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Sample records for embryo toxicity test

  1. Optimization of high-throughput nanomaterial developmental toxicity testing in zebrafish embryos

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanomaterial (NM) developmental toxicities are largely unknown. With an extensive variety of NMs available, high-throughput screening methods may be of value for initial characterization of potential hazard. We optimized a zebrafish embryo test as an in vivo high-throughput assay...

  2. Progress Towards the Development of a Fathead Minnow Embryo Test and Comparison to the Zebrafish Embryo Test for Assessing Acute Fish Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Zebrafish Embryo Test (ZFET) for acute fish toxicity is a well developed method nearing adoption as an OECD Test Guideline. Early drafts of the test guideline (TG) envisioned a suite of potential test species to be covered including zebrafish, fathead minnow, Japanese Medaka...

  3. Development of a new integrative toxicity index based on an improvement of the sea urchin embryo toxicity test.

    PubMed

    Morroni, L; Pinsino, A; Pellegrini, D; Regoli, F; Matranga, V

    2016-01-01

    The sea urchin embryo toxicity test is classically used to assess the noxious effects of contaminated marine waters and sediments. In Italian guidelines on quality of dredged sediments, the standard toxicity criteria used for this assay are based on a single endpoint at 48 hours of development, corresponding to the pluteus stage. Different typologies of abnormalities, including those which occur at earlier stages, are not categorized, thus preventing the evaluation of the actual teratogenic hazards. A new integrative toxicity index has been developed in this study based on the analysis of two developmental stages, at 24 and 48h post-fertilization, and the differentiation between development delays and germ layers impairments: the new toxicity index is calculated by integrating the frequency of abnormal embryos with the severity of such abnormalities. When tested on dredged sediments, the evaluation of increasing levels of toxicity affecting embryonic outcomes enhanced the capability to discriminate different samples, appearing particularly relevant to validate the sea urchin embryo toxicity assay, and supporting its utility in practical applications such as the sediments classification in harbor areas. PMID:26477574

  4. A test for evaluating the toxicity of oils, dispersants, and oil biodegradation products to embryos of grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio)

    SciTech Connect

    Foss, S.S.; Fisher, W.S.; Chapman, P.J.; Shelton, M.

    1994-12-31

    A test has been developed to determine the toxicity of oil, commercial oil dispersants, and oil biodegradation products to embryos of the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio. The system has several advantages over traditional toxicity tests: Embryos are exposed separately in glass tubes eliminating interaction between individuals, they do not require feeding, are easily examined, and require low volumes of test toxicant. Additionally, tests can be performed using artificial sea salts and adult P. pugio can be maintained and cultured year round in the laboratory. Toxicity tests demonstrated that oil dispersants increased the toxicity of the water-soluble fraction of No. 2 Fuel Oil with estimated LC50 values approximating those obtained with the 7d chronic tests using Mysidopsis bahia. Embryos exposed to neutral fractions derived by microbial degradation of weathered Prudhoe Bay crude oil showed toxicity of metabolic products at relatively low concentrations and cause virtually 100% mortality within a narrow time interval. P. pugio embryos were especially responsive to oil metabolites, exhibiting high sensitivity and low variability. All tests showed a consistently high survival (90--100%) of control embryos to hatch under a variety of temperatures and salinities; embryos at any given test condition usually hatched within 24h of one another.

  5. A high throughput passive dosing format for the Fish Embryo Acute Toxicity test.

    PubMed

    Vergauwen, Lucia; Schmidt, Stine N; Stinckens, Evelyn; Maho, Walid; Blust, Ronny; Mayer, Philipp; Covaci, Adrian; Knapen, Dries

    2015-11-01

    High throughput testing according to the Fish Embryo Acute Toxicity (FET) test (OECD Testing Guideline 236) is usually conducted in well plates. In the case of hydrophobic test substances, sorptive and evaporative losses often result in declining and poorly controlled exposure conditions. Therefore, our objective was to improve exposure conditions in FET tests by evaluating a passive dosing format using silicone O-rings in standard 24-well polystyrene plates. We exposed zebrafish embryos to a series of phenanthrene concentrations until 120h post fertilization (hpf), and obtained a linear dilution series. We report effect values for both mortality and sublethal morphological effects based on (1) measured exposure concentrations, (2) (lipid normalized) body residues and (3) chemical activity. The LC50 for 120hpf was 310?g/L, CBR50 (critical body residue) was 2.72mmol/kg fresh wt and La50 (lethal chemical activity) was 0.047. All values were within ranges expected for baseline toxicity. Impaired swim bladder inflation was the most pronounced morphological effect and swimming activity was reduced in all exposure concentrations. Further analysis showed that the effect on swimming activity was not attributed to impaired swim bladder inflation, but rather to baseline toxicity. We conclude that silicone O-rings (1) produce a linear dilution series of phenanthrene in the 120hpf FET test, (2) generate and maintain aqueous concentrations for reliable determination of effect concentrations, and allow for obtaining mechanistic toxicity information, and (3) cause no toxicity, demonstrating its potential as an extension of the FET test when testing hydrophobic chemicals. PMID:26026258

  6. OECD validation study to assess intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility of the zebrafish embryo toxicity test for acute aquatic toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Busquet, François; Strecker, Ruben; Rawlings, Jane M; Belanger, Scott E; Braunbeck, Thomas; Carr, Gregory J; Cenijn, Peter; Fochtman, Przemyslaw; Gourmelon, Anne; Hübler, Nicole; Kleensang, André; Knöbel, Melanie; Kussatz, Carola; Legler, Juliette; Lillicrap, Adam; Martínez-Jerónimo, Fernando; Polleichtner, Christian; Rzodeczko, Helena; Salinas, Edward; Schneider, Katharina E; Scholz, Stefan; van den Brandhof, Evert-Jan; van der Ven, Leo T M; Walter-Rohde, Susanne; Weigt, Stefan; Witters, Hilda; Halder, Marlies

    2014-08-01

    The OECD validation study of the zebrafish embryo acute toxicity test (ZFET) for acute aquatic toxicity testing evaluated the ZFET reproducibility by testing 20 chemicals at 5 different concentrations in 3 independent runs in at least 3 laboratories. Stock solutions and test concentrations were analytically confirmed for 11 chemicals. Newly fertilised zebrafish eggs (20/concentration and control) were exposed for 96h to chemicals. Four apical endpoints were recorded daily as indicators of acute lethality: coagulation of the embryo, lack of somite formation, non-detachment of the tail bud from the yolk sac and lack of heartbeat. Results (LC50 values for 48/96h exposure) show that the ZFET is a robust method with a good intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility (CV<30%) for most chemicals and laboratories. The reproducibility was lower (CV>30%) for some very toxic or volatile chemicals, and chemicals tested close to their limit of solubility. The ZFET is now available as OECD Test Guideline 236. Considering the high predictive capacity of the ZFET demonstrated by Belanger et al. (2013) in their retrospective analysis of acute fish toxicity and fish embryo acute toxicity data, the ZFET is ready to be considered for acute fish toxicity for regulatory purposes. PMID:24874798

  7. Comparison of toxicity test methods using embryos of the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio

    SciTech Connect

    Rayburn, J.R.; Fisher, W.S.; Foss, S.S.; Glas, P.S.

    1995-12-31

    The embryos of the grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) have shown sensitivity to the water soluble fraction of number 2 fuel oil (WSF{sub oil}). To determine the repeatability and versatility of the grass shrimp in bioassays, detailed concentration-response curves were performed using altered test methods. These alterations were to make the test system easier to use, require less volume of toxic material and to shorten the time of the assay. LC50 values for each method were obtained. The methods evaluated the differences between altering time of exposure from 12 to 4 days. The 4-day assay in 24-well plastic plates included the time of hatch, a critical life stage of these embryos. The average 12-day LC50 in the glass Leighton tubes was 11.8% VN WSF{sub oil}. The coefficient of variation of the individual test methods were approximately 25%, showing that the repeatability was reasonable for bioassays. These results show that a 4-day assay is practical for screening for the detection of number 2 fuel oil contamination. However, the 12-day assay may be necessary for detection of developmental abnormalities.

  8. Automated Lab-on-a-Chip Technology for Fish Embryo Toxicity Tests Performed under Continuous Microperfusion (?FET).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Wigh, Adriana; Friedrich, Timo; Devaux, Alain; Bony, Sylvie; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Kaslin, Jan; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-12-15

    The fish embryo toxicity (FET) biotest has gained popularity as one of the alternative approaches to acute fish toxicity tests in chemical hazard and risk assessment. Despite the importance and common acceptance of FET, it is still performed in multiwell plates and requires laborious and time-consuming manual manipulation of specimens and solutions. This work describes the design and validation of a microfluidic Lab-on-a-Chip technology for automation of the zebrafish embryo toxicity test common in aquatic ecotoxicology. The innovative device supports rapid loading and immobilization of large numbers of zebrafish embryos suspended in a continuous microfluidic perfusion as a means of toxicant delivery. Furthermore, we also present development of a customized mechatronic automation interface that includes a high-resolution USB microscope, LED cold light illumination, and miniaturized 3D printed pumping manifolds that were integrated to enable time-resolved in situ analysis of developing fish embryos. To investigate the applicability of the microfluidic FET (?FET) in toxicity testing, copper sulfate, phenol, ethanol, caffeine, nicotine, and dimethyl sulfoxide were tested as model chemical stressors. Results obtained on a chip-based system were compared with static protocols performed in microtiter plates. This work provides evidence that FET analysis performed under microperfusion opens a brand new alternative for inexpensive automation in aquatic ecotoxicology. PMID:26506399

  9. Simple test for toxicity of number 2 fuel oil and oil dispersants to embryos of grass shrimp, palaemonetes pugio

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, W.S.; Foss, S.S.

    1993-01-01

    A simple test, using embryos of the grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio, was employed to determine the toxicity of two commercial oil dispersants (Corexit 7664 and Corexit 9527) and toxicity of the water soluble fraction of Number 2 fuel oil (WSF oil) prepared with and without the addition of the dispersants. Tests revealed P. pugio embryos were similar to previously measured life stages in their sensitivity to WSF oil prepared without dispersants. They were approximately ten times more sensitive to water soluble fractions of dispersed oil, which may have been due to the approximately ten-fold increases in total hydrocarbons measured analytically. Both temperatures and salinity of the sea water affected toxicity of WSF prepared with dispersants, the most obvious effect being earlier onset of mortalities at higher temperatures. (Copyright (c) 1993 Pergamon Press Ltd.)

  10. ADAPTING THE MEDAKA EMBRYO ASSAY TO A HIGH-THROUGHPUT APPROACH FOR DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY TESTING.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical exposure during embryonic development may cause persistent effects, yet developmental toxicity data exist for very few chemicals. Current testing procedures are time consuming and costly, underlining the need for rapid and low cost screening strategies. While in vitro ...

  11. Developmental arrest in grass shrimp embryos exposed to selected toxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.E.H.

    1998-12-31

    Excised embryos of the grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) were exposed to single pulse concentrations of selected pollutants for 4 days. The following toxicity endpoints were monitored: rate of embryonic development, embryo mortality, and types of embryo malformation. Each endpoint exhibited concentration--response relationships which were modified by the embryonic age at which exposure commenced. Developmental retardation of up to 3 days was effected by phenol at 0.01% (V/V) and complete developmental arrest occurred at 0.05% and 0.1% (V/V). Similarly for methylene chloride, developmental retardation of 1003 days were observed at 0.1% (V/V) depending on the age of the embryos at the start of the tests. The morphological abnormalities of the embryos are described. The ecological significance of these findings and implications for the development of short-term toxicity tests using grass shrimp embryos are discussed.

  12. Toxicity screening of diclofenac, propranolol, sertraline and simvastatin using Danio rerio and Paracentrotus lividus embryo bioassays.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Sílvia; Torres, Tiago; Martins, Rosário; Santos, Miguel M

    2015-04-01

    Early life-stage bioassays have been used as an alternative to short-term adult toxicity tests since they are cost-effective. A single couple can produce hundreds or thousands of embryos and hence can be used as a simple high-throughput approach in toxicity studies. In the present study, zebrafish and sea urchin embryo bioassays were used to test the toxicity of four pharmaceuticals belonging to different therapeutic classes: diclofenac, propranolol, simvastatin and sertraline. Simvastatin was the most toxic tested compound for zebrafish embryo, followed by diclofenac. Sertraline was the most toxic drug to sea urchin embryos, inducing development abnormalities at the ng/L range. Overall, our results highlight the potential of sea urchin embryo bioassay as a promising and sensitive approach for the high-throughput methods to test the toxicity of new chemicals, including pharmaceuticals, and identify several drugs that should go through more detailed toxicity assays. PMID:25615533

  13. Comparison of the mouse Embryonic Stem cell Test, the rat Whole Embryo Culture and the Zebrafish Embryotoxicity Test as alternative methods for developmental toxicity testing of six 1,2,4-triazoles

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, Esther de; Barenys, Marta; Hermsen, Sanne A.B.; Verhoef, Aart; Ossendorp, Bernadette C.; Bessems, Jos G.M.; Piersma, Aldert H.

    2011-06-01

    The relatively high experimental animal use in developmental toxicity testing has stimulated the search for alternatives that are less animal intensive. Three widely studied alternative assays are the mouse Embryonic Stem cell Test (EST), the Zebrafish Embryotoxicity Test (ZET) and the rat postimplantation Whole Embryo Culture (WEC). The goal of this study was to determine their efficacy in assessing the relative developmental toxicity of six 1,2,4-triazole compounds, flusilazole, hexaconazole, cyproconazole, triadimefon, myclobutanil and triticonazole. For this purpose, we analyzed effects and relative potencies of the compounds in and among the alternative assays and compared the findings to their known in vivo developmental toxicity. Triazoles are antifungal agents used in agriculture and medicine, some of which are known to induce craniofacial and limb abnormalities in rodents. The WEC showed a general pattern of teratogenic effects, typical of exposure to triazoles, mainly consisting of reduction and fusion of the first and second branchial arches, which are in accordance with the craniofacial malformations reported after in vivo exposure. In the EST all triazole compounds inhibited cardiomyocyte differentiation concentration-dependently. Overall, the ZET gave the best correlation with the relative in vivo developmental toxicities of the tested compounds, closely followed by the EST. The relative potencies observed in the WEC showed the lowest correlation with the in vivo developmental toxicity data. These differences in the efficacy between the test systems might be due to differences in compound kinetics, in developmental stages represented and in the relative complexity of the alternative assays.

  14. The fish embryo toxicity test as a replacement for the larval growth and survival test: A comparison of test sensitivity and identification of alternative endpoints in zebrafish and fathead minnows.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Marlo K Sellin; Stultz, Amy E; Smith, Austin W; Stephens, Dane A; Rawlings, Jane M; Belanger, Scott E; Oris, James T

    2015-06-01

    The fish embryo toxicity (FET) test has been proposed as an alternative to the larval growth and survival (LGS) test. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the sensitivity of the FET and LGS tests in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) and to determine if the inclusion of sublethal metrics as test endpoints could enhance test utility. In both species, LGS and FET tests were conducted using 2 simulated effluents. A comparison of median lethal concentrations determined via each test revealed significant differences between test types; however, it could not be determined which test was the least and/or most sensitive. At the conclusion of each test, developmental abnormalities and the expression of genes related to growth and toxicity were evaluated. Fathead minnows and zebrafish exposed to mock municipal wastewater-treatment plant effluent in a FET test experienced an increased incidence of pericardial edema and significant alterations in the expression of genes including insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2, heat shock protein 70, and cytochrome P4501A, suggesting that the inclusion of these endpoints could enhance test utility. The results not only show the utility of the fathead minnow FET test as a replacement for the LGS test but also provide evidence that inclusion of additional endpoints could improve the predictive power of the FET test. PMID:25929752

  15. Evaluation of acute toxicity and teratogenic effects of disinfectants by Daphnia magna embryo assay.

    PubMed

    Ton, Shan-Shin; Chang, Shih-Hsien; Hsu, Ling-Yin; Wang, Meng-Hsuan; Wang, Kai-Sung

    2012-09-01

    Three common disinfectants were selected in this study to investigate their toxicity to Daphnia magna. The methods used in this study included the traditional acute toxicity test, new embryo toxicity test, and teratogenic test. The study concluded that the acute toxicity of the three disinfectants to young daphnids and embryos were hypochlorite > formaldehyde > m-cresol. The effects on growth mostly occurred in the late stages of organogenesis. Of the organs, the Malpighian tube was the most sensitive to disinfectants during embryonic organogenesis. After exposure of the disinfectants to sunlight for 4 h, acute toxicity and teratogenic effects of hypochlorite on young daphnids decreased by 30% and 71%, respectively, while those of formaldehyde decreased by 35% and 49%, respectively. In addition, comparing toxic endpoints of the three disinfectants with and without sunlight exposure, the embryo tests were equally sensitive to the three-week reproduction test in this study. PMID:22591789

  16. Evaluation of MWNT toxic effects on daphnia and zebrafish embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olasagasti, Maider; Alvarez, Noelia; Vera, Carolina; Rainieri, Sandra

    2009-05-01

    Organisms of daphnia (Daphnia magna) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were exposed to a range of different concentrations of COOH-functionalized MWCNT suspended in an aqueous solution of Tween 20. Immobilization of daphnia and growth retardation, inhibition and malformation of zebrafish embryos were the endpoints tested after 24 and 48 hours. Immobilization of daphnia could be observed from 3 to 16 ppm and an increasing mortality of zebrafish embryo was detected at all the concentration tested. To identify more subtle toxic effects, we took advantage of the extensive information available on the zebrafish genome and monitored by RT-PCR the expression patterns of different zebrafish genes that could act as toxicity bio-markers. At some of the concentrations tested, changes in the expression profiles of the genes examined were detected. Our results suggest that MWCNT could potentially represent a risk to human health and environment, therefore a wider range of concentrations and further testing of this molecules should be carried out to define possible limitations in their use.

  17. Toxicity of organic compounds to marine invertebrate embryos and larvae: a comparison between the sea urchin embryogenesis bioassay and alternative test species.

    PubMed

    Bellas, Juan; Beiras, Ricardo; Mariño-Balsa, José Carlos; Fernández, Nuria

    2005-04-01

    This study investigated the toxic effects of the insecticides lindane and chlorpyrifos, the herbicide diuron, the organometallic antifoulant tributyltin (TBT), and the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the early life stages of Paracentrotus lividus (Echinodermata, Euechinoidea), Ciona intestinalis (Chordata, Ascidiacea), Maja squinado and Palaemon serratus (Arthropoda, Crustacea) in laboratory acute toxicity tests. The assays studied embryogenesis success from fertilized egg to normal larvae in P. lividus (48 h incubation at 20 degrees C) and C. intestinalis (24 h incubation at 20 degrees C), and larval mortality at 24 and 48 h in M. squinado and P. serratus. For P. lividus, the median effective concentrations (EC50) reducing percentages of normal larvae by 50% were: 350 microg l(-1) for chlorpyrifos, 5500 microg l(-1) for diuron, 4277 microg l(-1) for SDS, and 0.309 microg l(-1) for TBT. For C. intestinalis, the EC50 values affecting embryogenesis success were 5666 microg l(-1) for chlorpyrifos, 24,397 microg (l-1) for diuron, 4412 microg l(-1) for lindane, 5145 microg I(-1) for SDS, and 7.1 microg l(-1) for TBT. The median lethal concentrations (LC50) for M. squinado larval survival were 0.84 microg l(-1) (24 h) and 0.79 microg l(-1) (48 h) for chlorpyrifos, 2.23 microg(l(-1) (24 h) and 2.18 microg l(-1) (48 h) for lindane, and 687 microg l(-1) (48 h) for SDS. For P. serratus the LC50 values obtained were 0.35 microg l(-1) (24 h) and 0.22 microg l(-1) (48 h) for chlorpyrifos, 3011 microg l(-1) (24 h) and 3044 microg l(-1) (48 h) for diuron, 5.20 microg l(-1) (24 h) and 5.59 microg l(-1) (48 h) for lindane, and 22.30 microg l(-1) (24 h) and 17.52 microg l(-1) (48 h) for TBT. Decapod larvae, as expected, were markedly more sensitive to the insecticides than sea urchins and ascidians, and SDS was the least toxic compound tested for these organisms. Lowest observed effect concentrations (LOEC) of TBT for sea urchin and ascidian embryos, chlorpyrifos and lindane for crustacean larvae, and SDS, were similar to those found in many coastal areas indicating that there would be a risk to invertebrate embryos and larvae from exposure in the field to these pollutants. PMID:15943109

  18. Evaluation of acute toxicity and teratogenic effects of plant growth regulators by Daphnia magna embryo assay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai-Sung; Lu, Chi-Yuan; Chang, Shih-Hsien

    2011-06-15

    This study selected common plant growth regulators (Atonik, Cytokinin, Ethephon, Gibberellic acid and Paclobutrazol) to investigate their biological toxicity to the waters of the important biological indicator Daphnia magna. The methods used in this study included traditional neonate acute toxicity test, new Daphnia embryo toxicity test, and teratogenic embryo test. The study concluded that the acute toxicity of the five PGRs to Daphnia neonate had EC(50) value range of 1.9-130.5 mg l(-1), while acute toxicity of PGRs on Daphnia embryo had EC(50) value range of 0.2-125 mg l(-1); the Daphnia embryos' LOEC values (0.05-48 mg l(-1)) for the five PGRs were lower than embryo EC(50) values. The toxic ratios of 48 h EC(50) (neonate)/48 h LOEC (embryo) for 5 PGRs were 19-512 times. The study found that teratogenic effects of Paclobutrazol and Cytokinin induced in embryo were higher than those of most other PGRs. Microscopic observation of the teratogenic effects showed that all 5 PGRs induced malformations of the second antenna, rostrum, Malpighian tube, sensory bristles, and tail spine as well as function loss and death. PMID:21514995

  19. Toxic Effects of Silica Nanoparticles on Zebrafish Embryos and Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Huiqin; Tian, Linwei; Guo, Caixia; Huang, Peili; Zhou, Xianqing; Peng, Shuangqing; Sun, Zhiwei

    2013-01-01

    Silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) have been widely used in biomedical and biotechnological applications. Environmental exposure to nanomaterials is inevitable as they become part of our daily life. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the possible toxic effects of SiNPs exposure. In this study, zebrafish embryos were treated with SiNPs (25, 50, 100, 200 µg/mL) during 4–96 hours post fertilization (hpf). Mortality, hatching rate, malformation and whole-embryo cellular death were detected. We also measured the larval behavior to analyze whether SiNPs had adverse effects on larvae locomotor activity. The results showed that as the exposure dosages increasing, the hatching rate of zebrafish embryos was decreased while the mortality and cell death were increased. Exposure to SiNPs caused embryonic malformations, including pericardial edema, yolk sac edema, tail and head malformation. The larval behavior testing showed that the total swimming distance was decreased in a dose-dependent manner. The lower dose (25 and 50 µg/mL SiNPs) produced substantial hyperactivity while the higher doses (100 and 200 µg/mL SiNPs) elicited remarkably hypoactivity in dark periods. In summary, our data indicated that SiNPs caused embryonic developmental toxicity, resulted in persistent effects on larval behavior. PMID:24058598

  20. Toxicity of cryoprotectants agents in freshwater prawn embryos of Macrobrachium amazonicum.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Arthur Vinícius Lourenço; Castro, Elias José Teles; Barbosa, Mariana Silva Alves; de Sousa, Míriam Luzia Nogueira Martins; de Araújo Neto, Manoel Paiva; Filho, Aldeney Andrade Soares; de Souza Sampaio, Celia Maria

    2015-12-01

    The process of cooling and cryopreservation of prawn embryos is a viable alternative for a continuous supply of larvae for freshwater prawn farming ponds. However, studies involving the application of those techniques as well as on toxicity of cryoprotectants in freshwater prawn embryos are scarce. Thus, this study aims to test the toxicity of methylic alcohol (MET), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and ethylene glycol (EG) on Macrobrachium amazonicum embryos. For the present experiment, pools of embryos were taken from 15 M. amazonicum females and were divided into three groups and tested in duplicate at concentrations of 10, 5, 3; 1, 0.5 or 0.1%. Toxicity tests were conducted for 24 h in Falcon® pipes to obtain the lethal concentration for 50% of the larvae (LC50). After the set period for testing, random samples of embryos were removed for morphological analysis under stereoscopic microscopes. Results were analysed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test at a 5% significance level and Trimmed Spearman-Karber Analysis to determine LC50-24 h. DMSO toxicity tests revealed that 5% and 10% concentrations showed the highest toxicity and differed from the control (P ? 0.05), 24h-LC50 was 437.4 ± 14.4 µL. MET was less toxic among the tested cryoprotectants and concentrations did not allow the determination of its LC50-24h. For tests with EG, concentrations of 3, 5 or 10% solutions resulted in a 100% mortality to tested embryos; EG was the tested cryoprotectant with the highest toxicity, with an LC50-24h average of 81.91 ± 35.3 µl. PMID:25255785

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF ISOLATED MAMMALIAN EMBRYO TECHNIQUES FOR TOXIC SUBSTANCES SCREENING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A potential screen for assessing teratogenic potential of compounds in mammals was tested. The technique involves testing isolated mammalian embryos in culture by direct exposure to agents. Embryos from three species of mammals were used; the mouse, rabbit and swine. Four differe...

  2. DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF COPPER SULFATE AND METHYLENE CHLORIDE TO SHRIMP EMBRYOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The embryos of the grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) have shown sensitivity to the water-soluble fraction of Number 2 fuel oil which indicates they may be a useful test species in estuarine developmental toxicity tests. Detailed concentration-response curves for copper sulfate an...

  3. Estradiol uptake, toxicity, metabolism, and adverse effects on cadmium-treated amphibian embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Fridman, Osvaldo; Corró, Lucrecia; Herkovits, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    The exposure of Bufo arenarum embryos to 25 micromol/L 17beta-estradiol (E2) resulted in 100% lethality within 48 hr, whereas 10 micromol//L E2 was the no observed effect concentration value for short-term chronic (7 days) exposure. The toxicity profile curves show that lethal effects were proportional to the E2 concentration and the time of exposure. The E2 uptake resulted in 20.1 ng E2/mg embryo at 8 hr posttreatment, but 67.3% of this value was achieved during the first 30 min of incubation with this estrogen. Regarding metabolism, the embryos synthesize estrone (E1) from E2 by means of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Simultaneous treatments of Bufo arenarum embryos with 1 mg/L Cd2+ and 0.1, 1, or 10 micromol/L E2 enhanced the lethality exerted by cadmium in 76.7, 80, and 83.3% of embryos, respectively. The results indicate that estrogenic endocrine disruptors could have an adverse effect on amphibian embryos and enhance the toxic effect of Cd on amphibian embryos. This study points to the possibility of using the AMPHITOX test as a screening method for potential endocrine disruption as well as the combined effects of chemical mixtures. PMID:15175173

  4. A novel contact assay for testing aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated toxicity of chemicals and whole sediments in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos.

    PubMed

    Schiwy, Sabrina; Bräunig, Jennifer; Alert, Henriette; Hollert, Henner; Keiter, Steffen H

    2015-11-01

    The European Water Framework Directive aims to achieve a good ecological and chemical status in surface waters until 2015. Sediment toxicology plays a major role in this intention as sediments can act as a secondary source of pollution. In order to fulfill this legal obligation, there is an urgent need to develop whole-sediment exposure protocols, since sediment contact assays represent the most realistic scenario to simulate in situ exposure conditions. Therefore, in the present study, a vertebrate sediment contact assay to determine aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated activity of particle-bound pollutants was developed. Furthermore, the activity and the expression of the CYP1 family in early life stages of zebrafish after exposure to freeze-dried sediment samples were investigated. In order to validate the developed protocol, effects of ?-naphthoflavone and three selected sediment on zebrafish embryos were investigated. Results documented clearly AhR-mediated toxicity after exposure to ?-naphthoflavone (?-NF) and to the sediment from the Vering canal. Upregulation of mRNA levels was observed for all investigated sediment samples. The highest levels of all investigated cyp genes (cyp1a, cyp1b1, cyp1c1, and cyp1c2) were recorded after exposure to the sediment sample of the Vering canal. In conclusion, the newly developed sediment contact assay can be recommended for the investigation of dioxin-like activities of single substances and the bioavailable fraction of complex environmental samples. Moreover, the exposure of whole zebrafish embryos to native (freeze-dried) sediment samples represents a highly realistic and ecologically relevant exposure scenario. PMID:24958532

  5. Virtual Embryo: Systems Modeling in Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput and high-content screening (HTS-HCS) studies are providing a rich source of data that can be applied to in vitro profiling of chemical compounds for biological activity and potential toxicity. EPA’s ToxCast™ project, and the broader Tox21 consortium, in addition t...

  6. Nanomaterial Toxicity Screening in Developing Zebrafish Embryos

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assess nanomaterial vertebrate toxicity, a high-content screening assay was created using developing zebrafish, Danio rerio. This included a diverse group of nanomaterials (n=42 total) ranging from metallic (Ag, Au) and metal oxide (CeO2, CuO, TiO2, ZnO) nanoparticles, to non...

  7. In Vivo Nanotoxicity Testing using the Zebrafish Embryo Assay

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Larissa Y.; Golombek, Susanne K.; Mertens, Marianne E.; Pan, Yu; Laaf, Dominic; Broda, Janine; Jayapaul, Jabadurai; Möckel, Diana; Subr, Vladimir; Hennink, Wim E.; Storm, Gert; Simon, Ulrich; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles are increasingly used for biomedical purposes. Many different diagnostic and therapeutic applications are envisioned for nanoparticles, but there are often also serious concerns regarding their safety. Given the fact that numerous new nanomaterials are being developed every day, and that not much is known about the long-term toxicological impact of exposure to nanoparticles, there is an urgent need to establish efficient methods for nanotoxicity testing. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo assay has recently emerged as an interesting ‘intermediate’ method for in vivo nanotoxicity screening, enabling (semi-) high-throughput analyses in a system significantly more complex than cultured cells, but at the same time also less ‘invasive’ and less expensive than large-scale biocompatibility studies in mice or rats. The zebrafish embryo assay is relatively well-established in the environmental sciences, but it has not yet gained wide notice in the nanomedicine field. Using prototypic polymeric drug carriers, gold-based nanodiagnostics and nanotherapeutics, and iron oxide-based nanodiagnostics, we here show that toxicity testing using zebrafish embryos is easy, efficient and informative, and faithfully reflects, yet significantly extends, cell-based toxicity testing. We therefore expect that the zebrafish embryo assay will become a popular future tool for in vivo nanotoxicity screening. PMID:24179674

  8. In Vivo Nanotoxicity Testing using the Zebrafish Embryo Assay.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Larissa Y; Golombek, Susanne K; Mertens, Marianne E; Pan, Yu; Laaf, Dominic; Broda, Janine; Jayapaul, Jabadurai; Möckel, Diana; Subr, Vladimir; Hennink, Wim E; Storm, Gert; Simon, Ulrich; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2013-06-10

    Nanoparticles are increasingly used for biomedical purposes. Many different diagnostic and therapeutic applications are envisioned for nanoparticles, but there are often also serious concerns regarding their safety. Given the fact that numerous new nanomaterials are being developed every day, and that not much is known about the long-term toxicological impact of exposure to nanoparticles, there is an urgent need to establish efficient methods for nanotoxicity testing. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo assay has recently emerged as an interesting 'intermediate' method for in vivo nanotoxicity screening, enabling (semi-) high-throughput analyses in a system significantly more complex than cultured cells, but at the same time also less 'invasive' and less expensive than large-scale biocompatibility studies in mice or rats. The zebrafish embryo assay is relatively well-established in the environmental sciences, but it has not yet gained wide notice in the nanomedicine field. Using prototypic polymeric drug carriers, gold-based nanodiagnostics and nanotherapeutics, and iron oxide-based nanodiagnostics, we here show that toxicity testing using zebrafish embryos is easy, efficient and informative, and faithfully reflects, yet significantly extends, cell-based toxicity testing. We therefore expect that the zebrafish embryo assay will become a popular future tool for in vivo nanotoxicity screening. PMID:24179674

  9. Virtual Embryo: Systems Modeling in Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput screening (HTS) studies are providing a rich source of data that can be applied to chemical profiling to address sensitivity and specificity of molecular targets, biological pathways, cellular and developmental processes. EPA’s ToxCast project is testing 960 uniq...

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticles in Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles cause toxicity in exposed organisms and are an environmental health concern. The mechanisms of silver nanoparticle toxicity, however, remain unclear. We examined the effects of exposure to silver in nano-, bulk-, and ionic forms on zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio) using a Next Generation Sequencing approach in an Illumina platform (High-Throughput SuperSAGE). Significant alterations in gene expression were found for all treatments and many of the gene pathways affected, most notably those associated with oxidative phosphorylation and protein synthesis, overlapped strongly between the three treatments indicating similar mechanisms of toxicity for the three forms of silver studied. Changes in oxidative phosphorylation indicated a down-regulation of this pathway at 24 h of exposure, but with a recovery at 48 h. This finding was consistent with a dose-dependent decrease in oxygen consumption at 24 h, but not at 48 h, following exposure to silver ions. Overall, our data provide support for the hypothesis that the toxicity caused by silver nanoparticles is principally associated with bioavailable silver ions in exposed zebrafish embryos. These findings are important in the evaluation of the risk that silver particles may pose to exposed vertebrate organisms. PMID:23758687

  11. Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryo assay for developmental toxicity incorporating individual embryo incubations: Evaluations of controls, a pure compound (BaP), soil extracts, and stream effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, C.G.

    1993-01-01

    A non-indigenous, but useful fish species has been largely overlooked by organizations preparing protocols for toxicity testing in research and environmental regulation. The Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) has been used in basic and applied research in the United States and Japan for many years. All life-history stages have been used and studied, including numerous different types of embryo and embryo-larval assays. However, a medaka embryo assay has yet to be recommended by the American Society for Testing and Materials, the United States Environmental Protection Agency or the American Public Health Association for use as a test species in water quality control. The authors have developed and refined methods for evaluating toxicity and abnormalities in embryos exposed to contaminants in a variety of media. Individual embryos exposed to benzo[a]pyrene showed both increased mortalities and abnormalities. In the two field applications, individual embryos were exposed to: (1) soil extracts from two hydrocarbon-contaminated sites on U.S. Army Kwajalein Atoll, in the General Republic of the Marshall Islands, or (2) water samples from ten sites on East Fork Poplar Creek, in Oak Ridge, TN, a stream that originates inside the DOE Y-12 Plant. The two soil extracts were from diesel fuel-contaminated soil; treated embryos showed significant responses ranging from increased mortalities to abnormalities and developmental delays. The stream has a history of industrial contamination, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and heavy metals, (particularly mercury); other typical industrial discharges (i.e. chlorine, ammonia, and nitrates) are also present at some sites. Treatment groups showed high mortality and dose-dependent mortality in diluted samples compared to control and reference water samples. This study demonstrates the flexibility of this medaka embryo assay for assessing the toxicity of complex environmental sites.

  12. Toxicity of surface water from Huangpu River to luminous bacteria (Vibrio qinghaiensis SP. Q67) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Li, Qian; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Ai; He, Jieni; Wen, Zhihao; Wu, Lingling

    2015-02-01

    Degradation of water quality is an emerging problem in many developing countries. Bioassay is an effective approach to monitor quality of water in aquatic environments. Studies have used luminescent bacteria and zebrafish embryos as bioassay tools in monitoring river water quality. In this study, luminous bacteria (Vibrio qinghaiensis sp. Q67) assay and zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo toxicity test were performed to assess the ecotoxicity of surface water from the Huangpu River, China, collected during 2012-2013. River water samples inhibited the luminescence [inhibition rates 0-34.6% (±4.82%)] of Q67 and increased the lethal rates and induced morphological abnormalities in zebrafish embryos. The toxicity to luminous bacteria and zebrafish embryos were higher in winter than in summer months. In addition, samples collected in industrial area, urban sampling sites near drainage outlets, and at the intersection of the tributary that flows into the Huangpu River showed higher toxicity. PMID:25463864

  13. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: BIOLOGICAL TOXICITY TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Engineering Bulletin is intended to provide site managers with information on ecological assessment and biological toxicity testing, applicability of biological toxicity testing, planning effective biological toxicity assessments, descriptions of test methods, limitations, c...

  14. Status and applications of echinoid (phylum echinodermata) toxicity test methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bay, S.; Burgess, R.; Nacci, D.

    1993-01-01

    The use of echinoderms for toxicity testing has focused primarily on sea urchins and sand dollars (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, Arbacia punctulata, Lytechinus pictus, and Dendraster excentricus, for example). The status and relative sensitivity of various test methods are described. The most frequently used test methods consist of short-term exposures of sea urchin sperm or embryos; these tests can be easily conducted at all times of the year by using species with complementary spawning cycles or laboratory conditioned populations of a single species. Data from reference toxicant and effluent toxicity tests are summarized. Information on the precision and sensitivity of echinoid test methods are limited and preclude rigorous comparisons with other test methods. The available data indicate that the sensitivity and precision of these methods are comparable to short-term chronic methods for other marine invertebrates and fish. Recent application of the sperm test in toxicity identification evaluations (TIEs) and studies of effluent toxicity decay and sediment toxicity illustrate the versatility of this rapid (10 to 60 min exposure) test method. Embryo tests typically use a 48 to 96 h exposure period and measure the occurrence of embryo malformations. Most recent applications of the embryo test have been for the assessment of sediment elutriate toxicity. Adult echinoderms are not frequently used to assess effluent or receiving water toxicity. Recent studies have had success in using the adult life stage of urchins and sand dollars to assess the effects of contaminated sediment on growth, behavior, and bioaccumulation.

  15. Developmental toxicity and alteration of gene expression in zebrafish embryos exposed to PFOS

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Xiongjie; Du Yongbing; Lam, Paul K.S.; Wu, Rudolf S.S.; Zhou Bingsheng

    2008-07-01

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) is a persistent organic pollutant, the potential toxicity of which is causing great concern. In the present study, we employed zebrafish embryos to investigate the developmental toxicity of this compound. Four-hour post-fertilization (hpf) zebrafish embryos were exposed to 0.1, 0.5, 1, 3 and 5 mg/L PFOS. Hatching was delayed and hatching rates as well as larval survivorship were significantly reduced after the embryos were exposed to 1, 3 and 5 mg/L PFOS until 132 hpf. The fry displayed gross developmental malformations, including epiboly deformities, hypopigmentation, yolk sac edema, tail and heart malformations and spinal curvature upon exposure to PFOS concentrations of 1 mg/L or greater. Growth (body length) was significantly reduced in the 3 and 5 mg/L PFOS-treated groups. To test whether developmental malformation was mediated via apoptosis, flow cytometry analysis of DNA content, acridine orange staining and TUNEL assay was used. These techniques indicated that more apoptotic cells were present in the PFOS-treated embryos than in the control embryos. Certain genes related to cell apoptosis, p53 and Bax, were both significantly up-regulated upon exposure to all the concentrations tested. In addition, we investigated the effects of PFOS on marker genes related to early thyroid development (hhex and pax8) and genes regulating the balance of androgens and estrogens (cyp19a and cyp19b). For thyroid development, the expression of hhex was significantly up-regulated at all concentrations tested, whereas pax8 expression was significantly up-regulated only upon exposure to lower concentrations of PFOS (0.1, 0.5, 1 mg/L). The expression of cyp19a and of cyp19b was significantly down-regulated at all exposure concentrations. The overall results indicated that zebrafish embryos constitute a reliable model for testing the developmental toxicity of PFOS, and the gene expression patterns in the embryos were able to reveal some potential mechanisms of developmental toxicity.

  16. The developmental toxicity of three carrier solvents using embryos of the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio

    SciTech Connect

    Rayburn, J.R.; Fisher, W.S.

    1995-12-31

    The embryos of the grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) have shown sensitivity to the water-soluble fraction of Number 2 fuel oil which indicates this test may be ideal for use as an estuarine developmental toxicity test. Many chemicals that require testing of this nature are insoluble in water. To determine the possible use of carrier solvents in the grass shrimp bioassays, detailed concentration-response curves for each solvent were performed using two test methods. LC50 values for each method were obtained. The first test was a 4-day assay that included the time of hatch, a critical life stage of these embryos. The second test was a 12-d assay which included development from tissue cap stage embryos through 2 days post hatch. The average 4-day LC50s for ETOH, DMSO and acetone were 12.07, 22.57, and 6.80 g/L, respectively. The average 12-day LC50s for ETOH, DMSO and Acetone were 3.63, 12.33 and 6.94 g/L, respectively. The coefficients of variation of each test were always less than 25.2%. Eye malformations were observed with embryos exposed to ETOH, while embryos exposed to DMSO and acetone showed very little embryo malformation. One experiment showed abnormal development of the last abdominal segment. Based on the concentration-response curves, the maximum allowable limit of ETOH, DMSO and acetone to be used as a carrier should be 1, 6, and 4 g/L, respectively.

