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) archived tissues, a challenging material for advanced genomic and transcriptomic studies. Using dedicated reagents and analysis pipelines, we performed whole exome sequencing and miRNA and mRNA profiling of 12 FFPE tumor tissues collected from pathological archives in Mexico. Sequencing analyses of the tumor tissues and their blood pairs identified TP53 and RB1 genes as the most frequently mutated genes, with a somatic mutation load of 1.7 mutations/exome Mb on average. Transcriptional analyses revealed an overexpression of growth-promoting signals (EGFR, PDGFR, VEGF, PIK3CA, FOXM1), a repression of cell cycle control pathways (TP53, RB1), a deregulation of DNA-repair pathways, and alterations in epigenetic modifiers through miRNA:mRNA network de-regulation. The molecular programs identified were typical of those described in basal-like tumors in other populations. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using archived clinical samples for advanced integrated genomics analyses. It thus opens up opportunities for investigating molecular features of tumors from regions where only FFPE tissues are available, allowing retrospective studies on the search for treatment strategies or on the exploration of the geographic diversity of breast cancer. PMID:25961742

  1. Revealing the Molecular Portrait of Triple Negative Breast Tumors in an Understudied Population through Omics Analysis of Formalin-Fixed and Paraffin-Embedded Tissues.

    PubMed

    Vaca-Paniagua, Felipe; Alvarez-Gomez, Rosa María; Maldonado-Martínez, Hector Aquiles; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos; Fragoso-Ontiveros, Veronica; Lasa-Gonsebatt, Federico; Herrera, Luis Alonso; Cantú, David; Bargallo-Rocha, Enrique; Mohar, Alejandro; Durand, Geoffroy; Forey, Nathalie; Voegele, Catherine; Vallée, Maxime; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; McKay, James; Ardin, Maude; Villar, Stéphanie; Zavadil, Jiri; Olivier, Magali

    2015-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), defined by the lack of expression of the estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal receptor 2, is an aggressive form of breast cancer that is more prevalent in certain populations, in particular in low- and middle-income regions. The detailed molecular features of TNBC in these regions remain unexplored as samples are mostly accessible as formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) archived tissues, a challenging material for advanced genomic and transcriptomic studies. Using dedicated reagents and analysis pipelines, we performed whole exome sequencing and miRNA and mRNA profiling of 12 FFPE tumor tissues collected from pathological archives in Mexico. Sequencing analyses of the tumor tissues and their blood pairs identified TP53 and RB1 genes as the most frequently mutated genes, with a somatic mutation load of 1.7 mutations/exome Mb on average. Transcriptional analyses revealed an overexpression of growth-promoting signals (EGFR, PDGFR, VEGF, PIK3CA, FOXM1), a repression of cell cycle control pathways (TP53, RB1), a deregulation of DNA-repair pathways, and alterations in epigenetic modifiers through miRNA:mRNA network de-regulation. The molecular programs identified were typical of those described in basal-like tumors in other populations. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using archived clinical samples for advanced integrated genomics analyses. It thus opens up opportunities for investigating molecular features of tumors from regions where only FFPE tissues are available, allowing retrospective studies on the search for treatment strategies or on the exploration of the geographic diversity of breast cancer. PMID:25961742

  2. Multiclass Carcinogenic DNA Adduct Quantification in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues by Ultraperformance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingshu; Yun, Byeong Hwa; Upadhyaya, Pramod; Yao, Lihua; Krishnamachari, Sesha; Rosenquist, Thomas A; Grollman, Arthur P; Turesky, Robert J

    2016-05-01

    DNA adducts are a measure of internal exposure to genotoxicants and an important biomarker for human risk assessment. However, the employment of DNA adducts as biomarkers in human studies is often restricted because fresh-frozen tissues are not available. In contrast, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues with clinical diagnosis are readily accessible. Recently, our laboratory reported that DNA adducts of aristolochic acid, a carcinogenic component of Aristolochia herbs used in traditional Chinese medicines worldwide, can be recovered quantitatively from FFPE tissues. In this study, we have evaluated the efficacy of our method for retrieval of DNA adducts from archived tissue by measuring DNA adducts derived from four other classes of human carcinogens: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), aromatic amines, heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs), and N-nitroso compounds (NOCs). Deoxyguanosine (dG) adducts of the PAH benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), 10-(deoxyguanosin-N(2)-yl)-7,8,9-trihydroxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (dG-N(2)-B[a]PDE); the aromatic amine 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP), N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4-aminobiphenyl (dG-C8-4-ABP); the HAA 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-PhIP (dG-C8-PhIP); and the dG adducts of the NOC 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), O(6)-methyl-dG (O(6)-Me-dG) and O(6)-pyridyloxobutyl-dG (O(6)-POB-dG), formed in liver, lung, bladder, pancreas, or colon were recovered in comparable yields from fresh-frozen and FFPE preserved tissues of rodents treated with the procarcinogens. Quantification was achieved by ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization ion-trap multistage mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-IT-MS(3)). These advancements in the technology of DNA adduct retrieval from FFPE tissue clear the way for use of archived pathology samples in molecular epidemiology studies designed to assess the causal role of exposure to hazardous chemicals

  3. Variation in pre-PCR processing of FFPE samples leads to discrepancies in BRAF and EGFR mutation detection: a diagnostic RING trial

    PubMed Central

    Kapp, Joshua R; Diss, Tim; Spicer, James; Gandy, Michael; Schrijver, Iris; Jennings, Lawrence J; Li, Marilyn M; Tsongalis, Gregory J; de Castro, David Gonzalez; Bridge, Julia A; Wallace, Andrew; Deignan, Joshua L; Hing, Sandra; Butler, Rachel; Verghese, Eldo; Latham, Gary J; Hamoudi, Rifat A

    2015-01-01

    Aims Mutation detection accuracy has been described extensively; however, it is surprising that pre-PCR processing of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples has not been systematically assessed in clinical context. We designed a RING trial to (i) investigate pre-PCR variability, (ii) correlate pre-PCR variation with EGFR/BRAF mutation testing accuracy and (iii) investigate causes for observed variation. Methods 13 molecular pathology laboratories were recruited. 104 blinded FFPE curls including engineered FFPE curls, cell-negative FFPE curls and control FFPE tissue samples were distributed to participants for pre-PCR processing and mutation detection. Follow-up analysis was performed to assess sample purity, DNA integrity and DNA quantitation. Results Rate of mutation detection failure was 11.9%. Of these failures, 80% were attributed to pre-PCR error. Significant differences in DNA yields across all samples were seen using analysis of variance (p<0.0001), and yield variation from engineered samples was not significant (p=0.3782). Two laboratories failed DNA extraction from samples that may be attributed to operator error. DNA extraction protocols themselves were not found to contribute significant variation. 10/13 labs reported yields averaging 235.8 ng (95% CI 90.7 to 380.9) from cell-negative samples, which was attributed to issues with spectrophotometry. DNA measurements using Qubit Fluorometry demonstrated a median fivefold overestimation of DNA quantity by Nanodrop Spectrophotometry. DNA integrity and PCR inhibition were factors not found to contribute significant variation. Conclusions In this study, we provide evidence demonstrating that variation in pre-PCR steps is prevalent and may detrimentally affect the patient's ability to receive critical therapy. We provide recommendations for preanalytical workflow optimisation that may reduce errors in down-stream sequencing and for next-generation sequencing library generation. PMID:25430497

  4. Multilocus sequence typing of Histoplasma capsulatum in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from cats living in non-endemic regions reveals a new phylogenetic clade.

    PubMed

    Arunmozhi Balajee, S; Hurst, Steven F; Chang, Loretta S; Miles, Macon; Beeler, Emily; Hale, Christa; Kasuga, Takao; Benedict, Kaitlin; Chiller, Tom; Lindsley, Mark D

    2013-05-01

    Infections caused by Histoplasma capsulatum are found most often in endemic regions of North, Central, and South America. H. capsulatum has been divided into eight geographic clades by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Recently, one isolate and five formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples were received from six of 15 suspected cases of histoplasmosis in cats residing in areas not known to be endemic for H. capsulatum. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and sequence analysis of the rDNA ITS-2 region confirmed the diagnosis of H. capsulatum. Since these cases were not, as noted, from the accepted endemic areas, it was of interest to understand the molecular epidemiology of these isolates. Results of molecular analysis indicated that the H. capsulatum recovered from the cats were most closely related to the North American-1 clade, but clustered separately outside this clade, suggesting that the H. capsulatum infecting the animals may represent a separate clade or phylogenetic species. This study also demonstrated the utility of obtaining valuable molecular subtype data directly from archived FFPE tissue blocks, particularly when a fungus culture was not performed or is otherwise unavailable. PMID:23072593

  5. iSERS microscopy guided by wide field immunofluorescence: analysis of HER2 expression on normal and breast cancer FFPE tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Ping; Zhang, Yuying; König, Matthias; Papadopoulou, Evanthia; Walkenfort, Bernd; Kasimir-Bauer, Sabine; Bankfalvi, Agnes; Schlücker, Sebastian

    2016-08-15

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) microscopy is an emerging imaging technique for tissue-based cancer diagnostics. Specifically, immuno-SERS (iSERS) microscopy employs antibodies labelled by molecularly functionalized noble metal colloids for antigen localization on tissue specimen. Spectrally resolved iSERS acquisition schemes are typically rather time-consuming when large tissue areas must be scanned. Here, we demonstrate the application of iSERS imaging guided by wide field immunofluorescence (IF) for localization of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on breast tissue sections. The addition of unlabelled anti-HER2 primary antibodies to the tissue is followed by the incubation with secondary antibodies labelled with both Alexa-647 (for IF) and hydrophilically stabilized gold nanostars coated with aromatic thiols (for iSERS). False-color iSERS images clearly reveal the different HER2 expression levels on normal and breast cancer tissue, respectively. A series of negative controls confirms that the binding specificity of the secondary antibody is maintained after conjugation to the SERS nanoparticles. PMID:27302205

  6. The use of laser microdissection in the identification of suitable reference genes for normalization of quantitative real-time PCR in human FFPE epithelial ovarian tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Li, Tao; Huang, Bangxing; Cheng, Henghui; Ding, Hui; Dong, Weihong; Xiao, Man; Liu, Ling; Wang, Zehua

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is a powerful and reproducible method of gene expression analysis in which expression levels are quantified by normalization against reference genes. Therefore, to investigate the potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for epithelial ovarian cancer by qPCR, it is critical to identify stable reference genes. In this study, twelve housekeeping genes (ACTB, GAPDH, 18S rRNA, GUSB, PPIA, PBGD, PUM1, TBP, HRPT1, RPLP0, RPL13A, and B2M) were analyzed in 50 ovarian samples from normal, benign, borderline, and malignant tissues. For reliable results, laser microdissection (LMD), an effective technique used to prepare homogeneous starting material, was utilized to precisely excise target tissues or cells. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and nonparametric (Kruskal-Wallis) tests were used to compare the expression differences. NormFinder and geNorm software were employed to further validate the suitability and stability of the candidate genes. Results showed that epithelial cells occupied a small percentage of the normal ovary indeed. The expression of ACTB, PPIA, RPL13A, RPLP0, and TBP were stable independent of the disease progression. In addition, NormFinder and geNorm identified the most stable combination (ACTB, PPIA, RPLP0, and TBP) and the relatively unstable reference gene GAPDH from the twelve commonly used housekeeping genes. Our results highlight the use of homogeneous ovarian tissues and multiple-reference normalization strategy, e.g. the combination of ACTB, PPIA, RPLP0, and TBP, for qPCR in epithelial ovarian tissues, whereas GAPDH, the most commonly used reference gene, is not recommended, especially as a single reference gene. PMID:24776823

  7. Somatic Mutation Screening Using Archival Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissues by Fluidigm Multiplex PCR and Illumina Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming; Escudero-Ibarz, Leire; Moody, Sarah; Zeng, Naiyan; Clipson, Alexandra; Huang, Yuanxue; Xue, Xuemin; Grigoropoulos, Nicholas F; Barrans, Sharon; Worrillow, Lisa; Forshew, Tim; Su, Jing; Firth, Andrew; Martin, Howard; Jack, Andrew; Brugger, Kim; Du, Ming-Qing

    2015-09-01

    High-throughput somatic mutation screening using FFPE tissues is a major challenge because of a lack of established methods and validated variant calling algorithms. We aimed to develop a targeted sequencing protocol by Fluidigm multiplex PCR and Illumina sequencing and to establish a companion variant calling algorithm. The experimental protocol and variant calling algorithm were first developed and optimized against a series of somatic mutations (147 substitutions, 12 indels ranging from 1 to 33 bp) in seven genes, previously detected by Sanger sequencing of DNA from 163 FFPE lymphoma biopsy specimens. The optimized experimental protocol and variant calling algorithm were further ascertained in two separate experiments by including the seven genes as a part of larger gene panels (22 or 13 genes) using FFPE and high-molecular-weight lymphoma DNAs, respectively. We found that most false-positive variants were due to DNA degradation, deamination, and Taq polymerase errors, but they were nonreproducible and could be efficiently eliminated by duplicate experiments. A small fraction of false-positive variants appeared in duplicate, but they were at low alternative allele frequencies and could be separated from mutations when appropriate threshold value was used. In conclusion, we established a robust practical approach for high-throughput mutation screening using archival FFPE tissues. PMID:26165823

  8. A Comparison of Fresh Frozen vs. Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Specimens of Canine Mammary Tumors via Branched-DNA Assay.

    PubMed

    Lüder Ripoli, Florenza; Mohr, Annika; Conradine Hammer, Susanne; Willenbrock, Saskia; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Hennecke, Silvia; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Nolte, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Mammary neoplasms are the tumors most affecting female dogs and women. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues are an invaluable source of archived biological material. Fresh frozen (FF) tissue is considered ideal for gene expression analysis. However, strategies based on FFPE material offer several advantages. Branched-DNA assays permit a reliable and fast workflow when analyzing gene expression. The aim of this study was to assess the comparability of the branched-DNA assay when analyzing certain gene expression patterns between FF and FFPE samples in canine mammary tumors. RNA was isolated from 109 FFPE samples and from 93 FF samples of different canine mammary tissues. Sixteen (16) target genes (Tp53; Myc; HMGA1; Pik3ca; Mcl1; MAPK3; FOXO3; PTEN; GATA4; PFDN5; HMGB1; MAPK1; BRCA2; BRCA1; HMGA2; and Her2) were analyzed via branched-DNA assay (b-DNA). ACTB, GAPDH, and HPRT1 were used as data normalizers. Overall, the relative gene expression of the two different origins of samples showed an agreement of 63%. Still, care should be taken, as FFPE specimens showed lower expression of the analyzed targets when compared to FF samples. The fact that the gene expression in FFPE proved to be lower than in FF specimens is likely to have been caused by the effect of storage time. ACTB had the best performance as a data normalizer. PMID:27187374

  9. A Comparison of Fresh Frozen vs. Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Specimens of Canine Mammary Tumors via Branched-DNA Assay

    PubMed Central

    Lüder Ripoli, Florenza; Mohr, Annika; Conradine Hammer, Susanne; Willenbrock, Saskia; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Hennecke, Silvia; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Nolte, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Mammary neoplasms are the tumors most affecting female dogs and women. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues are an invaluable source of archived biological material. Fresh frozen (FF) tissue is considered ideal for gene expression analysis. However, strategies based on FFPE material offer several advantages. Branched-DNA assays permit a reliable and fast workflow when analyzing gene expression. The aim of this study was to assess the comparability of the branched-DNA assay when analyzing certain gene expression patterns between FF and FFPE samples in canine mammary tumors. RNA was isolated from 109 FFPE samples and from 93 FF samples of different canine mammary tissues. Sixteen (16) target genes (Tp53; Myc; HMGA1; Pik3ca; Mcl1; MAPK3; FOXO3; PTEN; GATA4; PFDN5; HMGB1; MAPK1; BRCA2; BRCA1; HMGA2; and Her2) were analyzed via branched-DNA assay (b-DNA). ACTB, GAPDH, and HPRT1 were used as data normalizers. Overall, the relative gene expression of the two different origins of samples showed an agreement of 63%. Still, care should be taken, as FFPE specimens showed lower expression of the analyzed targets when compared to FF samples. The fact that the gene expression in FFPE proved to be lower than in FF specimens is likely to have been caused by the effect of storage time. ACTB had the best performance as a data normalizer. PMID:27187374

  10. An approach to optimize sample preparation for MALDI imaging MS of FFPE sections using fractional factorial design of experiments.

    PubMed

    Oetjen, Janina; Lachmund, Delf; Palmer, Andrew; Alexandrov, Theodore; Becker, Michael; Boskamp, Tobias; Maass, Peter

    2016-09-01

    A standardized workflow for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI imaging MS) is a prerequisite for the routine use of this promising technology in clinical applications. We present an approach to develop standard operating procedures for MALDI imaging MS sample preparation of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections based on a novel quantitative measure of dataset quality. To cover many parts of the complex workflow and simultaneously test several parameters, experiments were planned according to a fractional factorial design of experiments (DoE). The effect of ten different experiment parameters was investigated in two distinct DoE sets, each consisting of eight experiments. FFPE rat brain sections were used as standard material because of low biological variance. The mean peak intensity and a recently proposed spatial complexity measure were calculated for a list of 26 predefined peptides obtained by in silico digestion of five different proteins and served as quality criteria. A five-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied on the final scores to retrieve a ranking of experiment parameters with increasing impact on data variance. Graphical abstract MALDI imaging experiments were planned according to fractional factorial design of experiments for the parameters under study. Selected peptide images were evaluated by the chosen quality metric (structure and intensity for a given peak list), and the calculated values were used as an input for the ANOVA. The parameters with the highest impact on the quality were deduced and SOPs recommended. PMID:27485623

  11. Identification of accurate reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue from primary non-small cell lung cancers and brain and lymph node metastases.

    PubMed

    Søes, Signe; Sørensen, Brita Singers; Alsner, Jan; Overgaard, Jens; Hager, Henrik; Hansen, Lise Lotte; Kristensen, Lasse Sommer

    2013-08-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and metastatic spread of the cancer rather than the primary tumor is the main cause of death. However, the molecular alterations of cancer cells leading to the formation of metastasis are poorly understood. This is partly a result of most solid tumor samples available for retrospective studies being archived as formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens causing the nucleic acids to be highly degraded. Furthermore, stably expressed reference genes for normalization of gene expression data using reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) have not been identified for combined analysis of primary lung tumors and the tissues where to the cancer metastasize. Using an optimized RT-qPCR workflow we have analyzed the expression of 23 candidate reference genes in a total of 54 FFPE specimens derived from primary Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer tumors, brain metastases, and lymph node metastases as well as normal lung, lymph node, and brain tissues. We show that every aspect of the workflow is highly reproducible, and the PUM1, TBP, and IPO8 genes were identified as the most stably expressed reference genes among the candidates, by using the GeNorm and NormFinder software programs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that commonly used reference genes such as ACTB (β-actin), GAPDH, and rRNA18S are less stably expressed in the studied samples. The presented workflow and the identified reference genes may facilitate more reliable gene expression studies in lung cancer using RNA from FFPE tissues. PMID:23643276

  12. Diagnostic performance of HPV E6/E7, hTERT, and Ki67 mRNA RT-qPCR assays on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cervical tissue specimens from women with cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hye-Young; Kim, Geehyuk; Cho, Hyemi; Kim, Sunghyun; Lee, Dongsup; Park, Sunyoung; Park, Kwang Hwa; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2015-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major cause of cervical cancer, which is the third most common cancer in women. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and Ki67 are tumor cell markers indicating cancer cell proliferation in cancer patients, and activation of hTERT and Ki67 leads to progressive cervical carcinogenesis. In the present study, we evaluated the CervicGen HPVE6/E7 mRNA RT-qDx assay, which detects 16 HPV high-risk (HR) genotypes (HPV 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 53, 56, 58, 59, 66, 68 and 69), and the CervicGen hTERT and Ki67 mRNA RT-qDx assay using 117 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cervical cancer tissue samples. The diagnostic validity of the CervicGen HPV RT-qDx assay for detecting histologically proven prevalent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was 94% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 77.8% positive predictive value (PPV), and 78.9% negative predictive value (NPV). The most common HPV genotypes detected in FFPE cervical cancer tissue samples were HPV 16 (56%) and HPV 18 (10%). The positivity rate of hTERT and Ki67 mRNA expressions in FFPE cervical cancer tissue samples on RT-qPCR was 65% and 93% respectively. Moreover, the positivity rates were 92% for a combination of HPV E6/E7 and hTERT mRNA expressions, 97% for HPV E6/E7 and Ki67 mRNA expressions, and 99% (99/100) for the combination of HPV E6/E7, hTERT, and Ki67 mRNA expressions. These data showed that SSC FFPE cervical cancer tissue samples correlated more strongly with high Ki67 mRNA expressions than with hTERT mRNA expressions. Notably, hTERT and Ki67 mRNA expression level was increased in high-grade cervical lesions, but was very low in normal samples. Our findings suggest that the combination of HPV E6/E7, hTERT, and Ki67 mRNA expression levels could be used in a complementary manner in diagnosing high-grade cervical lesions. Further studies are required to evaluate these assays as a useful predictive tool for screening low-grade cervical lesions. PMID:25835783

  13. Multi-center evaluation of the novel fully-automated PCR-based Idylla™ BRAF Mutation Test on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue of malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Melchior, Linea; Grauslund, Morten; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Montagut, Clara; Torres, Erica; Moragón, Ester; Micalessi, Isabel; Frans, Johan; Noten, Veerle; Bourgain, Claire; Vriesema, Renske; van der Geize, Robert; Cokelaere, Kristof; Vercooren, Nancy; Crul, Katrien; Rüdiger, Thomas; Buchmüller, Diana; Reijans, Martin; Jans, Caroline

    2015-12-01

    The advent of BRAF-targeted therapies led to increased survival in patients with metastatic melanomas harboring a BRAF V600 mutation (implicated in 46-48% of malignant melanomas). The Idylla(™) System (Idylla(™)), i.e., the real-time-PCR-based Idylla(™) BRAF Mutation Test performed on the fully-automated Idylla(™) platform, enables detection of the most frequent BRAF V600 mutations (V600E/E2/D, V600K/R/M) in tumor material within approximately 90 min and with 1% detection limit. Idylla(™) performance was determined in a multi-center study by analyzing BRAF mutational status of 148 archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor samples from malignant melanoma patients, and comparing Idylla(™) results with assessments made by commercial or in-house routine diagnostic methods. Of the 148 samples analyzed, Idylla(™) initially recorded 7 insufficient DNA input calls and 15 results discordant with routine method results. Further analysis learned that the quality of 8 samples was insufficient for Idylla(™) testing, 1 sample had an invalid routine test result, and Idylla(™) results were confirmed in 10 samples. Hence, Idylla(™) identified all mutations present, including 7 not identified by routine methods. Idylla(™) enables fully automated BRAF V600 testing directly on FFPE tumor tissue with increased sensitivity, ease-of-use, and much shorter turnaround time compared to existing diagnostic tests, making it a tool for rapid, simple and highly reliable analysis of therapeutically relevant BRAF mutations, in particular for diagnostic units without molecular expertise and infrastructure. PMID:26407762

  14. Detection of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) ligand-c-MET receptor activation in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded specimens by a novel proximity assay.

    PubMed

    Dua, Rajiv; Zhang, Jianhuan; Parry, Gordon; Penuel, Elicia

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant activation of membrane receptors frequently occurs in human carcinomas. Detection of phosphorylated receptors is commonly used as an indicator of receptor activation in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tumor specimens. FFPE is a standard method of specimen preparation used in the histological analysis of solid tumors. Due to variability in FFPE preparations and the labile nature of protein phosphorylation, measurements of phospho-proteins are unreliable and create ambiguities in clinical interpretation. Here, we describe an alternative, novel approach to measure receptor activation by detecting and quantifying ligand-receptor complexes in FFPE specimens. We used hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-c-MET as our model ligand-receptor system. HGF is the only known ligand of the c-MET tyrosine kinase receptor and HGF binding triggers c-MET phosphorylation. Novel antibody proximity-based assays were developed and used to detect and quantify total c-MET, total HGF, and HGF-c-MET ligand-receptor interactions in FFPE cell line and tumor tissue. In glioma cells, autocrine activation of c-MET by HGF-c-MET increased basal levels of c-MET phosphorylation at tyrosine (Tyr) 1003. Furthermore, HGF-c-MET activation in glioma cell lines was verified by Surface Protein-Protein Interaction by Crosslinking ELISA (SPPICE) assay in corresponding soluble cell lysates. Finally, we profiled levels ofc-MET, HGF, and HGF-c-MET complexes in FFPE specimens of human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC), Gastric Cancer, Head and Neck Squamous Cell, and Head and Neck Non-Squamous Cell carcinomas. This report describes a novel approach for the detection and quantification of ligand-receptor interactions that can be widely applied to measure receptor activation in FFPE preclinical models and archived FFPE human tissue specimens. PMID:21283737

  15. Detection of Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) Ligand-c-MET Receptor Activation in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin Embedded Specimens by a Novel Proximity Assay

    PubMed Central

    Dua, Rajiv; Zhang, Jianhuan; Parry, Gordon; Penuel, Elicia

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant activation of membrane receptors frequently occurs in human carcinomas. Detection of phosphorylated receptors is commonly used as an indicator of receptor activation in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tumor specimens. FFPE is a standard method of specimen preparation used in the histological analysis of solid tumors. Due to variability in FFPE preparations and the labile nature of protein phosphorylation, measurements of phospho-proteins are unreliable and create ambiguities in clinical interpretation. Here, we describe an alternative, novel approach to measure receptor activation by detecting and quantifying ligand-receptor complexes in FFPE specimens. We used hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-c-MET as our model ligand-receptor system. HGF is the only known ligand of the c-MET tyrosine kinase receptor and HGF binding triggers c-MET phosphorylation. Novel antibody proximity-based assays were developed and used to detect and quantify total c-MET, total HGF, and HGF-c-MET ligand-receptor interactions in FFPE cell line and tumor tissue. In glioma cells, autocrine activation of c-MET by HGF-c-MET increased basal levels of c-MET phosphorylation at tyrosine (Tyr) 1003. Furthermore, HGF-c-MET activation in glioma cell lines was verified by Surface Protein-Protein Interaction by Crosslinking ELISA (SPPICE) assay in corresponding soluble cell lysates. Finally, we profiled levels of c-MET, HGF, and HGF-c-MET complexes in FFPE specimens of human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC), Gastric Cancer, Head and Neck Squamous Cell, and Head and Neck Non-Squamous Cell carcinomas. This report describes a novel approach for the detection and quantification of ligand-receptor interactions that can be widely applied to measure receptor activation in FFPE preclinical models and archived FFPE human tissue specimens. PMID:21283737

  16. Analysis of BRCA2 loss of heterozygosity in tumor tissue using droplet digital polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Rory L; Cravero, Karen; Chu, David; Erlanger, Bracha; Toro, Patricia Valda; Beaver, Julia A; Zabransky, Daniel J; Wong, Hong Yuen; Cidado, Justin; Croessmann, Sarah; Parsons, Heather A; Kim, Minsoo; Wheelan, Sarah J; Argani, Pedram; Park, Ben Ho

    2014-07-01

    Loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) analysis of archival tumor tissue can aid in determining the clinical significance of BRCA variants. Here we describe an approach for assessing LOH in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues using variant-specific probes and droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR). We evaluated LOH in 2 related breast cancer patients harboring a rare missense BRCA2 variant of unknown clinical significance (c.6966G>T; M2322I). Conventional PCR followed by Sanger sequencing suggested a change in allelic abundance in the FFPE specimens. However, we found no evidence of LOH as determined by the allelic ratio (wild type-variant) for BRCA2 in both patients' archival tumor specimens and adjacent normal control tissues using ddPCR. In summary, these experiments demonstrate the utility of ddPCR to quickly and accurately assess LOH in archival FFPE tumor tissue. PMID:24824029

  17. A Method to Evaluate Genome-Wide Methylation in Archival Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Ovarian Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiling; Li, Min; Ma, Li; Li, Wenzhi; Wu, Xuehong; Richards, Jendai; Fu, Guoxing; Xu, Wei; Bythwood, Tameka; Li, Xu; Wang, Jianxin; Song, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of DNA from archival formalin and paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue for genetic and epigenetic analyses may be problematic, since the DNA is often degraded and only limited amounts may be available. Thus, it is currently not known whether genome-wide methylation can be reliably assessed in DNA from archival FFPE tissue. Methodology/Principal Findings Ovarian tissues, which were obtained and formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded in either 1999 or 2011, were sectioned and stained with hematoxylin-eosin (H&E).Epithelial cells were captured by laser micro dissection, and their DNA subjected to whole genomic bisulfite conversion, whole genomic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, and purification. Sequencing and software analyses were performed to identify the extent of genomic methylation. We observed that 31.7% of sequence reads from the DNA in the 1999 archival FFPE tissue, and 70.6% of the reads from the 2011 sample, could be matched with the genome. Methylation rates of CpG on the Watson and Crick strands were 32.2% and 45.5%, respectively, in the 1999 sample, and 65.1% and 42.7% in the 2011 sample. Conclusions/Significance We have developed an efficient method that allows DNA methylation to be assessed in archival FFPE tissue samples. PMID:25133528

  18. Linkage-Specific in Situ Sialic Acid Derivatization for N-Glycan Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues.

    PubMed

    Holst, Stephanie; Heijs, Bram; de Haan, Noortje; van Zeijl, René J M; Briaire-de Bruijn, Inge H; van Pelt, Gabi W; Mehta, Anand S; Angel, Peggy M; Mesker, Wilma E; Tollenaar, Rob A; Drake, Richard R; Bovée, Judith V M G; McDonnell, Liam A; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging is a rapidly evolving field in which mass spectrometry techniques are applied directly on tissues to characterize the spatial distribution of various molecules such as lipids, protein/peptides, and recently also N-glycans. Glycans are involved in many biological processes and several glycan changes have been associated with different kinds of cancer, making them an interesting target group to study. An important analytical challenge for the study of glycans by MALDI mass spectrometry is the labile character of sialic acid groups which are prone to in-source/postsource decay, thereby biasing the recorded glycan profile. We therefore developed a linkage-specific sialic acid derivatization by dimethylamidation and subsequent amidation and transferred this onto formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues for MALDI imaging of N-glycans. Our results show (i) the successful stabilization of sialic acids in a linkage specific manner, thereby not only increasing the detection range, but also adding biological meaning, (ii) that no noticeable lateral diffusion is induced during to sample preparation, (iii) the potential of mass spectrometry imaging to spatially characterize the N-glycan expression within heterogeneous tissues. PMID:27145236

  19. Characterizing and Diminishing Autofluorescence in Formalin-fixed Paraffin-embedded Human Respiratory Tissue.

    PubMed

    Davis, A Sally; Richter, Anke; Becker, Steven; Moyer, Jenna E; Sandouk, Aline; Skinner, Jeff; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2014-04-10

    Tissue autofluorescence frequently hampers visualization of immunofluorescent markers in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded respiratory tissues. We assessed nine treatments reported to have efficacy in reducing autofluorescence in other tissue types. The three most efficacious were Eriochrome black T, Sudan black B and sodium borohydride, as measured using white light laser confocal Λ(2) (multi-lambda) analysis. We also assessed the impact of steam antigen retrieval and serum application on human tracheal tissue autofluorescence. Functionally fitting this Λ(2) data to 2-dimensional Gaussian surfaces revealed that steam antigen retrieval and serum application contribute minimally to autofluorescence and that the three treatments are disparately efficacious. Together, these studies provide a set of guidelines for diminishing autofluorescence in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human respiratory tissue. Additionally, these characterization techniques are transferable to similar questions in other tissue types, as demonstrated on frozen human liver tissue and paraffin-embedded mouse lung tissue fixed in different fixatives. PMID:24722432

  20. High quality DNA obtained with an automated DNA extraction method with 70+ year old formalin-fixed celloidin-embedded (FFCE) blocks from the indiana medical history museum

    PubMed Central

    Niland, Erin E; McGuire, Audrey; Cox, Mary H; Sandusky, George E

    2012-01-01

    DNA and RNA have been used as markers of tissue quality and integrity throughout the last few decades. In this research study, genomic quality DNA of kidney, liver, heart, lung, spleen, and brain were analyzed in tissues from post-mortem patients and surgical cancer cases spanning the past century. DNA extraction was performed on over 180 samples from: 70+ year old formalin-fixed celloidin-embedded (FFCE) tissues, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples from surgical cases and post-mortem cases from the 1970’s, 1980’s, 1990’s, and 2000’s, tissues fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin/stored in 70% ethanol from the 1990’s, 70+ year old tissues fixed in unbuffered formalin of various concentrations, and fresh tissue as a control. To extract DNA from FFCE samples and ethanol-soaked samples, a modified standard operating procedure was used in which all tissues were homogenized, digested with a proteinase K solution for a long period of time (24-48 hours), and DNA was extracted using the Autogen Flexstar automated extraction machine. To extract DNA from FFPE, all tissues were soaked in xylene to remove the paraffin from the tissue prior to digestion, and FFPE tissues were not homogenized. The results were as follows: celloidin-embedded and paraffin-embedded tissues yielded the highest DNA concentration and greatest DNA quality, while the formalin in various concentrations, and long term formalin/ethanol-stored tissue yielded both the lowest DNA concentration and quality of the tissues tested. The average DNA yield for the various fixatives was: 367.77 μg/ mL FFCE, 590.7 μg/mL FFPE, 53.74 μg/mL formalin-fixed/70% ethanol-stored and 33.2 μg/mL unbuffered formalin tissues. The average OD readings for FFCE, FFPE, formalin-fixed/70% ethanol-stored tissues, and tissues fixed in unbuffered formalin were 1.86, 1.87, 1.43, and 1.48 respectively. The results show that usable DNA can be extracted from tissue fixed in formalin and embedded in celloidin

  1. A novel proximity assay for the detection of proteins and protein complexes: quantitation of HER1 and HER2 total protein expression and homodimerization in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cell lines and breast cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yining; Huang, Weidong; Tan, Yuping; Jin, Xueguang; Dua, Rajiv; Penuel, Elicia; Mukherjee, Ali; Sperinde, Jeff; Pannu, Herjit; Chenna, Ahmed; DeFazio-Eli, Lisa; Pidaparthi, Sailaja; Badal, Youssouf; Wallweber, Gerald; Chen, Lili; Williams, Steve; Tahir, Hasan; Larson, Jeff; Goodman, Laurie; Whitcomb, Jeannette; Petropoulos, Christos; Winslow, John

    2009-03-01

    The availability of drugs targeting the EGFR/HER/erbB signaling pathway has created a need for diagnostics that accurately predict treatment responses. We have developed and characterized a novel assay to provide sensitive and quantitative measures of HER proteins and homodimers in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cell lines and breast tumor tissues, to test these variables. In the VeraTag assay, HER proteins and homodimers are detected through the release of fluorescent tags conjugated to specific HER antibodies, requiring proximity to a second HER antibody. HER2 protein quantification was normalized to tumor area, and compared to receptor numbers in 12 human tumor cell lines determined by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and with HER immunohistochemistry (IHC) test categories and histoscores in cell lines and 170 breast tumors. HER1 and HER2 expression levels determined by the VeraTag assay are proportional to receptor number over more than a 2 log10 range, and HER homodimer levels are consistent with crosslinking and immunoprecipitation results. VeraTag HER2 measurements of breast tumor tissue and cell lines correlate with standard IHC test categories (P<0.001). VeraTag HER2 levels also agree with IHC histoscores at lower HER2 protein levels, but are continuous and overlapping between IHC test categories, extending the dynamic range 5-fold to 10-fold at higher HER2 levels. The VeraTag assay specifically and reproducibly measures HER1 and HER2 protein and homodimers in FFPE tissues. The continuous measure of HER2 protein levels over a broad dynamic range, and the novel HER2 homodimer measure, are presently being assessed as predictive markers for responses to targeted HER2 therapy. PMID:19214113

  2. Quantitation of CDH1 promoter methylation in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues of breast cancer patients using differential high resolution melting analysis

    PubMed Central

    Naghitorabi, Mojgan; Mohammadi-Asl, Javad; Sadeghi, Hamid Mir Mohammad; Rabbani, Mohammad; Jafarian-Dehkordi, Abbas; Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjooy

    2016-01-01

    Background: E-cadherin (CDH1) plays an important role in cell–cell adhesion of epithelial tissues. Loss of E-cadherin expression can lead to loss of tissue integrity, metastasis, and cancer progression. Also loss of E-cadherin expression might be related to aberrant promoter methylation of the CDH1 gene. Many studies have been performed on CDH1 promoter methylation, especially in breast cancer. Although most of the studies have used qualitative methods for methylation analysis, this study is designed to quantitatively investigate CDH1 promoter methylation in breast cancer and its correlation with patients’ clinicopathological features. Materials and Methods: Using differential high resolution melting analysis (D-HRMA), the methylation level of the CDH1 gene promoter was quantified in 98 breast cancer formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues and also 10 fresh frozen normal breast tissues. Results: All samples were detected to be methylated at the CDH1 promoter region. About 74.5% of the breast cancer samples were hypermethylated with an average methylation level of around 60%, while 25.5% of the patients were methylated with the mean methylation level of about 33%, and 90% of the normal samples had a mean methylation level of about 18%. Statistical analyses represented a significant correlation between CDH1 promoter methylation and cancer progression hallmarks, such as, clinical stage, nodal involvement, tumor size, and histological grade. Conclusion: In summary, quantitation of CDH1 promoter methylation can serve as a diagnostic and prognostic tool in breast cancer. Also D-HRMA can be used as a fast and reliable method for quantitation of promoter methylation. PMID:27308263

  3. How Suitable is Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time-of-Flight for Metabolite Imaging from Clinical Formalin-Fixed and Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Samples in Comparison to Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry?

    PubMed

    Buck, Achim; Balluff, Benjamin; Voss, Andreas; Langer, Rupert; Zitzelsberger, Horst; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel

    2016-05-17

    In research and clinical settings, formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens are collected routinely and therefore this material constitutes a highly valuable source to gather insight in metabolic changes of diseases. Among mass spectrometry techniques to examine the molecular content of FFPE tissue, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is the most appropriate when morphological and histological features are to be related to metabolic information. Currently, high-resolution mass spectrometers are widely used for metabolomics studies. However, with regards to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MSI, no study has so far addressed the necessity of instrumental mass resolving power in terms of clinical diagnosis and prognosis using archived FFPE tissue. For this matter we performed for the first time a comprehensive comparison between a high mass resolution Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer and a time-of-flight (TOF) instrument with lower mass resolving power. Spectra analysis revealed that about one-third of the detected peaks remained unresolved by MALDI-TOF, which led to a 3-5 times lower number of m/z features compared to FTICR measurements. Overlaid peak information and background noise in TOF images made a precise assignment of molecular attributes to morphological features more difficult and limited classification approaches. This clearly demonstrates the need for high-mass resolution capabilities for metabolite imaging. Nevertheless, MALDI-TOF allowed reproducing and verifying individual markers identified previously by MALDI-FTICR MSI. The systematic comparison gives rise to a synergistic combination of the different MSI platforms for high-throughput discovery and validation of biomarkers. PMID:27065343

  4. Targeted or whole genome sequencing of formalin fixed tissue samples: potential applications in cancer genomics

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yue; Cottrell, Joseph; Klotzle, Brandy; Godwin, Andrew K.; Koestler, Devin; Beyerlein, Peter; Fan, Jian-Bing; Bibikova, Marina; Chien, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Current genomic studies are limited by the poor availability of fresh-frozen tissue samples. Although formalin-fixed diagnostic samples are in abundance, they are seldom used in current genomic studies because of the concern of formalin-fixation artifacts. Better characterization of these artifacts will allow the use of archived clinical specimens in translational and clinical research studies. To provide a systematic analysis of formalin-fixation artifacts on Illumina sequencing, we generated 26 DNA sequencing data sets from 13 pairs of matched formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) and fresh-frozen (FF) tissue samples. The results indicate high rate of concordant calls between matched FF/FFPE pairs at reference and variant positions in three commonly used sequencing approaches (whole genome, whole exome, and targeted exon sequencing). Global mismatch rates and C·G > T·A substitutions were comparable between matched FF/FFPE samples, and discordant rates were low (<0.26%) in all samples. Finally, low-pass whole genome sequencing produces similar pattern of copy number alterations between FF/FFPE pairs. The results from our studies suggest the potential use of diagnostic FFPE samples for cancer genomic studies to characterize and catalog variations in cancer genomes. PMID:26305677

  5. Targeted or whole genome sequencing of formalin fixed tissue samples: potential applications in cancer genomics.

    PubMed

    Munchel, Sarah; Hoang, Yen; Zhao, Yue; Cottrell, Joseph; Klotzle, Brandy; Godwin, Andrew K; Koestler, Devin; Beyerlein, Peter; Fan, Jian-Bing; Bibikova, Marina; Chien, Jeremy

    2015-09-22

    Current genomic studies are limited by the poor availability of fresh-frozen tissue samples. Although formalin-fixed diagnostic samples are in abundance, they are seldom used in current genomic studies because of the concern of formalin-fixation artifacts. Better characterization of these artifacts will allow the use of archived clinical specimens in translational and clinical research studies. To provide a systematic analysis of formalin-fixation artifacts on Illumina sequencing, we generated 26 DNA sequencing data sets from 13 pairs of matched formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) and fresh-frozen (FF) tissue samples. The results indicate high rate of concordant calls between matched FF/FFPE pairs at reference and variant positions in three commonly used sequencing approaches (whole genome, whole exome, and targeted exon sequencing). Global mismatch rates and C · G > T · A substitutions were comparable between matched FF/FFPE samples, and discordant rates were low (<0.26%) in all samples. Finally, low-pass whole genome sequencing produces similar pattern of copy number alterations between FF/FFPE pairs. The results from our studies suggest the potential use of diagnostic FFPE samples for cancer genomic studies to characterize and catalog variations in cancer genomes. PMID:26305677

  6. Validation of a Multiplex Allele-Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for Detection of KRAS Gene Mutations in Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissues from Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Seekhuntod, Sirirat; Thavarungkul, Paninee; Chaichanawongsaroj, Nuntaree

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with KRAS mutations do not respond to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors and fail to benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. Mutation analysis of KRAS is needed before starting treatment with monoclonal anti-EGFR antibodies in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). The objective of this study is to develop a multiplex allele-specific PCR (MAS-PCR) assay to detect KRAS mutations. Methods We developed a single-tube MAS-PCR assay for the detection of seven KRAS mutations (G12D, G12A, G12R, G12C, G12S, G12V, and G13D). We performed MAS-PCR assay analysis for KRAS on DNA isolated from 270 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) colorectal cancer tissues. Sequences of all 270 samples were determined by pyrosequencing. Seven known point-mutation DNA samples diluted with wild-type DNA were assayed to determine the limitation of detection and reproducibility of the MAS-PCR assay. Results Overall, the results of MAS-PCR assay were in good concordance with pyrosequencing, and only seven discordant samples were found. The MAS-PCR assay reproducibly detected 1 to 2% mutant alleles. The most common mutations were G13D in codon 13 (49.17%), G12D (25.83%) and G12V (12.50%) in codon 12. Conclusion The MAS-PCR assay provides a rapid, cost-effective, and reliable diagnostic tool for accurate detection of KRAS mutations in routine FFPE colorectal cancer tissues. PMID:26812617

  7. HaloPlex Targeted Resequencing for Mutation Detection in Clinical Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tumor Samples.

    PubMed

    Moens, Lotte N J; Falk-Sörqvist, Elin; Ljungström, Viktor; Mattsson, Johanna; Sundström, Magnus; La Fleur, Linnéa; Mathot, Lucy; Micke, Patrick; Nilsson, Mats; Botling, Johan

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, the advent of massively parallel next-generation sequencing technologies has enabled substantial advances in the study of human diseases. Combined with targeted DNA enrichment methods, high sequence coverage can be obtained for different genes simultaneously at a reduced cost per sample, creating unique opportunities for clinical cancer diagnostics. However, the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) process of tissue samples, routinely used in pathology departments, results in DNA fragmentation and nucleotide modifications that introduce a number of technical challenges for downstream biomolecular analyses. We evaluated the HaloPlex target enrichment system for somatic mutation detection in 80 tissue fractions derived from 20 clinical cancer cases with paired tumor and normal tissue available in both FFPE and fresh-frozen format. Several modifications to the standard method were introduced, including a reduced target fragment length and two strand capturing. We found that FFPE material can be used for HaloPlex-based target enrichment and next-generation sequencing, even when starting from small amounts of DNA. By specifically capturing both strands for each target fragment, we were able to reduce the number of false-positive errors caused by FFPE-induced artifacts and lower the detection limit for somatic mutations. We believe that the HaloPlex method presented here will be broadly applicable as a tool for somatic mutation detection in clinical cancer settings. PMID:26354930

  8. Improved reproducibility in genome-wide DNA methylation analysis for PAXgene-fixed samples compared with restored formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded DNA.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Gitte Brinch; Hager, Henrik; Hansen, Lise Lotte; Tost, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Formalin fixation has been the standard method for conservation of clinical specimens for decades. However, a major drawback is the high degradation of nucleic acids, which complicates its use in genome-wide analyses. Unbiased identification of biomarkers, however, requires genome-wide studies, precluding the use of the valuable archives of specimens with long-term follow-up data. Therefore, restoration protocols for DNA from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples have been developed, although they are cost-intensive and time-consuming. An alternative to FFPE and snap-freezing is the PAXgene Tissue System, developed for simultaneous preservation of morphology, proteins, and nucleic acids. In the current study, we compared the performance of DNA from either PAXgene or formalin-fixed tissues to snap-frozen material for genome-wide DNA methylation analysis using the Illumina 450K BeadChip. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis demonstrated that the methylation profile in PAXgene-fixed tissues showed, in comparison with restored FFPE samples, a higher concordance with the profile detected in frozen samples. We demonstrate, for the first time, that DNA from PAXgene conserved tissue performs better compared with restored FFPE DNA in genome-wide DNA methylation analysis. In addition, DNA from PAXgene tissue can be directly used on the array without prior restoration, rendering the analytical process significantly more time- and cost-effective. PMID:25277813

  9. Micro-precise spatiotemporal delivery system embedded in 3D printing for complex tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tarafder, Solaiman; Koch, Alia; Jun, Yena; Chou, Conrad; Awadallah, Mary R; Lee, Chang H

    2016-06-01

    Three dimensional (3D) printing has emerged as an efficient tool for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, given its advantages for constructing custom-designed scaffolds with tunable microstructure/physical properties. Here we developed a micro-precise spatiotemporal delivery system embedded in 3D printed scaffolds. PLGA microspheres (μS) were encapsulated with growth factors (GFs) and then embedded inside PCL microfibers that constitute custom-designed 3D scaffolds. Given the substantial difference in the melting points between PLGA and PCL and their low heat conductivity, μS were able to maintain its original structure while protecting GF's bioactivities. Micro-precise spatial control of multiple GFs was achieved by interchanging dispensing cartridges during a single printing process. Spatially controlled delivery of GFs, with a prolonged release, guided formation of multi-tissue interfaces from bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs). To investigate efficacy of the micro-precise delivery system embedded in 3D printed scaffold, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc scaffolds were fabricated with micro-precise spatiotemporal delivery of CTGF and TGFβ3, mimicking native-like multiphase fibrocartilage. In vitro, TMJ disc scaffolds spatially embedded with CTGF/TGFβ3-μS resulted in formation of multiphase fibrocartilaginous tissues from MSCs. In vivo, TMJ disc perforation was performed in rabbits, followed by implantation of CTGF/TGFβ3-μS-embedded scaffolds. After 4 wks, CTGF/TGFβ3-μS embedded scaffolds significantly improved healing of the perforated TMJ disc as compared to the degenerated TMJ disc in the control group with scaffold embedded with empty μS. In addition, CTGF/TGFβ3-μS embedded scaffolds significantly prevented arthritic changes on TMJ condyles. In conclusion, our micro-precise spatiotemporal delivery system embedded in 3D printing may serve as an efficient tool to regenerate complex and inhomogeneous tissues. PMID

  10. Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded Tissue as a Starting Point for PrPSc Detection by ELISA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue are regularly employed in TSE diagnosis by IHC, the standard by which all other diagnostic protocols are currently judged. While IHC affords advantages over diagnostic approaches that typically utilize fresh or frozen tissue, such as Western blot...

  11. Decoupling tissue and cell scale stresses using embedded oil microdroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Elijah; Serwane, Friedhelm; Mongera, Alessandro; Lucio, Adam; Campàs, Otger

    Embryonic development and organ morphogenesis require mechanical stresses to be patterned in space and time over length scales ranging from cellular to tissue level. While several approaches use 4D live-imaging to infer forces from the observed flow fields, few techniques allow direct measurements of stress in vivo and in situ. We use oil microdroplets injected in between cells as direct stress sensors. Through confocal imaging and custom software for high resolution 3D droplet surface reconstruction, we can directly measure the patterns of stress by looking at the deformations of the drop. This analysis allows us to decouple the stresses at the tissue scale from those generated at cellular scales by disentangling ellipsoidal drop deformation modes from higher order drop deformations. Using this technique we measure both tissue and cell scale stresses within aggregates of mesenchymal cells as well as within developing zebrafish embryonic tissues. The decoupling of mechanical stresses at cell and tissue scales makes our technique uniquely suited for understanding how tissue scale reorganizations emerge from cell scale interactions. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship.

  12. Quantitative and Sensitive Detection of Cancer Genome Amplifications from Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded Tumors with Droplet Digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Nadauld, Lincoln; Regan, John F; Miotke, Laura; Pai, Reet K; Longacre, Teri A; Kwok, Shirley S; Saxonov, Serge; Ford, James M; Ji, Hanlee P

    2012-01-01

    For the analysis of cancer, there is great interest in rapid and accurate detection of cancer genome amplifications containing oncogenes that are potential therapeutic targets. The vast majority of cancer tissue samples are formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) which enables histopathological examination and long term archiving. However, FFPE cancer genomic DNA is oftentimes degraded and generally a poor substrate for many molecular biology assays. To overcome the issues of poor DNA quality from FFPE samples and detect oncogenic copy number amplifications with high accuracy and sensitivity, we developed a novel approach. Our assay requires nanogram amounts of genomic DNA, thus facilitating study of small amounts of clinical samples. Using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), we can determine the relative copy number of specific genomic loci even in the presence of intermingled normal tissue. We used a control dilution series to determine the limits of detection for the ddPCR assay and report its improved sensitivity on minimal amounts of DNA compared to standard real-time PCR. To develop this approach, we designed an assay for the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene (FGFR2) that is amplified in a gastric and breast cancers as well as others. We successfully utilized ddPCR to ascertain FGFR2 amplifications from FFPE-preserved gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas. PMID:23682346

  13. Quantitative and Sensitive Detection of Cancer Genome Amplifications from Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded Tumors with Droplet Digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Nadauld, Lincoln; Regan, John F.; Miotke, Laura; Pai, Reet K.; Longacre, Teri A.; Kwok, Shirley S.; Saxonov, Serge; Ford, James M.; Ji, Hanlee P.

    2013-01-01

    For the analysis of cancer, there is great interest in rapid and accurate detection of cancer genome amplifications containing oncogenes that are potential therapeutic targets. The vast majority of cancer tissue samples are formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) which enables histopathological examination and long term archiving. However, FFPE cancer genomic DNA is oftentimes degraded and generally a poor substrate for many molecular biology assays. To overcome the issues of poor DNA quality from FFPE samples and detect oncogenic copy number amplifications with high accuracy and sensitivity, we developed a novel approach. Our assay requires nanogram amounts of genomic DNA, thus facilitating study of small amounts of clinical samples. Using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), we can determine the relative copy number of specific genomic loci even in the presence of intermingled normal tissue. We used a control dilution series to determine the limits of detection for the ddPCR assay and report its improved sensitivity on minimal amounts of DNA compared to standard real-time PCR. To develop this approach, we designed an assay for the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene (FGFR2) that is amplified in a gastric and breast cancers as well as others. We successfully utilized ddPCR to ascertain FGFR2 amplifications from FFPE-preserved gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas. PMID:23682346

  14. Transcriptome Sequencing (RNAseq) Enables Utilization of Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Biopsies with Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma for Exploration of Disease Biology and Biomarker Development

    PubMed Central

    Eikrem, Oystein; Beisland, Christian; Hjelle, Karin; Flatberg, Arnar; Scherer, Andreas; Landolt, Lea; Skogstrand, Trude; Leh, Sabine; Beisvag, Vidar; Marti, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues are an underused resource for molecular analyses. This proof of concept study aimed to compare RNAseq results from FFPE biopsies with the corresponding RNAlater® (Qiagen, Germany) stored samples from clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) patients to investigate feasibility of RNAseq in archival tissue. From each of 16 patients undergoing partial or full nephrectomy, four core biopsies, such as two specimens with ccRCC and two specimens of adjacent normal tissue, were obtained with a 16g needle. One normal and one ccRCC tissue specimen per patient was stored either in FFPE or RNAlater®. RNA sequencing libraries were generated applying the new Illumina TruSeq® Access library preparation protocol. Comparative analysis was done using voom/Limma R-package. The analysis of the FFPE and RNAlater® datasets yielded similar numbers of detected genes, differentially expressed transcripts and affected pathways. The FFPE and RNAlater datasets shared 80% (n = 1106) differentially expressed genes. The average expression and the log2 fold changes of these transcripts correlated with R2 = 0.97, and R2 = 0.96, respectively. Among transcripts with the highest fold changes in both datasets were carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9), neuronal pentraxin-2 (NPTX2) and uromodulin (UMOD) that were confirmed by immunohistochemistry. IPA revealed the presence of gene signatures of cancer and nephrotoxicity, renal damage and immune response. To simulate the feasibility of clinical biomarker studies with FFPE samples, a classifier model was developed for the FFPE dataset: expression data for CA9 alone had an accuracy, specificity and sensitivity of 94%, respectively, and achieved similar performance in the RNAlater dataset. Transforming growth factor-ß1 (TGFB1)-regulated genes, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and NOTCH signaling cascade may support novel therapeutic strategies. In conclusion, in this proof of concept study, RNAseq data

  15. Transcriptome Sequencing (RNAseq) Enables Utilization of Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Biopsies with Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma for Exploration of Disease Biology and Biomarker Development.

    PubMed

    Eikrem, Oystein; Beisland, Christian; Hjelle, Karin; Flatberg, Arnar; Scherer, Andreas; Landolt, Lea; Skogstrand, Trude; Leh, Sabine; Beisvag, Vidar; Marti, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues are an underused resource for molecular analyses. This proof of concept study aimed to compare RNAseq results from FFPE biopsies with the corresponding RNAlater® (Qiagen, Germany) stored samples from clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) patients to investigate feasibility of RNAseq in archival tissue. From each of 16 patients undergoing partial or full nephrectomy, four core biopsies, such as two specimens with ccRCC and two specimens of adjacent normal tissue, were obtained with a 16g needle. One normal and one ccRCC tissue specimen per patient was stored either in FFPE or RNAlater®. RNA sequencing libraries were generated applying the new Illumina TruSeq® Access library preparation protocol. Comparative analysis was done using voom/Limma R-package. The analysis of the FFPE and RNAlater® datasets yielded similar numbers of detected genes, differentially expressed transcripts and affected pathways. The FFPE and RNAlater datasets shared 80% (n = 1106) differentially expressed genes. The average expression and the log2 fold changes of these transcripts correlated with R2 = 0.97, and R2 = 0.96, respectively. Among transcripts with the highest fold changes in both datasets were carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9), neuronal pentraxin-2 (NPTX2) and uromodulin (UMOD) that were confirmed by immunohistochemistry. IPA revealed the presence of gene signatures of cancer and nephrotoxicity, renal damage and immune response. To simulate the feasibility of clinical biomarker studies with FFPE samples, a classifier model was developed for the FFPE dataset: expression data for CA9 alone had an accuracy, specificity and sensitivity of 94%, respectively, and achieved similar performance in the RNAlater dataset. Transforming growth factor-ß1 (TGFB1)-regulated genes, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and NOTCH signaling cascade may support novel therapeutic strategies. In conclusion, in this proof of concept study, RNAseq data

  16. An alternative protocol for DNA extraction from formalin fixed and paraffin wax embedded tissue

    PubMed Central

    Coura, R; Prolla, J C; Meurer, L; Ashton-Prolla, P

    2005-01-01

    Background: DNA extraction from paraffin wax embedded tissue requires special protocols, and most described methods report an amplification success rate of 60–80%. Aims: To propose a simple and inexpensive protocol consisting of xylene/ethanol dewaxing, followed by a kit based extraction. Method: Xylene/ethanol dewaxing was followed by a long rehydration step and a kit based DNA extraction step. Results: This method produced a 100% amplification success rate for fragments of 121 to 227 bp for tamponated formalin fixed paraffin wax embedded tissue. Conclusion: This cost effective and non-laborious protocol can successfully extract DNA from tamponated formalin fixed paraffin wax embedded tissue and should facilitate the molecular analysis of a large number of archival specimens in retrospective studies. PMID:16049299

  17. Regional spectroscopy of paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissue using pulsed terahertz transmission imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Tyler; El-Shenawee, Magda; Campbell, Lucas

    2016-03-01

    This work seeks to obtain the properties of paraffin-embedded breast cancer tumor tissues using transmission imaging and spectroscopy. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded breast tumors are first sectioned into slices of 20 μm and 30 μm and placed between two tsurupica slides. The slides are then scanned in a pulsed terahertz system using transmission imaging. The tissue regions in adjacent pathology section are compared to the transmission imaging scan in order to define a region of points over which to average the electrical properties results from the scan.