  17. Toxicity of sediment cores from Yangtze River estuary to zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peipei; Zhang, Lili; Liu, Li; Chen, Ling; Gao, Hongwen; Wu, Lingling

    2015-11-01

    Toxicity evaluation is an important segment in sediment quality monitoring in order to protect aquatic organisms and human health. The purpose of this study is to assess the toxicity of sediments from three sediment cores in Yangtze River Estuary, China, using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo tests. Fertilized zebrafish eggs were exposed to both whole sediments and sediment organic extracts prepared from collected sediments, in order to provide a comprehensive and realistic insight into the bioavailable toxicity potential of the sediments. As end points, development parameters (mortality, hatching rate, and abnormality) in the developing embryos were recorded during the 96-h exposure. The results showed that some samples increased mortality, inhibited the hatching of embryos, and induced morphological abnormalities. The embryonic toxicities presented serrated changes and irregular distribution with depth, which may be related to hydrodynamic effect and unstable environmental input. However, lethal and sub-lethal effects were more significant at the sub-surface sediments (10?40 cm), which indicated that the pollution is more serious in recent decades. PMID:25163567

  18. Formation of copper complexes in landfill leachate and their toxicity to zebrafish embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, J.K.; Butler, C.A.; Timperley, M.H.; Evans, C.W.

    2000-05-01

    Toxic metal organic complexes have not been found in natural waters, although some organic acids form bioavailable lipophilic and metabolite-type metal complexes. Landfill leachates usually contain organic acids and in the urban environment these leachates, when mixed with storm waters containing Cu, could be a source of toxic Cu organic complexes in streams and estuaries. The authors investigated the formation of Cu complexes in the leachate from an active urban landfill and found that some of the complexes formed were toxic to zebrafish embryos. High and low nominal molecular weight (NMWT) fractions; >5,000 Da and <700 Da, of leachate both formed Cu complexes with almost identical Cu complexing characteristics but the toxicity was due solely to the low NMWT complexes formed in the <700 Da fraction. Chemical equilibrium modeling with MINTEQA2 and H and Cu complex conditional association constants and ligand concentrations obtained from pH and Cu titrations with a Cu ion-selective electrode and van den Berg-Ruzic analyses of the titration data was used to calculate the copper speciation in the embryo test solutions. This calculated speciation, which was confirmed by measurements of Cu{sup 2+} in the test solutions, enabled the toxicity due to the free Cu ion and to the Cu complexes to be distinguished.

  19. Unexpected interaction with dispersed crude oil droplets drives severe toxicity in Atlantic haddock embryos.

    PubMed

    Sørhus, Elin; Edvardsen, Rolf B; Karlsen, Ørjan; Nordtug, Trond; van der Meeren, Terje; Thorsen, Anders; Harman, Christopher; Jentoft, Sissel; Meier, Sonnich

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity resulting from exposure to oil droplets in marine fish embryos and larvae is still subject for debate. The most detailed studies have investigated the effects of water-dissolved components of crude oil in water accommodated fractions (WAFs) that lack bulk oil droplets. Although exposure to dissolved petroleum compounds alone is sufficient to cause the characteristic developmental toxicity of crude oil, few studies have addressed whether physical interaction with oil micro-droplets are a relevant exposure pathway for open water marine speices. Here we used controlled delivery of mechanically dispersed crude oil to expose pelagic embryos and larvae of a marine teleost, the Atlantic haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus). Haddock embryos were exposed continuously to two different concentrations of dispersed crude oil, high and low, or in pulses. By 24 hours of exposure, micro-droplets of oil were observed adhering and accumulating on the chorion, accompanied by highly elevated levels of cyp1a, a biomarker for exposure to aromatic hydrocarbons. Embryos from all treatment groups showed abnormalities representative of crude oil cardiotoxicity at hatch (5 days of exposure), such as pericardial and yolk sac edema. Compared to other species, the frequency and severity of toxic effects was higher than expected for the waterborne PAH concentrations (e.g., 100% of larvae had edema at the low treatment). These findings suggest an enhanced tissue uptake of PAHs and/or other petroleum compounds from attached oil droplets. These studies highlight a novel property of haddock embryos that leads to greater than expected impact from dispersed crude oil. Given the very limited number of marine species tested in similar exposures, the likelihood of other species with similar properties could be high. This unanticipated result therefore has implications for assessing the ecological impacts of oil spills and the use of methods for dispersing oil in the open sea. PMID:25923774

  20. Unexpected Interaction with Dispersed Crude Oil Droplets Drives Severe Toxicity in Atlantic Haddock Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Sørhus, Elin; Edvardsen, Rolf B.; Karlsen, Ørjan; Nordtug, Trond; van der Meeren, Terje; Thorsen, Anders; Harman, Christopher; Jentoft, Sissel; Meier, Sonnich

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity resulting from exposure to oil droplets in marine fish embryos and larvae is still subject for debate. The most detailed studies have investigated the effects of water-dissolved components of crude oil in water accommodated fractions (WAFs) that lack bulk oil droplets. Although exposure to dissolved petroleum compounds alone is sufficient to cause the characteristic developmental toxicity of crude oil, few studies have addressed whether physical interaction with oil micro-droplets are a relevant exposure pathway for open water marine speices. Here we used controlled delivery of mechanically dispersed crude oil to expose pelagic embryos and larvae of a marine teleost, the Atlantic haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus). Haddock embryos were exposed continuously to two different concentrations of dispersed crude oil, high and low, or in pulses. By 24 hours of exposure, micro-droplets of oil were observed adhering and accumulating on the chorion, accompanied by highly elevated levels of cyp1a, a biomarker for exposure to aromatic hydrocarbons. Embryos from all treatment groups showed abnormalities representative of crude oil cardiotoxicity at hatch (5 days of exposure), such as pericardial and yolk sac edema. Compared to other species, the frequency and severity of toxic effects was higher than expected for the waterborne PAH concentrations (e.g., 100% of larvae had edema at the low treatment). These findings suggest an enhanced tissue uptake of PAHs and/or other petroleum compounds from attached oil droplets. These studies highlight a novel property of haddock embryos that leads to greater than expected impact from dispersed crude oil. Given the very limited number of marine species tested in similar exposures, the likelihood of other species with similar properties could be high. This unanticipated result therefore has implications for assessing the ecological impacts of oil spills and the use of methods for dispersing oil in the open sea. PMID:25923774

  1. Embryo Toxic Effects of Depleted Uranium on the Morphology of the Mouse Fetus

    PubMed Central

    Mirderikvand, Nina; Mohammadzadeh Asl, Baharak; Naserzadeh, Parvaneh; Shaki, Fatemeh; Shokrzadeh, Mohammad; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2014-01-01

    Although the biokinetics, metabolism, and chemical toxicity of uranium are well known, until recently little attention was paid to the potential toxic effects of uranium on reproduction and development in mammals. In recent years, it has been shown that uranium is a developmental toxicant when given orally or subcutaneously (SC) to mice. Decreased fertility, embryo/fetal toxicity including teratogenicity, and reduced growth of the offspring have been observed following uranium exposure at different gestation periods. For investigating the effects of DU on pregnant animals, three groups (control, sham and test) of NMRI mice were chosen. In test group 4 mg/Kg of DU were administered intraperitonealy at 11 day of gestation, in sham group only normal saline injected to interior peritoneum as indicated in the test group and in Control group which was considered as the comparison base line of our research, no injection was made. Caesarean sections were performed at 15 day of the gestation; and their placentas were examined externally. Base on our results DU caused significant external anomalies, and caused a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in the weight and diameter of placentas, the number of the embryos, their body weight and crown-rump length of fetuses. PMID:24734072

  2. Identification of proximate toxicant for ethylene glycol developmental toxicity using rat whole embryo culture.

    PubMed

    Carney, E W; Liberacki, A B; Bartels, M J; Breslin, W J

    1996-01-01

    The effects of ethylene glycol (EG) and its metabolite, glycolic acid (GA), were compared by culturing day 10.5 rat conceptuses for 46 h in media containing 0.5, 2.5, 12.5, 25 or 50 mM EG or GA. EG up to 50 mM was essentially without effect, whereas > or = 12.5 mM GA inhibited embryo growth and development. Craniofacial dysmorphogenesis was observed in 70% of the 12.5 mM GA embryos (0% in controls). To determine if GA toxicity in vitro was an indirect effect of medium acidification, embryos were cultured in 12.5 mM GA (pH 6.7), 12.5 mM sodium glycolate (pH 7.4), or in control medium (pH 7.4 or 6.7). The percentage of dysmorphic embryos was 67% for the 12.5 mM GA (pH 6.7) group, 58% for the sodium glycolate (pH 7.4) group, 8% in the pH 6.7 controls, and 0% in the pH 7.4 controls. These results suggest that GA, not parent EG, is the active toxicant for EG-induced developmental toxicity and that acidification of culture medium pH plays only a minor role in GA's effects in vitro. The identification of GA as the active toxicant is important for the risk assessment of EG because GA exhibits dose-rate-dependent, nonlinear kinetics in vivo. PMID:8928086

  3. Acute and embryo-larval toxicity of phenolic compounds to aquatic biota.

    PubMed

    DeGraeve, G M; Geiger, D L; Meyer, J S; Bergman, H L

    1980-01-01

    Because of the prevalence of phenolic compounds in various types of effluents, both acute and embryo-larval bioassays were performed on eight phenolic compounds with rainbow trout, fathead minnows and Daphnia pulicaria. In flow-through bioassays, the 96-hr LC50 values for rainbow trout and fathead minnows ranged from < 0.1 mg/L for hydroquinone to > 100 mg/L for resorcinol. Daphnia pulicaria was consistently the least sensitive species tested as measured in 48-hr bioassays, while fathead minnows and rainbow trout varied in their relative sensitivity to phenolics as measured in 96-hr tests. Fathead minnows were more sensitive to phenol at 25 degrees C than at 14 degrees C. In embryo-larval bioassays with phenol, fathead minnow growth was significantly reduced by 2.5 mg/L phenol, while rainbow trout growth was significantly reduced by 0.20 mg/L phenol. For both species the embryo-larval effects concentration was 1.1% of the 96-hr LC50. Another embryo-larval bioassay was attempted with p-benzoquinone, a highly toxic phenolic compound found in fossil fuel processing wastewaters, which was discontinued because the compound was rapidly degraded chemically or biologically in the headtank and aquaria. PMID:7436545

  4. Marine toxicity tests development with a New Zealand echinoid

    SciTech Connect

    Nipper, M.G.; Roper, D.S.; Martin, M.L.; Williams, E.K.

    1995-12-31

    The generally low levels of contamination around New Zealand lead to the search for a sensitive toxicity test, which could be used to screen effluent and to detect contaminant effects in coastal waters and sediments. Echinoid early life stage tests were considered ideal candidates. However, the adaptation of international toxicity test methods to indigenous species has not been straightforward or troublefree! The echinoid Fellaster zelandiae was selected because it is abundant around New Zealand and is fertile year round. Fertilization tests showed that gamete density, rather than sperm/egg ratio, was a crucial factor for successful control fertilization rates. This method, however, presented several problems related to (1) temporal variability in the quality of sperm batches, (2) rapid reduction of egg quality and viability after spawning, and (3) highly variable sensitivity in reference toxicant tests. Embryo tests were more reliable, with good control results (> 80% normal embryos) and consistent sensitivity to a reference toxicant, zinc sulfate. EC{sub 50} values averaged 0.06 mg Zn/L, comparable to the sensitivity of echinoid species used elsewhere. Brine prepared by freezing seawater was suitable for adjusting the salinity of effluents, with more than 90% normal embryos developing in brine diluted with UV-treated deionized water as a test-control. The assessment of the embryo development test as a tool for screening sediment toxicity (using sediment pore water), is presently underway, concurrently with growth and behavioral endpoint tests using indigenous amphipods and bivalves.

  5. Drosophila Embryos as Model to Assess Cellular and Developmental Toxicity of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) in Living Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Boyin; Campo, Eva M.; Bossing, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Different toxicity tests for carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been developed to assess their impact on human health and on aquatic and terrestrial animal and plant life. We present a new model, the fruit fly Drosophila embryo offering the opportunity for rapid, inexpensive and detailed analysis of CNTs toxicity during embryonic development. We show that injected DiI labelled multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) become incorporated into cells in early Drosophila embryos, allowing the study of the consequences of cellular uptake of CNTs on cell communication, tissue and organ formation in living embryos. Fluorescently labelled subcellular structures showed that MWCNTs remained cytoplasmic and were excluded from the nucleus. Analysis of developing ectodermal and neural stem cells in MWCNTs injected embryos revealed normal division patterns and differentiation capacity. However, an increase in cell death of ectodermal but not of neural stem cells was observed, indicating stem cell-specific vulnerability to MWCNT exposure. The ease of CNT embryo injections, the possibility of detailed morphological and genomic analysis and the low costs make Drosophila embryos a system of choice to assess potential developmental and cellular effects of CNTs and test their use in future CNT based new therapies including drug delivery. PMID:24558411

  6. Assessment of biocompatibility of 3D printed photopolymers using zebrafish embryo toxicity assays.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, N P; Zhu, F; Hall, C J; Reboud, J; Crosier, P S; Patton, E E; Wlodkowic, D; Cooper, J M

    2016-01-01

    3D printing has emerged as a rapid and cost-efficient manufacturing technique to enable the fabrication of bespoke, complex prototypes. If the technology is to have a significant impact in biomedical applications, such as drug discovery and molecular diagnostics, the devices produced must be biologically compatible to enable their use with established reference assays and protocols. In this work we demonstrate that we can adapt the Fish Embryo Test (FET) as a new method to quantify the toxicity of 3D printed microfluidic devices. We assessed the biocompatibility of four commercially available 3D printing polymers (VisiJetCrystal EX200, Watershed 11122XC, Fototec SLA 7150 Clear and ABSplus P-430), through the observation of key developmental markers in the developing zebrafish embryos. Results show all of the photopolymers to be highly toxic to the embryos, resulting in fatality, although we do demonstrate that post-printing treatment of Fototec 7150 makes it suitable for zebrafish culture within the FET. PMID:26646354

  7. VIRTUAL EMBRYO: SYSTEMS MODELING IN DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY - Symposium: SOT 2012

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput screening (HTS) studies are providing a rich source of data that can be applied to in vitro profiling of chemical compounds for biological activity and potential toxicity. Chemical profiling in ToxCast covered 965 drugs-chemicals in over 500 diverse assays testing...

  8. Effects of photoinduced toxicity of fluoranthene on amphibian embryos and larvae

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, A.C.; Burton, G.A. Jr.

    1998-09-01

    Embryos and newly hatched larvae of three amphibian species, the spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum), the northern leopard frog (Rana pipiens), and the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis), were exposed to fluoranthene and ultraviolet (UV) light in two scenarios. Embryos were exposed in a laboratory setting from an early developmental stage through hatching under artificial UV light, and newly hatched larvae were exposed outdoors in varying sunlight intensity levels. Outdoor exposures indicated greater sensitivity in the toxic response than did laboratory exposures. In the laboratory, mortality and malformation of X. laevis were the most sensitive indicators of exposure. Xenopus laevis was also the most sensitive species tested to the effects of UV light alone. Hatching success of R. pipiens was monitored outdoors and was not a useful predictive endpoint in the determination of photoinduced toxicity; however, newly hatched larvae were sensitive to the effects of photoinduced toxicity. Amybstoma maculatum and X. laevis larvae were affected by low ({micro}g/L) concentrations of fluoranthene in sunlight. These findings suggest that low levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons could be acting synergistically with environmental factors such as UV light to place young amphibians at risk.

  9. FURTHER DEVELOPMENT OF RODENT WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE: SOLVENT TOXICITY AND WATER INSOLUBLE COMPOUND DELIVERY SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to study the in vitro embryotoxicity and dysmorphogenesis of water insoluble compounds, solvents or chemical delivery systems of low toxicity and teratogenicity to the developing embryo must be found. Therefore, day 10.5 rat embryos were cultured for 2 days in whole rat ...

  10. DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF DI- AND TETRACHLOROETHANE AND DICHLOROPROPANE IN EMBRYO CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF DI- AND TETRACHLOROETHANE AND DICHLOROPROPANE IN EMBRYO CULTURE. JE Andrews, H Nichols, and ES Hunter. Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, USEPA, RTP, NC.

    Disinfection of drinking water with chlorine results in numerous chlorinated byprodu...

  11. Toxicity of Buprofezin on the Survival of Embryo and Larvae of African Catfish, Clarias gariepinus (Bloch)

    PubMed Central

    Marimuthu, Kasi; Muthu, Narmataa; Xavier, Rathinam; Arockiaraj, Jesu; Rahman, M. Aminur; Subramaniam, Sreeramanan

    2013-01-01

    Buprofezin is an insect growth regulator and widely used insecticide in Malaysia. The present study evaluated the toxic effects of buprofezin on the embryo and larvae of African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) as a model organism. The embryos and larvae were exposed to 7 different concentrations (0, 0.05, 0.5, 5, 25, 50 and 100 mg/L) of buprofezin. Each concentration was assessed in five replicates. Eggs were artificially fertilized and 200 eggs and larvae were subjected to a static bath treatment for all the concentrations. The mortality of embryos was significantly increased with increasing buprofezin concentrations from 5 to 100 mg/L (p< 0.05). However, the mortality was not significantly different (p<0.05) among the following concentrations: 0 (control), 0.05, 0.5 and 5 mg/L. Data obtained from the buprofezin acute toxicity tests were evaluated using probit analysis. The 24 h LC50 value (with 95% confidence limits) of buprofezin for embryos was estimated to be 6.725 (3.167-15.017) mg/L. The hatching of fish embryos was recorded as 68.8, 68.9, 66.9, 66.4, 26.9, 25.1 and 0.12% in response to 7 different concentrations of buprofezin, respectively. The mortality rate of larvae significantly (p<0.05) increased with increasing buprofezin concentrations exposed to 24-48 h. The 24 and 48 h LC50 values (with 95% confidence limits) of buprofezin for the larvae was estimated to be 5.702 (3.198-8.898) and 4.642 (3.264-6.287) mg/L respectively. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) in the LC50 values obtained at 24 and 48 h exposure times. Malformations were observed when the embryos and larvae exposed to more than 5 mg/L. The results emerged from the study suggest that even the low concentration (5 mg/L) of buprofezin in the aquatic environment may have adverse effect on the early embryonic and larval development of African catfish. PMID:24098390

  12. Effects of storage temperature and duration on toxicity of sediments assessed by Crassostrea gigas oyster embryo bioassay

    SciTech Connect

    Beiras, R.; His, E.; Seaman, M.N.L.

    1998-10-01

    The effects of temperature and duration of storage on the toxicity of estuarine sediments were investigated with the Crassostrea gigas oyster embryo bioassay. Sediments ranging from unpolluted (controls) to extremely polluted with heavy metals (>100 ppm Hg, Cu, Zn, and Pb) and total hydrocarbons (>1,000 ppm) were collected from sites in southwest France and northern Spain, Control sediments were toxic only at the highest concentrations tested and after freezing in liquid nitrogen ({minus}196 C). Polluted sediments significantly reduced the success of oyster embryogenesis. Analysis of variance showed that the effect of storage temperature on toxicity increased with the prolongation of storage. Prolonged storage of fresh (4 C) sediments resulted in a loss of toxicity, which was more rapid in the less-polluted sediments. Deep-frozen sediments ({minus}196 C) were highly toxic regardless of origin and storage time, and because deep-freezing causes spurious toxicity in the control samples, it cannot be recommended for toxicological studies. In the context of the assessment of sediment toxicity by embryo-larval bioassays, fresh (4 C) storage is recommended when sediments need to be stored for no longer than a few days. The advisable duration of fresh storage to avoid false-negative results is directly related to the degree of toxicity. Should the sediments require prolonged storage, freezing at {minus}20 C appears to be the best choice.

  13. The VIRTUAL EMBRYO. A Computational Framework for Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s ‘Virtual Embryo Project’ (v-Embryo™) is focused on the predictive toxicology of children’s health and developmental defects following prenatal exposure to environmental chemicals. The research is motivated by scientific principles in systems biology as a framework for the g...

  14. Nickel and Copper Toxicity to Embryos of the Long-Spined Sea Urchin, Diadema savignyi.

    PubMed

    Rosen, G; Rivera-Duarte, I; Colvin, M A; Dolecal, R E; Raymundo, L J; Earley, P J

    2015-07-01

    The sensitivity of long-spined sea urchins (Diadema savignyi) collected from Guam (Northern Marianas Islands), USA, to nickel and copper in seawater was explored using 48-h embryo-larval development toxicity tests. The median effective concentrations (EC50) averaged 94 µg L(-1) for nickel, and 19 µg L(-1) from a single exposure to copper, and suggest relatively high sensitivity of this species to nickel compared with other sea urchin genera, but similar sensitivity to copper. Ambient nickel and copper concentrations concurrently sampled from 16 near-shore locations around Guam were one to two orders of magnitude lower than those that would be expected to result in adverse effects to D. savignyi embryos. Although nationally recommended chronic ambient water quality criteria, currently 8.2 and 3.1 µg L(-1) for nickel and copper, respectively, were not exceeded, recently derived qualifying toxicity data should be considered for updating these criteria to ensure protectiveness of sensitive tropical species. PMID:25573279

  15. Enantioselective separation and zebrafish embryo toxicity of insecticide beta-cypermethrin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Tu, Wenqing; Lou, Chun; Hong, Yingying; Zhao, Meirong

    2010-01-01

    Enantioselectivity of chiral pollutants is receiving growing concern due to the difference in toxicology and environment fate between enantiomers. In this study, enantiomers of insecticide beta-cypermethrin (beta-CP) were separated on selected chiral column by HPLC, and the toxicity of enantiomers was evaluated using the zebrafish embryo-larval assays. The enantiomers of beta-CP were baseline separated on Chiralcel OD and Chiralpak AD columns and detected by circular dichroism (CD) at 236 nm. Better separation could be achieved at lower temperature (e.g., 20 degrees C) and with lower levels of polar modifiers. Pure enantiomers were obtained on Chiralcel OD. The CD spectra of enantiomers were recorded. By comparing the elution order with a previous similar study, the absolute configuration of beta-CP enantiomers was determined. The individual enantiomers were used in zebrafish embryo test, and the results showed that beta-CP enantioselectively induced yolk sac edema, pericardial edema and crooked body. The IR-cis-alphaS and 1R-trans-alphaS enantiomers showed strong developmental toxicities at concentration of 0.1 mg/L, while the 1S-cis-alphaR and 1S-trans-alphaR induced no malformations at higher concentration (e.g., 0.3 mg/L). The results suggest that the enantioselective toxicological effects of beta-CP should be considered when evaluating its ecotoxicological effects. PMID:20608511

  16. vEmbryo In Silico Models: Predicting Vascular Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cardiovascular system is the first to function in the vertebrate embryo, reflecting the critical need for nutrient delivery and waste removal during organogenesis. Blood vessel development occurs by complex interacting signaling networks, including extra-cellular matrix remod...

  17. Three-dimensional printed millifluidic devices for zebrafish embryo tests.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Skommer, Joanna; Macdonald, Niall P; Friedrich, Timo; Kaslin, Jan; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-07-01

    Implementations of Lab-on-a-Chip technologies for in-situ analysis of small model organisms and embryos (both invertebrate and vertebrate) are attracting an increasing interest. A significant hurdle to widespread applications of microfluidic and millifluidic devices for in-situ analysis of small model organisms is the access to expensive clean room facilities and complex microfabrication technologies. Furthermore, these resources require significant investments and engineering know-how. For example, poly(dimethylsiloxane) soft lithography is still largely unattainable to the gross majority of biomedical laboratories willing to pursue development of chip-based platforms. They often turn instead to readily available but inferior classical solutions. We refer to this phenomenon as workshop-to-bench gap of bioengineering science. To tackle the above issues, we examined the capabilities of commercially available Multi-Jet Modelling (MJM) and Stereolithography (SLA) systems for low volume fabrication of optical-grade millifluidic devices designed for culture and biotests performed on millimetre-sized specimens such as zebrafish embryos. The selected 3D printing technologies spanned a range from affordable personal desktop systems to high-end professional printers. The main motivation of our work was to pave the way for off-the-shelf and user-friendly 3D printing methods in order to rapidly and inexpensively build optical-grade millifluidic devices for customized studies on small model organisms. Compared with other rapid prototyping technologies such as soft lithography and infrared laser micromachining in poly(methyl methacrylate), we demonstrate that selected SLA technologies can achieve user-friendly and rapid production of prototypes, superior feature reproduction quality, and comparable levels of optical transparency. A caution need to be, however, exercised as majority of tested SLA and MJM resins were found toxic and caused significant developmental abnormalities in zebrafish embryos. Taken together, our data demonstrate that SLA technologies can be used for rapid and accurate production of devices for biomedical research. However, polymer biotoxicity needs to be carefully evaluated. PMID:26339325

  18. USING THE MEDAKA EMBRYO ASSAY TO INVESTIGATE DEVELOPMENTAL ETHANOL TOXICITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethanol (EtOH) is a well-known developmental toxicant that produces a range of abnormal phenotypes. While the toxic potential of developmental EtOH exposure is well characterized, the effect of the timing of exposure on the extent of toxicity remains unknown. Fish models such as ...

  19. Embryo-toxic effects of environmental concentrations of chlorpyrifos on the crustacean Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Palma, P; Palma, V L; Fernandes, R M; Bohn, A; Soares, A M V M; Barbosa, I R

    2009-09-01

    Chlorpyrifos is a non-systemic organophosphorus insecticide leading to the inhibition of the enzyme cholinesterase. Nowadays, this insecticide is widely used on a variety of crops and is frequently detected in surface waters around the world. The main aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of this insecticide on the embryonic development of Daphnia magna, and to assess the sensitivity of this endpoint in comparison with the endpoint of the chronic 21-day test. The featured endpoints were the number of offspring per female and abnormalities of both offspring and embryos. Chlorpyrifos exhibited significant toxic effects on the embryonic development manifested in the appearance of abnormalities, including arrested eggs, in 20% of the embryos exposed to a concentration of 0.01 microgL(-1). Furthermore, chronic exposition to the insecticide yielded a proportion of offspring abnormalities in later stages of development of about 43% at 0.01 microgL(-1). In contrast, a significant reduction in the number of offspring produced per female was only observed above a concentration of 0.03 microgL(-1). Hence, these results suggest that developmental abnormality was a more sensitive endpoint than the number of offspring production per female. PMID:19482356

  20. Aquatic toxicity assessment of single-walled carbon nanotubes using zebrafish embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Huichin; Lin, Yu-Jun; Li, Meng-Wei; Chuang, Han-Ni; Chou, Cheng-Chung

    2011-07-01

    Zebrafish embryos selected at the 64-cell stage were exposed to various concentrations of amide functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) ranging from 1 to 10 ?g/ml dissolved in 1% Pluronic F-68 (a cell culture grade surfactant), and the development of embryos was examined from 24 to 120 hours post fertilization (hpf). Incubation of embryos in 1% F-68 did not induce overt abnormal phenotype as compared to the wild-type; neither did it cause significant mortality during the exposure period. Generally, there was a slight developmental delay in larvae treated with SWCNTs of 5 ?g/ml or above. Only larvae exposed to >= 5 ?g/ml SWCNTs showed significantly reduced survival rates. About 50% of the embryos exposed to 5 ?g/ml showed abnormal phenotypes at 24 hpf as compared to the control group. As development proceeds to 120 hpf, more embryos displayed defective morphology. A slight hatching delay was observed in embryos exposed to concentrations above 5 ?g/ml. There was a general reduction of body axes, including narrowed somite and shortened yolk stalk. In addition, pigmentation in the ventral trunk area was less than that observed in control group. The body lengths of the exposed embryos were decreased significantly at 48 hpf (3.11 mm in control vs. 3.00 mm in SWCNTs-exposed embryos). However, exposure to SWCNTs did not affect the number of somites. Other features that were noticed in the SWCNTs-exposed embryos included edema and shrinkage and blebbling of the epidermal lining. Most of these observed phenotypes persisted from 48 hpf through 120 hpf. Overall, the aforementioned results indicate that soluble amide-functionalized SWCNTs are toxic to zebrafish embryos at a minimum concentration of 5 ?g/ml.

  1. GLUCOCORTICOID RECEPTOR REGULATION IN THE RAT EMBRYO: A POTENTIAL SITE FOR DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Glucocorticoid receptor regulation in the rat embryo: a potential site for developmental toxicity?

    Ghosh B, Wood CR, Held GA, Abbott BD, Lau C.

    National Research Council, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711, USA.

  2. NEW EARLY LIFE-STAGE TOXICITY TEST USING THE CALIFORNIA GRUNION (LEURESTHES TENUIS) AND RESULTS WITH CHLORPYRIFOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    California grunion were continuously exposed as embryos and fry to technical chlorpyrifos in two toxicity tests conducted in the same exposure apparatus. The first test, a 35-day early life-stage (ELS) test, began with approximately 2.5-day-old embryos that were exposed in flow-t...

  3. Developmental toxicity of copper chloride, methylene chloride, and 6-aminonicotinamide to embryos of the grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio

    SciTech Connect

    Rayburn, J.R.; Fisher, W.S.

    1999-05-01

    Embryos of estuarine grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio have demonstrated sensitivity to various solvents and petroleum products, indicating utility for evaluating estuarine contamination. Testing was performed to establish concentration-response curves for methylene chloride, copper chloride, and 6-aminonicotinamide, three known teratogenic chemicals. Two exposure periods were used, 4 d and 12 d, and both periods extended through hatching. The average 4-d LC50 values for methylene chloride, copper chloride, and 6-aminonicotinamide were 0.071% v/v, 1.82 mg/L, and 0.21 mg/ml, respectively. The average 12-d LC50 values for methylene chloride, copper chloride, and 6-aminonicotinamide were 0.031% v/v, 1.44 mg/L, and 0.057 mg/ml, respectively. Eye malformations were observed with embryos exposed to concentrations greater than 3 mg/L copper chloride or greater than 0.07% v/v methylene chloride. Very few abnormalities were observed in embryos exposed to 6-aminonicotinamide. Abnormal larval development was found with exposure to copper chloride at concentrations greater than 1 mg/L. The sensitivity and low variability found here further supports the development of these relatively simple methods using grass shrimp embryos. Establishment of sublethal developmental endpoints warrants further investigation because of their potential correspondence to mechanisms of toxic action.

  4. Individual and joint toxic effects of cadmium sulfate and ?-naphthoflavone on the development of zebrafish embryo*

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jian; Yang, Jian-ming; Zhang, Feng; Miao, Peng; Lin, Ying; Chen, Ming-li

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the individual and joint toxicities of cadmium sulfate (CdSO4) and ?-naphthoflavone (ANF) in zebrafish embryos. As a result, CdSO4 caused both lethal and sub-lethal effects, such as 24 h post-fertilization (hpf) death and 72 hpf delayed hatching. However, ANF only caused sub-lethal effects, including 48 hpf cardiac edema and 72 hpf delayed hatching. Taking 24 hpf death and 48 hpf cardiac edema as endpoints, the toxicities of CdSO4 and ANF were significantly enhanced by each other. Consistently, both CdSO4 and ANF caused significant oxidative stress, including decreases in the reduced glutathione (GSH) level, inhibition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, as well as increases in malondialdehyde (MDA) content in zebrafish embryos, but these mixtures produced much more significant alterations on the biomarkers. Co-treatment of CdSO4 and ANF significantly down-regulated the mRNA level of multidrug resistance-associated protein (mrp) 1 and cytochrome P450 (cyp) 1a, which constituted the protective mechanisms for zebrafish embryos to chemical toxins. In conclusion, co-treatment of CdSO4 and ANF exhibited a much more severe damage in zebrafish embryos than individual treatment. Meanwhile, production of oxidative stress and altered expression of mrp1 and cyp1a could be important components of such joint toxicity. PMID:25183031

  5. Toxic effects of triazophos on rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus) embryos and larvae.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bin; Gong, Yu-Xin; Liu, Lei; Li, Dong-Liang; Wang, Yuan; Ling, Fei; Wang, Gao-Xue

    2014-08-01

    Triazophos (TAP) has been widely used in agriculture for controlling insect pests and is a known organophosphorus pesticide. Due to TAP characteristics, such as high chemical and photochemical stability, its potential toxicity to aquatic organisms has gained great interest. To explore the potential developmental toxicity of TAP, Gobiocypris rarus embryos and larvae were exposed to various concentrations of TAP (0.1-15 mg L(-1)) until 72 h. Results showed that values of 72 h LC50 and EC50 were 7.44 and 5.60 mg L(-1) for embryos, 2.52 and 1.37 mg L(-1) for larvae. Increased malformation, decreased heart rate and body length provide a gradual concentration-dependent pattern. Enzyme activities and mRNA levels were significantly changed even at low concentration (0.05 mg L(-1) for embryos and 0.01 mg L(-(1) for larvae). Overall, the present study points out that TAP is likely a risk to the early development of G. rarus. The information presented in this study will be helpful in better understanding the toxicity induced by TAP in fish embryos and larvae. PMID:24875911

  6. Assessment of the toxic effect exerted by fluorescent pseudomonads on embryos and larvae of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus nudus.

    PubMed

    Beleneva, I A; Shamshurina, E V; Eliseikina, M G

    2015-05-01

    Strains of bacteria capable of growing on artificial culture media were isolated from the fouling of brass plates submerged in Nha Trang Bay, South China Sea, and from tissues of the seastar Distolasterias nipon, caught in Peter the Great Bay, Sea of Japan. According to the complex of data of genetic and physiological/biochemical analyzes, two strains of cultivated bacteria were identified by us as the species Pseudomonas aeruginosa, two strains as Pseudomonas fluorescens, and one strain as Ruegeria sp. It was shown that the cultivated strains of P. aeruginosa released exotoxins, particularly phenazine pigments, into the environment. Production of the toxins did not depend on presence of a target organism in the system and was aimed at regulation of interactions in the microbial community. The toxicity of the studied natural isolates of fluorescent pseudomonads was analyzed by using embryos and larvae of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus nudus, which are the sensitive and dynamic toxicological sea-urchin embryo test (SET) system. As was established, exotoxins produced by the strains of P. aeruginosa inhibit activity of cilia in sea urchin larvae, as well as disturb processes of cell differentiation in embryos and larvae. Their toxic influence is accompanied by disturbances of protein synthesis and the disruptions of cytoskeleton in the course of zygote cleavage and larval development. Unlike P. aeruginosa, the strains of P. fluorescens and Ruegeria sp. did not exert the toxic effect on SET. The obtained data allow considering objects of the environment as the natural reservoir of opportunistic microorganisms posing a potential threat to human, whereas the use of SET for determination of toxicity of isolated bacteria provides an opportunity to study the mechanisms of their interactions with organisms in marine ecosystems. PMID:25728358

  7. Sediment-contact fish embryo toxicity assay with Danio rerio to assess particle-bound pollutants in the Tietê River Basin (São Paulo, Brazil).

    PubMed

    Rocha, Paula Suares; Bernecker, Conny; Strecker, Ruben; Mariani, Carolina Fiorillo; Pompêo, Marcelo Luiz Martins; Storch, Volker; Hollert, Henner; Braunbeck, Thomas

    2011-10-01

    The Tietê River and its tributary Pinheiros River receive a highly complex organic and inorganic pollutants load from sanitary sewage and industrial sources, as well as agricultural and agroindustrial activities. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the embryotoxic and teratogenic effects of sediments from selected locations in the Tietê River Basin by means of the sediment contact embryo toxicity assay with Danio rerio, in order to provide a comprehensive and realistic insight into the bioavailable hazard potential of these sediment samples. Lethal and sub-lethal effects were recorded, and high embryo toxicity could be found in the samples not only in the vicinity of the megacity São Paulo (Billings reservoir and Pinheiros River samples), but also downstream (in the reservoirs Barra Bonita, Promissão and Três Irmãos). Results confirm that most toxicity is due to the discharges of the metropolitan area of São Paulo. However, they also indicate additional sources of pollutants along the river course, probably from industrial, agricultural and agroindustrial residues, which contribute to the degradation of each area. The sediment contact fish embryo test showed to be powerful tool to detect embryo toxicity in sediments, not only by being a sensitive method, but also for taking into account bioavailability. This test provides an ecological highly realistic and relevant exposure scenario, and should therefore be added in ecotoxicological sediment quality assessments. PMID:21802730

  8. Taxifolin mitigates oxidative DNA damage in vitro and protects zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos against cadmium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Manigandan, Krishnan; Jayaraj, Richard L; Jagatheesh, Kaliaperumal; Elangovan, Namasivayam

    2015-05-01

    Taxifolin (TAX) is a natural source of bioflavonoid found in various conifers. In this study, initially we investigated the antioxidant potential of TAX under in vitro assays such as 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), ferric-ion reducing power (FRAP) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The activities of DPPH, ABTS, FRAP and OH radical levels were significantly inhibited by TAX with an IC50 values of 16.48, 66.34, 18.17 and 11.42?g/ml, respectively. Secondly, TAX exhibited a strong protection against OH mediated DNA damage on pUC19 plasmid DNA at 1.0?g/ml. Finally, we evaluated the protective mechanism of TAX against cadmium intoxicated zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio). We found that embryos exposed to 100?M Cd exhibited significantly reduced survival, delayed hatching and phenotypic abnormalities at 24, 48, 72 and 96hours post fertilization (hpf). Similarly, Cd intoxicated embryos showed significantly increased cardiac function (131beats/min) at 60hpf. Conversely, treatment with TAX (0.1, 1.0 and 10?M) significantly enhanced the antioxidant enzyme levels (SOD, CAT, GPx and GR) by reducing the lipid peroxidation (MDA) in zebrafish embryos. Collectively, our results concluded that TAX could act as a potent redox scavenger against oxidative DNA damage and also functions as a crucial suppressor of Cd toxicity in zebrafish embryos. PMID:26002187

  9. Acute Toxic Effects of the Herbicide Formulation Focus(®) Ultra on Embryos and Larvae of the Moroccan Painted Frog, Discoglossus scovazzi.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Norman; Lötters, Stefan; Veith, Michael; Viertel, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    For regulatory and scientific purposes, there is a need to understand the sensitivity of a wider variety of wild species of amphibians and the sensitivities within their life stages to chemicals of widespread use such as herbicides. We investigated the acute toxic effects of the herbicide formulation Focus Ultra [with the active ingredient (a.i.) cycloxydim plus solvent naphtha and sodium dioctylsulphosuccinate as added substances] on embryos and early stage larvae of the Moroccan painted frog (Discoglossus scovazzi). Different clinical signs (twitching, convulsion, and narcosis) occurred at 40 and 80 mg/L in embryos (4 and 8 mg a.i./L) and narcotic effects (total immobilization or irregular escape responses) at 10, 15, and 20 mg/L in larvae (1, 1.5, and 2 mg a.i./L). Growth inhibition (total length), starting at 20 mg/L in embryos and 2.5 mg/L in larvae (2 and 0.25 mg a.i./L, respectively) was understood as sign of toxicity (retardation) and not as sign of teratogenicity. However, the connection to teratogenesis remained unclear though total length reduction occurred at concentrations <20 % of the 96-h LC50 value and at a minimum concentration that inhibits growth of only 17 % of the 96-h LC50 value. Starting at 20 mg/L, mortality in embryos significantly increased and at 15 mg/L in early larvae (2 and 1.5 mg a.i./L, respectively). Mortality of larvae was enhanced during the first 24 h of exposure to 15 and 20 mg/L (1.5 and 2 mg a.i./L). Morphology of the embryos remained unobtrusive. In contrary, axial malformations significantly increased in the early larvae starting at 10 mg/L (1 mg a.i./L), a concentration free of lethal effects. In all considered end points, larvae were significantly more sensitive than embryos, probably because of developmental and physiological properties or different exposure and bioavailability of the compound. Focus Ultra induced comparable lethal and immobilization effects in D. scovazzi as it does to standard test organisms in pesticide approval. However, to validate the apparent safety in the field, which is based on calculated surface water concentrations of the a.i., more data on real contamination levels is necessary (e.g., peak concentrations, concentrations of added substances). Furthermore, sufficient buffer strips between the farmland and amphibian ponds must be considered, and the effects of the substance on terrestrial life stages have not been assessed yet. PMID:26118991

  10. Toxicity to embryo and adult zebrafish of copper complexes with two malonic acids as models for dissolved organic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, F.B.; Evans, C.W.; Butler, C.A.; Timperley, M.H.