  18. Targeted Next Generation Sequencing as a Reliable Diagnostic Assay for the Detection of Somatic Mutations in Tumours Using Minimal DNA Amounts from Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded Material

    PubMed Central

    Koudijs, Marco J.; Nijman, Ies; Hinrichs, John W. J.; Cuppen, Edwin; van Lieshout, Stef; Loberg, Robert D.; de Jonge, Maja; Voest, Emile E.; de Weger, Roel A.; Steeghs, Neeltje; Langenberg, Marlies H. G.; Sleijfer, Stefan; Willems, Stefan M.; Lolkema, Martijn P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Targeted Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) offers a way to implement testing of multiple genetic aberrations in diagnostic pathology practice, which is necessary for personalized cancer treatment. However, no standards regarding input material have been defined. This study therefore aimed to determine the effect of the type of input material (e.g. formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) versus fresh frozen (FF) tissue) on NGS derived results. Moreover, this study aimed to explore a standardized analysis pipeline to support consistent clinical decision-making. Method We used the Ion Torrent PGM sequencing platform in combination with the Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel v2 to sequence frequently mutated regions in 50 cancer related genes, and validated the NGS detected variants in 250 FFPE samples using standard diagnostic assays. Next, 386 tumour samples were sequenced to explore the effect of input material on variant detection variables. For variant calling, Ion Torrent analysis software was supplemented with additional variant annotation and filtering. Results Both FFPE and FF tissue could be sequenced reliably with a sensitivity of 99.1%. Validation showed a 98.5% concordance between NGS and conventional sequencing techniques, where NGS provided both the advantage of low input DNA concentration and the detection of low-frequency variants. The reliability of mutation analysis could be further improved with manual inspection of sequence data. Conclusion Targeted NGS can be reliably implemented in cancer diagnostics using both FFPE and FF tissue when using appropriate analysis settings, even with low input DNA. PMID:26919633

  19. Identification by FFPE RNA-Seq of a new recurrent inversion leading to RBM10-TFE3 fusion in renal cell carcinoma with subtle TFE3 break-apart FISH pattern.

    PubMed

    Just, Pierre-Alexandre; Letourneur, Franck; Pouliquen, Christelle; Dome, Florence; Audebourg, Anne; Biquet, Philippe; Vidaud, Michel; Terris, Benoit; Sibony, Mathilde; Pasmant, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Gene fusions involving TFE3 defines the "Xp11.2 translocations" subclass of renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) belonging to the MiT family translocation RCC. Four recurrent TFE3 fusion partners were identified to date: PRCC, ASPSCR1, SFPQ, and NONO. Break-apart TFE3 fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections is currently the gold standard for identification of TFE3 rearrangements. Herein, we report a case of RCC with a morphological appearance of Xp11.2 translocation, and positive TFE3 immunostaining. By FISH, the spots constituting the split signal were barely spaced, suggestive of a chromosome X inversion rather than a translocation. We performed RNA-seq from FFPE material to test this hypothesis. RNA-seq suggested a fusion of RBM10 gene exon 17 (Xp11.23) with TFE3 gene exon 5 (Xp11.2). RBM10-TFE3 fusion transcript was confirmed using specific RT-PCR. Our work showed that RNA-Seq is a robust technique to detect fusion transcripts from FFPE material. A RBM10-TFE3 fusion was previously described in single case of Xp11.2 RCC. Although rare, RBM10-TFE3 fusion variant (from chromosome X paracentric inversion), therefore, appears to be a recurrent molecular event in Xp11.2 RCCs. RBM10-TFE3 fusion should be added in the list of screened fusion transcripts in targeted molecular diagnostic multiplex RT-PCR. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26998913

  20. Determining the utility of veterinary tissue archives for retrospective DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Abed, Firas M; Dark, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Histopathology tissue archives can be an important source of specimens for retrospective studies, as these include samples covering a large number of diseases. In veterinary medicine, archives also contain samples from a large variety of species and may represent naturally-occurring models of human disease. The formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues comprising these archives are rich resources for retrospective molecular biology studies and pilot studies for biomarkers, as evidenced by a number of recent publications highlighting FFPE tissues as a resource for analysis of specific diseases. However, DNA extracted from FFPE specimens are modified and fragmented, making utilization challenging. The current study examines the utility of FFPE tissue samples from a veterinary diagnostic laboratory archive in five year intervals from 1977 to 2013, with 2015 as a control year, to determine how standard processing and storage conditions has affected their utility for future studies. There was a significant difference in our ability to obtain large amplicons from samples from 2015 than from the remaining years, as well as an inverse correlation between the age of the samples and product size obtainable. However, usable DNA samples were obtained in at least some of the samples from all years tested, despite variable storage, fixation, and processing conditions. This study will help make veterinary diagnostic laboratory archives more useful in future studies of human and veterinary disease. PMID:27168995

  1. Determining the utility of veterinary tissue archives for retrospective DNA analysis

    PubMed Central

    Abed, Firas M.

    2016-01-01

    Histopathology tissue archives can be an important source of specimens for retrospective studies, as these include samples covering a large number of diseases. In veterinary medicine, archives also contain samples from a large variety of species and may represent naturally-occurring models of human disease. The formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues comprising these archives are rich resources for retrospective molecular biology studies and pilot studies for biomarkers, as evidenced by a number of recent publications highlighting FFPE tissues as a resource for analysis of specific diseases. However, DNA extracted from FFPE specimens are modified and fragmented, making utilization challenging. The current study examines the utility of FFPE tissue samples from a veterinary diagnostic laboratory archive in five year intervals from 1977 to 2013, with 2015 as a control year, to determine how standard processing and storage conditions has affected their utility for future studies. There was a significant difference in our ability to obtain large amplicons from samples from 2015 than from the remaining years, as well as an inverse correlation between the age of the samples and product size obtainable. However, usable DNA samples were obtained in at least some of the samples from all years tested, despite variable storage, fixation, and processing conditions. This study will help make veterinary diagnostic laboratory archives more useful in future studies of human and veterinary disease. PMID:27168995

  2. A spin cartridge system for DNA extraction from paraffin wax embedded tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, A P; Villa, L L

    1998-01-01

    A simple and efficient method of DNA extraction from paraffin wax embedded tissues using a spin cartridge system is described. Such DNAs were shown to be suitable for amplification by the polymerase chain reaction, which targeted two human papillomavirus genes and one globin fragment giving rise to products of 450, 150, and 110 base pairs, respectively. Different human tissues, stored for up to 20 years, were successfully amplified, demonstrating the usefulness of this very simple procedure for retrospective studies. PMID:9624421

  3. PrPSc detection in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue by ELISA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue is regularly employed in the diagnosis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) by immunohistochemistry (IHC), the standard by which all other TSE diagnostic protocols are judged. While IHC affords advantages over diagnostic approaches that typically...

  4. Tissue MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI MSI) of Peptides.

    PubMed

    Beine, Birte; Diehl, Hanna C; Meyer, Helmut E; Henkel, Corinna

    2016-01-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is a technique to visualize molecular features of tissues based on mass detection. This chapter focuses on MALDI MSI of peptides and provides detailed operational instructions for sample preparation of cryoconserved and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. Besides sample preparation we provide protocols for the MALDI measurement, tissue staining, and data analysis. On-tissue digestion and matrix application are described for two different commercially available and commonly used spraying devices: the SunCollect (SunChrom) and the ImagePrep (Bruker Daltonik GmbH). PMID:26700046

  5. Preparation of cells from paraffin-embedded tissue for cytometry and cytomorphologic evaluation.

    PubMed

    van Driel-Kulker, A M; Mesker, W E; van der Burg, M J; Ploem, J S

    1987-06-01

    A method is described for the preparation of monolayer smears from paraffin-embedded tissue. The smears are suitable for automated image analysis and DNA measurements while still allowing interpretation of nuclear morphology. The proposed technique uses enzyme treatment and syringing for cell dispersal. The preparation of cell monolayers is performed by cytocentrifugation. After staining the specimens with gallocyanin, nuclear DNA can be measured. Automated DNA measurements using the Leyden Television Analysis System (LEYTAS) showed coefficients of variation of 4.5% for the diploid cell population of suspended benign tissue. After DNA measurements, the specimens are counterstained using orange G and eosin. Since gallocyanin has spectral properties similar to those of hematoxylin, the obtained end product is comparable to specimens stained according to the routinely used Papanicolaou procedure. Using this technique, image cytometry can be applied to paraffin-embedded tissue in combination with conventional cytomorphologic study of the cells. PMID:3304329

  6. Changes in chromatin structure during processing of wax-embedded tissue sections

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Elizabeth; Kiyuna, Tomoharu; Boyle, Shelagh; Saito, Akira; Thomas, Jeremy St J.

    2010-01-01

    The use of immunofluorescence (IF) and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) underpins much of our understanding of how chromatin is organised in the nucleus. However, there has only recently been an appreciation that these types of study need to move away from cells grown in culture and towards an investigation of nuclear organisation in cells in situ in their normal tissue architecture. Such analyses, however, especially of archival clinical samples, often requires use of formalin-fixed paraffin wax-embedded tissue sections which need addition steps of processing prior to IF or FISH. Here we quantify the changes in nuclear and chromatin structure that may be caused by these additional processing steps. Treatments, especially the microwaving to reverse fixation, do significantly alter nuclear architecture and chromatin texture, and these must be considered when inferring the original organisation of the nucleus from data collected from wax-embedded tissue sections. PMID:20661639

  7. Isolation of high quality protein samples from punches of formalin fixed and paraffin embedded tissue blocks.

    PubMed

    Kroll, J; Becker, K F; Kuphal, S; Hein, R; Hofstädter, F; Bosserhoff, A K

    2008-04-01

    In general, it is believed that the extraction of proteins from formalin-fixed paraffin embedded samples is not feasible. However, recently a new technique was developed, presenting the extraction of non-degraded, full length proteins from formalin fixed tissues, usable for western blotting and protein arrays. In the study presented here, we applied this technique to punch biopsies of formalin fixed tissues embedded in paraffin to reduce heterogeneity of the tissue represented in sections, and to ensure analysing mainly defined cellular material. Successful extraction was achieved even from very small samples (0.7 mm(3)). Additionally, we were able to detect highly glycosylated proteins and protein modification, such as phosphorylation. Interestingly, with this technique it is feasible to extract high quality proteins from 14 year old samples. In summary, the new technique makes a great pool of material now usable for molecular analysis with high throughput tools. PMID:18228195

  8. Terahertz absorption and reflection imaging of carcinoma-affected colon tissues embedded in paraffin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahaia, Faustino; Kasalynas, Irmantas; Venckevicius, Rimvydas; Seliuta, Dalius; Valusis, Gintaras; Urbanowicz, Andrzej; Molis, Gediminas; Carneiro, Fatima; Carvalho Silva, Catia D.; Granja, Pedro L.

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, dehydrated human colon tissues embedded in paraffin were studied at THz frequency. A compact THz imaging system with high numerical aperture optics was developed for the analysis of adenocarcinoma-affected colon sections, in transmission and reflection geometry. A comprehensive analysis of the THz images revealed a contrast up to 23% between the neoplastic and control tissues. Absorption and reflection THz images demonstrated the possibility to distinguish adenocarcinoma-affected areas even without water in the tissue, as the main contrast mechanism in THz measurements has been observed to be water absorption in in vivo or freshly excised tissues. The present results corroborate with previous histologic findings in the same tissues, and confirm that the contrast prevails even in dehydrated tissues.

  9. Expression of miR-146a, miR-155, and miR-223 in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded synovial tissues of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kriegsmann, Mark; Randau, Thomas M; Gravius, Sascha; Lisenko, Katharina; Altmann, Carolin; Arens, Norbert; Kriegsmann, Jörg

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease with a heterogeneous clinical presentation affecting about 1 % of adults in developed countries. Currently, the diagnosis is based on the revised criteria of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) from 2010. These criteria include clinical and laboratory parameters. Because of the variability of the clinical picture, delayed diagnosis of RA occurs in a significant subset of patients. Therefore, the discovery of novel biomarkers that improve the diagnosis of RA is of particular interest. Recently, it became evident that miRNAs have regulatory activities in physiologic processes and human diseases. Upregulation of miR-146a, miR-155, and miR-223 has been shown in various compartments such as serum, blood, synovial fluid, and tissues in patients with RA. A total of 87 samples were analyzed (RA 50, osteoarthritis (OA) 37). RNA was isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded synovial tissue (FFPE). The relative expression of miR-146a, miR-155, and miR-223 was determined by comparison to a housekeeping RNA molecule (snRNA U6) and an RNA pool from histologically and clinically verified OA samples. miR-146a, miR-155, and miR-223 were significantly elevated in RA compared to OA synovial tissues (p < 0.001). A strong correlation between the miRNAs could be observed. The sensitivity and specificity for the detection of RA were 0.76/0.80 (miR-146a), 0.80/0.95 (miR-155), and 0.86/0.81 (miR-223). The combination of miR-155 and miR-223 resulted in the highest area under the curve (AUC 0.92) with a sensitivity and specificity of 0.84/0.91, respectively. Significantly higher expression levels of miR-146a, miR-155, and miR-223 in FFPE synovial tissue samples of patients with established RA compared to patients with OA were shown. The usefulness of these miRs for the differential diagnosis of early phases of RA against OA remains to be investigated. PMID:27079198

  10. A rapid and efficient method for DNA extraction from paraffin wax embedded tissue for PCR amplification

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Kevin; Lam, Letty; Kalsheker, Noor

    1996-01-01

    DNA from archival, formaldehyde fixed, paraffin wax embedded human tissue, suitable for amplification by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), was obtained using a microwave method based on the capture of DNA by magnetic beads. Fragments of the α-1-antitrypsin gene (AAT) and the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE) were amplified successfully from human liver and brain tissue, respectively. This procedure provides a more rapid, simple and efficient method for reproducibly obtaining DNA from preserved tissue that has been kept in storage for up to 30 years. Images PMID:16696069

  11. Steps Towards Precision Medicine: Utilizing FFPE Specimens - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Roy W. Tarnuzzer, Ph.D., the Biospecimen Core Resource Program Manager at the TCGA Program Office, provides an overview of the Formalin-fixed Paraffin Pilot Project, an initiative to investigate best practices for use of FFPE specimens in genomic studies.

  12. Determining methylation status of methylguanine DNA methyl transferase (MGMT) from formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded tumor tissue

    PubMed Central

    de Abreu, Francine B.; Gallagher, Torrey L.; Liu, Emmeline Z.; Tsongalis, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) has been associated with resistance to alkylating agent cancer therapy in Glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in adults. Lower expression or silencing of the MGMT protein by promoter methylation has been reported to improve survival in patients with GBM [1]. This protocol describes bisulfite conversion, methylation sensitive PCR amplification and data analysis/interpretation. This protocol differs from published protocols in that it:•Describes a detailed method to measure MGMT using DNA extracted from solid tumor tissue. We have optimized the DNA extraction by using FFPE tissue blocks that contain greater than 50% tumor tissue, when non-tumor tissue was also present. Performance of this assay is compromised when lower quantities of tumor cells are used as the methylation status of tumor cells is diluted out by methylation status of normal cells.•The measurement of MGMT could be further (enhanced) optimized using a percentage of methylation ration cutoff of 2 as methylated.•The machine specifications detailed here are specific to measuring MGMT from PPFE tumor tissue. PMID:26150933

  13. Microwave oven-based technique for immunofluorescent staining of paraffin-embedded tissues

    PubMed Central

    Buggs, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    Immunohistochemical analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues can be challenging due to potential modifications of protein structure by exposure to formalin. Heat-induced antigen retrieval techniques can reverse reactions between formalin and proteins that block antibody recognition. Interactions between antibodies and antigens are further enhanced by microwave irradiation, which has simplified immunohistochemical staining protocols. In this report, we modify a technique for antigen retrieval and immunofluorescent staining of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues by showing that it works well with several antibodies and buffers. This microwave-assisted method for antigen retrieval and immunofluorescent staining eliminates the need for blocking reagents and extended washes, which greatly simplifies the protocol allowing one to complete the analysis in less than 3 h. PMID:17653827

  14. Magnetoacoustic imaging of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles embedded in biological tissues with microsecond magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Gang; He, Bin

    2012-01-01

    We present an experimental study on magnetoacoustic imaging of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles embedded in biological tissues. In experiments, a large-current-carrying coil is used to deliver microsecond pulsed magnetic stimulation to samples. The ultrasound signals induced by magnetic forces on SPIO nanoparticles are measured by a rotating transducer. The distribution of nanoparticles is reconstructed by a back-projection imaging algorithm. The results demonstrated the feasibility to obtain cross-sectional image of magnetic nanoparticle targets with faithful dimensional and positional information, which suggests a promising tool for tomographic reconstruction of magnetic nanoparticle-labeled diseased tissues (e.g., cancerous tumor) in molecular or clinic imaging.

  15. Multimodal Mass Spectrometry Imaging of N-Glycans and Proteins from the Same Tissue Section.

    PubMed

    Heijs, Bram; Holst, Stephanie; Briaire-de Bruijn, Inge H; van Pelt, Gabi W; de Ru, Arnoud H; van Veelen, Peter A; Drake, Richard R; Mehta, Anand S; Mesker, Wilma E; Tollenaar, Rob A; Bovée, Judith V M G; Wuhrer, Manfred; McDonnell, Liam A

    2016-08-01

    On-tissue digestion matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) can be used to record spatially correlated molecular information from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections. In this work, we present the in situ multimodal analysis of N-linked glycans and proteins from the same FFPE tissue section. The robustness and applicability of the method are demonstrated for several tumors, including epithelial and mesenchymal tumor types. Major analytical aspects, such as lateral diffusion of the analyte molecules and differences in measurement sensitivity due to the additional sample preparation methods, have been investigated for both N-glycans and proteolytic peptides. By combining the MSI approach with extract analysis, we were also able to assess which mass spectral peaks generated by MALDI-MSI could be assigned to unique N-glycan and peptide identities. PMID:27373711

  16. BRCA somatic and germline mutation detection in paraffin embedded ovarian cancers by next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Mafficini, Andrea; Simbolo, Michele; Parisi, Alice; Rusev, Borislav; Luchini, Claudio; Cataldo, Ivana; Piazzola, Elena; Sperandio, Nicola; Turri, Giona; Franchi, Massimo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Bovo, Chiara; Lawlor, Rita T.; Scarpa, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    BRCA mutated ovarian cancers respond better to platinum-based therapy and to the recently approved PARP-inhibitors. There is the need for efficient and timely methods to detect both somatic and germline mutations using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues and commercially available technology. We used a commercial kit exploring all exons and 50bp exon-intron junctions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, and semiconductor next-generation sequencing (NGS) on DNA from 47 FFPE samples of high-grade serous ovarian cancers. Pathogenic mutations were found in 13/47 (28%) cancers: eight in BRCA1 and five in BRCA2. All BRCA1 and two BRCA2 mutations were germline; three BRCA2 mutations were somatic. All mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. To evaluate the performance of the NGS panel, we assessed its capability to detect the 6,953 variants described for BRCA1 and BRCA2 in ClinVar and COSMIC databases using callability analysis. 6,059 (87.1%) variants were identified automatically by the software; 829 (12.0%) required visual verification. The remaining 65 (0.9%) variants were uncallable, and would require 15 Sanger reactions to be resolved. Thus, the sensitivity of the NGS-panel was 99.1%. In conclusion, NGS performed with a commercial kit is highly efficient for detection of germline and somatic mutations in BRCA genes using routine FFPE tissue. PMID:26745875

  17. BRCA somatic and germline mutation detection in paraffin embedded ovarian cancers by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mafficini, Andrea; Simbolo, Michele; Parisi, Alice; Rusev, Borislav; Luchini, Claudio; Cataldo, Ivana; Piazzola, Elena; Sperandio, Nicola; Turri, Giona; Franchi, Massimo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Bovo, Chiara; Lawlor, Rita T; Scarpa, Aldo

    2016-01-12

    BRCA mutated ovarian cancers respond better to platinum-based therapy and to the recently approved PARP-inhibitors. There is the need for efficient and timely methods to detect both somatic and germline mutations using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues and commercially available technology. We used a commercial kit exploring all exons and 50bp exon-intron junctions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, and semiconductor next-generation sequencing (NGS) on DNA from 47 FFPE samples of high-grade serous ovarian cancers. Pathogenic mutations were found in 13/47 (28%) cancers: eight in BRCA1 and five in BRCA2. All BRCA1 and two BRCA2 mutations were germline; three BRCA2 mutations were somatic. All mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. To evaluate the performance of the NGS panel, we assessed its capability to detect the 6,953 variants described for BRCA1 and BRCA2 in ClinVar and COSMIC databases using callability analysis. 6,059 (87.1%) variants were identified automatically by the software; 829 (12.0%) required visual verification. The remaining 65 (0.9%) variants were uncallable, and would require 15 Sanger reactions to be resolved. Thus, the sensitivity of the NGS-panel was 99.1%. In conclusion, NGS performed with a commercial kit is highly efficient for detection of germline and somatic mutations in BRCA genes using routine FFPE tissue. PMID:26745875

  18. Application of a novel and automated branched DNA in situ hybridization method for the rapid and sensitive localization of mRNA molecules in plant tissues1

    PubMed Central

    Bowling, Andrew J.; Pence, Heather E.; Church, Jeffrey B.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: A novel branched DNA detection technology, RNAscope in situ hybridization (ISH), originally developed for use on human clinical and animal tissues, was adapted for use in plant tissue in an attempt to overcome some of the limitations associated with traditional ISH assays. • Methods and Results: Zea mays leaf tissue was formaldehyde fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) and then probed with the RNAscope ISH assay for two endogenous genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). Results from both manual and automated methods showed tissue- and cell-specific mRNA localization patterns expected from these well-studied genes. • Conclusions: RNAscope ISH is a sensitive method that generates high-quality, easily interpretable results from FFPE plant tissues. Automation of the RNAscope method on the Ventana Discovery Ultra platform allows significant advantages for repeatability, reduction in variability, and flexibility of workflow processes. PMID:25202621

  19. Unmasking of complements using proteinase-K in formalin fixed paraffin embedded renal biopsies.

    PubMed

    Nada, R; Kumar, A; Kumar, V G; Gupta, K L; Joshi, K

    2016-01-01

    Renal biopsy interpretation requires histopathology, direct immunofluorescence (DIF) and electron microscopy. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue (FFPE) sent for light microscopy can be used for DIF after antigen retrieval. However, complement staining has not been satisfactory. We standardized DIF using proteinase-K for antigen retrieval in FFPE renal biopsies. A pilot study was conducted on known cases of membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN), membranoproliferative type-1 (MPGN-1), immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN), and anti-glomerular basement disease (anti-GBM). Immunofluorescence panel included fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) conjugated IgG, IgA, IgM, complements (C3 and C1q), light chains (kappa, lambda) and fibrinogen antibodies. After standardization of the technique, 75 renal biopsies and 43 autopsies cases were stained. Out of 43 autopsy cases, immune-complex mediated glomerulonephritis (GN) was confirmed in 18 cases (Lupus nephritis-11, IgAN-6, MGN-1), complement-mediated dense deposit disease (DDD-1) and monoclonal diseases in 4 cases (amyloidosis-3, cast nephropathy-1). Immune-mediated injury was excluded in 17 cases (focal segmental glomerulosclerosis -3, crescentic GN-6 [pauci-immune-3, anti-GBM-3], thrombotic microangiopathy-5, atherosclerosis-3). Renal biopsies (n-75) where inadequate or no frozen sample was available; this technique classified 52 mesangiocapillary pattern as MPGN type-1-46, DDD-2 and (C3GN-4). Others were diagnosed as IgAN-3, lupus nephritis-2, MGN-4, diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (DPGN)-1, Non-IC crescentic GN-1, monoclonal diseases-3. In nine cases, DIF on FFPE tissue could not help in making diagnosis. Proteinase-K enzymatic digestion of FFPE renal biopsies can unmask complements (both C3 and C1q) in immune-complexes mediated and complement-mediated diseases. This method showed good results on autopsy tissues archived for as long as 15 years. PMID:27194832

  20. High-Throughput Amplicon-Based Copy Number Detection of 11 Genes in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Ovarian Tumour Samples by MLPA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Kondrashova, Olga; Love, Clare J.; Lunke, Sebastian; Hsu, Arthur L.; Waring, Paul M.; Taylor, Graham R.

    2015-01-01

    Whilst next generation sequencing can report point mutations in fixed tissue tumour samples reliably, the accurate determination of copy number is more challenging. The conventional Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) assay is an effective tool for measurement of gene dosage, but is restricted to around 50 targets due to size resolution of the MLPA probes. By switching from a size-resolved format, to a sequence-resolved format we developed a scalable, high-throughput, quantitative assay. MLPA-seq is capable of detecting deletions, duplications, and amplifications in as little as 5ng of genomic DNA, including from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumour samples. We show that this method can detect BRCA1, BRCA2, ERBB2 and CCNE1 copy number changes in DNA extracted from snap-frozen and FFPE tumour tissue, with 100% sensitivity and >99.5% specificity. PMID:26569395

  1. High-Throughput Amplicon-Based Copy Number Detection of 11 Genes in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Ovarian Tumour Samples by MLPA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Kondrashova, Olga; Love, Clare J; Lunke, Sebastian; Hsu, Arthur L; Waring, Paul M; Taylor, Graham R

    2015-01-01

    Whilst next generation sequencing can report point mutations in fixed tissue tumour samples reliably, the accurate determination of copy number is more challenging. The conventional Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) assay is an effective tool for measurement of gene dosage, but is restricted to around 50 targets due to size resolution of the MLPA probes. By switching from a size-resolved format, to a sequence-resolved format we developed a scalable, high-throughput, quantitative assay. MLPA-seq is capable of detecting deletions, duplications, and amplifications in as little as 5ng of genomic DNA, including from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumour samples. We show that this method can detect BRCA1, BRCA2, ERBB2 and CCNE1 copy number changes in DNA extracted from snap-frozen and FFPE tumour tissue, with 100% sensitivity and >99.5% specificity. PMID:26569395

  2. Relative shrinkage of adipocytes by paraffin in proportion to plastic embedding in human adipose tissue before and after weight loss.

    PubMed

    Verhoef, Sanne P M; van Dijk, Paul; Westerterp, Klaas R

    2013-01-01

    Adipocyte size is a major modulator of endocrine functioning of adipose tissue and methods allowing accurate determination of adipocyte size are important to study energy metabolism. The aim of this study was to assess the relative shrinkage of adipocytes before and after weight loss by comparing adipose tissue from the same subjects embedded in paraffin and plastic. 18 healthy subjects (5 males and 13 females) aged 20-50 y with a BMI of 28-38 kg/m² followed a very low energy diet for 8 weeks. Adipose tissue biopsies were taken prior to and after weight loss and were processed for paraffin and plastic sections. Parameters of adipocyte size were determined with computer image analysis. Mean adipocyte size was smaller in paraffin compared to plastic embedded tissue both before (66 ± 4 vs. 103 ± 5 μm, P < 0.001) as after weight loss (62 ± 4 vs. 91 ± 5 μm, P < 0.001). Relative shrinkage of adipocytes in paraffin embedded tissue in proportion to plastic embedded tissue was not significantly different before and after weight loss (73 and 69%, respectively). Shrinkage due to the type of embedding of the adipose tissue can be ignored when comparing before and after weight loss. Plastic embedding of adipose tissue provides more accurate and sensitive results. PMID:24331678

  3. High-quality genomic DNA extraction from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples deparaffinized using mineral oil.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jianghai; Kennedy, Stephen H; Svarovsky, Therese; Rogers, Jeffrey; Kemnitz, Joseph W; Xu, Anlong; Zondervan, Krina T

    2009-12-15

    Extracting DNA from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue remains a challenge, despite numerous attempts to develop a more effective method. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) success rates with DNA extracted using current methods remain low. We extracted DNA from 140 long-term archived FFPE samples using a simple but effective deparaffinization method, removing the wax with mineral oil, and a commercially available DNA extraction kit. DNA quality was subsequently tested in a genotyping experiment with 14 microsatellite markers. High-quality DNA was obtained with a mean PCR success rate of 97% (range: 88-100%) across markers. The results suggested that DNA extracted using this novel method is likely to be suitable for genetic studies involving DNA fragments <200 bp. PMID:19698695

  4. Limited yield of diagnoses of intrahepatic infectious causes of canine granulomatous hepatitis from archival liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, Rae G; Breitschwerdt, Edward B; Cullen, John M; Bissett, Sally A; Gookin, Jody L

    2012-09-01

    Canine granulomatous hepatitis is an uncommon morphologic diagnosis that has been associated with a variety of diseases, including a number of systemic infectious etiologies. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues are typically the only source of liver tissue remaining for additional testing for the presence of infectious disease within granulomas. It is unclear if the more common infectious culprits of granulomatous hepatitis can be identified from such specimens. The aim of the current study was to retrospectively investigate archival FFPE liver tissue from dogs with granulomatous hepatitis for the presence of infectious agents. Semiquantitative analysis of copper accumulation in liver specimens was also performed. Medical records were examined for recorded evidence of systemic infectious disease diagnosis. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded liver was prospectively evaluated for infectious agents via differential staining techniques (n = 13), eubacterial fluorescent in situ hybridization (n = 11), and Bartonella polymerase chain reaction assays (n = 15). An infectious cause of granulomatous hepatitis was not identified within liver tissue from any dog using these diagnostic methodologies. Six out of 25 (24%) dogs were diagnosed with concurrent systemic or localized bacterial infections at the time of presentation. Nine out of 17 (53%) dogs had excessive hepatic copper accumulation when evaluated by a semiquantitative histologic grading scheme or quantitative copper analysis. As definitive infectious causes of granulomatous hepatitis were not identified within archival liver biopsy samples, it was concluded that investigation of infectious etiologies within FFPE liver specimens using these diagnostic approaches may be of low yield. PMID:22855374

  5. Study of paraffin-embedded colon cancer tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahaia, Faustino; Kasalynas, Irmantas; Seliuta, Dalius; Molis, Gediminas; Urbanowicz, Andrzej; Carvalho Silva, Catia D.; Carneiro, Fatima; Valusis, Gintaras; Granja, Pedro L.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, samples of non-neoplastic and adenocarcinoma-affected human colon tissue samples were analyzed using multipoint transmission time-domain THz spectroscopy (THz-TDS) to sort out the contrast-contributing factors other than water, the main contrast mechanism factor in in-vivo or in freshly excised bio-tissue. Solving the electromagnetic inverse problem through THz-TDS and, analyzing the transmittance spectra that yielded the frequency-dependent absorption coefficient α and refractive index n of non-neoplastic and neoplastic tissues, we show that it is possible to distinguish between non-neoplastic and neoplastic regions in paraffin-embedded dehydrated. Results and discussion are presented.

  6. HIGH SENSITIVE PCR METHOD FOR DETECTION OF PATHOGENIC Leptospira spp. IN PARAFFIN-EMBEDDED TISSUES

    PubMed Central

    Noda, Angel Alberto; Rodríguez, Islay; Rodríguez, Yaindrys; Govín, Anamays; Fernández, Carmen; Obregón, Ana Margarita

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the development and application of a new PCR assay for the specific detection of pathogenic leptospires and its comparison with a previously reported PCR protocol. New primers were designed for PCR optimization and evaluation in artificially-infected paraffin-embedded tissues. PCR was then applied to post-mortem, paraffin-embedded samples, followed by amplicon sequencing. The PCR was more efficient than the reported protocol, allowing the amplification of expected DNA fragment from the artificially infected samples and from 44% of the post-mortem samples. The sequences of PCR amplicons from different patients showed >99% homology with pathogenic leptospires DNA sequences. The applicability of a highly sensitive and specific tool to screen histological specimens for the detection of pathogenic Leptospira spp. would facilitate a better assessment of the prevalence and epidemiology of leptospirosis, which constitutes a health problem in many countries. PMID:25229221

  7. Validation and Reproducibility of a Microarray-Based Gene Expression Test for Tumor Identification in Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Raji; Deeter, Rebecca; Rigl, C. Ted; Nystrom, J. Scott; Miller, Meredith Halks; Buturovic, Ljubomir; Henner, W. David

    2011-01-01

    Tumors whose primary site is challenging to diagnose represent a considerable proportion of new cancer cases. We present validation study results for a gene expression-based diagnostic test (the Pathwork Tissue of Origin Test) that aids in determining the tissue of origin using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens. Microarray data files were generated for 462 metastatic, poorly differentiated, or undifferentiated FFPE tumor specimens, all of which had a reference diagnosis. The reference diagnoses were masked, and the microarray data files were analyzed using a 2000-gene classification model. The algorithm quantifies the similarity between RNA expression patterns of the study specimens and the 15 tissues on the test panel. Among the 462 specimens, overall agreement with the reference diagnosis was 89% (95% CI, 85% to 91%). In addition to the positive test results (ie, rule-ins), an average of 12 tissues for each specimen could be ruled out with >99% probability. The large size of this study increases confidence in the test results. A multisite reproducibility study showed 89.3% concordance between laboratories. The Tissue of Origin Test makes the benefits of microarray-based gene expression tests for tumor diagnosis available for use with the most common type of histology specimen (ie, FFPE). PMID:21227394

  8. ToF-SIMS of tissues: “Lessons learned” from mice and women

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Lara J.; Graham, Daniel J.; Bluestein, Blake; Whitehead, Nicholas P.; Hockenbery, David; Morrish, Fionnuala; Porter, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    The ability to image cells and tissues with chemical and molecular specificity could greatly expand our understanding of biological processes. The subcellular resolution mass spectral imaging capability of time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) has the potential to acquire chemically detailed images. However, the complexities of biological systems combined with the sensitivity of ToF-SIMS require careful planning of experimental methods. Tissue sample preparation methods of formalin fixation followed by paraffin embedding (FFPE) and OCT embedding are compared. Results show that the FFPE can potentially be used as a tissue sample preparation protocol for ToF-SIMS analysis if a cluster ion presputter is used prior to analysis and if nonlipid related tissue features are the features of interest. In contrast, embedding tissue in OCT minimizes contamination and maintains lipid signals. Various data acquisition methodologies and analysis options are discussed and compared using mouse breast and diaphragm muscle tissue. Methodologies for acquiring ToF-SIMS 2D images are highlighted along with applications of multivariate analysis to better identify specific features in a tissue sections when compared to H&E images of serial sections. Identification of tissue features is necessary for researchers to visualize a molecular map that correlates with specific biological features or functions. Finally, lessons learned from sample preparation, data acquisition, and data analysis methods developed using mouse models are applied to a preliminary analysis of human breast tumor tissue sections. PMID:25708638

  9. Rapid, Simultaneous Detection of Clostridium sordellii and Clostridium perfringens in Archived Tissues by a Novel PCR-Based Microsphere Assay: Diagnostic Implications for Pregnancy-Associated Toxic Shock Syndrome Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Julu; DeLeon-Carnes, Marlene; Kellar, Kathryn L.; Bandyopadhyay, Kakali; Antoniadou, Zoi-Anna; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Paddock, Christopher D.; Zaki, Sherif R.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium sordellii and Clostridium perfringens are infrequent human pathogens; however, the case-fatality rates for the infections are very high, particularly in obstetric C. sordellii infections (>90%). Deaths from Clostridium sordellii and Clostridium perfringens toxic shock (CTS) are sudden, and diagnosis is often challenging. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues usually are the only specimens available for sudden fatal cases, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) for Clostridia is generally performed but it cannot identify species. A clear need exists for a rapid, species-specific diagnostic assay for FFPE tissues. We developed a duplex PCR-based microsphere assay for simultaneous detection of C. sordellii and C. perfringens and evaluated DNA extracted from 42 Clostridium isolates and FFPE tissues of 28 patients with toxic shock/endometritis (20 CTS, 8 non-CTS, as confirmed by PCR and sequencing). The microsphere assay correctly identified C. sordellii and C. perfringens in all known isolates and in all CTS patients (10 C. sordellii, 8 C. perfringens, 2 both) and showed 100% concordance with PCR and sequencing results. The microsphere assay is a rapid, specific, and cost-effective method for the diagnosis of CTS and offers the advantage of simultaneous testing for C. sordellii and C. perfringens in FFPE tissues using a limited amount of DNA. PMID:22536012

  10. The tissue is the issue: improved methylome analysis from paraffin-embedded tissues by application of the HOPE technique.

    PubMed

    Marwitz, Sebastian; Kolarova, Julia; Reck, Martin; Reinmuth, Niels; Kugler, Christian; Schädlich, Ines; Haake, Andrea; Zabel, Peter; Vollmer, Ekkehard; Siebert, Reiner; Goldmann, Torsten; Ammerpohl, Ole

    2014-08-01

    Alterations in the DNA methylome are characteristic for numerous diseases and a typical hallmark of cancer. Therefore, DNA methylation is currently under investigation in research labs and has also entered diagnostics. Recently, protocols like the BeadChip technology have become commercially available to study DNA methylation in an array format and semiquantitative fashion. However, it is known that fixation of the sample material with formalin prior to BeadChip analysis can affect the results. In this study we compared the influence of fixation on the outcome of BeadChip analysis. From six patients each a lung cancer tissue sample and a corresponding tumor-free lung tissue sample were collected. The samples were separated into three pieces. One piece of each sample was fixed with formalin, another one by the non-cross-linking HOPE technique (Hepes-glutamic acid buffer mediated Organic solvent Protection Effect). Subsequently, both became paraffin embedded. As a reference, the remaining third piece was cryopreserved. In addition we used three adenocarcinoma cell lines (H838, A549, and H1650) to validate the results from patient tissues. We show that using the HOPE technique instead of formalin largely prevents the introduction of formalin-fixation related artifacts. An ANOVA analysis significantly separated HOPE- and cryopreserved from formalin-fixed samples (FDR<0.05), while differences in the methylation data obtained from HOPE-fixed and cryopreserved material were minor. Consequently, HOPE fixation is superior to formalin fixation if a subsequent BeadChip analysis of paraffin-embedded sample material is intended. PMID:24933424

  11. Preparation of Formalin-fixed Paraffin-embedded Tissue Cores for both RNA and DNA Extraction.

    PubMed

    Patel, Palak G; Selvarajah, Shamini; Boursalie, Suzanne; How, Nathan E; Ejdelman, Joshua; Guerard, Karl-Philippe; Bartlett, John M; Lapointe, Jacques; Park, Paul C; Okello, John B A; Berman, David M

    2016-01-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue (FFPET) represents a valuable, well-annotated substrate for molecular investigations. The utility of FFPET in molecular analysis is complicated both by heterogeneous tissue composition and low yields when extracting nucleic acids. A literature search revealed a paucity of protocols addressing these issues, and none that showed a validated method for simultaneous extraction of RNA and DNA from regions of interest in FFPET. This method addresses both issues. Tissue specificity was achieved by mapping cancer areas of interest on microscope slides and transferring annotations onto FFPET blocks. Tissue cores were harvested from areas of interest using 0.6 mm microarray punches. Nucleic acid extraction was performed using a commercial FFPET extraction system, with modifications to homogenization, deparaffinization, and Proteinase K digestion steps to improve tissue digestion and increase nucleic acid yields. The modified protocol yields sufficient quantity and quality of nucleic acids for use in a number of downstream analyses, including a multi-analyte gene expression platform, as well as reverse transcriptase coupled real time PCR analysis of mRNA expression, and methylation-specific PCR (MSP) analysis of DNA methylation. PMID:27583817

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of light transport in turbid medium with embedded object--spherical, cylindrical, ellipsoidal, or cuboidal objects embedded within multilayered tissues.

    PubMed

    Periyasamy, Vijitha; Pramanik, Manojit

    2014-04-01

    Monte Carlo modeling of light transport in multilayered tissue (MCML) is modified to incorporate objects of various shapes (sphere, ellipsoid, cylinder, or cuboid) with a refractive-index mismatched boundary. These geometries would be useful for modeling lymph nodes, tumors, blood vessels, capillaries, bones, the head, and other body parts. Mesh-based Monte Carlo (MMC) has also been used to compare the results from the MCML with embedded objects (MCML-EO). Our simulation assumes a realistic tissue model and can also handle the transmission/reflection at the object-tissue boundary due to the mismatch of the refractive index. Simulation of MCML-EO takes a few seconds, whereas MMC takes nearly an hour for the same geometry and optical properties. Contour plots of fluence distribution from MCML-EO and MMC correlate well. This study assists one to decide on the tool to use for modeling light propagation in biological tissue with objects of regular shapes embedded in it. For irregular inhomogeneity in the model (tissue), MMC has to be used. If the embedded objects (inhomogeneity) are of regular geometry (shapes), then MCML-EO is a better option, as simulations like Raman scattering, fluorescent imaging, and optical coherence tomography are currently possible only with MCML. PMID:24727908

  13. Complex Retrieval of Embedded IVC Filters: Alternative Techniques and Histologic Tissue Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, William T.; Cupp, John S.; Louie, John D.; Kothary, Nishita; Hofmann, Lawrence V.; Sze, Daniel Y.; Hovsepian, David M.

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: We evaluated the safety and effectiveness of alternative endovascular methods to retrieve embedded optional and permanent filters in order to manage or reduce risk of long-term complications from implantation. Histologic tissue analysis was performed to elucidate the pathologic effects of chronic filter implantation. Methods: We studied the safety and effectiveness of alternative endovascular methods for removing embedded inferior vena cava (IVC) filters in 10 consecutive patients over 12 months. Indications for retrieval were symptomatic chronic IVC occlusion, caval and aortic perforation, and/or acute PE (pulmonary embolism) from filter-related thrombus. Retrieval was also performed to reduce risk of complications from long-term filter implantation and to eliminate the need for lifelong anticoagulation. All retrieved specimens were sent for histologic analysis. Results: Retrieval was successful in all 10 patients. Filter types and implantation times were as follows: one Venatech (1,495 days), one Simon-Nitinol (1,485 days), one Optease (300 days), one G2 (416 days), five Guenther-Tulip (GTF; mean 606 days, range 154-1,010 days), and one Celect (124 days). There were no procedural complications or adverse events at a mean follow-up of 304 days after removal (range 196-529 days). Histology revealed scant native intima surrounded by a predominance of neointimal hyperplasia and dense fibrosis in all specimens. Histologic evidence of photothermal tissue ablation was confirmed in three laser-treated specimens. Conclusion: Complex retrieval methods can now be used in select patients to safely remove embedded optional and permanent IVC filters previously considered irretrievable. Neointimal hyperplasia and dense fibrosis are the major components that must be separated to achieve successful retrieval of chronic filter implants.

  14. Diagnosis of Nocardia paucivorans central nervous system infection by DNA sequencing from paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Schiaroli, Elisabetta; Pasticci, Maria Bruna; De Carolis, Elena; Mello, Enrica; Pallotto, Carlo; Leli, Christian; De Socio, Giuseppe Vittorio; Baldelli, Franco; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Mencacci, Antonella

    2016-06-01

    Infections by Nocardia spp. are generally regarded as opportunistic diseases in immunocompromised patients, but can also affect immunocompetent subjects. Such infections represent an important diagnostic challenge for clinicians and microbiologists, and diagnosis is frequently delayed or even conducted post mortem. A 54-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of ventriculitis and relapsing brain abscess. Five months prior, this patient had undergone external ventricular drain and surgery for a cerebellar abscess. Histopathology demonstrated pyogenic inflammatory reaction, microbiologic investigations proved negative and empiric antimicrobial therapy was administered for a total of eight weeks. Six weeks later, the patient developed relapsing neurologic manifestations. On reviewing the patient's clinical history it emerged that the patient had suffered pneumonia two months prior to neurosurgery, treated with amoxicillin/clavulanate 3g a day and levofloxacin 500mg a day for three weeks. On the CNS relapsing manifestations, nocardiosis was suspected and DNA sequencing from the formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cerebellar tissue collected during neurosurgery allowed diagnosis of Nocardia paucivorans infection. The patient received medical therapy for 11 months. At follow-up, eight months after treatment was discontinued, the patient was aymptomatic. Nocardia spp. infections need to be suspected not only in immunocompromised, but also in immunocompetent patients. Proper samples need to be collected for proper microbiologic investigations. Paraffin-embedded tissue genomic sequencing can be a useful tool for diagnosis of nocardiosis. PMID:27367327

  15. Aberrant expression of Notch1, HES1, and DTX1 genes in glioblastoma formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Narayanappa, Rajeswari; Rout, Pritilata; Aithal, Madhuri G S; Chand, Ashis Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor accounting for more than 54 % of all gliomas. Despite aggressive treatments, median survival remains less than 1 year. This might be due to the unavailability of effective molecular diagnostic markers and targeted therapy. Thus, it is essential to discover molecular mechanisms underlying disease by identifying dysregulated pathways involved in tumorigenesis. Notch signaling is one such pathway which plays an important role in determining cell fates. Since it is found to play a critical role in many cancers, we investigated the role of Notch genes in glioblastoma with an aim to identify biomarkers that can improve diagnosis. Using real-time PCR, we assessed the expression of Notch genes including receptors (Notch1, Notch2, Notch3, and Notch4), ligands (JAG1, JAG2, and DLL3), downstream targets (HES1 and HEY2), regulator Deltex1 (DTX1), inhibitor NUMB along with transcriptional co-activator MAML1, and a component of gamma-secretase complex APH1A in 15 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) patient samples. Relative quantification was done by the 2(-ΔΔCt) method; the data are presented as fold change in gene expression normalized to an internal control gene and relative to the calibrator. The data revealed aberrant expression of Notch genes in glioblastoma compared to normal brain. More than 85 % of samples showed high Notch1 (P = 0.0397) gene expression and low HES1 (P = 0.011) and DTX1 (P = 0.0001) gene expression. Our results clearly show aberrant expression of Notch genes in glioblastoma which can be used as putative biomarkers together with histopathological observation to improve diagnosis, therapeutic strategies, and patient prognosis. PMID:26662803

  16. Quantitative analysis of chromosome in situ hybridization signal in paraffin-embedded tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Dhingra, K; Sneige, N; Pandita, T K; Johnston, D A; Lee, J S; Emami, K; Hortobagyi, G N; Hittelman, W N

    1994-06-01

    Interphase cytogenetic analysis using chromosome-specific probes is increasingly being used to detect chromosomal aberrations on paraffin-embedded tissue sections. However, quantitative analysis of the hybridization signal is confounded by the nuclear slicing that occurs during sectioning. To determine the sensitivity and accuracy of chromosome in situ hybridization for detecting numerical chromosomal aberrations on paraffin-embedded sections, in situ hybridization was performed on sections derived from mixtures of cell populations with known frequencies of numerical chromosomal aberrations and the Chromosome Index (CI) was calculated (i.e., total number of signal spots/number of nuclei counted) as a quantitative measure of chromosome copy number. The presence of 25% or more monosomic or tetrasomic cells in a given population was easily detected as a change in CI (P < 0.05). Lower degrees of polysomy could be detected as a small percentage of nuclear fragments with > 2 signal spots. The CI was not significantly influenced by a change in section thickness from 4 to 8 microM, by an increase in cell size from 478 to 986 microM3, or by the choice of detection method (fluorescence vs. conventional bright-field microscopy). Comparative analysis of touch preparations and tissue sections from the corresponding breast tumors showed that CI accurately reflects the average copy number of chromosomes in intact nuclei and may actually be superior to in situ hybridization on whole nuclei for the detection of numerical chromosomal changes in defined histologic areas. This method is thus a sensitive and accurate means of studying genetic changes in premalignant and malignant tissue, and of assessing the genetic changes associated with specific phenotypes. PMID:7924678

  17. Hyperspectral unmixing for removing autofluorescence from paraffin-embedded formalin-fixed tissue sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinou, P.; Wilson, B. C.; Damaskinos, S.

    2005-09-01

    The use of digital fluorescence confocal microscopy in biological sciences has grown in recent decades due to the versatility of fluorescence imaging. The ability to selectively label specific morphological features, genetic mutations and/or chemical micro-environmental changes with discreet fluorescent labels allows a better understanding of the complex systems that regulate cellular processes. Specimens can range in size from single cells to tissue sections and tissue arrays, which can occupy the entire surface of a microscope slide (25mm x 70mm). Using a confocal scanning laser MACROscope, a wide-area confocal imaging system (Biomedical Photometrics Inc.), it is possible to image these large specimens at high resolution, without the need to tile many small microscope fields. A hyperspectral imaging (HSI) mode has been added to the MACROscope system to assess the use of HSI in the removal/separation of tissue autofluorescence from digital images of fluorescently-labeled paraffin-embedded, formalin-fixed tissue sections. In pathology and immunohistochemistry applications this autofluorescence can hinder, or even prevent, detection of the applied fluorescent label(s). In the present study, fluorescence emission from the specimen was sampled at ~7 nm bandwidths across 32 channels, amounting to viewing ~220 nm of the visible spectrum as a hyperspectral data cube. The data cube was then processed to remove the contributions from autofluorescence, leaving only the signal from the fluorophore(s) of interest. Comparisons are drawn from HSI obtained with a commercial hyperspectral confocal microscope (Zeiss LSM 510 META) employing image tiling. The initial results demonstrate the ability to spectrally unmix the tissue autofluorescence in large tissue sections.

  18. Detection of Papillomavirus Gene Expression Patterns in Tissue Sections.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Heather; Doorbar, John

    2016-01-01

    Molecular events during the papillomavirus life cycle can be mapped in infected tissue biopsies using antibodies to viral and cellular gene products, or by in situ hybridization approaches that detect viral DNA or viral transcription products. For proteins, ease of immunodetection depends on antibody specificity and antigen availability. Epitopes in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples are often masked by crosslinking and must be exposed for immunodetection. RNA in FFPE material is often degraded, and such tissue must be handled carefully to optimize detection. Viral proteins and viral genomic DNA are both well preserved in routinely processed FFPE samples, with sensitive detection methodologies allowing the simultaneous detection of multiple markers. The combined visualization of nucleic acid and (viral) protein targets, when coupled with image analysis approaches that allow correlation with standard pathology diagnosis, have allowed us to understand the molecular changes required for normal HPV life-cycle organization as well as deregulation during cancer progression. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27153382

  19. Simultaneous immunofluorescent labeling using anti-BrdU monoclonal antibody and a melanocyte-specific marker in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human skin samples.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Morea; Davids, Lester M; Kidson, Susan H

    2012-12-01

    Immunolabeling of tissue sections requires careful optimization of protocols in order to achieve accurate and consistent data. Multiple immunolabeling is desirable when determining the exact location and phenotype of cell populations in the same cellular compartment. 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-immunolabeling is commonly used to assess cellular proliferation in vitro. However, the technical limitations of standard methods preclude multiple antigen immunolabeling. The aim was therefore to develop a robust protocol for simultaneous labeling using anti-BrdU and a melanocyte-specific marker in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) skin samples. Human skin samples were obtained from patients undergoing elective plastic surgery. The tissue was incubated with BrdU, and a standard sample procedure for FFPE tissue was used. Heat-induced antigen retrieval was performed in a conventional pressure cooker, followed by immunolabeling with anti-BrdU and anti-Melan A/MART-1 antibodies. Fluorescent-conjugated secondary antibodies were used for signal detection. We have demonstrated both proliferating cells (BrdU-immunopositive) and melanocytes (Melan A/MART-1-immunopositive) in the basal compartment of the epidermis in our skin samples. Successful double labeling requires heat-induced epitope retrieval to replace the harsh pretreatment protocols of standard BrdU immunolabeling methods. We have optimized a robust protocol for the double labeling of proliferating cells and cells bearing melanocyte-specific antigens (melanocytes and/or melanoblasts) in FFPE human skin samples. PMID:22531682

  20. Embedded silica nanoparticles in poly(caprolactone) nanofibrous scaffolds enhanced osteogenic potential for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Nitya; Jayakumar, Rangasamy; Koyakutty, Manzoor; Mony, Ullas; Nair, Shantikumar V

    2012-09-01

    Poly(caprolactone) (PCL) has been frequently considered for bone tissue engineering because of its excellent biocompatibility. A drawback, however, of PCL is its inadequate mechanical strength for bone tissue engineering and its inadequate bioactivity to promote bone tissue regeneration from mesenchymal stem cells. To correct this deficiency, this work investigates the addition of nanoparticles of silica (nSiO(2)) to the scaffold to take advantage of the known bioactivity of silica as an osteogenic material and also to improve the mechanical properties through nanoscale reinforcement of the PCL fibers. The nanocomposite scaffolds and the pristine PCL scaffolds were evaluated physicochemically, mechanically, and biologically in the presence of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The results indicated that, when the nanoparticles of size approximately 10 nm (concentrations of 0.5% and 1% w/v) were embedded within, or attached to, the PCL nanofibers, there was a substantial increase in scaffold strength, protein adsorption, and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. These nSiO(2) nanoparticles, when directly added to the cells evidently pointed to ingestion of these particles by the cells followed by cell death. The polymer nanofibers appeared to protect the cells by preventing ingestion of the silica nanoparticles, while at the same time adequately exposing them on fiber surfaces for their desired bioactivity. PMID:22725098

  1. Electrospun aligned PLGA and PLGA/gelatin nanofibers embedded with silica nanoparticles for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Mehrasa, Mohammad; Asadollahi, Mohammad Ali; Ghaedi, Kamran; Salehi, Hossein; Arpanaei, Ayyoob

    2015-08-01

    Aligned poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) and PLGA/gelatin nanofibrous scaffolds embedded with mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) were fabricated using electrospinning method. The mean diameters of nanofibers were 641±24 nm for the pure PLGA scaffolds vs 418±85 nm and 267±58 nm for the PLGA/10 wt% MSNPs and the PLGA/gelatin/10 wt% MSNPs scaffolds, respectively. The contact angle measurement results (102°±6.7 for the pure PLGA scaffold vs 81°±6.8 and 18°±8.7 for the PLGA/10 wt% MSNPs and the PLGA/gelatin/10 wt% MSNPs scaffolds, respectively) revealed enhanced hydrophilicity of scaffolds upon incorporation of gelatin and MSNPs. Besides, embedding the scaffolds with MSNPs resulted in improved tensile mechanical properties. Cultivation of PC12 cells on the scaffolds demonstrated that introduction of MSNPs into PLGA and PLGA/gelatin matrices leads to the improved cell attachment and proliferation as well as long cellular processes. DAPI staining results indicated that cell proliferations on the PLGA/10 wt% MSNPs and the PLGA/gelatin/10 wt% MSNPs scaffolds were strikingly (nearly 2.5 and 3 folds, respectively) higher than that on the aligned pure PLGA scaffolds. These results suggest superior properties of silica nanoparticles-incorporated PLGA/gelatin eletrospun nanofibrous scaffolds for the stem cell culture and tissue engineering applications. PMID:26045092

  2. PCR based identification and discrimination of agents of mucormycosis and aspergillosis in paraffin wax embedded tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bialek, R; Konrad, F; Kern, J; Aepinus, C; Cecenas, L; Gonzalez, G M; Just-Nübling, G; Willinger, B; Presterl, E; Lass-Flörl, C; Rickerts, V

    2005-01-01

    Background: Invasive fungal infections are often diagnosed by histopathology without identification of the causative fungi, which show significantly different antifungal susceptibilities. Aims: To establish and evaluate a system of two seminested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays to identify and discriminate between agents of aspergillosis and mucormycosis in paraffin wax embedded tissue samples. Methods: DNA of 52 blinded samples from five different centres was extracted and used as a template in two PCR assays targeting the mitochondrial aspergillosis DNA and the 18S ribosomal DNA of zygomycetes. Results: Specific fungal DNA was identified in 27 of 44 samples in accordance with a histopathological diagnosis of zygomycosis or aspergillosis, respectively. Aspergillus fumigatus DNA was amplified from one specimen of zygomycosis (diagnosed by histopathology). In four of 16 PCR negative samples no human DNA was amplified, possibly as a result of the destruction of DNA before paraffin wax embedding. In addition, eight samples from clinically suspected fungal infections (without histopathological proof) were examined. The two PCR assays detected a concomitant infection with Absidia corymbifera and A fumigatus in one, and infections with Rhizopus arrhizus and A fumigatus in another two cases. Conclusions: The two seminested PCR assays described here can support a histopathological diagnosis of mucormycosis or aspergillosis, and can identify the infective agent, thereby optimising antifungal treatment. PMID:16254108

  3. Determination of ABO genotypes with DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Yamada, M; Yamamoto, Y; Tanegashima, A; Kane, M; Ikehara, Y; Fukunaga, T; Nishi, K

    1994-01-01

    The gene encoding the specific glycosyltransferases which catalyze the conversion of the H antigen to A or B antigens shows a slight but distinct variation in its allelic nucleotide sequence and can be divided into 6 genotypes when digested with specific restriction enzymes. We extracted DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues using SDS/proteinase K treatment followed by phenol/chloroform extraction. The sequence of nucleotides for the A, B and O genes was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). DNA fragments of 128 bp and 200 bp could be amplified in the second round of PCR, using an aliquot of the first round PCR product as template. Degraded DNA from paraffin blocks stored for up to 10.7 years could be successfully typed. The ABO genotype was deduced from the digestion patterns with an appropriate combination of restriction enzymes and was compatible with the phenotype obtained from the blood sample. PMID:7947334

  4. Immunohistochemical diagnosis of tenacibaculosis in paraffin-embedded tissues of Senegalese sole Solea senegalensis Kaup, 1858.

    PubMed

    Faílde, L D; Bermúdez, R; Losada, A P; Riaza, A; Santos, Y; Quiroga, M I

    2014-11-01

    A sensitive and specific immunohistochemical technique was developed to improve the diagnosis of tenacibaculosis and to better understand its pathogenesis. Senegalese sole Solea senegalensis Kaup, 1858 were inoculated subcutaneously with a bacterial suspension of Tenacibaculum maritimum, and samples were taken at different hours post-inoculation. Sections from different organs were used as positive controls. In addition, a total of 128 field samples from different organs collected from tenacibaculosis outbreaks were used. Tenacibaculum maritimum antigens were detected in several organs of experimentally infected Senegalese sole and in at least one of the tissues from fish suffering from natural tenacibaculosis previously confirmed by culture and PCR-based methods. In fish collected during outbreaks, a strong positive reaction was detected in ulcerative skin areas. Moreover, bacterial antigen was identified inside scale pockets and in sites of the skin with mild lesion. In kidney and spleen, evident immunostaining of bacterial antigen was detected in both naturally and experimentally infected fish. Besides, the presence of T. maritimum in the intestinal tract without associated histological changes suggests that this organ may act as a reservoir for T. maritimum. The results of this study confirm the usefulness of IHC for the diagnosis of tenacibaculosis in paraffin-embedded tissues. PMID:24274927

  5. Reliable LC3 and p62 autophagy marker detection in formalin fixed paraffin embedded human tissue by immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Schläfli, A M; Berezowska, S; Adams, O; Langer, R; Tschan, M P

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy assures cellular homeostasis, and gains increasing importance in cancer, where it impacts on carcinogenesis, propagation of the malignant phenotype and development of resistance. To date, its tissue-based analysis by immunohistochemistry remains poorly standardized. Here we show the feasibility of specifically and reliably assessing the autophagy markers LC3B and p62 (SQSTM1) in formalin fixed and paraffin embedded human tissue by immunohistochemistry. Preceding functional experiments consisted of depleting LC3B and p62 in H1299 lung cancer cells with subsequent induction of autophagy. Western blot and immunofluorescence validated antibody specificity, knockdown efficiency and autophagy induction prior to fixation in formalin and embedding in paraffin. LC3B and p62 antibodies were validated on formalin fixed and paraffin embedded cell pellets of treated and control cells and finally applied on a tissue microarray with 80 human malignant and non-neoplastic lung and stomach formalin fixed and paraffin embedded tissue samples. Dot-like staining of various degrees was observed in cell pellets and 18/40 (LC3B) and 22/40 (p62) tumors, respectively. Seventeen tumors were double positive for LC3B and p62. P62 displayed additional significant cytoplasmic and nuclear staining of unknown significance. Interobserver-agreement for grading of staining intensities and patterns was substantial to excellent (kappa values 0.60 - 0.83). In summary, we present a specific and reliable IHC staining of LC3B and p62 on formalin fixed and paraffin embedded human tissue. Our presented protocol is designed to aid reliable investigation of dysregulated autophagy in solid tumors and may be used on large tissue collectives. PMID:26150155

  6. Combined in situ zymography, immunofluorescence, and staining of iron oxide particles in paraffin-embedded, zinc-fixed tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Haeckel, Akvile; Schoenzart, Lena; Appler, Franziska; Schnorr, Joerg; Taupitz, Matthias; Hamm, Bernd; Schellenberger, Eyk

    2012-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles are used as potent contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging. In histology, these particles are frequently visualized by Prussian blue iron staining of aldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. Recently, zinc salt-based fixative was shown to preserve enzyme activity in paraffin-embedded tissues. In this study, we demonstrate that zinc fixation allows combining in situ zymography with fluorescence immunohistochemistry (IHC) and iron staining for advanced biologic investigation of iron oxide particle accumulation. Very small iron oxide particles, developed for magnetic resonance angiography, were applied intravenously to BALB/c nude mice. After 3 hours, spleens were explanted and subjected to zinc fixation and paraffin embedding. Cut tissue sections were further processed to in situ zymography, IHC, and Prussian blue staining procedures. The combination of in situ zymography as well as IHC with subsequent Prussian blue iron staining on zinc-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues resulted in excellent histologic images of enzyme activity, protease distribution, and iron oxide particle accumulation. The combination of all three stains on a single section allowed direct comparison with only moderate degradation of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled substrate. This protocol is useful for investigating the biologic environment of accumulating iron oxide particles, with excellent preservation of morphology. PMID:22954182

  7. Use of Raman Spectroscopy in Characterizing Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Breast Tumor Samples (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downey, Frances; Cade, Nicholas; Cook, Richard; Springall, Robert; Gillet, Cheryl; Richards, David; Festy, Frederic

    2009-04-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) sections of breast tissue are used by pathologists to correctly type and grade the primary tumor and to assess the extent of a patient's disease. The cut sections represent a reproducible likeness of the morphology of the tissue when viewed through a microscope, although the fixation technique creates some artifacts. What is not known is how the sections differ chemically from how the tumor would look or behave within the breast. Raman spectroscopy is, like many other optical techniques, fast, noninvasive, and generally inexpensive. The advantage Raman has over other techniques is its powerful ability to identify specific chemicals, molecules, and bonds within a sample. Using Raman spectroscopy the chemicals present in both fresh tissue and FFPE sections can be identified and compared, allowing any differences between them to be identified. This information may be useful to the pathologist as an aid to further treatment regimes or novel molecular techniques, and as an aid to patient management. If these sections are found to be chemically similar to fresh tissue, they could be used to further characterize breast tumors, particularly rare tumors, using Raman spectroscopy.

  8. Tissue Resources for Clinical Use and Marker Studies in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Curry, Jonathan L.; Davies, Michael A.; Calderone, Tiffany L.; Nathanson, Katherine; Prieto, Victor G.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.

    2016-01-01

    The adequate procurement and preservation of high-quality tissue specimens from patients with melanoma is a critical clinical issue as patients’ tumor samples are now used not only for pathological diagnosis but are also necessary to determine the molecular signature of the tumor to stratify patients who may benefit from targeted melanoma therapy. Tissue resources available for physicians and investigators include formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue and frozen tissue, either preserved in optimal cutting temperature (OCT) media or snap frozen. Properly preserved tissue may be used to evaluate melanoma biomarkers by immunohistochemistry (IHC) with tissue microarray (TMA) technology, to perform genetic and genomic analyses, and for other types of translational research in melanoma. PMID:24259006

  9. Detection and characterization of Newcastle disease virus in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from commercial broilers in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Glil, Mostafa Y; Mor, Sunil K; Sharafeldin, Tamer A; Porter, Robert E; Goyal, Sagar M

    2014-03-01

    Newcastle disease (ND) is highly contagious and causes severe economic losses to the poultry industry due to high morbidity and mortality. In this report, we describe the detection of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) in formalin-fixed tissues from an outbreak of ND on broiler farms in Egypt. The affected birds experienced respiratory and/or nervous signs and a 75% mortality rate. Tissue samples were collected and placed in 10% neutral buffered formalin followed by embedding in paraffin. RNA was extracted from 80-microm formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks and recovered in 60 microl of elution buffer. All samples were negative for influenza virus by real-time reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR but positive for NDV. These flocks were known to have been vaccinated with a live NDV vaccine (LaSota strain). The nucleic acid sequences of the virus detected in this study were similar to those of a velogenic virus at its cleavage site 111GRRQKR*F117 and clustered with class II genogroup VII lineage of NDV, with a nucleotide sequence identity of 94%-99%. Although extraction and amplification of NDV from paraffin-embedded tissues from experimentally infected birds has been reported previously, this study reports on the use of RT-PCR on formalin-fixed tissues from actual field samples. PMID:24758123

  10. Pre-embedding Method of Electron Microscopy for Glycan Localization in Mammalian Tissues and Cells Using Lectin Probes.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Takata, Kuniaki; Kawakami, Hayato

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the study of glycans is progressing remarkably by the development of glycan analysis systems using mass spectrometry, glycan profiling systems using lectin microarrays, and glycoprotein analysis by the isotope-coded glycosylation site-specific tagging method. With these methodologies, glycan structures and biological functions are being elucidated. In the study of glycan function as well as disease diagnosis, it is important to examine the localization of glycans in tissues and cells. Histochemical methods using lectin probes can localize glycans in the tissues and cells. This chapter describes a pre-embedding electron microscopic method for glycan localization in which tissue sections and cells are incubated with lectin prior to embedding in resin. PMID:27515086

  11. Loss of antigenicity with tissue age in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Combs, Susan E; Han, Gang; Mani, Nikita; Beruti, Susan; Nerenberg, Michael; Rimm, David L

    2016-03-01

    Archived tumor specimens, particularly those collected by large cooperative groups and trials, provide a wealth of material for post hoc clinical investigation. As these tissues are rigorously collected and preserved for many decades, subsequent use of the specimens to answer clinical questions must rely on the assumption that expression and detection of target biomarkers are not degraded with time. To test this assumption, we measured the expression of estrogen receptor (ER), human epidermal growth receptor 2 (HER2), and Ki67 in human breast carcinoma using quantitative immunofluorescence (QIF) in a series of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues from 1295 individual patients preserved for 7 to 53 years in four cohorts on tissue microarrays. Protein expression was measured using the automated quantitative analysis method for QIF. Change in quantitative protein expression over time was estimated in positive cases using both Pearson's correlation and a polynomial regression analysis with a random effects model. The average signal decreased with preservation time for all biomarkers measured. For ER and HER2, there was an average of 10% signal loss after 9.9 years and 8.5 years, respectively, compared with the most recent tissue. Detection of Ki67 expression was lost more rapidly, with 10% signal loss in just 4.5 years. Overall, these results demonstrate the need for adjustment of tissue age when studying FFPE biospecimens. The rate of antigenicity loss is biomarker specific and should be considered as an important variable for studies using archived tissues. PMID:26568292

  12. Gene expression profiling of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded familial breast tumours using the whole genome-DASL assay.

    PubMed

    Waddell, Nic; Cocciardi, Sibylle; Johnson, Julie; Healey, Sue; Marsh, Anna; Riley, Joan; da Silva, Leonard; Vargas, Ana Cristina; Reid, Lynne; Simpson, Peter T; Lakhani, Sunil R; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2010-08-01

    Tissue sample acquisition is a limiting step in many studies. There are many thousands of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded archival blocks collected around the world, but in contrast relatively few fresh frozen samples in tumour banks. Once samples are fixed in formalin, the RNA is degraded and traditional methods for gene expression profiling are not suitable. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of the whole genome DASL (cDNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension, and Ligation) assay from Illumina to perform transcriptomic analysis of archived breast tumour tissue in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) blocks. We profiled 76 familial breast tumours from cases carrying a BRCA1, BRCA2 or ATM mutation, or from non-BRCA1/2 families. We found that replicate samples correlated well with each other (r(2) = 0.9-0.98). In 12/15 cases, the matched formalin-fixed and frozen samples predicted the same tumour molecular subtypes with confidence. These results demonstrate that the whole genome DASL assay is a valuable tool to profile degraded RNA from archival FFPE material. This assay will enable transcriptomic analysis of a large number of archival samples that are stored in pathology archives around the globe and consequently will have the potential to improve our understanding and characterization of many diseases. PMID:20593485

  13. Detection of Cell Proliferation Markers by Immunofluorescence Staining and Microscopy Imaging in Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Sections.

    PubMed

    Eminaga, Seda; Teekakirikul, Polakit; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, Jonathan G

    2016-01-01

    This unit describes a step-by-step protocol to detect and quantify proliferating cells in paraffin-embedded tissue sections. Two well-established markers of proliferation (incorporation of BrdU into newly synthesized DNA and expression of the nuclear protein Ki67) are detected after antigen-retrieval and subsequent immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27366888

  14. HB-EGF embedded in PGA/PLLA scaffolds via subcritical CO2 augments the production of tissue engineered intestine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanchun; Nelson, Tyler; Cromeens, Barrett; Rager, Terrence; Lannutti, John; Johnson, Jed; Besner, Gail E

    2016-10-01

    The ability to deliver sustained-release, biologically active growth factors through custom designed tissue engineering scaffolds at sites of tissue regeneration offers great therapeutic opportunity. Due to the short in vivo half-lives of most growth factors, it is challenging to deliver these proteins to sites of interest where they may be used before being degraded. The application of subcritical CO2 uses gas-phase CO2 at subcritical pressures ranging from 41 to 62 bar (595-913 PSI) which avoids foaming by reducing the amount of CO2 dissolved in the polymer and maintains completely reversible plasticization. In the current study, heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) was embedded into polyglycolic acid (PGA)/Poly-l-latic acid (PLLA) scaffolds via subcritical CO2 exposure for the production of tissue engineered intestine (TEI). PGA fiber morphology after subcritical CO2 exposure was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the distribution of HB-EGF embedded in the scaffold fibers was detected by HB-EGF immunofluorescent staining. In vivo implantation of HB-EGF-embedded scaffolds confirmed significantly improved TEI structure as a result of local delivery of the trophic growth factor. These findings may be critical for the production of TEI in the treatment of patients with short bowel syndrome in the future. PMID:27380441

  15. Thick-section fluorescence in situ hybridization on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded archival tissue provides a histogenetic profile.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, C. T.; LeBoit, P. E.; Nederlof, P. M.; Gray, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization has become a major tool for analysis of gene and chromosome copy number in normal and malignant tissue. The technique has been applied widely to fresh tissue and dispersed formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded archival tissue, but its use on sections of archival tissue has largely been limited to sections < 6 mu thick. This does not provide intact, uncut nuclei for accurate analysis of gene or chromosome copy number. We report here a method of hybridization to sections > 20 microns thick that overcomes these difficulties. Key developments were the use of DNA probes directly labeled with fluorochromes and optical sectioning using laser-scanning confocal microscopy. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8311111

  16. The homogeneous mutation status of a 22 gene panel justifies the use of serial sections of colorectal cancer tissue for external quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, Jeroen R; Tops, Bastiaan B J; Nagtegaal, Iris D; van Krieken, J Han J M; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L

    2015-09-01

    Testing for treatment related biomarkers in clinical care, like Ras mutation status in colorectal cancer (CRC), has increased drastically over recent years. Reliable testing of these markers is pivotal for optimal treatment of patients. Participation in external quality assessment (EQA) programs is an important element in quality management and often obligatory to comply with regulations or for accreditation. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) clinical specimens would ideally form the basis for these assessments, as they represent the most common starting material for molecular testing. However, molecular heterogeneity of a lesion in a FFPE tissue block could potentially affect test results of participating laboratories, which might compromise reliability of the quality assessment results. To assess the actual impact of this potential problem, we determined the mutation status of 22 genes commonly mutated in colon cancer in four levels covering 360 μm of 30 FFPE tissue blocks, by Next Generation Sequencing. In each block, the genotype of these genes was identical at all four levels, with only little variation in mutation load. This result shows that the mutation status of the selected 22 genes in CRC specimens is homogeneous within a 360 μm segment of the tumor. These data justify the use of serial sections, within a defined segment of a CRC tissue block, for external quality assessment of mutation analysis. PMID:26047774

  17. Optimization of extraction and PCR amplification of RNA extracts from paraffin-embedded tissue in different fixatives.

    PubMed

    Koopmans, M; Monroe, S S; Coffield, L M; Zaki, S R

    1993-07-01

    A method was developed for fast and efficient isolation of RNA from paraffin-embedded tissue sections for subsequent PCR analysis. This method is based on the binding of RNA to acid-treated glass beads in the presence of a high molarity of guanidinium salt. It can be completed within an hour, and obviates the need for dewaxing and phenol/chloroform extractions. The effect of various fixatives and fixation times was tested and the amplification of actin mRNA fragments ranging in length from 82 to 507 bp was used to demonstrate the presence of RNA in the extracts. The method was compared to existing extraction techniques by studying the quality of the templates for reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction amplification (RT-PCR), using virus-infected and mock-infected paraffin-embedded cell pellets as a model. PCR amplification of cellular and viral RNA was successful for RNA isolated by use of all extraction techniques, although the glass bead method was preferred for its simplicity and rapidity. Specimens fixed with formalin were found to be suitable for PCR, but the best results were obtained with acetone-fixed paraffin-embedded material. Dewaxing of tissue sections had no effect on the yield and quality of RNA extractions, and further purification of the extracts using gel filtration did not improve the results. After the protocols were optimized, rotavirus-infected cell pellets were used to demonstrate that extraction and amplification of dsRNA was possible. The information obtained from the studies with the model system was used for extraction of toroviral and rotaviral RNA from archival intestinal material. These data indicate that paraffin-embedded archival tissue can be used for RT-PCR analysis, adding an important technique to diagnostic pathology and retrospective studies. PMID:8396155

  18. A gene-protein assay for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2): brightfield tricolor visualization of HER2 protein, the HER2 gene, and chromosome 17 centromere (CEN17) in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissue sections

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The eligibility of breast cancer patients for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-directed therapies is determined by the HER2 gene amplification and/or HER2 protein overexpression status of the breast tumor as determined by in situ hybridization (ISH) or immunohistochemistry (IHC), respectively. Our objective was to combine the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved HER2 & chromosome 17 centromere (CEN17) brightfield ISH (BISH) and HER2 IHC assays into a single automated HER2 gene-protein assay allowing simultaneous detection of all three targets in a single tissue section. Methods The HER2 gene-protein assay was optimized using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples of the xenograft tumors MCF7 [HER2 negative (non-amplified gene, protein negative)] and Calu-3 [HER2 positive (amplified gene, protein positive)]. HER2 IHC was performed using a rabbit monoclonal anti-HER2 antibody (clone 4B5) and a conventional 3,3'-diaminobenzidine IHC detection. The HER2 & CEN17 BISH signals were visualized using horseradish peroxidase-based silver and alkaline phosphatase-based red detection systems, respectively with a cocktail of 2,4-dinitrophenyl-labeled HER2 and digoxigenin-labeled CEN17 probes. The performance of the gene-protein assay on tissue microarray slides containing 189 randomly selected FFPE clinical breast cancer tissue cores was compared to that of the separate HER2 IHC and HER2 & CEN17 BISH assays. Results HER2 protein detection was optimal when the HER2 IHC protocol was used before (rather than after) the BISH protocol. The sequential use of HER2 IHC and HER2 & CEN17 BISH detection steps on FFPE xenograft tumor sections appropriately co-localized the HER2 protein, HER2 gene, and CEN17 signals after mitigating the silver background staining by using a naphthol phosphate-containing hybridization buffer for the hybridization step. The HER2 protein and HER2 gene status obtained using the multiplex HER2 gene-protein assay

  19. The storage period of the formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor blocks does not influence the concentration and purity of the isolated DNA in a series of 83 renal and thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Nechifor-Boilă, Adela Corina; Loghin, Andrada; Vacariu, Victor; Halaţiu, Vasile Bogdan; Borda, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Optimal recovery of nucleic acids from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues is highly dependent on a series of pre-extraction steps, mainly related (but not limited) to fixation. The aim of our study was to investigate if the storage period of the FFPE blocks had a significant effect on the isolated DNA. We examined the quantity and purity of the isolated DNA from 83 FFPE blocks, corresponding to malignant thyroid (n=28) and renal (n=55) carcinomas that had been stored in our department for up to eight years. The DNA extraction protocol was based on a precipitation method (MasterPure™ DNA Purification Kit, Epicentre), in accordance to the manufacturer instructions, optimized in our laboratory. A spectrophotometer was used to determine the yield (A260) and purity (A260/A280 ratio) of the isolated DNA. We successfully isolated good DNA quantity and purity from all our study cases (mean concentration: 223.4 ± 104.16 ng/μL; mean A260/A280 ratio: 1.68 ± 0.09). Moreover, no statistically significant differences were observed between tumor blocks stored for 2-3 years and 7-8 years, respectively, both in terms of DNA quantity (p=0.196) and purity (p=0.663). In conclusion, we successfully validated an efficient, reproducible DNA extraction technique that provided a good range of DNA concentrations and purity, regardless the type of tissue (thyroid or kidney). Moreover, we demonstrated that the storage period of the FFPE blocks does not have a significant influence on the DNA quantity and purity. PMID:26429169

  20. Chromatin immunoprecipitation from fixed clinical tissues reveals tumor-specific enhancer profiles.

    PubMed

    Cejas, Paloma; Li, Lewyn; O'Neill, Nicholas K; Duarte, Melissa; Rao, Prakash; Bowden, Michaela; Zhou, Chensheng W; Mendiola, Marta; Burgos, Emilio; Feliu, Jaime; Moreno-Rubio, Juan; Guadalajara, Héctor; Moreno, Víctor; García-Olmo, Damián; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Mullane, Stephanie; Hirsch, Michelle; Sweeney, Christopher J; Richardson, Andrea; Liu, X Shirley; Brown, Myles; Shivdasani, Ramesh A; Long, Henry W

    2016-06-01

    Extensive cross-linking introduced during routine tissue fixation of clinical pathology specimens severely hampers chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis from archived tissue samples. This limits the ability to study the epigenomes of valuable, clinically annotated tissue resources. Here we describe fixed-tissue chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (FiT-seq), a method that enables reliable extraction of soluble chromatin from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples for accurate detection of histone marks. We demonstrate that FiT-seq data from FFPE specimens are concordant with ChIP-seq data from fresh-frozen samples of the same tumors. By using multiple histone marks, we generate chromatin-state maps and identify cis-regulatory elements in clinical samples from various tumor types that can readily allow us to distinguish between cancers by the tissue of origin. Tumor-specific enhancers and superenhancers that are elucidated by FiT-seq analysis correlate with known oncogenic drivers in different tissues and can assist in the understanding of how chromatin states affect gene regulation. PMID:27111282

  1. Diagnostic procedures for paraffin-embedded tissues analysis in pharmacogenomic studies.

    PubMed

    Palmirotta, Raffaele; De Marchis, Maria Laura; Ludovici, Giorgia; Ferroni, Patrizia; Abete, Pasquale; Guadagni, Fiorella; Della-Morte, David

    2014-01-01

    In this book chapter we report our own experience of mutational analysis in selecting tailored anticancer treatments for solid tumors. Our Department of Advanced Biotechnologies and Bioimaging, IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana, Rome, Italy, routinely performs pharmacogenetic screenings for different genes such as K-ras, BRAF, KIT, PDGFRα, and EGFR on paraffin-embedded cancer sections. Therefore, the chapter describes the mutational analysis procedures on paraffin-embedded tumors aimed to predict individual response to anticancer therapy. These molecular diagnostic methodologies may help us in improving the translational impact of genetic information on clinical practice. PMID:25150866

  2. Optimization of Single- and Dual-Color Immunofluorescence Protocols for Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Archival Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kajimura, Junko; Ito, Reiko; Manley, Nancy R; Hale, Laura P

    2016-02-01

    Performance of immunofluorescence staining on archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human tissues is generally not considered to be feasible, primarily due to problems with tissue quality and autofluorescence. We report the development and application of procedures that allowed for the study of a unique archive of thymus tissues derived from autopsies of individuals exposed to atomic bomb radiation in Hiroshima, Japan in 1945. Multiple independent treatments were used to minimize autofluorescence and maximize fluorescent antibody signals. Treatments with NH3/EtOH and Sudan Black B were particularly useful in decreasing autofluorescent moieties present in the tissue. Deconvolution microscopy was used to further enhance the signal-to-noise ratios. Together, these techniques provide high-quality single- and dual-color fluorescent images with low background and high contrast from paraffin blocks of thymus tissue that were prepared up to 60 years ago. The resulting high-quality images allow the application of a variety of image analyses to thymus tissues that previously were not accessible. Whereas the procedures presented remain to be tested for other tissue types and archival conditions, the approach described may facilitate greater utilization of older paraffin block archives for modern immunofluorescence studies. PMID:26392518

  3. A review of room temperature storage of biospecimen tissue and nucleic acids for anatomic pathology laboratories and biorepositories

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Jerry J; Mirsadraei, Leili; Sanchez, Desiree E; Wilson, Ryan W; Shabihkhani, Maryam; Lucey, Gregory M; Wei, Bowen; Singer, Elyse J; Mareninov, Sergey; Yong, William H

    2014-01-01

    Frozen biospecimens are crucial for translational research and contain well preserved nucleic acids and protein. However, the risk for catastrophic freezer failure as well as space, cost, and environmental concerns argue for evaluating long-term room temperature storage alternatives. Formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues have great value but their use is limited by cross-linking and fragmentation of nucleic acids, as well as loss of enzymatic activity. Stabilization solutions can now robustly preserve fresh tissue for up to 7 days at room temperature. For longer term storage, commercial vendors of chemical matrices claim real time stability of nucleic acids of over 2 years and their accelerated aging studies to date suggest stability for 12 years for RNA and 60 years for DNA. However, anatomic pathology biorepositories store mostly frozen tissue rather than nucleic acids. Small quantities of tissue can be directly placed on some chemical matrices to stabilize DNA, however RNA and proteins are not preserved. Current lyophilization approaches can preserve histomorphology, DNA, RNA, and proteins though RNA shows moderate degradation after 1–2 years. Formalin free fixatives show improved but varying abilities to preserve nucleic acids and face validation as well as cost barriers in replacing FFPE specimens. The paraffin embedding process can degrade RNA. Development of robust long-term room temperature biospecimen tissue storage technology can potentially reduce costs for the biomedical community in the face of growing targeted therapy needs and decreasing budgets. PMID:24362270

  4. Proteomic analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded glomeruli suggests depletion of glomerular filtration barrier proteins in two-kidney, one-clip hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Finne, Kenneth; Vethe, Heidrun; Skogstrand, Trude; Leh, Sabine; Dahl, Tone D.; Tenstad, Olav; Berven, Frode S.; Reed, Rolf K.; Vikse, Bjørn Egil

    2014-01-01

    Background It is well known that hypertension may cause glomerular damage, but the molecular mechanisms involved are still incompletely understood. Methods In the present study, we used formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue to investigate changes in the glomerular proteome in the non-clipped kidney of two-kidney one-clip (2K1C) hypertensive rats, with special emphasis on the glomerular filtration barrier. 2K1C hypertension was induced in 6-week-old Wistar Hannover rats (n = 6) that were sacrificed 23 weeks later and compared with age-matched sham-operated controls (n = 6). Tissue was stored in FFPE tissue blocks and later prepared on tissue slides for laser microdissection. Glomeruli without severe morphological damage were isolated, and the proteomes were analysed using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Results 2K1C glomeruli showed reduced abundance of proteins important for slit diaphragm complex, such as nephrin, podocin and neph1. The podocyte foot process had a pattern of reduced abundance of transmembrane proteins but unchanged abundances of the podocyte cytoskeletal proteins synaptopodin and α-actinin-4. Lower abundance of important glomerular basement membrane proteins was seen. Possible glomerular markers of damage with increased abundance in 2K1C were transgelin, desmin and acyl-coenzyme A thioesterase 1. Conclusions Microdissection and tandem mass spectrometry could be used to investigate the proteome of isolated glomeruli from FFPE tissue. Glomerular filtration barrier proteins had reduced abundance in the non-clipped kidney of 2K1C hypertensive rats. PMID:25129444

  5. Post-embedding Mammalian Tissue for Immunoelectron Microscopy: A Standardized Procedure Based on Heat-Induced Antigen Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    We describe a standardized method of fixation, antigen retrieval, and image contrasting for post-embedding immunoelectron microscopy. Tissues are fixed with formaldehyde solutions containing Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions at pH 7.4 and then at pH 8.5. After dehydration with dimethylformamide, the specimens are embedded in LR-White resin. For antigen retrieval, ultrathin sections are heated in 0.5 M Tris-HCl, pH 9.0, for 1-2 h at 95 °C. After immunogold labeling, the sections are treated with a mixture of tannic acid and glutaraldehyde, with OsO4 solution, and then double-stained with uranyl acetate and lead citrate. The standardized method yields strong and reproducible immunoreactions for many antigens showing excellent image contrast without destruction of fine structures. PMID:27515088

  6. Immunocytochemistry: its evolution and criteria for its application in the study of epon-embedded cells and tissue.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, E J; Cate, C C; Pettengill, O S; Sorenson, G D

    1986-01-01

    The word immunocytochemistry is currently used to describe a number of methods that can be employed to localize antigens within cells by means of antigen-specific antibodies. In this article we will review a number of these methods, including immunofluorescence, immunoperoxidase, avidin-biotin, and colloidal-gold techniques. The advantages and disadvantages of the various methods are discussed, special attention being focused upon immunocytochemical staining of plastic-embedded tissue. Studies on the light microscope level show that embedding tissue in plastic prior to immunoperoxidase staining not only improves visualization of antigen-specific staining but also provides an accurate and efficient means of prescreening tissue for antigen prior to immunocytochemical staining on the electron microscope level. Varying section thickness between 1 and 3 microns does not significantly influence staining, whereas the fixative used to preserve the tissue under study does. On the electron microscope level, the colloidal gold technique appears superior to immunoperoxidase staining. It is both esthetically more pleasing and highly sensitive. Of five different colloidal gold methods tested, the most sensitive is the two-step technique that employs an antigen-specific primary antibody followed by a gold-labeled secondary antibody. Throughout this article, special emphasis is placed on the use of proper controls, both on the light and electron microscope levels. Where possible, such controls should include substitution of specific antiserum with normal serum; the use of antigen-adsorbed antiserum; the use of antisera with specificities for antigens not present in the tissue being studied; the use of tissue previously shown to be stainable for the antigen; and if cultured cells are being studied, the use of a number of cell types that do not contain the antigen. PMID:2422914

  7. Alcohol based fixatives provide excellent tissue morphology, protein immunoreactivity and RNA integrity in paraffin embedded tissue specimens.

    PubMed

    Milcheva, Rositsa; Janega, Pavol; Celec, Peter; Russev, Russy; Babál, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    Fixation techniques preserving morphological fidelity, protein antigenicity and integrity of nucleic acids can have a high impact on both basic and applied biomedical sciences and diagnostic pathology. Different types of mouse tissues were fixed with neutral buffered formalin, ethanol supplemented with acetic acid and modified methacarn (methanol-Carnoy) fixative. The alcohol-fixed samples were processed in an Autotechnicon tissue processor or in an incubator. The preservation of tissue morphology was assessed in all specimens and the immunoreactivity was evaluated with antibodies specific for proteins with nuclear, membrane or cytoplasmic localization. RNA was extracted from all groups of fixed hind limb skeletal muscle specimens and was assessed versus unfixed tissue for preservation of its quantity and quality by amplification of gene-specific fragments of different lengths. Both alcohol-based fixatives preserved the tissue architecture and the specificity of immunoreactivity in excellent quality; the trimming approach did not result in detectable differences. Oligonucleotide fragments of length between 108 and 577 base pairs were amplified from all groups of alcohol-fixed skeletal muscle specimens in amounts comparative to the unfixed muscle tissue. We conclude that both alcohol-based fixatives are an excellent tool for storage of tissue samples designed for immunohistochemical and mRNA expression studies when the access to fresh samples is limited. PMID:22921675

  8. Identification of leucocyte surface antigens in paraffin-embedded bovine tissues using a modified formalin dichromate fixation.

    PubMed

    Rathkolb, B; Pohlenz, J F; Wohlsein, P

    1997-06-01

    A modified fixative of formalin dichromate was combined with a cold embedding procedure for the preservation of bovine leucocyte surface antigens. Fourteen monoclonal antibodies recognizing seven bovine leucocyte surface antigens (BoCD1w2, BoCD4, BoCD8, BoWC1, BoWC3, BoWC4 and BoIgM) were applied as primary antisera in a sensitive avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex detection method. The staining results were compared with those obtained in cryostat and routinely formalin-fixed sections of corresponding tissue samples. Using the modified formalin dichromate fixative and the cold embedding procedure, all the leucocyte surface antigens tested were detectable immunohistologically in paraffin sections with a generally more distinct staining than in traditionally processed tissues. Morphological structures were better preserved than in cryostat sections but, to some extent, were poorer when compared with routinely formalinfixed tissues. However, this method suggests that there are only mild masking effects and provides an alternative to the use of unfixed material, particularly for morphological-immunohistochemical investigations. PMID:9248856

  9. Genome-wide methylation profiling in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Killian, J Keith; Walker, Robert L; Bilke, Sven; Chen, Yidong; Davis, Sean; Cornelison, Robert; Smith, William I; Meltzer, Paul S

    2012-01-01

    New technologies allow for genome-scale measurement of DNA methylation. In an effort to increase the clinical utility of DNA methylation as a biomarker, we have adapted a commercial bisulfite epigenotyping assay for genome-wide methylation profiling in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded pathology specimens. This chapter takes the reader step by step through a biomarker discovery experiment to identify phenotype-correlated DNA methylation signatures in routine pathology specimens. PMID:22081342

  10. Temperature evolution in tissues embedded with large blood vessels during photo-thermal heating.

    PubMed

    Paul, Anup; Narasimhan, Arunn; Kahlen, Franz J; Das, Sarit K

    2014-04-01

    During laser-assisted photo-thermal therapy, the temperature of the heated tissue region must rise to the therapeutic value (e.g., 43°C) for complete ablation of the target cells. Large blood vessels (larger than 500 micron in diameter) at or near the irradiated tissues have a considerable impact on the transient temperature distribution in the tissue. In this study, the cooling effects of large blood vessels on temperature distribution in tissues during laser irradiation are predicted using finite element based simulation. A uniform flow is assumed at the entrance and three-dimensional conjugate heat transfer equations in the tissue region and the blood region are simultaneously solved for different vascular models. A volumetric heat source term based on Beer-Lambert law is introduced into the energy equation to account for laser heating. The heating pattern is taken to depend on the absorption and scattering coefficients of the tissue medium. Experiments are also conducted on tissue mimics in the presence and absence of simulated blood vessels to validate the numerical model. The coupled heat transfer between thermally significant blood vessels and their surrounding tissue for three different tissue-vascular networks are analyzed keeping the laser irradiation constant. A surface temperature map is obtained for different vascular models and for the bare tissue (without blood vessels). The transient temperature distribution is seen to differ according to the nature of the vascular network, blood vessel size, flow rate, laser spot size, laser power and tissue blood perfusion rate. The simulations suggest that the blood flow through large blood vessels in the vicinity of the photothermally heated tissue can lead to inefficient heating of the target. PMID:24679976

  11. Single-molecule RNA detection at depth by hybridization chain reaction and tissue hydrogel embedding and clearing.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sheel; Lubeck, Eric; Schwarzkopf, Maayan; He, Ting-Fang; Greenbaum, Alon; Sohn, Chang Ho; Lignell, Antti; Choi, Harry M T; Gradinaru, Viviana; Pierce, Niles A; Cai, Long

    2016-08-01

    Accurate and robust detection of mRNA molecules in thick tissue samples can reveal gene expression patterns in single cells within their native environment. Preserving spatial relationships while accessing the transcriptome of selected cells is a crucial feature for advancing many biological areas - from developmental biology to neuroscience. However, because of the high autofluorescence background of many tissue samples, it is difficult to detect single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH) signals robustly in opaque thick samples. Here, we draw on principles from the emerging discipline of dynamic nucleic acid nanotechnology to develop a robust method for multi-color, multi-RNA imaging in deep tissues using single-molecule hybridization chain reaction (smHCR). Using this approach, single transcripts can be imaged using epifluorescence, confocal or selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) depending on the imaging depth required. We show that smHCR has high sensitivity in detecting mRNAs in cell culture and whole-mount zebrafish embryos, and that combined with SPIM and PACT (passive CLARITY technique) tissue hydrogel embedding and clearing, smHCR can detect single mRNAs deep within thick (0.5 mm) brain slices. By simultaneously achieving ∼20-fold signal amplification and diffraction-limited spatial resolution, smHCR offers a robust and versatile approach for detecting single mRNAs in situ, including in thick tissues where high background undermines the performance of unamplified smFISH. PMID:27342713

  12. Single-molecule RNA detection at depth by hybridization chain reaction and tissue hydrogel embedding and clearing

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sheel; Lubeck, Eric; Schwarzkopf, Maayan; He, Ting-Fang; Greenbaum, Alon; Sohn, Chang Ho; Lignell, Antti; Choi, Harry M. T.; Gradinaru, Viviana; Pierce, Niles A.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and robust detection of mRNA molecules in thick tissue samples can reveal gene expression patterns in single cells within their native environment. Preserving spatial relationships while accessing the transcriptome of selected cells is a crucial feature for advancing many biological areas – from developmental biology to neuroscience. However, because of the high autofluorescence background of many tissue samples, it is difficult to detect single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH) signals robustly in opaque thick samples. Here, we draw on principles from the emerging discipline of dynamic nucleic acid nanotechnology to develop a robust method for multi-color, multi-RNA imaging in deep tissues using single-molecule hybridization chain reaction (smHCR). Using this approach, single transcripts can be imaged using epifluorescence, confocal or selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) depending on the imaging depth required. We show that smHCR has high sensitivity in detecting mRNAs in cell culture and whole-mount zebrafish embryos, and that combined with SPIM and PACT (passive CLARITY technique) tissue hydrogel embedding and clearing, smHCR can detect single mRNAs deep within thick (0.5 mm) brain slices. By simultaneously achieving ∼20-fold signal amplification and diffraction-limited spatial resolution, smHCR offers a robust and versatile approach for detecting single mRNAs in situ, including in thick tissues where high background undermines the performance of unamplified smFISH. PMID:27342713

  13. A polychromatic staining method for epoxy embedded tissue: a new combination of methylene blue and basic fuchsine for light microscopy.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, F

    2005-01-01

    A simple and rapid method is described for staining semithin sections of material embedded in epoxy resin for observing tissues prior to transmission electron microscopy. The method is suitable for tissue fixed with a glutaraldehyde-formaldehyde mixture and postfixed in osmium tetroxide. No etching or oxidizing procedures are necessary. Sections 0.5-0.8 microm thick are dried onto a slide and stained with either 0.75% methylene blue and 0.25% azure B or 0.5% methylene blue and 0.5% azure II in 0.5% aqueous borax and heated over a flame for 8-10 sec. The slides are rinsed with water, then stained the same way with 0.1% basic fuchsine in 5% aqueous ethanol. Cytoplasm stains blue; nuclei darker blue; collagen, mucus and elastin pink to red; fat and intracellular lipid droplets gray-green. PMID:16720521

  14. In situ hybridization for the detection of rust fungi in paraffin embedded plant tissue sections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rust fungi infect a wide range of plant species making them of particular interest to plant pathologists. In order to study the interactions between these important pathogenic fungi and their host plants it is useful to be able to differentiate fungal tissue from plant tissue. This can be accomplish...

  15. Coiled fiber scaffolds embedded with gold nanoparticles improve the performance of engineered cardiac tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, Sharon; Shevach, Michal; Feiner, Ron; Dvir, Tal

    2014-07-01

    Coiled perimysial fibers within the heart muscle provide it with the ability to contract and relax efficiently. Here, we report on a new nanocomposite scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering, integrating coiled electrospun fibers with gold nanoparticles. Cultivation of cardiac cells within the hybrid scaffolds promoted cell organization into elongated and aligned tissues generating a strong contraction force, high contraction rate and low excitation threshold.Coiled perimysial fibers within the heart muscle provide it with the ability to contract and relax efficiently. Here, we report on a new nanocomposite scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering, integrating coiled electrospun fibers with gold nanoparticles. Cultivation of cardiac cells within the hybrid scaffolds promoted cell organization into elongated and aligned tissues generating a strong contraction force, high contraction rate and low excitation threshold. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00300d

  16. Coiled fiber scaffolds embedded with gold nanoparticles improve the performance of engineered cardiac tissues.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Sharon; Shevach, Michal; Feiner, Ron; Dvir, Tal

    2014-08-21

    Coiled perimysial fibers within the heart muscle provide it with the ability to contract and relax efficiently. Here, we report on a new nanocomposite scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering, integrating coiled electrospun fibers with gold nanoparticles. Cultivation of cardiac cells within the hybrid scaffolds promoted cell organization into elongated and aligned tissues generating a strong contraction force, high contraction rate and low excitation threshold. PMID:24744098

  17. Resonant acoustic spectroscopy of soft tissues using embedded magnetomotive nanotransducers and optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Oldenburg, Amy L

    2010-01-01

    We present a new method for performing dynamic elastography of soft tissue samples. By sensing nanoscale displacements with optical coherence tomography, a chirped, modulated force is applied to acquire the mechanical spectrum of a tissue sample within a few seconds. This modulated force is applied via magnetic nanoparticles, named ‘nanotransducers’, which are diffused into the tissue, and which contribute negligible inertia to the soft tissue mechanical system. Using this novel system, we observed that excised tissues exhibit mechanical resonance modes which are well described by a linear damped harmonic oscillator. Results are validated by using cylindrical tissue phantoms of agarose in which resonant frequencies (30–400 Hz) are consistent with longitudinal modes and the sample boundary conditions. We furthermore show that the Young’s modulus can be computed from their measured resonance frequencies, analogous to resonant ultrasound spectroscopy for stiff material analysis. Using this new technique, named magnetomotive resonant acoustic spectroscopy (MRAS), we monitored the relative stiffening of an excised rat liver during a chemical fixation process. PMID:20124653

  18. Detection and Quantification of CWD Prions in Fixed Paraffin Embedded Tissues by Real-Time Quaking-Induced Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, Clare E.; Davenport, Kristen A.; Henderson, Davin M.; Pulscher, Laura A.; Mathiason, Candace K.; Zabel, Mark D.; Hoover, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional diagnostic detection of chronic wasting disease (CWD) relies on immunodetection of misfolded CWD prion protein (PrPCWD) by western blotting, ELISA, or immunohistochemistry (IHC). These techniques require separate sample collections (frozen and fixed) which may result in discrepancies due to variation in prion tissue distribution and assay sensitivities that limit detection especially in early and subclinical infections. Here, we harness the power of real-time quaking induced conversion (RT-QuIC) to amplify, detect, and quantify prion amyloid seeding activity in fixed paraffin-embedded (FPE) tissue sections. We show that FPE RT-QuIC has greater detection sensitivity than IHC in tissues with low PrPCWD burdens, including those that are IHC-negative. We also employ amyloid formation kinetics to yield a semi-quantitative estimate of prion concentration in a given FPE tissue. We report that FPE RT-QuIC has the ability to enhance diagnostic and investigative detection of disease-associated PrPRES in prion, and potentially other, protein misfolding disease states. PMID:27157060

  19. Immunohistochemical detection of DNA topoisomerase I in formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded normal tissues and in ovarian carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Holden, J A; Rahn, M P; Jolles, C J; Vorobyev, S V; Bronstein, I B

    1997-01-01

    AIMS: To determine, by in situ immunohistochemistry, whether ovarian carcinomas have increased expression of DNA topoisomerase I. METHODS: Paraffin wax blocks obtained from 15 samples of normal human tissues and from 14 cases of ovarian cancer were cut on to glass slides and immunohistochemically stained for topoisomerase I. The primary antibody was a mouse monoclonal that recognises topoisomerase I in western blots. Colour was detected using a peroxidase system with diaminobenzidine as the chromogen. The expression of topoisomerase I in the tissues and tumours was graded subjectively from 0 to 3+ based on the colour intensity of the immunostain. RESULTS: In normal tissues, topoisomerase I expression was strongest in the mucosal lymphocytes in the gastrointestinal tract and in the germinal centres of the tonsil. Weak topoisomerase I staining was found in the columnar epithelium of the gastrointestinal tract and in squamous mucosa. In the series of ovarian carcinomas, raised topoisomerase I was observed in 43% (6 of 14) of the tumours. Of the tumours with raised topoisomerase I, only three contained a population of rapidly cycling cells. Therefore, 21% of our series of ovarian carcinomas (3 of 14) had raised topoisomerase I expression and were proliferating rapidly. CONCLUSIONS: Topoisomerase I expression in formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded human tissues can be evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. Increases in topoisomerase I occur in some cases of ovarian cancer. Images PMID:9497914

  20. Detection and Quantification of CWD Prions in Fixed Paraffin Embedded Tissues by Real-Time Quaking-Induced Conversion.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Clare E; Davenport, Kristen A; Henderson, Davin M; Pulscher, Laura A; Mathiason, Candace K; Zabel, Mark D; Hoover, Edward A

    2016-01-01

    Traditional diagnostic detection of chronic wasting disease (CWD) relies on immunodetection of misfolded CWD prion protein (PrP(CWD)) by western blotting, ELISA, or immunohistochemistry (IHC). These techniques require separate sample collections (frozen and fixed) which may result in discrepancies due to variation in prion tissue distribution and assay sensitivities that limit detection especially in early and subclinical infections. Here, we harness the power of real-time quaking induced conversion (RT-QuIC) to amplify, detect, and quantify prion amyloid seeding activity in fixed paraffin-embedded (FPE) tissue sections. We show that FPE RT-QuIC has greater detection sensitivity than IHC in tissues with low PrP(CWD) burdens, including those that are IHC-negative. We also employ amyloid formation kinetics to yield a semi-quantitative estimate of prion concentration in a given FPE tissue. We report that FPE RT-QuIC has the ability to enhance diagnostic and investigative detection of disease-associated PrP(RES) in prion, and potentially other, protein misfolding disease states. PMID:27157060

  1. Gene fusion detection in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded benign fibrous histiocytomas using fluorescence in situ hybridization and RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Walther, Charles; Hofvander, Jakob; Nilsson, Jenny; Magnusson, Linda; Domanski, Henryk A; Gisselsson, David; Tayebwa, Johnbosco; Doyle, Leona A; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Mertens, Fredrik

    2015-09-01

    Benign fibrous histiocytomas (FH) can be subdivided into several morphological and clinical subgroups. Recently, gene fusions involving either one of two protein kinase C genes (PRKCB and PRKCD) or the ALK gene were described in FH. We here wanted to evaluate the frequency of PRKCB and PRKCD gene fusions in FH. Using interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization on sections from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumors, 36 cases could be analyzed. PRKCB or PRKCD rearrangements were seen in five tumors: 1/7 regular, 0/3 aneurysmal, 0/6 cellular, 2/7 epithelioid, 0/1 atypical, 2/10 deep, and 0/2 metastatic lesions. We also evaluated the status of the ALK gene in selected cases, finding rearrangements in 3/7 epithelioid and 0/1 atypical lesions. To assess the gene fusion status of FH further, deep sequencing of RNA (RNA-Seq) was performed on FFPE tissue from eight cases with unknown gene fusion status, as well as on two FH and six soft tissue sarcomas with known gene fusions; of the latter eight positive controls, the expected fusion transcript was found in all but one, while 2/8 FH with unknown genetic status showed fusion transcripts, including a novel KIRREL/PRKCA chimera. Thus, also a third member of the PRKC family is involved in FH tumorigenesis. We conclude that gene fusions involving PRKC genes occur in several morphological (regular, cellular, aneurysmal, epithelioid) and clinical (cutaneous, deep) subsets of FH, but they seem to account for only a minority of the cases. In epithelioid lesions, however, rearrangements of PRKC or ALK were seen, as mutually exclusive events, in the majority (5/7) of cases. Finally, the study also shows that RNA-Seq is a promising tool for identifying gene fusions in FFPE tissues. PMID:26121314

  2. The value of immunohistochemistry on paraffin wax embedded tissue sections in the differentiation of small lymphocytic and mantle cell lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, N; Wright, D H

    1997-01-01

    AIMS: To determine whether immunohistochemistry applied to paraffin wax embedded biopsy tissue can be used to distinguish between B-small lymphocytic lymphoma (B-SLL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). METHODS: Formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded tissue blocks of 12 cases of B-SLL and 12 cases of MCL were retrieved from the files of the Department of Pathology, Southampton University Hospitals Trust. Following antigen retrieval, where appropriate, sections were stained for CD3, CD5, CD20, CD23, CD43, Cyclin D, PGP9.5, and MIB1 using a streptavidin-biotin complex technique. RESULTS: CD20 stained the neoplastic cells of B-SLL and MCL, and CD3 labelled the reactive T cells in these tumours. In B-SLL, the T cells were generally dispersed among the tumour cells, whereas in MCL they often formed bands around tumour cell nodules. CD5 could be detected on T cells, following antigen retrieval. The level of expression on B cells of B-SLL and MCL was generally too low to allow detection in paraffin wax embedded tissues. CD23 stained B-SLL but not MCL. However, it could be detected in only five of the 12 cases of B-SLL. CD43 could be detected in most cases of B-SLL and MCL. It is not, therefore, of value in distinguishing between these tumours. It will, however, help in the differentiation of B-SLL and MCL from other low grade B cell lymphomas, such as follicle centre cell and marginal zone lymphomas. Cyclin D was expressed in all of the MCL but in none of the B-SLL. PGP9.5 showed reactivity in most cases of MCL and much weaker reactivity in B-SLL. The proliferation indexes of MCL were generally higher than those of B-SLL, as measured by MIB1 labelling. Both tumours, however, showed a wide range of values and considerable overlap. CONCLUSION: Staining for Cyclin D is the most reliable immunohistochemical mean of differentiating between B-SLL an MCL. High levels of PGP9.5, expressed in MCL, may be related to the degradation of Cyclin D by the ubiquitin pathway. Images PMID

  3. High-Throughput Sequencing and Copy Number Variation Detection Using Formalin Fixed Embedded Tissue in Metastatic Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Min Eui; Do, In-Gu; Kang, So Young; Ha, Sang Yun; Kim, Seung Tae; Park, Se Hoon; Kang, Won Ki; Choi, Min-Gew; Lee, Jun Ho; Sohn, Tae Sung; Bae, Jae Moon; Kim, Sung; Kim, Duk-Hwan; Kim, Kyoung-Mee

    2014-01-01

    In the era of targeted therapy, mutation profiling of cancer is a crucial aspect of making therapeutic decisions. To characterize cancer at a molecular level, the use of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue is important. We tested the Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel v2 and nCounter Copy Number Variation Assay in 89 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded gastric cancer samples to determine whether they are applicable in archival clinical samples for personalized targeted therapies. We validated the results with Sanger sequencing, real-time quantitative PCR, fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Frequently detected somatic mutations included TP53 (28.17%), APC (10.1%), PIK3CA (5.6%), KRAS (4.5%), SMO (3.4%), STK11 (3.4%), CDKN2A (3.4%) and SMAD4 (3.4%). Amplifications of HER2, CCNE1, MYC, KRAS and EGFR genes were observed in 8 (8.9%), 4 (4.5%), 2 (2.2%), 1 (1.1%) and 1 (1.1%) cases, respectively. In the cases with amplification, fluorescence in situ hybridization for HER2 verified gene amplification and immunohistochemistry for HER2, EGFR and CCNE1 verified the overexpression of proteins in tumor cells. In conclusion, we successfully performed semiconductor-based sequencing and nCounter copy number variation analyses in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded gastric cancer samples. High-throughput screening in archival clinical samples enables faster, more accurate and cost-effective detection of hotspot mutations or amplification in genes. PMID:25372287

  4. Direct fluorescent antibody technique for the detection of bacterial kidney disease in paraffin-embedded tissues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ochiai, T.; Yasutake, W.T.; Gould, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    The direct fluorescent antibody technique (FAT) was successfully used to detect the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), Renibacterium salmoninarum, in Bouin's solution flexed and paraffinembedded egg and tissue sections. This method is superior to gram stain and may be particularly useful in detecting the BKD organism in fish with low-grade infection.

  5. Remarks on the usefulness of toluidine blue staining for RNA cytophotometry in plastic embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Meyer, W; Zschemisch, N H

    1999-06-01

    The study demonstrates the usefulness of water-soluble plastic resins for the cytological quantification of RNA contents after toluidine blue staining. In this way shrinkage artefacts in delicate tissues are avoided and more exact cytophotometrical results can be obtained from embryological material. PMID:10432183

  6. Enhanced fungal DNA-Extraction from Formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue specimens by application of thermal energy

    PubMed Central

    Rickerts, V.; Khot, P.D.; Ko, D.L.; Fredricks, D.N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Determining the etiology of invasive fungal infections (IFI) is critical for patient management as fungi vary in their susceptibility to antifungals. However, the etiology remains obscure in many cases due to negative culture results. The identification of fungal DNA from pathology blocks by PCR and sequencing is an alternative approach to determine the etiology of IFI. Previous studies identified fungal DNA in only 50% of samples with positive histopathology, probably due to DNA damage by the tissue fixation. We used realtime PCR to quantify human and fungal DNA from Formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded tissue specimens in order to study the effect of thermal energy during extraction on the yield of amplifiable DNA and subsequent identification of fungal DNA. Tissue sections from eight patients with proven IFI were subjected to DNA extraction with varying exposure to thermal energy. Amplifiable DNA increased up to 76-fold by increasing incubation temperature from 65°C to 90°C. An additional increase was documented by incubation for up to 6 hours at 90°C. The augmented amplification of fungal DNA was associated with improved species identification by sequencing of the PCR amplicons. This may help illuminate the etiology of IFI and thereby improve patient management by guiding antifungal therapy. PMID:22414380

  7. Fabrication and characterization of a rapid prototyped tissue engineering scaffold with embedded multicomponent matrix for controlled drug release

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Muwan; Le, Dang QS; Hein, San; Li, Pengcheng; Nygaard, Jens V; Kassem, Moustapha; Kjems, Jørgen; Besenbacher, Flemming; Bünger, Cody

    2012-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering implants with sustained local drug delivery provide an opportunity for better postoperative care for bone tumor patients because these implants offer sustained drug release at the tumor site and reduce systemic side effects. A rapid prototyped macroporous polycaprolactone scaffold was embedded with a porous matrix composed of chitosan, nanoclay, and β-tricalcium phosphate by freeze-drying. This composite scaffold was evaluated on its ability to deliver an anthracycline antibiotic and to promote formation of mineralized matrix in vitro. Scanning electronic microscopy, confocal imaging, and DNA quantification confirmed that immortalized human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC-TERT) cultured in the scaffold showed high cell viability and growth, and good cell infiltration to the pores of the scaffold. Alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin staining showed that the scaffold was osteoinductive. The drug-release kinetics was investigated by loading doxorubicin into the scaffold. The scaffolds comprising nanoclay released up to 45% of the drug for up to 2 months, while the scaffold without nanoclay released 95% of the drug within 4 days. Therefore, this scaffold can fulfill the requirements for both bone tissue engineering and local sustained release of an anticancer drug in vitro. These results suggest that the scaffold can be used clinically in reconstructive surgery after bone tumor resection. Moreover, by changing the composition and amount of individual components, the scaffold can find application in other tissue engineering areas that need local sustained release of drug. PMID:22904634

  8. Double immunofluorescent staining of rat macrophages in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue using two monoclonal mouse antibodies.

    PubMed

    Isidro, Raymond A; Isidro, Angel A; Cruz, Myrella L; Hernandez, Siomara; Appleyard, Caroline B

    2015-12-01

    The conventional approach of double immunostaining to visualize more than one protein in tissues or cells using antibodies from two different host species is not always feasible due to limitations with antibody availability. Previously reported methodologies for performing multiple immunostains on the same tissue or cells with antibodies originating from the same species are varied in their complexity, sensitivity, and approach to prevent unwanted interactions between antibodies. In the ever-expanding field of macrophage biology, much more is known about mouse and human macrophages than their rat counterparts. The limited availability of validated and well-characterized monoclonal antibodies from different species is one factor responsible for preventing advances in rat macrophage biology. Here we describe an immunostaining method for identifying and examining rat macrophages that is sufficiently sensitive for use in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue and that uses only commercially available reagents and antibodies. This method can be used to help characterize both physiological and pathophysiological processes in rat macrophages and can be adapted for use with any two antibodies from the same species of origin as long as one of the antibodies is biotinylated. PMID:26403093

  9. Multicenter Evaluation of a Novel Automated Rapid Detection System of BRAF Status in Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissues.

    PubMed

    Schiefer, Ana-Iris; Parlow, Laura; Gabler, Lisa; Mesteri, Ildiko; Koperek, Oskar; von Deimling, Andreas; Streubel, Berthold; Preusser, Matthias; Lehmann, Annika; Kellner, Udo; Pauwels, Patrick; Lambin, Suzan; Dietel, Manfred; Hummel, Michael; Klauschen, Frederick; Birner, Peter; Möbs, Markus

    2016-05-01

    The mutated BRAF oncogene represents a therapeutic target in malignant melanoma. Because BRAF mutations are also involved in the pathogenesis of other human malignancies, the use of specific BRAF inhibitors might also be extended to other diseases in the future. A prerequisite for the clinical application of BRAF inhibitors is the reliable detection of activating BRAF mutations in routine histopathological samples. In a multicenter approach, we evaluated a novel and fully automated PCR-based system (Idylla) capable of detecting BRAF V600 mutations in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue within 90 minutes with high sensitivity. We analyzed a total of 436 samples with the Idylla system. Valid results were obtained in 421 cases (96.56%). Its performance was compared with conventional methods (pyrosequencing or Sanger sequencing). Concordant results were obtained in 406 cases (96.90%). Reanalysis of eight discordant samples by next-generation sequencing and/or pyrosequencing with newly extracted DNA and the BRAF RGQ Kit confirmed the Idylla result in seven cases, resulting in an overall agreement of 98.57%. In conclusion, the Idylla system is a highly reliable and sensitive platform for detection of BRAF V600 mutations in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material, providing an efficient alternative to conventional diagnostic methods, particularly for routine diagnostics laboratories with limited experience in molecular pathology. PMID:26921540

  10. Raman nanoparticle probes for antibody-based protein detection in tissues.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Barry; Dentinger, Claire; Sun, Lei; Nguyen, Lienchi; Zhang, Jingwu; Chmura, Aj; Allen, April; Chan, Selena; Knudsen, Beatrice

    2008-04-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles are emerging as a new approach for optical detection of biomolecules. In a model assay in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) prostate tissue sections, we detect prostate-specific antigen (PSA) using antibody (Ab) conjugated to composite organic-inorganic nanoparticles (COINs), and we use identical staining protocols to compare COIN-Ab and Alexa-Ab conjugates in adjacent tissue sections. Spectral analysis illustrates the fundamental difference between fluorescence and Raman signatures and accurately extracts COIN probe signals from background autofluorescence. Probe signals are used to generate images of PSA expression on the tissue, and quality measures are presented to characterize the performance of the COIN assay in comparison to Alexa. Staining accuracy (ability to correctly identify PSA expression in epithelial cells) is somewhat less for COIN than Alexa, which is attributed to an elevated false negative rate of the COIN. However, COIN provided signal intensities comparable to Alexa, and good intra-, inter-, and lot-to-lot consistencies. Overall, COIN and Alexa detection reagents possess similar performance with FFPE tissues, supporting the further development of Raman probes for this application. This manuscript contains online supplemental material at http://www.jhc.org. Please visit this article online to view these materials. PMID:18071064

  11. A Molecular Profile of Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis from Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Borczuk, Alain C.; Nasr, Samih H.; Markowitz, Glen S.; Nair, Viji; Martini, Sebastian; Eichinger, Felix; Vining, Courtenay; Berthier, Celine C.; Kretzler, Matthias; D'Agati, Vivette D.

    2010-01-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a common form of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome defined by the characteristic lesions of focal glomerular sclerosis and foot process effacement; however, its etiology and pathogenesis are unknown. We used mRNA isolated from laser-captured glomeruli from archived formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded renal biopsies, until recently considered an unsuitable source of mRNA for microarray analysis, to investigate the glomerular gene expression profiles of patients with primary classic FSGS, collapsing FSGS (COLL), minimal change disease (MCD), and normal controls (Normal). Amplified mRNA was hybridized to an Affymetrix Human X3P array. Unsupervised (unbiased) hierarchical clustering revealed two distinct clusters delineating FSGS and COLL from Normal and MCD. Class comparison analysis of FSGS + COLL combined versus Normal + MCD revealed 316 significantly differentially regulated genes (134 up-regulated, 182 down-regulated). Among the differentially regulated genes were those known to be part of the slit diaphragm junctional complex and those previously described in the dysregulated podocyte phenotype. Analysis based on Gene Ontology categories revealed overrepresented biological processes of development, differentiation and morphogenesis, cell motility and migration, cytoskeleton organization, and signal transduction. Transcription factors associated with developmental processes were heavily overrepresented, indicating the importance of reactivation of developmental programs in the pathogenesis of FSGS. Our findings reveal novel insights into the molecular pathogenesis of glomerular injury and structural degeneration in FSGS. PMID:20847290

  12. Ewing's Sarcoma: An Analysis of miRNA Expression Profiles and Target Genes in Paraffin-Embedded Primary Tumor Tissue.