    1998-08-01

    The toxicity to embryo and adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) of Cu complexes with two substituted malonic acids, benzyl- and n-hexadecyl-, chosen as models for low-molecular-weight natural dissolved organic matter, were investigated. Toxicity test solutions at pH 6.5 {+-} 0.1 with the required Cu ion-specific electrode. In the absence of malonic acids, concentrations of Cu{sup 2+} up to 1.13 {mu}mol/L increased the embryo hatching time from approx. 2 d in control solutions (no Cu or malonic acid) and solutions containing malonic acids without Cu to approx. 8 d. The Cu-benzylmalonic acid complex in the presence of inorganic Cu species did not delay hatching beyond that attributable to Cu{sup 2+}. In contrast, 0.60 {mu}mol/L Cu-n-hexadecylmalonic complexes delayed hatching by 5.5 d in excess of that attributable to 1.13 {mu}mol/L Cu{sup 2+}, assuming that the hatching delays caused by the different Cu species were additive, possibly because of Cu entry into the embryo as the lipophilic Cu-n-hexadecylmalonic complex. None of the Cu-malonic acid complexes was acutely toxic to adult zebrafish at concentrations up to 1.4 {mu}mol/L, possibly because Cu was removed from the Cu-malonic acid complexes by stronger chelating groups at the gill surface. Substituted malonic acids with similar proton and Cu association constants can be readily prepared with a variety of simple substituents, radiolabeled if required. Their results show that these acids could be useful ligands for investigating intracellular transport and metabolism of metal-organic complexes.

  11. Is UV radiation changing the toxicity of compounds to zebrafish embryos?

    PubMed

    Almeida, Ana Rita; Andrade, Thayres S; Burkina, Viktoriia; Fedorova, Ganna; Loureiro, Susana; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Domingues, Inês

    2015-12-01

    At ecosystems level, environmental parameters such as temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen concentration and intensity of UV radiation (UVR) have an important role on the efficiency of organisms' physiological and behavioral performances and consequently on the capacity of response to contaminants. Insignificant alterations of these parameters may compromise this response. In addition, these parameters can additionally alter chemical compounds by inducing their degradation, producing thereafter other metabolites. Understanding the combined effects of chemicals and environmental parameters is absolutely necessary for an adequate prediction of risk in aquatic environments. According to this scenario, this work aims at studying the combined toxicity of UVR and three xenobiotics: the biocide triclosan (TCS), the metal chromium (as potassium dichromate, PD) and the fungicide prochloraz (PCZ). To achieve this goal zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos (3h post fertilization (hpf)) were exposed to several concentrations of each chemical combined with different UV intensities; mortality and eggs were recorded every 24h for the all test duration (96h). Results showed different response patterns depending on the toxicant, stress levels and duration of exposure. The combination of UVR and TCS indicated a dose ratio deviation where synergism was observed when UVR was the dominant stressor (day 2). The combination of UVR and PD presented a dose level dependency at day 3 indicating antagonism at low stress levels, changing with time where at day 4, a dose ratio deviation showed statistically that synergism occurred at higher PD concentrations. Finally, UVR combined with PCZ indicated a dose ratio at day 3 and dose level deviation at day 4 of exposure, suggesting a synergistic response when PCZ is the dominant stressor in the combination. The obtained results in this study highlighted the importance of taking into account the possible interaction of stressors and time of exposure to better predict environmental risk. PMID:26232041

  12. Comparative study of non-invasive methods for assessing Daphnia magna embryo toxicity.

    PubMed

    Stensberg, Matthew C; Zeitchek, Michael Anthony; Inn, Kul; McLamore, Eric S; Porterfield, D Marshall; Sepúlveda, Maria S

    2014-09-01

    Embryos, unlike adults, are typically sessile, which allows for an increase in the available metrics that can be used to assess chemical toxicity. We investigate Daphnia magna development rate and oxygen consumption as toxicity metrics and compare them to arrested embryo development using four different techniques with potassium cyanide (KCN) as a common toxicant. The EC50 (95 % CI) for arrested development was 2,535 (1,747-3,677) ?g/L KCN. Using pixel intensity changes, recorded with difference imaging, we semi-quantitatively assessed a decrease in development rate at 200 ?g/L KCN, threefold lower than the arrested development lowest observed effect concentration (LOEC). Respirometry and self-referencing (SR) microsensors were two unique techniques used to assess oxygen consumption. Using respirometry, an increase in oxygen consumption was found in the 5 ?g/L KCN treatment and a decrease for 148 ?g/L, but no change was found for the 78 ?g/L KCN treatment. Whereas, with SR microsensors, we were able to detect significant changes in oxygen consumption for all three treatments: 5, 78, and 148 ?g/L KCN. While SR offered the highest sensitivity, the respirometry platform developed for this study was much easier to use to measure the same endpoint. Oxygen consumption may be subject to change during the development process, meaning consumption assessment techniques may only be useful only for short-term experiments. Development rate was a more sensitive endpoint though was only reliable four of the six embryonic developmental stages examined. Despite being the least sensitive endpoint, arrested embryo development was the only technique capable of assessing the embryos throughout all developmental stages. In conclusion, each metric has advantages and limitations, but because all are non-invasive, it is possible to use any combination of the three. PMID:24888613

  13. Opportunities for embryo transfer in the age of DNA testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Embryo transfer (ET) has contributed to increasing selection intensity in cattle breeding for many years. Preimplantation DNA testing offers the opportunity to increase selection response further through increasing within-family selection intensity. Further increases in between-family selection inte...

  14. Embryo toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin to the wood duck (Aix sponsa)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Augspurger, T.P.; Tillitt, D.E.; Bursian, S.J.; Fitzgerald, S.D.; Hinton, D.E.; Di Giulio, R.T.

    2008-01-01

    We examined the sensitivity of the wood duck (Aix sponsa) embryo to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) by injecting the toxicant into their eggs. Six groups of wood duck eggs (n = 35 to 211 per trial) were injected with 0 to 4600 pg TCDD/g egg between 2003 and 2005. Injections were made into yolk prior to incubation, and eggs were subsequently incubated and assessed weekly for mortality. Significant TCDD-induced mortality was not observed through day 25 (90% of incubation). Liver, heart, eye, and brain histology were generally unremarkable. Hepatic ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity, a biomarker of dioxin-like compound exposure, was induced by 12-fold in the 4600 pg/g treatment relative to controls. The median lethal dose for chicken (Gallus domesticus) eggs we dosed identically to wood duck eggs was about 100 pg/g, similar to other assessments of chickens. Among dioxin-like compound embryo lethality data for 15 avian genera, the wood duck 4600 pg/g no-observed-effect level ranks near the middle. Because no higher doses were tested, wood ducks may be like other waterfowl (order Anseriformes), which are comparatively tolerant to embryo mortality from polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans when exposed by egg injection. ?? 2008 US Government.

  15. Amphibian embryos as a biological test for environmental pollutants in leachates, industrial effluents, surface and ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Herkovits, J.; Perez-Coll, C.S.; Herkovits, F.D.; Tarlato, M.

    1995-12-31

    Test of early life stages are very sensitive to toxic effects and moreover a good predictive correlation between embryo-larval survival and independent ecological parameters such as species richness and diversity have been established. The main purpose of this preliminary study is to report that Bufo arenarum embryos are very sensitive to contaminants from a variety of sources such as leachates, industrial effluents, surface and ground water. The toxicity of 30 samples (five from each category plus controls of surface and ground water from reference places) was evaluated during a 14 day renewal toxicity test at 20 C, conducted with 10 embryos (by triplicate) from stage 23--25 onwards using six concentrations (V/V) of each sample of Holtfreter`s solution. For industrial effluents and leachates the results range from a concentration of 0.6% resulting in 24hs LC100 up to a sample which exert 20% of lethality after 14 days of treatment. The survival of controls and in samples from reference places was over 90% for 7 days and over 80% for 14 days. The results with Bufo arenarum embryos confirm that a 7 day Short-term Chronic Toxicity Test is appropriate for toxicity screening of industrial effluents (as it was established by EPA for whole effluent toxicity test for aquatic life protection performed with other species) as well as for leachates. On the other hand, for freshwater (surface and ground), it is convenient to extend the exposure period until 14 days in order to record situations of low, but significant levels of toxicity, which could be of particular value for surface as well as ground water quality criteria.

  16. Stage-dependent toxicity of bisphenol a on Rhinella arenarum (anura, bufonidae) embryos and larvae.

    PubMed

    Wolkowicz, Ianina R Hutler; Herkovits, Jorge; Pérez Coll, Cristina S

    2014-02-01

    The acute and chronic toxicity of bisphenol A (BPA) was evaluated on the common South American toad Rhinella arenarum embryos and larvae by means of continuous and pulse exposure treatments. Embryos were treated continuously from early blastula (S.4) up to complete operculum (S.25), during early larval stages and by means of 24 h pulse exposures of BPA in concentrations ranging between 1.25 and 40 mg L(-1) , in order to evaluate the susceptibility to this compound in different developmental stages. For lethal effects, S.25 was the most sensitive and gastrula was the most resistant to BPA. The Teratogenic Index for neurula, the most sensitive embryonic stage for sublethal effects was 4.7. The main morphological alterations during early stages were: delayed or arrested development, reduced body size, persistent yolk plug, microcephaly, axial/tail flexures, edemas, blisters, waving fin, underdeveloped gills, mouth malformations, and cellular dissociation. BPA caused a remarkable narcotic effect from gill circulation stage (S.20) onwards in all the organisms exposed after 3 h of treatment with 10 mg L(-1) BPA. After recovering, the embryos exhibited scarce response to stimuli, erratic or circular swimming, and spasmodic contractions from 5 mg L(-1) onwards. Our results highlight the lethal and sublethal effectsof BPA on R. arenarum embryos and larvae, in the last case both at structural and functional levels. PMID:22052622

  17. Use of toxicogenomics to predict the potential toxic effect of Benzo(a)pyrene on zebrafish embryos: ocular developmental toxicity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lixing; Zuo, Zhenghong; Zhang, Youyu; Wu, Meifang; Lin, Jackie Jin; Wang, Chonggang

    2014-08-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is a representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), which is ubiquitous in the environment. The toxic effects of BaP on fish embryos have been described in detail, but some potentially toxic effects of BaP might have been neglected owing to the limitations of traditional techniques. In the present research, global transcriptional patterns were used to study the potentially toxic effects of BaP, as well as its underlying toxicological mechanisms. The expression levels of multiple genes were significantly changed by BaP exposure. The results of ontology assignments and cluster analysis showed that BaP could affect the processes of photoreceptor maintenance and phototransduction. We also conducted an experiment on phototactic response and found that larvae exposed to BaP displayed a decreasing response to light. In addition, BaP exposure decreased the cellular density of the ganglion cell layer (GCL) significantly. These results suggested that BaP exposure induced visual system developmental defects and dysfunction by perturbation of photoreceptor development related genes. Our results were helpful for an understanding of the toxicity of BaP. This study also indicated that microarray analysis was effective for predicting the potential toxicity of chemicals with high sensitivity and accuracy. PMID:24875912

  18. Toxicity of dissolved Cu, Zn, Ni and Cd to developing embryos of the blue mussel (Mytilus trossolus) and the protective effect of dissolved organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Nadella, Sunita R; Fitzpatrick, John L; Franklin, Natasha; Bucking, Carol; Smith, Scott; Wood, Chris M

    2009-04-01

    Marine water quality criteria for metals are largely driven by the extremely sensitive embryo-larval toxicity of Mytilus sp. Here we assess the toxicity of four dissolved metals (Cu, Zn, Ni, Cd) in the mussel Mytilus trossolus, at various salinity levels while also examining the modifying effects of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on metal toxicity. In 48 h embryo development tests in natural seawater, measured EC50 values were 6.9-9.6 microg L(-1) (95% C.I.=5.5-10.8 microg L(-1)) for Cu, 99 microg L(-1) (86-101) for Zn, 150 microg L(-1) (73-156) for Ni, and 502 microg L(-1) (364-847) for Cd. A salinity threshold of >20 ppt (approximately 60% full strength seawater) was required for normal control development. Salinity in the 60-100% range did not alter Cu toxicity. Experimental addition of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from three sources reduced Cu toxicity; for example the EC50 of embryos developing in seawater with 20 mg C L(-1) was 39 microg Cu L(-1) (35.2-47.2) a 4-fold increase in Cu EC50. The protective effects of DOC were influenced by their distinct physicochemical properties. Protection appears to be related to higher fulvic acid and lower humic acid content as operationally defined by fluorescence spectroscopy. The fact that DOC from freshwater sources provides protection against Cu toxicity in seawater suggests that extrapolation from freshwater toxicity testing may be possible for saltwater criteria development, including development of a saltwater Biotic Ligand Model for prediction of Cu toxicity. PMID:18832046

  19. Nanosilver-coated socks and their toxicity to zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiejun; Sepúlveda, Maria S; Klinkhamer, Christopher; Wei, Alexander; Gao, Yu; Mahapatra, Cecon T

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are being incorporated and are known to be released from various consumer products such as textiles. However, no data are available on the toxicity of AgNPs released from any of these commercial products. In this study, we quantified total silver released from socks into wash water by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and determined the presence of AgNPs using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We then exposed zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos for 72 h to either this leachate ("sock-AgNP") or to the centrifugate ("spun-AgNP") free of AgNPs and compared their toxicity to that of ionic silver (Ag(+)). Our data suggest that AgNPs do get released into the wash water, and centrifugation eliminated AgNPs but did not decrease total silver concentrations, indicating that most of the silver in the sock-AgNP solution was in the ionic form. All embryos died during the first 24 h when exposed to undiluted sock-AgNP and spun-AgNP solutions resulting in significantly lower LC50 values (0.14 and 0.26 mg L(-1)) compared to AgNO3 (0.80 mg L(-1)). Similarly, at 72 hpf, both sock-derived solutions were more potent at affecting hatching and inducing abnormal development. These results suggest that both sock-AgNP and spun-AgNP solutions were more toxic than AgNO3. Previous studies have consistently shown the opposite, i.e., AgNPs are about 10 times less toxic that Ag(+). All together our results show that the high toxicity induced by the leachate of these socks is likely not caused by AgNPs or Ag(+). More studies are needed to evaluate the toxicity of the myriad of AgNP-coated commercial products that are now estimated to be close to 500. PMID:25303653

  20. Potential protective effect of L-cysteine against the toxicity of acrylamide and furan in exposed Xenopus laevis embryos: an interaction study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The embryo toxicities of two food-processing-induced toxic compounds, acrylamide and furan, with and without added L-cysteine were examined individually and in mixtures using the frog embryo teratogenesis assay-Xenopus (FETAX). The following measures of developmental toxicity were used (a) 96-h LC5...

  1. Developmental toxicity in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos after exposure to manufactured nanomaterials: buckminsterfullerene aggregates (nC60) and fullerol.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoshan; Zhu, Lin; Li, Yan; Duan, Zhenghua; Chen, Wei; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2007-05-01

    The present paper summarizes, to our knowledge, the first study regarding the developmental toxicity of stable buckminsterfullerene aggregates suspended in water (nC60) using zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a vertebrate model. Zebrafish embryo survival, hatching rate, heartbeat, and pericardial edema were noted and described within 96 h of exposure. Fullerol (a hydroxylated C60 derivative, C60(OH)16-18) at 50 mg/L did not exert toxicity to zebrafish embryos. In contrast, nC60 at 1.5 mg/L delayed zebrafish embryo and larval development, decreased survival and hatching rates, and caused pericardial edema. Toxicity was mitigated by adding an antioxidant (glutathione), which suggests that a free radical-induced mechanism or another form of oxidative stress played a role in developmental toxicity. PMID:17521145

  2. Triazole-induced toxicity in developing rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus) embryos.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bin; Liu, Lei; Gong, Yu-Xin; Ling, Fei; Wang, Gao-Xue

    2014-12-01

    Using rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus) at early-life stages as experimental models, the developmental toxicity of five widely used triazole fungicides (myclobutanil, fluconazole, flusilazole, triflumizole, and epoxiconazole) were investigated following exposure to 1-15 mg/L for 72 h. Meanwhile, morphological parameters (body length, body weight, and heart rate), enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione S-transferase (GST), adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), and acetyl cholinesterase (AChE)), and mRNA levels (hsp70, mstn, mt, apaf1, vezf1, and cyp1a) were also recorded following exposure to 0.2, 1.0, and 5.0 mg/L for 72 h. Results indicated that increased malformation and mortality, decreased body length, body weight, and heart rate provide a concentration-dependent pattern; values of 72 h LC50 (median lethal concentration) and EC50 (median effective concentration) ranged from 3 to 12 mg/L. Most importantly, the results of the present study suggest that even at the lowest concentration, 0.2 mg/L, five triazole fungicides also caused notable changes in enzyme activities and mRNA levels. Overall, the present study points out that those five triazole fungicides are highly toxic to the early development of G. rarus embryos. The information presented in this study will be helpful in better understanding the toxicity induced by triazole fungicides in fish embryos. PMID:25028328

  3. Assessment of trifloxystrobin uptake kinetics, developmental toxicity and mRNA expression in rare minnow embryos.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bin; Liu, Guang-Lu; Liu, Lei; Ling, Fei; Wang, Gao-Xue

    2015-02-01

    Trifloxystrobin (TFS) is the widely used strobilurin fungicide. However, little information is so far available regarding the uptake kinetics and developmental toxicity of TFS to fish. The present study was conducted to investigate the uptake kinetics, potential environment risk and toxicity of TFS on Gobiocypris rarus embryos. Results revealed that increased malformation, decreased body length and heart rate, affected spontaneous movement and swimming speed provide a gradual concentration-dependent manner; values of 144 h LC50 (median lethal concentration) and EC50 (median effective concentration) were 1.11 and 0.86 ?g L(-1). Continuous exposure to TFS resulted in a steady accumulation with no evidence of elimination. Enzyme activities were significantly changed; reactive oxygen species and DNA damage were significantly induced after TFS treatment. Certain genes related to cell apoptosis (p53), metabolism (cyp1a), stress response (hsp70) and blood vessels (vezf1) development were all significantly up-regulated. This is the first study to define uptake kinetics and to focus on behavioral consequences, physiological changes and mRNA expression following TFS exposure in the early life stages of fish. Our results suggest that TFS is highly toxic to fish embryos. PMID:25240160

  4. Joint toxicity of permethrin and cypermethrin at sublethal concentrations to the embryo-larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ye; Ma, Huihui; Zhou, Jinghua; Liu, Jing; Liu, Weiping

    2014-02-01

    Pyrethroids, the widely used pesticides, are highly toxic to aquatic organisms. However, little information is so far available regarding the joint toxicity of type I and type II pyrethroids to fish. Zebrafish is a well-accepted aquatic vertebrate model for toxicity assessment due to small size, easy husbandry, high fecundity and transparent embryos. In this study, we utilized embryo-larval zebrafish to elucidate the combined effects of sublethal concentrations of permethrin (PM) and cypermethrin (CP), which are the most frequently used type I and type II pyrethroids, respectively. Fish were exposed from 3h postfertilization (hpf) to 144 hpf to binary mixtures of nominal concentrations of 100, 200, 300?gL(-1) PM (PM100, PM200, PM300) and 10, 20, 30?gL(-1) CP (CP10, CP20, CP30). Analytical data of the real concentrations of the chemicals showed a significant degradation of the pyrethroids but an obvious recovery after the renewal of the exposure solution. Defect rates of embryos exposed to these low concentrations of single PM or CP exhibited no statistically significant difference from the control,while the application of combination of PM and CP resulted in deleterious effects on zebrafish embryonic development. In all PM200 and PM300 exposure groups, increasing CP concentrations acted additively to the action of PM in terms of all sublethal endpoints. Co-treatment of embryos with the specific sodium channel blocker MS-222 and pyrethroids (individuals or the mixture) caused a decline in the incidences of body axis curvature and spasms compared to treatment of animals with pyrethroids alone, suggesting that the developmental toxicity of PM and CP to zebrafish was related to disruption of ion channels. We further revealed that mixture of the two pyrethroids caused greater down-regulation in the mRNA levels of proneural genes. The individual pesticides had no effect on the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), while the mixture exposure caused significant induction. Treatment with CP or the mixture increased the activity of catalase (CAT). Taken together, our data indicated that the mixture of PM and CP caused higher incidence of morphological defects, greater inhibition in proneural gene expression and more oxidative stress, compared to the single chemical at the corresponding doses. Our findings suggest that the combination of type I and type II pyrethroids poses a greater risk to fish in the water column. PMID:24184047

  5. Toxicity, uptake kinetics and behavior assessment in zebrafish embryos following exposure to perfluorooctanesulphonicacid (PFOS)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haihua; Huang, Changjiang; Wang, Lijun; Ye, Xiaowei; Bai, Chenglian; Simonich, Michael T.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Dong, Qiaoxiang

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorooctanesulphonicacid (PFOS), a persistent organic contaminant, has been widely detected in the environment, wildlife and humans, but few studies have assessed its effect on aquatic organisms. The present study evaluated the effect of PFOS on zebrafish embryos. Zebrafish embryos exhibited bent spine and developmental toxicity after exposure to various PFOS concentrations (0.01-16.0 ?M) from 6 to 120 hour post-fertilization (hpf). The LC50 at 120 hpf was 4.39 ?M and the EC50 at 120 hpf was 2.23 ?M. PFOS induced apoptosis at 24 hpf was consistently located in the brain, eye, and tail region of embryos. PFOS elevated the basal rate of swimming after 4 days of exposure, and larvae exposed to PFOS (0.5-8.0?M) for only 1 h at 6 dpf swam faster with increasing PFOS concentration. Larvae exposed to 16.0 ?M PFOS for 24 h periods from 1 to 121 hpf showed the highest incidence of malformations in the 97-121 hpf window. Continuous exposure to PFOS from 1 to 121 hpf resulted in a steady accumulation with no evidence of elimination. Our results further the understanding of the health risks of PFOS to aquatic organisms and identify additional research needed on PFOS toxicology. PMID:20171748

  6. Living organisms influence on environmental conditions: pH modulation by amphibian embryos versus aluminum toxicity.

    PubMed

    Herkovits, Jorge; Castañaga, Luis Alberto; D'Eramo, José Luis; Jourani, Victoria Platonova

    2015-11-01

    The LC10, 50 and 90/24h of aluminum for Rhinella arenarum embryos at complete operculum stage were 0.55, 0.75 and 1mgAl(3+)/L respectively. Those values did not change significantly by expanding the exposure period till 168h. The aluminum toxicity was evaluated in different pH conditions by means of a citrate buffer resulting for instance, 1mgAl(3+)/L at pH 4, 4.1, 5 and 6 in 100%, 70%, 35% and 0% of lethality respectively. As an outstanding feature, the embryos changed the pH of the maintaining media both in the case of Al(3+) or citrate buffer treatments toward neutral. 10 embryos in 40mL of AMPHITOX solution were able to increase the pH from 4.2 to 7.05, a fact related with a metabolic shift resulting in an increase in nitrogen loss as ammonia. Our study point out the natural selection of the most resistant amphibian embryos both for pH or aluminum as well as the capacity of living organisms (as a population) to alter their chemical environment toward optimal conditions for their survival. As these facts occur at early life stages, it expand the concept that living organisms at ontogenic stages are biomarker of environmental signatures of the evolutionary process (Herkovits, 2006) to a global Onto-Evo concept which imply also the feedback mechanisms from living organisms to shape environmental conditions in a way that benefits them. PMID:26126231

  7. Toxicity and cardiac effects of carbaryl in early developing zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.C.; Hui, Michelle N.Y.; Cheng, S.H. E-mail: bhcheng@cityu.edu.hk

    2007-07-15

    Carbaryl, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, is known to be moderately toxic to adult zebrafish and has been reported to cause heart malformations and irregular heartbeat in medaka. We performed experiments to study the toxicity of carbaryl, specifically its effects on the heart, in early developing zebrafish embryos. LC50 and EC50 values for carbaryl at 28 h post-fertilization were 44.66 {mu}g/ml and 7.52 {mu}g/ml, respectively, and 10 {mu}g/ml carbaryl was used in subsequent experiments. After confirming acetylcholinesterase inhibition by carbaryl using an enzymatic method, we observed red blood cell accumulation, delayed hatching and pericardial edema, but not heart malformation as described in some previous reports. Our chronic exposure data also demonstrated carbaryl-induced bradycardia, which is a common effect of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors due to the accumulation of acetylcholine, in embryos from 1 day post-fertilization (dpf) to 5 dpf. The distance between the sinus venosus, the point where blood enters the atrium, and the bulbus arteriosus, the point where blood leaves the ventricle, indicated normal looping of the heart tube. Immunostaining of myosin heavy chains with the ventricle-specific antibody MF20 and the atrium-specific antibody S46 showed normal development of heart chambers. At the same time, acute exposure resulted in carbaryl-induced bradycardia. Heart rate dropped significantly after a 10-min exposure to 100 {mu}g/ml carbaryl but recovered when carbaryl was removed. The novel observation of carbaryl-induced bradycardia in 1- and 2-dpf embryos suggested that carbaryl affected cardiac function possibly through an alternative mechanism other than acetylcholinesterase inhibition such as inhibition of calcium ion channels, since acetylcholine receptors in zebrafish are not functional until 3 dpf. However, the exact nature of this mechanism is currently unknown, and thus further studies are required.

  8. BIOEQUIVALENCE APPROACH FOR WHOLE EFFLUENT TOXICITY TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased use of whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests in the regulatory arena has brought increased concern over the statistical analysis of WET test data and the determination of toxicity. One concern is the issue of statistical power. A number of WET tests may pass the current...

  9. Synthesis, physicochemical studies, embryos toxicity and DNA interaction of some new Iron(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H.; El-Khatib, Rafat M.; Nassr, Lobna A. E.; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M.

    2013-05-01

    New Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes derived from the condensation of o-hydroxynaphthaldehyde with L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-aspartic acid, L-histidine and L-arginine were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, electronic spectra, and conductance measurements. The stoichiometry and the stability constants of the complexes were determined spectrophotometrically. The investigated Schiff bases exhibited tridentate coordination mode with the general formulae [Fe(HL)2]·nH2O for all amino acids except L-histidine. But in case of L-histidine, the ligand acts as tetradentate ([FeL(H2O)2]·2H2O), where HL = mono anion and L = dianion of the ligand. The structure of the prepared complexes is suggested to be octahedral. The prepared complexes were tested for their toxicity on chick embryos and found to be safe until a concentration of 100 ?g/egg with full embryos formation. The interaction between CT-DNA and the investigated complexes were followed by spectrophotometry and viscosity measurements. It was found that, the prepared complexes bind to DNA via classical intercalative mode and showed a different DNA cleavage activity with the sequence: nhi > nari > nali > nasi > nphali. The thermodynamic Profile of the binding of nphali complex and CT-DNA was constructed by analyzing the experimental data of absorption titration and UV melting studies with the McGhee equation, van't Hoff's equation, and the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation.

  10. 9 CFR 113.37 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... embryo inoculation test. 113.37 Section 113.37 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.37 Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo...-serum mixture shall be inoculated into each of at least 20 fully susceptible chicken embryos. (1)...

  11. 9 CFR 113.37 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... embryo inoculation test. 113.37 Section 113.37 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.37 Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo...-serum mixture shall be inoculated into each of at least 20 fully susceptible chicken embryos. (1)...

  12. 9 CFR 113.37 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... embryo inoculation test. 113.37 Section 113.37 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.37 Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo...-serum mixture shall be inoculated into each of at least 20 fully susceptible chicken embryos. (1)...

  13. 9 CFR 113.37 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... embryo inoculation test. 113.37 Section 113.37 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.37 Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo...-serum mixture shall be inoculated into each of at least 20 fully susceptible chicken embryos. (1)...

  14. 9 CFR 113.37 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... embryo inoculation test. 113.37 Section 113.37 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.37 Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo...-serum mixture shall be inoculated into each of at least 20 fully susceptible chicken embryos. (1)...

  15. METHOD FOR EARLY LIFE-STAGE TOXICITY TESTS USING THREE ATHERINID FISHES AND RESULTS WITH CHLORPYRIFOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The authors have developed methods for obtaining embryos and conducting early life-stage toxicity tests (continuous exposure from the embryonic stage to approximately three weeks or more into the exogenous feeding stage) with three estuarine species of atherinid fishes. Early lif...

  16. EARLY LIFE-STAGE TOXICITY TEST METHODS FOR GULF TOADFISH, 'OPSANUS BETA', AND RESULTS USING CHLORPYRIFOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta) were continuously exposed as embryos, sac fry and juveniles to technical chlorpyrifos in two 49-day early life-stage toxicity tests. Survival was significantly (alpha = 0.05) reduced only in 150 micrograms/l). However, toadfish exposed to chlorpyrifos...

  17. In Vivo Quantitative Study of Sized-Dependent Transport and Toxicity of Single Silver Nanoparticles Using Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kerry J.; Browning, Lauren M.; Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Desai, Tanvi; Cherukui, Pavan K.; Xu, Xiao-Hong Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess distinctive physicochemical properties (e.g., small sizes, high surface area-to-volume ratios) and promise a wide variety of applications, ranging from design of high quality consumer products to effective disease diagnosis and therapy. These properties can lead to toxic effects, potentially hindering advance in nanotechnology. In this study, we have synthesized and characterized purified and stable (non-aggregation) silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs, 41.6±9.1 nm in average diameters), and utilized early-developing (cleavage-stage) zebrafish embryos (critical aquatic and eco- species) as in vivo model organisms to probe diffusion and toxicity of Ag NPs. We found that single Ag NPs (30–72 nm diameters) passively diffused into the embryos through chorionic pores via random Brownian motion and stayed inside the embryos throughout their entire development (120 hours-post-fertilization, hpf). Dose and size dependent toxic effects of the NPs on embryonic development were observed, showing the possibility of tuning biocompatibility and toxicity of the NPs. At lower concentrations of the NPs (? 0.02 nM), 75–91% of embryos developed to normal zebrafish. At the higher concentrations of NPs (? 0.20 nM), 100% of embryos became dead. At the concentrations in between (0.02–0.2 nM), embryos developed to various deformed zebrafish. Number and sizes of individual Ag NPs embedded in tissues of normal and deformed zebrafish at 120 hpf were quantitatively analyzed, showing deformed zebrafish with higher number of larger NPs than normal zebrafish, and size-dependent nanotoxicity. By comparing with our previous studies of smaller Ag NPs (11.6±3.5 nm), the results further demonstrate striking size-dependent nanotoxicity that, at the same molar concentration, the larger Ag NPs (41.6±9.1 nm) are more toxic than the smaller Ag NPs (11.6±3.5 nm). PMID:22486336

  18. POREWATER TOXICITY TESTING: AN OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediments act as sinks for contaminants, where they may build up to toxic levels. Sediments containing toxic levels of contaminants pose a risk to aquatic life, human health, and wildlife. There is an overwhelming amount of evidence that demonstrates chemicals in sediments are re...

  19. Acute toxicity and sublethal effects of the mixture glyphosate (Roundup Active) and Cosmo-Flux 411F to anuran embryos and tadpoles of four Colombian species.

    PubMed

    Henao Muñoz, Liliana Marcela; Montes Rojas, Claudia Marsela; Bernal Bautista, Manuel Hernando

    2015-03-01

    Glyphosate is the most widely used herbicide in the world with application in agriculture, forestry, industrial weed control, garden and aquatic environments. However, its use is highly controversial for the possible impact on not-target organisms, such as amphibians, which are vanishing at an alarming and rapid rate. Due to the high solubility in water and ionic nature, the glyphosate requires of surfactants to increase activity. In addition, for the control of coca (Erythroxylum coca) and agricultural weeds in Colombia, formulated glyphosate is mixed and sprayed with the adjuvant Cosmo-Flux 411F to increase the penetration and activity of the herbicide. This study evaluates the acute toxic and sublethal effects (embryonic development, tadpole body size, tadpole swimming performance) of the mixture of the formulated glyphosate Roundup Active and Cosmo-Flux 411F to anuran embryos and tadpoles of four Colombian species under 96h laboratory standard tests and microcosms, which are more similar to field conditions as they include soil, sand and macrophytes. In the laboratory, embryos and tadpoles of Engystomops pustulosus were the most tolerant (LC50 = 3904 microg a.e./L; LC50=2 799 pg a.e./L, respectively), while embryos and tadpoles of Hypsiboas crepitans (LC50=2 203 microg a.e./L; LC50=1424 microgg a.e./L, respectively) were the most sensitive. R. humboldti and R. marina presented an intermediate toxicity. Embryos were significantly more tolerant to the mixture than tadpoles, which could be likely attributed to the exclusion of chemicals by the embryonic membranes and the lack of organs, such as gills, which are sensitive to surfactants. Sublethal effects were observed for the tadpole body size, but not for the embryonic development and tadpole swimming performance. In microcosms, no toxicity (LC50 could not be estimated), or sublethal responses were observed at concentrations up to fourfold (14.76 kg glyphosate a.e./ha) the highest field application rate of 3.69 kg glyphosate a.e./ha. Thus, toxicity was less in the microcosms than in laboratory tests, which may be attributed to the presence of sediments and organic matter which rapidly adsorb glyphosate and surfactants such as POEA. It is concluded that the mixture of glyphosate (Roundup Active) and Cosmo-Flux*411F, as used in the field, has a negligible toxic effect to embryos and tadpoles of the species tested in this study. PMID:26299127

  20. INCREASING THE USEFULNESS OF ACUTE TOXICITY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The conceptually and practically simple acute toxicity test provides information that is useful in the protection of aquatic life from pollution. Standardization increases the usefulness of routine acute tests by increasing their quality and comparability and allowing the study o...

  1. Searching for biomarkers of developmental toxicity with microarrays: normal eye morphogenesis in rodent embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeth, Kimberly A.; Singh, Amar V.; Knudsen, Thomas B. . E-mail: thomas.knudsen@louisville.edu

    2005-08-07

    Gene expression arrays reveal the potential linkage of altered gene expression with specific adverse effects leading to disease phenotypes. But how closely do microarray data reflect early physiological or pharmacological measures that predict toxic event(s)? To explore this issue, we have undertaken experiments in early mouse embryos exposed to various teratogens during neurulation stages with the aim of correlating large-scale changes in gene expression across the critical period during exposure. This study reports some of the large-scale changes in gene expression that can be detected in the optic rudiment of the developing mouse and rat embryo across the window of development during which the eye is exceedingly sensitive to teratogen-induced micro-/anophthalmia. Microarray analysis was performed on RNA from the headfold or ocular region at the optic vesicle and optic cup stages when the ocular primordium is enriched for Pax-6, a master control gene for eye morphogenesis. Statistical selection of differentially regulated genes and various clustering techniques identified groups of genes in upward or downward trajectories in the normal optic primordium during early eye development in mouse and rat species. We identified 165 genes with significant differential expression during eye development, and a smaller subset of 58 genes that showed a tight correlation between mouse-rat development. Significantly over-represented functional categories included fatty acid metabolism (up-regulated) and glycolysis (down-regulated). From studies such as these that benchmark large-scale gene expression during normal embryonic development, we may be able to identify the panel of biomarkers that best correlate with species differences and the risks for developmental toxicity.

  2. Folic acid protects against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity by up-regulating the expression of Dvr1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Zhang, Chen; Gao, Xiao-Bo; Luo, Hai-Yan; Chen, Yang; Li, Hui-hua; Ma, Xu; Lu, Cai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    As a nutritional factor, folic acid can prevent cardiac and neural defects during embryo development. Our previous study showed that arsenic impairs embryo development by down-regulating Dvr1/GDF1 expression in zebrafish. Here, we investigated whether folic acid could protect against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity. We found that folic acid supplementation increases hatching and survival rates, decreases malformation rate and ameliorates abnormal cardiac and neural development of zebrafish embryos exposed to arsenite. Both real-time PCR analysis and whole in-mount hybridization showed that folic acid significantly rescued the decrease in Dvr1 expression caused by arsenite. Subsequently, our data demonstrated that arsenite significantly decreased cell viability and GDF1 mRNA and protein levels in HEK293ET cells, while folic acid reversed these effects. Folic acid attenuated the increase in subcellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and oxidative adaptor p66Shc protein expression in parallel with the changes in GDF1 expression and cell viability. P66Shc knockdown significantly inhibited the production of ROS and the down-regulation of GDF1 induced by arsenite. Our data demonstrated that folic acid supplementation protected against arsenic-mediated embryo toxicity by up-regulating the expression of Dvr1/GDF1, and folic acid enhanced the expression of GDF1 by decreasing p66Shc expression and subcellular ROS levels. PMID:26537450

  3. DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF COPPER CHLORIDE, METHYLENE CHLORIDE,AND 6-AMINONICOTINAMIDE TO EMBRYOS OF THE GRASS SHRIMPPALAEMONETES PUGIO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Embryos of estuarine grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio have demonstrated sensitivity to various solvents and petroleum products, indicating utility for evaluating estuarine contamination. Testing was performed to establish concentration-response curves for methylene chloride, cop...

  4. A comparison of standard acute toxicity tests with rapid-screening toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Toussaint, M.W.; Shedd, T.R.; Schalie, W.H. van der; Leather, G.R.

    1995-05-01

    This study compared the relative sensitivity of five inexpensive, rapid toxicity tests to the sensitivity of five standard aquatic acute toxicity tests through literature review and testing. The rapid toxicity tests utilized organisms that require little culturing or handling prior to testing: a freshwater rotifer (Branchionus calyciflorus); brine shrimp (Artemia salina); lettuce (Lactuca sativa); and two microbial tests (Photobacterium phosphoreum--Microtox{reg_sign} test, and a mixture of bacterial species--the Polytox{reg_sign} test). Standard acute toxicity test species included water fleas (Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia), green algae (Selenastrum capricornutum), fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), and mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia). Sensitivity comparisons between rapid and standard acute toxicity tests were based on LC50/EC50 data from 11 test chemicals. Individually, the lettuce and rotifer tests ranked most similar in sensitivity to the standard tests, while Microtox fell just outside the range of sensitivities represented by the group of standard acute toxicity tests. The brine shrimp and Polytox tests were one or more orders of magnitude different from the standard acute toxicity tests for most compounds. The lettuce, rotifer, and Microtox tests could be used as a battery for preliminary toxicity screening of chemicals. Further evaluation of complex real-world environmental samples is recommended.

  5. Comparison of standard acute toxicity tests with rapid-screening toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Toussaint, M.W.; Shedd, T.R.; VanDerSchal, W.H.; Leather, G.R.

    1995-10-01

    This study compared the relative sensitivity of five inexpensive, rapid toxicity tests to the sensitivity of five standard aquatic acute toxicity tests through literature review and testing. The rapid toxicity tests utilized organisms that require little culturing or handling prior to testing: a freshwater rotifer (Branchionus ccalyciflorus); brine shrimp (Artemia salina); lettuce (Lactuca sativa); and two microbial tests (Photo bacterium phosphoreum - Microtox test, and a mixture of bacterial species - the polytox test). Standard acute toxicity test species included water fleas (Daphnia magna and Ceriadaphnta dubia), green algae (Setenastrum capricarnutum), fathead minnows (Pimephalespromelas), and mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia). Sensitivity comparisons between rapid and standard acute toxicity tests were based on LC5O/EC50 data from 11 test chemicals. Individually, the lettuce and rotifer tests ranked most similar in sensitivity to the standard tests, while Microtox fell just outside the range of sensitivities represented by the group of standard acute toxicity tests. The brine shrimp and Polytox tests were one or more orders of magnitude different from the standard acute toxicity tests for most compounds. The lettuce, rotifer, and Microtox tests could be used as a battery for preliminary toxicity screening of chemicals. Further evaluation of complex real-world environmental samples is recommended.

  6. Automated Zebrafish Chorion Removal and Single Embryo Placement: Optimizing Throughput of Zebrafish Developmental Toxicity Screens

    PubMed Central

    Mandrell, David; Truong, Lisa; Jephson, Caleb; Sarker, Mushfiqur R.; Moore, Aaron; Lang, Christopher; Simonich, Michael T.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    The potential of the developing zebrafish model for toxicology and drug discovery is limited by inefficient approaches to manipulating and chemically exposing zebrafish embryos—namely, manual placement of embryos into 96- or 384-well plates and exposure of embryos while still in the chorion, a barrier of poorly characterized permeability enclosing the developing embryo. We report the automated dechorionation of 1600 embryos at once at 4 h postfertilization (hpf) and placement of the dechorionated embryos into 96-well plates for exposure by 6 hpf. The process removed ?95% of the embryos from their chorions with 2% embryo mortality by 24 hpf, and 2% of the embryos malformed at 120 hpf. The robotic embryo placement allocated 6-hpf embryos to 94.7% ± 4.2% of the wells in multiple 96-well trials. The rate of embryo mortality was 2.8% (43 of 1536) from robotic handling, the rate of missed wells was 1.2% (18 of 1536), and the frequency of multipicks was <0.1%. Embryo malformations observed at 24 hpf occurred nearly twice as frequently from robotic handling (16 of 864; 1.9%) as from manual pipetting (9 of 864; 1%). There was no statistical difference between the success of performing the embryo placement robotically or manually. PMID:22357610

  7. Toxicity of scorpion venom in chick embryo and mealworm assay depending on the use of the soluble fraction versus the whole venom.

    PubMed

    van der Valk, Tom; van der Meijden, Arie

    2014-09-01

    The LD50 is an important metric for venom studies and antivenom development. It has been shown that several variables in the protocol influence the LD50 value obtained, such as venom source, extraction and treatment and administration route. These inconsistencies reduce the utility of the results of these test for comparative studies. In scorpion venom LD50 assays, often only the soluble fraction of the venom is used, whereas other studies use the whole venom. We here tested the toxicity of the soluble fraction in isolation, and of the whole venom in two different systems: chick embryos and mealworms Tenebrio molitor. Ten microliters of venom solutions from Hadrurus arizonensis, Leiurus quinquestriatus, Androctonus australis, Grosphus grandidieri and Heterometrus laoticus were applied to five day old chicken embryos at stage 25-27. Our results showed no significant differences between the LD50 based on the whole venom versus that of only the soluble fraction and in the chicken embryo assay in four of the five scorpion species tested. H. laoticus however, showed a significantly lower LD50 value for the whole venom than the soluble fraction. In assays on mealworms however, this pattern was not seen. Nonetheless, caution may be warranted when using LD50 values obtained from only the soluble fraction. The LD50 values of the five species in this study, based on the chicken embryo assay, showed good correlation with values from the literature based on mouse studies. This suggests that the chick embryo assay may be an economic alternative to rodent assays for scorpion LD50 studies. PMID:24951875

  8. Estimating the gasoline components and formulations toxicity to microalgae (Tetraselmis chuii) and oyster (Crassostrea rhizophorae) embryos: An approach to minimize environmental pollution risk

    SciTech Connect

    Paixao, J.F.; Nascimento, I.A. . E-mail: iracema@ftc.br; Pereira, S.A.; Leite, M.B.L.; Carvalho, G.C.; Silveira, J.S.C.; Reboucas, M.; Matias, G.R.A.; Rodrigues, I.L.P.

    2007-03-15

    Even though petrochemical contamination frequently occurs in the form of oil spills, it is thought that a greater danger to coastal habitats is posed by chronic petrochemical toxicity associated with urban run-off, in which gasoline water-soluble-fraction (WSF) plays an important role. The hypothesis of the entrepreneurs, who were associated to the scientists uncharged of this research, was that recycled petrochemical waste may provide different gasoline formulations, having different toxic properties; the correlation between the gasoline formulations and their components' toxicological effects might contribute to the reformulation of the products, in such a way that the gasoline generated could be less toxic and less harmful to the environment. The aim of this research was to determine the toxic effects of 14 different types of gasoline (formulated, in accordance with National Petroleum Agency standards, from petrochemical waste), on Tetraselmis chuii (microalgae culture) and Crassostrea rhizophorae (embryos). Microalgae and oyster embryos were exposed to different gasoline formulations water-soluble fractions (WSF) at a range of concentrations (0%, 4.6%, 10.0%, 22.0%, 46.0%, and 100%), for 96 and 24 h, respectively. The tests were carried out under controlled conditions. End-points have been CI50-96h (concentration causing 50% growth inhibition in microalgae cultures) and EC50-24h (concentration causing abnormalities on 50% of the exposed embryos). Through these procedures, gasoline formulations, which represent the lowest environmental risk, were selected. Bioassays carried out on the 8 different gasoline components aimed to correlate gasoline toxicity with the toxic potential of its components. The analysis of principal components showed that the C9DI, a mixture of aromatic hydrocarbons of 9 carbon atoms, had the highest level of toxic potential, followed by C9S (a mixture of aromatics with 9-11 carbon atoms) and heavy naphtha. The results showed gasoline formulations 1-4 (monoaromatic hydrocarbons being the most conspicuous components) to be the least toxic, whilst formulations 12-14 (having higher content of C9DI, C9S and naphtha) were found to be the most harmful to organisms. This study led to the identification of the most toxic WSF gasoline components (C9DI and C9S), and to the possibility of developing more eco-compatible gasoline formulations.

  9. Developmental toxicity, acute toxicity and mutagenicity testing in freshwater snails Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca: Gastropoda) exposed to chromium and water samples.

    PubMed

    Tallarico, Lenita de Freitas; Borrely, Sueli Ivone; Hamada, Natália; Grazeffe, Vanessa Siqueira; Ohlweiler, Fernanda Pires; Okazaki, Kayo; Granatelli, Amanda Tosatte; Pereira, Ivana Wuo; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Bragança; Nakano, Eliana

    2014-12-01

    A protocol combining acute toxicity, developmental toxicity and mutagenicity analysis in freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata for application in ecotoxicological studies is described. For acute toxicity testing, LC50 and EC50 values were determined; dominant lethal mutations induction was the endpoint for mutagenicity analysis. Reference toxicant potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7) was used to characterize B. glabrata sensitivity for toxicity and cyclophosphamide to mutagenicity testing purposes. Compared to other relevant freshwater species, B. glabrata showed high sensitivity: the lowest EC50 value was obtained with embryos at veliger stage (5.76mg/L). To assess the model applicability for environmental studies, influent and effluent water samples from a wastewater treatment plant were evaluated. Gastropod sensitivity was assessed in comparison to the standardized bioassay with Daphnia similis exposed to the same water samples. Sampling sites identified as toxic to daphnids were also detected by snails, showing a qualitatively similar sensitivity suggesting that B. glabrata is a suitable test species for freshwater monitoring. Holding procedures and protocols implemented for toxicity and developmental bioassays showed to be in compliance with international standards for intra-laboratory precision. Thereby, we are proposing this system for application in ecotoxicological studies. PMID:25259848

  10. A high-throughput lab-on-a-chip interface for zebrafish embryo tests in drug discovery and ecotoxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Feng; Akagi, Jin; Hall, Chris J.; Crosier, Kathryn E.; Crosier, Philip S.; Delaage, Pierre; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2013-12-01

    Drug discovery screenings performed on zebrafish embryos mirror with a high level of accuracy. The tests usually performed on mammalian animal models, and the fish embryo toxicity assay (FET) is one of the most promising alternative approaches to acute ecotoxicity testing with adult fish. Notwithstanding this, conventional methods utilising 96-well microtiter plates and manual dispensing of fish embryos are very time-consuming. They rely on laborious and iterative manual pipetting that is a main source of analytical errors and low throughput. In this work, we present development of a miniaturised and high-throughput Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) platform for automation of FET assays. The 3D high-density LOC array was fabricated in poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) transparent thermoplastic using infrared laser micromachining while the off-chip interfaces were fabricated using additive manufacturing processes (FDM and SLA). The system's design facilitates rapid loading and immobilization of a large number of embryos in predefined clusters of traps during continuous microperfusion of drugs/toxins. It has been conceptually designed to seamlessly interface with both upright and inverted fluorescent imaging systems and also to directly interface with conventional microtiter plate readers that accept 96-well plates. We also present proof-of-concept interfacing with a high-speed imaging cytometer Plate RUNNER HD® capable of multispectral image acquisition with resolution of up to 8192 x 8192 pixels and depth of field of about 40 ?m. Furthermore, we developed a miniaturized and self-contained analytical device interfaced with a miniaturized USB microscope. This system modification is capable of performing rapid imaging of multiple embryos at a low resolution for drug toxicity analysis.

  11. MINIATURIZED SEDIMENT PROCEDURES FOR ASESSING TOXICITY USING MARINE AND FRESHWATER AMPHIPODS AND EMBRYO/LARVAL FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment toxicity tests are needed that can be conducted with less sediment volume and fewer organisms. Bench scale remediation techniques often produce less sediment than is required to perform the standardized sediment methods and the excess sediments that are generated present...

  12. Toxicity of petroleum crude oils and their effect on xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme activities in the chicken embryo in ovo

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Z.; O'Brien, P.J.; Payne, J.F.; Rahimtula, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    Microliter quantities of a Prudhoe Bay crude oil (PBCO) applied to the shell of fertile chick eggs during various stages of development induced cytochrome P-450 levels and mixed-function oxidase activities within the liver of the embryo. PBCO (5 ..mu..l) applied on Day 11 of incubation was found to maximally induce within 24 hr embryo hepatic cytochrome P-450 levels (fourfold), naphthalene hydroxylase (sixfold), benzo(a)pyrene 3-hyroxylase (14-fold), and 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (24-fold). Glutathione S-transferase was not induced. Crude oils are known to be highly toxic to avian embryos, especially during the early stages of development. The LD/sub 50/ of PBCO and Hibernia crude oil applied to the egg shell on Day 8 of incubation was found to be 1.3 and 2.2 ..mu..l, respectively. Mixed-function oxidase-dependent metabolism of crude oil components may be required for toxicity since administration of 20 ..mu..g of disulfiram in dioxane 1 hr prior to application of 1.3 ..mu..l of PBCO reduced embryo mortality from 60 to 20%.

  13. Assessing the toxicity of chemical compounds associated with land-based marine fish farms: the sea urchin embryo bioassay with Paracentrotus lividus and Arbacia lixula.

    PubMed

    Carballeira, C; De Orte, M R; Viana, I G; Delvalls, T A; Carballeira, A

    2012-08-01

    In aquaculture, disinfection of facilities, prevention of fish diseases, and stimulation of fish growth are priority goals and the most important sources of toxic substances to the environment, together with excretory products from fish. In the present study, embryos of two species of sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus and Arbacia lixula) were exposed to serial dilutions of six antibiotics (amoxicillin (AMOX), ampicillin, flumequine (FLU), oxytetracycline (OTC), streptomycin (ST), and sulfadiazine [SFD]) and two disinfectants (sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) and formaldehyde [CH(2)O]). Alterations in larval development were studied, and the effective concentrations (ECs) were calculated to evaluate the toxicity of the substances. Both species showed similar sensitivities to all substances tested. Disinfectants (EC(50) = 1.78 and 1.79 mg/l for CH(2)O; EC(50) = 10.15 and 11.1 mg/l for NaClO) were found to be more toxic than antibiotics. AMOX, OTC, and ST caused <20 % of alterations, even at the highest concentrations tested. FLU was the most toxic to P. lividus (EC(50) = 31.0 mg/l) and SFD to A. lixula (EC(50) = 12.7 mg/l). The sea urchin bioassay should be considered within toxicity assessment-monitoring plans because of the sensitivity of larvae to disinfectants. PMID:22562751

  14. New isocoumarins from a cold-adapted fungal strain mucor sp. and their developmental toxicity to zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chun-Chi; Chen, Guo-Dong; Zhao, Yan-Qiu; Xin, Sheng-Chang; Li, Song; Tang, Jin-Shan; Li, Xiao-Xia; Hu, Dan; Liu, Xing-Zhong; Gao, Hao

    2014-07-01

    Three new isocoumarin derivatives, mucorisocoumarins A-C (1-3, resp.), together with seven known compounds, 4-10, were isolated from the cold-adapted fungal strain Mucor sp. (No.?XJ07027-5). The structures of the new compounds were identified by detailed IR, MS, and 1D- and 2D-NMR analyses. It was noteworthy that compounds 1, 2, 4, and 5 were successfully resolved by chiral HPLC, indicating that 1-7 should exist as enantiomers. In an embryonic developmental toxicity assay using a zebrafish model, compound 3 produced developmental abnormalities in the zebrafish embryos. This is the first report of isocoumarins with developmental toxicity to zebrafish embryos. PMID:25044595

  15. The role of chemical speciation, chemical fractionation and calcium disruption in manganese-induced developmental toxicity in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos.

    PubMed

    Hernández, R B; Nishita, M I; Espósito, B P; Scholz, S; Michalke, B

    2015-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential nutrient that can be toxic in excess concentrations, especially during early development stages. The mechanisms of Mn toxicity is still unclear, and little information is available regarding the role of Mn speciation and fractionation in toxicology. We aimed to investigate the toxic effects of several chemical forms of Mn in embryos of Danio rerio exposed during different development stages, between 2 and 122h post fertilization. We found a stage-specific increase of lethality associated with hatching and removal of the chorion. Mn(II), ([Mn(H2O)6](2+)) appeared to be the most toxic species to embryos exposed for 48h, and Mn(II) citrate was most toxic to embryos exposed for 72 and/or 120h. Manganese toxicity was associated with calcium disruption, manganese speciation and metal fractionation, including bioaccumulation in tissue, granule fractions, organelles and denaturated proteins. PMID:26302931

  16. DMSO modifies the permeability of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) chorion-implications for the fish embryo test (FET).

    PubMed

    Kais, B; Schneider, K E; Keiter, S; Henn, K; Ackermann, C; Braunbeck, T

    2013-09-15

    Since 2007, when REACH came into force, the fish embryo test has received increasing attention as a potential alternative for the acute fish test. Due to its low toxicity and the ability to permeate biological membranes without significant damage to their structural integrity, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a commonly used solvent in the fish embryo test. Little is known, however, about the membrane penetration properties of DMSO, the impact of different concentrations of DMSO on the potential barrier function of the zebrafish chorion and on changes in the uptake of chemicals into the embryo. Therefore, in the present study, the fluorescent dyes fluorescein (mol wt 332; Pow 3.4) and 2,7-dichlorofluorescein (mol wt 401; Pow 4.7), both substances with limited water solubility, were used to visualize the uptake into the egg as well as the accumulation in the embryo of the zebrafish depending on different concentrations of DMSO. The distribution of fluorescein within the egg compartments varied with DMSO concentration: When dissolved in 0.01% DMSO, fluorescein did not pass the chorion. In contrast, concentrations ? 0.1% DMSO increasingly facilitated the uptake into the perivitelline space. In contrast, the uptake of 2,7-dichlorofluorescein was not substantially increased with rising DMSO concentrations, indicating the importance of factors other than the solvent (e.g. mol wt). With respect to the fish embryo test, results indicate that DMSO may be used without complications as a solvent, however, only at a maximum concentration of 0.01% (0.1 mL/L) as already indicated in the OECD difficult substances paper (OECD, 2000). PMID:23831690

  17. TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT TEST SUBMISSIONS (TSCATS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxic Substances Control Act Test Submissions (TSCATS) is an online index to unpublished, nonconfidential studies covering chemical testing results and adverse effects of chemicals on health and ecological systems. The studies are submitted by U.S. industry to EPA under several s...

  18. Toxicity of polychlorinated diphenyl ethers in hydra attenuata and in rat whole-embryo culture. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, M.C.

    1991-05-01

    Polychlorinated diphenyl ethers (PCDEs) are a class of biaryl compounds that have little commercial application, but appear to be widespread in the environment. They have been found in wood preservative waste dumpsites and in fly ash from municipal waste incinerators. They have been detected in bird eggs and tissues, fish, and other edible marine organisms in the United States, Canada, and Europe. There are limited reports in the extant literature on the toxicity of PCDEs. This study was designed to evaluate the toxicity of selected PCDEs in cultures of Hydra attenuata and post-implantation rat whole embryos. The toxicity of several closely related polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was evaluated in both cultures and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) was evaluated in whole embryo culture. Embryonic growth and development parameters (yolk sac diameter, crown-rump length, somite count, and DNA and protein content) and gross morphology were determined. Findings indicated that these chemicals were neither embryotoxic nor teratogenic. Thus, the PCDEs, which elicit other diverse toxic and biochemical responses in rodents, are relatively inactive in these bioassays for developmental toxicity.

  19. Automated Phenotype Recognition for Zebrafish Embryo Based In Vivo High Throughput Toxicity Screening of Engineered Nano-Materials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rong; Lin, Sijie; Rallo, Robert; Zhao, Yan; Damoiseaux, Robert; Xia, Tian; Lin, Shuo; Nel, Andre; Cohen, Yoram

    2012-01-01

    A phenotype recognition model was developed for high throughput screening (HTS) of engineered Nano-Materials (eNMs) toxicity using zebrafish embryo developmental response classified, from automatically captured images and without manual manipulation of zebrafish positioning, by three basic phenotypes (i.e., hatched, unhatched, and dead). The recognition model was built with a set of vectorial descriptors providing image color and texture information. The best performing model was attained with three image descriptors (color histogram, representative color, and color layout) identified as most suitable from an initial pool of six descriptors. This model had an average recognition accuracy of 97.40±0.95% in a 10-fold cross-validation and 93.75% in a stress test of low quality zebrafish images. The present work has shown that a phenotyping model can be developed with accurate recognition ability suitable for zebrafish-based HTS assays. Although the present methodology was successfully demonstrated for only three basic zebrafish embryonic phenotypes, it can be readily adapted to incorporate more subtle phenotypes. PMID:22506062

  20. Cardiac toxicity by sublethal 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin correlates with its anti-proliferation effect on cardiomyocytes in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing

    2015-02-01

    The cardiac toxicity of zebrafish embryos in response to the lethal dose of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been well characterized. Dioxin contamination levels in nature are usually lower, however, and sublethal TCDD toxicity is less investigated. The present study found that the nonlethal doses of TCDD for 72-h-postfertilization (hpf) zebrafish embryos were 25?pg/mL and lower. For the present study, sublethal TCDD concentrations of 10?pg/mL and 25?pg/mL were selected, and their toxicity was then characterized. The results showed that embryos still exhibited acute and subchronic cardiac toxicity at these 2 dosages. The stroke volume and cardiac output of these embryos significantly declined early until 8?d postexposure. Embryos' heart size became smaller, and the hearts contained fewer cardiomyocytes per heart, with decreased cardiomyocyte proliferation. Apoptosis was not detected either in the TCDD-treated or the control hearts. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) revealed that the transcription of a battery of cell-cycle-related genes was suppressed within the sublethal TCDD-treated heart. In contrast, embryonic jaw development seemed not to be affected. The present study suggests that dioxin contamination, even at lower levels, might lead to cardiac toxicity in fish embryos. Such cardiac toxicity presents as disrupted normal heart function, originating from the anti-proliferative effect of sublethal TCDD on cardiomyocytes. PMID:25477153

  1. Avian models for toxicity testing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    The use of birds as test models in experimental and environmental toxicology as related to health effects is reviewed, and an overview of descriptive tests routinely used in wildlife toxicology is provided. Toxicologic research on birds may be applicable to human health both directly by their use as models for mechanistic and descriptive studies and indirectly as monitors of environmental quality. Topics include the use of birds as models for study of teratogenesis and embryotoxicity, neurotoxicity, behavior, trends of environmental pollution, and for use in predictive wildlife toxicology. Uses of domestic and wild-captured birds are discussed.

  2. New Zealand sediment toxicity testing methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, C.W.; Roper, D.S.; Nipper, M.; Martin, M.L.

    1995-12-31

    Sediment toxicity testing in New Zealand is developing against a background of an increasing public desire for environmental protection and strict legislative requirements that contaminant discharges should not have any significant adverse effects on aquatic life. The importance of sediment contamination and its potential immediate and long term adverse effects on aquatic biota in general is becoming widely recognized, This has lead to an effort to develop acute and chronic sediment toxicity tests with organisms representative of the New Zealand indigenous biota. An amphipod species occurring in both freshwater and estuarine environments, Chaetocorophium cf lucasi, and the marine bivalve Macomona liliana, a common inhabitant of intertidal sandflats, have been evaluated for their sensitivity to natural sediment characteristics. The amphipod and bivalve are presently being used for testing sediment acute (10d) and chronic toxicity (20--30d), with survival and growth as test endpoints, and the bivalve has shown to be a useful organism for behavioral tests with burial and sediment avoidance by movement and drifting as endpoints. The estuarine bivalve Arthritica bifurca, abundant in muddy sediments, is a self-fertilizing hermaphroditic species and its suitability for sediment tests with a reproductive endpoint is underway. Freshwater sphaeriid bivalves, Sphaerium novazelandiae, are also being used for survival, growth, reproduction and behavioral endpoints. Sensitivity to reference toxicants and results for contaminated sediments will be presented and discussed in relation to sediment quality criteria developed elsewhere.

  3. 16 CFR 1500.40 - Method of testing toxic substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...toxicity of substances, including testing that does not require animals, are presented in the CPSC's animal testing policy set forth in 16 CFR 1500...to reduce the number of test animals. The method of testing the toxic substances...

  4. 16 CFR 1500.40 - Method of testing toxic substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...toxicity of substances, including testing that does not require animals, are presented in the CPSC's animal testing policy set forth in 16 CFR...to reduce the number of test animals. The method of testing the toxic substances...

  5. Validation of alternative methods for toxicity testing.

    PubMed Central

    Bruner, L H; Carr, G J; Curren, R D; Chamberlain, M

    1998-01-01

    Before nonanimal toxicity tests may be officially accepted by regulatory agencies, it is generally agreed that the validity of the new methods must be demonstrated in an independent, scientifically sound validation program. Validation has been defined as the demonstration of the reliability and relevance of a test method for a particular purpose. This paper provides a brief review of the development of the theoretical aspects of the validation process and updates current thinking about objectively testing the performance of an alternative method in a validation study. Validation of alternative methods for eye irritation testing is a specific example illustrating important concepts. Although discussion focuses on the validation of alternative methods intended to replace current in vivo toxicity tests, the procedures can be used to assess the performance of alternative methods intended for other uses. Images Figure 1 PMID:9599695

  6. Toxicity test of a dental commercial composite

    PubMed Central

    Ponce-Bravo, Santa; Martínez-Rivera, José-Luis; Garcés-Ortíz, Maricela

    2015-01-01

    Background International rules must be followed for testing biosecurity in dental materials. A new brand of restorative material appeared in the market and regulations indicated that it should be tested for toxicity. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the 90-day sub chronic toxicity of one triethylene glycol dimethacrylate containing composite (MEDENTAL Light-Cure Composite™) orally administered to rats according to Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development no. 48 guidelines and the requirements specified in the ISO 10993-11. Material and Methods Wistar rats ate the polymerized composite during 90 days and were observed to determine changes in their behavior, eye and skin signs and other attitudes such as aggressiveness, posture, walking and response to handling. After 90 days were sacrificed to ascertain blood alterations, we did special hematological tests and assessed microscopic slides from 33 different organs. Results We recorded no significant changes in clinical behavior of the animals. Microscopic review of the H&E stained slides obtained from the analyzed organs showed no abnormal inflammatory or cytological changes and all hematological special tests were within normal limits. Conclusions Results of this study show that under our experimental conditions the MEDENTAL Light-Cure Composite™ does not produce inflammatory or cytological changes suggestive of toxicity. Key words:Dental materials, composite resin, toxicity, inflammation, TEGDMA. PMID:26155348

  7. 40 CFR 795.120 - Gammarid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 true Gammarid acute toxicity test. 795.120 Section 795.120 Protection...CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) PROVISIONAL TEST GUIDELINES Provisional Environmental... § 795.120 Gammarid acute toxicity test. (a) Purpose. This...

  8. 40 CFR 795.120 - Gammarid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Gammarid acute toxicity test. 795.120 Section 795.120 Protection...CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) PROVISIONAL TEST GUIDELINES Provisional Environmental... § 795.120 Gammarid acute toxicity test. (a) Purpose. This...

  9. 40 CFR 795.120 - Gammarid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Gammarid acute toxicity test. 795.120 Section 795.120 Protection...CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) PROVISIONAL TEST GUIDELINES Provisional Environmental... § 795.120 Gammarid acute toxicity test. (a) Purpose. This...

  10. 40 CFR 795.120 - Gammarid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Gammarid acute toxicity test. 795.120 Section 795.120 Protection...CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) PROVISIONAL TEST GUIDELINES Provisional Environmental... § 795.120 Gammarid acute toxicity test. (a) Purpose. This...

  11. 40 CFR 795.120 - Gammarid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Gammarid acute toxicity test. 795.120 Section 795.120 Protection...CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) PROVISIONAL TEST GUIDELINES Provisional Environmental... § 795.120 Gammarid acute toxicity test. (a) Purpose. This...

  12. 16 CFR 1500.40 - Method of testing toxic substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... testing toxic substances. Guidelines for testing the toxicity of substances, including testing that does not require animals, are presented in the CPSC's animal testing policy set forth in 16 CFR 1500.232. A... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Method of testing toxic substances....

  13. Estimation of toxicity using the Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tens of thousands of chemicals are currently in commerce, and hundreds more are introduced every year. Since experimental measurements of toxicity are extremely time consuming and expensive, it is imperative that alternative methods to estimate toxicity are developed.

  14. Comparison of toxicity values across zebrafish early life stages and mammalian studies: Implications for chemical testing.

    PubMed

    Ducharme, Nicole A; Reif, David M; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Bondesson, Maria

    2015-08-01

    With the high cost and slow pace of toxicity testing in mammals, the vertebrate zebrafish has become a tractable model organism for high throughput toxicity testing. We present here a meta-analysis of 600 chemicals tested for toxicity in zebrafish embryos and larvae. Nineteen aggregated and 57 individual toxicity endpoints were recorded from published studies yielding 2695 unique data points. These data points were compared to lethality and reproductive toxicology endpoints analyzed in rodents and rabbits and to exposure values for humans. We show that although many zebrafish endpoints did not correlate to rodent or rabbit acute toxicity data, zebrafish could be used to accurately predict relative acute toxicity through the rat inhalation, rabbit dermal, and rat oral exposure routes. Ranking of the chemicals based on toxicity and teratogenicity in zebrafish, as well as human exposure levels, revealed that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), benzo(a)pyrene, and chlorpyrifos ranked in the top nine of all chemicals for these three categories, and as such should be considered high priority chemicals for testing in higher vertebrates. PMID:25261610

  15. 16 CFR 1500.40 - Method of testing toxic substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... that does not require animals, are presented in the CPSC's animal testing policy set forth in 16 CFR... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Method of testing toxic substances. 1500.40... testing toxic substances. The method of testing the toxic substances referred to in § 1500.3(c)...

  16. Kupffer Cell Isolation for Nanoparticle Toxicity Testing.

    PubMed

    Bourgognon, Maxime; Klippstein, Rebecca; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T

    2015-01-01

    The large majority of in vitro nanotoxicological studies have used immortalized cell lines for their practicality. However, results from nanoparticle toxicity testing in immortalized cell lines or primary cells have shown discrepancies, highlighting the need to extend the use of primary cells for in vitro assays. This protocol describes the isolation of mouse liver macrophages, named Kupffer cells, and their use to study nanoparticle toxicity. Kupffer cells are the most abundant macrophage population in the body and constitute part of the reticulo-endothelial system (RES), responsible for the capture of circulating nanoparticles. The Kupffer cell isolation method reported here is based on a 2-step perfusion method followed by purification on density gradient. The method, based on collagenase digestion and density centrifugation, is adapted from the original protocol developed by Smedsrød et al. designed for rat liver cell isolation and provides high yield (up to 14 x 10(6) cells per mouse) and high purity (>95%) of Kupffer cells. This isolation method does not require sophisticated or expensive equipment and therefore represents an ideal compromise between complexity and cell yield. The use of heavier mice (35-45 g) improves the yield of the isolation method but also facilitates remarkably the procedure of portal vein cannulation. The toxicity of functionalized carbon nanotubes f-CNTs was measured in this model by the modified LDH assay. This method assesses cell viability by measuring the lack of structural integrity of Kupffer cell membrane after incubation with f-CNTs. Toxicity induced by f-CNTs can be measured consistently using this assay, highlighting that isolated Kupffer cells are useful for nanoparticle toxicity testing. The overall understanding of nanotoxicology could benefit from such models, making the nanoparticle selection for clinical translation more efficient. PMID:26327223

  17. Integrated chip-based physiometer for automated fish embryo toxicity biotests in pharmaceutical screening and ecotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Jin; Zhu, Feng; Hall, Chris J; Crosier, Kathryn E; Crosier, Philip S; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2014-06-01

    Transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio) models of human diseases have recently emerged as innovative experimental systems in drug discovery and molecular pathology. None of the currently available technologies, however, allow for automated immobilization and treatment of large numbers of spatially encoded transgenic embryos during real-time developmental analysis. This work describes the proof-of-concept design and validation of an integrated 3D microfluidic chip-based system fabricated directly in the poly(methyl methacrylate) transparent thermoplastic using infrared laser micromachining. At its core, the device utilizes an array of 3D micromechanical traps to actively capture and immobilize single embryos using a low-pressure suction. It also features built-in piezoelectric microdiaphragm pumps, embryo-trapping suction manifold, drug delivery manifold, and optically transparent indium tin oxide heating element to provide optimal temperature during embryo development. Furthermore, we present design of the proof-of-concept off-chip electronic interface equipped with robotic servo actuator driven stage, innovative servomotor-actuated pinch valves, and embedded miniaturized fluorescent USB microscope. Our results showed that the innovative device has 100% embryo-trapping efficiency while supporting normal embryo development for up to 72 hr in a confined microfluidic environment. We also showed data that this microfluidic system can be readily applied to kinetic analysis of a panel of investigational antiangiogenic agents in transgenic zebrafish lines. The optical transparency and embryo immobilization allow for convenient visualization of developing vasculature patterns in response to drug treatment without the need for specimen re-positioning. The integrated electronic interfaces bring the lab-on-a-chip systems a step closer to realization of complete analytical automation. PMID:24664821

  18. Ocular Toxicity Testing of Lunar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, Valerie E.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of ocular testing to determine the toxicity of lunar dust. The OECD recommendations are reviewed. With these recommendations in mind the test methodology was to use EpiOcular, tissues derived from normal human epidermal keratinocytes, the cells of which have been differentiated on cell culture inserts to form a multi-layered structure, which closely parallels the corneal epithelium and to dose the tissue with 100 mg dust from various sources. The in-vitro study provides evidence that lunar dust is not severely corrosive or irritating, however, in vitro tests have limitations, and in vivo tests provides a more complete scenario, and information, it is recommended that in vivo tests be performed.

  19. Developmental toxicity and neurotoxicity of two matrine-type alkaloids, matrine and sophocarpine, in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos/larvae.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhao-Guang; Li, Ming-Hui; Wang, Jun-Song; Wei, Dan-Dan; Liu, Qing-Wang; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2014-08-01

    Matrine and sophocarpine are two major matrine-type alkaloids included in the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) Kushen (the root of Sophora flavescens Ait.). They have been widely used clinically in China, however with few reports concerning their potential toxicities. This study investigated the developmental toxicity and neurotoxicity of matrine and sophocarpine on zebrafish embryos/larvae from 0 to 96/120h post fertilization (hpf). Both drugs displayed teratogenic and lethal effects with the EC50 and LC50 values at 145 and 240mg/L for matrine and 87.1 and 166mg/L for sophocarpine, respectively. Exposure of matrine and sophocarpine significantly altered spontaneous movement and inhibited swimming performance at concentrations below those causing lethality and malformations, indicating a neurotoxic potential of both drugs. The results are in agreement with most mammalian studies and clinical observations. PMID:24911943

  20. SEDIMENT TOXICITY ASSESSMENT: COMPARISON OF STANDARD AND NEW TESTING DESIGNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standard methods of sediment toxicity testing are fairly well accepted; however, as with all else, evolution of these methods is inevitable. We compared a standard ASTM 10-day amphipod toxicity testing method with smaller, 48- and 96-h test methods using very toxic and reference ...

  1. 40 CFR 797.1950 - Mysid shrimp chronic toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mysid shrimp chronic toxicity test. 797.1950 Section 797.1950 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Aquatic Guidelines § 797.1950 Mysid shrimp chronic toxicity test....

  2. 16 CFR 1500.40 - Method of testing toxic substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Method of testing toxic substances. 1500.40... testing toxic substances. The method of testing the toxic substances referred to in § 1500.3(c) (1)(ii)(C... with additional strips and should fit snugly around the trunk of the animal. The ends of the sleeve...

  3. 40 CFR 797.1300 - Daphnid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Daphnid acute toxicity test. 797.1300 Section 797.1300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Aquatic Guidelines § 797.1300 Daphnid acute toxicity test. (a) Purpose....

  4. 40 CFR 797.1330 - Daphnid chronic toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Daphnid chronic toxicity test. 797.1330 Section 797.1330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Aquatic Guidelines § 797.1330 Daphnid chronic toxicity test. (a) Purpose....

  5. 40 CFR 797.1330 - Daphnid chronic toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Daphnid chronic toxicity test. 797.1330 Section 797.1330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Aquatic Guidelines § 797.1330 Daphnid chronic toxicity test. (a) Purpose....

  6. 40 CFR 797.1330 - Daphnid chronic toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Daphnid chronic toxicity test. 797.1330 Section 797.1330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Aquatic Guidelines § 797.1330 Daphnid chronic toxicity test. (a) Purpose....

  7. A dietary embryo/fetal developmental toxicity study of arruva, an R,R-monatin salt isomer, in Crl:CD(SD) rats.

    PubMed

    Brathwaite, W A; Casterton, P L; Nikiforov, A I; Rihner, M O; Sloter, E D; Hlywka, J J

    2013-12-01

    R,R-Monatin is an intensely sweet substance originally identified in the root bark of Sclerochiton ilicifolius. R,R-Monatin salt, commonly known as "arruva", has potential for use as a high-potency sweetener food ingredient. Previously, arruva was concluded to present no toxicologically relevant effects to Crl:CD(SD) rats and Crl:CD-1(ICR) mice fed up to 35,000 ppm arruva in the diet for 90 days. In the present study, groups of mated Sprague-Dawley rats (25 Crl:CD(SD) females/group) were exposed continuously to 0 (control), 15,000, 30,000, or 50,000 ppm arruva in the diet during gestation days 6-21. There were no fetal malformations or developmental variations that were attributable to arruva at any exposure level, nor were there any test article-related effects on intrauterine survival. Maternal toxicity, evidenced by lower mean body weights, body weight gains and feed efficiency, was observed at 50,000 ppm. A developmental effect, in the form of lower mean fetal body weight, was noted in the 50,000 ppm group in the presence of maternal toxicity. Therefore, the dietary no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for maternal and embryo/fetal developmental toxicity of arruva in pregnant rats during gestation days 6-21 was 30,000 ppm (equivalent to 2564 mg/kg bw/day) based on reductions in maternal and fetal body weights. PMID:23973404

  8. THE USE OF EMBRYOS OF PALAEMONETES PUGIO IN EVALUATING THE DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, is a common, well distributed species along the eastern coast of America that is an important part of the food web. The embryos of P. pugio have shown sensitivity to the water-soluble fraction of Number 2 fuel oil, which indicates they may be...

  9. Combinatorial QSAR Modeling of Chemical Toxicants Tested against Tetrahymena pyriformis

    E-print Network

    Combinatorial QSAR Modeling of Chemical Toxicants Tested against Tetrahymena pyriformis Hao Zhu containing 983 unique compounds tested in the same laboratory over a decade against Tetrahymena pyriformis

  10. Toxicity of Uranium Adsorbent Materials using the Microtox Toxicity Test

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T.; Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Bonheyo, George T.

    2015-10-01

    The Marine Sciences Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the toxicity of a diverse range of natural and synthetic materials used to extract uranium from seawater. The uranium adsorbent materials are being developed as part of the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Resources Program. The goal of this effort was to identify whether deployment of a farm of these materials into the marine environment would have any toxic effects on marine organisms.

  11. Effect of pH on pentachlorophenol toxicity to embryos and larvae of zebrafish (Brachydanio rerio)

    SciTech Connect

    Dave, G.

    1984-11-01

    The hydrogen ion is an important determinant of toxicity in the aquatic environment, especially for weak acids or bases. Pentachlorophenol is a weak acid and is consequently more toxic at low pH because of increasing proportions of free phenol. For some heavy metals the toxic interaction with ambient pH is complicated by complexation with organic and inorganic compounds. These complexes are affected by pH, and bioassays may be the easiest and most reliable method of determining the influence of pH in such cases. The objective of this study was to find a simple laboratory procedure for determination of the effect of pH on the toxicity of various chemicals added to or already present in various samples of ground and surface waters. Pentachlorophenol was selected as a reference toxicant and positive control because of its established pH-toxicity interaction in fish.

  12. A Simple "in Vitro" Culture of Freshwater Prawn Embryos for Laboratory Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porntrai, Supaporn; Damrongphol, Praneet

    2008-01-01

    Giant freshwater prawn ("Macrobrachium rosenbergii" De Man) embryos can be cultured "in vitro" to hatching in 15% (v/v) artificial seawater (ASW). This technique can be applied as a bioassay for testing toxicity or for the effects of various substances on embryo development and can be used as a simple and low-cost model for studying embryo

  13. TOXICITY TESTS FOR SEDIMENT QUALITY ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxic sediments have contributed to a wide-variety of environmental problems around the world. The observed effects include direct toxic effects to aquatic life, bio-magnification of toxicants in the food chain, and economic impacts. This chapter discusses the use of toxicity...

  14. Comparison of bulk sediment and sediment elutriate toxicity testing methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elutriate bioassays are among numerous methods that exist for assessing the potential toxicity of sediments in aquatic systems. In this study, interlaboratory results were compared from 96-hour Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas static-renewal acute toxicity tests conduct...

  15. EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF FLY ASH EXPOSURE ON FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES: FATHEAD MINNOW EMBRYO-LARVAL TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen; Elmore, Logan R; McCracken, Kitty

    2012-05-01

    On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash in an 84-acre complex of the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Steam Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits extended as far as 4 miles upstream (Emory River mile 6) of the Plant, and some ash was carried as far downstream as Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}4 miles downstream of the Tennessee River confluence with the Clinch River). A byproduct of coal burning power plants, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be toxic to biological systems. The effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to be the effects of specific ash constituents, especially selenium, on fish early life stages. Uptake by adult female fish of fly ash constituents through the food chain and subsequent maternal transfer of contaminants to the developing eggs is thought to be the primary route of selenium exposure to larval fish (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Lemly 1999, Moscatello and others 2006), but direct contact of the fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash constituents in river water and sediments is also a potential risk factor (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Jezierska and others 2009). To address the risk of fly ash from the Kingston spill to the reproductive health of downstream fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA including: (1) a field study of the bioaccumulation of fly ash constituents in fish ovaries and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill; (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (reported in the current technical manuscript); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence; and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers. These fish reproduction and early life-stage studies are being conducted in conjunction with a broader biological monitoring program administered by TVA that includes a field study of the condition of larval fish in the Emory and Clinch Rivers along with assessments of water quality, sediment composition, ecotoxicological studies, terrestrial wildlife studies, and human and ecological risk assessment. Information and data generated from these studies will provide direct input into risk assessment efforts and will also complement and help support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program. Fish eggs, in general, are known to be capable of concentrating heavy metals and other environmental contaminants from water-borne exposures during embryonic development (Jezierska and others 2009), and fathead minnow embryos in particular have been shown to concentrate methylmercury (Devlin 2006) as well as other chemical toxicants. This technical report focuses on the responses of fathead minnow embryos to simple contact exposures to fly ash in laboratory toxicity tests adapted from a standard fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) 7-d embryo-larval survival and teratogenicity test (method 1001.0 in EPA 2002) with mortality, hatching success, and the incidences of developmental abnormalities as measured endpoints.

  16. Effect of water hardness on peracetic toxicity to zebrafish, Danio rerio, embryos

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of peracetic acid (PAA) in aquaculture has been suggested as an alternative therapeutic agent as use of previous therapeutants becomes restricted. Few data are available concerning fish toxicity by PAA or factors that affect this toxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the influ...

  17. Developmental toxicity of metaldehyde in the embryos of Lymnaea stagnalis (Gastropoda: Pulmonata) co-exposed to the synergist piperonyl butoxide.