    PubMed

    Parafioriti, Antonina; Bason, Caterina; Armiraglio, Elisabetta; Calciano, Lucia; Daolio, Primo Andrea; Berardocco, Martina; Di Bernardo, Andrea; Colosimo, Alessia; Luksch, Roberto; Berardi, Anna C

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanism responsible for Ewing's Sarcoma (ES) remains largely unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding RNAs able to regulate gene expression, are deregulated in tumors and may serve as a tool for diagnosis and prediction. However, the status of miRNAs in ES has not yet been thoroughly investigated. This study compared global miRNAs expression in paraffin-embedded tumor tissue samples from 20 ES patients, affected by primary untreated tumors, with miRNAs expressed in normal human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) by microarray analysis. A miRTarBase database was used to identify the predicted target genes for differentially expressed miRNAs. The miRNAs microarray analysis revealed distinct patterns of miRNAs expression between ES samples and normal MSCs. 58 of the 954 analyzed miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed in ES samples compared to MSCs. Moreover, the qRT-PCR analysis carried out on three selected miRNAs showed that miR-181b, miR-1915 and miR-1275 were significantly aberrantly regulated, confirming the microarray results. Bio-database analysis identified BCL-2 as a bona fide target gene of the miR-21, miR-181a, miR-181b, miR-29a, miR-29b, miR-497, miR-195, miR-let-7a, miR-34a and miR-1915. Using paraffin-embedded tissues from ES patients, this study has identified several potential target miRNAs and one gene that might be considered a novel critical biomarker for ES pathogenesis. PMID:27144561

  13. Molecular classification of melanomas and nevi using gene expression microarray signatures and formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Koh, Stephen S; Opel, Michael L; Wei, Jia-Perng J; Yau, Kenneth; Shah, Rashmi; Gorre, Mercedes E; Whitman, Eric; Shitabata, Paul K; Tao, Yong; Cochran, Alistair J; Abrishami, Payam; Binder, Scott W

    2009-04-01

    Melanoma may be difficult to identify histologically and relatively high rates of misdiagnosis leads to many malpractice claims. Currently separation of melanomas from nevi is based primarily on light microscopic interpretation of hematoxylin and eosin stained sections with limited assistance from immunohistology. To increase the accuracy of discrimination of benign and malignant melanocytic lesions we identified DNA microarray-derived gene expression profiles of different melanocytic lesions and evaluated the performance of these gene signatures as molecular diagnostic tools in the molecular classification and separation of melanomas and nevi. Melanocyte-derived cells were isolated by laser capture microdissection from 165 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded melanocytic nevi and melanoma tissue sections. RNA was isolated, amplified, labeled, and hybridized to a custom DNA microarray. In all 120 samples were used to identify differentially expressed genes and generate a gene expression classifier capable of distinguishing between melanomas and nevi. These classifiers were tested by the leave-one-out method and in a blinded study. RT-PCR verified the results. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering identified two distinct lesional groups that closely correlated with the histopathologically identified melanomas and nevi. Analysis of gene expression levels identified 36 significant differentially expressed genes. In comparison with nevi, melanomas expressed higher levels of genes promoting signal transduction, transcription, and cell growth. In contrast, expression of L1CAM (homolog) was reduced in melanomas relative to nevi. Genes differentially expressed in melanomas and nevi, on the basis of molecular signal, sub classified a group of unknown melanocytic lesions as melanomas or nevi and had high concordance rates with histopathology. Gene signatures established using DNA microarray gene expression profiling can distinguish melanomas from nevi, indicating the

  14. Proteomic Analysis of Stage-II Breast Cancer from Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah Al-Dhabi, Naif; Srigopalram, Srisesharam; Ilavenil, Soundharrajan; Kim, Young Ock; Agastian, Paul; Baaru, Rajasekhar; Balamurugan, Kannan; Choi, Ki Choon; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently occurring disease among women worldwide. The early stage of breast cancer identification is the key challenge in cancer control and prevention procedures. Although gene expression profiling helps to understand the molecular mechanism of diseases or disorder in the living system, gene expression pattern alone is not sufficient to predict the exact mechanisms. Current proteomics tools hold great application for analysis of cancerous conditions. Hence, the generation of differential protein expression profiles has been optimized for breast cancer and normal tissue samples in our organization. Normal and tumor tissues were collected from 20 people from a local hospital. Proteins from the diseased and normal tissues have been investigated by 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS. The peptide mass fingerprint data were fed into various public domains like Mascot, MS-Fit, and Pept-ident against Swiss-Prot protein database and the proteins of interest were identified. Some of the differentially expressed proteins identified were human annexin, glutathione S-transferase, vimentin, enolase-1, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, Cyclin A1, hormone sensitive lipase, beta catenin, and so forth. Many types of proteins were identified as fundamental steps for developing molecular markers for diagnosis of human breast cancer as well as making a new proteomic database for future research. PMID:27110560

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Stage-II Breast Cancer from Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues.

    PubMed

    Abdullah Al-Dhabi, Naif; Srigopalram, Srisesharam; Ilavenil, Soundharrajan; Kim, Young Ock; Agastian, Paul; Baaru, Rajasekhar; Balamurugan, Kannan; Choi, Ki Choon; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently occurring disease among women worldwide. The early stage of breast cancer identification is the key challenge in cancer control and prevention procedures. Although gene expression profiling helps to understand the molecular mechanism of diseases or disorder in the living system, gene expression pattern alone is not sufficient to predict the exact mechanisms. Current proteomics tools hold great application for analysis of cancerous conditions. Hence, the generation of differential protein expression profiles has been optimized for breast cancer and normal tissue samples in our organization. Normal and tumor tissues were collected from 20 people from a local hospital. Proteins from the diseased and normal tissues have been investigated by 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS. The peptide mass fingerprint data were fed into various public domains like Mascot, MS-Fit, and Pept-ident against Swiss-Prot protein database and the proteins of interest were identified. Some of the differentially expressed proteins identified were human annexin, glutathione S-transferase, vimentin, enolase-1, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, Cyclin A1, hormone sensitive lipase, beta catenin, and so forth. Many types of proteins were identified as fundamental steps for developing molecular markers for diagnosis of human breast cancer as well as making a new proteomic database for future research. PMID:27110560

  16. Determination of estrogen receptors in paraffin-embedded tissue. Techniques and the value in breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Andersen, J

    1992-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) analysis in breast cancer has been used in three clinical situations: to select patients with advanced breast cancer for hormonal therapy, as a prognostic parameter, and for selection of women with early breast cancer to adjuvant hormonal treatment. ER has traditionally been measured using labelled hormone in binding assays--often in dextran-coated charcoal assays (DCC). Monoclonal antibodies to ER has permitted development of a solid phase enzyme immunoassay (ER-EIA) used for quantitative determination of ER in tissue homogenates, and have also been used for determination of ER using an immunohistochemical assay in frozen sections (ER-ICA) or in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue (ER-PAR). A large number of studies has compared ER-EIA with ER-DCC assays. There is a good linear correlation between the two types of assay but ER-EIA measure more ER and classify a larger fraction of tumors ER-positive than conventional ER assays. Lack of clinical data makes the significance of this uncertain. Numerous studies have reported on the correlation between ER-ICA and ER-DCC or ER-EIA. There is a good correlation among the assays on classification of ER status with a median 86% concordance, but a somewhat poorer correlation between semiquantified ER of immunohistochemical assays and ER determined by the quantitative methods (median coefficient of correlation 0.67). There is a large variation in the cut-off level for definition of ER-positive in immunohistochemical assays emphasizing the need for quality control studies. The major problem involved in ER analysis in paraffin-embedded tissue is a considerable loss of immunoreactivity compared to sections from frozen tissue. This can partly be overcome by modifications of the immunohistochemical technique using enzyme pretreatment and other amplification systems, but the sensitivity of ER-PAR remains lower than ER-ICA despite these modifications, and the ER status is less reliably determined in tumors

  17. Meniscus Tissue Engineering Using a Novel Combination of Electrospun Scaffolds and Human Meniscus Cells Embedded within an Extracellular Matrix Hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jihye; Chen, Xian; Sovani, Sujata; Jin, Sungho; Grogan, Shawn P; D’Lima, Darryl D

    2015-01-01

    Meniscus injury and degeneration have been linked to the development of secondary osteoarthritis (OA). Therapies that successfully repair or replace the meniscus are therefore likely to prevent or delay OA progression. We investigated the novel approach of building layers of aligned polylactic acid (PLA) electrospun (ES) scaffolds with human meniscus cells embedded in extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogel to lead to formation of neotissues that resemble meniscus-like tissue. PLA ES scaffolds with randomly oriented or aligned fibers were seeded with human meniscus cells derived from vascular or avascular regions. Cell viability, cell morphology, and gene expression profiles were monitored via confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and real-time PCR, respectively. Seeded scaffolds were used to produce multilayered constructs and were examined via histology and immunohistochemistry. Morphology and mechanical properties of PLA scaffolds (with and without cells) were influenced by fiber direction of the scaffolds. Both PLA scaffolds supported meniscus tissue formation with increased COL1A1, SOX9, COMP, yet no difference in gene expression was found between random and aligned PLA scaffolds. Overall, ES materials, which possess mechanical strength of meniscus and can support neotissue formation, show potential for use in cell-based meniscus regeneration strategies. PMID:25640671

  18. Molecular genotyping of Echinococcus granulosus using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded preparations from human isolates in unusual tissue sites.

    PubMed

    Hizem, A; M'rad, S; Oudni-M'rad, M; Mestiri, S; Hammedi, F; Mezhoud, H; Zakhama, A; Mokni, M; Babba, H

    2016-07-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) caused by Echinococcus granulosus remains a serious problem worldwide for issues relating to public health and the economy. The most predominantly affected sites are the liver and the lungs, but other organs such as the heart, the spleen and the peritoneum can also be infected. Access to cysts from uncommon sites has limited genomic and molecular investigations. In the present study, genotypes of E. granulosus sensu lato were identified from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues (FF-PETs) implicated in human CE. Tissue samples were obtained from 57 patients with histologically confirmed CE. DNA samples were analysed using Egss 1 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) specific to the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene of E. granulosus sensu stricto. All cysts were typed as E. granulosus sensu stricto with up to 35% of the liver and 16.6% of lungs being the most frequently infected, and up to 48.4% of samples being from rare sites. No correlation was found between cyst site and either the gender or the age of patients. This study demonstrates the possibility of exploiting atypical cysts using FF-PET samples and highlights the predominance of E. granulosus sensu stricto species in the Tunisian population, even in unusual infection sites. PMID:26190231

  19. Imaging through diffusive layers using speckle pattern fractal analysis and application to embedded object detection in tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremberger, George, Jr.; Flamholz, A.; Cheung, E.; Sullivan, R.; Subramaniam, R.; Schneider, P.; Brathwaite, G.; Boteju, J.; Marchese, P.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.; Holden, Todd

    2007-09-01

    The absorption effect of the back surface boundary of a diffuse layer was studied via laser generated reflection speckle pattern. The spatial speckle intensity provided by a laser beam was measured. The speckle data were analyzed in terms of fractal dimension (computed by NIH ImageJ software via the box counting fractal method) and weak localization theory based on Mie scattering. Bar code imaging was modeled as binary absorption contrast and scanning resolution in millimeter range was achieved for diffusive layers up to thirty transport mean free path thick. Samples included alumina, porous glass and chicken tissue. Computer simulation was used to study the effect of speckle spatial distribution and observed fractal dimension differences were ascribed to variance controlled speckle sizes. Fractal dimension suppressions were observed in samples that had thickness dimensions around ten transport mean free path. Computer simulation suggested a maximum fractal dimension of about 2 and that subtracting information could lower fractal dimension. The fractal dimension was shown to be sensitive to sample thickness up to about fifteen transport mean free paths, and embedded objects which modified 20% or more of the effective thickness was shown to be detectable. The box counting fractal method was supplemented with the Higuchi data series fractal method and application to architectural distortion mammograms was demonstrated. The use of fractals in diffusive analysis would provide a simple language for a dialog between optics experts and mammography radiologists, facilitating the applications of laser diagnostics in tissues.

  20. [Detection of mixed lymphoid chimerism after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation: demonstration by interphase cytogenetics in paraffin-embedded tissue].

    PubMed

    Friedrich, T; Ott, G; Kalla, J; Helbig, W; Schwenke, H; Kubel, M; Pönisch, W; Feyer, P; Friedrich, A

    1994-01-01

    In bone marrow transplantation (BMT) the detection of residual host lymphoid or haematopoietic cells surviving conditioning therapy is because of its association to graft-versus-host disease, graft-versus-leukemia reaction, and relapse of leukemia a matter of great interest. We studied the occurrence of this mixed lymphoid chimerism (MC) in the formol-fixed lymphatic tissue of lymph nodes and spleen from 21 autopsies after allogeneic sex-mismatched BMT (5 females, 16 males, survival 5 to 1140 days after BMT). In situ hybridisation with biotinylated centromer-specific anti-X- and anti-Y-chromosome probes was performed on pepsin-digested paraffin sections. The number of double X-, single X-, and Y-chromosome bearing cells was analysed microscopically. Because of artefacts only 14 cases remained for valid investigation. MC was detected in 6 cases (5 out of 11 males 5 days to 840 days and 1 out of 3 females 76 days after BMT). MC occurred after whole body irradiation with 10 Gy (n = 5) and 7 Gy (n = 1). In 1 autopsy relapse of leukemia caused host cell infiltration. Cases with MC did not express histological signs of acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease, but 5 out of 8 with complete lymphoid chimerism did. The sensitivity of interphase cytogenetics on paraffin embedded tissue is low. PMID:7534002

  1. Prediction of Lung Cancer Histological Types by RT-qPCR Gene Expression in FFPE Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Schallheim, Jason M.; Hayes, D. Neil; Roberts, Patrick J.; Bastien, Roy R.L.; Mullins, Michael; Yin, Xiaoying; Miller, C. Ryan; Thorne, Leigh B.; Geiersbach, Katherine B.; Muldrew, Kenneth L.; Funkhouser, William K.; Fan, Cheng; Hayward, Michele C.; Bayer, Steven; Perou, Charles M.; Bernard, Philip S.

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer histologic diagnosis is clinically relevant because there are histology-specific treatment indications and contraindications. Histologic diagnosis can be challenging owing to tumor characteristics, and it has been shown to have less-than-ideal agreement among pathologists reviewing the same specimens. Microarray profiling studies using frozen specimens have shown that histologies exhibit different gene expression trends; however, frozen specimens are not amenable to routine clinical application. Herein, we developed a gene expression–based predictor of lung cancer histology for FFPE specimens, which are routinely available in clinical settings. Genes predictive of lung cancer histologies were derived from published cohorts that had been profiled by microarrays. Expression of these genes was measured by quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) in a cohort of patients with FFPE lung cancer. A histology expression predictor (HEP) was developed using RT-qPCR expression data for adenocarcinoma, carcinoid, small cell carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma. In cross-validation, the HEP exhibited mean accuracy of 84% and κ = 0.77. In separate independent validation sets, the HEP was compared with pathologist diagnoses on the same tumor block specimens, and the HEP yielded similar accuracy and precision as the pathologists. The HEP also exhibited good performance in specimens with low tumor cellularity. Therefore, RT-qPCR gene expression from FFPE specimens can be effectively used to predict lung cancer histology. PMID:23701907

  2. Assessment of Telomere Length in Archived Formalin-Fixed, Paraffinized Human Tissue Is Confounded by Chronological Age and Storage Duration.

    PubMed

    Kong, Po-Lian; Looi, Lai-Meng; Lau, Tze-Pheng; Cheah, Phaik-Leng

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres shorten with physiological aging but undergo substantial restoration during cancer immortalization. Increasingly, cancer studies utilize the archive of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues in diagnostic pathology departments. Conceptually, such studies would be confounded by physiological telomere attrition and loss of DNA integrity from prolonged tissue storage. Our study aimed to investigate these two confounding factors. 145 FFPE tissues of surgically-resected, non-diseased appendixes were retrieved from our pathology archive, from years 2008 to 2014. Cases from 2013 to 2014 were categorized by patient chronological age (0-20 years, 21-40 years, 41-60 years, > 60 years). Telomere lengths of age categories were depicted by telomere/chromosome 2 centromere intensity ratio (TCR) revealed by quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization. Material from individuals aged 0-20 years from years 2013/2014, 2011/2012, 2009/2010, and 2008 were compared for storage effect. Telomere integrity was assessed by telomere fluorescence intensity (TFI). Epithelial TCRs (mean ± SD) for the respective age groups were 4.84 ± 2.08, 3.64 ± 1.21, 2.03 ± 0.37, and 1.93 ± 0.45, whereas corresponding stromal TCRs were 5.16 ± 2.55, 3.84 ± 1.36, 2.49 ± 1.20, and 2.93 ± 1.24. A trend of inverse correlation with age in both epithelial and stromal tissues is supported by r = -0.69, p < 0.001 and r = -0.42, p < 0.001 respectively. Epithelial TFIs (mean ± SD) of years 2013/2014, 2011/2012, 2009/2010 and 2008 were 852.60 ± 432.46, 353.04 ± 127.12, 209.24 ± 55.57 and 429.22 ± 188.75 respectively. Generally, TFIs reduced with storage duration (r = -0.42, p < 0.001). Our findings agree that age-related telomere attrition occurs in normal somatic tissues, and suggest that an age-based reference can be established for telomere studies on FFPE tissues. We also showed that FFPE tissues archived beyond 2 years are suboptimal for telomere analysis. PMID:27598341

  3. Evaluation of extraction methods from paraffin wax embedded tissues for PCR amplification of human and viral DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chan, P; Chan, D; To, K; Yu, M; Cheung, J; Cheng, A

    2001-01-01

    Aim—To evaluate the efficiency of phenol/chloroform, microwave, and Qiagen spin column based DNA extractions from paraffin wax embedded tissue for use in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In addition, to assess the reliability of amplifying a housekeeping gene to indicate successful viral DNA extraction. Methods—DNA samples extracted from 20 blocks of cervical carcinoma tissues using the three methods were subjected to PCRs targeting 509 bp and 355 bp of the ß globin gene, and 450 bp and 150 bp of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA. Results—Microwave extraction showed the highest positive rate for ß globin PCR, whereas the spin column method was the most efficient for HPV DNA extraction. When the 509 bp ß globin and 450 bp HPV PCR results were correlated, two of 10, eight of 12, and nine of 10 ß globin positive extractions prepared by means of the phenol/chloroform, microwave, and spin column methods, respectively, yielded HPV DNA of the expected size. For the ß globin negative samples, HPV was detected in three of 10, two of eight, and four of 10 samples. Conclusions—HPV DNA extraction was most efficient using the Qiagen spin column and had the highest positive predictive value when a housekeeping gene was used as an indicator of successful viral DNA extraction; the phenol/chloroform method was the least efficient. The potential drawbacks of some extraction methods when using a human housekeeping gene to assess the quality of viral DNA extraction need to be considered. Key Words: cervical cancer • DNA extraction • polymerase chain reaction PMID:11328843

  4. Application of in-situ hybridization for the detection and identification of avian malaria parasites in paraffin wax-embedded tissues from captive penguins

    PubMed Central

    Dinhopl, Nora; Mostegl, Meike M.; Richter, Barbara; Nedorost, Nora; Maderner, Anton; Fragner, Karin; Weissenböck, Herbert

    2011-01-01

    In captive penguins, avian malaria due to Plasmodium parasites is a well-recognized disease problem as these protozoa may cause severe losses among valuable collections of zoo birds. In blood films from naturally infected birds, identification and differentiation of malaria parasites based on morphological criteria are difficult because parasitaemia is frequently light and blood stages, which are necessary for identification of parasites, are often absent. Post-mortem diagnosis by histological examination of tissue samples is sometimes inconclusive due to the difficulties in differentiating protozoal tissue stages from fragmented nuclei in necrotic tissue. The diagnosis of avian malaria would be facilitated by a technique with the ability to specifically identify developmental stages of Plasmodium in tissue samples. Thus, a chromogenic in-situ hybridization (ISH) procedure with a digoxigenin-labelled probe, targeting a fragment of the 18S rRNA, was developed for the detection of Plasmodium parasites in paraffin wax-embedded tissues. This method was validated in comparison with traditional techniques (histology, polymerase chain reaction), on various tissues from 48 captive penguins that died at the zoological garden Schönbrunn, Vienna, Austria. Meronts of Plasmodium gave clear signals and were easily identified using ISH. Potential cross-reactivity of the probe was ruled out by the negative outcome of the ISH against a number of protozoa and fungi. Thus, ISH proved to be a powerful, specific and sensitive tool for unambiguous detection of Plasmodium parasites in paraffin wax-embedded tissue samples. PMID:21711191

  5. Mass-spectrometry analysis of histone post-translational modifications in pathology tissue using the PAT-H-MS approach.

    PubMed

    Noberini, Roberta; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Minucci, Saverio; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2016-06-01

    Aberrant histone post-translational modifications (hPTMs) have been implicated with various pathologies, including cancer, and may represent useful epigenetic biomarkers. The data described here provide a mass spectrometry-based quantitative analysis of hPTMs from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, from which histones were extracted through the recently developed PAT-H-MS method. First, we analyzed FFPE samples from mouse spleen and liver or human breast cancer up to six years old, together with their corresponding fresh frozen tissue. We then combined the PAT-H-MS approach with a histone-focused version of the super-SILAC strategy-using a mix of histones from four breast cancer cell lines as a spike-in standard- to accurately quantify hPTMs from breast cancer specimens belonging to different subtypes. The data, which are associated with a recent publication (Pathology tissue-quantitative mass spectrometry analysis to profile histone post-translational modification patterns in patient samples (Noberini, 2015) [1]), are deposited at the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD002669. PMID:27408908

  6. The effect of deoxyribonucleic acid extraction methods from lymphoid tissue on the purity, content, and amplifying ability

    PubMed Central

    Ayatollahi, Hossein; Sadeghian, Mohammad Hadi; Keramati, Mohammad Reza; Ayatollahi, Ali; Shajiei, Arezoo; Sheikhi, Maryam; Bakhshi, Samane

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, definitive diagnosis of numerous diseases is based on the genetic and molecular findings. Therefore, preparation of fundamental materials for these evaluations is necessary. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the first material for the molecular pathology and genetic analysis, and better results need more pure DNA. Furthermore, higher concentration of achieved DNA causes better results and higher amplifying ability for subsequent steps. We aim to evaluate five DNA extraction methods to compare DNA intimacy including purity, concentration, and amplifying ability with each other. Materials and Methods: The lymphoid tissue DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue through five different methods including phenol-chloroform as the reference method, DNA isolation kit (QIAamp DNA FFPE Tissue Kit, Qiagen, Germany), proteinase K and xylol extraction and heat alkaline plus mineral oil extraction as authorship innovative method. Finally, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR method were assessed to compare each following method consider to DNA purity and its concentration. Results: Among five different applied methods, the highest mean of DNA purity was related to heat alkaline method. Moreover, the highest mean of DNA concentration was related to heat alkaline plus mineral oil. Furthermore, the best result in quantitative PCR was in proteinase K method that had the lowest cycle threshold averages among the other extraction methods. Conclusion: We concluded that our innovative method for DNA extraction (heat alkaline plus mineral oil) achieved high DNA purity and concentration.

  7. Identification of BRCA1 Deficiency Using Multi-Analyte Estimation of BRCA1 and Its Repressors in FFPE Tumor Samples from Patients with Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Korlimarla, Aruna; Prabhu, Jyothi S.; Remacle, Jose; Rajarajan, Savitha; Raja, Uma; C. E., Anupama; Srinath, B. S.; Manjunath, Suraj; K. S., Gopinath; Correa, Marjorrie; M. S. N., Prasad; Sridhar, T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Apart from germ-line BRCA1-mutated breast cancers, a significant proportion of women with sporadic triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) sub-type are known to harbour varying levels of BRCA1-dysfuction. There is currently no established diagnostic method to identify these patients. Methods The analysis was performed on 183 primary breast cancer tumor specimens from our longitudinal case-series archived as formalin-fixed-paraffin-embedded (FFPE) blocks comprising 71 TNBCs and 112 Hormone receptor positive HER2 negative (HR+HER2-) tumors. Transcript levels of BRCA1 and two of its repressors ID4 and microRNA182 were determined by TaqMan quantitative PCR. BRCA1 protein was detected immunohistochemically with the MS110 antibody. Results The representation of BRCA1 and its repressor ID4 as a ratio led to improved separation of TNBCs from HR+HER2- compared to either measure by itself. We then dichotomised the continuous distribution of each of the three measurements (Protein, MIRNA and transcript:repressor ratio) into categories of deficient (0) and adequate (1). A composite BRCA1 Deficiency Score (BDS) was computed by the addition of the score for all three measures. Samples deficient on 2 or more measures were deemed to be BRCA1 deficient; and 40% of all TNBCs met this criterion. Conclusion We propose here a simple multi-level assay of BRCA1 deficiency using the BRCA1:ID4 ratio as a critical parameter that can be performed on FFPE samples in clinical laboratories by the estimation of only 3 bio-markers. The ease of testing will hopefully encourage adoption and clinical validation. PMID:27077368

  8. Independent component analysis for three-dimensional optical imaging and localization of a fluorescent contrast agent target embedded in a slab of ex vivo human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrubaiee, M.; Xu, M.; Gayen, S. K.; Alfano, R. R.

    2005-08-01

    An innovative approach for three-dimensional localization and characterization of a fluorescent target embedded in a turbid medium is presented. The target was a ~4-mm diameter glass sphere with a solution of indocyanine green placed within a 50-mm thick tissuelike phantom with mean free path of ~1-mm at 784-nm and a ~ 26-mm thick ex vivo breast tissue slab. The experimental approach uses a multi-source illumination, and a multi-detector signal acquisition scheme. An analysis scheme based on the independent component analysis from information theory is used for target localization and characterization. Independent component analysis of the perturbation in the spatial intensity distribution of the fluorescent signal measured on the exit plane of the turbid medium locates the embedded objects. The location and size, of the embedded objects are obtained from a Green's function analysis and back-projection Fourier transform of the retrieved independent components.

  9. Digital Sorting of Pure Cell Populations Enables Unambiguous Genetic Analysis of Heterogeneous Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tumors by Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Bolognesi, Chiara; Forcato, Claudio; Buson, Genny; Fontana, Francesca; Mangano, Chiara; Doffini, Anna; Sero, Valeria; Lanzellotto, Rossana; Signorini, Giulio; Calanca, Alex; Sergio, Maximilian; Romano, Rita; Gianni, Stefano; Medoro, Gianni; Giorgini, Giuseppe; Morreau, Hans; Barberis, Massimo; Corver, Willem E.; Manaresi, Nicolò

    2016-01-01

    Precision medicine in oncology requires an accurate characterization of a tumor molecular profile for patient stratification. Though targeted deep sequencing is an effective tool to detect the presence of somatic sequence variants, a significant number of patient specimens do not meet the requirements needed for routine clinical application. Analysis is hindered by contamination of normal cells and inherent tumor heterogeneity, compounded with challenges of dealing with minute amounts of tissue and DNA damages common in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens. Here we present an innovative workflow using DEPArray™ system, a microchip-based digital sorter to achieve 100%-pure, homogenous subpopulations of cells from FFPE samples. Cells are distinguished by fluorescently labeled antibodies and DNA content. The ability to address tumor heterogeneity enables unambiguous determination of true-positive sequence variants, loss-of-heterozygosity as well as copy number variants. The proposed strategy overcomes the inherent trade-offs made between sensitivity and specificity in detecting genetic variants from a mixed population, thus rescuing for analysis even the smaller clinical samples with low tumor cellularity. PMID:26864208

  10. Use of softening agents to improve the production of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of nail tissue: an assessment.

    PubMed

    Orchard, G E; Torres, J; Sounthararajah, R

    2008-01-01

    The use of tissue softeners to enhance the quality of tissue sections of heavily keratotic tissue is not widely published. There are very few indicators in the scientific literature that attempt to compare and contrast the benefits and disadvantages of such techniques, as most are passed down through word of mouth rather than through published data. This study attempts to present a preliminary evaluation of several methods employing tissue softeners to facilitate the preparation of reproducible, good-quality formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of nail tissue. A standard 10-minute surface application of each softener is employed for all paraffin-embedded tissue in order to ensure consistency. The results show that the use of Veet (hair remover), Fairy Liquid or fabric conditioner provides the most beneficial results. Thus, widely available products can be used in preference to specific commercially produced reagents that have no clear benefits and can cost considerably more to purchase. This study will form the basis of a more in-depth evaluation of the most beneficial softeners, in an attempt to determine optimal parameters for their use in routine histopathology laboratories. PMID:19055107

  11. A Single Simple Procedure for Dewaxing, Hydration and Heat-Induced Epitope Retrieval (HIER) for Immunohistochemistry in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, I.M.S.; Dimke, H.

    2015-01-01

    Heat-induced epitope retrieval (HIER) is widely used for immunohistochemistry on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue and includes temperatures well above the melting point of paraffin. We therefore tested whether traditional xylene-based removal of paraffin is required on sections from paraffin-embedded tissue, when HIER is performed by vigorous boiling in 10 mM Tris/0.5 mM EGTA-buffer (pH=9). Immunohistochemical results using HIER with or without prior dewaxing in xylene were evaluated using 7 primary antibodies targeting proteins located in the cytosol, intracellular vesicles and plasma membrane. No effect of omitting prior dewaxing was observed on staining pattern. Semiquantitative analysis did not show HIER to influence the intensity of labelling consistently. Consequently, quantification of immune labelling intensity using fluorescent secondary antibodies was performed at 5 dilutions of primary antibody with and without prior dewaxing in xylene. No effect of omitting prior dewaxing on signal intensity was detectable indicating similar immunoreactivity in dewaxed and non-dewaxed sections. The intensity of staining the nucleus with the DNA-stain ToPro3 was similarly unaffected by omission of dewaxing in xylene. In conclusion, the HIER procedure described and tested can be used as a single procedure enabling dewaxing, hydration and epitope retrieval for immunohistochemistry in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. PMID:26708177

  12. A single simple procedure for dewaxing, hydration and heat-induced epitope retrieval (HIER) for immunohistochemistry in formalin fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, I M S; Dimke, H; Frische, S

    2015-01-01

    Heat-induced epitope retrieval (HIER) is widely used for immunohistochemistry on formalin fixed paraffin-embedded tissue and includes temperatures well above the melting point of paraffin. We therefore tested whether traditional xylene-based removal of paraffin is required on sections from paraffin-embedded tissue, when HIER is performed by vigorous boiling in 10 mM Tris/0.5 mM EGTA-buffer (pH=9). Immunohistochemical results using HIER with or without prior dewaxing in xylene were evaluated using 7 primary antibodies targeting proteins located in the cytosol, intracellular vesicles and plasma membrane. No effect of omitting prior dewaxing was observed on staining pattern. Semiquantitative analysis did not show HIER to influence the intensity of labelling consistently. Consequently, quantification of immune labelling intensity using fluorescent secondary antibodies was performed at 5 dilutions of primary antibody with and without prior dewaxing in xylene. No effect of omitting prior dewaxing on signal intensity was detectable indicating similar immunoreactivity in dewaxed and non-dewaxed sections. The intensity of staining the nucleus with the DNA-stain ToPro3 was similarly unaffected by omission of dewaxing in xylene. In conclusion, the HIER procedure described and tested can be used as a single procedure enabling dewaxing, hydration and epitope retrieval for immunohistochemistry in formalin fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. PMID:26708177

  13. In Situ Detection of Bacteria within Paraffin-embedded Tissues Using a Digoxin-labeled DNA Probe Targeting 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun Sik; Kim, Yong Cheol; Baek, Keum Jin; Choi, Youngnim

    2015-01-01

    The presence of bacteria within the pocket epithelium and underlying connective tissue in gingival biopsies from patients with periodontitis has been reported using various methods, including electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry or immunofluorescence using bacteria-specific antibodies, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using a fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide probe. Nevertheless, these methods are not widely used due to technical limitation or difficulties. Here a method to localize bacteria within paraffin-embedded tissues using DIG-labeled DNA probes has been introduced. The paraffin-embedded tissues are the most common form of biopsy tissues available from pathology banks. Bacteria can be detected either in a species-specific or universal manner. Bacterial signals are detected as either discrete forms (coccus, rod, fusiform, and hairy form) of bacteria or dispersed forms. The technique allows other histological information to be obtained: the epithelia, connective tissue, inflammatory infiltrates, and blood vessels are well distinguished. This method can be used to study the role of bacteria in various diseases, such as periodontitis, cancers, and inflammatory immune diseases. PMID:26066790

  14. Beginning of personalized medicine in Panama: Molecular and pathological characteristics of gastrointestinal stromal tumors from archival paraffin-embedded tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Yaxelis; Singh, Carlos; Castillo Mewa, Juan; Fonseca, Evelise; Smith, Rebecca; Pascale, Juan M.

    2011-01-01

    This is the first study from Central America to analyze genetic mutations and histopathological features associated with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Mutations found in the tyrosine kinase membrane receptors c-kit and pdgfra are associated with clinical and pathological characteristics of GIST. New drugs that inhibit the expression of these oncogenes at the molecular level substantially improve the quality of life for patients with this tumor. It is therefore essential for patient care in Panama that genetic analysis of GIST tumors continues to develop from the pilot study presented herein into routine clinical use. This study evaluated 39 cases of GIST in Panama, using samples archived at the Instituto Oncológico Nacional from 1994 to 2004. DNA from paraffin‑embedded tumor tissues was isolated and amplified for the exons of c-kit and pdgfra associated with a high frequency of mutations. Direct PCR sequencing of specific exons was performed, and those with different alleles were cloned and re-sequenced. Amino acid sequences were inferred from DNA and aligned to Genbank reference sequences to determine the position and type of mutation. The highest frequency of mutations was found in exon 11 of the c-kit gene (70%). Mutations found in this exon were heterogeneous, while only one type of mutation (p.A502_Y503dup) was observed in c-kit exon 9. Mutations in the pdgfra gene constituted several substitutions, with the deletion p.D842V being observed most frequently. The observed GIST-associated mutations were previously described. Four patients with mutations associated with familial GIST were also found. The majority (66%) of patients with mutations in exon 11 (residues 550-591) were considered to be at high risk and 75% of patients with mutations specifically within residues 556-560 (exon 11) were considered to have high-risk GIST. This is the first molecular study of GIST in Central America. It was performed to gain a better understanding of the cancer

  15. The AMeX method: a multipurpose tissue-processing and paraffin-embedding method. II. Extraction of spooled DNA and its application to Southern blot hybridization analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Y.; Mukai, K.; Matsuno, Y.; Furuya, S.; Kagami, Y.; Miwa, M.; Shimosato, Y.

    1990-01-01

    In our previous report, we described a new fixation and paraffin-embedding method (the AMeX method) that preserves many of the antigens that are normally destroyed by routine formalin fixation. The current study was conducted to examine the preservation of high-molecular-weight DNA in tissues processed by this method. DNA was extracted from AMeX-processed tissue sections after deparaffinization by the same method as that used to extract DNA from fresh tissues. The total amounts of DNA extracted from 10 mg each in wet weight of AMeX-processed and fresh mouse liver tissues were identical. In tissues of malignant lymphoma, the total amount of spooled DNA extracted from 50 sections, each 20 microns thick, was about 8 micrograms/mm2. The electrophoretic pattern of DNA digested with restriction endonucleases on agarose gel from AMeX-processed tissue sections did not differ from that of fresh materials. Southern blot hybridization analysis also revealed that the mobility of specific DNA fragments was identical for AMeX-processed and fresh tissues. The AMeX method was thus proved to be a versatile multipurpose tissue-processing procedure, which is expected to provide important information regarding the correlation between morphology, phenotypic expression, and gene alteration. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5A Figure 5B PMID:2407122

  16. Investigation of false positives associated with loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays for detection of Toxoplasma gondii in archived tissue samples of captive felids.

    PubMed

    Suleman, Essa; Mtshali, Moses Sibusiso; Lane, Emily

    2016-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a ubiquitous protozoan parasite that infects humans and many different animals, including felids. Many molecular and serologic tests have been developed for detection of T. gondii in a wide range of hosts. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a field-friendly technique that lacks the practical drawbacks of other molecular and serologic tests, and LAMP assays have been successfully developed for detection of T. gondii in fresh tissue samples. In the current study, both a previously published and a de-novo designed LAMP assay were compared to a quantitative real-time (q)PCR assay, for the detection of T. gondii in archived formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples from captive wildlife. The LAMP assays produced conflicting results, generating both false positives and false negatives. Furthermore, the LAMP assays were unable to positively identify samples with low levels of parasites as determined by qPCR and histopathology. Therefore, these LAMP assays may not be the most suitable assays for detection of T. gondii in archived FFPE and frozen tissue samples. PMID:27449130

  17. A microwave antigen retrieval method using two heating steps for enhanced immunostaining on aldehyde-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ling; Cong, Jing; Zhang, Jie; Tian, Ying-Ying; Zhai, Xiao-Yue

    2016-06-01

    Antigen retrieval is an immunohistochemical procedure that results in better exposure of target antigens in aldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections to antibodies. However, the commercially recommended or conventional protocols for antigen retrieval do not always succeed in expressing the target antigen. Here, an improved method was developed for antigen retrieval from aldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded histological sections. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), tight junction proteins Claudin-2 and Claudin-7, and water channel aquaporins in kidney tissue were selected as test antigens. Typically, PCNA and Claudin-2 and Claudin-7 show negative, weak, or nonspecific immunoreactions with conventional antigen retrieval methods using microwave heating. In the present study, microwave heating was performed twice with an interval of 30 min between the two steps to allow the buffer solution to cool. Sodium citrate buffer (10 mM sodium citrate, pH 6.0) was used for PCNA, and Tris-EDTA buffer (10 mM Tris, 1 mM EDTA, pH 9.0) was used for the Claudins. Compared with conventionally prepared tissues, the tissues exhibited both enhanced and specific immunostaining, and well-preserved morphology. In conclusion, the conventional protocol could be supplemented with a second microwave heating step to improve the expression of antigens that do not respond well to the conventional method. PMID:27002723

  18. In situ hybridisation for the detection of Leishmania species in paraffin wax-embedded canine tissues using a digoxigenin-labelled oligonucleotide probe.

    PubMed

    Dinhopl, N; Mostegl, M M; Richter, B; Nedorost, N; Maderner, A; Fragner, K; Weissenböck, H

    2011-11-12

    The diagnosis of canine leishmaniosis (CanL) is currently predominantly achieved by cytological or histological identification of amastigotes in biopsy samples, demonstration of specific anti-Leishmania antibodies and PCR-based approaches. All these methods have the advantage of being sensitive and more or less specific; nevertheless, most of them also have disadvantages. A chromogenic in situ hybridisation (ISH) procedure with a digoxigenin-labelled probe, targeting a fragment of the 5.8S rRNA was developed for the detection of all species of Leishmania parasites in routinely paraffin wax-embedded canine tissues. This method was validated in comparison with traditional techniques (histology, PCR), on various tissues from three dogs with histological changes consistent with a florid leishmaniosis. Amastigote forms of Leishmania gave clear signals and were easily identified using ISH. Various tissues from 10 additional dogs with clinical suspicion or/and a positive serological test but without histological presence of amastigotes did not show any ISH signals. Potential cross-reactivity of the probe was ruled out by negative outcome of the ISH against selected protozoa (including the related Trypanosoma cruzi) and fungi. Thus, ISH proved to be a powerful tool for unambiguous detection of Leishmania parasites in paraffin wax-embedded tissues. PMID:21921059

  19. High stability of microRNAs in tissue samples of compromised quality.

    PubMed

    Peiró-Chova, Lorena; Peña-Chilet, María; López-Guerrero, José Antonio; García-Giménez, José Luis; Alonso-Yuste, Elisa; Burgues, Octavio; Lluch, Ana; Ferrer-Lozano, Jaime; Ribas, Gloria

    2013-12-01

    Degradation of tissue samples limits performing RNA-based molecular studies, but little is known about the potential usefulness of samples of compromised quality for studies focused on miRNAs. In this work we analyze a series of cryopreserved tissue samples (n = 14), frozen samples that underwent a severe thawing process (n = 10), and their paired formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples (n = 24) from patients with breast cancer obtained during primary surgical resection and collected in 2011. Quality and integrity analyses of the total and small fraction of RNA were carried out. Recovery of specific RNA molecules (miRNAs hsa-miR-21, hsa-miR-125b, and hsa-miR-191; snoRNA RNU6B; and mRNAs GAPDH and HPRT1) was also analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. Our results suggest that visualisation of the small RNA electrophoretic profiles obtained using the Agilent 2100 bioanalyzer makes it possible to differentiate between the three groups of samples (optimally frozen, thawed, and FFPE). We demonstrate that specific miRNA molecules can be similarly recovered from different tissue sample sources, which supports their high degree of stability. We conclude that miRNAs are robustly detected irrespective of the quality of the tissue sample. In this regard, a word of caution should be raised before degraded samples are discarded: although prior quality assessment of the biological material to be analyzed is recommended, our work demonstrates that degraded tissue samples are also suitable for miRNA studies. PMID:24197449

  20. Babesia gibsoni: detection in blood smears and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues using deoxyribonucleic acid in situ hybridization analysis.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Nakamura, Kensuke; Sasaki, Noboru; Murakami, Masahiro; Rajapakshage, Bandula Kumara Wickramasekara; Ohta, Hiroshi; Yamato, Osamu; Maede, Yoshimitsu; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we attempted to detect Babesia gibsoni in blood smears and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues obtained from B. gibsoni-infected dogs using in situ hybridization. Using a digoxigenin-conjugated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probe, both intraerythrocytic and exoerythrocytic parasites in the culture could be specifically stained in blood smears fixed with 4% phosphate-buffered paraformaldehyde. This indicated that genomic DNA extracted from the parasites could be detected using in situ hybridization. Moreover, the parasite could be specifically stained in paraffin-embedded spleen, lymph node, and kidney sections using in situ hybridization. Infected erythrocytes in blood vessels in the spleen and kidney, hemosiderin-laden macrophages in the spleen, and phagocytized erythrocytes, which seemed to be infected with the parasites, in lymph nodes were also specifically stained. This suggests that in situ hybridization can be utilized to investigate both the life cycle of B. gibsoni and the pathological condition of canine babesiosis. PMID:20637756

  1. Development and validation of an immunohistochemical method for rapid diagnosis of swine erysipelas in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Opriessnig, Tanja; Bender, Joseph S; Halbur, Patrick G

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to develop an immunohistochemical (IHC) assay for rapid detection of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae. Serotypes 1a, 1b, and 2 are most frequently associated with clinical disease in pigs. Antiserum against serotypes 1a, 1b, and 2 was produced in rabbits, pooled, and applied to formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections of pigs (lungs, heart, spleen, and skin). The results obtained with the IHC assay were compared with direct culture on tissue samples from experimentally inoculated pigs either treated (n = 6) with antibiotics or untreated (n = 8) as well as on samples from field cases (n = 170) submitted to the Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at Iowa State University. The agreement between direct culture and IHC staining was found to be substantial. The results of the present study indicate that the IHC assay is highly sensitive and specific in detecting E. rhusiopathiae antigen in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. Results indicated that the IHC is particularly useful in cases in which pigs had been treated with antibiotics prior to submission and in which direct cultures of organs were negative. In addition, the IHC was found to be useful for detection of E. rhusiopathiae antigen in skin lesions, which are often culture negative. PMID:20093690

  2. Detection of Clonal T-Cell Receptor γ Gene Rearrangements in Paraffin-Embedded Tissue by Polymerase Chain Reaction and Nonradioactive Single-Strand Conformational Polymorphism Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Signoretti, Sabina; Murphy, Michael; Cangi, Maria Giulia; Puddu, Pietro; Kadin, Marshall E.; Loda, Massimo

    1999-01-01

    The diagnosis of T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders, which frequently involve the skin and other extranodal sites, is often problematic because of the difficulty in establishing clonality in paraffin-embedded tissue. To this end, we developed a simple, nonradioactive method to detect T-cell receptor γ (TCR-γ) gene rearrangements by polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) in paraffin-embedded tissue. Jurkat and HSB-2 cell lines and peripheral blood samples from normal individuals were used as monoclonal and polyclonal controls, respectively. DNA was extracted from 24 biopsies of T-cell lymphomas, 12 biopsies of reactive lymphoid infiltrates, and 2 biopsies of primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas. Vγ1–8, Vγ9, Vγ10, Vγ11, and Jγ1/Jγ2 consensus primers were used for TCR-γ gene rearrangement amplification and PCR products were analyzed by nonradioactive SSCP. Monoclonal controls yielded a well-defined banded pattern, whereas all polyclonal T-cell controls showed a reproducible pattern of smears. We detected monoclonality in 20/21 (95%) T-cell lymphoma cases, whereas no dominant T-cell clones were found in any of the reactive lymphoid infiltrates or B-cell lymphomas. Sensitivity of 1–5% was demonstrated by serially diluting Jurkat cells in mononuclear blood cells from normal individuals. We conclude that nonradioactive PCR-SSCP for TCR-γ gene rearrangement analysis is a useful adjunct to routine histological and immunophenotypic methods in the diagnosis of T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders in paraffin-embedded tissue. PMID:9916920

  3. Genetic Characterization of Echinococcus granulosus from a Large Number of Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Samples of Human Isolates in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Sima; Torbaghan, Shams Shariat; Dabiri, Shahriar; Babaei, Zahra; Mohammadi, Mohammad Ali; Sharbatkhori, Mitra; Harandi, Majid Fasihi

    2015-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE), caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus, presents an important medical and veterinary problem globally, including that in Iran. Different genotypes of E. granulosus have been reported from human isolates worldwide. This study identifies the genotype of the parasite responsible for human hydatidosis in three provinces of Iran using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples. In this study, 200 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples from human CE cases were collected from Alborz, Tehran, and Kerman provinces. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of the partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene were performed for genetic characterization of the samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the isolates from this study and reference sequences of different genotypes was done using a maximum likelihood method. In total, 54.4%, 0.8%, 1%, and 40.8% of the samples were identified as the G1, G2, G3, and G6 genotypes, respectively. The findings of the current study confirm the G1 genotype (sheep strain) to be the most prevalent genotype involved in human CE cases in Iran and indicates the high prevalence of the G6 genotype with a high infectivity for humans. Furthermore, this study illustrates the first documented human CE case in Iran infected with the G2 genotype. PMID:25535316

  4. A comparison of two methods for colorimetric in situ hybridization using paraffin-embedded tissue sections and digoxigenin-labeled hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Marcino, Joe

    2013-06-01

    Two methods for colorimetric in situ DNA probe hybridization (CISH) assays on paraffin-embedded tissue sections were compared. The heated method used heat (90-100°C) to denature DNA in the sample prior to probe hybridization, while the unheated method used a standard hybridization temperature of 42°C. Both procedures were tested on tissue samples that harbored the mollusk protozoan pathogens Perkinsus marinus, P. chesapeaki, or Haplosporidium nelsoni, the protozoan and bacterial fish pathogens Myxobolus cerebralis (myxosporidean) or Renibacterium salmoninarum (bacterial), or the crab viral pathogen Callinectes sapidus reovirus. Samples were fixed in either formalin or Davidson's fixative and embedded in paraffin for histological examination. The heated method is labor intensive and highly prone to human error, while the unheated method is less labor intensive and can be completed in a shorter period of time. Both methods yielded similar hybridization results. The use of complex and expensive prehybridization buffers did not improve the performances of the tested CISH assays. Prehybridization heat denaturation of DNA in assayed samples increased both assay duration and loss of samples but did not improve hybridization signals. PMID:23697605

  5. Novel enzyme immunoassay and optimized DNA extraction for the detection of polymerase-chain-reaction-amplified viral DNA from paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Merkelbach, S.; Gehlen, J.; Handt, S.; Füzesi, L.

    1997-01-01

    Four different DNA extraction methods were compared to determine their ability to provide DNA for amplification of viral sequences from paraffin-embedded human tissue samples by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The suitability of extraction methods was assessed using parameters like DNA yield, length of recovered DNA fragments, and duration. Furthermore, the efficiency of amplifying a human single-copy gene, the beta-globin gene, from DNA samples was tested. The best preservation of DNA molecules could be achieved by binding the DNA onto a silica column before further purification. Viral DNA sequences could be amplified by PCR in DNA extracted from routinely processed paraffin blocks from cases with clinically or morphologically suspected cytomegalovirus or Epstein-Barr virus infections. The PCR products were specified by a novel liquid hybridization assay called PCR-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Using this assay, the time-consuming Southern hybridization could be replaced and the time requirement for the detection of PCR products could be reduced from 1 day to 4 hours. The assay system described here represents a reliable, sensitive, and specific method for the detection of viral DNA from paraffin-embedded tissue samples. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9137080

  6. Multilabel immunofluorescence and antigen reprobing on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections: novel applications for precision pathology diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jie; Thoeni, Cornelia; Muise, Aleixo; Yeger, Herman; Cutz, Ernest

    2016-06-01

    We report new methods for multilabel immunofluorescence (MIF) and reprobing of antigen epitopes on the same formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) sections. The MIF method includes an antigen-retrieval step followed by multilabel immunostaining and examination by confocal microscopy. As examples, we illustrate epitopes localized to the apical and basolateral membranes, and the cytoplasm of enterocytes of normal small intestine and in cases of congenital enteropathies (microvillous inclusion disease and congenital tufting enteropathy). We also demonstrate localization of the bile salt excretion pump protein (BSEP) in bile canalicular membrane of normal hepatocytes and in cases of primary sclerosing cholangitis. To demonstrate colocalization of cytoplasmic and nuclear epitopes we analyzed normal control and hyperplastic pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNEC) and neuroepithelial bodies (NEBs), presumed airway sensors in the lungs of infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). As cytoplasmic markers we used anti-bombesin or anti-synaptic vesicle protein 2 (SV2) antibody, respectively, and for nuclear localization, antibodies against neurogenic genes mammalian achaete-scute homolog (Mash1) and prospero homeobox 1 (Prox1), essential for NEB cells differentiation and maturation, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) a downstream modulator of hypoxia response and a proliferation marker Ki67. The reprobing method consisted of removal of the previously immunolabeled target and immunostaining with different antibodies, facilitating colocalization of enterocyte brush border epitopes as well as HIF1α, Mash1 and Prox1 in PNEC/NEB PNEC and NEBs. As these methods are suitable for routine FFPE pathology samples from various tissues, allowing visualization of multiple epitopes in the same cells/sections with superior contrast and resolution, they are suitable for a wide range of applications in diagnostic pathology and may be particularly well suited for precision medicine

  7. Retrospective molecular detection of Transthyretin Met 111 mutation in a Danish kindred with familial amyloid cardiomyopathy, using DNA from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Nordvåg, B Y; Ranløv, I; Riise, H M; Husby, G; el-Gewely, M R

    1993-10-01

    Severe familial amyloid cardiomyopathy (FAC) in a Danish kindred is associated with a specific mutation (Met for Leu 111) in the transthyretin (TTR) gene. The mutation causes the loss of a DdeI restriction site in the gene, allowing molecular diagnostic studies. We studied formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues, up to 39 years old, from 29 family members of this kindred. DNA was partially purified from deparaffinized tissue sections and a DNA sequence of the TTR gene flanking the mutation site was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), followed by restriction enzyme analysis. Amplified DNA was obtained from tissues representing 23 of the 29 persons. Ten out of the 23 family members were found to carry the TTR Met 111 mutation, whereas 13 were not affected. The results were consistent with known clinical data and with corresponding serum TTR examinations. This retrospective study shows that archival tissues can be used to confirm the diagnosis and disease pattern in members of families affected by hereditary diseases. PMID:8406434

  8. Immunohistochemical identification of Renibacterium salmoninarum by monoclonal antibodies in paraffin-embedded tissues of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.), using paired immunoenzyme and paired immunofluorescence techniques.

    PubMed

    Evensen, O; Dale, O B; Nilsen, A

    1994-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum was identified in situ by immunoenzymatic and immunofluorescence techniques in paraffin-embedded tissue specimens collected during a natural outbreak of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) and from an experimental infection in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 4D3 and 2G5 were used in this study, both specific for the 57-58-kD outer membrane protein (p57) of the bacterium. Both MAbs revealed positive staining in ethanol-fixed tissue specimens, but only the epitope identified by MAb 4D3 was formalin resistant. Pretreatment with trypsin did not reestablish the antigenicity for the epitope identified by Mab 2G5. Paired immunoenzymatic staining for identification of the bacterium in sequential incubation steps on ethanol-fixed tissue specimens using an avidin-biotin-peroxidase system was obtained after serial dilution of the Mab (2G5) or the chromagen, amino ethyl carbazole, in the first sequence. Paired immunofluorescence staining with well-balanced color mixing was easily obtained on ethanol-fixed tissue specimens using sequential incubations. Single exposures gave blue (aminomethyl coumarin acetic acid) and green (fluorescein isothiocyanate) fluorescence for MAbs 2G5 and biotinylated 4D3, respectively. Color mixing was revealed as a turquoise staining. Studies on method sensitivity was performed by incorporating a known amount of a protein preparation of p57 into an inert matrix, creating an artificial test substrate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8011782

  9. Structural requirements of research tissue banks derived from standardized project surveillance.

    PubMed

    Herpel, E; Koleganova, N; Schreiber, B; Walter, B; Kalle, C V; Schirmacher, P

    2012-07-01

    Tissue banks constitute decisive and rate-limiting resource and technology platforms for basic and translational biomedical research, notably in the area of cancer. Thus, it is essential to plan and structure tissue banking and allocate resources according to research needs, but essential requirements are still incompletely defined. The tissue bank of the National Center of Tumor Diseases Heidelberg (NCT) was founded with the intention to provide tissues of optimal quality and to prioritize the realization of research projects. We analysed its structure and prospective project management registration as well as tracking records for all projects of the NCT tissue bank as of its start in 2005 in order to obtain information that may be relevant for tissue bank planning. All project proposals submitted to the NCT tissue bank (n = 681) were included in the study. For a detailed evaluation of provided services, only projects that were completed until July 2011 (n = 605) were analysed. For these 605 projects, NCT tissue bank provided 769 specific services. In all projects/services, we recorded project leader, type and amount of material provided, type of research (basic/translational), work load of project and project completion. Furthermore, all completed projects were tracked after 90 days according to a standard protocol to determine principal investigators' (PI) satisfaction and quality of the provided material. Until July 2011, 605 projects had been successfully completed as documented by material transfer agreement. Of the projects, 72.7 % addressed basic research, 22.3 % were translational research projects and 3 % concerned epidemiological research; 91 % (n = 546) concerned a single PI and the NTC tissue bank. For these projects, 769 specific services were provided. Of these services, 288 concerned providing formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue (extracts, full size sections), 126 providing fresh frozen materials (including fresh frozen

  10. Pathology Tissue-quantitative Mass Spectrometry Analysis to Profile Histone Post-translational Modification Patterns in Patient Samples*

    PubMed Central

    Noberini, Roberta; Uggetti, Andrea; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Minucci, Saverio

    2016-01-01

    Histone post-translational modifications (hPTMs) generate a complex combinatorial code that has been implicated with various pathologies, including cancer. Dissecting such a code in physiological and diseased states may be exploited for epigenetic biomarker discovery, but hPTM analysis in clinical samples has been hindered by technical limitations. Here, we developed a method (PAThology tissue analysis of Histones by Mass Spectrometry - PAT-H-MS) that allows to perform a comprehensive, unbiased and quantitative MS-analysis of hPTM patterns on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. In pairwise comparisons, histone extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues showed patterns similar to fresh frozen samples for 24 differentially modified peptides from histone H3. In addition, when coupled with a histone-focused version of the super-SILAC approach, this method allows the accurate quantification of modification changes among breast cancer patient samples. As an initial application of the PAThology tissue analysis of Histones by Mass Spectrometry method, we analyzed breast cancer samples, revealing significant changes in histone H3 methylation patterns among Luminal A-like and Triple Negative disease subtypes. These results pave the way for retrospective epigenetic studies that combine the power of MS-based hPTM analysis with the extensive clinical information associated with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archives. PMID:26463340

  11. Pathology Tissue-quantitative Mass Spectrometry Analysis to Profile Histone Post-translational Modification Patterns in Patient Samples.

    PubMed

    Noberini, Roberta; Uggetti, Andrea; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Minucci, Saverio; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2016-03-01

    Histone post-translational modifications (hPTMs) generate a complex combinatorial code that has been implicated with various pathologies, including cancer. Dissecting such a code in physiological and diseased states may be exploited for epigenetic biomarker discovery, but hPTM analysis in clinical samples has been hindered by technical limitations. Here, we developed a method (PAThology tissue analysis of Histones by Mass Spectrometry - PAT-H-MS) that allows to perform a comprehensive, unbiased and quantitative MS-analysis of hPTM patterns on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. In pairwise comparisons, histone extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues showed patterns similar to fresh frozen samples for 24 differentially modified peptides from histone H3. In addition, when coupled with a histone-focused version of the super-SILAC approach, this method allows the accurate quantification of modification changes among breast cancer patient samples. As an initial application of the PAThology tissue analysis of Histones by Mass Spectrometry method, we analyzed breast cancer samples, revealing significant changes in histone H3 methylation patterns among Luminal A-like and Triple Negative disease subtypes. These results pave the way for retrospective epigenetic studies that combine the power of MS-based hPTM analysis with the extensive clinical information associated with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archives. PMID:26463340

  12. Copy-number analysis of topoisomerase and thymidylate synthase genes in frozen and FFPE DNAs of colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jinsheng; Miller, Ryan; Zhang, Wanghai; Sharma, Mala; Holtschlag, Vicky; Watson, Mark A; McLeod, Howard L

    2008-01-01

    Background Archived formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens represent an important resource for pharmacogenomic analysis in retrospective clinical studies but the quality of results from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples is of concern due to the fact of the degradation of DNAs and RNAs from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. Methods In the present study, we used DNA from fresh frozen as well as formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor to detect copy-number changes in colorectal cancer, and our data shows that formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded DNAs were able to deliver reliable copy-number data, and that quantitative PCR had the ability to detect copy-number changes from deletion to amplification, with high concordance of copy-number calls among formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded and frozen DNAs. Results The amplification of topoisomerase I and deletion of thymidylate synthase were found in 23% (12/52) and 27% (14/52) of colorectal cancers, but EGF receptor amplification was not common (5/52, < 10%). Among 52 colorectal cancers, 31 tumors were both topoisomerase I and thymidylate synthase diploid, which may have a worse outcome for tumor chemotherapy; and there were five tumors with favorable genomics (topoisomerase I amplification and thymidylate synthase deletion). Furthermore, topoisomerase I-amplified tumors had a two-times higher RNA level and a nearly twofold higher protein expression level than did the diploid tumors (p < 0.001 and 0.01, respectively), but there were no correlations between copy-number status and RNA or protein level for thymidylate synthase. Conclusions Our study suggests a potential pharmacogenomic influence of topoisomerase I copy-number alteration on its RNA/protein expressions, which could be reflected on tumor response to chemotherapy in human colorectal cancer. PMID:18855534

  13. Ewing’s Sarcoma: An Analysis of miRNA Expression Profiles and Target Genes in Paraffin-Embedded Primary Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Parafioriti, Antonina; Bason, Caterina; Armiraglio, Elisabetta; Calciano, Lucia; Daolio, Primo Andrea; Berardocco, Martina; Di Bernardo, Andrea; Colosimo, Alessia; Luksch, Roberto; Berardi, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanism responsible for Ewing’s Sarcoma (ES) remains largely unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding RNAs able to regulate gene expression, are deregulated in tumors and may serve as a tool for diagnosis and prediction. However, the status of miRNAs in ES has not yet been thoroughly investigated. This study compared global miRNAs expression in paraffin-embedded tumor tissue samples from 20 ES patients, affected by primary untreated tumors, with miRNAs expressed in normal human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) by microarray analysis. A miRTarBase database was used to identify the predicted target genes for differentially expressed miRNAs. The miRNAs microarray analysis revealed distinct patterns of miRNAs expression between ES samples and normal MSCs. 58 of the 954 analyzed miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed in ES samples compared to MSCs. Moreover, the qRT-PCR analysis carried out on three selected miRNAs showed that miR-181b, miR-1915 and miR-1275 were significantly aberrantly regulated, confirming the microarray results. Bio-database analysis identified BCL-2 as a bona fide target gene of the miR-21, miR-181a, miR-181b, miR-29a, miR-29b, miR-497, miR-195, miR-let-7a, miR-34a and miR-1915. Using paraffin-embedded tissues from ES patients, this study has identified several potential target miRNAs and one gene that might be considered a novel critical biomarker for ES pathogenesis. PMID:27144561

  14. Molecular Detection and Typing of Human Papillomaviruses in Paraffin-Embedded Cervical Cancer and Pre-Cancer Tissue Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoodi, Pezhman; Motamedi, Hossein; Seyfi Abad Shapouri, Masoud Reza; Bahrami Shehni, Mahjabin; Kargar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is one of the important reasons of mortality among females. Prevention, early diagnosis and immediate treatment can affect the rate of mortality in this cancer and several epidemiological studies have shown a strong relationship between human papilloma viruses (HPVs) and cervical cancer. Objectives: The present study was conducted to survey HPV infections in a women population with cervical cancer and cervical dysplasia/metaplasia in southwest of Iran. Materials and Methods: 72 paraffin-embedded cervical biopsies which had been previously archived from women with cervical cancer and cervical dysplasia were examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Afterward, the detected HPV strains were typed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of PCR amplicons. Results: 60 out of 72 samples had necessary requirements and HPV DNA was detected in 43.3% of these samples. Most HPV positive samples belonged to women aged from 48 to 63 years. On the other hand, HPV infection among patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was 48.78% and in women with dysplasia/metaplasia was 26.66%. The most prevalent type of the human papilloma virus was HPV16 (100%). Conclusions: Knowing the most prevalent type of the human papilloma viruses circulating in the population (HPV16) can be applied in the future screening and managing programs of this major disease and also in vaccination against the prevalent types of the virus. Meanwhile, it seems that more studies should be performed to determine the role of different risk factors involved in development of the disease, especially those related with social behaviors and traditions with respect to different areas. PMID:27366309

  15. Antibody validation and scoring guidelines for ABCG2 immunohistochemical staining in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded colon cancer tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cederbye, Camilla Natasha; Palshof, Jesper Andreas; Hansen, Tine Plato; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Linnemann, Dorte; Stenvang, Jan; Nielsen, Dorte Lisbet; Brünner, Nils; Viuff, Birgitte Martine

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of the ATP-dependent drug efflux pump ABCG2 is a major molecular mechanism of multidrug resistance in cancer and might be a predictive biomarker for drug response. Contradictory results have been reported for immunohistochemical studies of ABCG2 protein expression in colorectal cancer (CRC), probably because of the use of different antibodies and scoring approaches. In this study, we systematically studied six commercially available anti-ABCG2 antibodies, using cell lines with up-regulation of ABCG2, and selected one antibody for validation in CRC tissue. Furthermore, we established scoring guidelines for ABCG2 expression based on the clinically used guidelines for HER2 immunohistochemistry assessment in gastric cancer. The guidelines provide a semi-quantitative measure of the basolateral membrane staining of ABCG2 and disregard the apical membrane staining and the cytoplasmic signal. Intra-tumor heterogeneity in ABCG2 immunoreactivity was observed; however, statistical analyses of tissue microarrays (TMAs) and the corresponding whole sections from primary tumors of 57 metastatic CRC patients revealed a strong positive correlation between maximum TMA scores and whole sections, especially when more than one core was used. In conclusion, here, we provide validated results to guide future studies on the associations between ABCG2 immunoreactivity in tumor cells and the benefits of chemotherapeutic treatment in patients with CRC. PMID:27257141

  16. High recovery FASP applied to the proteomic analysis of microdissected formalin fixed paraffin embedded cancer tissues retrieves known colon cancer markers.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Ostasiewicz, Pawel; Mann, Matthias

    2011-07-01

    Proteomic analysis of samples isolated by laser capture microdissection from clinical specimens requires sample preparation and fractionation methods suitable for small amounts of protein. Here we describe a streamlined filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) workflow that allows efficient analysis of lysates from low numbers of cells. Addition of carrier substances such as polyethylene glycol or dextran to the processed samples improves the peptide yields in the low to submicrogram range. In a single LC-MS/MS run, analyses of 500, 1000, and 3000 cells allowed identification of 905, 1536, and 2055 proteins, respectively. Incorporation of an additional SAX fractionation step at somewhat higher amounts enabled the analysis of formalin fixed and paraffin embedded human tissues prepared by LCM to a depth of 3600-4400 proteins per single experiment. We applied this workflow to compare archival neoplastic and matched normal colonic mucosa cancer specimens for three patients. Label-free quantification of more than 6000 proteins verified this technology through the differential expression of 30 known colon cancer markers. These included Carcino-Embryonic Antigen (CEA), the most widely used colon cancer marker, complement decay accelerating factor (DAF, CD55) and Metastasis-associated in colon cancer protein 1 (MACC1). Concordant with literature knowledge, mucin 1 was overexpressed and mucin 2 underexpressed in all three patients. These results show that FASP is suitable for the low level analysis of microdissected tissue and that it has the potential for exploration of clinical samples for biomarker and drug target discovery. PMID:21526778

  17. bcl-2 rearrangement in Hodgkin's disease. Results of polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, and sequencing on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Reid, A. H.; Cunningham, R. E.; Frizzera, G.; O'Leary, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    We examined 81 cases of Hodgkin's disease for evidence of the t(14;18) translocation, using the polymerase chain reaction assay on lysates of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. Seven of 74 amplifiable cases (9%) were positive for the translocation, which involves the bcl-2 oncogene and the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene. Two of these cases were sequenced and the breakpoints had the same pattern found in follicular lymphoma. The nuclei from one of the cases were sorted into large and small subpopulations. The t(14;18) signal was more intense in the large nucleus subpopulation, which contained a greater proportion of Reed-Sternberg-like nuclei. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that Reed-Sternberg cells carry the translocation, but they do not exclude the possibility that the translocation is found in cells representing the reactive component of Hodgkin's disease. The results also demonstrate that routinely processed material is suitable for polymerase chain reaction-based analysis of translocations, although the sensitivity is reduced 10- to 100-fold, compared with fresh tissue. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:8434638

  18. DNA extraction from paraffin embedded material for genetic and epigenetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Pikor, Larissa A; Enfield, Katey S S; Cameron, Heryet; Lam, Wan L

    2011-01-01

    Disease development and progression are characterized by frequent genetic and epigenetic aberrations including chromosomal rearrangements, copy number gains and losses and DNA methylation. Advances in high-throughput, genome-wide profiling technologies, such as microarrays, have significantly improved our ability to identify and detect these specific alterations. However as technology continues to improve, a limiting factor remains sample quality and availability. Furthermore, follow-up clinical information and disease outcome are often collected years after the initial specimen collection. Specimens, typically formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE), are stored in hospital archives for years to decades. DNA can be efficiently and effectively recovered from paraffin-embedded specimens if the appropriate method of extraction is applied. High quality DNA extracted from properly preserved and stored specimens can support quantitative assays for comparisons of normal and diseased tissues and generation of genetic and epigenetic signatures (1). To extract DNA from paraffin-embedded samples, tissue cores or microdissected tissue are subjected to xylene treatment, which dissolves the paraffin from the tissue, and then rehydrated using a series of ethanol washes. Proteins and harmful enzymes such as nucleases are subsequently digested by proteinase K. The addition of lysis buffer, which contains denaturing agents such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), facilitates digestion (2). Nucleic acids are purified from the tissue lysate using buffer-saturated phenol and high speed centrifugation which generates a biphasic solution. DNA and RNA remain in the upper aqueous phase, while proteins, lipids and polysaccharides are sequestered in the inter- and organic-phases respectively. Retention of the aqueous phase and repeated phenol extractions generates a clean sample. Following phenol extractions, RNase A is added to eliminate contaminating RNA. Additional phenol extractions

  19. Ultrasensitive detection and identification of BRAF V600 mutations in fresh frozen, FFPE, and plasma samples of melanoma patients by E-ice-COLD-PCR.

    PubMed

    How-Kit, Alexandre; Lebbé, Céleste; Bousard, Aurélie; Daunay, Antoine; Mazaleyrat, Nicolas; Daviaud, Christian; Mourah, Samia; Tost, Jörg

    2014-09-01

    A number of molecular diagnostic methods have been developed for the detection and identification of mutations in tumor samples, which are important for the choice of treatment in the context of personalized medicine. For the treatment of metastatic melanoma, Vemurafenib is recommended for patients with BRAF V600 activating mutations. However, the different assays developed to date for the detection of these mutations lack sensitivity or specificity or do not allow a sequencing-based identification or validation of the mutation. Recently, enhanced improved and complete enrichment co-amplification at lower denaturation temperature-polymerase chain reaction (E-ice-COLD-PCR) has been developed as a sensitive method for the detection and identification of mutations in KRAS codons 12/13. Here, we present the first E-ice-COLD-PCR assay for the detection and identification of BRAF codon 600 mutations, which has a large dynamic range, as 25 pg to 25 ng can be used as DNA input without any reduction in mutation enrichment efficiency, and which can detect down to 0.01 % of mutated alleles in a wild-type background. The assay has been validated on fresh frozen, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE), and plasma samples of melanoma patients and has allowed the detection and identification of BRAF mutations present in samples appearing as wild type using standard pyrosequencing, endpoint genotyping, or Sanger sequencing. Thus, the BRAF V600 E-ice-COLD-PCR assay is currently one of the most powerful molecular diagnostic tools for the ultrasensitive detection and identification of BRAF codon 600 mutations. PMID:24969466

  20. Fully Automated RNAscope In Situ Hybridization Assays for Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Cells and Tissues.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Courtney M; Zhang, Bingqing; Miller, Melanie; Butko, Emerald; Wu, Xingyong; Laver, Thomas; Kernag, Casey; Kim, Jeffrey; Luo, Yuling; Lamparski, Henry; Park, Emily; Su, Nan; Ma, Xiao-Jun

    2016-10-01

    Biomarkers such as DNA, RNA, and protein are powerful tools in clinical diagnostics and therapeutic development for many diseases. Identifying RNA expression at the single cell level within the morphological context by RNA in situ hybridization provides a great deal of information on gene expression changes over conventional techniques that analyze bulk tissue, yet widespread use of this technique in the clinical setting has been hampered by the dearth of automated RNA ISH assays. Here we present an automated version of the RNA ISH technology RNAscope that is adaptable to multiple automation platforms. The automated RNAscope assay yields a high signal-to-noise ratio with little to no background staining and results comparable to the manual assay. In addition, the automated duplex RNAscope assay was able to detect two biomarkers simultaneously. Lastly, assay consistency and reproducibility were confirmed by quantification of TATA-box binding protein (TBP) mRNA signals across multiple lots and multiple experiments. Taken together, the data presented in this study demonstrate that the automated RNAscope technology is a high performance RNA ISH assay with broad applicability in biomarker research and diagnostic assay development. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2201-2208, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27191821

  1. Human papillomavirus infection is rare in nonmalignant tonsil tissue in the UK: implications for tonsil cancer precursor lesions.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Elizabeth; Newcombe, Robert G; Green, Adele C; Kelly, Carole; Noel Gill, O; Hall, Gillian; Fiander, Alison N; Pirotte, Evelyne; Hibbitts, Sam J; Homer, Jarrod; Powell, Ned G

    2014-11-15

    The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated tonsil cancer is increasing but the prevalence of HPV, and of premalignant precursors, in tonsil tissue is unknown. We aimed to assess prevalence of HPV infection in nonmalignant tonsillar crypt epithelia and to histopathologically characterise positive samples. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tonsil tissue specimens were obtained from an age- and sex-stratified random sample of patients aged 0-69 years whose paired tonsils were archived following elective tonsillectomy at hospitals throughout England and Southern Scotland from 2004 to 2008. Homogenised fresh-frozen tonsil tissue was also obtained from archive for two random subsets of males aged 25-34 and over 44. HPV status was assessed in all samples for 20 mucosal HPV types by GP5+/6+ polymerase chain reaction (PCR) enzyme immunoassay and by HPV16 type-specific PCR targeting the E6 gene. In the homogenised material, HPV status was also assessed for 44 HPV types by SPF10-PCR enzyme immunoassay. Of 4,095 randomly sampled FFPE specimens, amplifiable DNA was extracted from 3,377 (82.5%) and from 511 of 524 (97.5%) homogenised tonsils. HPV DNA was identified in 0 of 3,377 (0%, 95% CI 0-0.089%) fixed samples and 0 of 511 (0%, 95% CI 0-0.58%) homogenised samples. This suggests HPV infection may be rare in tonsil reticulated crypt epithelia. Furthermore, we found no evidence of HPV-associated premalignant neoplasia. These data suggest that if HPV-associated premalignant lesions do occur, they are likely to be rare and may have a high risk of progression to carcinoma. PMID:24723209

  2. Targeted therapies in cancer - challenges and chances offered by newly developed techniques for protein analysis in clinical tissues

    PubMed Central

    Malinowsky, K; Wolff, C; Gündisch, S; Berg, D; Becker, KF

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, new anticancer therapies have accompanied the classical approaches of surgery and radio- and chemotherapy. These new forms of treatment aim to inhibit specific molecular targets namely altered or deregulated proteins, which offer the possibility of individualized therapies. The specificity and efficiency of these new approaches, however, bring about a number of challenges. First of all, it is essential to specifically identify and quantify protein targets in tumor tissues for the reasonable use of such targeted therapies. Additionally, it has become even more obvious in recent years that the presence of a target protein is not always sufficient to predict the outcome of targeted therapies. The deregulation of downstream signaling molecules might also play an important role in the success of such therapeutic approaches. For these reasons, the analysis of tumor-specific protein expression profiles prior to therapy has been suggested as the most effective way to predict possible therapeutic results. To further elucidate signaling networks underlying cancer development and to identify new targets, it is necessary to implement tools that allow the rapid, precise, inexpensive and simultaneous analysis of many network components while requiring only a small amount of clinical material. Reverse phase protein microarray (RPPA) is a promising technology that meets these requirements while enabling the quantitative measurement of proteins. Together with recently developed protocols for the extraction of proteins from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, RPPA may provide the means to quantify therapeutic targets and diagnostic markers in the near future and reliably screen for new protein targets. With the possibility to quantitatively analyze DNA, RNA and protein from a single FFPE tissue sample, the methods are available for integrated patient profiling at all levels of gene expression, thus allowing optimal patient stratification for

  3. Trypanosoma cruzi Necrotizing Meningoencephalitis in a Venezuelan HIV+-AIDS Patient: Pathological Diagnosis Confirmed by PCR Using Formalin-Fixed- and Paraffin-Embedded-Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Rossi Spadafora, Marcello Salvatore; Céspedes, Ghislaine; Romero, Sandra; Fuentes, Isabel; Boada-Sucre, Alpidio A.; Cañavate, Carmen; Flores-Chávez, María

    2014-01-01

    Coinfections with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and infectious agents have been recognized since the early 90s. In the central nervous system (CNS) of HIV+ patients, parasitic protozoans like Toxoplasma gondii have been described as responsible for the space occupying lesions (SOL) developed. However, the involvement of Trypanosoma cruzi is also described but appears to be less frequent in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and transplant recipients, associated with necrotizing myocarditis and neurological symptoms related to the occurrence of necrotizing pseudotumoral encephalitis (NPE) and meningoencephalitis (NME). The present work aims to present a Venezuelan case of NME associated with the coinfection of HIV and a T. cruzi-like trypanosomatid as well as its evolution and diagnosis by histopathological techniques, electron microscopy, and PCR methods using formalin-fixed- (FF-) and paraffin-embedded- (PE-) tissues. Postmortem cytological studies of leptomeninges imprints reveal the presence of trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma sp. Histopathological and electron microscopy studies allowed us to identify an amastigote stage and to reject the involvement of other opportunistic microorganisms as the etiological agent of the SOL. The definitive confirmation of T. cruzi as the etiological agent was achieved by PCR suggesting that the NME by T. cruzi was due to a reactivation of Chagas' disease. PMID:25763312

  4. Clinical and pathological features of Burkitt lymphoma showing expression of BCL2--an analysis including gene expression in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Masqué-Soler, Neus; Szczepanowski, Monika; Kohler, Christian W; Aukema, Sietse M; Nagel, Inga; Richter, Julia; Siebert, Reiner; Spang, Rainer; Burkhardt, Birgit; Klapper, Wolfram

    2015-11-01

    The differential diagnosis between Burkitt lymphoma (BL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) can be challenging. BL has been reported to express less BCL2 than DLBCL, but this issue has not been analysed systematically. BL expressing BCL2 can be considered to be MYC/BCL2 co-expressors, a feature that is associated with poorer outcome in DLBCL but that has not been correlated with outcome in BL so far. We analysed the expression of BCL2 in 150 cases of conventionally diagnosed BL using two different BCL2 antibodies. BCL2 expression was detected in 23% of the cases, though the expression varied in intensity and number of positive cells. We did not detect any relevant differences in clinical presentation and outcome between BCL2-positive and BCL2-negative BL in a subgroup of 43 cases for which detailed clinical data were available. An independent cohort of 17 BL with expression of BCL2 were analysed molecularly, with 13 of 17 cases classified as molecularly defined BL (Burkitt Lymphoma) using gene expression profiling on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. The four lymphomas diagnosed molecularly as intermediates did not differ in clinical presentation and outcome from molecularly defined BL. PMID:26218299

  5. Proteomic Profiling of Paraffin-Embedded Samples Identifies Metaplasia-Specific and Early-Stage Gastric Cancer Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Josane F.; Ham, Amy-Joan L.; Whitwell, Corbin; Nam, Ki Taek; Lee, Hyuk-Joon; Yang, Han-Kwang; Kim, Woo Ho; Zhang, Bing; Li, Ming; LaFleur, Bonnie; Liebler, Daniel C.; Goldenring, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Early diagnosis and curative resection are the predominant factors associated with increased survival in patients with gastric cancer. However, most gastric cancer cases are still diagnosed at later stages. Since most pathologic specimens are archived as FFPE samples, the ability to use them to generate expression profiles can greatly improve cancer biomarker discovery. We sought to uncover new biomarkers for stomach preneoplastic metaplasias and neoplastic lesions by generating proteome profiles using FFPE samples. We combined peptide isoelectric focusing and liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry analysis to generate proteomic profiles from FFPE samples of intestinal-type gastric cancer, metaplasia, and normal mucosa. The expression patterns of selected proteins were analyzed by immunostaining first in single tissue sections from normal stomach, metaplasia, and gastric cancer and later in larger tissue array cohorts. We detected 60 proteins up-regulated and 87 proteins down-regulated during the progression from normal mucosa to metaplasia to gastric cancer. Two of the up-regulated proteins, LTF and DMBT1, were validated as specific markers for spasmolytic polypeptide–expressing metaplasia and intestinal metaplasia, respectively. In cancers, significantly lower levels of DMBT1 or LTF correlated with more advanced disease and worse prognosis. Thus, proteomic profiling using FFPE samples has led to the identification of two novel markers for stomach metaplasias and gastric cancer prognosis. PMID:22944598

  6. Data embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.

    1997-08-19

    A method is disclosed for embedding auxiliary information into a set of host data, such as a photograph, television signal, facsimile transmission, or identification card. All such host data contain intrinsic noise, allowing pixels in the host data which are nearly identical and which have values differing by less than the noise value to be manipulated and replaced with auxiliary data. As the embedding method does not change the elemental values of the host data, the auxiliary data do not noticeably affect the appearance or interpretation of the host data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. 19 figs.

  7. Data embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.

    1997-01-01

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into a set of host data, such as a photograph, television signal, facsimile transmission, or identification card. All such host data contain intrinsic noise, allowing pixels in the host data which are nearly identical and which have values differing by less than the noise value to be manipulated and replaced with auxiliary data. As the embedding method does not change the elemental values of the host data, the auxiliary data do not noticeably affect the appearance or interpretation of the host data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user.

  8. Immunohistochemistry for the detection of neural and inflammatory cells in equine brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Delcambre, Gretchen H; Liu, Junjie; Herrington, Jenna M; Vallario, Kelsey; Long, Maureen T

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic characterization of cellular responses in equine infectious encephalitides has had limited description of both peripheral and resident cell populations in central nervous system (CNS) tissues due to limited species-specific reagents that react with formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded tissue (FFPE). This study identified a set of antibodies for investigating the immunopathology of infectious CNS diseases in horses. Multiple commercially available staining reagents and antibodies derived from antigens of various species for manual immunohistochemistry (IHC) were screened. Several techniques and reagents for heat-induced antigen retrieval, non-specific protein blocking, endogenous peroxidase blocking, and visualization-detection systems were tested during IHC protocol development. Boiling of slides in a low pH, citrate-based buffer solution in a double-boiler system was most consistent for epitope retrieval. Pressure-cooking, microwaving, high pH buffers, and proteinase K solutions often resulted in tissue disruption or no reactivity. Optimal blocking reagents and concentrations of each working antibody were determined. Ultimately, a set of monoclonal (mAb) and polyclonal antibodies (pAb) were identified for CD3(+) (pAb A0452, Dako) T-lymphocytes, CD79αcy(+) B-lymphocytes (mAb HM57, Dako), macrophages (mAb MAC387, Leica), NF-H(+) neurons (mAb NAP4, EnCor Biotechnology), microglia/macrophage (pAb Iba-1, Wako), and GFAP(+) astrocytes (mAb 5C10, EnCor Biotechnology). In paraffin embedded tissues, mAbs and pAbs derived from human and swine antigens were very successful at binding equine tissue targets. Individual, optimized protocols are provided for each positively reactive antibody for analyzing equine neuroinflammatory disease histopathology. PMID:26855862

  9. Immunohistochemistry for the detection of neural and inflammatory cells in equine brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junjie; Herrington, Jenna M.; Vallario, Kelsey

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic characterization of cellular responses in equine infectious encephalitides has had limited description of both peripheral and resident cell populations in central nervous system (CNS) tissues due to limited species-specific reagents that react with formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded tissue (FFPE). This study identified a set of antibodies for investigating the immunopathology of infectious CNS diseases in horses. Multiple commercially available staining reagents and antibodies derived from antigens of various species for manual immunohistochemistry (IHC) were screened. Several techniques and reagents for heat-induced antigen retrieval, non-specific protein blocking, endogenous peroxidase blocking, and visualization-detection systems were tested during IHC protocol development. Boiling of slides in a low pH, citrate-based buffer solution in a double-boiler system was most consistent for epitope retrieval. Pressure-cooking, microwaving, high pH buffers, and proteinase K solutions often resulted in tissue disruption or no reactivity. Optimal blocking reagents and concentrations of each working antibody were determined. Ultimately, a set of monoclonal (mAb) and polyclonal antibodies (pAb) were identified for CD3+ (pAb A0452, Dako) T-lymphocytes, CD79αcy+ B-lymphocytes (mAb HM57, Dako), macrophages (mAb MAC387, Leica), NF-H+ neurons (mAb NAP4, EnCor Biotechnology), microglia/macrophage (pAb Iba-1, Wako), and GFAP+ astrocytes (mAb 5C10, EnCor Biotechnology). In paraffin embedded tissues, mAbs and pAbs derived from human and swine antigens were very successful at binding equine tissue targets. Individual, optimized protocols are provided for each positively reactive antibody for analyzing equine neuroinflammatory disease histopathology. PMID:26855862

  10. Localization of BRCA1 protein in breast cancer tissue and cell lines with mutations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene (BRCA1) encodes a tumor suppressor. The BRCA1 protein is found primarily in cell nuclei and plays an important role in the DNA damage response and transcriptional regulation. Deficiencies in DNA repair capabilities have been associated with higher histopathological grade and worse prognosis in breast cancer. Methods In order to investigate the subcellular distribution of BRCA1 in tumor tissue we randomly selected 22 breast carcinomas and tested BRCA1 protein localization in frozen and contiguous formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue, using pressure cooker antigen-retrieval and the MS110 antibody staining. To assess the impact of BRCA1 germline mutations on protein localization, we retrospectively tested 16 of the tumor specimens to determine whether they contained the common Ashkenazi Jewish founder mutations in BRCA1 (185delAG, 5382insC), and BRCA2 (6174delT). We also compared co-localization of BRCA1 and nucleolin in MCF7 cells (wild type) and a mutant BRCA1 cell line, HCC1937 (5382insC). Results In FFPE tissue, with MS110 antibody staining, we frequently found reduced BRCA1 nuclear staining in breast tumor tissue compared to normal tissue, and less BRCA1 staining with higher histological grade in the tumors. However, in the frozen sections, BRCA1 antibody staining showed punctate, intra-nuclear granules in varying numbers of tumor, lactating, and normal cells. Two mutation carriers were identified and were confirmed by gene sequencing. We have also compared co-localization of BRCA1 and nucleolin in MCF7 cells (wild type) and a mutant BRCA1 cell line, HCC1937 (5382insC) and found altered sub-nuclear and nucleolar localization patterns consistent with a functional impact of the mutation on protein localization. Conclusions The data presented here support a role for BRCA1 in the pathogenesis of sporadic and inherited breast cancers. The use of well-characterized reagents may lead to further

  11. Evaluation of a fluorescence-labelled oligonucleotide probe targeting 23S rRNA for in situ detection of Salmonella serovars in paraffin-embedded tissue sections and their rapid identification in bacterial smears.

    PubMed Central

    Nordentoft, S; Christensen, H; Wegener, H C

    1997-01-01

    A method for the detection of Salmonella based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has been developed and applied for the direct detection of Salmonella in pure cultures and in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections. On the basis of the 23S rRNA gene sequences representing all of the S. enterica subspecies and S. bongori, an 18-mer oligonucleotide probe was selected. The specificity of the probe was tested by in situ hybridization to bacterial cell smears of pure cultures. Forty-nine of 55 tested Salmonella serovars belonging to subspecies I, II, IIIb, IV, and VI hybridized with the probe. The probe did not hybridize to serovars from subspecies IIIa (S. arizonae) or to S. bongori. No cross-reaction to 64 other strains of the family Enterobacteriaceae or 18 other bacterial strains outside this family was observed. The probe was tested with sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from experimentally infected mice or from animals with a history of clinical salmonellosis. In these tissue sections the probe hybridized specifically to Salmonella serovars, allowing for the detection of single bacterial cells. The development of a fluorescence-labelled specific oligonucleotide probe makes the FISH technique a promising tool for the rapid identification of S. enterica in bacterial smears, as well as for the detection of S. enterica in histological tissue sections. PMID:9316923

  12. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method.

  13. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-03-10

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique is disclosed. The method applies to data compressed with lossy algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty in value by one unit. Indices which are adjacent in value are manipulated to encode auxiliary data. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compressions known also as entropy coding, to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the compression entropy coding, known also as entropy coding is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage in the manner taught by the method. 11 figs.

  14. A Sensitive IHC Method for Monitoring Autophagy-Specific Markers in Human Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    He, Helen; Yang, Yu; Xiang, Zhongmin; Yu, Lunyin; Chouitar, Jouhara; Yu, Jie; D'Amore, Natalie Roy; Li, Ping; Li, Zhi; Bowman, Douglas; Theisen, Matthew; Brownell, James E.; Tirrell, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Use of tyramide signal amplification (TSA) to detect autophagy biomarkers in formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) xenograft tissue. Materials and Methods. Autophagy marker regulation was studied in xenograft tissues using Amp HQ IHC and standard IHC methods. Results. The data demonstrate the feasibility of using high sensitivity TSA IHC assays to measure low abundant autophagy markers in FFPE xenograft tissue. PMID:27247826

  15. Gastric adenocarcinoma microRNA profiles in fixed tissue and in plasma reveal cancer-associated and Epstein-Barr virus-related expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Treece, Amanda L; Duncan, Daniel L; Tang, Weihua; Elmore, Sandra; Morgan, Douglas R; Dominguez, Ricardo L; Speck, Olga; Meyers, Michael O; Gulley, Margaret L

    2016-06-01

    MicroRNA expression in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue (FFPE) or plasma may add value for cancer management. The GastroGenus miR Panel was developed to measure 55 cancer-specific human microRNAs, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded microRNAs, and controls. This Q-rtPCR panel was applied to 100 FFPEs enriched for adenocarcinoma or adjacent non-malignant mucosa, and to plasma of 31 patients. In FFPE, microRNAs upregulated in malignant versus adjacent benign gastric mucosa were hsa-miR-21, -155, -196a, -196b, -185, and -let-7i. Hsa-miR-18a, 34a, 187, -200a, -423-3p, -484, and -744 were downregulated. Plasma of cancer versus non-cancer controls had upregulated hsa-miR-23a, -103, and -221 and downregulated hsa-miR-378, -346, -486-5p, -200b, -196a, -141, and -484. EBV-infected versus uninfected cancers expressed multiple EBV-encoded microRNAs, and concomitant dysregulation of four human microRNAs suggests that viral infection may alter cellular biochemical pathways. Human microRNAs were dysregulated between malignant and benign gastric mucosa and between plasma of cancer patients and non-cancer controls. Strong association of EBV microRNA expression with known EBV status underscores the ability of microRNA technology to reflect disease biology. Expression of viral microRNAs in concert with unique human microRNAs provides novel insights into viral oncogenesis and reinforces the potential for microRNA profiles to aid in classifying gastric cancer subtypes. Pilot studies of plasma suggest the potential for a noninvasive addition to cancer diagnostics. PMID:26950485

  16. Next-Generation Sequencing-Based HPV Genotyping Assay Validated in Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Oropharyngeal and Cervical Cancer Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Ambulos, Nicholas P.; Schumaker, Lisa M.; Mathias, Trevor J.; White, Ruth; Troyer, Jennifer; Wells, David

    2016-01-01

    Available clinical human papilloma virus (HPV) diagnostics for head and neck cancer have limited sensitivity and/or fail to define the HPV genotype. Common HPV genotyping assays are costly and labor intensive. We sought to develop a next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based HPV genotyping assay that was sensitive enough to work on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. We developed an ion torrent NGS HPV genotyping assay using barcoded HPV PCR broad-spectrum general primers 5+/6+ (BSGP)5+/6+. To validate genotype specificity and use in archived clinical FFPE tumor samples, we compared NGS HPV genotyping at 2 sequencing centers with typing by Roche Linear Array assay in 42 oropharyngeal and cervical cancer specimens representing 10 HPV genotypes, as well as HPV-negative cases. To demonstrate the detection of a broad range of HPV genotypes, we genotyped a cohort of 266 cervical cancers. A comparison of NGS genotyping of FFPE cancer specimens with genotyping by Linear Array showed concordant results in 34/37 samples (92%) at sequencing site 1 and 39/42 samples (93%) at sequencing site 2. Concordance between sites was 92%. Designed for use with 10 ng genomic DNA, the assay detected HPV using as little as 1.25 ng FFPE-derived genomic DNA. In 266 cervical cancer specimens, the NGS assay identified 20 different HPV genotypes, including all 13 carcinogenic genotypes. This novel NGS assay provides a sensitive and specific high-throughput method to detect and genotype HPV in a range of clinical specimens derived from FFPE with low per-sample cost. PMID:27006646

  17. Next-Generation Sequencing-Based HPV Genotyping Assay Validated in Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Oropharyngeal and Cervical Cancer Specimens.

    PubMed

    Ambulos, Nicholas P; Schumaker, Lisa M; Mathias, Trevor J; White, Ruth; Troyer, Jennifer; Wells, David; Cullen, Kevin J

    2016-07-01

    Available clinical human papilloma virus (HPV) diagnostics for head and neck cancer have limited sensitivity and/or fail to define the HPV genotype. Common HPV genotyping assays are costly and labor intensive. We sought to develop a next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based HPV genotyping assay that was sensitive enough to work on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. We developed an ion torrent NGS HPV genotyping assay using barcoded HPV PCR broad-spectrum general primers 5(+)/6(+) (BSGP)5(+)/6(+). To validate genotype specificity and use in archived clinical FFPE tumor samples, we compared NGS HPV genotyping at 2 sequencing centers with typing by Roche Linear Array assay in 42 oropharyngeal and cervical cancer specimens representing 10 HPV genotypes, as well as HPV-negative cases. To demonstrate the detection of a broad range of HPV genotypes, we genotyped a cohort of 266 cervical cancers. A comparison of NGS genotyping of FFPE cancer specimens with genotyping by Linear Array showed concordant results in 34/37 samples (92%) at sequencing site 1 and 39/42 samples (93%) at sequencing site 2. Concordance between sites was 92%. Designed for use with 10 ng genomic DNA, the assay detected HPV using as little as 1.25 ng FFPE-derived genomic DNA. In 266 cervical cancer specimens, the NGS assay identified 20 different HPV genotypes, including all 13 carcinogenic genotypes. This novel NGS assay provides a sensitive and specific high-throughput method to detect and genotype HPV in a range of clinical specimens derived from FFPE with low per-sample cost. PMID:27006646

  18. [Development of a Dual Detection Method with Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization and Immunostaining on Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Sections--Molecular Pathological Detection Techniques and Their Applications to Pathological Diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has recently become important for pathological diagnosis. However, its practical applications is not widespread because FISH protocol with FFPE specimens is complicated. We report a dual detection method by overlapping FISH with fluorescent immunostaining on FFPE sections. This method is characterized by changing buffers for heat treatment without proteolytic enzyme treatment. Subsequent proteolytic enzyme treatment can be omitted using an antigen activation solution, pH9 (Nichirei Corporation), for heat treatment. After the pretreatment, dual detection was achieved by DNA FISH following RNA FISH and fluorescent immunostaining. This protocol visualized gene abnormalities and protein overexpression on the same sections. Of note, in poorly differentiated tumors containing both normal and tumor cells, the tumor cells were clearly identified on the sections, and FISH signals could be counted in these cells. In addition, HER2 mRNA overexpression and gene amplification were simultaneously detected in HER2-positive gastric cancer. Thus, this method should be widely applicable in clinical settings. PMID:26548243

  19. Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Drug Related Crystal-Like Structures in Formalin-Fixed Frozen and Paraffin-Embedded Rabbit Kidney Tissue Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruinen, Anne L.; van Oevelen, Cateau; Eijkel, Gert B.; Van Heerden, Marjolein; Cuyckens, Filip; Heeren, Ron M. A.

    2016-01-01

    A multimodal mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) based approach was used to characterize the molecular content of crystal-like structures in a frozen and paraffin embedded piece of a formalin-fixed rabbit kidney. Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) imaging and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry imaging were combined to analyze the frozen and paraffin embedded sample without further preparation steps to remove the paraffin. The investigated rabbit kidney was part of a study on a drug compound in development, in which severe renal toxicity was observed in dosed rabbits. Histological examination of the kidney showed tubular degeneration with precipitation of crystal-like structures in the cortex, which were assumed to cause the renal toxicity. The MS imaging approach was used to find out whether the crystal-like structures were composed of the drug compound, metabolites, or an endogenous compound as a reaction to the drug administration. The generated MALDI-MSI data were analyzed using principal component analysis. In combination with the MS/MS results, this way of data processing demonstrates that the crystal structures were mainly composed of metabolites and relatively little parent drug.

  20. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%.

  1. Compression embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-07-07

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique are disclosed. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%. 21 figs.

  2. A Robust Protocol for Using Multiplexed Droplet Digital PCR to Quantify Somatic Copy Number Alterations in Clinical Tissue Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Hughesman, Curtis B.; Lu, X. J. David; Liu, Kelly Y. P.; Zhu, Yuqi; Poh, Catherine F.; Haynes, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The ability of droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) to accurately determine the concentrations of amplifiable targets makes it a promising platform for measuring copy number alterations (CNAs) in genomic biomarkers. However, its application to clinical samples, particularly formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens, will require strategies to reliably determine CNAs in DNA of limited quantity and quality. When applied to cancerous tissue, those methods must also account for global genetic instability and the associated probability that the abundance(s) of one or more chosen reference loci do not represent the average ploidy of cells comprising the specimen. Here we present an experimental design strategy and associated data analysis tool that enables accurate determination of CNAs in a panel of biomarkers using multiplexed ddPCR. The method includes strategies to optimize primer and probes design to cleanly segregate droplets in the data output from reaction wells amplifying multiple independent templates, and to correct for bias from artifacts such as DNA fragmentation. We demonstrate how a panel of reference loci can be used to determine a stable CNA-neutral benchmark. These innovations, when taken together, provide a comprehensive strategy that can be used to reliably detect biomarker CNAs in DNA extracted from either frozen or FFPE tissue biopsies. PMID:27537682

  3. A Robust Protocol for Using Multiplexed Droplet Digital PCR to Quantify Somatic Copy Number Alterations in Clinical Tissue Specimens.

    PubMed

    Hughesman, Curtis B; Lu, X J David; Liu, Kelly Y P; Zhu, Yuqi; Poh, Catherine F; Haynes, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The ability of droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) to accurately determine the concentrations of amplifiable targets makes it a promising platform for measuring copy number alterations (CNAs) in genomic biomarkers. However, its application to clinical samples, particularly formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens, will require strategies to reliably determine CNAs in DNA of limited quantity and quality. When applied to cancerous tissue, those methods must also account for global genetic instability and the associated probability that the abundance(s) of one or more chosen reference loci do not represent the average ploidy of cells comprising the specimen. Here we present an experimental design strategy and associated data analysis tool that enables accurate determination of CNAs in a panel of biomarkers using multiplexed ddPCR. The method includes strategies to optimize primer and probes design to cleanly segregate droplets in the data output from reaction wells amplifying multiple independent templates, and to correct for bias from artifacts such as DNA fragmentation. We demonstrate how a panel of reference loci can be used to determine a stable CNA-neutral benchmark. These innovations, when taken together, provide a comprehensive strategy that can be used to reliably detect biomarker CNAs in DNA extracted from either frozen or FFPE tissue biopsies. PMID:27537682

  4. CpG Methylation Analysis of HPV16 in Laser Capture Microdissected Archival Tissue and Whole Tissue Sections from High Grade Anal Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions: A Potential Disease Biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Molano, Monica; Tabrizi, Sepehr N.; Garland, Suzanne M.; Roberts, Jennifer M.; Machalek, Dorothy A.; Phillips, Samuel; Chandler, David; Hillman, Richard J.; Grulich, Andrew E.; Jin, Fengyi; Poynten, I. Mary; Templeton, David J.; Cornall, Alyssa M.

    2016-01-01

    Incidence and mortality rates of anal cancer are increasing globally. More than 90% of anal squamous cell carcinomas (ASCC) are associated with human papillomavirus (HPV). Studies on HPV-related anogenital lesions have shown that patterns of methylation of viral and cellular DNA targets could potentially be developed as disease biomarkers. Lesion-specific DNA isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues from existing or prospective patient cohorts may constitute a valuable resource for methylation analysis. However, low concentrations of DNA make these samples technically challenging to analyse using existing methods. We therefore set out to develop a sensitive and reproducible nested PCR-pyrosequencing based method to accurately quantify methylation at 10 CpG sites within the E2BS1, E2BS2,3,4 and Sp1 binding sites in the viral upstream regulatory region of HPV16 genome. Methylation analyses using primary and nested PCR-pyrosequencing on 52 FFPE tissue [26 paired whole tissue sections (WTS) and laser capture microdissected (LCM) tissues] from patients with anal squamous intraepithelial lesions was performed. Using nested PCR, methylation results were obtained for the E2BS1, E2BS2,3,4 and Sp1 binding sites in 86.4% of the WTS and 81.8% of the LCM samples. Methylation patterns were strongly correlated within median values of matched pairs of WTS and LCM sections, but overall methylation was higher in LCM samples at different CpG sites. High grade lesions showed low methylation levels in the E2BS1 and E2BS2 regions, with increased methylation detected in the E2BS,3,4/Sp1 regions, showing the highest methylation at CpG site 37. The method developed is highly sensitive in samples with low amounts of DNA and demonstrated to be suitable for archival samples. Our data shows a possible role of specific methylation in the HPV16 URR for detection of HSIL. PMID:27529629

  5. CpG Methylation Analysis of HPV16 in Laser Capture Microdissected Archival Tissue and Whole Tissue Sections from High Grade Anal Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions: A Potential Disease Biomarker.

    PubMed

    Molano, Monica; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Garland, Suzanne M; Roberts, Jennifer M; Machalek, Dorothy A; Phillips, Samuel; Chandler, David; Hillman, Richard J; Grulich, Andrew E; Jin, Fengyi; Poynten, I Mary; Templeton, David J; Cornall, Alyssa M

    2016-01-01

    Incidence and mortality rates of anal cancer are increasing globally. More than 90% of anal squamous cell carcinomas (ASCC) are associated with human papillomavirus (HPV). Studies on HPV-related anogenital lesions have shown that patterns of methylation of viral and cellular DNA targets could potentially be developed as disease biomarkers. Lesion-specific DNA isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues from existing or prospective patient cohorts may constitute a valuable resource for methylation analysis. However, low concentrations of DNA make these samples technically challenging to analyse using existing methods. We therefore set out to develop a sensitive and reproducible nested PCR-pyrosequencing based method to accurately quantify methylation at 10 CpG sites within the E2BS1, E2BS2,3,4 and Sp1 binding sites in the viral upstream regulatory region of HPV16 genome. Methylation analyses using primary and nested PCR-pyrosequencing on 52 FFPE tissue [26 paired whole tissue sections (WTS) and laser capture microdissected (LCM) tissues] from patients with anal squamous intraepithelial lesions was performed. Using nested PCR, methylation results were obtained for the E2BS1, E2BS2,3,4 and Sp1 binding sites in 86.4% of the WTS and 81.8% of the LCM samples. Methylation patterns were strongly correlated within median values of matched pairs of WTS and LCM sections, but overall methylation was higher in LCM samples at different CpG sites. High grade lesions showed low methylation levels in the E2BS1 and E2BS2 regions, with increased methylation detected in the E2BS,3,4/Sp1 regions, showing the highest methylation at CpG site 37. The method developed is highly sensitive in samples with low amounts of DNA and demonstrated to be suitable for archival samples. Our data shows a possible role of specific methylation in the HPV16 URR for detection of HSIL. PMID:27529629

  6. Detection of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in formalin fixed paraffin embedded biopsies in Malaysian non-small cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Somatic mutations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are reportedly associated with various responses in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving the anti-EGFR agents. Detection of the mutation therefore plays an important role in therapeutic decision making. The aim of this study was to detect EGFR mutations in formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) samples using both Scorpion ARMS and high resolution melt (HRM) assay, and to compare the sensitivity of these methods. Results All of the mutations were found in adenocarcinoma, except one that was in squamous cell carcinoma. The mutation rate was 45.7% (221/484). Complex mutations were also observed, wherein 8 tumours carried 2 mutations and 1 tumour carried 3 mutations. Conclusions Both methods detected EGFR mutations in FFPE samples. HRM assays gave more EGFR positive results compared to Scorpion ARMS. PMID:23590575

  7. Detection and Genotyping of Human Papillomavirus DNA in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Specimens with the HPV Direct Flow CHIP System

    PubMed Central

    Herraez-Hernandez, Elsa; Preda, Ovidiu; Alonso, Sonia; Pardo, Rosario Serrano; Olmo, Asuncion

    2013-01-01

    The novel HPV Direct Flow CHIP commercial system for Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping is based on rapid PCR and automatic reverse dot blot hybridization to genotype-specific probes, allowing the detection of 36 HPV genotypes. This study examined the performance of HPV Direct Flow CHIP in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples (n= 99). Each sample was analyzed both by Direct PCR, using crude cell extracts without DNA purification, and by conventional PCR, using purified DNA. Pair-wise analysis of the results demonstrated strong concordance between the results obtained with the two protocols, although a slightly higher rate of multiple infections was detected by conventional PCR. In summary, HPV Direct Flow CHIP achieves effective HPV detection from FFPE samples with both Direct PCR and Conventional PCR protocols. PMID:24222806

  8. Confirmation of immunoglobulin heavy chain rearrangement by polymerase chain reaction using surgically obtained, paraffin-embedded samples to diagnose primary palate mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma: A case study

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Shigehiro; Yokomizo, Naoko; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Kouhei

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intraoral mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is a rare lymphoma that has a good prognosis if diagnosed correctly and treated in time. Presentation of case A 64-year-old woman was referred to our department with asymptomatic swelling of the left hard palate. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the left hard palate. We performed a pre-surgery biopsy; however, it was difficult to differentiate MALT lymphoma from other reactive lymphoproliferative disorders via gross or microscopic examination. Although the lesion was completely excised, histological findings did not allow a definitive diagnosis due to an absence of visible monoclonality. We then performed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded surgical samples. Capillary electrophoresis showed monoclonal peaks of immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangement, thus facilitating a definitive diagnosis of MALT lymphoma. Discussion PCR technique is rapid, accurate, and enables a definitive diagnosis without relying on traditional histological or molecular diagnostic techniques, such as Southern blotting. Conclusion We suggest that, if histological examination is ambiguous or fresh material is insufficient, PCR can be performed using paraffin-embedded materials to definitively diagnose low-grade lymphomas, such as MALT lymphoma. PMID:25841155

  9. Detection of KIAA1549-BRAF Fusion Transcripts in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Pediatric Low-Grade Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yongji; Rich, Benjamin E.; Vena, Natalie; Craig, Justin M.; MacConaill, Laura E.; Rajaram, Veena; Goldman, Stewart; Taha, Hala; Mahmoud, Madeha; Ozek, Memet; Sav, Aydin; Longtine, Janina A.; Lindeman, Neal I.; Garraway, Levi A.; Ligon, Azra H.; Stiles, Charles D.; Santagata, Sandro; Chan, Jennifer A.; Kieran, Mark W.; Ligon, Keith L.

    2011-01-01

    Alterations of BRAF are the most common known genetic aberrations in pediatric gliomas. They frequently are found in pilocytic astrocytomas, where genomic duplications involving BRAF and the poorly characterized gene KIAA1549 create fusion proteins with constitutive B-Raf kinase activity. BRAF V600E point mutations are less common and generally occur in nonpilocytic tumors. The development of BRAF inhibitors as drugs has created an urgent need for robust clinical assays to identify activating lesions in BRAF. KIAA1549-BRAF fusion transcripts have been detected in frozen tissue, however, methods for FFPE tissue have not been reported. We developed a panel of FFPE-compatible quantitative RT-PCR assays for the most common KIAA1549-BRAF fusion transcripts. Application of these assays to a collection of 51 low-grade pediatric gliomas showed 97% sensitivity and 91% specificity compared with fluorescence in situ hybridization or array comparative genomic hybridization. In parallel, we assayed samples for the presence of the BRAF V600E mutation by PCR pyrosequencing. The data further support previous observations that these two alterations of the BRAF, KIAA1549 fusions and V600E point mutations, are associated primarily with pilocytic astrocytomas and nonpilocytic gliomas, respectively. These results show that fusion transcripts and mutations can be detected reliably in standard FFPE specimens and may be useful for incorporation into future studies of pediatric gliomas in basic science or clinical trials. PMID:21884820

  10. Characterization of a Novel Anti-Human HB-EGF Monoclonal Antibody Applicable for Paraffin-Embedded Tissues and Diagnosis of HB-EGF-Related Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Ryo; Takagi, Mika; Akatsuka, Jun-ichi; Ono, Ken-ichiro; Kishi, Yoshiro

    2016-01-01

    Heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) is a member of the EGF family of growth factors that bind to and activate the EGF receptor (EGFR/ErbB1) and ErbB4. HB-EGF plays pivotal roles in pathophysiological processes, including cancer. Thus, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for HB-EGF detection could be an important tool in the therapeutic diagnosis of HB-EGF-related cancers and other diseases. However, few mAbs, especially those applicable for immunohistochemistry (IHC), have been established to date. In this study, we generated a clone of hybridoma-derived mAb 2-108 by immunizing mice with recombinant human HB-EGF protein expressed by human cells. The mAb 2-108 specifically bound to human HB-EGF but not to mouse HB-EGF and was successful in immunoblotting, even under reducing conditions, immunoprecipitation, and immunofluorescence for unfixed as well as paraformaldehyde-fixed cells. Notably, this mAb was effective in IHC of paraffin-embedded tumor specimens. Epitope mapping analysis showed that mAb 2-108 recognized the N-terminal prodomain in HB-EGF. These results indicate that this new anti-HB-EGF mAb 2-108 would be useful in the diagnosis of HB-EGF-related cancers and would be a strong tool in both basic and clinical research on HB-EGF. PMID:26974561

  11. On the problem of local tissue hyperthermia control: multiscale modelling of pulsed laser radiation action on a medium with embedded nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Avetisyan, A Yu; Yakunin, A N; Tuchin, Valerii V

    2011-01-24

    Methods for solving analytically and numerically the problem of multiscale modelling of the laser hyperthermia processes in a medium with nanoparticles are developed with regard to composite spherical nanoparticles (nanoshells). The features of the laser radiation field localisation on nanoscale inhomogeneities are investigated. Issues related to the control of the tissue hyperthermia processes by choosing the parameters of spatiotemporal localisation of the laser beam and of the absorbing nanoparticles are discussed. (application of lasers and laser-optical methods in life sciences)

  12. Coaxial electrospun aligned tussah silk fibroin nanostructured fiber scaffolds embedded with hydroxyapatite-tussah silk fibroin nanoparticles for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Shao, Weili; He, Jianxin; Sang, Feng; Ding, Bin; Chen, Li; Cui, Shizhong; Li, Kejing; Han, Qiming; Tan, Weilin

    2016-01-01

    The bone is a composite of inorganic and organic materials and possesses a complex hierarchical architecture consisting of mineralized fibrils formed by collagen molecules and coated with oriented hydroxyapatite. To regenerate bone tissue, it is necessary to provide a scaffold that mimics the architecture of the extracellular matrix in native bone. Here, we describe one such scaffold, a nanostructured composite with a core made of a composite of hydroxyapatite and tussah silk fibroin. The core is encased in a shell of tussah silk fibroin. The composite fibers were fabricated by coaxial electrospinning using green water solvent and were characterized using different techniques. In comparison to nanofibers of pure tussah silk, composite notably improved mechanical properties, with 90-fold and 2-fold higher initial modulus and breaking stress, respectively, obtained. Osteoblast-like MG-63 cells were cultivated on the composite to assess its suitability as a scaffold for bone tissue engineering. We found that the fiber scaffold supported cell adhesion and proliferation and functionally promoted alkaline phosphatase and mineral deposition relevant for biomineralization. In addition, the composite were more biocompatible than pure tussah silk fibroin or cover slip. Thus, the nanostructured composite has excellent biomimetic and mechanical properties and is a potential biocompatible scaffold for bone tissue engineering. PMID:26478319

  13. Usefulness of molecular biology performed with formaldehyde-fixed paraffin embedded tissue for the diagnosis of combined pulmonary invasive mucormycosis and aspergillosis in an immunocompromised patient

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Immunocompromised patients who develop invasive filamentous mycotic infections can be efficiently treated if rapid identification of the causative fungus is obtained. We report a case of fatal necrotic pneumonia caused by combined pulmonary invasive mucormycosis and aspergillosis in a 66 year-old renal transplant recipient. Aspergillus was first identified during the course of the disease by cytological examination and culture (A. fumigatus) of bronchoalveolar fluid. Hyphae of Mucorales (Rhizopus microsporus) were subsequently identified by culture of a tissue specimen taken from the left inferior pulmonary lobe, which was surgically resected two days before the patient died. Histological analysis of the lung parenchyma showed the association of two different filamentous mycoses for which the morphological features were evocative of aspergillosis and mucormycosis. However, the definitive identification of the associative infection was made by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) performed on deparaffinized tissue sections using specific primers for aspergillosis and mucormycosis. This case demonstrates that discrepancies between histological, cytological and mycological analyses can occur in cases of combined mycotic infection. In this regard, it shows that PCR on selected paraffin blocks is a very powerful method for making or confirming the association of different filamentous mycoses and that this method should be made available to pathology laboratories. PMID:20205795

  14. Utilizing Murine Inducible Telomerase Alleles in the Studies of Tissue Degeneration/Regeneration and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shingu, Takashi; Jaskelioff, Mariela; Yuan, Liang; Ding, Zhihu; Protopopov, Alexei; Kost-Alimova, Maria; Hu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Telomere dysfunction-induced loss of genome integrity and its associated DNA damage signaling and checkpoint responses are well-established drivers that cause tissue degeneration during ageing. Cancer, with incidence rates greatly increasing with age, is characterized by short telomere lengths and high telomerase activity. To study the roles of telomere dysfunction and telomerase reactivation in ageing and cancer, the protocol shows how to generate two murine inducible telomerase knock-in alleles 4-Hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT)-inducible TERT-Estrogen Receptor (mTERT-ER) and Lox-Stopper-LoxTERT (LSL-mTERT). The protocol describes the procedures to induce telomere dysfunction and reactivate telomerase activity in mTERT-ER and LSL-mTERT mice in vivo. The representative data show that reactivation of telomerase activity can ameliorate the tissue degenerative phenotypes induced by telomere dysfunction. In order to determine the impact of telomerase reactivation on tumorigenesis, we generated prostate tumor model G4 PB-Cre4 PtenL/L p53L/L LSL-mTERTL/L and thymic T-cell lymphoma model G4 Atm-/- mTERTER/ER. The representative data show that telomerase reactivation in the backdrop of genomic instability induced by telomere dysfunction can greatly enhance tumorigenesis. The protocol also describes the procedures used to isolate neural stem cells (NSCs) from mTERT-ER and LSL-mTERT mice and reactivate telomerase activity in NSCs in vitro. The representative data show that reactivation of telomerase can enhance the self-renewal capability and neurogenesis in vitro. Finally, the protocol describes the procedures for performing telomere FISH (Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization) on both mouse FFPE (Formalin Fixed and Paraffin Embedded) brain tissues and metaphase chromosomes of cultured cells. PMID:25938254

  15. Tissue-plastinated vs. celloidin-embedded large serial sections in video, analog and digital photographic on-screen reproduction: a preliminary step to exact virtual 3D modelling, exemplified in the normal midface and cleft-lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Landes, Constantin A; Weichert, Frank; Geis, Philipp; Wernstedt, Katrin; Wilde, Anja; Fritsch, Helga; Wagner, Mathias

    2005-01-01

    This study analyses tissue-plastinated vs. celloidin-embedded large serial sections, their inherent artefacts and aptitude with common video, analog or digital photographic on-screen reproduction. Subsequent virtual 3D microanatomical reconstruction will increase our knowledge of normal and pathological microanatomy for cleft-lip-palate (clp) reconstructive surgery. Of 18 fetal (six clp, 12 control) specimens, six randomized specimens (two clp) were BiodurE12-plastinated, sawn, burnished 90 µm thick transversely (five) or frontally (one), stained with azureII/methylene blue, and counterstained with basic-fuchsin (TP-AMF). Twelve remaining specimens (four clp) were celloidin-embedded, microtome-sectioned 75 µm thick transversely (ten) or frontally (two), and stained with haematoxylin–eosin (CE-HE). Computed-planimetry gauged artefacts, structure differentiation was compared with light microscopy on video, analog and digital photography. Total artefact was 0.9% (TP-AMF) and 2.1% (CE-HE); TP-AMF showed higher colour contrast, gamut and luminance, and CE-HE more red contrast, saturation and hue (P < 0.4). All (100%) structures of interest were light microscopically discerned, 83% on video, 76% on analog photography and 98% in digital photography. Computed image analysis assessed the greatest colour contrast, gamut, luminance and saturation on video; the most detailed, colour-balanced and sharpest images were obatined with digital photography (P < 0.02). TP-AMF retained spatial oversight, covered the entire area of interest and should be combined in different specimens with CE-HE which enables more refined muscle fibre reproduction. Digital photography is preferred for on-screen analysis. PMID:16050904

  16. Comprehensive Screening of Gene Copy Number Aberrations in Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Solid Tumors Using Molecular Inversion Probe-Based Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Array.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajesh R; Mehrotra, Meenakshi; Chen, Hui; Almohammedsalim, Alaa A; Sahin, Ayesagul; Bosamra, Alex; Patel, Keyur P; Routbort, Mark J; Lu, Xinyan; Ronald, Abraham; Mishra, Bal Mukund; Virani, Shumaila; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi

    2016-09-01

    Gene copy number aberrations (CNAs) represent a major class of cancer-related genomic alterations that drive solid tumors. Comprehensive and sensitive detection of CNAs is challenging because of often low quality and quantity of DNA isolated from the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) solid tumor samples. Here, in a clinical molecular diagnostic laboratory, we tested the utility and validated a molecular inversion probe-based (MIP) array to routinely screen for CNAs in solid tumors. Using low-input FFPE DNA, the array detects genome-wide CNAs with a special focus on 900 cancer-related genes. A cohort of 76 solid tumors of various types and tumor cellularity (20% to 100%), and four cancer cell lines were used. These harbored CNAs in clinically important genes (ERBB2, EGFR, FGFR1, KRAS, MYC) as detected by orthogonal techniques like next-generation sequencing or fluorescence in situ hybridization. Results of the MIP array were concordant with results from orthogonal techniques, and also provided additional information regarding the allelic nature of the CNAs. Limit-of-detection and assay reproducibility studies showed a high degree of sensitivity and reproducibility of detection, respectively. FFPE compatibility, ability to detect CNAs with high sensitivity, accuracy, and provide valuable information such as loss of heterozygosity along with relatively short turnaround times makes the MIP array a desirable clinical platform for routine screening of solid tumors in a clinical laboratory. PMID:27392636

  17. Genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii: DNA extraction from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded autopsy tissues from AIDS patients who died by severe disseminated toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Bastos da Silva, Inara; Batista, Tatiana Pimental de Andrade; Martines, Roosecelis Brasil; Kanamura, Cristina Takami; Ferreira, Isabelle Martins Ribeiro; Vidal, Jose Ernesto; Pereira-Chioccola, Vera Lucia

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the genetic features of Toxoplasma gondii isolated directly in autopsies of HIV-infected patients who died with severe disseminated toxoplasmosis. This retrospective analysis was conducted in a cohort of 15 HIV-infected patients with clinical and laboratory data. They had previous cerebral toxoplasmosis at least 6 months before the disseminated toxoplasmosis episode. The hypothesis was that they were infected with highly virulent parasites due to the condition in which they died. T. gondii genotyping was done directly in DNA extracted from 30 autopsy brain and lung samples (2 per patient) and mutilocus PCR-RFLP genotyping was done using 12 molecular markers. The 30 clinical samples were genotyped successfully in 8 or more loci and six suggestive genotypes were identified. One of them was Toxo DB #11, previously identified in different domestic animals and virulent in experimental animals. The other five suggestive genotypes identified in 14 patients were not described. TgHuDis1 was the most frequent and was determined in 8 patients. TgHuDis3 and TgHuDis5 were identified in two patients each. TgHuDis2 and TgHuDis4 have been identified in one patient each. These suggestive genotypes could be considered as virulent, since they caused severe tissue damage and had similar characteristics as Toxo # DB 11. PMID:26969767

  18. Novel antibody capture assay for paraffin-embedded tissue detects wide-ranging amyloid beta and paired helical filament–tau accumulation in cognitively normal older adults

    PubMed Central

    Postupna, Nadia; Rose, Shannon E.; Bird, Thomas D.; Gonzalez-Cuyar, Luis F.; Sonnen, Joshua A.; Larson, Eric B.; Keene, C. Dirk; Montine, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Quantifying antigens in formalin-fixed tissue is challenging and limits investigation in population-based studies of brain aging. To address this major limitation, we have developed a new technique that we call “Histelide”: immunohistochemistry (HIST-) and ELISA (-EL-) performed on a glass slide (-IDE). We validated Histelide in sections of prefrontal cortex from 20 selected cases: 12 subjects with clinically and neuropathologically diagnosed Alzheimer’s disease (AD), either autosomal dominant or late-onset forms, and 8 clinical and neuropathologic Controls. AD cases had significantly increased amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide and paired helical filament– (PHF-) tau per area of neocortex that was proteinase K-sensitive, and significantly decreased amount of synaptophysin. We next investigated prefrontal cortex from 81 consecutive cases of high cognitive performers from the Adult Changes in Thought (ACT) study, a population-based study of brain aging and incident dementia. As expected, latent AD was common in this group; however, our results quantified widely individually-varying levels of Aβ peptides and PHF-tau among these high cognitive performers. This novel approach obtains quantitative data from population-based studies, and our initial studies with high cognitive performers provide important quantitative insights into latent AD that should help guide expectations from neuroimaging and prevention studies. PMID:21999410

  19. Immunohistochemical characterization of selected cell markers for the detection of hematopoietic cells in formalin-fixed, paraffin wax-embedded lymphoid tissues of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) and walruses (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus).