    PubMed

    Hallett, Katrina C; Atfield, Andrew; Comber, Sean; Hutchinson, Thomas H

    2016-02-01

    Metaldehyde is a widely used molluscicide in countries where damage to crops from slugs and snails is a major problem associated with warm and wet winters. In the UK it is estimated that over 8% of the area covered by arable crops is treated with formulated granular bait pellets containing metaldehyde as the main active ingredient. Metaldehyde is hydrophilic (log Kow=0.12), water soluble (200mg·L(-1) at 17°C) and has been detected in UK surface waters in the concentration range of typically 0.2-0.6?g·L(-1) (maximum 2.7?g·L(-1)) during 2008-2011. In the absence of chronic data on potential hazards to non-target freshwater molluscs, a laboratory study was conducted to investigate the impact of metaldehyde on embryo development in the gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis (RENILYS strain) and using zinc as a positive control. L. stagnalis embryos were exposed to metaldehyde under semi-static conditions at 20±1°C and hatching success and growth (measured as shell height and intraocular distance) examined after 21d. Exposure concentrations were verified using HPLC and gave 21d (hatching)NOEC and (hatching)LOEC mean measured values of 36 and 116mgMET·L(-1), respectively (equal to the 21d (shell height)NOEC and (shell height)LOEC values). For basic research purposes, a second group of L. stagnalis embryos was co-exposed to metaldehyde and the pesticide synergist piperonyl butoxide (PBO). Co-exposure to the PBO (measured concentrations between 0.47-0.56mg·L(-1)) reduced hatching success from 100% to 47% and resulted in a 30% reduction in embryo growth (shell height) in snail embryos co-exposed to metaldehyde at 34-36mg·L(-1) over 21d. In conclusion, these data suggest mollusc embryos may have some metabolic detoxication capacity for metaldehyde and further work is warranted to explore this aspect in order to support the recent initiative to include molluscs in the OECD test guideline programme. PMID:26575636

  18. Toxicity of the 13 priority pollutant metals to Vibrio fisheri in the Microtox chronic toxicity test.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chi-Ying; Tsai, Meng-Hsiun; Ryan, David K; Pancorbo, Oscar C

    2004-03-01

    The Microtox Acute Toxicity Test has been successfully used to measure the toxicity of metals and other pollutants at high concentrations (ppm) in selected environmental samples. However, metals and other toxicants are often found in much lower concentrations (ppb) in many municipal wastewaters and receiving waters. In order to assess the toxicity of these pollutants in these samples, a more sensitive toxicity assay is needed. The Microtox chronic toxicity test has been developed to measure the sublethal effect of toxicants over multiple generations of the test species, Vibrio fisheri. In this study, the toxicity of the 13 priority pollutant metals [i.e. As, Se, Cd, Cr (III and VI), Cu, Pb, Sb, Ag, Tl, Zn, Be, Hg and Ni] to V. fisheri was evaluated using the Microtox chronic toxicity test. In this test, the inhibitory concentration (IC), lowest observable effect concentration (LOEC), and no observable effect concentration (NOEC) were obtained after 22-h of incubation at 27+/-1 degrees C, by comparing the light output of the control to that of the test sample. Among the 13 priority pollutant metals, beryllium (Be) was found to be the most toxic in the test (LOEC=0.742-1.49 microg/l) while thallium (Tl) was the least toxic (LOEC=3840-15300 microg/l). The LOECs for copper (as Cu) and lead (Pb) in reagent (ASTM Type I) water were 6.78-13.6 microg/l and 626-1251 microg/l, respectively. The toxicity of copper sulfate (as Cu) in reagent water was shown and significantly reduced with the addition of natural organic matter (fulvic acid) or EDTA to the sample. The LOEC values for the 13 priority pollutant metals in this test were comparable to or lower than those reported for commonly used aquatic toxicity tests, such as the Ceriodaphnia dubia assay. PMID:14987925

  19. In vivo testing for gold nanoparticle toxicity.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Carrie A; Huffman, Brian J; Cliffel, David E

    2013-01-01

    A technique for measuring the toxicity of nanomaterials using a murine model is described. Blood samples are collected via submandibular bleeding while urine samples are collected on cellophane sheets. Both biosamples are then analyzed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) for nanotoxicity. Blood samples are further tested for immunological response using a standard Coulter counter. The major organs of interest for filtration are also digested and analyzed via ICP-OES, producing useful information regarding target specificity of the nanomaterial of interest. Collection of the biosamples and analysis afterward is detailed, and the operation of the technique is described and illustrated by analysis of the nanotoxicity of an injection of a modified tiopronin monolayer-protected cluster. PMID:23749578

  20. 40 CFR 797.1400 - Fish acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fish acute toxicity test. 797.1400... CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Aquatic Guidelines § 797.1400 Fish acute... prescribes tests to be used to develop data on the acute toxicity of chemicals to fish. The United...

  1. 40 CFR 797.1400 - Fish acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fish acute toxicity test. 797.1400... CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Aquatic Guidelines § 797.1400 Fish acute... prescribes tests to be used to develop data on the acute toxicity of chemicals to fish. The United...

  2. 40 CFR 797.1400 - Fish acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fish acute toxicity test. 797.1400... CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Aquatic Guidelines § 797.1400 Fish acute... prescribes tests to be used to develop data on the acute toxicity of chemicals to fish. The United...

  3. 40 CFR 797.1400 - Fish acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fish acute toxicity test. 797.1400... CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Aquatic Guidelines § 797.1400 Fish acute... prescribes tests to be used to develop data on the acute toxicity of chemicals to fish. The United...

  4. 40 CFR 797.1400 - Fish acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Fish acute toxicity test. 797.1400... CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Aquatic Guidelines § 797.1400 Fish acute... prescribes tests to be used to develop data on the acute toxicity of chemicals to fish. The United...

  5. Optimization of culturing conditions for toxicity testing with the alga Oophila sp. (Chlorophyceae), an amphibian endosymbiont.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gil, José Luis; Brain, Richard; Baxter, Leilan; Ruffell, Sarah; McConkey, Brendan; Solomon, Keith; Hanson, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Eggs of the yellow-spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) have a symbiotic relationship with green algae. It has been suggested that contaminants that are preferentially toxic to algae, such as herbicides, may impair the symbiont and, hence, indirectly affect the development of the salamander embryo. To enable testing under near-standard conditions for first-tier toxicity screening, the authors isolated the alga from field-collected eggs and identified conditions providing exponential growth rates in the apparent asexual phase of the alga. This approach provided a uniform, single-species culture, facilitating assessment of common toxicity end points and comparison of sensitivity relative to other species. Sequencing of the 18s ribosomal DNA indicated that the isolated alga is closely related to the recently described Oophila amblystomatis but is more similar to other known Chlamydomonas species, suggesting possible biogeographical variability in the genetic identity of the algal symbiont. After a tiered approach to culturing method refinement, a modified Bristol's media with 1?mM NH4 (+) as nitrogen source was found to provide suitable conditions for toxicity testing at 18?°C and 200?µmol?m(-2) s(-1) photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) on a 24-h light cycle. The validity of the approach was demonstrated with Zn(2+) as a reference toxicant. Overall, the present study shows that screening for direct effects of contaminants on the algal symbiont without the presence of the host salamander is possible under certain laboratory conditions. PMID:25113146

  6. Assessing contaminant sensitivity of endangered and threatened aquatic species: Part III. Effluent toxicity tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dwyer, F.J.; Hardesty, D.K.; Henke, C.E.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Whites, D.W.; Augspurger, T.; Canfield, T.J.; Mount, D.R.; Mayer, F.L.

    2005-01-01

    Toxicity tests using standard effluent test procedures described by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency were conducted with Ceriodaphnia dubia, fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), and seven threatened and endangered (listed) fish species from four families: (1) Acipenseridae: shortnose sturgeon (Acipenser brevirostrum); (2) Catostomidae; razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus); (3) Cyprinidae: bonytail chub (Gila elegans), Cape Fear shiner (Notropis mekistocholas) Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius), and spotfin chub (Cyprinella monacha); and (4) Poecillidae: Gila topminnow (Poeciliopsis occidentalis). We conducted 7-day survival and growth studies with embryo-larval fathead minnows and analogous exposures using the listed species. Survival and reproduction were also determined with C. dubia. Tests were conducted with carbaryl, ammonia-or a simulated effluent complex mixture of carbaryl, copper, 4-nonylphenol, pentachlorophenol and permethrin at equitoxic proportions. In addition, Cape Fear shiners and spotfin chub were tested using diazinon, copper, and chlorine. Toxicity tests were also conducted with field-collected effluents from domestic or industrial facilities. Bonytail chub and razorback suckers were tested with effluents collected in Arizona whereas effluent samples collected from North Carolina were tested with Cape Fear shiner, spotfin chub, and shortnose sturgeon. The fathead minnow 7-day effluent test was often a reliable estimator of toxic effects to the listed fishes. However, in 21 % of the tests, a listed species was more sensitive than fathead minnows. More sensitive species results varied by test so that usually no species was always more or less sensitive than fathead minnows. Only the Gila topminnow was consistently less sensitive than the fathead minnow. Listed fish species were protected 96% of the time when results for both fathead minnows and C. dubia were considered, thus reinforcing the value of standard whole-effluent toxicity tests using those two species. If the responses of specific listed species are important for management decisions, our study supports the value in developing culture and testing procedures for those species. ?? 2005 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  7. Toxicity testing of trinitrotoluene-contaminated soil composts

    SciTech Connect

    Honeycutt, M.E.; McFarland, V.A.; Jarvis, A.S.

    1997-10-01

    The Mutatox{trademark} assay and earthworm acute toxicity test were employed to evaluate the efficacy of composting in reducing the toxicity of TNT-contaminated soils. The Mutatox assay is a proprietary bacterial bioluminescence test that determines the mutagenic potential of sample extracts. The earthworm acute toxicity test was chosen because it exposes the organisms to the unaltered contaminant/solid matrix. Rockeye soil, a TNT-contaminated soil collected from a military installation, was composted using two methods. This yielded five samples, Rockeye, Compost A composting. Soil extracts were prepared for Mutatox using the sonification method. Ten serial dilution samples were tested soils/artificial soil were tested in the earthworm toxicity test. In the Rockeye soil samples, a toxic response was shown in both test methods. Mutatox indicated no toxicity in Composts A and B after composting but did not show a positive mutagenic response in the lower serial dilutions. The LC50s for Compost A and B after composting in the earthworm toxicity test were 35.3% and 100%, respectively. Using Mutatox and the earthworm toxicity test together provides a sensitive means of monitoring the effectiveness of various composting techniques for remediating TNT-contaminated soils.

  8. Biologically Relevant Exposure Science for 21st Century Toxicity Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    High visibility efforts in toxicity testing and computational toxicology including the recent NRC report, Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: a Vision and Strategy (NRC, 2007), raise important research questions and opportunities for the field of exposure science. The authors ...

  9. 40 CFR 797.1600 - Fish early life stage toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... exposed during the period of their early development. (7) “Embryo cup” a small glass jar or similar container with a screened bottom in which the embryos of some species (i.e., minnow) are placed during the... of newly fertilized embryos to various concentrations of a test substance. Exposure continues for...

  10. 40 CFR 797.1600 - Fish early life stage toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... exposed during the period of their early development. (7) “Embryo cup” a small glass jar or similar container with a screened bottom in which the embryos of some species (i.e., minnow) are placed during the... of newly fertilized embryos to various concentrations of a test substance. Exposure continues for...

  11. 40 CFR 797.1600 - Fish early life stage toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... exposed during the period of their early development. (7) “Embryo cup” a small glass jar or similar container with a screened bottom in which the embryos of some species (i.e., minnow) are placed during the... of newly fertilized embryos to various concentrations of a test substance. Exposure continues for...

  12. 40 CFR 797.1600 - Fish early life stage toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... exposed during the period of their early development. (7) “Embryo cup” a small glass jar or similar container with a screened bottom in which the embryos of some species (i.e., minnow) are placed during the... of newly fertilized embryos to various concentrations of a test substance. Exposure continues for...

  13. 40 CFR 797.1600 - Fish early life stage toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... exposed during the period of their early development. (7) “Embryo cup” a small glass jar or similar container with a screened bottom in which the embryos of some species (i.e., minnow) are placed during the... of newly fertilized embryos to various concentrations of a test substance. Exposure continues for...

  14. Toxicity and cytochrome P450 1A mRNA induction by 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) in chicken and Japanese quail embryos.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Maria E; Mattsson, Anna; Shaik, Siraz; Brunström, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The tryptophan derivative formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) binds with high ligand affinity to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and is readily degraded by AHR-regulated cytochrome P450 family 1 (CYP1) enzymes. Whether in vivo exposure to FICZ can result in toxic effects has not been examined and the main objective of this study was to determine if FICZ is embryotoxic in birds. We examined toxicity and CYP1 mRNA induction of FICZ in embryos from chicken (Gallus domesticus) and Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) exposed to FICZ (2-200?gkg(-1)) by yolk and air sac injections. FICZ caused liver toxicity, embryo mortality, and CYP1A4 and CYP1A5 induction in both species with similar potency. This is in stark contrast to the very large difference in sensitivity of these species to halogenated AHR agonists. We also exposed chicken embryos to a low dose of FICZ (4?gkg(-1)) in combination with a CYP inhibitor, ketoconazole (KCZ). The mixture of FICZ and KCZ was lethal while FICZ alone had no effect at 4?gkg(-1). Furthermore, mixed exposure to FICZ and KCZ caused stronger and more long-lasting hepatic CYP1A4 induction than exposure to each compound alone. These findings indicate reduced biotransformation of FICZ by co-treatment with KCZ as a cause for the enhanced effects although additive AHR activation is also possible. To conclude, FICZ is toxic to bird embryos and it seems reasonable that the toxicity by FICZ involves AHR activation. However, the molecular targets and biological events leading to hepatic damage and mortality are unknown. PMID:26456929

  15. STATUS AND APPLICATIONS OF ECHINOID (PHYLUM ECHINODERMATA) TOXICITY TEST METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of echinoderms for toxicity testing has focused primarily on sea urchins and sand dollars (Strongylocentrolus purpuratus, Arbacia punctulata, Lytechinus pictus, and Dendraster excentricus, for example). he status and relative sensitivity of various test methods are descri...

  16. EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVE REFERENCE TOXICANTS FOR USE IN THE EARTHWORM TOXICITY TEST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of the 14-d earthworm toxicity test to aid in the evaluation of the ecological impact of contaminated soils is becoming increasingly widespread. However,the method is in need of further standardization. As part of this continuing process, the choice of reference toxicants...

  17. RESULTS OF SOLID PHASE SEDIMENT TOXICITY TESTS WITH REDUCED SEDIMENT VOLUMES FOR SEDIMENT TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development and standardization of sediment toxicity test methods for freshwater organisms have been underway for several years. Both EPA and ASTM have published methods for assessing the short-term (e.g., 10-d) toxicity of sediments to two benthic freshwater organisms (Hyalella ...

  18. Toxicity assessment of sequential leachates of tire powder using a battery of toxicity tests and toxicity identification evaluations.

    PubMed

    Wik, Anna; Nilsson, Eva; Källqvist, Torsten; Tobiesen, August; Dave, Göran

    2009-11-01

    Approximately 460,000 ton of rubber are dispersed annually along the European roads due to tire wear. Tire rubber is known to leach compounds that are toxic to aquatic organisms. However, the potential effects of tire wear material on aquatic organisms at environmental relevant concentrations, and over time have so far not been extensively studied. In this study, rubber from three different tires was abraded and the powder leached in deionised water. The rubber powder was leached six times sequentially. All leachates were tested for toxicity using standardized toxicity tests including green algae (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, 72h growth inhibition), crustaceans (Daphnia magna, 24 and 48h immobility and Ceriodaphnia dubia, 48h survival and 9d reproduction and survival), and zebra fish eggs (Danio rerio, 48h lethality). The reproduction of C. dubia was the most sensitive endpoint tested, with an EC50 of 0.013 g L(-1) up to the third leaching of the most toxic tire, which is similar to a predicted concentration in road runoffs. The toxicity of all tires was reduced by the sequential leachings and after the sixth leaching the EC50s were >0.1 g L(-1) for all endpoints. Toxicity identification evaluations indicated that the toxicity was caused by zinc and organic compounds. PMID:19758678

  19. Toxicity of five antidepressant drugs on embryo-larval development and metamorphosis success in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Di Poi, C; Evariste, L; Serpentini, A; Halm-Lemeille, M P; Lebel, J M; Costil, K

    2014-12-01

    Unlike conventional pollutants, pharmaceutical residues are continuously discharged at low levels (low to mid ng l(-1) concentrations), which results in the chronic contamination of non-target organisms, but little is known about the effects of these residues. The purpose of this study was to provide the first assessment of the ecotoxicity of five antidepressants (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors [SSRIs] fluoxetine and sertraline, tricyclic antidepressants [TCAs] clomipramine and amitriptyline, and serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor [SNRI] duloxetine) at a wide range of concentrations from 0.1 to 100,000 ?g l(-1) on two early life stages in the Pacific oyster. The toxicity was quantified in D-shaped larvae after 36 h of exposure, and in 21-day-old pediveliger larvae after 24 h of exposure using the percentage of normal larval development and the metamorphosis rate as endpoints, respectively. The embryotoxicity assays reported that the EC50 values were within the same range of concentrations (67 to 192 ?g l(-1)) for all of the tested molecules. The metamorphosis tests revealed that the antidepressants can be ranked along an increasing severity gradient: clomipramine < amitriptyline < duloxetine ~ fluoxetine. Sertraline appeared to be the less toxic molecule on this endpoint; however, a different concentration range was used. The embryotoxicity test was more sensitive than the metamorphosis bioassay for three of the five molecules tested, but the latter test showed more practical benefits. Overall, the obtained toxicity values were at least 10,000-fold higher than the reported environmental concentrations. PMID:24122267

  20. Development toxicity of functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes on rare minnow embryos and larvae.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bin; Liu, Guang-Lu; Ling, Fei; Song, Lin-Sheng; Wang, Gao-Xue

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are widely used in industrial and commercial applications, but few studies systematically evaluate their developmental toxicity on aquatic organism. Using rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus) at early life stages as experimental models, developmental toxicity of functionalized single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) was investigated following exposure to 0-320?mg/L for 144?h. Results revealed that significantly increased in mortality and malformation was only observed after hatching. Decreased body length, heart rate and swimming speed provide a concentration-dependent manner on larvae; values of 144?h LC50 and EC50 were 140.8 and 109.8?mg/L, respectively. Antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione S-transferase) and antioxidant enzyme related mRNA expressions were significant changed; cell apoptosis activities (caspase-3, -8, -9) and cell apoptosis related mRNA expressions were significant up-regulated; reactive oxygen species and DNA damage were significantly induced when the concentration of SWCNTs above 100?mg/L. Fluorescence and electron microscopy sliced observation show that SWCNTs were well dispersed in larvae within 0.5?h, eventually cleared from the larvae at 144?h. This is the first study to define uptake kinetics and to focus on behavioral consequences, physiological changes and mRNA expression following SWCNTs exposure in the early life stages of fish. The results obtained in the present study demonstrated that functionalized SWCNTs have the potential to affect aquatic life when released into the aquatic environment and reached high concentration. In the increasing economical context of SWCNTs, complementary studies must be undertaken, especially including mechanistic and environmental investigations. PMID:25211547

  1. Reference toxicants for toxicity testing using Caenorhabditis elegans in aquatic media

    SciTech Connect

    Cressman, C.P. III; Williams, P.L.

    1997-09-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans aquatic toxicity assays were standardized with five common reference toxicants: CdCl{sub 2}, NaCl, KCl, sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), and sodium pentachlorophenate (PCP). Aquatic toxicity testing was conducted in 3 media: a standard C. elegans medium; EPA moderately hard reconstituted water; and EPA moderately hard mineral water. Test duration in each medium was 24h without a food source, and 24h and 48h with Escherichia coli strain OP50 as a food source. Each test was replicated three times with each replicate having 6 wells per concentration, 10 worms per well. LC{sub 50} values were calculated using probit analysis. The average LC{sub 50}s for each set of replications were compared to assess sensitivity and reproducibility of the data, identifying expected variation between replicate tests. These reference toxicants increase the database for C. elegans and provide a benchmark for further application.

  2. Validation test with embryonic and larval stages of Chordodes nobilii (Gordiida, Nematomorpha): sensitivity to three reference toxicants.

    PubMed

    Achiorno, Cecilia L; de Villalobos, Cristina; Ferrari, Lucrecia

    2010-09-01

    Chordodes nobilii is a parasite whose pre- and postparasitic stages are found in different types of freshwater bodies. Due to the peculiarities of its life cycle, it acts as a link between freshwater bodies and terrestrial ecosystems. There is little toxicological information on the group Gordiida. It is only known that embryos and larvae of C. nobilii are sensitive to glyphosate and malathion at relevant concentrations in the environment. On this basis, the aims of this study were to characterize the sensitivity of the pre-parasitic stages of C. nobilii to three reference toxicants: sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cadmium chloride and potassium dichromate (Cr(6+)), and to validate a previous experimental protocol for ecotoxicological risk assessment. The protocol involved acute exposure of early embryonic stages and larvae to the three toxicants for 96 h and 48 h, respectively. Embryo development was inhibited only by Cr(6+) which presented a IC(50) of 0.71 mg Cr(6+)L(-1). The development of the eggs exposed to SDS and those exposed to cadmium chloride showed no differences as compared to that of controls. However, the infective capacity of larvae derived from the eggs exposed to the three toxicants was lower than that of controls. Larval survival was affected even at the lowest concentration of the three toxicants assayed. In relation to other freshwater organisms, C. nobilii can be characterized as an organism medium to highly sensitive to the toxicants tested. PMID:20655086

  3. SHORT-TERM CHRONIC TOXICITY TEST USING 'DAPHNIA MAGNA'

    EPA Science Inventory

    A seven-day short-term chronic toxicity test using 10-day old Daphnia magna is described as a possible alternative to the Ceriodaphnia life-cycle test. Five tests using sodium pentachlorophenate, conducted during the development of the method, gave test results similar to those p...

  4. Rapid toxicity testing based on yeast respiratory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Haubenstricker, M.E. ); Meier, P.G.; Mancy, K.H. ); Brabec, M.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Rapid and economical techniques are needed to determine the effects of environmental contaminants. At present, the main methods to assess the impact of pollutants are based on chemical analysis of the samples. Invertebrate and vertebrate exposures have been used over the last two decades in assessing acute and chronic toxicities. However, these tests are labor intensive and require several days to complete. An alternative to whole organism exposure is to determine toxic effects in monocellular systems. Another approach for assessing toxicity is to monitor sensitive, nonspecific, subcellular target sites such as mitochondria. Changes in mitochondrial function which could indicate a toxic effect can be demonstrated readily after addition of a foreign substance. In initial assessments of various chemicals, rat liver mitochondria (RLM) were evaluated as a biological sensor of toxicity. False toxicity assessments will result if these ions are present even though they are generally considered nontoxic. Because of these disadvantages, an alternative mitochondrial system, such as found in bakers yeast, was evaluated.

  5. Hypersalinity toxicity thresholds for nine California ocean plan toxicity test protocols.

    PubMed

    Voorhees, Jennifer P; Phillips, Bryn M; Anderson, Brian S; Siegler, Katie; Katz, Scott; Jennings, Lydia; Tjeerdema, Ron S; Jensen, Joanna; de la Paz Carpio-Obeso, Maria

    2013-11-01

    Currently, several desalination facilities have been proposed to operate or are actually operating in California. These facilities' use of reverse osmosis (RO) may discharge hypersaline reject brine into the marine environment. The risks, if any, this brine would pose to coastal receiving waters are unknown. To test the toxicity of hypersaline brine in the absence of any additional toxic constituents, we prepared brine and tested it with the seven toxicity test organisms listed in the 2009 California Ocean Plan. The most sensitive protocols were the marine larval development tests, whereas the most tolerant to increased salinities were the euryhaline topsmelt, mysid shrimp, and giant kelp tests. Reject brines from the Monterey Bay Aquarium's RO desalination facility were also tested with three species. The effects of the aquarium's brine effluent on topsmelt, mussels, and giant kelp were consistent with those observed in the salinity tolerance experiments. This information will be used by regulators to establish receiving water limitations for hypersaline discharges. PMID:23821235

  6. Predictive modeling of developmental toxicity using EPA’s Virtual Embryo

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standard practice in prenatal developmental toxicology involves testing chemicals in pregnant laboratory animals of two species, typically rats and rabbits, exposed during organogenesis and evaluating for fetal growth retardation, structural malformations, and prenatal death just...

  7. MANUAL FOR THE EVALUATION OF LABORATORIES PERFORMING AQUATIC TOXICITY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual describes guidelines and standardized procedures for conducting on-site audits and evaluations of laboratories performing toxicity tests. ncluded are pre-survey information activities, on-site evaluation activities, evaluation criteria, organizational history and labo...

  8. The Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (T.E.S.T.)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (T.E.S.T.) has been developed to estimate toxicological values for aquatic and mammalian species considering acute and chronic endpoints for screening purposes within TSCA and REACH programs.

  9. Bacterial and enzymatic bioassays for toxicity testing in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Bitton, G.; Koopman, B. )

    1992-01-01

    Microbioassays using bacteria or enzymes are increasingly applied to measure chemical toxicity in the environment. Attractive features of these assays may include low cost, rapid response to toxicants, high sample throughput, modest laboratory equipment and space requirements, low sample volume, portability, and reproducible responses. Enzymatic tests rely on measurement of either enzyme activity or enzyme biosynthesis. Dehydrogenases are the enzymes most used in toxicity testing. Assay of dehydrogenase activity is conveniently carried out using oxidoreduction dyes such as tetrazolium salts. Other enzyme activity tests utilize ATPases, esterases, phosphatases, urease, luciferase, beta-galactosidase, protease, amylase, or beta-glucosidase. Recently, the inhibition of enzyme (beta-galactosidase, tryptophanase, alpha-glucosidase) biosynthesis has been explored as a basis for toxicity testing. Enzyme biosynthesis was found to be generally more sensitive to organic chemicals than enzyme activity.107 references.

  10. THE TOXCAST PROGRAM FOR PRIORITIZING TOXICITY TESTING OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing methods for utilizing computational chemistry, high-throughput screening (HTS) and various toxicogenomic technologies to predict potential for toxicity and prioritize limited testing resources towards chemicals...

  11. TOXICITY TESTING, RISK ASSESSMENT, AND OPTIONS FOR DREDGED MATERIAL MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Programs for evaluating proposed discharges of dredged material into waters of the United States specify a tiered testing and evaluation protocol that includes performance of acute and chronic bioassays to assess toxicity of the dredged sediments. Although these evaluations refl...

  12. Eugenic selection benefits embryos.

    PubMed

    Walker, Mark

    2014-06-01

    The primary question to be addressed here is whether pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), used for both negative and positive trait selection, benefits potential supernumerary embryos. The phrase 'potential supernumerary embryos' is used to indicate that PGD is typically performed on a set of embryos, only some of which will be implanted. Prior to any testing, each embryo in the set is potentially supernumerary in the sense that it may not be selected for implantation. Those embryos that are not selected, and hence destroyed or frozen, are 'actually supernumerary'. The argument to be advanced is hypothetical: If embryos may be said to benefit or be harmed by our actions, then PGD used to select for an embryo or embryos with the highest expected Wellbeing benefits potential supernumerary embryos. The argument shows that the 'non-identity' problem is not sufficient to show that eugenic selection does not benefit supernumerary embryos. PMID:22845885

  13. Extrapolation of toxic indices among test objects

    PubMed Central

    Tichý, Milo?; Rucki, Marián; Roth, Zden?k; Hanzlíková, Iveta; Vlková, Alena; Tumová, Jana; Uzlová, Rút

    2010-01-01

    Oligochaeta Tubifex tubifex, fish fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), hepatocytes isolated from rat liver and ciliated protozoan are absolutely different organisms and yet their acute toxicity indices correlate. Correlation equations for special effects were developed for a large heterogeneous series of compounds (QSAR, quantitative structure-activity relationships). Knowing those correlation equations and their statistic evaluation, one can extrapolate the toxic indices. The reason is that a common physicochemical property governs the biological effect, namely the partition coefficient between two unmissible phases, simulated generally by n-octanol and water. This may mean that the transport of chemicals towards a target is responsible for the magnitude of the effect, rather than reactivity, as one would assume suppose. PMID:21331180

  14. DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF METHANOL: PATHOGENESIS IN CD-1 AND C57BL/6J MICE EXPOSED IN WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Methanol causes axial skeleton and craniofacial defects in both CD-1 and C57BL/6J mice during gastrulation, but C57BL/6J embryos are more severely affected. We evaluated methanol-induced pathogenesis in CD-1 and C57BL/6J embryos exposed during gastrulation in whole em...

  15. A COUPLED MICROSOMAL-ACTIVATING/EMBRYO CULTURE SYSTEM: TOXICITY OF REDUCED BETA-NICOTINAMIDE ADENINE DINUCLEOTIDE PHOSPHATE (NADPH)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An NADPH-dependent microsomal-activating system has been coupled to a rat embryo culture in vitro. No embryonic morphological abnormalities or decrease in final yolk sac or embryo DNA and protein contents occurred when 0.2 mM NADPH was used in this coupled system. In contrast, 1....

  16. A New Toxicity Test Using the Freshwater Copepod Cyclops vernalis.

    PubMed

    Marus, Emma M; Elphick, James R; Bailey, Howard C

    2015-09-01

    The cladocerans Ceriodaphnia dubia and Daphnia magna are widely used in environmental toxicity testing and the test methodologies for these species are well developed. However, copepods are a much more abundant contributor to zooplankton in many lakes, but they are not routinely used in toxicity tests. Therefore, we propose toxicity test methods for the freshwater copepod, Cyclops vernalis assessing effects on its survival and growth. A case study is presented in which the proposed test was performed with a range of concentrations of total dissolved solids (TDS) and used as part of a test battery to develop a site-specific water quality objective. C. vernalis was less sensitive to TDS compared to D. magna and C. dubia, but similarly sensitive to an alga, a diatom, a rotifer, a chironomid, and two fish species. No adverse effects were observed on survival or growth of C. vernalis at TDS concentrations up to 1500 mg/L. PMID:26183385

  17. The chick embryo neutralization test in the assay of meningococcal antibody*

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, K.; Diena, B. B.; Greenberg, L.

    1969-01-01

    Present methods of controlling meningococcal cerebrospinal meningitis have failed to contain the disease. This has led to the search for effective vaccines and to the development of methods for assaying the potency of these vaccines, as well as for measuring the immune response of the individual. The feasibility of using the sero-protection test in embryonated eggs for the assay of meningococcal antibody has been investigated. The paper describes detailed investigations of the infectious process established by injecting Neisseria meningitidis by various challenge routes. Embryos, even 10-12 days old, showed high susceptibility to meningococci injected via the yolksac or chorioallantoic vein, and lesser susceptibility when injected via the intra-allantoic and chorioallantoic routes. The deaths of intravenously inoculated embryos coincided with the multiplication of the organisms and ensuing septicaemia. A study of the infection in embryos which had died, or were killed, 18-24 hours after inoculation showed a specific localization of the organisms in the brain. PMID:4979390

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF A SPERM CELL TOXICITY TEST FOR MARINE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Preliminary methods for conducting a quick and sensitive sperm cell toxicity test for marine waters have been developed. This paper presents a simple static test in which sea urchin or sand dollar sperm cells are exposed to test or control solutions for short periods of time (typ...

  19. 40 CFR 797.1330 - Daphnid chronic toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for asexual (parthenogenic) reproduction. For automatic feeding devices, a suggested rate is 5 to 7 mg... cultured to produce test organisms through reproduction. (2) Chronic toxicity test means a method used to... an extended period of time. In this test guideline, mortality and reproduction (and...

  20. 40 CFR 797.1330 - Daphnid chronic toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for asexual (parthenogenic) reproduction. For automatic feeding devices, a suggested rate is 5 to 7 mg... cultured to produce test organisms through reproduction. (2) Chronic toxicity test means a method used to... an extended period of time. In this test guideline, mortality and reproduction (and...

  1. 40 CFR 797.1330 - Daphnid chronic toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for asexual (parthenogenic) reproduction. For automatic feeding devices, a suggested rate is 5 to 7 mg... cultured to produce test organisms through reproduction. (2) Chronic toxicity test means a method used to... an extended period of time. In this test guideline, mortality and reproduction (and...

  2. 40 CFR 797.1330 - Daphnid chronic toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for asexual (parthenogenic) reproduction. For automatic feeding devices, a suggested rate is 5 to 7 mg... cultured to produce test organisms through reproduction. (2) Chronic toxicity test means a method used to... an extended period of time. In this test guideline, mortality and reproduction (and...

  3. 40 CFR 797.1330 - Daphnid chronic toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for asexual (parthenogenic) reproduction. For automatic feeding devices, a suggested rate is 5 to 7 mg... cultured to produce test organisms through reproduction. (2) Chronic toxicity test means a method used to... an extended period of time. In this test guideline, mortality and reproduction (and...

  4. A new biological test of water toxicity-yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae conductometric test.

    PubMed

    Dolezalova, Jaroslava; Rumlova, Lubomira

    2014-11-01

    This new biological test of water toxicity is based on monitoring of specific conductivity changes of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae suspension as a result of yeast fermentation activity inhibition in toxic conditions. The test was verified on ten substances with various mechanisms of toxic effect and the results were compared with two standard toxicity tests based on Daphnia magna mobility inhibition (EN ISO 6341) and Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition (EN ISO 11348-2) and with the results of the S. cerevisiae lethal test (Rumlova and Dolezalova, 2012). The new biological test - S. cerevisiae conductometric test - is an express method developed primarily for field conditions. It is applicable in case of need of immediate information about water toxicity. Fast completion is an advantage of this test (time necessary for test completion is about 60min), the test is simple and the test organism - dried instant yeast - belongs among its biggest advantages because of its long-term storage life and broad availability. PMID:25461558

  5. Evaluation of alternative reference toxicants for use in the earthworm toxicity test

    SciTech Connect

    Yeardley, R.B. Jr.; Lazorchak, J.M.; Pence, M.A.

    1995-07-01

    The use of the 14-d earthworm toxicity test to aid in the evaluation of the ecological impact of contaminated soils is becoming increasingly widespread. However, the method is in need of further standardization. As part of this continuing process, the choice of reference toxicants was evaluated. Reference toxicants were rated in relation to the following criteria: (a) reproducibility, (b) low human health hazard, (c) feasibility of measurement, and (d) chemical stability. Potassium chloride (KCl) and ammonium chloride (NH{sub 4}Cl) were evaluated as possible alternatives to the one currently in common use, 2-chloroacetamide. Potassium chloride rated the best for the combination of the four criteria, followed by NH{sub 4}Cl and 2-chloroacetamide. Coefficients of variation (C.V.s) from control charts of six definitive tests were use to measure reproducibility. The best reproducibility (lowest C.V.) was shown by KCl, followed by NH{sub 4}Cl and 2-chloroacetamide. Toxicants ranked KCl < NH{sub 4}Cl {much_lt} 2-chloroacetamide in terms of health hazard; and KCl = NH{sub 4}Cl > 2-chloroacetamide in terms of measurement feasibility. Both 2-chloroacetamide and NH{sub 4}Cl changed in concentration during testing. Evidence is also presented that 2-chloroacetamide degrades rapidly during testing, and that, as dead worms decay, ammonification may be adding another toxicant, ammonia, to tests.

  6. Results of chronic toxicity tests conducted on selected A-area outfalls, June-August 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, W.L.

    1997-07-01

    In anticipation of possible toxicity testing requirements in the SRS`s new (1996) NPDES permit, toxicity tests were performed at selected A-Area NPDES outfalls in order to determine if the outfalls were toxic. Chronic definitive toxicity tests were conducted on Ceriodaphnia dubia using water collected from nine locations during the summer of 1996. Six of the nine locations were toxic.

  7. A COMPARISON OF BULK SEDIMENT TOXICITY TESTING METHODS AND SEDIMENT ELUTRIATE TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bulk sediment toxicity tests are routinely used to assess the level and extent of contamination in natural sediments. While reliable, these tests can be resource intensive, requiring significant outlays of time and materials. The purpose of this study was to compare the results ...

  8. Neurobehavioral toxicity testing for risk assessment.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurobehavioral evaluations are key components in neurotoxicity testing. In the realm of regulatory testing, these evaluations range from a functional observational battery (FOB) and an Irwin’s screen, which assess the neurological, motor, and functional integrity of the subject...

  9. In vitro developmental toxicity test detects inhibition of stem cell differentiation by silica nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Margriet V.D.Z. Annema, Wijtske; Salvati, Anna; Lesniak, Anna; Elsaesser, Andreas; Barnes, Clifford; McKerr, George; Howard, C. Vyvyan; Lynch, Iseult; Dawson, Kenneth A.; Piersma, Aldert H.; Jong, Wim H. de

    2009-10-01

    While research into the potential toxic properties of nanomaterials is now increasing, the area of developmental toxicity has remained relatively uninvestigated. The embryonic stem cell test is an in vitro screening assay used to investigate the embryotoxic potential of chemicals by determining their ability to inhibit differentiation of embryonic stem cells into spontaneously contracting cardiomyocytes. Four well characterized silica nanoparticles of various sizes were used to investigate whether nanomaterials are capable of inhibition of differentiation in the embryonic stem cell test. Nanoparticle size distributions and dispersion characteristics were determined before and during incubation in the stem cell culture medium by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering. Mouse embryonic stem cells were exposed to silica nanoparticles at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 {mu}g/ml. The embryonic stem cell test detected a concentration dependent inhibition of differentiation of stem cells into contracting cardiomyocytes by two silica nanoparticles of primary size 10 (TEM 11) and 30 (TEM 34) nm while two other particles of primary size 80 (TEM 34) and 400 (TEM 248) nm had no effect up to the highest concentration tested. Inhibition of differentiation of stem cells occurred below cytotoxic concentrations, indicating a specific effect of the particles on the differentiation of the embryonic stem cells. The impaired differentiation of stem cells by such widely used particles warrants further investigation into the potential of these nanoparticles to migrate into the uterus, placenta and embryo and their possible effects on embryogenesis.

  10. Static renewal tests using Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows). Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, ambient water toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of October 21--28, 1993. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Due to serious reproduction/embryo abortion problems with the TVA daphnid cultures, TVA conducted tests during this study period using only fathead minnows. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Poplar Creek Mile 2.9, Mile 4.3, and Mile 5.1 on October 20, 22, and 25. Samples were split and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) in testing conducted by TVA. Attachments to this report include: Chain of custody forms -- originals; Toxicity test bench sheets and statistical analyses; and Reference toxicant test information.

  11. COMPARATIVE TOXICITY OF DIURON ON SURVIVAL AND GROWTH OF PACIFIC TREEFROG, BULLFROG, RED-LEGGED FROG, AND AFRICAN CLAWED FROG EMBRYOS AND TADPOLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of the herbicide diuron on survival and growth of Pacific treefrog (Pseudacris regilla),bullfrog(Rana catesbeiana), red-legged frog(Rana aurora),and African clawed frog(Xenopus laevis)embryos and tadpoles were determined in static-renewal tests. P.regilla and X.laevis...

  12. Sun light mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles as carrier for 6-mercaptopurine: Preparation, characterization and toxicity studies in zebrafish embryo model

    SciTech Connect

    Ganeshkumar, Moorthy; Sastry, Thotapalli Parvathaleswara; Sathish Kumar, Muniram; Dinesh, Murugan Girija; Kannappan, Sudalyandi; Suguna, Lonchin

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ? Gold nanoparticles prepared using eco-friendly method with good in vitro stability. ? Can be used as drug delivery system. ? Did not show any toxicity in zebrafish embryo. ? More toxic to cancer cells when compared to N-Au-Mp and Mp. -- Abstract: The objective of this study is to synthesize green chemistry based gold nanoparticles by sun light irradiation method. The prepared gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were modified using folic acid and then coupled with 6-mercaptopurine. These modified nanoparticles were used as a tool for targeted drug delivery to treat laryngeal cancer. In the present study, novel bionanocomposites containing nutrient agar coated gold nano particles (N-AuNPs) coupled with 6-mercaptopurine (drug) (N-AuNPs-Mp), folic acid (ligand) (N-AuNPs-Mp-Fa) and rhodamine (dye) (N-AuNPs-Rd), a fluorescent agent, were prepared and characterized by IR, UV, TEM, Particle size analysis and in vitro stability. The toxicity and fluorescence of N-Au was studied using zebrafish embryo model. The in vitro cytotoxicity of free Mp, N-Au-Mp and N-Au-Mp-Fa against HEp-2 cells was compared and found that the amount of Mp required to achieve 50% of growth of inhibition (IC{sub 50}) was much lower in N-Au-Mp-Fa than in free Mp and N-Au-Mp.

  13. POREWATER CHEMISTRY: EFFECTS OF SAMPLING, STORAGE, HANDLING, AND TOXICITY TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a general principle, it is nearly impossible to remove a porewater sample from sediment, use it in a toxicity testing vessel with test organisms, and prevent changes in the chemistry of the natural and anthropogenic organic and inorganic constituents. The degree of change in t...

  14. PROPOSED TEST PROTOCOL TO DETERMINE TOXICANT LEACHING INTO POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research was conducted to develop a general test protocol to identify the possible deterioration of water quality as a result of leaching of toxicants from distribution/transmission pipes and tanks during distribution and storage of potable water. The developed protocol was teste...

  15. THE ROLE OF INORGANIC ION IMBALANCE IN AQUATIC TOXICITY TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effluent toxicity testing methods have been well defined, but to a large part have not attempted to segregate the effects of active ionic concentrations and ion imbalances upon test and species performances. The role that various total dissolved solids in effluents have on regula...

  16. SIMPLIFIED FEEDING TECHNIQUES FOR CULTURING AND TOXICITY TESTING WITH 'CERIODAPHNIA'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Food used for Ceriodaphnia dubia in culture and toxicity testing should be uniform, adequate, and easily prepared. Using as a control the current standard food, YCTF, the authors tested a variety of foods made with algal species singly and in combination, prepared with several me...

  17. GENETIC VARIATION FOR COPPER RESISTANCE IN FATHEAD MINNOW TOXICITY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Unexplained variation in the results of aquatic organism toxicity tests is a consistently observed and troubling phenomenon. Possible sources of variation include differences in condition or nutritional status of the population prior to the test, as well as age, density and hand...