    PubMed

    Seibel, H; Stimmer, L; Siebert, U; Beineke, A

    2010-10-15

    To facilitate a detailed investigation of pinniped lymphoid organs, 30 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) as well as eight polyclonal antibodies (pAb) of different species specificities directed against cell antigens of the hematopoietic system were tested for immunohistochemical cross-reactivity on formalin-fixed, paraffin wax-embedded tissues of harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) and a walrus (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus). Six monoclonal and eight polyclonal antibodies showed specific immunoreactivities. Lymphocytes were immunolabeled by an anti-CD3 pAb, anti-Foxp3 mAb and anti-CD79 alpha mAb, while plasma cell subpopulations were recognized by anti-IgA pAb, anti-IgG pAb and anti-IgM pAb as well as by anti-kappa- and anti-lambda light chain pAb. Cells of the histiocytic lineage were recognized by lysozyme-, myeloid/histiocyte antigen-, and CD68-specific markers. Furthermore, dendritic cell-like cells were detected by an anti-S100 protein pAb. The MHC class II antigen was labeled on the majority of immune cells of the harbor seal and walrus using a bovine mAb. Mast cells were stained by an anti-mast cell tryptase mAb. Thus, using these antibodies from various species, it is now possible to determine phenotypical changes in lymphoid organs and detect different leukocyte subsets involved in inflammatory responses in archived tissue samples of these pinniped species. PMID:20566219

  20. NGS-based BRCA1/2 mutation testing of high-grade serous ovarian cancer tissue: results and conclusions of the first international round robin trial.

    PubMed

    Endris, Volker; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Pfarr, Nicole; Penzel, Roland; Möbs, Markus; Lenze, Dido; Darb-Esfahani, Silvia; Hummel, Michael; Sabine-Merkelbach-Bruse; Jung, Andreas; Lehmann, Ulrich; Kreipe, Hans; Kirchner, Thomas; Büttner, Reinhard; Jochum, Wolfram; Höfler, Gerald; Dietel, Manfred; Weichert, Wilko; Schirmacher, Peter

    2016-06-01

    With the approval of olaparib as monotherapy treatment in platinum-sensitive, relapsed high-grade serous ovarian cancer by the European Medical Agency (EMA), comprehensive genotyping of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in tumor tissue has become a mandatory pre-therapeutic test. This requires significant advances in routine tumor test methodologies due to the large size of both genes and the lack of mutational hot spots. Classical focused screening approaches, like Sanger sequencing, do not allow for a sensitive, rapid, and economic analysis of tumor tissue. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) approaches employing targeted panels for BRCA1/2 to interrogate formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tumor samples from either surgical resection or biopsy specimens can overcome these limitations. Although focused NGS methods have been implemented by few centers in routine molecular diagnostics for the analysis of some druggable oncogenic mutations, the reliable diagnostic testing of the entire coding regions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 was a new challenge requiring extensive technological improvement and quality management. Here, we describe the implementation and results of the first round robin trial for BRCA1/2 mutation testing in tumor tissue that was conducted in central Europe on May 2015, shortly after the approval and prior to the official release of olaparib. The high success rate of 81 % (21/26 test centers) demonstrates that BRCA1/2 multicenter mutation testing is well feasible in FFPE tumor tissue, extending to other tumor entities beyond ovarian cancer. The high number of test centers passing the trial demonstrates the success of the concerted efforts by German, Swiss, and Austrian pathology centers to ensure quality-controlled NGS-based testing and proves the potential of this technology in routine molecular pathology. On the basis of our results, we provide recommendations for predictive testing of tumor tissue for BRCA1/2 to clinical decision making in ovarian cancer patients. PMID

  1. Characterization of gene expression profiling of mouse tissues obtained during the postmortem interval.

    PubMed

    Sobue, Sayaka; Sakata, Keita; Sekijima, Yuki; Qiao, Shanlou; Murate, Takashi; Ichihara, Masatoshi

    2016-06-01

    Attempts to establish a tissue bank from autopsy samples have led to uncovering of the secrets of many diseases. Here, we examined the length of time that the RNA from postmortem tissues is available for microarray analysis and reported the gene expression profile for up- and down-regulated genes during the postmortem interval. We extracted RNA from fresh-frozen (FF) and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) brains and livers of three different groups of mice: 1) mice immediately after death, 2) mice that were stored at room temperature for 3h after death, and 3) mice that were stored at 4°C for 18h after death, as this storage resembles the human autopsy process in Japan. The RNA quality of the brain and the liver was maintained up to 18h during the postmortem interval. Based on the microarray analysis, we selected genes that were altered by >1.3-fold or <0.77-fold and classified these genes using hierarchical cluster analysis following DAVID gene ontology analysis. These studies revealed that cytoskeleton-related genes were enriched in the set of up-regulated genes, while serine protease inhibitors were enriched in the set of down-regulated genes. Interestingly, although the RNA quality was maintained due to high RNA integrity number (RIN) values, up-regulated genes were not validated by quantitative PCR, suggesting that these genes may become fragmented or modified by an unknown mechanism. Taken together, our findings suggest that under typical autopsy conditions, gene expression profiles that reflect disease pathology can be examined by understanding comprehensive recognition of postmortem fluctuation of gene expression. PMID:27185020

  2. Evaluation of a quantitative RT-PCR assay to detect HER2 mRNA overexpression for diagnosis and selection of trastuzumab therapy in breast cancer tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hye-Young; Kim, Sunghyun; Park, Sangjung; Kim, Seungil; Jung, Dongju; Park, Kwang Hwa; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2014-12-01

    Breast cancer patients who have a positive result for HER2 overexpression are commonly treated with Herceptin, a HER2-targeted therapy. In the present study, the BrightGen HER2 RT-qDx (Syantra, Calgary, Canada), which is based on a one-tube nested RT-qPCR method that detects HER2 mRNA overexpression, was clinically evaluated in a total of 237 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples from breast cancer patients. Among the 38 HER2 positive samples, which were determined via IHC/FISH methods, 13 samples out of 16 (81.3%) that were IHC2+/FISH+ and 22 samples out of 22 (100%) that were IHC3+ have been decided positive for HER2 expression via the RT-qPCR method. The true positivity and false positivity results for the RT-qPCR were 92% (35/38) and 2% (1/65), respectively. The concordance between RT-qPCR and IHC results and RT-qPCR and IHC/FISH was 87.2% and 92.1%, respectively. Conclusively, the BrightGen HER2 RT-qDx may be a reliable and convenient method that can supplement traditional IHC and FISH methods for efficient use of trastuzumab. PMID:25236569

  3. Lack of concordance in microarray gene expression responses to Phenobarbital in companion aged FFPE and Frozen liver samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite the immense potential value of public and private biorepositories, direct utilization of archival tissues for molecular profiling has been limited. A major reason for this limited use is the difficulty in obtaining reliable transcriptomic profiles from formalin-fixed par...

  4. Global DNA methylation and PTEN hypermethylation alterations in lung tissues from human silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianan; Jia, Xiaowei; Mei, Liangying; Zheng, Min; Yu, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background Silicosis is a respiratory disease caused by long-term silica dust exposure. Our previous study has demonstrated that silica mediates the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN)/serine or threonine kinase (AKT)/mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK)/AP-1 pathway in human embryo lung fibroblasts (HELFs). The purpose of this study is to identify genome-wide aberrant DNA methylation profiling in lung tissues from silicosis patients. Methods We performed Illumina Human Methylation 450K Beadchip arrays to investigate the methylation alteration in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) lung specimens, immunohistochemistry to detect the level of c-Jun and PTEN proteins; methylation specific PCR (MS-PCR) to identify PTEN and c-Jun promoter methylation in HELFs. Results We found 86,770 CpG sites and 79,660 CpG sites significantly differed in methylation status in early-stage and advanced-stage compared with GEO normal lung methylation data. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis revealed the methylated status of MAPK signaling pathway was considered changed. The number of PTEN and c-Jun CpG promoter methylated-sites were increased in advanced-stage. Early-stage showed the positive expression of c-Jun and PTEN protein and negative or mild expression in advanced-stage. PTEN promoter was no differentially methylated and c-Jun promoter differed at 12 and 24 h in HELFs. Conclusions Abnormal DNA methylation on genome-scale was implicated in silicosis, and PTEN promoter hypermethylation might be associated with decrease of PTEN protein.

  5. Analytic performance studies and clinical reproducibility of a real-time PCR assay for the detection of epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutations in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens of non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations identify patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have a high likelihood of benefiting from treatment with anti-EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Sanger sequencing is widely used for mutation detection but can be technically challenging, resulting in longer turn-around-time, with limited sensitivity for low levels of mutations. This manuscript details the technical performance verification studies and external clinical reproducibility studies of the cobas EGFR Mutation Test, a rapid multiplex real-time PCR assay designed to detect 41 mutations in exons 18, 19, 20 and 21. Methods The assay’s limit of detection was determined using 25 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue (FFPET)-derived and plasmid DNA blends. Assay performance for a panel of 201 specimens was compared against Sanger sequencing with resolution of discordant specimens by quantitative massively parallel pyrosequencing (MPP). Internal and external reproducibility was assessed using specimens tested in duplicate by different operators, using different reagent lots, instruments and at different sites. The effects on the performance of the cobas EGFR test of endogenous substances and nine therapeutic drugs were evaluated in ten FFPET specimens. Other tests included an evaluation of the effects of necrosis, micro-organisms and homologous DNA sequences on assay performance, and the inclusivity of the assay for less frequent mutations. Results A >95% hit rate was obtained in blends with >5% mutant alleles, as determined by MPP analysis, at a total DNA input of 150 ng. The overall percent agreement between Sanger sequencing and the cobas test was 96.7% (negative percent agreement 97.5%; positive percent agreement 95.8%). Assay repeatability was 98% when tested with two operators, instruments, and reagent lots. In the external reproducibility study, the agreement was > 99% across all sites, all operators and all reagent lots

  6. The data embedding method

    SciTech Connect

    Sandford, M.T. II; Bradley, J.N.; Handel, T.G.

    1996-06-01

    Data embedding is a new steganographic method for combining digital information sets. This paper describes the data embedding method and gives examples of its application using software written in the C-programming language. Sandford and Handel produced a computer program (BMPEMBED, Ver. 1.51 written for IBM PC/AT or compatible, MS/DOS Ver. 3.3 or later) that implements data embedding in an application for digital imagery. Information is embedded into, and extracted from, Truecolor or color-pallet images in Microsoft{reg_sign} bitmap (.BMP) format. Hiding data in the noise component of a host, by means of an algorithm that modifies or replaces the noise bits, is termed {open_quote}steganography.{close_quote} Data embedding differs markedly from conventional steganography, because it uses the noise component of the host to insert information with few or no modifications to the host data values or their statistical properties. Consequently, the entropy of the host data is affected little by using data embedding to add information. The data embedding method applies to host data compressed with transform, or {open_quote}lossy{close_quote} compression algorithms, as for example ones based on discrete cosine transform and wavelet functions. Analysis of the host noise generates a key required for embedding and extracting the auxiliary data from the combined data. The key is stored easily in the combined data. Images without the key cannot be processed to extract the embedded information. To provide security for the embedded data, one can remove the key from the combined data and manage it separately. The image key can be encrypted and stored in the combined data or transmitted separately as a ciphertext much smaller in size than the embedded data. The key size is typically ten to one-hundred bytes, and it is in data an analysis algorithm.

  7. Nationale Roadmap Embedded Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damm, Werner; Achatz, Reinhold; Beetz, Klaus; Broy, Manfred; Daembkes, Heinrich; Grimm, Klaus; Liggesmeyer, Peter

    Eingebettete Systeme" sind in ihrem Softwareanteil nicht sichtbar und doch hoch relevant für den Wirtschaftsstandort Deutschland. Ihre Bedeutung fasst die vorliegende Nationale Roadmap Embedded Systems in den folgenden 10 Thesen zusammen: These 1 Die zentralen ökonomischen und gesellschaftlichen Herausforderungen in Deutschland lassen sich ohne die Querschnittstechnologie Embedded Systems nicht lösen1.

  8. Silica Embedded Metal Hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.

    1998-08-01

    A method to produce silica embedded metal hydride was developed. The product is a composite in which metal hydride particles are embedded in a matrix of silica. The silica matrix is highly porous. Hydrogen gas can easily reach the embedded metal hydride particles. The pores are small so that the metal hydride particles cannot leave the matrix. The porous matrix also protects the metal hydride particles from larger and reactive molecules such as oxygen, since the larger gas molecules cannot pass through the small pores easily. Tests show that granules of this composite can absorb hydrogen readily and withstand many cycles without making fines.

  9. K-Ras mutation detection in liquid biopsy and tumor tissue as prognostic biomarker in patients with pancreatic cancer: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Zheng, Yuanting; Sun, Hong; Zhuang, Rongyuan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Tianshu; Cai, Weimin

    2016-07-01

    K-Ras gene mutations have been found in most pancreatic cancers; however, conflicting data on the prognostic value of K-Ras mutations in pancreatic cancer have been published. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess its prognostic significance. Literature searches of PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science and Google Scholar were performed through December 2015 to identify publications exploring the association of K-Ras mutation with overall survival. Forty eligible studies involving 3427 patients with pancreatic cancer were included in the present meta-analysis. Our analysis showed a hazard ratio (HR) of negative association with survival of 1.61 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.36-1.90; p < 0.01] in K-Ras mutant pancreatic cancer patients. In subgroup analyses, K-Ras mutations detected in tumor tissues and in liquid biopsies had HRs of 1.37 (95 % CI 1.20-1.57; p < 0.01) and 3.16 (95 % CI 2.1-4.71; p < 0.01), respectively. In addition, the HR was higher when K-Ras mutations were detected in fresh frozen samples (HR = 2.01, 95 % CI 1.28-3.16, p = 0.002) than in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples (HR = 1.29, 95 % CI 1.12-1.49, p < 0.01). Though K-Ras alterations are more frequent among non-East Asian individuals than East Asian individuals, there were no significant differences in HRs of survival between the two ethnic subgroups. In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggests that K-Ras mutations are associated with a worse overall survival in pancreatic cancer patients, especially when mutations are detected in liquid biopsies or fresh frozen tumor tissue samples. PMID:27225938

  10. Differential Expression of MicroRNAs in Tissues and Plasma Co-exists as a Biomarker for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shadan; Dubaybo, Hala; Brand, Randall E; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2016-01-01

    Objective Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a lethal disease with disappointing results from current treatment modalities, suggesting that novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Since microRNAs (miRNAs) are important player in biology, the clinical utility of miRNAs for designing novel therapeutics is an active area of research. The objective of the present study was to examine differentially expressed miRNAs between normal and tumor tissues, and in plasma samples obtained from PC patients, chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients and healthy subjects (HC). Material and methods The miRNA expression profiling using formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues from normal and tumor specimens was accomplished using miRBase version 19 (LC Sciences, Houston, TX, USA). Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was subsequently performed in individual samples for 7 selected miRNAs. In addition, qRT-PCR was also performed for assessing the expression of 8 selected miRNAs in plasma samples. Results A significant difference in the expressions of miR-21, miR-205, miR-155, miR-31, miR-203, miR-214 and miR-129-2 were found in tumor tissue samples. Lower expression of miR-214 was found to be associated with better overall survival. We also observed differential expression of 8 miRNAs in plasma samples of CP and PC patients compared to HC. Interestingly, over expression of miR-21, and miR-31 was noted in both tumor tissues and in the plasma. Conclusion We found deregulated expression of miRNAs that could distinguish normal from PC in two different types of samples (tissues and plasma). Interestingly, lower expression of miR-214 was found to be associated with better overall survival. Although not statistically significant, we also observed higher expression of let-7a and lower expression of miR-508 to be associated with overall better survival. We conclude that our study nicely lays the foundation for detailed future investigations for assessing the role of these miRNAs in the

  11. Modular error embedding

    DOEpatents

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T.; Handel, Theodore G.; Ettinger, J. Mark

    1999-01-01

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data containing noise in the low-order bits. The method applies to digital data representing analog signals, for example digital images. The method reduces the error introduced by other methods that replace the low-order bits with auxiliary information. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user through use of a digital key. The modular error embedding method includes a process to permute the order in which the host data values are processed. The method doubles the amount of auxiliary information that can be added to host data values, in comparison with bit-replacement methods for high bit-rate coding. The invention preserves human perception of the meaning and content of the host data, permitting the addition of auxiliary data in the amount of 50% or greater of the original host data.

  12. Health effects of embedded depleted uranium.

    PubMed

    McClain, David E; Benson, Kimberly A; Dalton, Tom K; Ejnik, John; Emond, Christy A; Hodge, Shelly J; Kalinich, John F; Landauer, Michael R; Livengood, David R; Miller, Alexandra C; Pellmar, Terry C; Stewart, Michael D; Villa, Vilmar; Xu, Jiaquan

    2002-02-01

    The health effects of embedded fragments of depleted uranium (DU) are being investigated to determine whether current surgical fragment-removal policies are appropriate for this metal. The authors studied rodents implanted with DU pellets as well as cultured human cells exposed to DU compounds. Results indicate that uranium from implanted DU fragments distributes to tissues distant from implantation sites, including bone, kidney, muscle, and liver. Despite levels of uranium in kidney that would be nephrotoxic after acute exposure, no histological or functional kidney toxicity was observed with embedded DU, indicating that the kidney adapts when exposed chronically. Nonetheless, further studies of the long-term health impact are needed. DU is mutagenic and transforms human osteoblastic cells into a tumorigenic phenotype. It alters neurophysiological parameters in rat hippocampus, crosses the placental barrier, and enters fetal tissue. Preliminary data also indicate decreased rodent litter size when animals are bred 6 months or longer after DU implantation. PMID:11873491

  13. Immunohistochemistry and molecular epidemiology of avian paramyxovirus 1 from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded sections of Japanese doves (Columba livia) affected with neurological signs

    PubMed Central

    NAKAMURA, Kikuyasu; FUJIMORI, Hideo; KOYAMA, Akiko; DAI, Trinh Quang; IMAI, Kunitoshi; IKEZAWA, Mitsutaka; YAMAMOTO, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Four doves (Nos. 1–4 birds) affected with neurological signs (ataxia, circling and torticollis) were investigated pathologically and microbiologically. Viral isolation was tried from the tracheal and cloacal swabs of all 4 birds and from liver, spleen, kidney, heart, lung and brain of Nos. 1 and 2 birds. No viruses were isolated from 4 birds, but they had high serum antibody titers against avian paramyxovirus 1 (APMV-1). Histologically, they had the characteristic histological changes of pigeon APMV-1 infection; nonpurulent encephalitis and interstitial nephritis. Immununohistochemically, APMV-1 antigens were detected in the necrotic renal tubular epithelial cells of 1 bird of them (No. 3 bird). Detection of APMV-1 ribonucleic acid (RNA) from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) sections was attempted by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Sequencing the RT-PCR product showed the virus RNA belonged to the same APMV-1 genotype (VI) as the strains isolated from the world previous cases of pigeon APMV-1 infection. The RT-PCR of FFPE sections and sequencing of RT-PCR products are useful for molecular epidemiology of the virus when viral isolation from fresh samples is unsuccessful. PMID:25816803

  14. Immunohistochemistry and molecular epidemiology of avian paramyxovirus 1 from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded sections of Japanese doves (Columba livia) affected with neurological signs.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kikuyasu; Fujimori, Hideo; Koyama, Akiko; Dai, Trinh Quang; Imai, Kunitoshi; Ikezawa, Mitsutaka; Yamamoto, Yu

    2015-07-01

    Four doves (Nos. 1-4 birds) affected with neurological signs (ataxia, circling and torticollis) were investigated pathologically and microbiologically. Viral isolation was tried from the tracheal and cloacal swabs of all 4 birds and from liver, spleen, kidney, heart, lung and brain of Nos. 1 and 2 birds. No viruses were isolated from 4 birds, but they had high serum antibody titers against avian paramyxovirus 1 (APMV-1). Histologically, they had the characteristic histological changes of pigeon APMV-1 infection; nonpurulent encephalitis and interstitial nephritis. Immununohistochemically, APMV-1 antigens were detected in the necrotic renal tubular epithelial cells of 1 bird of them (No. 3 bird). Detection of APMV-1 ribonucleic acid (RNA) from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) sections was attempted by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Sequencing the RT-PCR product showed the virus RNA belonged to the same APMV-1 genotype (VI) as the strains isolated from the world previous cases of pigeon APMV-1 infection. The RT-PCR of FFPE sections and sequencing of RT-PCR products are useful for molecular epidemiology of the virus when viral isolation from fresh samples is unsuccessful. PMID:25816803

  15. Modified Embedded Atom Method

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-08-01

    Interatomic force and energy calculation subroutine to be used with the molecular dynamics simulation code LAMMPS (Ref a.). The code evaluated the total energy and atomic forces (energy gradient) according to a cubic spline-based variant (Ref b.) of the Modified Embedded Atom Method (MEAM) with a additional Stillinger-Weber (SW) contribution.

  16. Community-Embedded Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazmer, Michelle M.

    2005-01-01

    Online learners often stay located in, and tied to, their communities, kinship networks, households, and workplaces. Institutions providing online education can thus create ties to communities as students draw their learning into networks in which they are already embedded. Frequent interactions across multiple media that are afforded by…

  17. Flexible embedding of networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Gracia, Juan; Buckee, Caroline; Onnela, Jukka-Pekka

    We introduce a model for embedding one network into another, focusing on the case where network A is much bigger than network B. Nodes from network A are assigned to the nodes in network B using an algorithm where we control the extent of localization of node placement in network B using a single parameter. Starting from an unassigned node in network A, called the source node, we first map this node to a randomly chosen node in network B, called the target node. We then assign the neighbors of the source node to the neighborhood of the target node using a random walk based approach. To assign each neighbor of the source node to one of the nodes in network B, we perform a random walk starting from the target node with stopping probability α. We repeat this process until all nodes in network A have been mapped to the nodes of network B. The simplicity of the model allows us to calculate key quantities of interest in closed form. By varying the parameter α, we are able to produce embeddings from very local (α = 1) to very global (α --> 0). We show how our calculations fit the simulated results, and we apply the model to study how social networks are embedded in geography and how the neurons of C. Elegans are embedded in the surrounding volume.

  18. Embedded-monolith armor

    DOEpatents

    McElfresh, Michael W.; Groves, Scott E; Moffet, Mitchell L.; Martin, Louis P.

    2016-07-19

    A lightweight armor system utilizing a face section having a multiplicity of monoliths embedded in a matrix supported on low density foam. The face section is supported with a strong stiff backing plate. The backing plate is mounted on a spall plate.

  19. Media Embedded Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, J. David

    A review of literature and two surveys, one of college students and one of a random sample of adults, were used to examine four aspects of media embedded interactions (social behavior in front of a TV or radio): their functions, their environment, their effects, and the reactions of the interactants to them. Television is seen as performing a…

  20. Release of copper from embedded solid copper bullets into muscle and fat tissues of fallow deer (Dama dama), roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), and wild boar (Sus scrofa) and effect of copper content on oxidative stability of heat-processed meat.

    PubMed

    Schuhmann-Irschik, I; Sager, M; Paulsen, P; Tichy, A; Bauer, F

    2015-10-01

    When venison with embedded copper bullets was subjected to different culinary processing procedures, the amount of copper released from the embedded bullet was affected more by the retention period of the bullet in the meat during cool storage, than by the different heating protocols. The presence of copper fragments had no significant effect on levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Conversely, TBARS in lean meat (fallow deer, wild boar, roe deer) were significantly affected by culinary treatment (higher TBARS in boiled and boiled-stored meat than in meat barbecued or boiled in brine). In pork-beef patties doped with up to 28mg/kg Cu, TBARS increased after dry-heating and subsequently storing the meat patties. The amount of copper doping had no effect on TBARS for 0 and 7days of storage, but a significant effect at day 14 (fat oxidation retarded at higher Cu doses). Evidence is presented that wild boar meat may be more sensitive to fat oxidation than pork-beef. PMID:26005913

  1. Isometric embeddings of polyhedra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minemyer, Barry

    An indefinite metric polyhedron is a triple (X, T, g) where X is a topological space, T is a simplicial triangulation of X with edge set E, and g is a function from E to the reals. g assigns to each k-dimensional simplex S a unique quadratic form on Rk, denoted by G(S). An indefinite metric polyhedron is called a Euclidean polyhedron if the form G(S) is positive definite for every simplex S. Rpq denotes R p + q endowed with the inner product of signature (p, q). Our first result is that every compact n-dimensional indefinite metric polyhedron with vertex set V admits a simplicial isometric embedding into Rqq where q = max{d, 2n + 1} and d = max{deg(v) | v is in V}. We can use the compact case to extend to the non-compact case, but only if we assume that d = max{deg(v) | v is in V} is less than infinity. Specifically, every (non-compact) indefinite metric polyhedron admits a simplicial isometric embedding into Rpp where p = 2q(d3 - d2 + d + 1) and q and d are defined as above. Finally we use results of Akopyan and Greene to prove that every n-dimensional indefinite metric polyhedron admits a piecewise linear isometric embedding into Rn2n. In Chapter 2 we prove that every short (1-Lipschitz) map from an n-dimensional Euclidean polyhedron into EN is epsilon close to a pl isometric embedding (for anyepsilon > 0) provided N ≥ 3n. We can relax the dimensionality of the Euclidean space to 2n + 1 if we allow our map to be continuous instead of pl. These results are extensions of a result due to Akopyan. We provide a detailed proof of Akopyan's Theorem, as the only currently available proof is in Russian. The remaining results in this work are applications of our continuous isometric embedding theorem above. This result is used to prove that every Pro-Euclidean space of rank at most n admits an isometric embedding into E2n + 1. The result, as well as a theorem due to Bridson, also allows for an approximate isometric embedding theorem for geodesic metric spaces with

  2. Terahertz pulsed spectroscopy of paraffin-embedded brain glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Kun; Chen, Tu-nan; Chen, Tao; Zhu, Li-guo; Liu, Qiao; Li, Zhao; Li, Fei; Zhong, Sen-cheng; Li, Ze-ren; Feng, Hua; Zhao, Jian-heng

    2014-07-01

    The refractive indices, absorption coefficients, and complex dielectric constants of paraffin-embedded brain glioma and normal brain tissues have been measured by a terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system in the 0.2- to 2.0-THz range. The spectral differences between gliomas and normal brain tissues were obtained. Compared with normal brain tissue, our results indicate that paraffin-embedded brain gliomas have a higher refractive index, absorption coefficient, and dielectric constant. Based on these results, the best THz frequencies for different methods of paraffin-embedded brain glioma imaging, such as intensity imaging, coherent imaging with continuum THz sources, and THz pulsed imaging with short-pulsed THz sources, are analyzed.

  3. Optical clearing and multiphoton imaging of paraffin-embedded specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jesse W.; Degan, Simone; Fischer, Martin C.; Warren, Warren S.

    2013-02-01

    New labeling, imaging, or analysis tools could provide new retrospective insights when applied to archived, paraffin-embedded samples. Deep-tissue multiphoton microscopy of paraffin-embedded specimens is achieved using optical clearing with mineral oil. We tested a variety of murine tissue specimens including skin, lung, spleen, kidney, and heart, acquiring multiphoton autofluorescence and second-harmonic generation, and pump-probe images This technique introduces the capability for non-destructive 3-dimensional microscopic imaging of existing archived pathology specimens, enabling retrospective studies.

  4. Embedded instrumentation systems architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visnevski, Nikita A.

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes the operational concept of the Embedded Instrumentation Systems Architecture (EISA) that is being developed for Test and Evaluation (T&E) applications. The architecture addresses such future T&E requirements as interoperability, flexibility, and non-intrusiveness. These are the ultimate requirements that support continuous T&E objectives. In this paper, we demonstrate that these objectives can be met by decoupling the Embedded Instrumentation (EI) system into an on-board and an off-board component. An on-board component is responsible for sampling, pre-processing, buffering, and transmitting data to the off-board component. The latter is responsible for aggregating, post-processing, and storing test data as well as providing access to the data via a clearly defined interface including such aspects as security, user authentication and access control. The power of the EISA architecture approach is in its inherent ability to support virtual instrumentation as well as enabling interoperability with such important T&E systems as Integrated Network-Enhanced Telemetry (iNET), Test and Training Enabling Architecture (TENA) and other relevant Department of Defense initiatives.

  5. Embedding potentials for excited states of embedded species

    SciTech Connect

    Wesolowski, Tomasz A.

    2014-05-14

    Frozen-Density-Embedding Theory (FDET) is a formalism to obtain the upper bound of the ground-state energy of the total system and the corresponding embedded wavefunction by means of Euler-Lagrange equations [T. A. Wesolowski, Phys. Rev. A 77(1), 012504 (2008)]. FDET provides the expression for the embedding potential as a functional of the electron density of the embedded species, electron density of the environment, and the field generated by other charges in the environment. Under certain conditions, FDET leads to the exact ground-state energy and density of the whole system. Following Perdew-Levy theorem on stationary states of the ground-state energy functional, the other-than-ground-state stationary states of the FDET energy functional correspond to excited states. In the present work, we analyze such use of other-than-ground-state embedded wavefunctions obtained in practical calculations, i.e., when the FDET embedding potential is approximated. Three computational approaches based on FDET, that assure self-consistent excitation energy and embedded wavefunction dealing with the issue of orthogonality of embedded wavefunctions for different states in a different manner, are proposed and discussed.

  6. Evaluation of Mutational Testing of Preneoplastic Barrett's Mucosa by Next-Generation Sequencing of Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Endoscopic Samples for Detection of Concurrent Dysplasia and Adenocarcinoma in Barrett's Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Del Portillo, Armando; Lagana, Stephen M.; Yao, Yuan; Uehara, Takeshi; Jhala, Nirag; Ganguly, Tapan; Nagy, Peter; Gutierrez, Jorge; Luna, Aesis; Abrams, Julian; Liu, Yang; Brand, Randall; Sepulveda, Jorge L.; Falk, Gary W.; Sepulveda, Antonia R.

    2016-01-01

    Barrett's intestinal metaplasia (BIM) may harbor genomic mutations before the histologic appearance of dysplasia and cancer and requires frequent surveillance. We explored next-generation sequencing to detect mutations with the analytical sensitivity required to predict concurrent high-grade dysplasia (HGD) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) in patients with Barrett's esophagus by testing nonneoplastic BIM. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) routine biopsy or endoscopic mucosal resection samples from 32 patients were tested: nonprogressors to HGD or EAC (BIM-NP) with BIM, who never had a diagnosis of dysplasia or EAC (N = 13); progressors to HGD or EAC (BIM-P) with BIM and a worse diagnosis of HGD or EAC (N = 15); and four BIM-negative samples. No mutations were detected in the BIM-NP (0 of 13) or BIM-negative samples, whereas the BIM-P samples had mutations in 6 (75%) of 8 cases in TP53, APC, and CDKN2A (P = 0.0005), detected in samples with as low as 20% BIM. We found that next-generation sequencing from routine FFPE nonneoplastic Barrett's esophagus samples can detect multiple mutations in minute areas of BIM with high analytical sensitivity. Next-generation sequencing panels for detection of TP53 and possibly combined mutations in other genes, such as APC and CDKN2A, may be useful in the clinical setting to improve dysplasia and cancer surveillance in patients with Barrett's esophagus. PMID:26068095

  7. Evaluation of Mutational Testing of Preneoplastic Barrett's Mucosa by Next-Generation Sequencing of Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Endoscopic Samples for Detection of Concurrent Dysplasia and Adenocarcinoma in Barrett's Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Del Portillo, Armando; Lagana, Stephen M; Yao, Yuan; Uehara, Takeshi; Jhala, Nirag; Ganguly, Tapan; Nagy, Peter; Gutierrez, Jorge; Luna, Aesis; Abrams, Julian; Liu, Yang; Brand, Randall; Sepulveda, Jorge L; Falk, Gary W; Sepulveda, Antonia R

    2015-07-01

    Barrett's intestinal metaplasia (BIM) may harbor genomic mutations before the histologic appearance of dysplasia and cancer and requires frequent surveillance. We explored next-generation sequencing to detect mutations with the analytical sensitivity required to predict concurrent high-grade dysplasia (HGD) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) in patients with Barrett's esophagus by testing nonneoplastic BIM. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) routine biopsy or endoscopic mucosal resection samples from 32 patients were tested: nonprogressors to HGD or EAC (BIM-NP) with BIM, who never had a diagnosis of dysplasia or EAC (N = 13); progressors to HGD or EAC (BIM-P) with BIM and a worse diagnosis of HGD or EAC (N = 15); and four BIM-negative samples. No mutations were detected in the BIM-NP (0 of 13) or BIM-negative samples, whereas the BIM-P samples had mutations in 6 (75%) of 8 cases in TP53, APC, and CDKN2A (P = 0.0005), detected in samples with as low as 20% BIM. We found that next-generation sequencing from routine FFPE nonneoplastic Barrett's esophagus samples can detect multiple mutations in minute areas of BIM with high analytical sensitivity. Next-generation sequencing panels for detection of TP53 and possibly combined mutations in other genes, such as APC and CDKN2A, may be useful in the clinical setting to improve dysplasia and cancer surveillance in patients with Barrett's esophagus. PMID:26068095

  8. Embedded Clusters in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lada, Charles J.; Lada, Elizabeth A.

    Stellar clusters are born embedded within giant molecular clouds (GMCs) and during their formation and early evolution are often only visible at infrared wavelengths, being heavily obscured by dust. Over the past 15 years advances in infrared detection capabilities have enabled the first systematic studies of embedded clusters in galactic molecular clouds. In this article we review the current state of empirical knowledge concerning these extremely young protocluster systems. From a survey of the literature we compile the first extensive catalog of galactic embedded clusters. We use the catalog to construct the mass function and estimate the birthrate for embedded clusters within 2 kpc of the sun. We find that the embedded cluster birthrate exceeds that of visible open clusters by an order of magnitude or more indicating a high infant mortality rate for protocluster systems. Less than 4-7% of embedded clusters survive emergence from molecular clouds to become bound clusters of Pleiades age. The vast majority (90%) of stars that form in embedded clusters form in rich clusters of 100 or more members with masses in excess of 50 M⊙. Moreover, observations of nearby cloud complexes indicate that embedded clusters account for a significant (70-90%) fraction of all stars formed in GMCs. We review the role of embedded clusters in investigating the nature of the initial mass function (IMF) that, in one nearby example, has been measured over the entire range of stellar and substellar mass, from OB stars to substellar objects near the deuterium burning limit. We also review the role embedded clusters play in the investigation of circumstellar disk evolution and the important constraints they provide for understanding the origin of planetary systems. Finally, we discuss current ideas concerning the origin and dynamical evolution of embedded clusters and the implications for the formation of bound open clusters.

  9. Chapter 4 embedded metal fragments.

    PubMed

    Kalinich, John F; Vane, Elizabeth A; Centeno, Jose A; Gaitens, Joanna M; Squibb, Katherine S; McDiarmid, Melissa A; Kasper, Christine E

    2014-01-01

    The continued evolution of military munitions and armor on the battlefield, as well as the insurgent use of improvised explosive devices, has led to embedded fragment wounds containing metal and metal mixtures whose long-term toxicologic and carcinogenic properties are not as yet known. Advances in medical care have greatly increased the survival from these types of injuries. Standard surgical guidelines suggest leaving embedded fragments in place, thus individuals may carry these retained metal fragments for the rest of their lives. Nursing professionals will be at the forefront in caring for these wounded individuals, both immediately after the trauma and during the healing and rehabilitation process. Therefore, an understanding of the potential health effects of embedded metal fragment wounds is essential. This review will explore the history of embedded fragment wounds, current research in the field, and Department of Defense and Department of Veterans Affairs guidelines for the identification and long-term monitoring of individuals with embedded fragments. PMID:25222538

  10. Embodied, Embedded Language Use

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    Language use has a public face that is as important to study as the private faces under intensive psycholinguistic study. In the domain of phonology, public use of speech must meet an interpersonal “parity” constraint if it is to serve to communicate. That is, spoken language forms must reliably be identified by listeners. To that end, language forms are embodied, at the lowest level of description, as phonetic gestures of the vocal tract that lawfully structure informational media such as air and light. Over time, under the parity constraint, sound inventories emerge over communicative exchanges that have the property of sufficient identifiability. Communicative activities involve more than vocal tract actions. Talkers gesture and use facial expressions and eye gaze to communicate. Listeners embody their language understandings, exhibiting dispositions to behave in ways related to language understanding. Moreover, linguistic interchanges are embedded in the larger context of language use. Talkers recruit the environment in their communicative activities, for example, in using deictic points. Moreover, in using language as a “coordination device,” interlocutors mutually entrain. PMID:21243080

  11. Embedded gage impact study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, S. W.; Daniel, I. M.

    1984-01-01

    Impact damage in graphite/epoxy laminates was characterized and transient strain history during impact was correlated. The material investigated was AS-4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy. Eight-ply and sixteen-ply quasi-isotropic laminates of 45/0/-45/90 sub s and 45/0/-45/90 sub 2s layups were fabricated with strain gages embedded between plies during the strain gages and leads from the highly conductive graphite fibers. The specimens were circular plates 12.7 cm (5 in.) in diameter and clamped along their circumference. The specimens were impacted with a 185 gm impactor, dropped from heights of 1.20 m and 1.65 m. An accelerometer was attached to the back surface of the specimen opposite the impact point and was used to trigger the recording instrumentation. The transient strain data were recorded with an eight channel waveform digitizer capable of sampling data at 0.5 microsec intervals. The data were stored, processed, and plotted by means of a microcomputer. Transient strain data were correlated with results from ultrasonic inspection of the specimens.

  12. Embedded sensors in layered manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaochun

    Layered Manufacturing can be applied to build ``smart'' parts with sensors, integrated circuits, and actuators placed within the component. Embedded sensors can be used to gain data for validating or improving designs during the prototype stage or to obtain information on the performance and structural integrity of components in service. Techniques for embedding fiber optic sensors in metals, polymers, and ceramics have been investigated. Embedding optical fibers into metals is especially challenging because engineering alloys tend to exhibit high melting temperatures. In the present research an embedding sequence was developed capable of embedding fiber sensors into parts made of metal alloys with high melting temperatures. Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors were selected as the most promising sensor candidate. The embedded FBG sensors were characterized for temperature and strain measurements. The embedded FBG sensors in nickel and stainless steel provided high sensitivity, good accuracy, and high temperature capacity for temperature measurements. Temperature sensitivity approximately 100% higher than that of bare FBGs was demonstrated. For strain measurements, the sensors embedded in metal and polyurethane yielded high sensitivity, accuracy, and linearity. The sensitivity of the embedded FBGs was in good agreement with that of bare FBGs. Moreover, a decoupling technique for embedded FBG sensors was developed to separate temperature and strain effects. The embedded FBG sensors were used to monitor the accumulation of residual stresses during the laser- assisted Layered Manufacturing, to measure the strain field in layered materials, to measure pressure, and to monitor temperature and strain simultaneously. New techniques have been developed for temperature and strain measurements of rotating components with FBG sensors embedded or attached to the surface. Tunable laser diodes were incorporated into the sensing system for monitoring the Bragg grating wavelength

  13. Embedded fiducials in optical surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2000-01-01

    Embedded fiducials are provided in optical surfaces and a method for embedding the fiducials. Fiducials, or marks on a surface, are important for optical fabrication and alignment, particularly when individual optical elements are aspheres. Fiducials are used during the course of the polishing process to connect interferometric data, and the equation describing the asphere, to physical points on the optic. By embedding fiducials below the surface of the optic and slightly outside the clear aperture of the optic, the fiducials are not removed by polishing, do not interfere with the polishing process, and do not affect the performance of the finished optic.

  14. Embedded fiducials in optical surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sommargren, G.E.

    2000-01-11

    Embedded fiducials are provided in optical surfaces and a method for embedding the fiducials. Fiducials, or marks on a surface, are important for optical fabrication and alignment, particularly when individual optical elements are aspheres. Fiducials are used during the course of the polishing process to connect interferometric data, and the equation describing the asphere, to physical points on the optic. By embedding fiducials below the surface of the optic and slightly outside the clear aperture of the optic, the fiducials are not removed by polishing, do not interfere with the polishing process, and do not affect the performance of the finished optic.

  15. Array tomography: rodent brain fixation and embedding.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time-consuming and require some practice to perfect. This protocol describes the fixation and processing required to prepare tissues for immunofluorescence array tomography. PMID:21041396

  16. Germanium Nanocrystals Embedded in Sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Q.; Sharp, I.D.; Liao, C.Y.; Yi, D.O.; Ager III, J.W.; Beeman, J.W.; Yu, K.M.; Chrzan, D.C.; Haller, E.E.

    2005-04-15

    {sup 74}Ge nanocrystals are formed in a sapphire matrix by ion implantation followed by damage. Embedded nanocrystals experience large compressive stress relative to bulk, as embedded in sapphire melt very close to the bulk melting point (Tm = 936 C) whereas experience considerably lower stresses. Also, in situ TEM reveals that nanocrystals ion-beam-synthesized nanocrystals embedded in silica are observed to be spherical and measured by Raman spectroscopy of the zone center optical phonon. In contrast, reveals that the nanocrystals are faceted and have a bi-modal size distribution. Notably, the matrix remains crystalline despite the large implantation dose and corresponding thermal annealing. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of as-grown samples those embedded in silica exhibit a significant melting point hysteresis around T{sub m}.

  17. Conservation laws in embedding theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo, Oscar; Mustafaev, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    In this work is considered embedding theory, a theory in which independent variables which describe gravity are functions of the space-time embedding into a ten-dimensional pseudo-Euclidean space. Neother's theorem is used to find conservation laws for energy and angular momentum as a result from the action's invariance in relation to the rotation and translation of the system. The form of these conservation laws and their consequences depending on the different formulations of embedding theory is discussed. It is also analyzed a transition from embedding theory to a field theory in a flat space-time with a number of dimensions greater than four. The same procedure is followed in this case to find conservation laws, resulting in the solution of the problem of time present in Einstein's theory of general relativity.

  18. Identify paraffin-embedded brain glioma using terahertz pulsed spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ze-ren; Meng, Kun; Chen, Tu-nan; Chen, Tao; Zhu, Li-guo; Liu, Qiao; Li, Zhao; Li, Fei; Zhong, Sen-cheng; Feng, Hua; Zhao, Jian-heng

    2015-01-01

    The refractive indices, absorption coefficients and complex dielectric constants spectra of paraffin-embedded brain glioma and normal brain tissues have been measured by a terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system in the range of 0.2 - 2.0 THz. The spectral differences between glioma and normal brain tissues were obtained. Our results indicate that, compared with normal tissue, glioma had higher refractive index, absorption coefficient, and dielectric constant. Based on these results, the suitable frequency components for different methods of glioma imaging (intensity imaging, coherent imaging and terahertz pulsed imaging) are analyzed.

  19. Conformal bootstrap in embedding space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, Jean-François; Skiba, Witold

    2016-05-01

    It is shown how to obtain conformal blocks from embedding space with the help of the operator product expansion. The minimal conformal block originates from scalar exchange in a four-point correlation function of four scalars. All remaining conformal blocks are simple derivatives of the minimal conformal block. With the help of the orthogonality properties of the conformal blocks, the analytic conformal bootstrap can be implemented directly in embedding space, leading to a Jacobi-like definition of conformal field theories.

  20. Embedded biofilm, a new biofilm model based on the embedded growth of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yong-Gyun; Choi, Jungil; Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Lee, Joon-Hee; Kwon, Sunghoon

    2015-01-01

    A variety of systems have been developed to study biofilm formation. However, most systems are based on the surface-attached growth of microbes under shear stress. In this study, we designed a microfluidic channel device, called a microfluidic agarose channel (MAC), and found that microbial cells in the MAC system formed an embedded cell aggregative structure (ECAS). ECASs were generated from the embedded growth of bacterial cells in an agarose matrix and better mimicked the clinical environment of biofilms formed within mucus or host tissue under shear-free conditions. ECASs were developed with the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), the most important feature of biofilms, and eventually burst to release planktonic cells, which resembles the full developmental cycle of biofilms. Chemical and genetic effects have also confirmed that ECASs are a type of biofilm. Unlike the conventional biofilms formed in the flow cell model system, this embedded-type biofilm completes the developmental cycle in only 9 to 12 h and can easily be observed with ordinary microscopes. We suggest that ECASs are a type of biofilm and that the MAC is a system for observing biofilm formation. PMID:25326307

  1. Embedded Biofilm, a New Biofilm Model Based on the Embedded Growth of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yong-Gyun; Choi, Jungil; Kim, Soo-Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    A variety of systems have been developed to study biofilm formation. However, most systems are based on the surface-attached growth of microbes under shear stress. In this study, we designed a microfluidic channel device, called a microfluidic agarose channel (MAC), and found that microbial cells in the MAC system formed an embedded cell aggregative structure (ECAS). ECASs were generated from the embedded growth of bacterial cells in an agarose matrix and better mimicked the clinical environment of biofilms formed within mucus or host tissue under shear-free conditions. ECASs were developed with the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), the most important feature of biofilms, and eventually burst to release planktonic cells, which resembles the full developmental cycle of biofilms. Chemical and genetic effects have also confirmed that ECASs are a type of biofilm. Unlike the conventional biofilms formed in the flow cell model system, this embedded-type biofilm completes the developmental cycle in only 9 to 12 h and can easily be observed with ordinary microscopes. We suggest that ECASs are a type of biofilm and that the MAC is a system for observing biofilm formation. PMID:25326307

  2. Chemical reactivation of quenched fluorescent protein molecules enables resin-embedded fluorescence microimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanqing; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Zhu, Mingqiang; Lv, Xiaohua; Li, Anan; Li, Shiwei; Li, Longhui; Yang, Tao; Wang, Siming; Yang, Zhongqin; Xu, Tonghui; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2014-06-01

    Resin embedding is a well-established technique to prepare biological specimens for microscopic imaging. However, it is not compatible with modern green-fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescent-labelling technique because it significantly quenches the fluorescence of GFP and its variants. Previous empirical optimization efforts are good for thin tissue but not successful on macroscopic tissue blocks as the quenching mechanism remains uncertain. Here we show most of the quenched GFP molecules are structurally preserved and not denatured after routine embedding in resin, and can be chemically reactivated to a fluorescent state by alkaline buffer during imaging. We observe up to 98% preservation in yellow-fluorescent protein case, and improve the fluorescence intensity 11.8-fold compared with unprocessed samples. We demonstrate fluorescence microimaging of resin-embedded EGFP/EYFP-labelled tissue block without noticeable loss of labelled structures. This work provides a turning point for the imaging of fluorescent protein-labelled specimens after resin embedding.

  3. Characterization of human breast cancer tissues by infrared imaging.

    PubMed

    Verdonck, M; Denayer, A; Delvaux, B; Garaud, S; De Wind, R; Desmedt, C; Sotiriou, C; Willard-Gallo, K; Goormaghtigh, E

    2016-01-21

    Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy coupled to microscopy (IR imaging) has shown unique advantages in detecting morphological and molecular pathologic alterations in biological tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of IR imaging as a diagnostic tool to identify characteristics of breast epithelial cells and the stroma. In this study a total of 19 breast tissue samples were obtained from 13 patients. For 6 of the patients, we also obtained Non-Adjacent Non-Tumor tissue samples. Infrared images were recorded on the main cell/tissue types identified in all breast tissue samples. Unsupervised Principal Component Analyses and supervised Partial Least Square Discriminant Analyses (PLS-DA) were used to discriminate spectra. Leave-one-out cross-validation was used to evaluate the performance of PLS-DA models. Our results show that IR imaging coupled with PLS-DA can efficiently identify the main cell types present in FFPE breast tissue sections, i.e. epithelial cells, lymphocytes, connective tissue, vascular tissue and erythrocytes. A second PLS-DA model could distinguish normal and tumor breast epithelial cells in the breast tissue sections. A patient-specific model reached particularly high sensitivity, specificity and MCC rates. Finally, we showed that the stroma located close or at distance from the tumor exhibits distinct spectral characteristics. In conclusion FTIR imaging combined with computational algorithms could be an accurate, rapid and objective tool to identify/quantify breast epithelial cells and differentiate tumor from normal breast tissue as well as normal from tumor-associated stroma, paving the way to the establishment of a potential complementary tool to ensure safe tumor margins. PMID:26535413

  4. Texture Representations Using Subspace Embeddings

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaodong; Tian, YingLi

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a texture representation framework to map local texture patches into a low-dimensional texture subspace. In natural texture images, textons are entangled with multiple factors, such as rotation, scaling, viewpoint variation, illumination change, and non-rigid surface deformation. Mapping local texture patches into a low-dimensional subspace can alleviate or eliminate these undesired variation factors resulting from both geometric and photometric transformations. We observe that texture representations based on subspace embeddings have strong resistance to image deformations, meanwhile, are more distinctive and more compact than traditional representations. We investigate both linear and non-linear embedding methods including Principle Component Analysis (PCA), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), and Locality Preserving Projections (LPP) to compute the essential texture subspace. The experiments in the context of texture classification on benchmark datasets demonstrate that the proposed subspace embedding representations achieve the state-of-the-art results while with much fewer feature dimensions. PMID:23710105

  5. Texture Representations Using Subspace Embeddings.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodong; Tian, Yingli

    2013-07-15

    In this paper, we propose a texture representation framework to map local texture patches into a low-dimensional texture subspace. In natural texture images, textons are entangled with multiple factors, such as rotation, scaling, viewpoint variation, illumination change, and non-rigid surface deformation. Mapping local texture patches into a low-dimensional subspace can alleviate or eliminate these undesired variation factors resulting from both geometric and photometric transformations. We observe that texture representations based on subspace embeddings have strong resistance to image deformations, meanwhile, are more distinctive and more compact than traditional representations. We investigate both linear and non-linear embedding methods including Principle Component Analysis (PCA), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), and Locality Preserving Projections (LPP) to compute the essential texture subspace. The experiments in the context of texture classification on benchmark datasets demonstrate that the proposed subspace embedding representations achieve the state-of-the-art results while with much fewer feature dimensions. PMID:23710105

  6. Tissue microRNAs as predictive markers for gastric cancer patients undergoing palliative chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Smid, David; Kulda, Vlastimil; Srbecka, Kristyna; Kubackova, Dasa; Dolezal, Jan; Daum, Ondrej; Kucera, Radek; Topolcan, Ondrej; Treska, Vladislav; Skalicky, Tomas; Pesta, Martin

    2016-06-01

    MicroRNAs have the potential to become valuable predictive markers for gastric cancer. Samples of biopsy tissue, routinely taken from gastric cancer patients undergoing palliative chemotherapy, constitute suitable material for microRNA profiling with the aim of predicting the effect of chemotherapy. Our study group consisted of 54 patients, all of whom underwent palliative chemotherapy based on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or 5-FU in combination with platinum derivatives between 2000 and 2013. The expression of 29 selected microRNAs and genes BRCA1, ERCC1, RRM1 and TS, in gastric cancer tissue macrodissected from FFPE tissue samples, was measured by quantitative RT-PCR. The relationship between gene expression levels and time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) was analysed. From the set of the 29 microRNAs of interest, we found high expression of miR-150, miR-342-3p, miR-181b, miR-221, miR-224 and low levels of miR-520h relate to shorter TTP. High levels of miR-150, miR-192, miR-224, miR-375 and miR-342-3p related to shorter OS. In routinely available FFPE tissue samples, we found 6 miRNAs with a relation to TTP, which may serve as predictors of the effectiveness of palliative treatment in gastric cancer patients. These miRNAs could also help in deciding whether to indicate palliative chemotherapy. PMID:27081844

  7. Embedded Temperature-Change Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita; Thakoor, Anil; Karmon, Dan

    1995-01-01

    Transducers sensitive to rates of change of temperature embedded in integrated circuits and discrete electronic components damaged by overheating, according to proposal. Used to detect onset of rapid heating and to trigger shutoffs of power or other corrective actions before temperatures rise beyond safe limits. Sensors respond fast and reliably to incipient overheating because they are in direct thermal contact with vulnerable circuit elements.

  8. Embedding Sensors During Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Sbriglia, Lexey Raylene

    2015-08-10

    This PowerPoint presentation had the following headings: Fused deposition modeling (FDM); Open source 3D printing; Objectives; Vibration analysis; Equipment; Design; Material choices; Failure causes, such as tension, bubbling; Potential solutions; Simulations; Embedding the sensors; LabView programming; Alternate data acquisition; Problem and proposed solution; and, Conclusions

  9. Scaffold porosity and oxygenation of printed hydrogel constructs affect functionality of embedded osteogenic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Fedorovich, Natalja E; Kuipers, Elske; Gawlitta, Debby; Dhert, Wouter J A; Alblas, Jacqueline

    2011-10-01

    Insufficient supply of oxygen and nutrients throughout the graft is considered one of the principal limitations in development of large, tissue-engineered bone grafts. Organ or tissue printing by means of three-dimensional (3D) fiber deposition is a novel modality in regenerative medicine that combines pore formation and defined cell placement, and is used here for development of cell-laden hydrogel structures with reproducible internal architecture to sustain oxygen supply and to support adequate tissue development. In this study we tested the effect of porosity on multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) embedded in hydrogel constructs printed with a 3D fiber deposition (3DF) machine. For this, porous and solid alginate hydrogel scaffolds, with MSCs homogeneously dispersed throughout the construct, were printed and analyzed in vitro for the presence of hypoxia markers, metabolism, survival, and osteogenic differentiation. We demonstrated that porosity promotes oxygenation of MSCs in printed hydrogel scaffolds and supported the viability and osteogenic differentiation of embedded cells. Porous and solid printed constructs were subsequently implanted subcutaneously in immunodeficient mice to analyze tissue formation in relation to hypoxia responses of embedded cells. Implantation of printed grafts resulted in ingrowth of vascularized tissue and significantly enhanced oxygenation of embedded MSCs. In conclusion, the introduction of pores significantly enhances the conductive properties of printed hydrogel constructs and contributes to the functionality of embedded osteogenic progenitors. PMID:21599540

  10. Singular Shell Embedded into a Cosmological Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grøn, Øyvind; Rippis, Peter D.