  18. Use of DNA strand damage (Comet assay) and embryo hatching effects to assess contaminant exposure in blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.F.; Steinert, S.A.; Nakayama, K.; Oshima, Y.

    1999-07-01

    After fertilization, blue crab eggs are embedded in a sponge which is attached to the female abdomen during embryo development. Embryos after 9 stages in the egg sac hatch into a swimming zoea stage (stage 10). The authors have developed a bioassay where embryo development is monitored in culture plates with and without toxicants in the water. Toxicant effects are based on determining the percentage of embryos which hatch to zoea. Hatching EC{sub 50} (toxicant concentration at which 50% of the embryos fail to hatch) for a number of pesticides, organometallics and metals were determined. The test takes from 2 to 6 days depending on the embryo stage selected for the study. In addition to embryo development effects the prevalence of DNA single-strand breaks in individual embryo cells were determined using the single cell gel electrophoresis method (Comet assay). A good correlation between DNA strand breakage and embryo defects was found after exposure to genotoxic contaminants. Thus, the bioassay linking DNA damage to embryo hatching effects is rapid, sensitive and mechanistically relevant.

  19. Economical test methods for developmental neurobehavioral toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Bignami, G

    1996-01-01

    The assessment of behavioral changes produced by prenatal or early postnatal exposure to potentially noxious agents requires both the designing of ad hoc tests and the adaptation of tests for adult animals to the characteristics of successive developmental stages. The experience in designing tests is still more limited than in the adaptation of tests, but several tests have already proven their usefulness; some examples are the suckling test, the homing test, and evaluations of dam-pup and pup-pup interactions. Functional observational batteries can exploit the development at specified postnatal ages of several reflexes and responses that are absent at birth in altricial rodent species with a short pregnancy such as the rat and the mouse. In neonates, the assessment of early treatment effects can rely not only on deviations from normal responding but also on changes in the time of appearance of otherwise normal response patterns. The same applies to other end points such as responses to pain and various types of spontaneous motor/exploratory activities, including reactivity to a variety of drug challenges that can provide information on the regulatory systems whose development may be affected by early treatments. In particular, the analysis of ontogenetic dissociations (i.e., differential early treatment effects depending jointly on developmental stage at the time of exposure, age of testing, and response end point) can be of considerable value in the study of treatments' mechanisms of action. Overall, it appears that behavioral teratological assessments can be effectively used both proactively, i.e., in risk assessment prior to any human exposure, and reactively. In the latter case, these assessments could have special value in the face of agents suspected to produce borderline changes in developing humans, whose innocuousness or noxiousness can be difficult to establish in the absence of hard evidence of teratogenicity. PMID:9182035

  20. Baker's yeast assay procedure for testing heavy metal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Bitton, G.; Koopman, B.; Wang, H.D.

    1984-01-01

    Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) is microorganism which is commercially available and sold as packaged dry pellets in any food store at low cost. Studies have been undertaken on the effects of organic xenobiotics as well as heavy metals on yeast metabolism. This type of study has been generally useful in examining the mechanism(s) of chemical toxicity. However, a rapid and quantitative toxicity test using S. cerevisiae as the test organism has not been developed. The purpose of this study was to develop a toxicity assay for heavy metals, using commercial dry yeast as the test microorganism. This rapid and simple procedure is based on the reduction of 2-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(p-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyltetrazolium chloride (INT) to INT-formazan by the yeast electron transport system. The scoring of active cells following exposure to heavy metals was undertaken according to the MINT (malachite green-INT) method developed by Bitton and Koopman.

  1. REPORT ON ALGAL TOXICITY TESTS ON SELECTED OFFICE OF TOXIC SUBSTANCES (OTS) CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Algal (Selenastrum capricornutum) assays were performed on 11 chemicals selected from a larger list of candidate chemicals provided by the EPA's Office of Toxic Substances (OTS). imited chemical analysis of those chemicals that could be tested readily at ERL-C was performed in su...

  2. Decreased Dissolution of ZnO by Iron Doping Yields Nanoparticles with Reduced Toxicity in the Rodent Lung and Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Tian; Zhao, Yan; Sager, Tina; George, Saji; Pokhrel, Suman; Li, Ning; Schoenfeld, David; Meng, Huan; Lin, Sijie; Wang, Xiang; Wang, Meiying; Ji, Zhaoxia; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Mädler, Lutz; Castranova, Vincent; Lin, Shuo; Nel, Andre E.

    2014-01-01

    We have recently shown that the dissolution of ZnO nanoparticles and Zn2+ shedding leads to a series of sub-lethal and lethal toxicological responses at cellular level that can be alleviated by iron-doping. Iron-doping changes the particle matrix and slows the rate of particle dissolution. To determine whether iron doping of ZnO also leads to lesser toxic effects in vivo, toxicity studies were performed in rodent and zebrafish models. First, we synthesized a fresh batch of ZnO nanoparticles doped with 1–10 wt % of Fe. These particles were extensively characterized to confirm their doping status, reduced rate of dissolution in an exposure medium and reduced toxicity in a cellular screen. Subsequent studies compared the effects of undoped to doped particles in the rat lung, mouse lung and the zebrafish embryo. The zebrafish studies looked at embryo hatching and mortality rates as well as the generation of morphological defects, while the endpoints in the rodent lung included an assessment of inflammatory cell infiltrates, LDH release and cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Iron doping, similar to the effect of the metal chelator, DTPA, interfered in the inhibitory effects of Zn2+ on zebrafish hatching. In the oropharyngeal aspiration model in the mouse, iron doping was associated with decreased polymorphonuclear cell counts and IL-6 mRNA production. Doped particles also elicited decreased heme oxygenase 1 expression in the murine lung. In the intratracheal instillation studies in the rat, Fe-doping was associated with decreased polymorphonuclear cell counts, LDH and albumin levels. All considered, the above data show that Fe-doping is a possible safe design strategy for preventing ZnO toxicity in animals and the environment. PMID:21250651

  3. Decreased dissolution of ZnO by iron doping yields nanoparticles with reduced toxicity in the rodent lung and zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Xia, Tian; Zhao, Yan; Sager, Tina; George, Saji; Pokhrel, Suman; Li, Ning; Schoenfeld, David; Meng, Huan; Lin, Sijie; Wang, Xiang; Wang, Meiying; Ji, Zhaoxia; Zink, Jeffrey I; Mädler, Lutz; Castranova, Vincent; Lin, Shuo; Nel, Andre E

    2011-02-22

    We have recently shown that the dissolution of ZnO nanoparticles and Zn(2+) shedding leads to a series of sublethal and lethal toxicological responses at the cellular level that can be alleviated by iron doping. Iron doping changes the particle matrix and slows the rate of particle dissolution. To determine whether iron doping of ZnO also leads to lesser toxic effects in vivo, toxicity studies were performed in rodent and zebrafish models. First, we synthesized a fresh batch of ZnO nanoparticles doped with 1-10 wt % of Fe. These particles were extensively characterized to confirm their doping status, reduced rate of dissolution in an exposure medium, and reduced toxicity in a cellular screen. Subsequent studies compared the effects of undoped to doped particles in the rat lung, mouse lung, and the zebrafish embryo. The zebrafish studies looked at embryo hatching and mortality rates as well as the generation of morphological defects, while the endpoints in the rodent lung included an assessment of inflammatory cell infiltrates, LDH release, and cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Iron doping, similar to the effect of the metal chelator, DTPA, interfered in the inhibitory effects of Zn(2+) on zebrafish hatching. In the oropharyngeal aspiration model in the mouse, iron doping was associated with decreased polymorphonuclear cell counts and IL-6 mRNA production. Doped particles also elicited decreased heme oxygenase 1 expression in the murine lung. In the intratracheal instillation studies in the rat, Fe doping was associated with decreased polymorphonuclear cell counts, LDH, and albumin levels. All considered, the above data show that Fe doping is a possible safe design strategy for preventing ZnO toxicity in animals and the environment. PMID:21250651

  4. Comparisons of Sediment Test Volumes for Freshwater Solid Phase Sediment Toxicity Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory tests with benthic macroinvertebrates are commonly used to assess the potential toxicity of contaminated sediments, and detailed standard test procedures have been developed for various species. For freshwater, two benthic organisms, Hyalella azteca and Chironomus dil...

  5. Sediment acute toxicity testing utilizing short-term bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness of two new bioassays for acute toxicity assessments of sediments. A bacterial bioassay based on inhibition of alpha-glucosidase biosynthesis in Bacillus licheniformis and a 48-hour lethality bioassay employing the benthic cladoceran, Chydorus sphaericus. were evaluated by direct comparisons with standard bioassays, using sediment samples collected from various sites in Florida. This study showed that the bioassay based on inhibition of alpha-glucosidase biosynthesis in Bacillus licheniformis was useful in the acute toxicity screening of sediment elutriates. In regards to Escambia County, Florida samples, the assay was comparable with the Microtox assay and was especially sensitive for samples containing metals. To determine an appropriate procedure for assessing hydrophobic contaminants of sediments in the B. licheniformis bioassay, two extracting procedures were compared. Based on the responses in the Microtox bioassay, shaking sediment samples in methylene chloride produced extracts that were significantly higher in toxicity than extracts obtained by sonication for eight of the ten sediment samples tested. Comparisons of methanol and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as exchange solvents revealed that there was generally no significant difference between these solvents in terms of toxicity in the Microtox assay. Solvent extracts prepared by shaking and exchanged into methanol showed lower toxicity in the B. licheniformis bioassay than in the Microtox assay. Observed sediment toxicity in both bioassays was expressed in terms of the equivalent dry weight concentration of sediment causing 50% inhibition of the assay organism.

  6. Discovery of Quinoline-Derived Trifluoromethyl Alcohols, Determination of Their in vivo Toxicity and Anticancer Activity in a Zebrafish Embryo Model.

    PubMed

    Sittaramane, Vinoth; Padgett, Jihan; Salter, Philip; Williams, Ashley; Luke, Shauntelle; McCall, Rebecca; Arambula, Jonathan F; Graves, Vincent B; Blocker, Mark; Van Leuven, David; Bowe, Keturah; Heimberger, Julia; Cade, Hannah C; Immaneni, Supriya; Shaikh, Abid

    2015-11-01

    In this study the rational design, synthesis, and anticancer activity of quinoline-derived trifluoromethyl alcohols were evaluated. Members of this novel class of trifluoromethyl alcohols were identified as potent growth inhibitors in a zebrafish embryo model. Synthesis of these compounds was carried out with an sp(3) -C-H functionalization strategy of methyl quinolines with trifluoromethyl ketones. A zebrafish embryo model was also used to explore the toxicity of ethyl 4,4,4-trifluoro-3-hydroxy-3-(quinolin-2-ylmethyl)butanoate (1), 2-benzyl-1,1,1-trifluoro-3-(quinolin-2-yl)propan-2-ol (2), and trifluoro-3-(isoquinolin-1-yl)-2-(thiophen-2-yl)propan-2-ol (3). Compounds 2 and 3 were found to be more toxic than compound 1; apoptotic staining assays indicated that compound 3 causes increased cell death. In vitro cell proliferation assays showed that compound 2, with an LC50 value of 14.14??m, has more potent anticancer activity than cisplatin. This novel class of inhibitors provides a new direction in the discovery of effective anticancer agents. PMID:26388134

  7. Joint toxic actions of organic flocculating polymers: Impact on Whole Effluent Toxicity testing. Part 3

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, D.J.; Stover, E.L.

    1996-11-01

    Most states and/or US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regions have adopted narrative water quality criteria requiring various forms of Whole Effluent Toxicity (WET) testing as a component of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) discharge criteria. Because polymers and inorganic coagulant aids are commonly used in conjunction with one another for wastewater treatment, an assessment of potential interactions between the two types of additives was warranted. Thus, joint-compound interaction studies with both the polymer and FeCl{sub 3} or Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} were conducted to determine the effect of co-treatment on WET. Results from these studies clearly demonstrated that the toxicity of these additives during combined treatment was much more dramatic than for each compound individually and that individual toxic assessment would not account for the total magnitude of toxicity induced during combined treatment. Combinations of flocculating polymers with different physical/chemical characteristics (i.e., chemical structure, molecular weight, hydrophobicity, molar refractivity, and charge density) are also commonly used in wastewater treatment. Thus, joint-polymer action studies with several polymer mixtures were performed. Polymers used in these studies included cationic polyquaternary amine (PQA), cationic epichlorohydrin/dimethylamine (EPI/DMA), anionic polyacrylamide (A-PAM), and non-ionic polyacrylamide (N-PAM) polymers. Results from these studies are presented in this manuscript. Overall, results from these studies indicated that the type of polymer mixture was important in determining the joint toxic actions of the flocculating polymers.

  8. COMPUTER INTERFACED TOXICITY TESTING SYSTEM FOR SIMULATING VARIABLE EFFLUENT LOADING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water quality criteria and standards are based primarily on toxicity tests carried out with single chemicals whose concentration is as nearly constant as possible. In the 'real world', however, organisms are exposed to mixtures of chemicals which usually have markedly fluctuating...

  9. THE FUTURE OF TOXICITY TESTING AND ASSESSMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL AGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Research Council's Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology is conducting a two-part study to assess and advance current approaches to toxicity testing and assessment to meet regulatory data needs. The first part of the study was completed January 2006, in which...

  10. A FIELD VALIDATION OF TWO SEDIMENT-AMPHIPOD TOXICITY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field validation study of two sediment-amphipod toxicity tests was conducted using sediment samples collected subtidally in the vicinity of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated Superfund site in Elliott Bay, WA, USA. Sediment samples were collected at 30 stati...

  11. TOXICITY TEST USING LIFE STAGES OF 'CHAMPIA PARVULA' (RHODOPHYTA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A static-renewal, 11- to 14-day toxicity test has been developed using the life cycle of the marine red alga Champia parvula (C. Ag.) Harv. It measures the vegetative growth, formation of tetrasporangia (meiosis), and formation of cystocarps (sexual fusion). The procedure has bee...

  12. Effect of test conditions on relative toxicity rankings of fifteen materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    Fifteen materials were evaluated for relative toxicity of pyrolysis effluents, using different test conditions in the USF methodology. Wool fabrics were consistently among the most toxic materials, and polystyrene and polychloroprene flexible foam were consistently among the least toxic materials.

  13. Genotoxic and teratogenic effect of freshwater sediment samples from the Rhine and Elbe River (Germany) in zebrafish embryo using a multi-endpoint testing strategy.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Käufer, M; Gartiser, S; Hafner, C; Schiwy, S; Keiter, S; Gründemann, C; Hollert, H

    2015-11-01

    The embryotoxic potential of three model sediment samples with a distinct and well-characterized pollutant burden from the main German river basins Rhine and Elbe was investigated. The Fish Embryo Contact Test (FECT) in zebrafish (Danio rerio) was applied and submitted to further development to allow for a comprehensive risk assessment of such complex environmental samples. As particulate pollutants are constructive constituents of sediments, they underlay episodic source-sink dynamics, becoming available to benthic organisms. As bioavailability of xenobiotics is a crucial factor for ecotoxicological hazard, we focused on the direct particle-exposure pathway, evaluating throughput-capable endpoints and considering toxicokinetics. Fish embryo and larvae were exposed toward reconstituted (freeze-dried) sediment samples on a microcosm-scale experimental approach. A range of different developmental embryonic stages were considered to gain knowledge of potential correlations with metabolic competence during the early embryogenesis. Morphological, physiological, and molecular endpoints were investigated to elucidate induced adverse effects, placing particular emphasis on genomic instability, assessed by the in vivo comet assay. Flow cytometry was used to investigate the extent of induced cell death, since cytotoxicity can lead to confounding effects. The implementation of relative toxicity indices further provides inter-comparability between samples and related studies. All of the investigated sediments represent a significant ecotoxicological hazard by disrupting embryogenesis in zebrafish. Beside the induction of acute toxicity, morphological and physiological embryotoxic effects could be identified in a concentration-response manner. Increased DNA strand break frequency was detected after sediment contact in characteristic non-monotonic dose-response behavior due to overlapping cytotoxic effects. The embryonic zebrafish toxicity model along with the in vivo comet assay and molecular biomarker analysis should prospectively be considered to assess the ecotoxicological potential of sediments allowing for a comprehensive hazard ranking. In order to elucidate mode of action, novel techniques such as flow cytometry have been adopted and proved to be valuable tools for advanced risk assessment and management. PMID:25471716

  14. COMPARISON AND EVALUATION OF FIELD AND LABORATORY TOXICITY TESTS WITH FENVALERATE ON AN ESTUARINE CRUSTACEAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A combination of laboratory toxicity tests was conducted on the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio. est results were compared with field toxicity tests to evaluate the usefulness of laboratory testing in estimating mortality from fenvalerate exposure associated with agricultural ru...

  15. An evaluation of the whole effluent toxicity test method

    SciTech Connect

    Osteen, D.V.

    1999-12-17

    Whole effluent toxicity (WET) testing has become increasingly more important to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the States in the permitting of wastewater discharges from industry and municipalities. The primary purpose of the WET test is to protect aquatic life by predicting the effect of an effluent on the receiving stream. However, there are both scientific and regulatory concerns that using WET tests to regulate industrial effluents may result in either false positives and/or false negatives. In order to realistically predict the effect of an effluent on the receiving stream, the test should be as representative as possible of the conditions in the receiving stream. Studies (Rand and Petrocelli 1985) suggested several criteria for an ideal aquatic toxicity test organism, one of which is that the organism be indigenous to, or representative of, the ecosystem receiving the effluent. The other component needed in the development of a predictive test is the use of the receiving stream water or similar synthetic water as the control and dilution water in the test method. Use of an indigenous species and receiving water in the test should help reduce the variability in the method and allow the test to predict the effect of the effluent on the receiving stream. The experience with toxicity testing at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has yielded inconclusive data because of the inconsistency and unreliability of the results. The SRS contention is that the WET method in its present form does not adequately mimic actual biological/chemical conditions of the receiving streams and is neither reasonable nor accurate. This paper discusses the rationale for such a position by SRS on toxicity testing in terms of historical permitting requirements, outfall effluent test results, standard test method evaluation, scientific review of alternate test species, and concerns over the test method expressed by other organizations. This paper presents the Savannah River Site position that the EPA test is neither reasonable nor accurate and thus cannot adequately establish the impact of NPDES outfall discharges on receiving streams.

  16. Teratogenicity testing of BI 58 EC (38% dimethoate) in chicken embryos with special respect to degradation of the active ingredient.

    PubMed

    Várnagy, L; Budai, P; Molnár, E; Füzesi, I; Fáncsi, T

    2001-01-01

    The insecticide formulation BI 58 EC was tested for teratogenicity in chicken embryos, with particular reference to degradation of the active ingredient (dimethoate) after the treatment of embryonated eggs. The pesticide was diluted in water to a concentration level of 0.8%, and the emulsion was injected into the air space in a volume of 0.1 ml/egg, or hen's eggs were treated by the immersion technique. Residues of dimethoate were measured in the samples on days, 13, 15 and 19 of the incubation of chicken embryos, and morphological examinations were performed simultaneously. Analytical chemistry data indicated a slower degradation of dimethoate in embryos after the immersion of eggs, and cyllosis was remarkable in this group among the sporadic developmental anomalies. The liver tissues of both treated groups exhibited severe fatty infiltration. PMID:11702348

  17. The Role of Toxicity Testing in NASA's Future Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitfield, Steve; Davis, Samuel; Wise, Harry; Moore, Robin

    2005-01-01

    NASA has deemed it necessary to perform the Toxicity Test (offgassing of toxic products) on all non-metallic materials proposed for use in habitable environments onboard the Shuttle and International Space Station flS,!J. This requirement stems from the desire to maintain a healthy, breathable atmosphere for the astronauts. As Shuttle missions have lengthened and with the habitation of the International Space Station, the need for understanding and controlling the contaminants in breathable atmospheres has increased. The increased duration of humans in space present two concerns to the astronauts with regard to their breathing air: 1. Breathing the on-board air. 2. Improved cleaning/filtering of existing air. Trends using existing toxicity data for materials and an understanding of the air cleaning/filtering capabilities in relation to Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMAC) of offgassed components are explored. Recommendations are made for materials selection practices that should be followed to ensure a safe and healthy breathing environment for astronauts aboard these long term projects. The importance and relevance of Toxicity testing and materials selection in conjunction with the new NASA missions of creating a human presence on the Moon and traveling to Mars are described.

  18. In situ toxicity testing with locally collected Daphnia

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder-Conn, E.

    1993-07-01

    Daphnia middlendorffiana from local tundra ponds were transplanted into five reserve pits (sumps with used drilling wastes and precipitation) at drill sites in the Prudhoe Bay oil field. Concurrently, Daphnia were transplanted into tundra ponds adjacent to the reserve pits (near ponds), into more distant but connected ponds (distant ponds), and into control ponds to evaluate the toxicity of the fluids along contaminant gradients. Twenty adult Daphnia were placed in eight waxed flow-through containers and exposed to the conditions of each test site. In each exposure container, the ratios of the number of dead Daphnia to the total number of adult Daphnia, the number of young Daphnia to the total number of adult Daphnia, the number of molting Daphnia to the total number of adult Daphnia, and the number of released ephippia to the total number of adult Daphnia were determined. The results not only indicate the utility of in situ testing of invertebrate toxicity but suggest that under certain conditions in situ tests may be more sensitive than traditional laboratory toxicity tests.

  19. Non-animal Replacements for Acute Toxicity Testing.

    PubMed

    Barker-Treasure, Carol; Coll, Kevin; Belot, Nathalie; Longmore, Chris; Bygrave, Karl; Avey, Suzanne; Clothier, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Current approaches to predicting adverse effects in humans from acute toxic exposure to cosmetic ingredients still heavily necessitate the use of animals under EU legislation, particularly in the context of the REACH system, when cosmetic ingredients are also destined for use in other industries. These include the LD50 test, the Up-and-Down Procedure and the Fixed Dose Procedure, which are regarded as having notable scientific deficiencies and low transferability to humans. By expanding on previous in vitro tests, such as the animal cell-based 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake (NRU) assay, this project aims to develop a truly animal-free predictive test for the acute toxicity of cosmetic ingredients in humans, by using human-derived cells and a prediction model that does not rely on animal data. The project, funded by Innovate UK, will incorporate the NRU assay with human dermal fibroblasts in animal product-free culture, to generate an in vitro protocol that can be validated as an accepted replacement for the currently available in vivo tests. To date, the project has successfully completed an assessment of the robustness and reproducibility of the method, by using sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) as a positive control, and displaying analogous results to those of the original studies with mouse 3T3 cells. Currently, the testing of five known ingredients from key groups (a surfactant, a preservative, a fragrance, a colour and an emulsifier) is under way. The testing consists of initial range-finding runs followed by three valid runs of a main experiment with the appropriate concentration ranges, to generate IC50 values. Expanded blind trials of 20 ingredients will follow. Early results indicate that this human cell-based test holds the potential to replace aspects of in vivo animal acute toxicity testing, particularly with reference to cosmetic ingredients. PMID:26256397

  20. Fish embryo tests with Danio rerio as a tool to evaluate surface water and sediment quality in rivers influenced by wastewater treatment plants using different treatment technologies.

    PubMed

    Thellmann, Paul; Köhler, Heinz-R; Rößler, Annette; Scheurer, Marco; Schwarz, Simon; Vogel, Hans-Joachim; Triebskorn, Rita

    2015-11-01

    In order to evaluate surface water and the sediment quality of rivers connected to wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with different treatment technologies, fish embryo tests (FET) with Danio rerio were conducted using native water and sediment samples collected upstream and downstream of four WWTPs in Southern Germany. Two of these WWTPs are connected to the Schussen River, a tributary of Lake Constance, and use a sand filter with final water purification by flocculation. The two others are located on the rivers Schmiecha and Eyach in the area of the Swabian Alb and were equipped with a powdered activated carbon stage 20 years ago, which was originally aimed at reducing the release of stains from the textile industry. Several endpoints of embryo toxicity including mortality, malformations, reduced hatching rate, and heart rate were investigated at defined time points of embryonic development. Higher embryotoxic potentials were found in water and sediments collected downstream of the WWTPs equipped with sand filtration than in the sample obtained downstream of both WWTPs upgraded with a powdered activated carbon stage. PMID:25391229

  1. Technical considerations regarding toxicity testing of commercial bioremediation agents

    SciTech Connect

    Bidwell, J.R.; Cavender, R.C.; Cherry, D.S.; Merski, A.T.; Cianciarulo, F.L.

    1995-12-31

    The toxicological evaluation of commercial bioremediation agents (CBAs) for use on oil spills is under consideration by the USEPA. Currently, acute and chronic bioassays are conducted with the CBA alone and with CBA that has been diluted with the water soluble fraction (WSF) of a crude oil. Endpoints are expressed as a concentration of the CBA. This approach may not address the toxicological issue of CBA use since it (1) does not determine if the CBA affects toxicity of the oil itself, and (2) does not consider temporal aspects associated with byproducts of oil degradation. The present study was conducted to address these issues. A CBA was mixed with unweathered crude oil from 1 to 42 days. The WSF of the mixture was then drawn off and acute bioassays were conducted with silverside minnows, Menidia beryllina, and mysid shrimp, Mysidopsis bahia. For silversides, 96-hr LC50 values ranged from 42.7% WSF after 1 day mixing to 10.5% after 42 days. Toxicity increased sharply between days 4 and 7 when the 96-hr LC50 dropped from 39.0 to 18.2% WSF. A similar trend occurred for mysid shrimp. The presence of the CBA caused a more rapid increase in the toxicity of the oil as compared to bioassays in which oil was mixed alone and then tested. These data indicate that the interaction of CBAs with oil, and associated temporal trends in toxicity, are important aspects to consider in hazard evaluation of these products. The current proposed CBA toxicity testing protocol does not effectively address these issues.

  2. 78 FR 69414 - Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ...propanesulfonic acid, 2-hydroxy-3-(2-propen-1-yloxy)-, sodium salt (1:1). These data were submitted pursuant to a test...for Biodegradation; Acute 0146 (2-propen-1-yloxy)-, sodium salt vinylic systems; antistatic Toxicity to Fish;...

  3. Preliminary investigation of the effects of dispersed Prudhoe Bay Crude Oil on developing topsmelt embryos, Atherinops affinis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian S; Arenella-Parkerson, Diane; Phillips, Bryn M; Tjeerdema, Ronald S; Crane, David

    2009-03-01

    Static exposure experiments were conducted to assess the toxicity of dispersed Prudhoe Bay Crude Oil (PBCO) to embryos of the topsmelt (Atherinops affinis). Treatment with the dispersant COREXIT 9500 resulted in greater hydrocarbon concentrations in chemically enhanced water-accommodated fractions (CEWAFs) of oil, relative to the untreated water-accommodated fractions (WAFs). Topsmelt embryo development and survival to hatching was significantly inhibited in CEWAF tests while minimal effects on embryo-larval survival were observed in WAF tests. Increased hydrocarbon concentrations in the CEWAF tests caused cardiovascular and other abnormalities in developing topsmelt embryos. PMID:19028002

  4. CELLULAR TOXICITY IN CHINESE HAMSTER OVARY CELL CULTURES. 2. A STATISTICAL APPRAISAL OF SENSITIVITY WITH THE RABBIT ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGE, SYRIAN HAMSTER EMBRYO, BALB 3T3 MOUSE, AND HUMAN NEONATAL FIBROBLAST CELL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chinese hamster ovary, rabbit alveolar macrophage, Syrian Hamster embryo, mouse, and human neonatal fibroblast cells were employed in a statistical evaluation of the relative sensitivity of the cells to toxic substances. The cells were exposed to 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, 2,4-dimet...

  5. Field assessments in conjunction with whole effluent toxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    La Point, T.W.; Waller, W.T.

    2000-01-01

    Whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests are widely used to assess potential effects of wastewater discharges on aquatic life. This paper represents a summary of chapters in a 1996 Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry-sponsored workshop and a literature review concerning linkages between WET testing and associated field biomonitoring. Most published studies thus far focus primarily on benthic macroinvertebrates and on effluent-dominated stream systems in which effluents demonstrate little or no significant acute toxicity. Fewer studies examine WET test predictability in other aquatic ecosystems (e.g., wetlands, estuaries, large rivers) or deal with instream biota such as fish and primary producers. Published results indicate that standards for the usual WET freshwater test species, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas, may not always protect most of the species inhabiting a receiving stream. Although WET tests are useful in predicting aquatic individual responses, they are not meant to directly measure natural population or community responses. Further, they do not address bioconcentration or bioaccumulation of hydrophobic compounds; do not assess eutrophication effects in receiving systems; and lastly, do not reflect genotoxic effects or function to test for endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Consequently, a more direct evaluation of ecosystem health, using bioassessment techniques, may be needed to properly evaluate aquatic systems affected by wastewater discharges.

  6. 78 FR 69414 - Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... October 21, 2011 (76 FR 65385) (FRL-8885-5) (docket ID number EPA-HQ-OPPT-2009-0112). The table in this... AGENCY Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces EPA's receipt of test data on...

  7. PHOTOACTIVATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON TOXICITY IN MEDAKA (ORYZIAS LATIPES) EMBRYOS: RELEVANCE TO ENVIRONMENTAL RISK IN CONTAMINATED SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hazard for photoactivated toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been clearly demonstrated; however, to our knowledge, the risk in contaminated systems has not been characterized. To address this question, a median lethal dose (LD50) for fluoranthene photoa...

  8. A SURROGATE SUBCHRONIC TOXICITY TEST METHOD FOR WATERS WITH HIGH TOTAL DISSOLVED SOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total dissolved solids (TDS) are often identified as a toxicant in whole-effluent toxicity (WET) testing. The primary test organism used in WET testing, Ceriodaphnia dubia, is very sensitive to TDS ions, which can be problematic when differentiating the toxicity of TDS from those...

  9. An in vivo evaluation of acute toxicity of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles in larval-embryo Zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Farooq; Liu, Xiaoyi; Zhou, Ying; Yao, Hongzhou

    2015-09-01

    The broad spectrum applications of CoFe2O4 NPs have attracted much interest in medicine, environment and industry, resulting in exceedingly higher exposures to humans and environmental systems in succeeding days. Their health effects and potential biological impacts need to be determined for risk assessment. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were exposed to environmentally relevant doses of nano-CoFe2O4 (mean diameter of 40nm) with a concentration range of 10-500?M for 96h. Acute toxic end points were evaluated by survival rate, malformation, hatching delay, heart dysfunction and tail flexure of larvae. Dose and time dependent developmental toxicity with severe cardiac edema, down regulation of metabolism, hatching delay and tail/spinal cord flexure and apoptosis was observed. The biochemical changes were evaluated by ROS, Catalase (CAT), Lipid peroxidation (LPO), Acid phophatase (AP) and Glutatione s- transferase (GST). An Agglomeration of NPs and dissolution of ions induces severe mechanical damage to membranes and oxidative stress. Severe apoptosis of cells in the head, heart and tail region with inhibition of catalase confirms ROS induced acute toxicity with increasing concentration. Increased activity of GST and AP at lower concentrations of CoFe2O4 NPs demonstrates the severe oxidative stress. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra indicated the weak interactions of NPs with BSA and slight changes in ?-helix structure. In addition, CoFe2O4 NPs at lower concentrations do not show any considerable interference with assay components and analytical instruments. The results are possible elucidation of pathways of toxicity induced by these particles, as well as contributing in defining the protocols for risk assessment of these nanoparticles. PMID:26197244

  10. Mechanistic approaches and the development of alternative toxicity test methods.

    PubMed Central

    Balls, M

    1998-01-01

    A mechanism can be defined as an explanation of an observed phenomenon that explains the processes underlying the phenomenon in terms of events at lower levels of organization. A prerequisite for new, more mechanistic, approaches, which would use in vitro systems rather than conventional animal analogy models, is a strengthening of the underlying scientific basis of toxicity testing. This will require greater recognition of the differences between fidelity and discrimination models and between analogy and correlation models. The development of high-fidelity, high-discrimination tests with a sound mechanistic basis will also require greater appreciation of the interdependence of all the components of test systems and the development of new alternative (i.e., nonanimal) testing strategies that can provide the specific knowledge needed for making relevant and reliable predictions about the potential effects of chemicals and products in human beings. The optimal use of this new knowledge will require fundamental changes to current practices in risk assessment. PMID:9599691

  11. Establishing relative sensitivities of various toxicity testing organisms to ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Karle, L.M.; Mayhew, H.L.; Barrows, M.E.; Karls, R.K.

    1994-12-31

    The toxicity of ammonia to various organisms was examined to develop a baseline for mortality in several commonly used testing species. This baseline data will assist in choosing the proper test species and in interpreting results as they pertain to ammonia. Responses for two juvenile fish species, three marine amphipods, and two species of mysid shrimp were compared for their sensitivity to levels of ammonia. All mortality caused by ammonia in the bottom-dwelling Citharichthys stigmaeus occurred within 24 h of exposure, whereas mortality in the silverside, Menidia beryllina, occurred over the entire 96-h test duration. Responses to ammonia varied among the amphipods Rhepoxynius abronius, Ampelisca abdita, and Eohaustorius estuarius. R. abronius and A. abdita showed similar sensitivity to ammonia at lower concentrations; A. abdita appeared more sensitive than R. abronius at levels above 40 mg/L. Concentrations of ammonia required to produce significant mortality in the amphipod E. estuarius were far higher than the other species examined (> 100 mg/L NH{sub 3}). A comparison of ammonia toxicity with two commonly used invertebrates, Holmesimysis sculpts and Mysidopsis bahia, suggest that these two species of mysid have similar sensitivities to ammonia. Further studies with ammonia that examine sensitivity of different organisms should be conducted to assist regulatory and environmental agencies in determining appropriate test species and in interpreting toxicological results as they may be affected by levels of ammonia.

  12. KEPONE (TRADEMARK): CHRONIC EFFECTS ON EMBRYO, FRY, JUVENILE, AND ADULT SHEEPSHEAD MINNOWS ('CYPRINODON VARIEGATUS')

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the toxicity of Kepone to, and uptake by embryo, fry, juvenile, and adult sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) using intermittent-flow toxicity tests. Concentrations of Kepone and percentage of adult fish surviving in a 28-day exposure were--Control, 95...

  13. VALIDATION OF EMBRYO TESTS FOR DETERMINING EFFECTS OF FUNGAL PEST CONTROL AGENTS ON NONTARGET AQUATIC ANIMALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developing embryos of the inland silverside fish Menidia beryllina and grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio were exposed to conidiospores of the fungal weed control agent, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, f. sp. aeschynomene, and the entomopathogen, Metarhizium anisopliae. nly Metarhiz...

  14. Sediment toxicity testing of Lake Orta after liming

    SciTech Connect

    Baudo, R.; Beltrami, M.; Rossi, D.; Gronda, A.; Abdel-Monem, A.M.; Burton, G.A.

    1995-12-31

    Lake Orta has been severely polluted by industrial effluents containing Cu, NH{sub 3}, Cr., Ni, and Zn. Ammonia oxidation caused a pH drop below 4. More than 60 papers have described the adverse chemical and biological changes which occurred in Lake Orta in the past several decades. In 1989, CaCO{sub 3} (10,900 tons) was added to the lake as a remedial action. The treatment was effective, improving water quality and allowing some original plankton, benthic, and fish populations to return. However, Cu and Cr are still present in the top 10 cm of sediment. The toxicity of the sediment was evaluated using multiple assays: Microtox (solid phase and pore water), Brachionus calyciflorus and Thamnocephalus platyurus Toxkits (pore water), seed germination and root elongation (solid phase and pore water). In addition, in situ and laboratory tests were conducted with Hyalella azteca and an indigenous species of Daphnia. Assays responses varied yet showed surficial sediments to be toxic. Toxicity increased with sediment in pre-liming deposition zones. Recovery of the ecosystem is evident, however the contaminated sediments may impede further improvement.

  15. Organotypic liver culture models: Meeting current challenges in toxicity testing

    PubMed Central

    LeCluyse, Edward L.; Witek, Rafal P.; Andersen, Melvin E.; Powers, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of chemical-induced hepatotoxicity in humans from in vitro data continues to be a significant challenge for the pharmaceutical and chemical industries. Generally, conventional in vitro hepatic model systems (i.e. 2-D static monocultures of primary or immortalized hepatocytes) are limited by their inability to maintain histotypic and phenotypic characteristics over time in culture, including stable expression of clearance and bioactivation pathways, as well as complex adaptive responses to chemical exposure. These systems are less than ideal for longer-term toxicity evaluations and elucidation of key cellular and molecular events involved in primary and secondary adaptation to chemical exposure, or for identification of important mediators of inflammation, proliferation and apoptosis. Progress in implementing a more effective strategy for in vitro-in vivo extrapolation and human risk assessment depends on significant advances in tissue culture technology and increasing their level of biological complexity. This article describes the current and ongoing need for more relevant, organotypic in vitro surrogate systems of human liver and recent efforts to recreate the multicellular architecture and hemodynamic properties of the liver using novel culture platforms. As these systems become more widely used for chemical and drug toxicity testing, there will be a corresponding need to establish standardized testing conditions, endpoint analyses and acceptance criteria. In the future, a balanced approach between sample throughput and biological relevance should provide better in vitro tools that are complementary with animal testing and assist in conducting more predictive human risk assessment. PMID:22582993

  16. Tests for oil/dispersant toxicity: In situ laboratory assays

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, D.A.; Coelho, G.M.; Aurand, D.V.

    1995-12-31

    As part of its readiness program in oil spill response, the Marine Pollution Control Unit (MPCU), Department of Transport, U.K. conducts annual field trials in the North Sea, approximately 30 nautical miles from the southeast coast of England. The trials take the form of controlled releases of crude oil or Medium Fuel/Gas Oil mix (MFO), with and without the application of Corexit 9527 dispersant. In 1994 and 1995 the authors conducted a series of in situ toxicity bioassays in association with these spills with included 48h LC50 tests for turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) and oyster (Crassostrea gigas) larvae, a 48 h oyster (C. gigas) embryonic development test and two full life-cycle assays using the copepods Acartia tonsa and Tisbe battagliai. Tests were also conducted in the Chesapeake Bay laboratory using estuarine species including the copepod Eurytemora affinis and the inland silverside Menidia beryllina. Here, the authors report on the results of these assays, together with 1996 in situ toxicity data resulting from Norwegian field trials in the northern North Sea.

  17. 76 FR 38169 - Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... FR 22402) (FRL-7312-2), and later amended by a final rule titled ``Revocation of TSCA Section 4... 12, 2006 (71 FR 18650) (FRL-7751-7). Section 4(d) of TSCA (15 U.S.C. 2603(d)) requires EPA to publish... AGENCY Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data AGENCY:...

  18. Chilling of Steindachneridionparahybae (siluriformes: pimelodidae) embryos.

    PubMed

    da Silva Lopes, Taís; Sanches, Eduardo Antônio; Okawara, Renan Yoshiharu; Romagosa, Elizabeth

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the viability of Steindachneridion parahybae embryos after chilling using different cryoprotectant solutions, stages of embryonic development, chilling curves, and storage periods at temperatures between -10 °C and 0 °C. Three experimental tests were conducted, and the following aspects were evaluated: (1) the toxicity of six cryoprotectant solutions (10% methanol, ethylene glycol, or DMSO combined with 0.5-M sucrose or lactose); (2) viability of embryos submitted to cooling with two cryoprotectant solutions (10% or 20% methanol combined with 10-M sucrose) at three different stages of development (closure of blastoporus, appearance of the optic vesicle and the moment when the tail began to straighten out), and two chilling periods (6 and 12 hours); (3) viability of embryos submitted to cooling with three chilling curves (directly to the freezer without a curve, 0.5 °C/min and 1.0 °C/min) and two chilling periods (6 and 12 hours). After the tests, it was concluded that the protocol which presented the most positive results after chilling, with a hatching rate of 63.50 ± 9.98% of the embryos and 12.32 ± 3.85% normal hatched larvae, was the one with embryos at the free-tail stage, the cryoprotectant solution with 10% methanol and 10-M sucrose, a chilling curve of 0.5 °C/min, stored for a maximum of 6 hours at subzero temperatures (temperature ranging between -5.05 °C and -7.83 °C). PMID:25989879

  19. An interlaboratory comparison of sediment elutriate preparation and toxicity test methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elutriate bioassays are among numerous methods that exist for assessing the potential toxicity of sediments in aquatic systems. In this study, interlaboratory results were compared from 96-hour Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas static-renewal acute toxicity tests conduct...

  20. AN ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) TESTING OF SEVEN TECHNOLOGIES DETECTING TOXICITY IN DRINKING WATER (R2)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rapid toxicity technologies can detect certain toxins and with testing it can be determined their susceptibility to interfering chemical in controlled experimental matrix. Rapid toxicity technologies do not identify or determine the concentrations of specific contaminants, but s...

  1. Comparison of prehatch C-start responses in rainbow trout and lake trout embryos by means of a tactile stimulus test

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, P.J.; Noltie, D.B.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2003-01-01

    The C-start in teleost fishes, a type of startle response, mediates the ability to respond to abrupt, unexpected stimuli and is characterized by a short-latency, C-type fast start acceleration. In prehatch fish embryos, the C-start appears necessary for mechanical breakdown of the egg chorion and successful hatching by way of increased embryo movement and distribution of the hatching enzymes. In later stages, the C-start plays an important role in predator avoidance. Using tactile stimulation, we evaluated the C-start response in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss at 170 degree-days, when 6.6% of embryos exhibited C-starts, and lake trout Salvelinus namaycush embryos at 320 degree-days, when 23% of embryos exhibited C-starts. Triplicate groups of embryos were later tested at three developmental stages: early (220 and 360 degree-days for rainbow trout and lake trout, respectively), middle (260 and 480 degree-days, respectively), and late (320 and 560 degree-days, respectively). The proportion of trout embryos exhibiting C-start increased through time, such that 100% had responded by the late stage, just prior to hatching. C-starts could be obtained by repeated stimulation, and the relative activity of the embryos (based on the number of flexures per stimulus) also increased over time. Rainbow trout and lake trout showed very similar C-start responses at parallel developmental stages, and these patterns of response were similar to those reported in other fish species.

  2. Evaluation of municipal waste incinerator fly ash toxicity and the role of cadmium by two aquatic toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Hidehiro

    1996-12-31

    Fly ash from a municipal solid waste incinerator in Japan is regulated under the hazardous waste regulation Waste under Special Control, according to the Amendment of the Waste Disposal and Public Cleansing Law, because it contains high concentrations of heavy metals which are available for leaching. To evaluate the toxicity of fly ash, a fly ash leachate was prepared according to the Japanese standard leaching procedure. The chemical analysis of the leachate showed that possibly one of the most toxic substances was cadmium. The toxicity of the leachate and the cadmium was determined by algal assay and a Daphnia acute toxicity test. The results showed that the leachate was about seven times more toxic to the growth of algae and 20 to 30 times more toxic to the survival of Daphnia than expected from its cadmium concentration. The toxicity interaction between cadmium and the other constituents in the leachate was also examined. The toxicity of cadmium showed an additive effect with the other constituents in the leachate in algal assay. In the Daphnia test, however, cadmium showed an antagonistic effect.

  3. Characterization of toxicants in urban road dust by Toxicity Identification Evaluation using ostracod Heterocypris incongruens direct contact test.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Rajendra; Furumai, Hiroaki; Nakajima, Fumiyuki

    2015-10-15

    The current study involves characterization of organic compounds, heavy metals, and ammonia as potential toxicants in one arterial road (St. 3) and two highway (St. 7 and 8) urban road dust (URD) collected in Tokyo, Japan. URD toxicity was evaluated by Toxicity Identification Evaluation using the ostracod Heterocypris incongruens direct contact test. URDs were treated with resins (10% XAD-4, 20% SIR-300 and 20% SIR-600) to determine the reduction in mortality after treatment. The mortality of ostracods exposed to St. 3 URD (baseline 80%) was significantly (p<0.05) reduced to 0% and 47% after XAD-4 and SIR-300 treatment respectively. This reduction led us to suspect hydrophobic organic compounds and heavy metals as potential toxicants. Subsequent elution of the recovered XAD-4 with polar (methanol, acetone) and non-polar (dichloromethane) solvents confirmed the dominance of relatively polar hydrophobic organic toxicants. The dissolved concentration of Cu and Zn after SIR-300 treatment exceeded the 50% lethal concentration (LC50) for ostracods, which led us to suspect Cu and Zn as other probable toxicants. The concentration of Zn in a SIR-300 acidic elutriate, recovered after the termination of toxicity test, confirmed Zn as one of the toxicants in St. 3. The baseline mortality (100%) of St. 7 was significantly reduced (23%) by SIR-300 treatment. This indicated the presence of heavy metals as the probable toxicant. However, the concentration of dissolved heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in the overlying water was below previously reported LC50 values for each metal in St. 7. Recovery of Zn concentrations exceeding the LC50 in the St. 7 SIR-300 elutriate led us to suspect a dietary exposure route of Zn to the ostracod during the direct contact test. The overall results indicate that the toxicant types can vary widely depending on the road sampled. PMID:26026413

  4. Fractionating nanosilver: importance for determining toxicity to aquatic test organisms.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Alan J; Hull, Matthew S; Bednar, Anthony J; Goss, Jennifer D; Gunter, Jonas C; Bouldin, Jennifer L; Vikesland, Peter J; Steevens, Jeffery A

    2010-12-15

    This investigation applied novel techniques for characterizing and fractionating nanosilver particles and aggregates and relating these measurements to toxicological endpoints. The acute toxicity of eight nanosilver suspensions of varying primary particle sizes (10-80 nm) and coatings (citrate, polyvinylpyrrolidone, EDTA, proprietary) was assessed using three aquatic test organisms (Daphnia magna, Pimephales promelas, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata). When 48-h lethal median concentrations (LC50) were expressed as total silver, both D. magna and P. promelas were significantly more sensitive to ionic silver (Ag(+)) as AgNO(3) (mean LC50 = 1.2 and 6.3 ?g/L, respectively) relative to a wide range in LC50 values determined for the nanosilver suspensions (2 -126 ?g/L). However, when LC50 values for nanosilver suspensions were expressed as fractionated nanosilver (Ag(+) and/or <4 nm particles), determined by ultracentrifugation of particles and confirmed field-flow-fractograms, the LC50 values (0.3-5.6 ?g/L) were comparable to the values obtained for ionic Ag(+) as AgNO(3). These results suggest that dissolved Ag(+) plays a critical role in acute toxicity and underscores the importance of characterizing dissolved fractions in nanometal suspensions. PMID:21082828

  5. Test of significant toxicity: a statistical application for assessing whether an effluent or site water is truly toxic.

    PubMed

    Denton, Debra L; Diamond, Jerry; Zheng, Lei

    2011-05-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) and state agencies implement the Clean Water Act, in part, by evaluating the toxicity of effluent and surface water samples. A common goal for both regulatory authorities and permittees is confidence in an individual test result (e.g., no-observed-effect concentration [NOEC], pass/fail, 25% effective concentration [EC25]), which is used to make regulatory decisions, such as reasonable potential determinations, permit compliance, and watershed assessments. This paper discusses an additional statistical approach (test of significant toxicity [TST]), based on bioequivalence hypothesis testing, or, more appropriately, test of noninferiority, which examines whether there is a nontoxic effect at a single concentration of concern compared with a control. Unlike the traditional hypothesis testing approach in whole effluent toxicity (WET) testing, TST is designed to incorporate explicitly both ? and ? error rates at levels of toxicity that are unacceptable and acceptable, given routine laboratory test performance for a given test method. Regulatory management decisions are used to identify unacceptable toxicity levels for acute and chronic tests, and the null hypothesis is constructed such that test power is associated with the ability to declare correctly a truly nontoxic sample as acceptable. This approach provides a positive incentive to generate high-quality WET data to make informed decisions regarding regulatory decisions. This paper illustrates how ? and ? error rates were established for specific test method designs and tests the TST approach using both simulation analyses and actual WET data. In general, those WET test endpoints having higher routine (e.g., 50th percentile) within-test control variation, on average, have higher method-specific ? values (type I error rate), to maintain a desired type II error rate. This paper delineates the technical underpinnings of this approach and demonstrates the benefits to both regulatory authorities and permitted entities. PMID:21305584

  6. Quality testing of three species of Tephritid fruit flies after embryo cryopreservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluates characteristics commonly used to define insect quality or fitness by using a complement of three species of tephritid fruit flies obtained from cryopreserved embryos. The Mexican, Anastrepah ludens, Caribbean, A. suspense, and Mediterranean, Certatitis capitata, fruit flies were...

  7. Quality Testing of Three Species of Tephritid Fruit Flies After Embryo Cryopreservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluates characteristics commonly used to define insect quality or fitness by using a complement of three species of tephritid fruit flies obtained from cryopreserved embryos. The Mexican, Anastrepah ludens, Caribbean, A. suspense, and Mediterranean, Certatitis capitata, fruit flies were...

  8. Benefits and costs to mussels from ejecting bitterling embryos: a test of the evolutionary equilibrium hypothesis

    E-print Network

    Reynolds, John D.

    benefits and costs of host defence in an unusual interaction, between a freshwater fish, the European bitterling, Rhodeus sericeus, and live unionid mussels that are used as hosts for the fish's eggs. We found a significant reduction in ventilation rate of mussels that were incubating bitterling embryos, which became

  9. Comparison of mathematically-predicted toxic equivalents (TEQs) and bioassay-derived dioxin-equivalents (TCDD-EQs) in heron embryos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.; Hatfield, J.; Melancon, M.; Custer, T.; Tillitt, D.

    1995-01-01

    Pipping black-crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) embryos were collected from an uncontaminated site (Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge,VA) and three polluted sites (Cat Island, Green Bay, WI; Bair and West Marin Islands, San Francisco Bay, CA). Hepatic microsomal monooxygenases were induced up to 85-fold relative to the reference site, and was associated with concentrations of total PCBs and 11 PCB congeners that are presumed to concern.to express toxicity through the Ah receptor. TEQs [mathematically predicted; summed product of PCB congener concentrations using 5 different sets of toxic equivalency factors (TEFs)] were compared to TCDD-EQs [derived by bioassay; ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase activity of treated H411E rat hepatoma cells]. Although TEQs were up to 15-fold greater than TCDD-EQs, the pattern among sites was consistent and TEQs were highly correlated with TCDD-EQs. TEFs based on single congener mammalian studies yielded TEQs that greatly exceeded values from the H411E bioassay of field sample. TEFs generated from avian egg injection studies yielded TEQs that most closely approximated bioassay-derived TCDD-EQs. Cytochrome P450 parameters were related to TEQs and TCDD-EQs; adjusted r2 often exceeded 0.5 for the relation among mathematically predicted TEQs and cytochrome P450 measurements. These data document the general predictive value of TEQs and TCDD-EQs for P450 induction in field collected samples, but also indicate the need for development of TEFs for the species and biological end point of concern.

  10. Tigriopus fulvus: The interlaboratory comparison of the acute toxicity test.

    PubMed

    Faraponova, Olga; Giacco, Elisabetta; Biandolino, Francesca; Prato, Ermelinda; Del Prete, Francesco; Valenti, Alessandra; Sarcina, Stefania; Pasteris, Andrea; Montecavalli, Adele; Comin, Stefano; Cesca, Claudia; Francese, Marco; Cigar, Monica; Piazza, Veronica; Falleni, Fabrizio; Lacchetti, Ines

    2016-02-01

    The paper reports the results of an interlaboratory comparison involving 11 laboratories, with the objectives of apply and validate a new standardized ecotoxicological method on marine crustacean Tigriopus fulvus. Copper was chosen as reference toxicant as indicated in the official method. The results of two independent tests performed by all the participants, demonstrated that the new method is simple, fast and easy to learn. This is confirmed even by the values of z-score index calculated for each laboratory and the relative coefficient of variation (CV) which are 6.32% after 24h, 6.56 after 48h and 35.3% after 96h, mentioned in the ISO standards for the precision of interlaboratory assays. Therefore its use could be recommended in environmental studies and monitoring. PMID:26584461

  11. Toxicity testing with the marine algae, Symbiodinium kawagutii (Dinophyceae)

    SciTech Connect

    Gorrie, J.R.; Bidwell, J.R.; Rippingale, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    The dinoflagellate, Symbiodinium kawagutii, is among the algal taxa which exist in symbiosis with a range of marine invertebrates. S. kawagutii is commonly found in association with the Hawaiian stony coral, Montipora verrucosa. The algae has been successfully cultured in the laboratory using a common marine algal growth media (Guillard f/2), and sufficient cell densities were achieved in a 96-hr bioassay to allow statistical evaluation of toxicity data. A 96-hr EC{sub 50} of 6.47 mg/L (95% C.I.: 3.54--9.88 mg/L) was calculated after exposure to potassium dichromate. Wide distribution of the coral host and ecological importance of the symbiosis make S. kawagutii an excellent candidate species for hazard evaluation in tropical marine ecosystems. Continuing research will seek to further refine the bioassay, including the use of a microplate technique for more rapid testing.

  12. EFFECT OF CHEMICAL CARRIERS ON AVIAN LC(50) TOXICITY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The subacute dietary (LC50) toxicity of a pesticide as prescribed by the Federal Insecticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act and of toxic substances as defined by the Toxic Substances Control Act is a routine data point for many chemicals. The methods under which the LC50 data are ...

  13. Results of acute and chronic toxicity tests conducted at SRS NPDES outfalls, July--October 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    Acute (48 hour LC50) and chronic (7-day reproductive impairment) toxicity tests were conducted on Ceriodaphnia dubia in water collected from 53 NPDES outfalls. All tests were conducted at the in-stream waste concentration. only 12 of the 53 outfalls showed no evidence of toxicity. Twenty-eight of the outfalls were acutely toxic, often producing 100% mortality during the first day of exposure. Fourteen outfalls had no discharge at the time of sampling and could not be tested. Three outfalls were not tested because their toxicity has been adequately characterized in other investigations. Elevated concentrations of total residual chlorine are suspected to be responsible for the observed toxicity of many NPDES outfalls, particularly the sanitary wastewater treatment plants. Chemical data from previous studies indicate that metals may also be present in toxic concentrations at many outfalls. Toxicity identification and reduction options are discussed.

  14. Environmental concentrations of the cocaine metabolite benzoylecgonine induced sublethal toxicity in the development of plants but not in a zebrafish embryo-larval model.

    PubMed

    García-Cambero, J P; García-Cortés, H; Valcárcel, Y; Catalá, M

    2015-12-30

    Several studies have found cocaine and its main active metabolite benzoylecgonine (BE) in the aquatic environment and drinking water, derived from its consumption by humans as well as the inability of water treatment processes to eliminate it. A few studies have already investigated the ecotoxicology of BE to aquatic invertebrates, but none has still addressed the effects of BE on aquatic vertebrates or vascular plants. The goal of this publication is to provide information on the toxicity of environmental concentrations of BE during animal and vascular plant development, in order to contribute to a better understanding of the potential risk of this substance for the environment. BE induced alterations in mitochondrial activity and DNA levels of fern spores at environmental concentrations (1ngL(-1)), which could disrupt gametophyte germination. However, BE at concentrations ranging from 1ngL(-1) to 1mgL(-1) did not disturb morphogenesis, hatching, heartbeat rate or larval motility in a zebrafish embryo-larval model. Adverse effects on ferns agree with the allelophathic role described for alkaloids and their unspecific interference with plant germination. Therefore, the anthropogenic dispersion of alkaloid allelochemicals may pose a risk for biodiversity and irrigated food production that should be further investigated. PMID:26340554

  15. Current developments in reproductive toxicity testing of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ralph L

    2009-09-01

    A protocol to evaluate the potential developmental and reproductive effects of test chemicals has been developed by the Life Stages Task Force of the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI)/Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) Agricultural Chemical Safety Assessment (ACSA) Technical Committee. Since the original publication, several international groups have provided public comment on conducting the test. The extended one-generation reproductive toxicity test is now under consideration as a potential test guideline. The protocol uses a flexible approach that is markedly different from the current multigenerational guidelines. It encourages the use of toxicokinetics when setting the doses, evaluates more than one rat per sex per litter in the F1 offspring and does not necessarily require mating of the F1 to produce an F2 (F1 mating may be triggered by the presence of effects in the P0 and developing F1 rats). A number of additional reproductive endpoints, and the neurotoxicity and immunotoxicity cohorts are included. The ACSA protocol was developed with the goal of assuring that the methods are scientifically appropriate and the toxicological endpoints and exposure durations are relevant for risk assessment. Compared to existing testing strategies, the proposed approach uses substantially fewer animals, provides additional information on the neonate, juvenile and pubertal animal, and includes an estimation of human exposure potential for making decisions about the extent of testing required. In this paper, the evolution of the protocol since the 2006 publication is discussed. These changes reflect the collective input of a U.S. expert panel of government and industrial scientist convened in 2007 and discussions of an OECD expert group held in Paris, France (October, 2008). PMID:19409482

  16. Aquatic toxicity testing for multicomponent compounds with special reference to preparation of test solution

    SciTech Connect

    Tadokoro, H.; Maeda, M.; Kawashima, Y.; Kitano, M.; Hwang, D.F.; Yoshida, T. )

    1991-02-01

    An adequate method of determining the toxicity of a compound consisting of multiple components, such as creosote, coal tar, and coal tar pitch, was studied for different test solution preparation methods, i.e., direct dosing without filtration, diluting the stock solution of saturated concentration, and dispersing with acetone. Killifish, Oryzias latipes, as a freshwater fish; red sea bream, Pagrus major, as a saltwater fish; and daphnia, Daphnia magna, as a representative crustacean, were used for testing. The chemical analysis of each preparation of test solution with gas chromatography revealed an entirely different profile of the components. The highest toxicity was obtained with preparation by acetone dispersion. That was followed by the preparations with direct dosing method and with the method of dilution of saturated concentration stock solution. Considering the results obtained, the direct dosing method with a suitable settling time may provide useful information enabling extrapolation of the test results to the natural environment for complex multicomponent compounds.

  17. Early Evolution of the Toxicity Identification Evaluation Process: Contributions from the USEPA Effluent Testing Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of its whole effluent testing program, the USEPA developed an effects-directed analysis (EDA) approach to identifying the cause of toxicity in toxic effluents or ambient waters, an EDA process termed a “Toxicity Identification Evaluation” (TIE), which is the focus of this...

  18. Custom-designed nanomaterial libraries for testing metal oxide toxicity.

    PubMed

    Pokhrel, Suman; Nel, André E; Mädler, Lutz

    2013-03-19

    Advances in aerosol technology over the past 10 years have enabled the generation and design of ultrafine nanoscale materials for many applications. A key new method is flame spray pyrolysis (FSP), which produces particles by pyrolyzing a precursor solution in the gas phase. FSP is a highly versatile technique for fast, single-step, scalable synthesis of nanoscale materials. New innovations in particle synthesis using FSP technology, including variations in precursor chemistry, have enabled flexible, dry synthesis of loosely agglomerated, highly crystalline ultrafine powders (porosity ? 90%) of binary, ternary, and mixed-binary-and-ternary oxides. FSP can fulfill much of the increasing demand, especially in biological applications, for particles with specific material composition, high purity, and high crystallinity. In this Account, we describe a strategy for creating nanoparticle libraries (pure or Fedoped ZnO or TiO?) utilizing FSP and using these libraries to test hypotheses related to the particles' toxicity. Our innovation lies in the overall integration of the knowledge we have developed in the last 5 years in (1) synthesizing nanomaterials to address specific hypotheses, (2) demonstrating the electronic properties that cause the material toxicity, (3) understanding the reaction mechanisms causing the toxicity, and (4) extracting from in vitro testing and in vivo testing in terrestrial and marine organisms the essential properties of safe nanomaterials. On the basis of this acquired knowledge, we further describe how the dissolved metal ion from these materials (Zn²? in this Account) can effectively bind with different cell constituents, causing toxicity. We use Fe-S protein clusters as an example of the complex chemical reactions taking place after free metal ions migrate into the cells. As a second example, TiO? is an active material in the UV range that exhibits photocatalytic behavior. The induction of electron-hole (e?/h?) pairs followed by free radical production is a key mechanism for biological injury. We show that decreasing the bandgap energy increases the phototoxicity in the presence of near-visible light. We present in detail the mechanism of electron transfer in biotic and abiotic systems during light exposure. Through this example we show that FSP is a versatile technique for efficiently designing a homologous library, meaning a library based on a parent oxide doped with different amounts of dopant, and investigating the properties of the resulting compounds. Finally, we describe the future outlook and state-of-the-art of an innovative two-flame system. A double-flame reactor enables independent control over each flame, the nozzle distances and the flame angles for efficient mixing of the particle streams. In addition, it allows for different flame compositions, flame sizes, and multicomponent mixing (a grain-grain heterojunction) during the reaction process. PMID:23194152

  19. Methods For Collecting , Culturing And Performing Toxicity Tests With Daphnia ambigua

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, Winona L.

    2005-07-01

    Toxicity tests conducted on water collected from impacted locations in SRS streams often failed chronic toxicity tests and sometimes failed acute toxicity tests (Specht 1995). These findings prompted SRS to determine the cause of the failures. Some SRS NPDES outfalls were also failing chronic toxicity tests, even though no toxicant could be identified and when TIEs were performed, none of the TIE treatments removed the toxicity. Ultimately, it was determined that the failures were due to the low hardness of SRS surface waters, rather than to the presence of a toxicant. The species of cladoceran that the EPA recommends for toxicity testing, Ceriodaphnia dubia, is stressed by the very low hardness of SRS waters. SRS developed an alternate species toxicity test that is similar to the EPA test, but uses an indigenous cladoceran, Daphnia ambigua (Specht and Harmon, 1997; Harmon et al., 2003). In 2001, SCDHEC approved the use of D. ambigua for toxicity testing at SRS, contingent upon approval by EPA Region 4. In 2002, EPA Region 4 approved the use of this species for compliance toxicity testing at SRS. Ultimately, the use of this species demonstrated that SRS effluents were not toxic, and most toxicity testing requirements were removed from the NPDES permit that was issued in December 2003, with the exception of one round of chronic definitive testing on outfalls A-01, A-11, and G-10 just before the next NPDES permit application is submitted to SCDHEC. Although the alternate species test was developed at SRS (1996-1998), the culture was transferred to a contract toxicity testing lab (ETT Environmental) located in Greer, SC in 1998. ETT Environmental became certified by SCDHEC to perform toxicity tests using D. ambigua in 2002, and at this time is the only laboratory certified by SCDHEC to perform tests with this species. Because of the expense associated with maintaining the D. ambigua culture for several years when no toxicity testing is required, SRS decided to suspend financial support associated with maintaining the cultures until testing is needed. The purpose of this document is to provide guidance on how to establish a laboratory culture of D. ambigua so that a culture can be restarted when needed.

  20. UTILITY OF TOXICITY TESTS TO MEASURE EFFECTS OF SUBSTANCES ON MARINE ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity tests using single species, microcosms, and communities of test species are described for laboratory evaluations of marine (estuarine and oceanic) pollution effects. The design of acute, early life-stage, life-cycle, and community toxicity tests is discussed. Uses of tes...

  1. REVIEW OF THE CURRENT STATUS OF MARINE ALGAL TOXICITY TESTING IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Algal toxicity testing is not new, but only within the past few years have data from such testing been used to help set standards for allowable contamination. arly toxicity testing with marine algae used a few planktonic species with inhibition of growth as the primary endpoint. ...

  2. SEED GERMINATION AND ROOT ELONGATION TOXICITY TESTS IN HAZARDOUS WASTE SITE EVALUATION: METHODS DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seed germination tests measure soil toxicity directly, while root elongation tests consider the indirect effects of water-soluble constituents which may be present in site-samples. n the seed germination toxicity test, site-soil is mixed with a reference soil to yield exposure co...

  3. Integrated testing strategies for toxicity employing new and existing technologies.

    PubMed

    Combes, Robert D; Balls, Michael

    2011-07-01

    We have developed individual, integrated testing strategies (ITS) for predicting the toxicity of general chemicals, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, inhaled chemicals, and nanoparticles. These ITS are based on published schemes developed previously for the risk assessment of chemicals to fulfil the requirements of REACH, which have been updated to take account of the latest developments in advanced in chemico modelling and in vitro technologies. In addition, we propose an ITS for neurotoxicity, based on the same principles, for incorporation in the other ITS. The technologies are deployed in a step-wise manner, as a basis for decision-tree approaches, incorporating weight-of-evidence stages. This means that testing can be stopped at the point where a risk assessment and/or classification can be performed, with labelling in accordance with the requirements of the regulatory authority concerned, rather than following a checklist approach to hazard identification. In addition, the strategies are intelligent, in that they are based on the fundamental premise that there is no hazard in the absence of exposure - which is why pharmacokinetic modelling plays a key role in each ITS. The new technologies include the use of complex, three-dimensional human cell tissue culture systems with in vivo-like structural, physiological and biochemical features, as well as dosing conditions. In this way, problems of inter-species extrapolation and in vitro/in vivo extrapolation are minimised. This is reflected in the ITS placing more emphasis on the use of volunteers at the whole organism testing stage, rather than on existing animal testing, which is the current situation. PMID:21777036

  4. Field validation of 10-day freshwater sediment toxicity tests using Hyalella azteca and Chironomus tentans

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, D.S.; Bigham, G.N.

    1995-12-31

    Two of the toxicity tests commonly used to evaluate freshwater sediments are the 10-day amphipod (Hyalella azteca) and chironomid (Chironomus tentans) tests. EPA and ASTM have recently developed standardized protocols for these tests. Although both tests are considered sensitive indicators of sediment toxicity, little information exists on how well test results correspond to adverse biological effects in the field. In this study, the lethal and sublethal (i.e., biomass) responses of the two toxicity tests were compared with alterations of benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages (i.e., benthic effects) at 56 stations in Onondaga Lake, New York. The lake has received municipal and industrial discharges for more than 100 years, and sediment chemical concentrations range widely throughout the lake. Toxicity results for Onondaga Lake were compared with reference conditions using the t-test, and benthic effects were determined using classification analysis of log-transformed taxa abundances. In general, a relatively high level of agreement was found between results of the toxicity tests and alterations of benthic assemblages. Significant (P < 0.05) correlations were found between all toxicity test endpoints and taxa richness of benthic assemblages. In addition, significant concordance (P {le} 0.01, binomial test) was found between toxicity designations for the 56 stations based on toxicity tests and toxicity designations based on benthic effects. Despite the general level of agreement among the various biological indicators, chironomid biomass and benthic effects were found to be the most sensitive indicators of toxicity, whereas amphipod survival and biomass were the least sensitive indicators. This study suggests that results of the 10-day amphipod and chironomid toxicity tests are highly predictive of adverse biological effects in the field.

  5. Applicability of ambient toxicity testing to national or regional water-quality assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elder, John F.

    1990-01-01

    Comprehensive assessment of the quality of natural waters requires a multifaceted approach. Descriptions of existing conditions may be achieved by various kinds of chemical and hydrologic analyses, whereas information about the effects of such conditions on living organisms depends on biological monitoring. Toxicity testing is one type of biological monitoring that can be used to identify possible effects of toxic contaminants. Based on experimentation designed to monitor responses of organisms to environmental stresses, toxicity testing may have diverse purposes in water-quality assessments. These purposes may include identification of areas that warrant further study because of poor water quality or unusual ecological features, verification of other types of monitoring, or assessment of contaminant effects on aquatic communities. Toxicity-test results are most effective when used as a complement to chemical analyses, hydrologic measurements, and other biological monitoring. However, all toxicity-testing procedures have certain limitations that must be considered in developing the methodology and applications of toxicity testing in any large-scale water-quality-assessment program. A wide variety of toxicity-test methods have been developed to fulfill the needs of diverse applications. The methods differ primarily in the selections made relative to four characteristics: (1) test species, (2) endpoint (acute or chronic), (3) test-enclosure type, and (4) test substance (toxicant) that functions as the environmental stress. Toxicity-test approaches vary in their capacity to meet the needs of large-scale assessments of existing water quality. Ambient testing, whereby the test organism is exposed to naturally occurring substances that contain toxicant mixtures in an organic or inorganic matrix, is more likely to meet these needs than are procedures that call for exposure of the test organisms to known concentrations of a single toxicant. However, meaningful interpretation of ambient test results depends on the existence of accompanying chemical analysis of the ambient media. The ambient test substance may be water or sediments. Sediment tests have had limited application, but they are useful because most toxicants tend to accumulate in sediments and many test species either inhabit the sediments or are in frequent contact with them. Biochemical testing methods, which have been developing rapidly in recent years, are likely to be among the most useful procedures for large-scale water-quality assessments. They are relatively rapid and simple, and more. importantly, they focus on biochemical changes that are the initial responses of virtually all organisms to environmental stimuli. Most species are sensitive to relatively few toxicants, and their sensitivities vary as conditions change. Therefore, each test method has particular uses and limitations, and no single test has universal applicability. One of the most informative approaches to toxicity testing is to combine biochemical tests with other test methods in a 'battery of tests' that is diversified enough to characterize different types of toxicants and different trophic levels. However, such an approach can be costly, and if not carefully designed, it may not yield enough additional information to warrant the additional cost. The application of toxicity tests to large-scale water-quality assessments is hampered by a number of difficulties. Toxicity tests often are not sensitive enough to enable detection of most contaminant problems in the natural environment. Furthermore, because sensitivities among different species and test conditions can be highly variable, conclusions about the toxicant problems of an ecosystem are strongly dependent on the test procedure used. In addition, the experimental systems used in toxicity tests cannot replicate the complexity or variability of natural conditions, and positive test results cannot identify the source or nature of

  6. Microfluidic EmbryoSort technology: towards in flow analysis, sorting and dispensing of individual vertebrate embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuad, Nurul M.; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2013-12-01

    The demand to reduce the numbers of laboratory animals has facilitated the emergence of surrogate models such as tests performed on zebrafish (Danio rerio) or African clawed frog's (Xenopus levis) eggs, embryos and larvae. Those two model organisms are becoming increasingly popular replacements to current adult animal testing in toxicology, ecotoxicology and also in drug discovery. Zebrafish eggs and embryos are particularly attractive for toxicological analysis due their size (diameter 1.6 mm), optical transparency, large numbers generated per fish and very straightforward husbandry. The current bottleneck in using zebrafish embryos for screening purposes is, however, a tedious manual evaluation to confirm the fertilization status and subsequent dispensing of single developing embryos to multitier plates to perform toxicity analysis. Manual procedures associated with sorting hundreds of embryos are very monotonous and as such prone to significant analytical errors due to operator's fatigue. In this work, we present a proofof- concept design of a continuous flow embryo sorter capable of analyzing, sorting and dispensing objects ranging in size from 1.5 - 2.5 mm. The prototypes were fabricated in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) transparent thermoplastic using infrared laser micromachining. The application of additive manufacturing processes to prototype Lab-on-a-Chip sorters using both fused deposition manufacturing (FDM) and stereolithography (SLA) were also explored. The operation of the device was based on a revolving receptacle capable of receiving, holding and positioning single fish embryos for both interrogation and subsequent sorting. The actuation of the revolving receptacle was performed using a DC motor and/or microservo motor. The system was designed to separate between fertilized (LIVE) and non-fertilized (DEAD) eggs, based on optical transparency using infrared (IR) emitters and receivers.

  7. Anodonta imbecillis copper sulfate reference toxicant test, Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP)

    SciTech Connect

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Reference toxicant testing using juvenile freshwater mussels was conducted as part of the CR-ERP biomonitoring study of Clinch River sediments to assess the sensitivity of test organisms and the overall performance of the test. Tests were conducted using moderately hard synthetic water spiked with known concentrations of copper as copper sulfate. Toxicity testing of copper sulfate reference toxicant was conducted from May 12-21, 1993. The organisms used for testing were juvenile fresh-water mussels (Anodonta imbecillis). Results from this test showed an LC{sub 50} value of 1.12 mg Cu/L which is lower than the value of 2.02 mg Cu/L obtained in a previous test. Too few tests have been conducted with copper as the toxicant to determine a normal range of values.

  8. Evaluation of three soil toxicity tests used to monitor acceptable endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkmann, M.; Stroo, H.; Leuschner, A.; Leuteritz, D.; Stromberg, M.; Brourman, M.

    1995-12-31

    Three terrestrial toxicity tests were used to evaluate the efficacy of biological treatment of creosote and pentachlorophenol impacted soils at a Superfund site. Microtox, 5-day lettuce seed, and 14-day earthworm toxicity tests were performed on 10 soil samples at the beginning and end of 3 months of land treatment. Secondary endpoints of root length and earthworm weight loss were also evaluated. EC50 and LC50 values were calculated using a Trimmed Logit Statistical Program and compared to toxicity of 10 background samples collected from the site. Results for initial soils demonstrated toxicity with three of the five endpoints. End treatment results showed no measurable toxicity using all endpoints. Toxicity testing results are critical for obtaining regulatory approval for the full-scale treatment system. Post treatment closure requirements for the site will be based on bioassay results. Evaluation of the three tests used showed the Microtox test to be the most sensitive to this type of toxicity. Lettuce seed germination results were the least sensitive of the three primary endpoints chosen. Of the secondary endpoint criteria, root length demonstrated reliable EC50 values and showed toxicity trends similar to Microtox and earthworm tests. The earthworm weight loss endpoint was not a useful toxicity measurement at 14 days.

  9. Factors affecting toxicity test endpoints in sensitive life stages of native Gulf of Mexico species.

    PubMed

    Echols, B S; Smith, A J; Rand, G M; Seda, B C

    2015-05-01

    Indigenous species are less commonly used in laboratory aquatic toxicity tests compared with standard test species due to (1) limited availability lack of requisite information necessary for their acclimation and maintenance under laboratory conditions and (2) lack of information on their sensitivity and the reproducibility of toxicity test results. As part of the Natural Resource Damage Assessment aquatic toxicity program in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil incident (2010), sensitive life stages of native Gulf of Mexico species were evaluated in laboratory toxicity tests to determine the potential effects of the spill. Fish (n = 5) and invertebrates (n = 2) selected for this program include the following: the Florida pompano (Trachinotus carolinus), red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), spotted sea trout (Cynoscion nebulosus), cobia (Rachycentron canadum), red porgy (Pagrus pagrus), blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), and the common moon jellyfish (Aurelia aurita). Initially in the program, to establish part of the background information, acute tests with reference toxicants (CdCl2, KCl, CuSO4) were performed with each species to establish data on intraspecies variability and test precision as well as identify other factors that may affect toxicity results. Median lethal concentration (LC50) values were calculated for each acute toxicity test with average LC50 values ranging from 248 to 862 mg/L for fish exposures to potassium chloride. Variability between test results was determined for each species by calculating the coefficient of variation (%CV) based on LC50 values. CVs ranged from 11.2 % for pompano (96-h LC50 value) to 74.8 % for red porgy 24-h tests. Cadmium chloride acute toxicity tests with the jellyfish A. aurita had the lowest overall CV of 3.6 %. By understanding acute toxicity to these native organisms from a compound with known toxicity ranges and the variability in test results, acute tests with nonstandard species can be better interpreted and used appropriately when determining risk. PMID:25563746

  10. Rapid toxicity testing based on mitochondrial respiratory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Haubenstricker, M.E. ); Holodnick, S.E.; Mancy, K.H. ); Brabec, M.J. )

    1990-05-01

    The need exists for rapid and inexpensive methods to determine the health effects of environmental contaminants on biological systems. One of the current research approaches for assessing cytotoxicity is to monitor the respiratory activity of the mitochondrion, a sensitive, nonspecific subcellular target site. Detected changes in mitochondrial function after the addition of a test chemical could be correlated to toxic effects. Mitochondrial respiration can be characterized by three indices: state 3 and state 4 respiratory rates, and the respiratory control ratio (RCR). State 4, the idle or resting state, results when coupled mitochondrial respire in a medium containing inorganic phosphate and a Kreb's cycle substrate in the absence of a phosphate acceptor such as adenosine diphosphate (ADP). In the presence of ADP the respiration rate increases to a maximum (state 3), accompanied by phosphorylation of ADP to adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The ratio of state 3 to state 4, or RCR, indicates how tightly the oxidative phosphorylation process is coupled. The synthesis of ATP by mitochondria is influenced by a number of compounds, most of which are either uncouplers or inhibitors.

  11. New technologies and approaches in toxicity testing and risk assessment (ESOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The release of the National Research Council’s Report “Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and a Strategy” in 2007 initiated a broad-based movement in the toxicology community to re-think how toxicity testing and risk assessment are performed. Multiple efforts in the ...

  12. PERIPHYTON PHOTOSYNTHESIS AS AN INDICATOR OF EFFLUENT TOXICITY: RELATIONSHIP TO EFFECTS ON ANIMAL TEST SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of aquatic plants in effluent toxicity evaluations is uncommon despite the availability of test methods and numerous recommendations for their use. It has been assumed that aquatic plants are less sensitive than animal test species and consequently, results from toxicity ...

  13. COMPARATIVE TOXICITY TESTING OF SELECTED BENTHIC AND EPIBENTHIC ORGANISMS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF SEDIMENT QUALITY TEST PROTOCOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment contamination has resulted in the need to develop an appropriate suite of toxicity tests to assess ecotoxicological impacts on estuarine ecosystems. Existing Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) protocols recommend a number of test organisms, including amphipods, polych...

  14. Development and application of a marine sediment porewater toxicity test using algal spores

    SciTech Connect

    Hooten, R.; Carr, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    An acute pore water toxicity test protocol using germination and growth of marine macroalgae as endpoints was developed to indicate the presence of toxic compounds in marine/estuarine and sediment porewater samples. Zoospores collected from Ulva fasciata and U. lactuca were used as test organisms. Preliminary results with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, a reference toxicant) indicate that zoospores germination and growth of embryonic gametophytes are as sensitive as the sea urchin fertilization and embryological development toxicity tests. Algal germination and growth data for copper, mercury and other metals will be presented. The results of tests utilizing this algal assay with sediment pore water from contaminated sediments will be compared with more traditional sediment toxicity test methods.

  15. ASSESSING CONTAMINANT SENSITIVITY OF ENDANGERED AND THREATENED SPECIES: EFFLUENT TOXICITY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity tests using standard effluent test procedures were conducted (EPA 1994) with Ceriodaphnia dubia and fathead minnows and four endangered fish species: bonytail chub (Gila elegans), Colorado squawfish (Ptychocheilus lucias ), razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) and Gila t...

  16. Assessing Contaminant Sensitivity of Endangered and Threatened Aquatic Species: Part III. Effluent Toxicity Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper reports on the results of chronic toxicity tests conducted with common surrogate species, and several threatened and endangered species for which there were excess artificially propagated stock to allow direct testing.

  17. AN EVALUATION OF THE 7-DAY TOXICITY TEST WITH AMERICAMYSIS BAHIA (FORMERLY MYSIDOPSIS BAHIA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 7-d test measuring survival, growth, and fecundity of Americamysis bahia formerly Mysidopsis bahia) was developed for estimating the chronic toxicity of effluents and associated receiving waters for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permits. Currently, this test...

  18. A serum-free and defined medium for the culture of mammalian postimplantation embryos.

    PubMed

    Drakou, Katerina; Georgiades, Pantelis

    2015-12-25

    Whole embryo culture (WEC) of postimplantation rodent embryos is widely used for the study of mammalian embryogenesis and developmental toxicity testing. Its major advantage is that it allows direct access to embryos for experimental manipulations and the monitoring of their consequences that would otherwise not be possible or technically difficult to perform in utero. However, a major drawback of mammalian WEC is that the culture media currently in use display batch variations and are undefined, as they contain serum or serum replacements of unknown composition. Moreover, these media possess cell-signalling activities important for embryogenesis. Therefore, reproducibility of mammalian postimplantation WEC results may be affected by batch variation and their interpretation is complicated because the experimenter is unsure whether the embryo response to experimental perturbations is solely due to their action, or modified as a result of influences from undefined substances/signaling activities present in culture media. To alleviate these problems we investigated whether N2B27, a serum-free and defined medium, can support the in vitro development of postimplantation mammalian embryos. We show that N2B27 allows pre-gastrulation mouse embryos isolated at embryonic day 5.5 to develop to advanced gastrulation, reaching the mid- and late primitive streak stages. This is the first demonstration that postimplantation mammalian embryos can develop in vitro in a defined medium in the absence of serum and provides a novel WEC system for studying developmental mechanisms and testing for developmental toxicity during the early postimplantation period. PMID:26603939

  19. Application of simple and low-cost toxicity tests for ecotoxicological assessment of industrial wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Mehmet Emin; Aydin, Senar; Tongur, Süheyla; Kara, Gülnihal; Kolb, Marit; Bahadir, Müfit

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to identify and to apply appropriate biotests having the advantages of being highly sensitive, easy to run, relatively inexpensive and able to substitute fish toxicity tests due to ethical reasons of animal welfare. To perform an ecotoxicological assessment of industrial wastewaters, different microbiotests were conducted to substitute the fish toxicity test with Lebistes reticulatus through Vibrio fischeri, Thamnocephalus platyurus, Daphnia magna, Lemna minor and Lepidium sativum representing different trophic levels in the aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Also, Algaltox F(TM) with Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Protox F(TM) with Tetrahymena thermophila tests were carried out. However, they could not be applied successfully for the wastewater samples. Wastewater samples from seven different industrial zones comprising different industries were subjected to characterization through measuring their physical-chemical parameters and their toxicity versus the above-mentioned organisms. T. platyurus, D. magna and L. reticulatus were the most sensitive test organisms investigated for the wastewaters. Considering toxic unit values, generally wastewater samples were toxic according to Thamnotox F(TM), Daphtox F(TM) and fish toxicity tests. As an important outcome, it was concluded that Daphtox F(TM) and Thamnotox F(TM) could be a good alternative for the fish toxicity test, which is so far the sole toxicity test accepted by the Turkish Water Pollution Control Regulation. PMID:25951939

  20. Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis: Prenatal Testing for Embryos Finally Achieving Its Potential

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Harvey J.