    2003-12-01

    We generalize Israel's formalism to cover singular shells embedded in a non-vacuum Universe. That is, we deduce the relativistic equation of motion for a thin shell embedded in a Schwarzschild/Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetime. Also, we review the embedding of a Schwarzschild mass into a cosmological model using ``curvature'' coordinates and give solutions with (Sch/FLRW) and without the embedded mass (FLRW).

  11. The Modified Embedded Atom Method

    SciTech Connect

    Baskes, M.I.

    1994-08-01

    Recent modifications have been made to generalize the Embedded Atom Method (EAM) to describe bonding in diverse materials. By including angular dependence of the electron density in an empirical way, the Modified Embedded Atom Method (MEAM) has been able to reproduce the basic energetic and structural properties of 45 elements. This method is ideally suited for examining the interfacial behavior of dissimilar materials. This paper explains in detail the derivation of the method, shows how the parameters of the MEAM are determined directly from experiment or first principles calculations, and examines the quality of the reproduction of the database. Materials with fcc, bcc, hcp, and diamond cubic crystal structure are discussed. A few simple examples of the application of the MEAM to surfaces and interfaces are presented. Calculations of pullout of a SiC fiber in a diamond matrix as a function of applied stress show non-uniform deformation of the fiber.

  12. An Embedded Reconfigurable Logic Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Jerry H.; Klenke, Robert H.; Shams, Qamar A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A Miniature Embedded Reconfigurable Computer and Logic (MERCAL) module has been developed and verified. MERCAL was designed to be a general-purpose, universal module that that can provide significant hardware and software resources to meet the requirements of many of today's complex embedded applications. This is accomplished in the MERCAL module by combining a sub credit card size PC in a DIMM form factor with a XILINX Spartan I1 FPGA. The PC has the ability to download program files to the FPGA to configure it for different hardware functions and to transfer data to and from the FPGA via the PC's ISA bus during run time. The MERCAL module combines, in a compact package, the computational power of a 133 MHz PC with up to 150,000 gate equivalents of digital logic that can be reconfigured by software. The general architecture and functionality of the MERCAL hardware and system software are described.

  13. The embedded operating system project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    This progress report describes research towards the design and construction of embedded operating systems for real-time advanced aerospace applications. The applications concerned require reliable operating system support that must accommodate networks of computers. The report addresses the problems of constructing such operating systems, the communications media, reconfiguration, consistency and recovery in a distributed system, and the issues of realtime processing. A discussion is included on suitable theoretical foundations for the use of atomic actions to support fault tolerance and data consistency in real-time object-based systems. In particular, this report addresses: atomic actions, fault tolerance, operating system structure, program development, reliability and availability, and networking issues. This document reports the status of various experiments designed and conducted to investigate embedded operating system design issues.

  14. A face recognition embedded system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pun, Kwok Ho; Moon, Yiu Sang; Tsang, Chi Chiu; Chow, Chun Tak; Chan, Siu Man

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the implementation of a face recognition system in embedded systems. To investigate the feasibility and practicality of real time face recognition on such systems, a door access control system based on face recognition is built. Due to the limited computation power of embedded device, a semi-automatic scheme for face detection and eye location is proposed to solve these computationally hard problems. It is found that to achieve real time performance, optimization of the core face recognition module is needed. As a result, extensive profiling is done to pinpoint the execution hotspots in the system and optimization are carried out. After careful precision analysis, all slow floating point calculations are replaced with their fixed-point versions. Experimental results show that real time performance can be achieved without significant loss in recognition accuracy.

  15. Cryosectioning of undecalcified tissues for immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Rijntjes, N V; Van de Putte, L B; Van der Pol, M; Guelen, P J

    1979-01-01

    The present report describes a procedure for preparing 4--6 micrometers cryostat sections of undecalcified fresh frozen tissue which contain hard tissue, for immunofluorescence. The apparatus used is a cryomicrotome originally designed for cutting sections for whole body autoradiography. To obtain cryostat sections suitable for tissue immunofluorescence the standard procedure was modified with respect to the hardness and edges of the microtome knife, the temperature of the cryostat and the carboxymethyl cellulose concentration of the embedding material. PMID:387879

  16. Embedded Services in Chinese Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Si, Li; Xing, Wenming; Zhou, Limei; Liu, Sha

    2012-01-01

    Embedded librarianship service describes the practice of librarians integrating actively into the user's environment, rather than remaining in the library to await requests for service. This paper examines the concept of embedded service in the recent literature, within the past 5 years. It reports on a survey of embedded service in Chinese…

  17. Zero-distortion lossless data embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, Nithin; Mullick, Rakesh

    2004-05-01

    All known methods of lossless or reversible data embedding that exist today suffer from two major disadvantages: 1) The embedded image suffers from distortion, however small it may be by the very process of embedding and 2) The requirement of a special parser (decoder), which is necessary for the client to remove the embedded data in order to obtain the original image (lossless). We propose a novel lossless data embedding method where both these disadvantages are circumvented. Zero-distortion lossless data embedding (ZeroD-LDE) claims 'zero-distortion' of the embedded image for all viewing purposes and further maintaining that clients without any specialized parser can still recover the original image losslessly but would not have direct access to the embedded data. The fact that not all gray levels are used by most images is exploited to embed data by selective lossless compression of run-lengths of zeros (or any compressible pattern). Contiguous runs of zeros are changed such that the leading zero is made equal to the maximum original intensity plus the run-length and the succeeding zeros are converted to the embedded data (plus maximum original intensity) thus achieving extremely high embedding capacities. This way, the histograms of the host-data and the embedded data do not overlap and hence we can obtain zero-distortion by using the window-level setting of standard DICOM viewers. The embedded image is thus not only DICOM compatible but also zero-distortion visually and requires no clinical validation.

  18. Liquid-Embedded Elastomer Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Rebecca; Majidi, Carmel; Park, Yong-Lae; Paik, Jamie; Wood, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Hyperelastic sensors are fabricated by embedding a silicone rubber film with microchannels of conductive liquid. In the case of soft tactile sensors, pressing the surface of the elastomer will deform the cross-section of underlying channels and change their electrical resistance. Soft pressure sensors may be employed in a variety of applications. For example, a network of pressure sensors can serve as artificial skin by yielding detailed information about contact pressures. This concept was demonstrated in a hyperelastic keypad, where perpendicular conductive channels form a quasi-planar network within an elastomeric matrix that registers the location, intensity and duration of applied pressure. In a second demonstration, soft curvature sensors were used for joint angle proprioception. Because the sensors are soft and stretchable, they conform to the host without interfering with the natural mechanics of motion. This marked the first use of liquid-embedded elastomer electronics to monitor human or robotic motion. Finally, liquid-embedded elastomers may be implemented as conductors in applications that call for flexible or stretchable circuitry, such as robotic origami.

  19. When are projections also embeddings?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, I. M.; Letellier, C.; Gilmore, R.

    2007-04-01

    We study an autonomous four-dimensional dynamical system used to model certain geophysical processes. This system generates a chaotic attractor that is strongly contracting, with four Lyapunov exponents λi that satisfy λ1+λ2+λ3<0 , so the Lyapunov dimension is DL=2+∣λ3∣/λ1<3 in the range of coupling parameter values studied. As a result, it should be possible to find three-dimensional spaces in which the attractors can be embedded so that topological analyses can be carried out to determine which stretching and squeezing mechanisms generate chaotic behavior. We study mappings into R3 to determine which can be used as embeddings to reconstruct the dynamics. We find dramatically different behavior in the two simplest mappings: projections from R4 to R3 . In one case the one-parameter family of attractors studied remains topologically unchanged for all coupling parameter values. In the other case, during an intermediate range of parameter values the projection undergoes self-intersections, while the embedded attractors at the two ends of this range are topologically mirror images of each other.

  20. When are projections also embeddings?

    PubMed

    Moroz, I M; Letellier, C; Gilmore, R

    2007-04-01

    We study an autonomous four-dimensional dynamical system used to model certain geophysical processes. This system generates a chaotic attractor that is strongly contracting, with four Lyapunov exponents lambdai that satisfy lambda1+lambda2+lambda3<0 , so the Lyapunov dimension is DL=2+|lambda3|/lambda1<3 in the range of coupling parameter values studied. As a result, it should be possible to find three-dimensional spaces in which the attractors can be embedded so that topological analyses can be carried out to determine which stretching and squeezing mechanisms generate chaotic behavior. We study mappings into R3 to determine which can be used as embeddings to reconstruct the dynamics. We find dramatically different behavior in the two simplest mappings: projections from R4 to R3 . In one case the one-parameter family of attractors studied remains topologically unchanged for all coupling parameter values. In the other case, during an intermediate range of parameter values the projection undergoes self-intersections, while the embedded attractors at the two ends of this range are topologically mirror images of each other. PMID:17500972

  1. Density-orbital embedding theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gritsenko, O. V.; Visscher, L.

    2010-09-15

    In the article density-orbital embedding (DOE) theory is proposed. DOE is based on the concept of density orbital (DO), which is a generalization of the square root of the density for real functions and fractional electron numbers. The basic feature of DOE is the representation of the total supermolecular density {rho}{sub s} as the square of the sum of the DO {phi}{sub a}, which represents the active subsystem A and the square root of the frozen density {rho}{sub f} of the environment F. The correct {rho}{sub s} is obtained with {phi}{sub a} being negative in the regions in which {rho}{sub f} might exceed {rho}{sub s}. This makes it possible to obtain the correct {rho}{sub s} with a broad range of the input frozen densities {rho}{sub f} so that DOE resolves the problem of the frozen-density admissibility of the current frozen-density embedding theory. The DOE Euler equation for the DO {phi}{sub a} is derived with the characteristic embedding potential representing the effect of the environment. The DO square {phi}{sub a}{sup 2} is determined from the orbitals of the effective Kohn-Sham (KS) system. Self-consistent solution of the corresponding one-electron KS equations yields not only {phi}{sub a}{sup 2}, but also the DO {phi}{sub a} itself.

  2. Dimension of spatially embedded networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daqing, Li; Kosmidis, Kosmas; Bunde, Armin; Havlin, Shlomo

    2011-06-01

    The dimension of a system is one of the most fundamental quantities to characterize its structure and basic physical properties. Diffusion and vibrational excitations, for example, as well as the universal features of a system near a critical point depend crucially on its dimension. However, in the theory of complex networks the concept of dimension has been rarely discussed. Here we study models for spatially embedded networks and show how their dimension can be determined. Our results indicate that networks characterized by a broad distribution of link lengths have a dimension higher than that of the embedding space. We illustrate our findings using the global airline network and the Internet and argue that although these networks are embedded in two-dimensional space they should be regarded as systems with dimension close to 3 and 4.5, respectively. We show that the network dimension is a key concept to understand not only network topology, but also dynamical processes on networks, such as diffusion and critical phenomena including percolation.

  3. Embedding parameters for Quantum Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturelli, Davide

    Many optimization problems are defined on highly connected graphs and many interesting physical spin-glass systems are featuring long-range interactions. One method to solve for the optimum/ground state is quantum annealing (QA). Most architectures for QA devices, manufactured or proposed, are based on optimizing Hamiltonians having spins connected in a non-complete graph, with nodes with a small maximum degree, compared to the requirements. To overcome this limitation 'embedding' is employed: the native graph is 'tiled' with ferromagnetic chains of spins that now are meant to represent the logical binary variables. While it is known how the strength of the ferromagnetic bonds can ensure that the classical Ising ground state of the embedded system can be univocally mapped to the ground state of the original system, there is very little study on the impact of these parameters on QA. Programmers have taken conservative choices for the parameters and the common practices can be improved. Starting from the physics of connected ferromagnetic Ising chains, we will review several parameter choices and discuss previous and new results obtained on the D-Wave 2X machine, on carefully designed problems that allow to isolate and evaluate the role of connectivity in embedded systems.

  4. Time of flight estimation for breast cancer margin thickness using embedded tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Tyler; El-Shenawee, Magda; Campbell, Lucas

    2016-03-01

    This work aims to enact a quick and reasonable estimation of breast cancer margin thickness using time of flight analysis of embedded breast cancer tissue. A pulsed terahertz system is used to obtain reflection imaging scans from breast cancer tumors that are formalin-fixed and embedded in paraffin blocks. Time of flight analysis is then used to compare the reflection patterns seen within the block to pathology sections and paraffin-embedded sections that are taken throughout the depth of the tumor in order to estimate the three-dimensional boundaries of the tumor.

  5. Post-embedding tem signal-to-noise ratio of S-100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fermin, C. D.; Lee, D. H.; Martin, D.

    1994-01-01

    We assessed the reactivity of purified S-100 antiserum in immuno-electron microscopy by counting the number of gold particles per microns 2 over inner ear tissues embedded in different media. Sections containing predominantly Schwann's cell cytoplasm and nucleus, afferent fiber axoplasm and myelin sheath of chick cochleae were reacted with anti-S-100 IgG, an antibody to a calcium binding protein of neuronal tissues, then labeled with anti-IgG-gold conjugate. This investigation was conducted because previously published procedures, unmodified, did not yield acceptable results. Preparation of all specimens was identical. Only the medium (PolyBed 812, Araldite or Spurr epoxies; and LR White, LR Gold or Lowicryl plastics) was changed. The medium was made the changing variable because antigens available in post-embedding immuno-electron microscopy are decreased by heat, either used and/or released during polymerization of the embedding medium. The results indicate that: (a) none of the embedding media above provided optimal signal-to-noise ratio for all parts of the nerve stained in the same section; (b) aggregation of gold particles over cells was highest in embedding media with high background labeling over areas devoid of tissue (noise); (c) aggregation occurred randomly throughout both cellular and acellular regions; and (d) particles aggregated less and were distributed more evenly in tissues from media yielding good ultrastructural integrity.

  6. Sensor Authentication: Embedded Processor Code

    SciTech Connect

    Svoboda, John

    2012-09-25

    Described is the c code running on the embedded Microchip 32bit PIC32MX575F256H located on the INL developed noise analysis circuit board. The code performs the following functions: Controls the noise analysis circuit board preamplifier voltage gains of 1, 10, 100, 000 Initializes the analog to digital conversion hardware, input channel selection, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) function, USB communications interface, and internal memory allocations Initiates high resolution 4096 point 200 kHz data acquisition Computes complex 2048 point FFT and FFT magnitude. Services Host command set Transfers raw data to Host Transfers FFT result to host Communication error checking

  7. Testing framework for embedded languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskó, Dániel; Tejfel, Máté

    2012-09-01

    Embedding a new programming language into an existing one is a widely used technique, because it fastens the development process and gives a part of a language infrastructure for free (e.g. lexical, syntactical analyzers). In this paper we are presenting a new advantage of this development approach regarding to adding testing support for these new languages. Tool support for testing is a crucial point for a newly designed programming language. It could be done in the hard way by creating a testing tool from scratch, or we could try to reuse existing testing tools by extending them with an interface to our new language. The second approach requires less work, and also it fits very well for the embedded approach. The problem is that the creation of such interfaces is not straightforward at all, because the existing testing tools were mostly not designed to be extendable and to be able to deal with new languages. This paper presents an extendable and modular model of a testing framework, in which the most basic design decision was to keep the - previously mentioned - interface creation simple and straightforward. Other important aspects of our model are the test data generation, the oracle problem and the customizability of the whole testing phase.

  8. Recent Developments on Embedding Theories of Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, C.; Dahia, F.

    We review two recent developments on five-dimensional embedding theories of the spacetime: the embedding of branes, which is related to the Campbell-Magaard theorem, and the dynamics of particles in the context of the induced-matter theory. In the latter case, we show that there are two different ways of treating the anomalous acceleration of particles: the foliation and the embedding approach.

  9. Embedding Optical Fibers In Cast Metal Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibler, William N.; Atkins, Robert A.; Lee, Chung E.; Taylor, Henry F.

    1995-01-01

    Use of metal strain reliefs eliminates breakage of fibers during casting process. Technique for embedding fused silica optical fibers in cast metal parts devised. Optical fiber embedded in flange, fitting, or wall of vacuum or pressure chamber, to provide hermetically sealed feedthrough for optical transmission of measurement or control signals. Another example, optical-fiber temperature sensor embedded in metal structural component to measure strain or temperature inside component.

  10. Fully localized two-dimensional embedded solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Jianke

    2010-11-15

    We report the prediction of fully localized two-dimensional embedded solitons. These solitons are obtained in a quasi-one-dimensional waveguide array which is periodic along one spatial direction and localized along the orthogonal direction. Under appropriate nonlinearity, these solitons are found to exist inside the Bloch bands (continuous spectrum) of the waveguide and thus are embedded solitons. These embedded solitons are fully localized along both spatial directions. In addition, they are fully stable under perturbations.

  11. Histological Assessment of PAXgene Tissue Fixation and Stabilization Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Kap, Marcel; Smedts, Frank; Oosterhuis, Wolter; Winther, Rosa; Christensen, Nanna; Reischauer, Bilge; Viertler, Christian; Groelz, Daniel; Becker, Karl-Friedrich; Zatloukal, Kurt; Langer, Rupert; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Bodo, Koppany; de Jong, Bas; Oelmuller, Uwe; Riegman, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Within SPIDIA, an EC FP7 project aimed to improve pre analytic procedures, the PAXgene Tissue System (PAXgene), was designed to improve tissue quality for parallel molecular and morphological analysis. Within the SPIDIA project promising results were found in both genomic and proteomic experiments with PAXgene-fixed and paraffin embedded tissue derived biomolecules. But, for this technology to be accepted for use in both clinical and basic research, it is essential that its adequacy for preserving morphology and antigenicity is validated relative to formalin fixation. It is our aim to assess the suitability of PAXgene tissue fixation for (immuno)histological methods. Normal human tissue specimens (n = 70) were collected and divided into equal parts for fixation either with formalin or PAXgene. Sections of the obtained paraffin-embedded tissue were cut and stained. Morphological aspects of PAXgene-fixed tissue were described and also scored relative to formalin-fixed tissue. Performance of PAXgene-fixed tissue in immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization assays was also assessed relative to the corresponding formalin-fixed tissues. Morphology of PAXgene-fixed paraffin embedded tissue was well preserved and deemed adequate for diagnostics in most cases. Some antigens in PAXgene-fixed and paraffin embedded sections were detectable without the need for antigen retrieval, while others were detected using standard, formalin fixation based, immunohistochemistry protocols. Comparable results were obtained with in situ hybridization and histochemical stains. Basically all assessed histological techniques were found to be applicable to PAXgene-fixed and paraffin embedded tissue. In general results obtained with PAXgene-fixed tissue are comparable to those of formalin-fixed tissue. Compromises made in morphology can be called minor compared to the advantages in the molecular pathology possibilities. PMID:22110732

  12. Isolating Viral and Host RNA Sequences from Archival Material and Production of cDNA Libraries for High-Throughput DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yongli; Sheng, Zong-Mei; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of surgical biopsy and post-mortem tissue samples are formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE), but this process leads to RNA degradation that limits gene expression analysis. As an example, the viral RNA genome of the 1918 pandemic influenza A virus was previously determined in a 9-year effort by overlapping RT-PCR from post-mortem samples. Using the protocols described here, the full genome of the 1918 virus at high coverage was determined in one high-throughput sequencing run of a cDNA library derived from total RNA of a 1918 FFPE sample after duplex-specific nuclease treatments. This basic methodological approach should assist in the analysis of FFPE tissue samples isolated over the past century from a variety of infectious diseases. PMID:26344216

  13. Metal embedded Fiber Brag Grating Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanal, Chooda; Vargas, Garman; Balani, Kantesh; Keshri, Anup; Barbosa, Carmen; Agarwal, Arvind; Panepucci, Roberto

    2009-03-01

    A novel method of embedding optical fibers and optical fiber sensors, inside metallic structures will be discussed. We specifically report results for embedding fiber bragg grating sensors in an aluminum coating onto a steel plate. Characterization of an embedded FBG sensor and its effects on the sensor operation are also presented. Temperature sensitivity and the strain sensitivity will be discussed. The novel high throughput deposition method show the potential of embedding optical sensors onto metallic structures which make it suitable for many engineering applications in biomedical, civil, mechanical and aeronautical, among other fields.

  14. Embedded Wing Propulsion Conceptual Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyun D.; Saunders, John D.

    2003-01-01

    As a part of distributed propulsion work under NASA's Revolutionary Aeropropulsion Concepts or RAC project, a new propulsion-airframe integrated vehicle concept called Embedded Wing Propulsion (EWP) is developed and examined through system and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies. The idea behind the concept is to fully integrate a propulsion system within a wing structure so that the aircraft takes full benefits of coupling of wing aerodynamics and the propulsion thrust stream. The objective of this study is to assess the feasibility of the EWP concept applied to large transport aircraft such as the Blended-Wing-Body aircraft. In this paper, some of early analysis and current status of the study are presented. In addition, other current activities of distributed propulsion under the RAC project are briefly discussed.

  15. Dielectrophoretic systems without embedded electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Cummings, Eric B.; Singh, Anup K.

    2006-03-21

    Method and apparatus for dielectrophoretic separation of particles in a fluid based using array of insulating structures arranged in a fluid flow channel. By utilizing an array of insulating structures, a spatially inhomogeneous electric field is created without the use of the embedded electrodes conventionally employed for dielectrophoretic separations. Moreover, by using these insulating structures a steady applied electric field has been shown to provide for dielectrophoresis in contrast to the conventional use of an alternating electric field. In a uniform array of posts, dielectrophoretic effects have been produced flows having significant pressure-driven and electrokinetic transport. Above a threshold applied electric field, filaments of concentrated and rarefied particles appear in the flow as a result of dielectrophoresis. Above a higher threshold applied voltage, dielectrophoresis produces zones of highly concentrated and immobilized particles. These patterns are strongly influenced by the angle of the array of insulating structures with respect to the mean applied electric field and the shape of the insulating structures.

  16. Sensor Authentication: Embedded Processor Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-09-25

    Described is the c code running on the embedded Microchip 32bit PIC32MX575F256H located on the INL developed noise analysis circuit board. The code performs the following functions: Controls the noise analysis circuit board preamplifier voltage gains of 1, 10, 100, 000 Initializes the analog to digital conversion hardware, input channel selection, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) function, USB communications interface, and internal memory allocations Initiates high resolution 4096 point 200 kHz data acquisition Computes complex 2048more » point FFT and FFT magnitude. Services Host command set Transfers raw data to Host Transfers FFT result to host Communication error checking« less

  17. The embedded operating system project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The design and construction of embedded operating systems for real-time advanced aerospace applications was investigated. The applications require reliable operating system support that must accommodate computer networks. Problems that arise in the construction of such operating systems, reconfiguration, consistency and recovery in a distributed system, and the issues of real-time processing are reported. A thesis that provides theoretical foundations for the use of atomic actions to support fault tolerance and data consistency in real-time object-based system is included. The following items are addressed: (1) atomic actions and fault-tolerance issues; (2) operating system structure; (3) program development; (4) a reliable compiler for path Pascal; and (5) mediators, a mechanism for scheduling distributed system processes.

  18. Structural Embeddings: Mechanization with Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, Cesar; Rushby, John

    1999-01-01

    The most powerful tools for analysis of formal specifications are general-purpose theorem provers and model checkers, but these tools provide scant methodological support. Conversely, those approaches that do provide a well-developed method generally have less powerful automation. It is natural, therefore, to try to combine the better-developed methods with the more powerful general-purpose tools. An obstacle is that the methods and the tools often employ very different logics. We argue that methods are separable from their logics and are largely concerned with the structure and organization of specifications. We, propose a technique called structural embedding that allows the structural elements of a method to be supported by a general-purpose tool, while substituting the logic of the tool for that of the method. We have found this technique quite effective and we provide some examples of its application. We also suggest how general-purpose systems could be restructured to support this activity better.

  19. FINE: fisher information nonparametric embedding.

    PubMed

    Carter, Kevin M; Raich, Raviv; Finn, William G; Hero, Alfred O

    2009-11-01

    We consider the problems of clustering, classification, and visualization of high-dimensional data when no straightforward euclidean representation exists. In this paper, we propose using the properties of information geometry and statistical manifolds in order to define similarities between data sets using the Fisher information distance. We will show that this metric can be approximated using entirely nonparametric methods, as the parameterization and geometry of the manifold is generally unknown. Furthermore, by using multidimensional scaling methods, we are able to reconstruct the statistical manifold in a low-dimensional euclidean space; enabling effective learning on the data. As a whole, we refer to our framework as Fisher Information Nonparametric Embedding (FINE) and illustrate its uses on practical problems, including a biomedical application and document classification. PMID:19762935

  20. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction is an alternative method for the detection of HER-2 amplification in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded breast cancer samples

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Tianjie; Guo, Peng; Qiu, Yan; Chen, Shinan; Yang, Libo; Sun, Linyong; Ye, Feng; Bu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) are the most common methods that are used to quantify HER-2 gene and protein levels, respectively, in human breast cancer. However, due to bad sample quality, some samples are unable to be subjected to a FISH assay. We evaluated 71 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) breast carcinoma specimens by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), IHC, and FISH. We also performed qPCR and FISH assays on delayed formalin-fixed (DDF) samples. The qPCR results were in complete concordance with the results of IHC and FISH. In regards to the DDF samples, the HER-2 fluorescent signal seemed decayed compared with that of the DDF samples after 1 h. However, the qPCR method still works well up to 12 hours. Our results indicated that qPCR was obviously superior to FISH in cases that were not fixed in a reasonable amount of time. However, qPCR can be an alternative method by which to perform HER2 amplification assays in breast cancer. PMID:26617766

  1. Influence of Probe Flexibility and Gelatin Embedding on Neuronal Density and Glial Responses to Brain Implants

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Per; Wolff, Anette; Ejserholm, Fredrik; Wallman, Lars

    2015-01-01

    To develop long-term high quality communication between brain and computer, a key issue is how to reduce the adverse foreign body responses. Here, the impact of probe flexibility and gelatine embedding on long-term (6w) tissue responses, was analyzed. Probes of same polymer material, size and shape, flexible mainly in one direction, were implanted in rat cerebral cortex (nimplants = 3 x 8) in two orientations with respect to the major movement direction of the brain relative to the skull: parallel to (flex mode) or transverse to (rigid mode). Flex mode implants were either embedded in gelatin or non-embedded. Neurons, activated microglia and astrocytes were visualized using immunohistochemistry. The astrocytic reactivity, but not microglial response, was significantly lower to probes implanted in flex mode as compared to rigid mode. The microglial response, but not astrocytic reactivity, was significantly smaller to gelatin embedded probes (flex mode) than non-embedded. Interestingly, the neuronal density was preserved in the inner zone surrounding gelatin embedded probes. This contrasts to the common reports of reduced neuronal density close to implanted probes. In conclusion, sheer stress appears to be an important factor for astrocytic reactivity to implanted probes. Moreover, gelatin embedding can improve the neuronal density and reduce the microglial response close to the probe. PMID:25790172

  2. Tissue types (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... are 4 basic types of tissue: connective tissue, epithelial tissue, muscle tissue, and nervous tissue. Connective tissue supports ... binds them together (bone, blood, and lymph tissues). Epithelial tissue provides a covering (skin, the linings of the ...

  3. Teaching Embedded System Concepts for Technological Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winzker, M.; Schwandt, A.

    2011-01-01

    A basic understanding of technology is recognized as important knowledge even for students not connected with engineering and computer science. This paper shows that embedded system concepts can be taught in a technological literacy course. An embedded system teaching block that has been used in an electronics module for non-engineers is…

  4. Embedded Picture Mnemonics to Learn Letters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shmidman, Adina; Ehri, Linnea

    2010-01-01

    Can embedded mnemonics ease the task of learning a foreign alphabet? English-speaking preschoolers (N = 36, M = 5;2 years) were taught 10 Hebrew letter-sound relations. Experimental letters were learned with mnemonics that embedded letter shapes in drawings of objects whose shapes resembled the letters and whose English names began with the…

  5. Virtually Embedded: Library Instruction within Second Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Marian G.; Smith, Carol E.

    2009-01-01

    Embedded librarianship in distance learning courses taught within virtual environments such as Second Life is an emerging, leading-edge practice. This paper describes the experiences of librarians embedded in undergraduate English composition courses taught entirely in Second Life and presents the results of an empirical research study to assess…

  6. Extraocular connective tissue architecture.

    PubMed

    Miller, Joel M; Demer, Joseph L; Poukens, Vadims; Pavlovski, Dmitri S; Nguyen, Hien N; Rossi, Ethan A

    2003-01-01

    Extraocular muscle pulleys, now well known to be kinematically significant extraocular structures, have been noted in passing and described in fragments several times over the past two centuries. They were late to be fully appreciated because biomechanical modeling of the orbit was not available to derive their kinematic consequences, and because pulleys are distributed condensations of collagen, elastin and smooth muscle (SM) that are not sharply delineated. Might other mechanically significant distributed extraocular structures still be awaiting description?An imaging approach is useful for describing distributed structures, but does not seem suitable for assessing mechanical properties. However, an image that distinguished types and densities of constituent tissues could give strong hints about mechanical properties. Thus, we have developed methods for producing three dimensional (3D) images of extraocular tissues based on thin histochemically processed slices, which distinguish collagen, elastin, striated muscle and SM. Overall tissue distortions caused by embedding for sectioning, and individual-slice distortions caused by thin sectioning and subsequent histologic processing were corrected by ordered image warping with intrinsic fiducials. We describe an extraocular structure, partly included in Lockwood's ligament, which contains dense elastin and SM bands, and which might refine horizontal eye alignment as a function of vertical gaze, and torsion in down-gaze. This active structure might therefore be a factor in strabismus and a target of therapeutic intervention. PMID:12723968

  7. Visual embedding: a model for visualization.

    PubMed

    Demiralp, Çağatay; Scheidegger, Carlos E; Kindlmann, Gordon L; Laidlaw, David H; Heer, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The authors propose visual embedding as a model for automatically generating and evaluating visualizations. A visual embedding is a function from data points to a space of visual primitives that measurably preserves structures in the data (domain) within the mapped perceptual space (range). The authors demonstrate its use with three examples: coloring of neural tracts, scatterplots with icons, and evaluation of alternative diffusion tensor glyphs. They discuss several techniques for generating visual-embedding functions, including probabilistic graphical models for embedding in discrete visual spaces. They also describe two complementary approaches--crowdsourcing and visual product spaces--for building visual spaces with associated perceptual--distance measures. In addition, they recommend several research directions for further developing the visual-embedding model. PMID:24808163

  8. Tissue Microdissection.

    PubMed

    Rabien, Anja; Kristiansen, Glen

    2016-01-01

    The new opportunities of modern assays of molecular biology can only be exploited fully if the results can be accurately correlated to the tissue phenotype under investigation. This is a general problem of non-in situ techniques, whereas results from in situ techniques are often difficult to quantify. The use of bulk tissue, which is not precisely characterized in terms of histology, has long been the basis for molecular analysis. It has, however, become apparent, that this simple approach is not sufficient for a detailed analysis of molecular alterations, which might be restricted to a specific tissue phenotype (e.g., tumor or normal tissue, stromal or epithelial cells). Microdissection is a method to provide minute amounts of histologically characterized tissues for molecular analysis with non-in situ techniques and has become an indispensable research tool. If tissue diversity is moderate and negligible, manual microdissection can be an easy and cost-efficient method of choice. In contrast, the advantage of laser microdissection is a very exact selection down to the level of a single cell, but often with a considerable time exposure to get enough material for the following analyses. The latter issue and the method of tissue preparation needed for laser microdissection are the main problems to solve if RNA, highly sensitive to degradation, shall be analyzed. This chapter focuses on optimized procedures for manual microdissection and laser microdissection to analyze RNA of malignant and nonmalignant prostate tissue. PMID:26667453

  9. The effect of section thickness and embedding media on the observed S-phase labelling index of artificially selected cell populations from neonatal mouse liver and spleen.

    PubMed

    Monkhouse, W S

    1985-08-01

    Following an intraperitoneal injection of tritiated thymidine to neonatal mice, livers and spleens were removed and their labelling indices were derived autoradiographically. This was done in a number of ways: (1) from tissue imprints on gelatinised glass slides; (2) from tissue embedded in JB4 plastic sectioned at thicknesses of 2, 5 and 7 micron; and (3) from tissue embedded in paraffin wax and sectioned at 7 micron. The results show that the indices from the JB4 embedded sections increase as the section thickness decreases, and that this relationship persists down to the notional section thickness of zero in the tissue imprints (in which all the cells are in contact with the autoradiographic emulsion). Indices from the 7 micron paraffin wax embedded sections are surprisingly close to the values from the imprints, are higher than indices from the 5 and 7 micron JB4 embedded sections, and are not significantly different (at the 2% level) from those from 2 micron JB4 embedded sections. Possible reasons for these results are discussed in respect of the autoradiographic process and in relationship to various mathematical correction factors which have been proposed to take account of beta-particle self-absorption in thick sections. It is concluded that none of these correction factors is of value and that the embedding medium has an important effect on the observed labelling indices. Comparisons between labelling indices, therefore, should be made only when they are derived from similarly embedded material at the same section thickness. PMID:3908424

  10. Tissue Tregs.

    PubMed

    Panduro, Marisella; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane

    2016-05-20

    The immune system is responsible for defending an organism against the myriad of microbial invaders it constantly confronts. It has become increasingly clear that the immune system has a second major function: the maintenance of organismal homeostasis. Foxp3(+)CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important contributors to both of these critical activities, defense being the primary purview of Tregs circulating through lymphoid organs, and homeostasis ensured mainly by their counterparts residing in parenchymal tissues. This review focuses on so-called tissue Tregs. We first survey existing information on the phenotype, function, sustaining factors, and human equivalents of the three best-characterized tissue-Treg populations-those operating in visceral adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and the colonic lamina propria. We then attempt to distill general principles from this body of work-as concerns the provenance, local adaptation, molecular sustenance, and targets of action of tissue Tregs, in particular. PMID:27168246

  11. CLIPS++: Embedding CLIPS into C++

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obermeyer, Lance; Miranker, Daniel P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a set of C++ extensions to the CLIPS language and their embodiment in CLIPS++. These extensions and the implementation approach of CLIPS++ provide a new level of embeddability with C and C++. These extensions are a C++ include statement and a defcontainer construct; (include (c++-header-file.h)) and (defcontainer (c++-type)). The include construct allows C++ functions to be embedded in both the LHS and RHS of CLIPS rules. The header file in an include construct is the same header file the programmer uses for his/her own C++ code, independent of CLIPS. The defcontainer construct allows the inference engine to treat C++ class instances as CLIPS deftemplate facts. Consequently existing C++ class libraries may be transparently imported into CLIPS. These C++ types may use advanced features like inheritance, virtual functions, and templates. The implementation has been tested with several class libraries, including Rogue Wave Software's Tools.h++, GNU's libg++, and USL's C++ Standard Components. The execution speed of CLIPS++ has been determined to be 5 to 700 times the execution speed of CLIPS 6.0 (10 to 20X typical).

  12. The Social Embedding of Intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, Bruce

    I claim that to pass the Turing Test over any period of extended time, it will be necessary to embed the entity into society. This chapter discusses why this is, and how it might be brought about. I start by arguing that intelligence is better characterized by tests of social interaction, especially in open-ended and extended situations. I then argue that learning is an essential component of intelligence and hence that a universal intelligence is impossible. These two arguments support the relevance of the Turing Test as a particular, but appropriate test of interactive intelligence. I look to the human case to argue that individual intelligence uses society to a considerable extent for its development. Taking a lead from the human case, I outline how a socially embedded Artificial Intelligence might be brought about in terms of four aspects: free will, emotion, empathy, and self-modeling. In each case, I try to specify what social 'hooks' might be required for the full ability to develop during a considerable period of in situ acculturation. The chapter ends by speculating what it might be like to live with the result.

  13. Filter Paper-based Nucleic Acid Storage in High-throughput Solid Tumor Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Stachler, Matthew; Jia, Yonghui; Sharaf, Nematullah; Wade, Jacqueline; Longtine, Janina; Garcia, Elizabeth; Sholl, Lynette M

    2015-01-01

    Molecular testing of tumors from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue blocks is central to clinical practice; however, it requires histology support and increases test turnaround time. Prospective fresh frozen tissue collection requires special handling, additional storage space, and may not be feasible for small specimens. Filter paper-based collection of tumor DNA reduces the need for histology support, requires little storage space, and preserves high-quality nucleic acid. We investigated the performance of tumor smears on filter paper in solid tumor genotyping, as compared with paired FFPE samples. Whatman FTA Micro Card (FTA preps) smears were prepared from 21 fresh tumor samples. A corresponding cytology smear was used to assess tumor cellularity and necrosis. DNA was isolated from FTA preps and FFPE core samples using automated methods and quantified using SYBR green dsDNA detection. Samples were genotyped for 471 mutations on a mass spectrophotometry-based platform (Sequenom). DNA concentrations from FTA preps and FFPE correlated for untreated carcinomas but not for mesenchymal tumors (Spearman σ=0.39 and σ=-0.1, respectively). Average DNA concentrations were lower from FTA preps as compared with FFPE, but DNA quality was higher with less fragmentation. Seventy-six percent of FTA preps and 86% of FFPE samples generated adequate DNA for genotyping. FTA preps tended to perform poorly for collection of DNA from pretreated carcinomas and mesenchymal neoplasms. Of the 16 paired DNA samples that were genotyped, 15 (94%) gave entirely concordant results. Filter paper-based sample preservation is a feasible alternative to FFPE for use in automated, high-throughput genotyping of carcinomas. PMID:25221956

  14. Clinical utility of reverse phase protein array for molecular classification of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Negm, Ola H; Muftah, Abir A; Aleskandarany, Mohammed A; Hamed, Mohamed R; Ahmad, Dena A J; Nolan, Christopher C; Diez-Rodriguez, Maria; Tighe, Patrick J; Ellis, Ian O; Rakha, Emad A; Green, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    Reverse Phase Protein Array (RPPA) represents a sensitive and high-throughput technique allowing simultaneous quantitation of protein expression levels in biological samples. This study aimed to confirm the ability of RPPA to classify archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) breast cancer tissues into molecular classes used in the Nottingham prognostic index plus (NPI+) determined by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Proteins were extracted from FFPE breast cancer tissues using three extraction protocols: the Q-proteome FFPE Tissue Kit (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany) and two in-house methods using Laemmli buffer with either incubation for 20 min or 2 h at 105 °C. Two preparation methods, full-face sections and macrodissection, were used to assess the yield and quality of protein extracts. Ten biomarkers used for the NPI+ (ER, PgR, HER2, Cytokeratins 5/6 and 7/8, EGFR, HER3, HER4, p53 and Mucin 1) were quantified using RPPA and compared to results determined by IHC. The Q-proteome FFPE Tissue Kit produced significantly higher protein concentration and signal intensities. The intra- and inter-array reproducibility assessment indicated that RPPA using FFPE lysates was a highly reproducible and robust technique. Expression of the biomarkers individually and in combination using RPPA was highly consistent with IHC results. Macrodissection of the invasive tumour component gave more reliable results with the majority of biomarkers determined by IHC, (80 % concordance) compared with full-face sections (60 % concordance). Our results provide evidence for the technical feasibility of RPPA for high-throughput protein expression profiling of FFPE breast cancer tissues. The sensitivity of the technique is related to the quality of extracted protein and purity of tumour tissue. RPPA could provide a quantitative technique alternative to IHC for the biomarkers used in the NPI+. PMID:26661092

  15. Development of the Embedded Membrane Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Nick R. Mann; R. S. Herbst; T. L. Trowbridge

    2004-04-01

    Recent evaluations in the field of biomass separations have resulted in a novel concept termed the “embedded membrane.” Biomass solutions, which typically consist of a sludge-like material, contain a wide range of particle types and concentrations. These highly abusive solutions have the potential to cause reduced flux and even catastrophic failure through erosion mechanisms within the membrane. The embedded membrane concept relies on embedding finer, filtration inducing particles (e.g. ceramic such as TiO2) into the interstices of a macroporous support (e.g., sintered metal such as sintered stainless steel). It is believed that the embedded membrane would be resistant to erosion processes, since only the macroporous support material would be subjected to the harsh hydrodynamic properties of the flowing bulk process fluid. Moreover, the finer, filtration inducing embedded particles that provide the necessary filtration efficiency are protected from the bulk process fluid. In an effort to investigate the embedded membrane concept, samples of sintered stainless steel membranes embedded with ceramic particles have been prepared.

  16. Early evolution of embedded clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, J. E.; Ercolano, B.; Bonnell, I. A.

    2015-07-01

    We examine the combined effects of winds and photoionizing radiation from O-type stars on embedded stellar clusters formed in model turbulent molecular clouds covering a range of masses and radii. We find that feedback is able to increase the quantities of dense gas present, but decreases the rate and efficiency of the conversion of gas to stars relative to control simulations in which feedback is absent. Star formation in these calculations often proceeds at a rate substantially slower than the freefall rate in the dense gas. This decoupling is due to the weakening of, and expulsion of gas from, the deepest parts of the clouds' potential wells where most of the star formation occurs in the control simulations. This results in large fractions of the stellar populations in the feedback simulation becoming dissociated from dense gas. However, where star formation does occur in both control and feedback simulations, it does so in dense gas, so the correlation between star formation activity and dense gas is preserved. The overall dynamical effects of feedback on the clusters are minimal, with only small fraction of stars becoming unbound, despite large quantities of gas being expelled from some clouds. This owes to the settling of the stars into virialized and stellar-dominated configurations before the onset of feedback. By contrast, the effects of feedback on the observable properties of the clusters - their U-, B- and V-band magnitudes - are strong and sudden. The time-scales on which the clusters become visible and unobscured are short compared with the time-scales which the clouds are actually destroyed.

  17. Embedded spacecraft thermal control using ultrasonic consolidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Jared W.

    Research has been completed in order to rapidly manufacture spacecraft thermal control technologies embedded in spacecraft structural panels using ultrasonic consolidation. This rapid manufacturing process enables custom thermal control designs in the time frame necessary for responsive space. Successfully embedded components include temperature sensors, heaters, wire harnessing, pre-manufactured heat pipes, and custom integral heat pipes. High conductivity inserts and custom integral pulsating heat pipes were unsuccessfully attempted. This research shows the viability of rapid manufacturing of spacecraft structures with embedded thermal control using ultrasonic consolidation.

  18. New Derivatives of Pyridoxine Exhibit High Antibacterial Activity against Biofilm-Embedded Staphylococcus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kayumov, Airat R.; Nureeva, Aliya A.; Trizna, Elena Yu.; Gazizova, Guzel R.; Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Shtyrlin, Nikita V.; Pugachev, Mikhail V.; Sapozhnikov, Sergey V.; Shtyrlin, Yurii G.

    2015-01-01

    Opportunistic bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis often form rigid biofilms on tissues and inorganic surfaces. In the biofilm bacterial cells are embedded in a self-produced polysaccharide matrix and thereby are inaccessible to biocides, antibiotics, or host immune system. Here we show the antibacterial activity of newly synthesized cationic biocides, the quaternary ammonium, and bisphosphonium salts of pyridoxine (vitamin B6) against biofilm-embedded Staphylococci. The derivatives of 6-hydroxymethylpyridoxine were ineffective against biofilm-embedded S. aureus and S. epidermidis at concentrations up to 64 μg/mL, although all compounds tested exhibited low MICs (2 μg/mL) against planktonic cells. In contrast, the quaternary ammonium salt of pyridoxine (N,N-dimethyl-N-((2,2,8-trimethyl-4H-[1,3]dioxino[4,5-c]pyridin-5-yl)methyl)octadecan-1-aminium chloride (3)) demonstrated high biocidal activity against both planktonic and biofilm-embedded bacteria. Thus, the complete death of biofilm-embedded S. aureus and S. epidermidis cells was obtained at concentrations of 64 and 16 μg/mL, respectively. We suggest that the quaternary ammonium salts of pyridoxine are perspective to design new synthetic antibiotics and disinfectants for external application against biofilm-embedded cells. PMID:26839888

  19. Tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    As living beings that encounter every kind of traumatic event from paper cut to myocardial infarction, we must possess ways to heal damaged tissues. While some animals are able to regrow complete body parts following injury (such as the earthworm who grows a new head following bisection), humans are sadly incapable of such feats. Our means of recovery following tissue damage consists largely of repair rather than pure regeneration. Thousands of times in our lives, a meticulously scripted but unseen wound healing drama plays, with cells serving as actors, extracellular matrix as the setting and growth factors as the means of communication. This article briefly reviews the cells involved in tissue repair, their signaling and proliferation mechanisms and the function of the extracellular matrix, then presents the actors and script for the three acts of the tissue repair drama. PMID:21220961

  20. Enabling Multiphoton and Second Harmonic Generation Imaging in Paraffin-Embedded and Histologically Stained Sections

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Michael G.; Kroll, Sebastian; Brucker, Sara Y.

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear microscopy, namely multiphoton imaging and second harmonic generation (SHG), is an established noninvasive technique useful for the imaging of extracellular matrix (ECM). Typically, measurements are performed in vivo on freshly excised tissues or biopsies. In this article, we describe the effect of rehydrating paraffin-embedded sections on multiphoton and SHG emission signals and the acquisition of nonlinear images from hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained sections before and after a destaining protocol. Our results reveal that bringing tissue sections to a physiological state yields a significant improvement in nonlinear signals, particularly in SHG. Additionally, the destaining of sections previously processed with H&E staining significantly improves their SHG emission signals during imaging, thereby allowing sufficient analysis of collagen in these sections. These results are important for researchers and pathologists to obtain additional information from paraffin-embedded tissues and archived samples to perform retrospective analysis of the ECM or gain additional information from rare samples. PMID:27018844

  1. Terahertz spectroscopy for the study of paraffin-embedded gastric cancer samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahaia, Faustino; Kasalynas, Irmantas; Seliuta, Dalius; Molis, Gediminas; Urbanowicz, Andrzej; Carvalho Silva, Catia D.; Carneiro, Fatima; Valusis, Gintaras; Granja, Pedro L.

    2015-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy constitute promising technique for biomedical applications as a complementary and powerful tool for diseases screening specially for early cancer diagnostic. The THz radiation is not harmful to biological tissues. As increased blood supply in cancer-affected tissues and consequent local increase in tissue water content makes THz technology a potentially attractive. In the present work, samples of healthy and adenocarcinoma-affected gastric tissue were analyzed using transmission time-domain THz spectroscopy (THz-TDS). The work shows the capability of the technique to distinguish between normal and cancerous regions in dried and paraffin-embedded samples. Plots of absorption coefficient α and refractive index n of normal and cancer affected tissues, are presented and the conditions for discrimination between normal and affected tissues are discussed.

  2. Validation and comparison of anti-αvβ3 and anti-αvβ5 rabbit monoclonal versus murine monoclonal antibodies in four different tumor entities.

    PubMed

    Böger, Christine; Kalthoff, Holger; Goodman, Simon L; Röcken, Christoph

    2013-12-01

    Integrins are pivotal in cancer biology and are putative candidates for cancer therapy. The investigation of integrins has been hampered by the lack of antibodies suitable for formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens. Here, we validated monoclonal rabbit antibodies (RabMAbs) against integrins αvβ3 (EM22703) and αvβ5 (EM09902) with murine monoclonal antibodies (MuMabs) LM609 (against αvβ3) and P1F6 (against αvβ5), in immunohistochemistry. Immunostaining was performed on sections of matching unfixed, cryoconserved (CC) and FFPE tissue from 19 colorectal, 20 lung, 17 breast, and 9 ovarian carcinomas. Sections were stained with LM609 and P1F6 and compared with the immunoreactions of the RabMAbs. The degree of concordance was assigned for staining patterns and intensity. Concordance between MuMAbs and RabMAbs ranged from weak, for anti-αvβ5 antibodies, to nearly complete for anti-αvβ3 antibodies. We confirmed that MuMAbs LM609 and P1F6 bound very weakly in FFPE tissue and no staining was seen. By contrast, RabMAbs EM22703 and EM09902 generally showed a high degree of agreement in staining patterns of CC and FFPE tissue. In summary, the RabMAbs had overlapping staining patterns that were generally more intense for CC when compared with FFPE material. This study suggests that EM22703 and EM09902 staining closely matches the staining of standard MuMAbs and also does so in archival FFPE tissue. PMID:23455183

  3. Embedding methods for the steady Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S. H.; Johnson, G. M.

    1983-01-01

    An approach to the numerical solution of the steady Euler equations is to embed the first-order Euler system in a second-order system and then to recapture the original solution by imposing additional boundary conditions. Initial development of this approach and computational experimentation with it were previously based on heuristic physical reasoning. This has led to the construction of a relaxation procedure for the solution of two-dimensional steady flow problems. The theoretical justification for the embedding approach is addressed. It is proven that, with the appropriate choice of embedding operator and additional boundary conditions, the solution to the embedded system is exactly the one to the original Euler equations. Hence, solving the embedded version of the Euler equations will not produce extraneous solutions.

  4. Debugging embedded computer programs. [tactical missile computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, G. H.

    1980-01-01

    Every embedded computer program must complete its debugging cycle using some system that will allow real time debugging. Many of the common items addressed during debugging are listed. Seven approaches to debugging are analyzed to evaluate how well they treat those items. Cost evaluations are also included in the comparison. The results indicate that the best collection of capabilities to cover the common items present in the debugging task occurs in the approach where a minicomputer handles the environment simulation with an emulation of some kind representing the embedded computer. This approach can be taken at a reasonable cost. The case study chosen is an embedded computer in a tactical missile. Several choices of computer for the environment simulation are discussed as well as different approaches to the embedded emulator.

  5. Embedded Electronic Nose for VOC Mixture Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botre, B.; Gharpure, D.; Shaligram, A.

    2009-05-23

    This paper details the work done towards a low cost, small size, portable embedded electronic nose (e-nose) and its application for analysis of different VOC mixtures. The sensor array is composed of commercially available metal oxide semiconductor sensors by Figaro. The embedded E-nose consists of an ADuC831 and has an RS 232 interface for Desktop PC for higher level data collection and NN training. The ESP tool with database facility and multilayer perceptron neural network (MLP NN) is employed to interface the embedded hardware and to process the electronic nose signals before being classified. The use of embedded e-nose for the quantification of VOCs in mixtures is investigated.

  6. Adaptive data embedding framework for multiclass classification.

    PubMed

    Mu, Tingting; Jiang, Jianmin; Wang, Yan; Goulermas, John Y

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this paper is the design of an engine for the automatic generation of supervised manifold embedding models. It proposes a modular and adaptive data embedding framework for classification, referred to as DEFC, which realizes in different stages including initial data preprocessing, relation feature generation and embedding computation. For the computation of embeddings, the concepts of friend closeness and enemy dispersion are introduced, to better control at local level the relative positions of the intraclass and interclass data samples. These are shown to be general cases of the global information setup utilized in the Fisher criterion, and are employed for the construction of different optimization templates to drive the DEFC model generation. For model identification, we use a simple but effective bilevel evolutionary optimization, which searches for the optimal model and its best model parameters. The effectiveness of DEFC is demonstrated with experiments using noisy synthetic datasets possessing nonlinear distributions and real-world datasets from different application fields. PMID:24807525

  7. Accurate basis set truncation for wavefunction embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Taylor A.; Goodpaster, Jason D.; Manby, Frederick R.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2013-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) provides a formally exact framework for performing embedded subsystem electronic structure calculations, including DFT-in-DFT and wavefunction theory-in-DFT descriptions. In the interest of efficiency, it is desirable to truncate the atomic orbital basis set in which the subsystem calculation is performed, thus avoiding high-order scaling with respect to the size of the MO virtual space. In this study, we extend a recently introduced projection-based embedding method [F. R. Manby, M. Stella, J. D. Goodpaster, and T. F. Miller III, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2564 (2012)], 10.1021/ct300544e to allow for the systematic and accurate truncation of the embedded subsystem basis set. The approach is applied to both covalently and non-covalently bound test cases, including water clusters and polypeptide chains, and it is demonstrated that errors associated with basis set truncation are controllable to well within chemical accuracy. Furthermore, we show that this approach allows for switching between accurate projection-based embedding and DFT embedding with approximate kinetic energy (KE) functionals; in this sense, the approach provides a means of systematically improving upon the use of approximate KE functionals in DFT embedding.

  8. Epitope recognition in the human-pig comparison model on fixed and embedded material.

    PubMed

    Scalia, Carla Rossana; Gendusa, Rossella; Basciu, Maria; Riva, Lorella; Tusa, Lorenza; Musarò, Antonella; Veronese, Silvio; Formenti, Angelo; D'Angelo, Donatella; Ronzio, Angela Gabriella; Cattoretti, Giorgio; Bolognesi, Maddalena Maria

    2015-10-01

    The conditions and the specificity by which an antibody binds to its target protein in routinely fixed and embedded tissues are unknown. Direct methods, such as staining in a knock-out animal or in vitro peptide scanning of the epitope, are costly and impractical. We aimed to elucidate antibody specificity and binding conditions using tissue staining and public genomic and immunological databases by comparing human and pig-the farmed mammal evolutionarily closest to humans besides apes. We used a database of 146 anti-human antibodies and found that antibodies tolerate partially conserved amino acid substitutions but not changes in target accessibility, as defined by epitope prediction algorithms. Some epitopes are sensitive to fixation and embedding in a species-specific fashion. We also find that half of the antibodies stain porcine tissue epitopes that have 60% to 100% similarity to human tissue at the amino acid sequence level. The reason why the remaining antibodies fail to stain the tissues remains elusive. Because of its similarity with the human, pig tissue offers a convenient tissue for quality control in immunohistochemistry, within and across laboratories, and an interesting model to investigate antibody specificity. PMID:26209082

  9. A unified data embedding and scrambling method.

    PubMed

    Rad, Reza Moradi; Wong, Koksheik; Guo, Jing-Ming

    2014-04-01

    Conventionally, data embedding techniques aim at maintaining high-output image quality so that the difference between the original and the embedded images is imperceptible to the naked eye. Recently, as a new trend, some researchers exploited reversible data embedding techniques to deliberately degrade image quality to a desirable level of distortion. In this paper, a unified data embedding-scrambling technique called UES is proposed to achieve two objectives simultaneously, namely, high payload and adaptive scalable quality degradation. First, a pixel intensity value prediction method called checkerboard-based prediction is proposed to accurately predict 75% of the pixels in the image based on the information obtained from 25% of the image. Then, the locations of the predicted pixels are vacated to embed information while degrading the image quality. Given a desirable quality (quantified in SSIM) for the output image, UES guides the embedding-scrambling algorithm to handle the exact number of pixels, i.e., the perceptual quality of the embedded-scrambled image can be controlled. In addition, the prediction errors are stored at a predetermined precision using the structure side information to perfectly reconstruct or approximate the original image. In particular, given a desirable SSIM value, the precision of the stored prediction errors can be adjusted to control the perceptual quality of the reconstructed image. Experimental results confirmed that UES is able to perfectly reconstruct or approximate the original image with SSIM value > 0.99 after completely degrading its perceptual quality while embedding at 7.001 bpp on average. PMID:24565789

  10. Tissue Contraction Force Microscopy for Optimization of Engineered Cardiac Tissue.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Jeremy A; Tranquillo, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    We developed a high-throughput screening assay that allows for relative comparison of the twitch force of millimeter-scale gel-based cardiac tissues. This assay is based on principles taken from traction force microscopy and uses fluorescent microspheres embedded in a soft polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate. A gel-forming cell suspension is simply pipetted onto the PDMS to form hemispherical cardiac tissue samples. Recordings of the fluorescent bead movement during tissue pacing are used to determine the maximum distance that the tissue can displace the elastic PDMS substrate. In this study, fibrin gel hemispheres containing human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes were formed on the PDMS and allowed to culture for 9 days. Bead displacement values were measured and compared to direct force measurements to validate the utility of the system. The amplitude of bead displacement correlated with direct force measurements, and the twitch force generated by the tissues was the same in 2 and 4 mg/mL fibrin gels, even though the 2 mg/mL samples visually appear more contractile if the assessment were made on free-floating samples. These results demonstrate the usefulness of this assay as a screening tool that allows for rapid sample preparation, data collection, and analysis in a simple and cost-effective platform. PMID:26538167

  11. A practical approach for the correction of iatrogenic penile skin loss in children: Scrotal embedding technique

    PubMed Central

    Ziylan, Orhan; Acar, Ömer; Özden, Burcu Celet; Tefik, Tzevat; Dönmez, M. İrfan; Oktar, Tayfun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this particular study is to determine the efficacy of scrotal embedding technique in children with overly deficient penile shaft skin, which takes advantage of the rich vascular supply of the scrotal layers and provides adequate tissue coverage. We give the operative and clinical details of two consecutive cases for which we preferred scrotal embedding technique to replace deficient penile skin. The mean operative time for the first and second stages was 72.5 and 52.5 min, respectively. Intraoperative and postoperative courses and convalescences were uneventful. The patients were hospitalized for a mean duration of 2 days. After a mean follow-up of 29 months, cosmetic and functional results were satisfactory. Scrotal embedding technique should be considered as a feasible surgical alternative while reconstructing the penile shaft in iatrogenic cases with overly deficient shaft skin. PMID:26623155

  12. Embedded computer systems for control applications in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.B.; Start, S.E.

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the embedded computer systems approach taken at Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) for non-safety related systems. The hardware and software structures for typical embedded systems are presented The embedded systems development process is described. Three examples are given which illustrate typical embedded computer applications in EBR-II.

  13. Embedded computer systems for control applications in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.B.; Start, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the embedded computer systems approach taken at Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) for non-safety related systems. The hardware and software structures for typical embedded systems are presented The embedded systems development process is described. Three examples are given which illustrate typical embedded computer applications in EBR-II.

  14. Distributed neural computations for embedded sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peckens, Courtney A.; Lynch, Jerome P.; Pei, Jin-Song

    2011-04-01

    Wireless sensing technologies have recently emerged as an inexpensive and robust method of data collection in a variety of structural monitoring applications. In comparison with cabled monitoring systems, wireless systems offer low-cost and low-power communication between a network of sensing devices. Wireless sensing networks possess embedded data processing capabilities which allow for data processing directly at the sensor, thereby eliminating the need for the transmission of raw data. In this study, the Volterra/Weiner neural network (VWNN), a powerful modeling tool for nonlinear hysteretic behavior, is decentralized for embedment in a network of wireless sensors so as to take advantage of each sensor's processing capabilities. The VWNN was chosen for modeling nonlinear dynamic systems because its architecture is computationally efficient and allows computational tasks to be decomposed for parallel execution. In the algorithm, each sensor collects it own data and performs a series of calculations. It then shares its resulting calculations with every other sensor in the network, while the other sensors are simultaneously exchanging their information. Because resource conservation is important in embedded sensor design, the data is pruned wherever possible to eliminate excessive communication between sensors. Once a sensor has its required data, it continues its calculations and computes a prediction of the system acceleration. The VWNN is embedded in the computational core of the Narada wireless sensor node for on-line execution. Data generated by a steel framed structure excited by seismic ground motions is used for validation of the embedded VWNN model.

  15. Diverse Power Iteration Embeddings and Its Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Huang H.; Yoo S.; Yu, D.; Qin, H.

    2014-12-14

    Abstract—Spectral Embedding is one of the most effective dimension reduction algorithms in data mining. However, its computation complexity has to be mitigated in order to apply it for real-world large scale data analysis. Many researches have been focusing on developing approximate spectral embeddings which are more efficient, but meanwhile far less effective. This paper proposes Diverse Power Iteration Embeddings (DPIE), which not only retains the similar efficiency of power iteration methods but also produces a series of diverse and more effective embedding vectors. We test this novel method by applying it to various data mining applications (e.g. clustering, anomaly detection and feature selection) and evaluating their performance improvements. The experimental results show our proposed DPIE is more effective than popular spectral approximation methods, and obtains the similar quality of classic spectral embedding derived from eigen-decompositions. Moreover it is extremely fast on big data applications. For example in terms of clustering result, DPIE achieves as good as 95% of classic spectral clustering on the complex datasets but 4000+ times faster in limited memory environment.

  16. Label-Embedding for Image Classification.

    PubMed

    Akata, Zeynep; Perronnin, Florent; Harchaoui, Zaid; Schmid, Cordelia

    2016-07-01

    Attributes act as intermediate representations that enable parameter sharing between classes, a must when training data is scarce. We propose to view attribute-based image classification as a label-embedding problem: each class is embedded in the space of attribute vectors. We introduce a function that measures the compatibility between an image and a label embedding. The parameters of this function are learned on a training set of labeled samples to ensure that, given an image, the correct classes rank higher than the incorrect ones. Results on the Animals With Attributes and Caltech-UCSD-Birds datasets show that the proposed framework outperforms the standard Direct Attribute Prediction baseline in a zero-shot learning scenario. Label embedding enjoys a built-in ability to leverage alternative sources of information instead of or in addition to attributes, such as, e.g., class hierarchies or textual descriptions. Moreover, label embedding encompasses the whole range of learning settings from zero-shot learning to regular learning with a large number of labeled examples. PMID:26452251

  17. Orthogonality of embedded wave functions for different states in frozen-density embedding theory.

    PubMed

    Zech, Alexander; Aquilante, Francesco; Wesolowski, Tomasz A

    2015-10-28

    Other than lowest-energy stationary embedded wave functions obtained in Frozen-Density Embedding Theory (FDET) [T. A. Wesolowski, Phys. Rev. A 77, 012504 (2008)] can be associated with electronic excited states but they can be mutually non-orthogonal. Although this does not violate any physical principles--embedded wave functions are only auxiliary objects used to obtain stationary densities--working with orthogonal functions has many practical advantages. In the present work, we show numerically that excitation energies obtained using conventional FDET calculations (allowing for non-orthogonality) can be obtained using embedded wave functions which are strictly orthogonal. The used method preserves the mathematical structure of FDET and self-consistency between energy, embedded wave function, and the embedding potential (they are connected through the Euler-Lagrange equations). The orthogonality is built-in through the linearization in the embedded density of the relevant components of the total energy functional. Moreover, we show formally that the differences between the expectation values of the embedded Hamiltonian are equal to the excitation energies, which is the exact result within linearized FDET. Linearized FDET is shown to be a robust approximation for a large class of reference densities. PMID:26520497

  18. Orthogonality of embedded wave functions for different states in frozen-density embedding theory

    SciTech Connect

    Zech, Alexander; Wesolowski, Tomasz A.; Aquilante, Francesco

    2015-10-28

    Other than lowest-energy stationary embedded wave functions obtained in Frozen-Density Embedding Theory (FDET) [T. A. Wesolowski, Phys. Rev. A 77, 012504 (2008)] can be associated with electronic excited states but they can be mutually non-orthogonal. Although this does not violate any physical principles — embedded wave functions are only auxiliary objects used to obtain stationary densities — working with orthogonal functions has many practical advantages. In the present work, we show numerically that excitation energies obtained using conventional FDET calculations (allowing for non-orthogonality) can be obtained using embedded wave functions which are strictly orthogonal. The used method preserves the mathematical structure of FDET and self-consistency between energy, embedded wave function, and the embedding potential (they are connected through the Euler-Lagrange equations). The orthogonality is built-in through the linearization in the embedded density of the relevant components of the total energy functional. Moreover, we show formally that the differences between the expectation values of the embedded Hamiltonian are equal to the excitation energies, which is the exact result within linearized FDET. Linearized FDET is shown to be a robust approximation for a large class of reference densities.

  19. Embedded Web Technology: Applying World Wide Web Standards to Embedded Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponyik, Joseph G.; York, David W.

    2002-01-01

    Embedded Systems have traditionally been developed in a highly customized manner. The user interface hardware and software along with the interface to the embedded system are typically unique to the system for which they are built, resulting in extra cost to the system in terms of development time and maintenance effort. World Wide Web standards have been developed in the passed ten years with the goal of allowing servers and clients to intemperate seamlessly. The client and server systems can consist of differing hardware and software platforms but the World Wide Web standards allow them to interface without knowing about the details of system at the other end of the interface. Embedded Web Technology is the merging of Embedded Systems with the World Wide Web. Embedded Web Technology decreases the cost of developing and maintaining the user interface by allowing the user to interface to the embedded system through a web browser running on a standard personal computer. Embedded Web Technology can also be used to simplify an Embedded System's internal network.

  20. Stimulus-induced response patterns of medium-embedded neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnov, D. E.; Chetverikov, A. P.; Postnov, D. D.

    2010-09-01

    Neuronal ensembles in living organisms are often embedded in a media that provides additional interaction pathways and autoregulation. The underlying mechanisms include but are not limited to modulatory activity of some distantly propagated neuromediators like serotonin, variation of extracellular potassium concentration in brain tissue, and calcium waves propagation in networks of astrocytes. Interaction of these diverse processes can lead to formation of complex spatiotemporal patterns, both self-sustained or triggered by external signal. Besides network effects, many dynamical features of such systems originate from reciprocal interaction between single neuron and surrounding medium. In the present paper we study the response of such systems to the application of a single stimulus pulse. We use a minimal mathematical model representing a forced excitable unit that is embedded in a diffusive or (spatially inhomogeneous) excitable medium. We illustrate three different mechanisms for the formation of response patterns: (i) self-sustained depolarization, (ii) propagation of depolarization due to “nearest-neighbor” networks, and (iii) re-entrant waves.

  1. Grating-based tomography of human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bert; Schulz, Georg; Mehlin, Andrea; Herzen, Julia; Lang, Sabrina; Holme, Margaret; Zanette, Irene; Hieber, Simone; Deyhle, Hans; Beckmann, Felix; Pfeiffer, Franz; Weitkamp, Timm

    2012-07-01

    The development of therapies to improve our health requires a detailed knowledge on the anatomy of soft tissues from the human body down to the cellular level. Grating-based phase contrast micro computed tomography using synchrotron radiation provides a sensitivity, which allows visualizing micrometer size anatomical features in soft tissue without applying any contrast agent. We show phase contrast tomography data of human brain, tumor vessels and constricted arteries from the beamline ID 19 (ESRF) and urethral tissue from the beamline W2 (HASYLAB/DESY) with micrometer resolution. Here, we demonstrate that anatomical features can be identified within brain tissue as well known from histology. Using human urethral tissue, the application of two photon energies is compared. Tumor vessels thicker than 20 μm can be perfectly segmented. The morphology of coronary arteries can be better extracted in formalin than after paraffin embedding.

  2. Cross-Linked Fiber Network Embedded in Elastic Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L.; Lake, S.P.; Barocas, V.H.; Shephard, M.S.; Picu, R.C.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of a three-dimensional cross-linked fiber network embedded in matrix is studied in this work. The network is composed from linear elastic fibers which store energy only in the axial deformation mode, while the matrix is also isotropic and linear elastic. Such systems are encountered in a broad range of applications, from tissue to consumer products. As the matrix modulus increases, the network is constrained to deform more affinely. This leads to internal forces acting between the network and the matrix, which produce strong stress concentration at the network cross-links. This interaction increases the apparent modulus of the network and decreases the apparent modulus of the matrix. A model is developed to predict the effective modulus of the composite and its predictions are compared with numerical data for a variety of networks. PMID:24089623

  3. On linear area embedding of planar graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolev, D.; Trickey, H.

    1981-09-01

    Planar embedding with minimal area of graphs on an integer grid is one of the major issues in VLSI. Valiant (V) gave an algorithm to construct a planar embedding for trees in linear area; he also proved that there are planar graphs that require quadratic area. An algorithm to embed outerplanar graphs in linear area is given. This algorithm is extended to work for every planar graph that has the following property: for every vertex there exists a path of length less than K to the exterior face, where K is a constant. Finally, finding a minimal embedding area is shown to be NP-complete for forests, and hence more general types of graphs.

  4. Embedded Thermal Control for Spacecraft Subsystems Miniaturization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didion, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Optimization of spacecraft size, weight and power (SWaP) resources is an explicit technical priority at Goddard Space Flight Center. Embedded Thermal Control Subsystems are a promising technology with many cross cutting NSAA, DoD and commercial applications: 1.) CubeSatSmallSat spacecraft architecture, 2.) high performance computing, 3.) On-board spacecraft electronics, 4.) Power electronics and RF arrays. The Embedded Thermal Control Subsystem technology development efforts focus on component, board and enclosure level devices that will ultimately include intelligent capabilities. The presentation will discuss electric, capillary and hybrid based hardware research and development efforts at Goddard Space Flight Center. The Embedded Thermal Control Subsystem development program consists of interrelated sub-initiatives, e.g., chip component level thermal control devices, self-sensing thermal management, advanced manufactured structures. This presentation includes technical status and progress on each of these investigations. Future sub-initiatives, technical milestones and program goals will be presented.

  5. Data entry and error embedding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Jr., John (Inventor); Woo, Daniel N. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A data entry and error embedding system in which, first, a document is bitmapped and recorded in a first memory. Then, it is displayed, and portions of it to be replicated by data entry are underlayed by a window, into which window replicated data is entered in location and size such that it is juxtaposed just below that which is replicated, enhancing the accuracy of replication. Second, with this format in place, selected portions of the replicated data are altered by the insertion of character or word substitutions, thus the embedding of errors. Finally, a proofreader would endeavor to correct the error embedded data and a record of his or her changes recorded. In this manner, the skill level of the proofreader and accuracy of the data are computed.

  6. Scar Tissue.

    PubMed

    McLean, Haydn J

    2015-12-01

    Scar tissue is associated with physical wounds and their mending, but it is also descriptive in portraying the emotional scarring that occurs following adversity, resulting in potential psychological morbidity. Provided the adversity is not severe, such challenges to adaptability may provoke Andrew Solomon's process of forging meaning and building identity. Perceiving an emotional constitution as analogous to the immune system provides a metaphor for appreciating the benefits of emotional challenges, which may provoke greater emotional resilience or posttraumatic growth. PMID:26631526

  7. Global string embeddings for the nilpotent Goldstino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Etxebarria, Iñaki; Quevedo, Fernando; Valandro, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    We discuss techniques for embedding a nilpotent Goldstino sector both in weakly coupled type IIB compactifications and F-theory models at arbitrary coupling, providing examples of both scenarios in semi-realistic compactifications. We start by showing how to construct a local embedding for the nilpotent Goldstino in terms of an anti D3-brane in a local conifold throat, and then discuss how to engineer the required local structure in globally consistent compact models. We present two explicit examples, the last one supporting also chiral matter and Kähler moduli stabilisation.

  8. Anisotropic optical film embedded with cellulose nanowhisker.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dah Hee; Song, Young Seok

    2015-10-01

    We investigated anisotropic optical behaviors of composite films embedded with CNWs. To control the orientation of CNWs, elongation was applied to the composite film. Morphological and mechanical analyses of the specimens were carried out to examine the influence of the applied extension. The CNWs were found to be aligned in the elongated direction, yielding remarkable anisotropic microstructure and optical properties. As the applied elongation and CNW loading increased, the resulting degree of polarization and birefringence increased due to increased interactions between the embedded particles. This study suggests a way to prepare an anisotropic optical component with nanoparticles of which the microstructures, such as orientation and filler content, can be controlled. PMID:26076646

  9. Tools for Embedded Computing Systems Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A workshop was held to assess the state of tools for embedded systems software and to determine directions for tool development. A synopsis of the talk and the key figures of each workshop presentation, together with chairmen summaries, are presented. The presentations covered four major areas: (1) tools and the software environment (development and testing); (2) tools and software requirements, design, and specification; (3) tools and language processors; and (4) tools and verification and validation (analysis and testing). The utility and contribution of existing tools and research results for the development and testing of embedded computing systems software are described and assessed.

  10. Microring embedded hollow polymer fiber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Linslal, C. L. Sebastian, S.; Mathew, S.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Girijavallabhan, C. P.; Kailasnath, M.

    2015-03-30

    Strongly modulated laser emission has been observed from rhodamine B doped microring resonator embedded in a hollow polymer optical fiber by transverse optical pumping. The microring resonator is fabricated on the inner wall of a hollow polymer fiber. Highly sharp lasing lines, strong mode selection, and a collimated laser beam are observed from the fiber. Nearly single mode lasing with a side mode suppression ratio of up to 11.8 dB is obtained from the strongly modulated lasing spectrum. The microring embedded hollow polymer fiber laser has shown efficient lasing characteristics even at a propagation length of 1.5 m.

  11. Security audit for embedded avionics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. N.

    The design of security audit subsystems for real-time embedded avionics systems is described. The selection criteria of auditable events and the design of the audit functions are described. The data storage requirements and the data compression features of embedded avionics systems are analyzed. Two data compression algorithms applicable to avionics systems are described. Huffman encoding is optimal, but Fibonacci encoding is shown to be nearly optimal and better suited for airborne avionics systems. The memory capacity needed for audit data storage is computed for typical avionics missions.

  12. Embedded GPS solves the installation dilemma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturza, Mark A.; Richards, Charles C.

    The authors describe a proposed embedded GPS/INS (Global Positioning System/Inertial Navigation System) architecture. The architecture provides full Phase III (jammed) GPS performance and supports all GPS/inertial integration approaches. The GPS unique interfaces are minimized by taking advantage of existing INS interfaces. Single-point failures are minimized by use of a partitioned power supply. It is concluded that the embedded GPS receiver offers equal or better performance, increased reliability, and significantly reduced weight and volume when compared to a standalone Receiver 3A.

  13. Converting VSAM in COBOL to embedded SQL

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hai; Wang, Yamin; Tsai, Wei-Tek

    1996-12-31

    VSAM databases we widely used on IBM mainframe systems. As new technology, such as relational database and client-server computing, becomes popular, there is a need to reengineer the VSAM databases to relational databases. This paper addresses the issues on converting COBOL programs that access VSAM database to COBOL programs that access relational databases with embedded SQL. It proposed a semi-automatic approach to the conversion of VSAM data sets to SQL tables and VSAM operations in COBOL program to embedded SQL queries. The proposed approach has been experimented on several industrial COBOL programs and a tool implementing the approach is under development.

  14. Two-color SERS microscopy for protein co-localization in prostate tissue with primary antibody-protein A/G-gold nanocluster conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, Mohammad; Schneider, Lilli; Ströbel, Philipp; Marx, Alexander; Packeisen, Jens; Schlücker, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    SERS microscopy is a novel staining technique in immunohistochemistry, which is based on antibodies labeled with functionalized noble metal colloids called SERS labels or nanotags for optical detection. Conventional covalent bioconjugation of these SERS labels cannot prevent blocking of the antigen recognition sites of the antibody. We present a rational chemical design for SERS label-antibody conjugates which addresses this issue. Highly sensitive, silica-coated gold nanoparticle clusters as SERS labels are non-covalently conjugated to primary antibodies by using the chimeric protein A/G, which selectively recognizes the Fc part of antibodies and therefore prevents blocking of the antigen recognition sites. In proof-of-concept two-color imaging experiments for the co-localization of p63 and PSA on non-neoplastic prostate tissue FFPE specimens, we demonstrate the specificity and signal brightness of these rationally designed primary antibody-protein A/G-gold nanocluster conjugates.SERS microscopy is a novel staining technique in immunohistochemistry, which is based on antibodies labeled with functionalized noble metal colloids called SERS labels or nanotags for optical detection. Conventional covalent bioconjugation of these SERS labels cannot prevent blocking of the antigen recognition sites of the antibody. We present a rational chemical design for SERS label-antibody conjugates which addresses this issue. Highly sensitive, silica-coated gold nanoparticle clusters as SERS labels are non-covalently conjugated to primary antibodies by using the chimeric protein A/G, which selectively recognizes the Fc part of antibodies and therefore prevents blocking of the antigen recognition sites. In proof-of-concept two-color imaging experiments for the co-localization of p63 and PSA on non-neoplastic prostate tissue FFPE specimens, we demonstrate the specificity and signal brightness of these rationally designed primary antibody-protein A/G-gold nanocluster conjugates

  15. Growing Embedded Librarians Like Kudzu: How the Embedded Extension Service Creates More Embedded Librarians without Creating New Positions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coltrain, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In an era of exploding online enrollment and tight budgets, Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC) struggles to meet the needs of online students. CPCC librarians went one step towards solving that problem in 2009-2010 by launching an embedded librarian program. CPCC's program became so successful that it struggled to meet demand. In 2013,…

  16. Manual hematoxylin and eosin staining of mouse tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Cardiff, Robert D; Miller, Claramae H; Munn, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    The hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain is the standard used for microscopic examination of tissues that have been fixed, processed, embedded, and sectioned. It can be performed manually or by automation. For economic reasons, the manual technique is generally the method of choice for facilities with a low sample volume. This protocol describes manual H&E staining of fixed, processed, paraffin-embedded, and sectioned mouse tissues. In H&E-stained tissues, the nucleic acids stain dark blue and the proteins stain red to pink or orange. For accurate phenotyping and delineation of tissue detail, the protocol must be adhered to rigorously. This includes frequent reagent changes as well as the use of "in-date" reagents. Appropriate color in a good H&E stain allows for identification of many tissue subtleties that are necessary for accurate diagnosis. PMID:24890205

  17. Post-embedding Immunogold Labeling of Synaptic Proteins in Hippocampal Slice Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ling; Brown, Joshua C.; Wells, Clive; Gerges, Nashaat Z.

    2013-01-01

    Immunoelectron microscopy is a powerful tool to study biological molecules at the subcellular level. Antibodies coupled to electron-dense markers such as colloidal gold can reveal the localization and distribution of specific antigens in various tissues1. The two most widely used techniques are pre-embedding and post-embedding techniques. In pre-embedding immunogold-electron microscopy (EM) techniques, the tissue must be permeabilized to allow antibody penetration before it is embedded. These techniques are ideal for preserving structures but poor penetration of the antibody (often only the first few micrometers) is a considerable drawback2. The post-embedding labeling methods can avoid this problem because labeling takes place on sections of fixed tissues where antigens are more easily accessible. Over the years, a number of modifications have improved the post-embedding methods to enhance immunoreactivity and to preserve ultrastructure3-5. Tissue fixation is a crucial part of EM studies. Fixatives chemically crosslink the macromolecules to lock the tissue structures in place. The choice of fixative affects not only structural preservation but also antigenicity and contrast. Osmium tetroxide (OsO4), formaldehyde, and glutaraldehyde have been the standard fixatives for decades, including for central nervous system (CNS) tissues that are especially prone to structural damage during chemical and physical processing. Unfortunately, OsO4 is highly reactive and has been shown to mask antigens6, resulting in poor and insufficient labeling. Alternative approaches to avoid chemical fixation include freezing the tissues. But these techniques are difficult to perform and require expensive instrumentation. To address some of these problems and to improve CNS tissue labeling, Phend et al. replaced OsO4 with uranyl acetate (UA) and tannic acid (TA), and successfully introduced additional modifications to improve the sensitivity of antigen detection and structural preservation

  18. Optical architecture design for detection of absorbers embedded in visceral fat

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Robert; Florence, James; MacFarlane, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    Optically absorbing ducts embedded in scattering adipose tissue can be injured during laparoscopic surgery. Non-sequential simulations and theoretical analysis compare optical system configurations for detecting these absorbers. For absorbers in deep scattering volumes, trans-illumination is preferred instead of diffuse reflectance. For improved contrast, a scanning source with a large area detector is preferred instead of a large area source with a pixelated detector. PMID:24877008

  19. Optical architecture design for detection of absorbers embedded in visceral fat.

    PubMed

    Francis, Robert; Florence, James; MacFarlane, Duncan

    2014-05-01

    Optically absorbing ducts embedded in scattering adipose tissue can be injured during laparoscopic surgery. Non-sequential simulations and theoretical analysis compare optical system configurations for detecting these absorbers. For absorbers in deep scattering volumes, trans-illumination is preferred instead of diffuse reflectance. For improved contrast, a scanning source with a large area detector is preferred instead of a large area source with a pixelated detector. PMID:24877008

  20. Embedded Multiprocessor Technology for VHSIC Insertion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Paul J.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on embedded multiprocessor technology for VHSIC insertion are presented. The objective was to develop multiprocessor system technology providing user-selectable fault tolerance, increased throughput, and ease of application representation for concurrent operation. The approach was to develop graph management mapping theory for proper performance, model multiprocessor performance, and demonstrate performance in selected hardware systems.

  1. Is Embedded Librarianship Right for Your Institution?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Gordon; Heller-Ross, Holly

    2010-01-01

    Embedded librarians, connected with students and faculty inside the classroom, lab and studio, have new opportunities for preparing students for research and for collaborating with faculty on course-integrated information literacy, research assignment design, teaching, assignment interpretation, and timely student assistance. What makes embedded…

  2. Far-infrared embedding impedance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neikirk, D. P.; Rutledge, D. B.

    1984-01-01

    A technique which allows the measurement of detector embedding impedance has been developed. By using a bismuth microbolometer as a variable resistance load the impedance of one element in a bow-tie antenna array operating at 94 GHz was inferred. The technique is frequency insensitive, and could be used throughout the far-infrared.

  3. Embedding Enterprise in Science and Engineering Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handscombe, Robert D.; Rodriguez-Falcon, Elena; Patterson, Eann A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to focus on the attempts to implement the challenges of teaching enterprise to science and engineering students by the embedding approach chosen by the White Rose Centre for Enterprise (WRCE), one of the centres formed under the Science Engineering Challenge in the UK. Design/methodology/approach: WRCE's objective was to…

  4. Approximate Orthogonal Sparse Embedding for Dimensionality Reduction.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zhihui; Wong, Wai Keung; Xu, Yong; Yang, Jian; Zhang, David

    2016-04-01

    Locally linear embedding (LLE) is one of the most well-known manifold learning methods. As the representative linear extension of LLE, orthogonal neighborhood preserving projection (ONPP) has attracted widespread attention in the field of dimensionality reduction. In this paper, a unified sparse learning framework is proposed by introducing the sparsity or L1-norm learning, which further extends the LLE-based methods to sparse cases. Theoretical connections between the ONPP and the proposed sparse linear embedding are discovered. The optimal sparse embeddings derived from the proposed framework can be computed by iterating the modified elastic net and singular value decomposition. We also show that the proposed model can be viewed as a general model for sparse linear and nonlinear (kernel) subspace learning. Based on this general model, sparse kernel embedding is also proposed for nonlinear sparse feature extraction. Extensive experiments on five databases demonstrate that the proposed sparse learning framework performs better than the existing subspace learning algorithm, particularly in the cases of small sample sizes. PMID:25955995

  5. Structure Map for Embedded Binary Alloy Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, C.W.; Shin, S.J.; Liao, C.Y.; Guzman, J.; Stone, P.R.; Watanabe, M.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.; Chrzan, D.C.

    2008-09-20

    The equilibrium structure of embedded nanocrystals formed from strongly segregating binary-alloys is considered within a simple thermodynamic model. The model identifies two dimensionlessinterface energies that dictate the structure, and allows prediction of the stable structure for anychoice of these parameters. The resulting structure map includes three distinct nanocrystal mor-phologies: core/shell, lobe/lobe, and completely separated spheres.

  6. Embedded Preservice Teacher Education: Sophomore Multicultural Internship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Richard

    This paper describes the Sophomore Multicultural Internship for preservice teachers at Moorhead State University, Minnesota. From 1990-95, the program immersed preservice teachers in cross-cultural encounters and K-12 clinical experiences intended to: engender enlightened tolerance; provide an embedded context for making moral choices to pursue…

  7. Embedding Quality: The Challenges for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lomas, Laurie

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews recent research, literature and the views of a small sample of senior managers and academics in English higher education institutions on the challenges associated with embedding quality. When implemented by a university, quality enhancement models such as total quality management and the European Foundation for Quality…

  8. Efficient algorithms for survivable virtual network embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gang; Yu, Hongfang; Li, Lemin; Anand, Vishal; di, Hao; Gao, Xiujiao

    2010-12-01

    Network Virtualization Technology is serving as an effective method for providing a flexible and highly adaptable shared substrate network to satisfy the diversity of demands. But the problem of efficiently embedding Virtual Network (VN) onto substrate network is intractable since it is NP-hard. How to guarantee survivability of the embedding efficiently is another great challenge. In this paper, we investigate the Survivable Virtual Network Embedding (SVNE) problem and propose two efficient algorithms for solving this problem efficiently. Firstly, we formulate the model with minimum-cost objective of survivable network virtualization problem by Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP). We then devise two efficient relaxation-based algorithms for solving survivable virtual network embedding problem: (1) Lagrangian Relaxation based algorithm, called LR-SVNE in this paper; (2) Decomposition based algorithm called DSVNE in this paper. The results of simulation experiments show that these two algorithms both have good performance on time efficiency but LR-SVNE can guarantee the solution converge to optimal one under small scale substrate network.

  9. Tapered fibers embedded in silica aerogel.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Limin; Grogan, Michael D W; Leon-Saval, Sergio G; Williams, Rhys; England, Richard; Wadsworth, Willam J; Birks, Tim A

    2009-09-15

    We have embedded thin tapered fibers (with diameters down to 1 microm) in silica aerogel with low loss. The aerogel is rigid but behaves refractively like air, protecting the taper without disturbing light propagation along it. This enables a new class of fiber devices exploiting volume evanescent interactions with the aerogel itself or with dopants or gases in the pores. PMID:19756084

  10. Embedded solution for a microwave moisture meter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper, the conversion of a PC or laptop-controlled microwave moisture meter to a stand-alone meter hosting its own embedded system is discussed. The moisture meter is based on the free-space transmission measurement technique and uses low-intensity microwaves to measure the attenuation and p...

  11. Adaptive Embedded Digital System for Plasma Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Angel; Rodríguez, Othoniel; Mangual, Osvaldo; Ponce, Eduardo; Vélez, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    An Adaptive Embedded Digital System to perform plasma diagnostics using electrostatic probes was developed at the Plasma Engineering Laboratory at Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico. The system will replace the existing instrumentation at the Laboratory, using reconfigurable hardware to minimize the equipment and software needed to perform diagnostics. The adaptability of the design resides on the possibility of replacing the computational algorithm on the fly, allowing to use the same hardware for different probes. The system was prototyped using Very High Speed Integrated Circuits Hardware Description Language (VHDL) into an Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) board. The design of the Embedded Digital System includes a Zero Phase Digital Filter, a Derivative Unit, and a Computational Unit designed using the VHDL-2008 Support Library. The prototype is able to compute the Plasma Electron Temperature and Density from a Single Langmuir probe. The system was tested using real data previously acquired from a single Langmuir probe. The plasma parameters obtained from the embedded system were compared with results computed using matlab yielding excellent matching. The new embedded system operates on 4096 samples versus 500 on the previous system, and completes its computations in 26 milliseconds compared with about 15 seconds on the previous system.

  12. Polarizable Embedding Density Matrix Renormalization Group.

    PubMed

    Hedegård, Erik D; Reiher, Markus

    2016-09-13

    The polarizable embedding (PE) approach is a flexible embedding model where a preselected region out of a larger system is described quantum mechanically, while the interaction with the surrounding environment is modeled through an effective operator. This effective operator represents the environment by atom-centered multipoles and polarizabilities derived from quantum mechanical calculations on (fragments of) the environment. Thereby, the polarization of the environment is explicitly accounted for. Here, we present the coupling of the PE approach with the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG). This PE-DMRG method is particularly suitable for embedded subsystems that feature a dense manifold of frontier orbitals which requires large active spaces. Recovering such static electron-correlation effects in multiconfigurational electronic structure problems, while accounting for both electrostatics and polarization of a surrounding environment, allows us to describe strongly correlated electronic structures in complex molecular environments. We investigate various embedding potentials for the well-studied first excited state of water with active spaces that correspond to a full configuration-interaction treatment. Moreover, we study the environment effect on the first excited state of a retinylidene Schiff base within a channelrhodopsin protein. For this system, we also investigate the effect of dynamical correlation included through short-range density functional theory. PMID:27537835

  13. Smirnov-Sobolev spaces and their embeddings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekarskii, A. A.

    2003-04-01

    Let G be a bounded simply connected domain with rectifiable boundary \\partial G and assume that 0. Let E_p(G) be the Smirnov space of analytic functions f in G. The Smirnov-Sobolev space E_p^s(G), s\\in\\mathbb N, consists of analytic functions f in G such that f^{(s)}\\in E_p(G). If G is a disc, then E_p(G) is the Hardy space and E_p^s(G) is the Hardy-Sobolev space. In that case the following Hardy-Littlewood embedding is known: \\displaystyle E_\\sigma^s(G)\\subset E_p(G), \\qquad 1/\\sigma=s+1/p.The author has recently extended this embedding to Smirnov-Sobolev spaces in Lavrent'ev domains. A further generalization of the Hardy-Littlewood embedding is obtained in the present paper. Namely, it is shown that such an embedding holds if the domain G satisfies the following condition: for all points \\xi and \\eta in \\partial G, \\displaystyle \\vert\\Gamma(\\xi,\\eta)\\vert\\leqslant \\chi\\rho^+(\\xi,\\eta), \\qquad \\chi=\\chi(G)\\geqslant 1.Here \\vert\\Gamma(\\xi,\\eta)\\vert is the length of the smallest of the two arcs of \\partial G connecting \\xi and \\eta; \\rho^+(\\xi,\\eta) is the interior distance (with respect to G) between the points \\xi and \\eta.

  14. Heat pipe with embedded wick structure

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, D.R.; Shen, D.S.; Tuck, M.R.; Palmer, D.W.; Grafe, V.G.

    1998-06-23

    A heat pipe has an embedded wick structure that maximizes capillary pumping capability. Heat from attached devices such as integrated circuits evaporates working fluid in the heat pipe. The vapor cools and condenses on a heat dissipation surface. The condensate collects in the wick structure, where capillary pumping returns the fluid to high heat areas. 7 figs.

  15. Heat pipe with embedded wick structure

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, Douglas Ray; Shen, David S.; Tuck, Melanie R.; Palmer, David W.; Grafe, V. Gerald

    1998-01-01

    A heat pipe has an embedded wick structure that maximizes capillary pumping capability. Heat from attached devices such as integrated circuits evaporates working fluid in the heat pipe. The vapor cools and condenses on a heat dissipation surface. The condensate collects in the wick structure, where capillary pumping returns the fluid to high heat areas.

  16. Heat pipe with embedded wick structure

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, Douglas Ray; Shen, David S.; Tuck, Melanie R.; Palmer, David W.; Grafe, V. Gerald

    1999-01-01

    A heat pipe has an embedded wick structure that maximizes capillary pumping capability. Heat from attached devices such as integrated circuits evaporates working fluid in the heat pipe. The vapor cools and condenses on a heat dissipation surface. The condensate collects in the wick structure, where capillary pumping returns the fluid to high heat areas.

  17. Embedding Multiple Literacies into STEM Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soules, Aline; Nielsen, Sarah; LeDuc, Danika; Inouye, Caron; Singley, Jason; Wildy, Erica; Seitz, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    In fall 2012, an interdisciplinary team of science, English, and library faculty embedded reading, writing, and information literacy strategies in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) curricula as a first step in improving student learning and retention in science courses and aligning them with the Next Generation Science and…

  18. EMBEDDED FIBER OPTIC SENSORS FOR INTEGRAL ARMOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the work performed with Production Products Manufacturing & Sales (PPMS), Inc., under the "Liquid Molded Composite Armor Smart Structures Using Embedded Sensors" Small Business Innovative Research (SBlR) Program sponsored by the U.S. Army Research Laboratory...

  19. Singular interactions supported by embedded curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tevfik Kaynak, Burak; Teoman Turgut, O.

    2012-07-01

    In this work, singular interactions supported by embedded curves on Riemannian manifolds are discussed from a more direct and physical perspective, via the heat kernel approach. We show that the renormalized problem is well defined, the ground state is finite and the corresponding wavefunction is positive. The renormalization group invariance of the model is also discussed. Dedicated to the memory of Professor Yavuz Nutku.

  20. Web Service Architecture Framework for Embedded Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanzick, Paul David

    2009-01-01

    The use of Service Oriented Architectures, namely web services, has become a widely adopted method for transfer of data between systems across the Internet as well as the Enterprise. Adopting a similar approach to embedded devices is also starting to emerge as personal devices and sensor networks are becoming more common in the industry. This…

  1. A Laboratory Testbed for Embedded Fuzzy Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srivastava, S.; Sukumar, V.; Bhasin, P. S.; Arun Kumar, D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel scheme called "Laboratory Testbed for Embedded Fuzzy Control of a Real Time Nonlinear System." The idea is based upon the fact that project-based learning motivates students to learn actively and to use their engineering skills acquired in their previous years of study. It also fosters initiative and focuses students'…

  2. LC Circuits for Diagnosing Embedded Piezoelectric Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattin, Richard L.; Fox, Robert Lee; Moses, Robert W.; Shams, Qamar A.

    2005-01-01

    A recently invented method of nonintrusively detecting faults in piezoelectric devices involves measurement of the resonance frequencies of inductor capacitor (LC) resonant circuits. The method is intended especially to enable diagnosis of piezoelectric sensors, actuators, and sensor/actuators that are embedded in structures and/or are components of multilayer composite material structures.

  3. Embeddings of the "New Massive Gravity"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmazi, D.; Mendonça, E. L.

    2016-07-01

    Here we apply different types of embeddings of the equations of motion of the linearized "New Massive Gravity" in order to generate alternative and even higher-order (in derivatives) massive gravity theories in D=2+1. In the first part of the work we use the Weyl symmetry as a guiding principle for the embeddings. First we show that a Noether gauge embedding of the Weyl symmetry leads to a sixth-order model in derivatives with either a massive or a massless ghost, according to the chosen overall sign of the theory. On the other hand, if the Weyl symmetry is implemented by means of a Stueckelberg field we obtain a new scalar-tensor model for massive gravitons. It is ghost-free and Weyl invariant at the linearized level around Minkowski space. The model can be nonlinearly completed into a scalar field coupled to the NMG theory. The elimination of the scalar field leads to a nonlocal modification of the NMG. In the second part of the work we prove to all orders in derivatives that there is no local, ghost-free embedding of the linearized NMG equations of motion around Minkowski space when written in terms of one symmetric tensor. Regarding that point, NMG differs from the Fierz-Pauli theory, since in the latter case we can replace the Einstein-Hilbert action by specific f(R,Box R) generalizations and still keep the theory ghost-free at the linearized level.

  4. The Embedded Character of Workplace Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frenkel, Stephen J.

    2003-01-01

    The workplace is embedded in three force fields: the macro field of globalization/technology, the meso field of transnational production networks, and the micro field of local labor markets and organizations. Each field influences the way flexibility and cost reduction are prioritized and has consequences for workplace structures and relations.…

  5. Embedded high-contrast distributed grating structures

    DOEpatents

    Zubrzycki, Walter J.; Vawter, Gregory A.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of fabrication methods for embedded distributed grating structures is claimed, together with optical devices which include such structures. These new methods are the only known approach to making defect-free high-dielectric contrast grating structures, which are smaller and more efficient than are conventional grating structures.

  6. Mutation and Transcriptional Profiling of Formalin-Fixed Paraffin Embedded Specimens as Companion Methods to Immunohistochemistry for Determining Therapeutic Targets in Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OPSCC): A Pilot of Proof of Principle.

    PubMed

    Saba, Nabil F; Wilson, Malania; Doho, Gregory; DaSilva, Juliana; Benjamin Isett, R; Newman, Scott; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Magliocca, Kelly; Rossi, Michael R

    2015-06-01

    The role of molecular methods in the diagnosis of head and neck cancer is rapidly evolving and holds great potential for improving outcomes for all patients who suffer from this diverse group of malignancies . However, there is considerable debate as to the best clinical approaches, particularly for Next Generation Sequencing (NGS). The choices of NGS methods such as whole exome, whole genome, whole transcriptomes (RNA-Seq) or multiple gene resequencing panels, each have strengths and weakness based on data quality, the size of the data, the turnaround time for data analysis, and clinical actionability. There have also been a variety of gene expression signatures established from microarray studies that correlate with relapse and response to treatment, but none of these methods have been implemented as standard of care for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Because many genomic methodologies are still far from the capabilities of most clinical laboratories, we chose to explore the use of a combination of off the shelf targeted mutation analysis and gene expression analysis methods to complement standard anatomical pathology methods. Specifically, we have used the Ion Torrent AmpliSeq cancer panel in combination with the NanoString nCounter Human Cancer Reference Kit on 8 formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) OPSCC tumor specimens, (4) HPV-positive and (4) HPV-negative. Differential expression analysis between HPV-positive and negative groups showed that expression of several genes was highly likely to correlate with HPV status. For example, WNT1, PDGFA and OGG1 were all over-expressed in the positive group. Our results show the utility of these methods with routine FFPE clinical specimens to identify potential therapeutic targets which could be readily applied in a clinical trial setting for clinical laboratories lacking the instrumentation or bioinformatics infrastructure to support comprehensive genomics workflows. To the best of our knowledge

  7. Quantum annealing correction with minor embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinci, Walter; Albash, Tameem; Paz-Silva, Gerardo; Hen, Itay; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2015-10-01

    Quantum annealing provides a promising route for the development of quantum optimization devices, but the usefulness of such devices will be limited in part by the range of implementable problems as dictated by hardware constraints. To overcome constraints imposed by restricted connectivity between qubits, a larger set of interactions can be approximated using minor embedding techniques whereby several physical qubits are used to represent a single logical qubit. However, minor embedding introduces new types of errors due to its approximate nature. We introduce and study quantum annealing correction schemes designed to improve the performance of quantum annealers in conjunction with minor embedding, thus leading to a hybrid scheme defined over an encoded graph. We argue that this scheme can be efficiently decoded using an energy minimization technique provided the density of errors does not exceed the per-site percolation threshold of the encoded graph. We test the hybrid scheme using a D-Wave Two processor on problems for which the encoded graph is a two-level grid and the Ising model is known to be NP-hard. The problems we consider are frustrated Ising model problem instances with "planted" (a priori known) solutions. Applied in conjunction with optimized energy penalties and decoding techniques, we find that this approach enables the quantum annealer to solve minor embedded instances with significantly higher success probability than it would without error correction. Our work demonstrates that quantum annealing correction can and should be used to improve the robustness of quantum annealing not only for natively embeddable problems but also when minor embedding is used to extend the connectivity of physical devices.

  8. Tissue irradiator

    DOEpatents

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1975-12-16

    A tissue irradiator is provided for the in-vivo irradiation of body tissue. The irradiator comprises a radiation source material contained and completely encapsulated within vitreous carbon. An embodiment for use as an in- vivo blood irradiator comprises a cylindrical body having an axial bore therethrough. A radioisotope is contained within a first portion of vitreous carbon cylindrically surrounding the axial bore, and a containment portion of vitreous carbon surrounds the radioisotope containing portion, the two portions of vitreous carbon being integrally formed as a single unit. Connecting means are provided at each end of the cylindrical body to permit connections to blood- carrying vessels and to provide for passage of blood through the bore. In a preferred embodiment, the radioisotope is thulium-170 which is present in the irradiator in the form of thulium oxide. A method of producing the preferred blood irradiator is also provided, whereby nonradioactive thulium-169 is dispersed within a polyfurfuryl alcohol resin which is carbonized and fired to form the integral vitreous carbon body and the device is activated by neutron bombardment of the thulium-169 to produce the beta-emitting thulium-170.

  9. Immunohistochemical Methods for Measuring Tissue Lymphangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Royston, Daniel J; Clasper, Steven; Jackson, David G

    2016-01-01

    The field of lymphatic research has benefited enormously from the discovery of "marker" proteins that permit not only the identification and quantitation of lymphatic vessels in tissue sections for tumor pathology but also the isolation of primary lymphatic endothelial cells for basic research. This chapter focuses on the use of these markers for the immunohistochemical analysis of lymphangiogenesis in both frozen and paraffin-embedded tissue sections and discusses current protocols including newer versions employing biotin tyramide amplification and their associated problems. PMID:27172944

  10. Overview on Techniques to Construct Tissue Arrays with Special Emphasis on Tissue Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of new histopathological staining techniques (histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization) and the discovery of thousands of new genes, mRNA, and proteins by molecular biology, the need grew for a technique to compare many different cells or tissues on one slide in a cost effective manner and with the possibility to easily track the identity of each specimen: the tissue array (TA). Basically, a TA consists of at least two different specimens per slide. TAs differ in the kind of specimens, the number of specimens installed, the dimension of the specimens, the arrangement of the specimens, the embedding medium, the technique to prepare the specimens to be installed, and the technique to construct the TA itself. A TA can be constructed by arranging the tissue specimens in a mold and subsequently pouring the mold with the embedding medium of choice. In contrast, preformed so-called recipient blocks consisting of the embedding medium of choice have punched, drilled, or poured holes of different diameters and distances in which the cells or tissue biopsies will be deployed manually, semi-automatically, or automatically. The costs of constructing a TA differ from a few to thousands of Euros depending on the technique/equipment used. Remarkably high quality TAs can be also achieved by low cost techniques.

  11. The Activation of Embedded Words in Spoken Word Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xujin; Samuel, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated how listeners understand English words that have shorter words embedded in them. A series of auditory-auditory priming experiments assessed the activation of six types of embedded words (2 embedded positions × 3 embedded proportions) under different listening conditions. Facilitation of lexical decision responses to targets (e.g., pig) associated with words embedded in primes (e.g., hamster) indexed activation of the embedded words (e.g., ham). When the listening conditions were optimal, isolated embedded words (e.g., ham) primed their targets in all six conditions (Experiment 1a). Within carrier words (e.g., hamster), the same set of embedded words produced priming only when they were at the beginning or comprised a large proportion of the carrier word (Experiment 1b). When the listening conditions were made suboptimal by expanding or compressing the primes, significant priming was found for isolated embedded words (Experiment 2a), but no priming was produced when the carrier words were compressed/expanded (Experiment 2b). Similarly, priming was eliminated when the carrier words were presented with one segment replaced by noise (Experiment 3). When cognitive load was imposed, priming for embedded words was again found when they were presented in isolation (Experiment 4a), but not when they were embedded in the carrier words (Experiment 4b). The results suggest that both embedded position and proportion play important roles in the activation of embedded words, but that such activation only occurs under unusually good listening conditions. PMID:25593407

  12. Photochemical tissue bonding

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, Robert W.; Kochevar, Irene E.

    2012-01-10

    Photochemical tissue bonding methods include the application of a photosensitizer to a tissue and/or tissue graft, followed by irradiation with electromagnetic energy to produce a tissue seal. The methods are useful for tissue adhesion, such as in wound closure, tissue grafting, skin grafting, musculoskeletal tissue repair, ligament or tendon repair and corneal repair.

  13. Research about Memory Detection Based on the Embedded Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Chu, Jian

    As is known to us all, the resources of memory detection of the embedded systems are very limited. Taking the Linux-based embedded arm as platform, this article puts forward two efficient memory detection technologies according to the characteristics of the embedded software. Especially for the programs which need specific libraries, the article puts forwards portable memory detection methods to help program designers to reduce human errors,improve programming quality and therefore make better use of the valuable embedded memory resource.

  14. Non-standard analysis and embedded software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platek, Richard

    1995-01-01

    One model for computing in the future is ubiquitous, embedded computational devices analogous to embedded electrical motors. Many of these computers will control physical objects and processes. Such hidden computerized environments introduce new safety and correctness concerns whose treatment go beyond present Formal Methods. In particular, one has to begin to speak about Real Space software in analogy with Real Time software. By this we mean, computerized systems which have to meet requirements expressed in the real geometry of space. How to translate such requirements into ordinary software specifications and how to carry out proofs is a major challenge. In this talk we propose a research program based on the use of no-standard analysis. Much detail remains to be carried out. The purpose of the talk is to inform the Formal Methods community that Non-Standard Analysis provides a possible avenue to attack which we believe will be fruitful.

  15. Synchronous correlation matrices and Connes' embedding conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykema, Kenneth J.; Paulsen, Vern

    2016-01-01

    In the work of Paulsen et al. [J. Funct. Anal. (in press); preprint arXiv:1407.6918], the concept of synchronous quantum correlation matrices was introduced and these were shown to correspond to traces on certain C*-algebras. In particular, synchronous correlation matrices arose in their study of various versions of quantum chromatic numbers of graphs and other quantum versions of graph theoretic parameters. In this paper, we develop these ideas further, focusing on the relations between synchronous correlation matrices and microstates. We prove that Connes' embedding conjecture is equivalent to the equality of two families of synchronous quantum correlation matrices. We prove that if Connes' embedding conjecture has a positive answer, then the tracial rank and projective rank are equal for every graph. We then apply these results to more general non-local games.

  16. Dynamic temperature measurements with embedded optical sensors.

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H.,; Seagle, Christopher T; Ao, Tommy

    2013-10-01

    This report summarizes LDRD project number 151365, %5CDynamic Temperature Measurements with Embedded Optical Sensors%22. The purpose of this project was to develop an optical sensor capable of detecting modest temperature states (<1000 K) with nanosecond time resolution, a recurring diagnostic need in dynamic compression experiments at the Sandia Z machine. Gold sensors were selected because the visible re ectance spectrum of gold varies strongly with temperature. A variety of static and dynamic measurements were performed to assess re ectance changes at di erent temperatures and pressures. Using a minimal optical model for gold, a plausible connection between static calibrations and dynamic measurements was found. With re nements to the model and diagnostic upgrades, embedded gold sensors seem capable of detecting minor (<50 K) temperature changes under dynamic compression.

  17. Accessing textual information embedded in Internet images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonacopoulos, Apostolos; Karatzas, Dimosthenis; Ortiz-Lopez, Jordi

    2000-12-01

    Indexing and searching for WWW pages is relying on analyzing text. Current technology cannot process the text embedded in images on WWW pages. This paper argues that this is a significant problem as text in image form is usually semantically important (e.g. headers, titles). The results of a recent study are presented to show that the majority (76%) of words embedded in images do not appear elsewhere in the main text and that the majority (56%) of ALT tag descriptions of images are incorrect of do not exist at all. Research under way to devise tools to extracted text from images based on the way humans perceive color differences is outlined and results are presented.

  18. Constraint Embedding for Multibody System Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Abhinandan

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a constraint embedding approach for the handling of local closure constraints in multibody system dynamics. The approach uses spatial operator techniques to eliminate local-loop constraints from the system and effectively convert the system into tree-topology systems. This approach allows the direct derivation of recursive O(N) techniques for solving the system dynamics and avoiding the expensive steps that would otherwise be required for handling the closedchain dynamics. The approach is very effective for systems where the constraints are confined to small-subgraphs within the system topology. The paper provides background on the spatial operator O(N) algorithms, the extensions for handling embedded constraints, and concludes with some examples of such constraints.

  19. Global embeddings for branes at toric singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Vijay; Berglund, Per; Braun, Volker; García-Etxebarria, Iñaki

    2012-10-01

    We describe how local toric singularities, including the Toric Lego construction, can be embedded in compact Calabi-Yau manifolds. We study in detail the addition of D-branes, including non-compact flavor branes as typically used in semi-realistic model building. The global geometry provides constraints on allowable local models. As an illustration of our discussion we focus on D3 and D7-branes on (the partially resolved) ( dP 0)3 singularity, its embedding in a specific Calabi-Yau manifold as a hypersurface in a toric variety, the related type IIB orientifold compactification, as well as the corresponding F-theory uplift. Our techniques generalize naturally to complete intersections, and to a large class of F-theory backgrounds with singularities.

  20. Tissue Photolithography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Lawrence A.; Kartalov, Emil; Shibata, Darryl; Taylor, Clive

    2011-01-01

    Tissue lithography will enable physicians and researchers to obtain macromolecules with high purity (greater than 90 percent) from desired cells in conventionally processed, clinical tissues by simply annotating the desired cells on a computer screen. After identifying the desired cells, a suitable lithography mask will be generated to protect the contents of the desired cells while allowing destruction of all undesired cells by irradiation with ultraviolet light. The DNA from the protected cells can be used in a number of downstream applications including DNA sequencing. The purity (i.e., macromolecules isolated form specific cell types) of such specimens will greatly enhance the value and information of downstream applications. In this method, the specific cells are isolated on a microscope slide using photolithography, which will be faster, more specific, and less expensive than current methods. It relies on the fact that many biological molecules such as DNA are photosensitive and can be destroyed by ultraviolet irradiation. Therefore, it is possible to protect the contents of desired cells, yet destroy undesired cells. This approach leverages the technologies of the microelectronics industry, which can make features smaller than 1 micrometer with photolithography. A variety of ways has been created to achieve identification of the desired cell, and also to designate the other cells for destruction. This can be accomplished through chrome masks, direct laser writing, and also active masking using dynamic arrays. Image recognition is envisioned as one method for identifying cell nuclei and cell membranes. The pathologist can identify the cells of interest using a microscopic computerized image of the slide, and appropriate custom software. In one of the approaches described in this work, the software converts the selection into a digital mask that can be fed into a direct laser writer, e.g. the Heidelberg DWL66. Such a machine uses a metalized glass plate (with

  1. Digital audio authentication by robust feature embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmudzinski, Sascha; Munir, Badar; Steinebach, Martin

    2012-03-01

    We introduce an approach for verifying the integrity of digital audio recording by means of content-based integrity watermarking. Here an audio fingerprint is extracted from the Fourier domain and embedded as a digital watermark in the same domain. The design of the feature extraction allows a fine temporal resolution of the verification of the integrity. Experimental results show a good distinction between authentic and tampered audio content.

  2. Drill Embedded Nanosensors For Planetary Subsurface Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a carbon nanotube (CNT) sensor for water vapor detection under Martian Conditions and the miniaturized electronics can be embedded in the drill bit for collecting sensor data and transmit it to a computer wirelessly.This capability will enable the real time measurement of ice during drilling. With this real time and in-situ measurement, subsurface ice detection can be easy, fast, precise and low cost.

  3. Covariance tracking: architecture optimizations for embedded systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Andrés; Lacassagne, Lionel; Gouiffès, Michèle; Zahraee, Ali Hassan

    2014-12-01

    Covariance matching techniques have recently grown in interest due to their good performances for object retrieval, detection, and tracking. By mixing color and texture information in a compact representation, it can be applied to various kinds of objects (textured or not, rigid or not). Unfortunately, the original version requires heavy computations and is difficult to execute in real time on embedded systems. This article presents a review on different versions of the algorithm and its various applications; our aim is to describe the most crucial challenges and particularities that appeared when implementing and optimizing the covariance matching algorithm on a variety of desktop processors and on low-power processors suitable for embedded systems. An application of texture classification is used to compare different versions of the region descriptor. Then a comprehensive study is made to reach a higher level of performance on multi-core CPU architectures by comparing different ways to structure the information, using single instruction, multiple data (SIMD) instructions and advanced loop transformations. The execution time is reduced significantly on two dual-core CPU architectures for embedded computing: ARM Cortex-A9 and Cortex-A15 and Intel Penryn-M U9300 and Haswell-M 4650U. According to our experiments on covariance tracking, it is possible to reach a speedup greater than ×2 on both ARM and Intel architectures, when compared to the original algorithm, leading to real-time execution.

  4. Embedding loop quantum cosmology without piecewise linearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Jonathan

    2013-04-01

    An important goal is to understand better the relation between full loop quantum gravity (LQG) and the simplified, reduced theory known as loop quantum cosmology (LQC), directly at the quantum level. Such a firmer understanding would increase confidence in the reduced theory as a tool for formulating predictions of the full theory, as well as permitting lessons from the reduced theory to guide further development in the full theory. This paper constructs an embedding of the usual state space of LQC into that of standard LQG, that is, LQG based on piecewise analytic paths. The embedding is well defined even prior to solving the diffeomorphism constraint, at no point is a graph fixed and at no point is the piecewise linear category used. This motivates for the first time a definition of operators in LQC corresponding to holonomies along non-piecewise linear paths, without changing the usual kinematics of LQC in any way. The new embedding intertwines all operators corresponding to such holonomies, and all elements in its image satisfy an operator equation which classically implies homogeneity and isotropy. The construction is made possible by a recent result proven by Fleischhack. Communicated by P Singh

  5. Structural properties of spatially embedded networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmidis, K.; Havlin, S.; Bunde, A.

    2008-05-01

    We study the effects of spatial constraints on the structural properties of networks embedded in one- or two-dimensional space. When nodes are embedded in space, they have a well-defined Euclidean distance r between any pair. We assume that nodes at distance r have a link with probability p(r)~r-δ. We study the mean topological distance l and the clustering coefficient C of these networks and find that they both exhibit phase transitions for some critical value of the control parameter δ depending on the dimensionality d of the embedding space. We have identified three regimes. When δ2d the networks are "large" worlds l~N1/d with high clustering. Our results indicate that spatial constrains have a significant impact on the network properties, a fact that should be taken into account when modeling complex networks.

  6. Embedding and retrieving private metadata in electrocardiograms.

    PubMed

    Kozat, Suleyman S; Vlachos, Michail; Lucchese, Claudio; Van Herle, Helga; Yu, Philip S

    2009-08-01

    Due to the recent explosion of 'identity theft' cases, the safeguarding of private data has been the focus of many scientific efforts. Medical data contain a number of sensitive attributes, whose access the rightful owner would ideally like to disclose only to authorized personnel. One way of providing limited access to sensitive data is through means of encryption. In this work we follow a different path, by proposing the fusion of the sensitive metadata within the medical data. Our work is focused on medical time-series signals and in particular on Electrocardiograms (ECG). We present techniques that allow the embedding and retrieval of sensitive numerical data, such as the patient's social security number or birth date, within the medical signal. The proposed technique not only allows the effective hiding of the sensitive metadata within the signal itself, but it additionally provides a way of authenticating the data ownership or providing assurances about the origin of the data. Our methodology builds upon watermarking notions, and presents the following desirable characteristics: (a) it does not distort important ECG characteristics, which are essential for proper medical diagnosis, (b) it allows not only the embedding but also the efficient retrieval of the embedded data, (c) it provides resilience and fault tolerance by employing multistage watermarks (both robust and fragile). Our experiments on real ECG data indicate the viability of the proposed scheme. PMID:19697691

  7. Polar Embedding for Aurora Image Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Gao, Xinbo; Tian, Qi

    2015-11-01

    Exploring the multimedia techniques to assist scientists for their research is an interesting and meaningful topic. In this paper, we focus on the large-scale aurora image retrieval by leveraging the bag-of-visual words (BoVW) framework. To refine the unsuitable representation and improve the retrieval performance, the BoVW model is modified by embedding the polar information. The superiority of the proposed polar embedding method lies in two aspects. On the one hand, the polar meshing scheme is conducted to determine the interest points, which is more suitable for images captured by circular fisheye lens. Especially for the aurora image, the extracted polar scale-invariant feature transform (polar-SIFT) feature can also reflect the geomagnetic longitude and latitude, and thus facilitates the further data analysis. On the other hand, a binary polar deep local binary pattern (polar-DLBP) descriptor is proposed to enhance the discriminative power of visual words. Together with the 64-bit polar-SIFT code obtained via Hamming embedding, the multifeature index is performed to reduce the impact of false positive matches. Extensive experiments are conducted on the large-scale aurora image data set. The experimental result indicates that the proposed method improves the retrieval accuracy significantly with acceptable efficiency and memory cost. In addition, the effectiveness of the polar-SIFT scheme and polar-DLBP integration are separately demonstrated. PMID:26068312

  8. A procedure for tissue freezing and processing applicable to both intra-operative frozen section diagnosis and tissue banking in surgical pathology.

    PubMed

    Steu, Susanne; Baucamp, Maya; von Dach, Gabriela; Bawohl, Marion; Dettwiler, Susanne; Storz, Martina; Moch, Holger; Schraml, Peter

    2008-03-01

    Different methods for snap freezing surgical human tissue specimens exist. At pathology institutes with higher work loads, solid carbon dioxide, freezing sprays, and cryostat freezing are commonly used as coolants for diagnosing frozen tissue sections, whereas for