    2014-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis was developed nearly a quarter-century ago as an alternative form of prenatal diagnosis that is carried out on embryos. Initially offered for diagnosis in couples at-risk for single gene genetic disorders, such as cystic fibrosis, spinal muscular atrophy and Huntington disease, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) has most frequently been employed in assisted reproduction for detection of chromosome aneuploidy from advancing maternal age or structural chromosome rearrangements. Major improvements have been seen in PGD analysis with movement away from older, less effective technologies, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), to newer molecular tools, such as DNA microarrays and next generation sequencing. Improved results have also started to be seen with decreasing use of Day 3 blastomere biopsy in favor of polar body or Day 5 trophectoderm biopsy. Discussions regarding the scientific, ethical, legal and social issues surrounding the use of sequence data from embryo biopsy have begun and must continue to avoid concern regarding eugenic or inappropriate use of this technology. PMID:26237262

  1. Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids: Testing for Toxic Constituents of Comfrey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, John J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the possibilities of toxins present in medicinal herbs. Describes an experiment in which toxic constituents can be selectively detected by thin-layer chromatography and NMR spectroscopy. (TW)

  2. Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: Defining New Risk Assessment Approaches Based on Perturbation of Intracellular Toxicity Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Sudin; Zhang, Qiang; Carmichael, Paul L.; Boekelheide, Kim; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2011-01-01

    The approaches to quantitatively assessing the health risks of chemical exposure have not changed appreciably in the past 50 to 80 years, the focus remaining on high-dose studies that measure adverse outcomes in homogeneous animal populations. This expensive, low-throughput approach relies on conservative extrapolations to relate animal studies to much lower-dose human exposures and is of questionable relevance to predicting risks to humans at their typical low exposures. It makes little use of a mechanistic understanding of the mode of action by which chemicals perturb biological processes in human cells and tissues. An alternative vision, proposed by the U.S. National Research Council (NRC) report Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and a Strategy, called for moving away from traditional high-dose animal studies to an approach based on perturbation of cellular responses using well-designed in vitro assays. Central to this vision are (a) “toxicity pathways” (the innate cellular pathways that may be perturbed by chemicals) and (b) the determination of chemical concentration ranges where those perturbations are likely to be excessive, thereby leading to adverse health effects if present for a prolonged duration in an intact organism. In this paper we briefly review the original NRC report and responses to that report over the past 3 years, and discuss how the change in testing might be achieved in the U.S. and in the European Union (EU). EU initiatives in developing alternatives to animal testing of cosmetic ingredients have run very much in parallel with the NRC report. Moving from current practice to the NRC vision would require using prototype toxicity pathways to develop case studies showing the new vision in action. In this vein, we also discuss how the proposed strategy for toxicity testing might be applied to the toxicity pathways associated with DNA damage and repair. PMID:21701582

  3. A toxicity scoring system for the 10-day whole sediment test with Corophium insidiosum (Crawford).

    PubMed

    Prato, Ermelinda; Biandolino, Francesca; Libralato, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    This study developed a tool able to evaluate the potential contamination of marine sediments detecting the presence or absence of toxicity supporting environmental decision-making processes. When the sample is toxic, it is important to classify its level of toxicity to understand its subsequent effects and management practices. Corophium insidiosum is a widespread and frequently recorded species along the Mediterranean Sea, North Sea and western Baltic Sea with records also in the Atlantic Ocean and Pacific Ocean. This amphipod is found in high abundance in shallow brackish inshore areas and estuaries also with high turbidity. At Italian level, C. insidiosum is more frequently collectable than Corophium orientale, making routine toxicity tests easier to be performed. Moreover, according to the international scientific literature, C. insidiosum is more sensitive than C. orientale. Whole sediment toxicity data (10 days) with C. insidiosum were organised in a species-specific toxicity score on the basis of the minimum significance difference (MSD) approach. Thresholds to rank samples as non-toxic and toxic were based on sediment samples (n=84) from the Gulf of Taranto (Italy). A five-class toxicity score (absent, low, medium, high and very high toxicity) was developed, considering the distribution of the 90th percentile of the MSD normalised to the effects on the negative controls (samples from reference sites). This toxicity score could be useful for interpreting sediment potential impacts and providing quick responsive management information. PMID:25773894

  4. Non-animal alternative toxicity tests for detergents: genuine replacements or mere prescreens?

    PubMed

    Balls, M; Reader, S; Atkinson, K; Tarrant, J; Clothier, R

    1991-01-01

    Non-animal toxicity tests and testing strategies for use in identifying the potential toxic hazard of chemicals and products, and in providing information for use in risk and safety assessment, are in the course of development, validation and evaluation. Possible replacement alternatives to the rabbit Draize eye irritancy test are discussed, and results obtained for two in-vitro tests developed by FRAME (the kenacid blue test and the neutral red release test), applied to 19 surfactants and 32 formulations, are discussed. It is concluded that there are now legal and moral requirements that relevant and reliable non-animal tests should be developed and accepted for use whenever possible. PMID:1367188

  5. Evaluation of Daphnia ambigua for Routine Aquatic Toxicity Testing at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, W.L.; Harmon, S.M.

    1997-09-01

    Short-term whole effluent toxicity testing, which is currently a requirement of the U.S. EPA`s National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), commonly uses the cladoceran species Ceriodaphnia dubia. Despite the advantages to using a common test species to model the toxic effects of effluents, it could be argued that toxicity test results would be more meaningful if a wider variety of test organisms were commonly used. One particular argument against C. dubia is that tests conducted with this species do not always reflect local, site-specific conditions. The careful selection and use of an indigenous test species would produce a more realistic model of local instream effects and would account for regional differences in water quality. Permitted effluent discharges from Savannah River Site (SRS), a government weapons facility operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, require toxicity testing with C. dubia. However, water quality in these receiving streams is markedly different (lower pH and hardness) from standard laboratory water used for the culturing and testing of C. dubia, and it has been shown that this receiving water presents varying degrees of toxicity to C. dubia. Based on these results, it is possible that toxic effects observed during an effluent study could be the result of test organism stress from the dilution water and not the effects of SRS effluents. Therefore, this study addressed the substitution of C. dubia with an indigenous cladoceran species, Daphnia ambigua for routine regulatory testing at SRS. Given the indigenous nature of this species, combined with the fact that it has been successfully cultured by other investigators, D. ambigua was ideal for consideration as a replacement for C. dubia, but further study of the overall success and sensitivity of laboratory-reared D. ambigua was required. This investigation determined that D. ambigua could be laboratory cultured with only minimal changes to established regulatory protocol and that the life-cycle characteristics of this species were conducive to traditional acute and chronic aquatic toxicity test methods. Acute toxicity tests showed that when comparing LC50 values for C. dubia and D. ambigua, D. ambigua was less sensitive to some toxicants (sodium chloride, copper sulfate, and sodium lauryl sulfate) while more sensitive to others (chlorpyrifos). Results of chronic tests with copper sulfate and sodium chloride resulted in the same NOEC/LOEC values for both species. When exposed to unaltered SRS stream water, C. dubia demonstrated a `toxic` response for two of the three streams tested, while reproduction for D. ambigua was higher in all stream samples. Acute toxicity tests with sodium chloride in stream water, generally followed the sensitivity trend noted in tests conducted with regular laboratory water.

  6. Interlaboratory Evaluation of Hyalella Azteca and Chironomus Tentans Short-term and Long-term Sediment Toxicity Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the results of interlaboratory toxicity tests on sediment toxicity methods for use in routine testing and this data has been presented in an EPA report and this is a summary of that data.

  7. Sediment toxicity tests involving immobilized microalgae (Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin).

    PubMed

    Moreno-Garrido, I; Lubián, L M; Blasco, J

    2007-05-01

    Populations of calcium-alginate immobilized marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum were exposed to two sediments containing different levels of surfactant (LAS). Toxic responses were compared for free and immobilized algae. Although there is a direct relation between LAS content in sediment and inhibition, immobilized algae suffered less inhibition than free cells, over all when fluorescence is chosen as a biomarker for biomass. When cells are counted from dissolved beads, inhibition of growth is closer to the values found for free cells. Immobilization can be useful for in situ experiments but protection of cells inside the alginate beads against toxic capacity of xenobiotics must be taken into account. PMID:17157382

  8. Development of protocols for chronic toxicity testing of Pacific marine species

    SciTech Connect

    Langdon, C.J.; Seim, W.K.; Hoffman, R.L.; Weber, L.

    1990-03-01

    The development of a year-round capability for conducting short-term toxicity tests for estimating chronic-effect levels of toxic materials with a native Pacific coast fish and a native Pacific coast mysid shrimp was the goal of the project. In order to achieve acceptable sensitivity as a surrogate for chronic toxicity tests, targeting the reproductive portion of the mysid life cycle and all or part of the embryonic, larval, or early post-larval portion of the fish life cycle was deemed necessary. This targeting is consistent with conclusions based upon earlier work in developing similar tests with Atlantic coast, Gulf coast, and freshwater fish and invertebrates.

  9. Computerized In Vitro Test for Chemical Toxicity Based on Tetrahymena Swimming Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Matsos, Helen C.; Cronise, Raymond J.; Looger, Loren L.; Relwani, Rachna A.; Johnson, Jacqueline U.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and a method for rapidly determining chemical toxicity have been evaluated as an alternative to the rabbit eye initancy test (Draize). The toxicity monitor includes an automated scoring of how motile biological cells (Tetrahymena pyriformis) slow down or otherwise change their swimming patterns in a hostile chemical environment. The method, called the motility assay (MA), is tested for 30 s to determine the chemical toxicity in 20 aqueous samples containing trace organics and salts. With equal or better detection limits, results compare favorably to in vivo animal tests of eye irritancy.

  10. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 300 - Swirling Flask Dispersant Effectiveness Test, Revised Standard Dispersant Toxicity Test, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Chemicals) in 40 CFR part 300 (National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan). They are... agents are provided in 40 CFR 300.5. 2.0Swirling Flask Dispersant Effectiveness Test 2.1Summary of Method... Effectiveness Test, Revised Standard Dispersant Toxicity Test, and Bioremediation Agent Effectiveness Test...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 268 - Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and Structural Integrity Test (Method 1310B)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and Structural Integrity Test (Method 1310B) IX Appendix IX to Part 268 Protection of... Integrity Test (Method 1310B) Note: The EP (Method 1310B) is published in “Test Methods for Evaluating...

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A TOXICITY TEST SYSTEM USING PRIMARY RAT LIVER CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model in vitro rat liver parenchymal cellular toxicity system employing cells obtained by the in situ collagenase perfusion technique has been developed to detect potential liver toxicants. The initial evaluation of this test system was accomplished using cadmium chloride, chro...

  13. TOXICITY REDUCTION TEST TO ASSIST IN PREDICTING LAND TREATABILITY OF HAZARDOUS ORGANIC WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Migration of toxic organics contained in the water soluble fraction (WSF) of land applied hazardous wastes poses the most serious threat to ground-water resources. A toxicity reduction (TR) test system is being proposed that will serve to determine if, and to what extent, attenua...

  14. 40 CFR 797.1300 - Daphnid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... in daphnids. (4) Flow-through means a continuous or an intermittent passage of test solution or... ratio of daphnid biomass (grams, wet weight) to the volume (liters) of test solution in a test chamber... means a test system in which the test solution and test organisms are placed in the test chamber...

  15. 40 CFR 797.1300 - Daphnid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... in daphnids. (4) Flow-through means a continuous or an intermittent passage of test solution or... ratio of daphnid biomass (grams, wet weight) to the volume (liters) of test solution in a test chamber... means a test system in which the test solution and test organisms are placed in the test chamber...

  16. 40 CFR 797.1300 - Daphnid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... in daphnids. (4) Flow-through means a continuous or an intermittent passage of test solution or... ratio of daphnid biomass (grams, wet weight) to the volume (liters) of test solution in a test chamber... means a test system in which the test solution and test organisms are placed in the test chamber...

  17. A new biological test utilising the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the rapid detection of toxic substances in water.

    PubMed

    Rumlova, Lubomira; Dolezalova, Jaroslava

    2012-05-01

    This study evaluates the toxic effects of five substances (atropine, fenitrothion, potassium cyanide, mercuric chloride and lead nitrate) on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It describes a new biological toxicity test based on inhibition of S. cerevisiae viability and compares it with two standard toxicity tests based on Daphnia magna mobility inhibition (EN ISO 6341) and Vibrio fischeri bioluminiscence inhibition (EN ISO 11348-2). The new biological test -S. cerevisiae lethal test - is cheaper and 24 times faster than the D. magna test. The test speed is comparable with the V. fischeri test but the new test is more sensitive for some substances. The test indicates reliably the presence of all used toxicants in water in concentrations which are significantly lower than the concentration in toxic or lethal doses for man. Therefore, this new toxicity test could be proposed for rapid detection of toxic substances in water. PMID:22407169

  18. ExpoCast: Exposure Science for Prioritization and Toxicity Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA is completing the Phase I pilot for a chemical prioritization research program, called ToxCastTM. Here EPA is developing methods for using computational chemistry, high-throughput screening, and toxicogenomic technologies to predict potential toxicity and prioritize l...

  19. Development of a test system for screening toxic substances: a comparison using organic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a test system for screening toxic substances by predicting their aquatic ecosystem effects. The system studied was a static, one liter microcosm with a diverse species assemblage. The microcosm was composed of biotic inoculum, chemically defined medium and sediment. The biotic inoculum contained primary producers, grazers, carnivores and decomposers. Three different types of sediment were studied: sand, clay, and clay plus sand. Four organic chemicals: phenol, triethylene glycol (TEG), quinoline and naphthoquinone were evaluated with this test system. The toxicities of TEG, quinoline and naphthoquinone were compared for each sediment type. Toxicity was evaluated in terms of the chemical's effects on primary productivity and heterotrophic activity though other effects are also noted. Naphthoquinone concentration exhibited no correlation between ecosystem property values and therefore, could not be ranked. Phenol exhibited the greatest toxicity to net production immediately after the toxicant addition. Quinoline was most toxic to net production over the longer time scale. TEG exhibited the least toxicity to net production, however, TEG exhibited higher toxicity to heterotrophic activity than either quinoline or phenol. Although the type of sediment used in the microcosms did not change the relative toxicities of the chemicals, the microcosms with clay sediment always were observed to exhibit lower net production and higher variability.

  20. Validation of a short-term toxicity test endpoint by comparison with longer-term effects on larval red abalone Haliotis rufescens

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, P.T.; Hunt, J.W.; Anderson, B.S.

    1996-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to compare a short-term 48-h aquatic toxicity test endpoint of abnormal larval shell development with other, more clearly adverse effects. In similar experiments conducted with two different toxicants, zinc sulfate and bleached-kraft mill effluent, red abalone (Haliotis rufescens) embryos were simultaneously exposed to identical dilution series and incubated for three different exposure periods: 48 h, 48 h followed by an 8-d recovery period in clean seawater, and 10 d of continuous exposure. Abnormal larval shell development was assessed in the 48-h short-term tests, and inhibition of metamorphosis was assessed in the exposure-recovery and continuous exposure experiments. For the zinc experiments, the median effective concentration (EC50) values for the 48-h exposure, the exposure-recovery experiment, and the continuous exposure experiment were 40, 34, and 32 {micro}g/L zinc, respectively. For the bleached-kraft mill effluent experiments, the EC50 values were 0.98, 0.76, and 0.69% effluent, respectively. Results indicate that toxicant concentrations causing abnormal larval shell development also inhibit metamorphosis and that larvae exposed to toxicant concentrations which inhibit larval shell development do not recover to metamorphose when transferred to clean seawater. None of the successfully metamorphosed postlarvae had deformed larval shells, indicating that shell deformity precludes survival past the planktonic stage. A longer (15-d) experiment allowed measurement of postlarval shell length in exposed postmetamorphic abalone. Insignificant differences in postlarval shell length indicated that the timing of larval metamorphosis was similar regardless of toxicant exposure and that the effects of the toxicant was to inhibit rather than to delay metamorphosis.

  1. The assessment of sewage sludge gasification by-products toxicity by ecotoxicologial test.

    PubMed

    Werle, Sebastian; Dudziak, Mariusz

    2015-08-01

    The process of gasification of sewage sludge generates by-products, which may be contaminated with toxic and hazardous substances, both organic and inorganic. It is therefore important to assess the environmental risk associated with this type of waste. The feasibility of using an ecotoxicological tests for this purpose was determined in the presented study. The applied tests contained indicator organisms belonging to various biological groups (bacteria, crustaceans, plants). The subject of the study were solid (ash, char) and liquid (tar) by-products generated during gasification (in a fixed bed reactor) of dried sewage sludge from various wastewater treatment systems. The tested samples were classified based on their toxic effect. The sensitivity of the indicator organisms to the tested material was determined. In-house procedures for the preparation for toxicity analysis of both sewage sludge and by-products generated during the gasification were presented. The scope of work also included the determination of the effect of selected process parameters (temperature, amount of gasifying agent) on the toxicity of gasification by-products depending on the sewage sludge source. It was shown that both the type of sewage sludge and the parameters of the gasification process affects the toxicity of the by-products of gasification. However, the results of toxicity studies also depend on the type of ecotoxicological test used, which is associated with a different sensitivity of the indicator organisms. Nevertheless, it may be concluded that the by-products formed during the gasification of the low toxicity sewage sludge can be regarded as non-toxic or low toxic. However, the results analysis of the gasification of the toxic sludge were not conclusive, which leads to further research needs in this area. PMID:25827844

  2. Toxic stress prioritizes and imbalances stem cell differentiation: implications for new biomarkers and in vitro toxicology tests.

    PubMed

    Rappolee, Daniel A; Xie, Yufen; Slater, Jill A; Zhou, Sichang; Puscheck, Elizabeth E

    2012-02-01

    This hypothesis and review introduces rules of stem cell stress responses that provide biomarkers and alternative testing that replaces or reduces gestational tests using whole animals. These rules for the stress responses of cultured stem cells validate the organismal strategy of the stress response and show that it emulates what must happen if the conceptus implants during a response to stress in vivo. Specifically there is a profound threshold during a stress dose response where stem cell accumulation is significantly reduced. Below this threshold stress enzymes manage the stress response by converting anabolic to catabolic processes and by suppressing apoptosis, without affecting differentiation. However above this threshold the stem cell survival response converts to an organismal survival response where stress enzymes switch to new substrates and mediate loss of potency factors, gain of early essential differentiated lineages, and suppression of later essential lineages. Stressed stem cells 'compensate' for lower accumulation rates by differentiating a higher fraction of cells, and the organismal survival response further enhances adaptation by prioritizing the differentiation of early essential lineages. Thus compensatory and prioritized differentiation and the sets of markers produced are part of a response of cultured embryos and stem cells that emulate what must happen during implantation of a stressed gestation. Knowledge of these markers and use of stressed stem cell assays in culture should replace or reduce the number of animals needed for developmental toxicity and should produce biomarkers for stressed development in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22239079

  3. Toxic stress prioritizes and imbalances stem cell differentiation: implications for new biomarkers and in vitro toxicology tests

    PubMed Central

    Rappolee, Daniel A.; Xie, Y.; Slater, J.A.; Zhou, S.; Puscheck, E.E.

    2012-01-01

    This hypothesis and review provides rules of stem cell stress responses that provide biomarkers and alternative testing that replaces or reduces gestational tests using whole animals. These rules for the stress responses of cultured stem cells validate the organismal strategy of the stress response and show that it emulates what must happen if the conceptus implants during a response to stress in vivo. Specifically there is a profound threshold during a stress dose response where stem cells accumulate significantly less well. Below this threshold stress enzymes manage the stress response by converting catabolic to anabolic processes and by suppressing apoptosis, without affecting differentiation. However above this threshold the stem cell survival response converts to an organismal survival response where stress enzymes switch to new substrates and mediate loss of potency factors, gain of early essential differentiated lineages, and suppression of later essential lineages. Stressed stem cells ‘compensate’ for lower accumulation rates by differentiating a higher fraction of cells, and the organismal survival response further enhances adaptation by prioritizing the differentiation of early essential lineages. Thus compensatory and prioritized differentiation and the sets of markers produced are part of a response of cultured embryos and stem cells that emulate what must happen during implantation of a stressed gestation. Knowledge of these markers and use of stressed stem cell assays in culture should replace or reduce the number of animals needed for developmental toxicity and should produce biomarkers for stressed development in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22239079

  4. Toxicity testing strategies for assessing water-quality conditions in receiving streams

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, A.J.

    1994-12-31

    This paper explores the use of short-term, EPA-approved laboratory toxicity tests for assessing water-quality conditions in streams and rivers. Strategies for the cost-effective application of such tests for long-term monitoring objectives are considered in the context of logistic constraints and statistical design. A subtle but important difference in objectives for effluent versus ambient testing is this: in effluent testing for regulatory purposes, a key objective is to determine how toxic an effluent is; in ambient testing, the main objective usually is that of determining if the water at a site is toxic. This difference shapes the strategy for cost-effective ambient testing and determines the framework for effective statistical analysis and interpretation of ambient toxicity test results. Recommendations derived as `` lessons learned`` from large-scale ambient toxicity testing programs for receiving streams at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities include: (1) testing more frequently with one species (preferably Ceriodaphnia) generally is more effective, in terms of information gained per dollar spent, than testing less frequently with two or more species; (2) use five or more sites per test period, plus two or more reference sites, whenever possible; (3) use four to six test periods per year; and (4) use diagnostic testing to supplement the ambient-testing program. Various laboratory and in situ methods for environmental assessment are now under development, but these methods probably will not gain acceptance for use in regulatory situations for many years. Rapid growth in need for ecological risk assessments outstrips the rate at which new test procedures are approved for regulatory purposes. Thus, laboratory tests for estimating possible environmental impacts of toxic or disruptive pollutants are likely to be used more frequently, not less frequently, during the next decade.

  5. EFFECTS OF BEAUVERIA BASSIANA TO EMBRYOS OF THE INLAND SILVERSIDE (MENIDIA BERYLLINA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A chemical toxicity/teratogenicity test was adapted to assess potential adverse affect of a microbial pest control agent on a nontarget fish. eveloping embryos of inland silverside, Menidia beryllina, were exposed to conidiospores or the insect-pathogenic fungus, Beauveria bassia...

  6. Sensitivity comparison of laboratory-cultured and field-collected amphipod Corophium multisetosum in toxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Menchaca, Iratxe; Belzunce, María Jesús; Franco, Javier; Garmendia, Joxe Mikel; Montero, Natalia; Revilla, Marta

    2010-04-01

    The feasibility of using lab-cultured amphipods Corophium multisetosum (Stock 1952) to evaluate the toxicity of contaminants present within marine sediments was studied. This was done by comparing the sensitivity of lab-cultured amphipods in a cadmium toxicity test and to toxic sediment samples, during a 10-days bioassay, with field collected individuals. Different responses were observed between field and cultured individuals. Cadmium test indicated high temporal variability in the LC(50) values of field amphipods (2.40-6.55 mg L(-1)). Sensitivity of cultured amphipods was within the seasonal range of the field individuals (5.81 mg L(-1), LC(50)). However, culture amphipods showed much lower sensitivity in toxic sediment samples. Our results indicate that sensitivity should be determined using a sediment matrix, if the assessment of toxicity is based upon bioassays performed with cultured burrower-amphipods. PMID:20306172

  7. Development and application of a marine sediment pore-water toxicity test using Ulva fasciata zoospores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hooten, R.L.; Carr, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    An acute (96 h) pore-water toxicity test protocol using germination and growth of Ulva fasciata zoospores as endpoints was developed to test the toxicity of marine and estuarine sediment pore-water samples. Tests with an organic toxicant (sodium dodecyl sulfate; SDS), three metals (Cd, Cu, and Zn), and ammonia (NH3) were conducted to determine zoospore sensitivity. Zoospore germination and gametophyte growth were as sensitive to SDS as sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development. Zoospore sensitivity to metals was greater than or comparable to that of adult macroalgae. Zoospores were less sensitive to NH3 than were other commonly used toxicity test organisms. Test results using this algal assay with sediment pore-water samples with high NH3 concentrations were compared with results from sea urchin fertilization and embryological development tests for the same samples. Ulva fasciata zoospore germination was not affected by samples with high NH3 concentrations that were toxic in both sea urchin tests. Zoospore tolerance of NH3 and sensitivity to other contaminants indicate that their response may be useful in toxicity identification evaluation studies with pore-water samples that contain high concentrations of unionized NH3.

  8. Development and application of a marine sediment pore-water toxicity test using Ulva fasciata zoospores

    SciTech Connect

    Hooten, R.L.; Carr, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    An acute (96 h) pore-water toxicity test protocol using germination and growth of Ulva fasciata zoospores as endpoints was developed to test the toxicity of marine and estuarine sediment pore-water samples. Tests with an organic toxicant (sodium dodecyl sulfate; SDS), three metals (Cd, Cu, and Zn), and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) were conducted to determine zoospore sensitivity. Zoospore germination and gametophyte growth were as sensitive to SDS as sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development. Zoospore sensitivity to metals was greater than or comparable to that of adult macroalgae. Zoospores were less sensitive to NH{sub 3} than were other commonly used toxicity test organisms. Test results using this algal assay with sediment pore-water samples with high NH{sub 3} concentrations were compared with results from sea urchin fertilization and embryological development tests for the same samples. Ulva fasciata zoospore germination was not affected by samples with high NH{sub 3} concentrations that were toxic in both sea urchin tests. Zoospore tolerance of NH{sub 3} and sensitivity to other contaminants indicate that their response may be useful in toxicity identification evaluation studies with pore-water samples that contain high concentrations of unionized NH{sub 3}.

  9. Assessment of four different test designs for Hyalella azteca 10 days sediment toxicity test

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez-Romero, P.; Oris, J.T.; Bailer, J.; DePoy, M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to assess the adequacy of four experimental designs of the Hyalella azteca 10 days sediment toxicity test. The authors conducted a series of sediment toxicity tests using an EPA recommended experimental design (8 chambers with 10 organisms per treatment) and three other designs. These had the same total number of organisms (80) per treatment and the same sediment:water ratio (1:1.5) but different number of chambers (4,2,1). The number of organisms recovered, the time to sort and count the animals, as well as the time to make a water change were compared for these four designs. Logistic regression was used to analyze the recovery data while one-way analysis of variance methods were used to analyze the time responses. The results showed that the four treatments were comparable in terms of proportion of organisms recovered. However, the sorting time and the water change time decreased as the number of chambers decreased, making those designs with less chambers more desirable.

  10. A Roadmap for the Development of Alternative (Non-Animal) Methods for Systemic Toxicity Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Systemic toxicity testing forms the cornerstone for the safety evaluation of substances. Pressures to move from traditional animal models to novel technologies arise from various concerns, including: the need to evaluate large numbers of previously untested chemicals and new prod...

  11. EPA's Toxcast ™ Program for Predicting Hazard and Priortizing Toxicity Testing of Environemntal Chemicals (T)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is developing methods for utilizing computational chemistry, high-throughput screening (HTS) and various toxicogenomic technologies to predict potential for toxicity and prioritize limited testing resources towards chemicals that likely represent the greatest hazard to human ...

  12. TOXICITY TESTS OF EFFLUENTS WITH MARSH PLANTS IN WATER AND SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods are described for toxicity testing of water and sediment with the rooted marsh plants, Echinochloa crusgalli var. crusgalli and var. zelavensis (freshwater) and Spartina alterniflora (estuarine). ive industrial effluents, a sewage treatment plant effluent and a herbicide ...

  13. USE OF MARSH PLANTS FOR TOXICITY TESTING OF WATER AND SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The freshwater wetland plants, Echinochlo crusgalli crusgalli andEchinocloa crusgalli zelayensis, and the saltmarsh plant, Spartina alterniflora, were exposed to the herbicides, metolachlor and norflurazon, in two types of toxicity tests: eed germination and early seedling growth...

  14. EPAS TOXCAST PROGRAM FOR PREDICTING HAZARD AND PRIORITIZING TOXICITY TESTING OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS(S).

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPAs National Center for Computational Toxicology is developing methods that apply computational chemistry, high-throughput screening (HTS) and genomic technologies to predict potential toxicity and prioritize the use of limited testing resources.

  15. Improving the quality of aquatic toxicity tests: Lessons learned and proficiency needs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquatic toxicity testing methodologies have been widely used to assess potential adverse effects of chemicals and wastewater discharges on aquatic life in the United States since the 1970’s. Over the years, continued method modifications, increased training, and technical r...

  16. MOTOR ACTIVITY: A SURVEY OF METHODS WITH POTENTIAL USE IN TOXICITY TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Activity measurements are expected to have widespread use in toxicity testing. The multifaceted nature of motor activity will directly influence the selection of a measurement technique since the relative contribution of various motor acts to any particular measurement will depen...

  17. EPA'S TOXCAST PROGRAM FOR PREDICTING HAZARD AND PRIORITIZING TOXICITY TESTING OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is developing methods for utilizing computational chemistry, high-throughput screening (HTS) and various toxicogenomic technologies to predict potential for toxicity and prioritize limited testing resources towards chemicals that likely represent the greatest hazard to human ...

  18. Intra- and interlaboratory variability in acute toxicity tests with glochidia and juveniles of freshwater mussels (Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, N.; Augspurger, T.; Barnhart, M.C.; Bidwell, Joseph R.; Cope, W.G.; Dwyer, F.J.; Geis, S.; Greer, I.E.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Kane, C.M.; May, T.W.; Neves, R.J.; Newton, T.J.; Roberts, A.D.; Whites, D.W.

    2007-01-01

    The present study evaluated the performance and variability in acute toxicity tests with glochidia and newly transformed juvenile mussels using the standard methods outlined in American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). Multiple 48-h toxicity tests with glochidia and 96-h tests with juvenile mussels were conducted within a single laboratory and among five laboratories. All tests met the test acceptability requirements (e.g., ???90% control survival). Intralaboratory tests were conducted over two consecutive mussel-spawning seasons with mucket (Actinonaias ligamentina) or fatmucket (Lampsilis siliquoidea) using copper, ammonia, or chlorine as a toxicant. For the glochidia of both species, the variability of intralaboratory median effective concentrations (EC50s) for the three toxicants, expressed as the coefficient of variation (CV), ranged from 14 to 27% in 24-h exposures and from 13 to 36% in 48-h exposures. The intralaboratory CV of copper EC50s for juvenile fatmucket was 24% in 48-h exposures and 13% in 96-h exposures. Interlaboratory tests were conducted with fatmucket glochidia and juveniles by five laboratories using copper as a toxicant. The interlaboratory CV of copper EC50s for glochidia was 13% in 24-h exposures and 24% in 48-h exposures, and the interlaboratory CV for juveniles was 22% in 48-h exposures and 42% in 96-h exposures. The high completion success and the overall low variability in test results indicate that the test methods have acceptable precision and can be performed routinely. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  19. 40 CFR 795.120 - Gammarid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... solution. Test chambers made of stainless steel should be welded, not soldered. Test chambers made of glass... prodding. Flow-through means a continuous or an intermittent passage of test solution or dilution water... biomass of gammarids (grams, wet weight) to the volume (liters) of test solution in either a test...

  20. 40 CFR 795.120 - Gammarid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... solution. Test chambers made of stainless steel should be welded, not soldered. Test chambers made of glass... prodding. Flow-through means a continuous or an intermittent passage of test solution or dilution water... biomass of gammarids (grams, wet weight) to the volume (liters) of test solution in either a test...

  1. 40 CFR 795.120 - Gammarid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... solution. Test chambers made of stainless steel should be welded, not soldered. Test chambers made of glass... prodding. Flow-through means a continuous or an intermittent passage of test solution or dilution water... biomass of gammarids (grams, wet weight) to the volume (liters) of test solution in either a test...

  2. 40 CFR 795.120 - Gammarid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... solution. Test chambers made of stainless steel should be welded, not soldered. Test chambers made of glass... prodding. Flow-through means a continuous or an intermittent passage of test solution or dilution water... biomass of gammarids (grams, wet weight) to the volume (liters) of test solution in either a test...

  3. Computerized in vitro test for chemical toxicity based on tetrahymena swimming patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Matsos, Helen C.; Cronise, Raymond J.; Looger, Loren L.; Relwani, Rachna A.; Johnson, Jacqueline U.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and method for rapidly determining chemical toxicity was evaluated. The toxicity monitor includes an automated scoring of how motile biological cells (Tetrahymena pyriformis) slow down or otherwise change their swimming patterns in a hostile chemical environment. The device, called the Motility Assay Apparatus (MAA) is tested for 30 second determination of chemical toxicity in 20 aqueous samples containing trace organics and salts. With equal or better detection limits, results compare favorably to in vivo animal tests of eye irritancy, in addition to agreeing for all chemicals with previous manual evaluations of single cell motility.

  4. A theoretical model for simulating the outcome of mechanism based in vitro toxicity testing strategies.

    PubMed

    Frazier, John M

    2004-04-01

    In order to investigate the fundamental principles that influence the optimal selection of toxicity test methods for the evaluation of chemical hazards, it is useful to have a design model to explore possible alternative testing strategies. In general, our lack of detailed knowledge of the mechanisms of toxicity (including not only the early events in the interaction of chemicals with biological systems, but the sequence of events that lead to experimentally measurable toxicity) limits the development of realistic dynamic models of the toxicological process for individual chemicals. We report here the development of a theoretical model that includes two independent hypothetical mechanisms of toxicity. The mechanisms are designed to be qualitatively similar to known mechanisms of action. The model is exercised to simulate the experimental data that would be obtained for a collection of "test" and "validation" chemicals using a single or a combination of two toxicity tests. The data generated are used to evaluate the "relevance" of the testing strategy based on the two proposed in vitro toxicity tests. PMID:14757107

  5. Comparison of amphipods Corophium insidiosum and C. orientale (Crustacea: Amphipoda) in sediment toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Prato, Ermelinda; Bigongiari, Nicola; Barghigiani, Corrado; Biandolino, Francesca

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity of two Corophidae: Corophium orientale a standardized species and Corophium insidiosum a species more available in the Ionian sea (Southern Italy), in order to evaluate the suitability and applicability of C. insidiosum to sediment toxicity test. The sensitivity of the 2 species was compared through simultaneous bioassays: the 96-h static water-only toxicity test and a 10-day static sediment toxicity test. Sediment samples were collected in the Livorno harbour (Ligurian Sea). Both amphipods showed high sensitivity to reference toxicant and no significant differences were found between the two Corophiidae (t test; p > 0.05). Numerical Sediment Quality Guidelines (SQGs) have been used to relate the chemical concentrations of sediment samples to biological effects. Both amphipod species indicated the same sediment samples as potentially toxic according to chemical data. The results indicate that Corophium insidiosum would be suitable as an alternative test species to the recommended species C. orientale, in the development of sediment toxicity test. PMID:20694884

  6. Assessing the toxicity of contaminated soils using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as test organism.

    PubMed

    Höss, S; Jänsch, S; Moser, T; Junker, T; Römbke, J

    2009-10-01

    In this study, nine uncontaminated reference soils and 22 contaminated soils with different physico-chemical properties and contamination patterns were tested with a standardized toxicity test, using the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, as test organism. Fertility, growth and reproduction of C. elegans in the soils were compared with the exposure in standard soil Lufa St.2.2. C. elegans showed 100% fertility and a very low variability of growth in the reference soils. Although, reproduction varied considerably between the various reference soils, validity criteria (>30 offspring per test organism) were met in all reference soils. Moreover, Lufa St. 2.2 turned out to be a suitable and representative control soil. In order to clearly classify the effects of the polluted soils on C. elegans, toxicity thresholds were derived for nematode fertility (20% inhibition), growth (10% inhibition) and reproduction (40% inhibition) on the basis of the test inherent variability (MDD=minimal detectable difference), as well as their variability between the uncontaminated reference soils (MTI=maximal tolerable inhibition). The contaminated soils showed clear toxic effects on the nematodes, whereas the toxicity was better correlated to organic than to heavy metal contamination in bulk soil. Interestingly, the results of the nematode toxicity test were not well correlated with those of tests with oligochaetes, collembolans and plants, performed with the same soils, showing that the results are not redundant. The toxicity test using C. elegans turned out to be suitable for testing the toxicity of field collected soils and might by a valuable addition to soil test batteries. PMID:19665791

  7. Use of sublethal endpoints in sediment toxicity testing with the amphipod Hyalella azteca

    SciTech Connect

    Kemble, N.E.; Brunson, E.B.; Dwyer, F.J.; Ehrhardt, E.A.; Hardesty, D.K.; Haverland, P.S.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    1995-12-31

    ASTM and EPA standard methods for sediment toxicity tests with Hyalella azteca typically recommend use of lethality as the endpoint in a 10-d exposure. However, data from 10- to 28-d exposures with amphipods indicate sublethal endpoints (i.e., growth, sexual maturation, or reproduction) identify additional samples as toxic. The authors compared the frequency that lethal and sublethal endpoints identified a sediment sample as toxic in 14- and 28-d amphipod exposures. In the 14-d amphipod exposures, lethality identified 20% of the samples as toxic, and sublethal endpoints identified an additional 16% of the samples as toxic using sublethal endpoints only. Similarly, in the 28-d exposures, lethality identified 14% of the samples as toxic and sublethal endpoints identified an additional 18% of the samples as toxic. The authors are also currently evaluating Sediment Effect Concentrations (SECs) relative to both lethal and sublethal endpoints in H. azteca exposures. These SECs will be used to evaluate reliability in estimating toxicity of samples. Potential factors which may confound interpretation of sublethal endpoints in sediment tests include: (1) changes in sediment chemistry resulting from long-term storage or feeding (2) the influence of physical characteristics of sediment (grain size), and (3) effects of ammonia or hydrogen sulfide.

  8. Evaluation of anticoccidial drugs in chicken embryos.

    PubMed

    Xie, M Q; Fukata, T; Gilbert, J M; McDougald, L R

    1991-01-01

    Infections of Eimeria tenella in chicken embryos were used to compare the anticoccidial activity of ten drugs. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal toxic concentration (MTC) were affected by the time of inoculation into the embryos and by the chemical nature of the compounds. Some compounds (nicarbazin, amprolium) had no effect on the development of coccidia when they were injected into embryos after the day of infection. Drugs that act early in the life cycle of coccidia (robenidine, clopidol, decoquinate, diclazuril, halofuginone, monensin, salinomycin, and lasalocid) were active at 5-125 micrograms/embryo when they were injected on the day of infection. The ionophores and halofuginone were highly toxic to embryos; most synthetic compounds were nontoxic. The incubation of merozoites in drug suspensions prior to the infection of embryos did not result in embryo toxicity, but the resultant MICs were much higher than those obtained when drugs were injected directly into the embryos. Several products were essentially inactive. Neither nicarbazin nor amprolium prevented oocyst formation. The widely divergent endpoints for the MIC and MTC of anticoccidials in embryos seriously limits the application of this technique as a screen for anticoccidial drugs. PMID:1792230

  9. Toxicity tests of effluents with marsh plants in water and sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, G.E.; Weber, D.E.; Simon, T.L.; Brashers, L.K.

    1991-01-01

    Methods are described for toxicity testing of water and sediment with two varieties of the freshwater marsh plant Echinochloa crusgalli (Linneaus) Palisot de Beauvois (Poaceae), and complex effluents. Two tests are described: a seed germination and early seedling growth test in water, and a survival and seedling growth test in natural and synthetic sediments. Effects of effluents from a sewage treatment plant, tannery, textile mill, pulp and paper mill, coking plant and sewage treatment plant included inhibition of germination, chlorophyll synthesis and growth. The tests with rooted marsh plants were sensitive to pollutants and detected toxicity of a range of pollutants in water and sediment. Synthetic sediments similar to natural sediments allowed toxicity tests to be done under carefully controlled conditions of particle size distribution, organic content, pH, electrode potential (Eh) and cation exchange capacity (CEC).

  10. USE OF THE AMPHIPOD CRUSTACEAN HYALELLA AZTECA IN FRESHWATER AND ESTUARINE SEDIMENT TOXICITY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hyalella azteca (Saussure), which are currently used in toxicity tests with freshwater sediments, were tested to determine their suitability for tests with estuarine sediments. eproduction was good after 24 d at and below 12.5 g/L (ppt) salinity in water only. C50 values (50% red...

  11. Influence of sediment composition on apparent toxicity in a solid-phase test using bioluminescent bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, M.J.; Malott, M.L. |; Knight, S.S.; Cooper, C.M.; Benson, W.H.

    1995-03-01

    Clean and spiked sediment formulations of various silt:sand and clay:sand ratios were tested for toxicity using a bioassay that utilizes bioluminescent bacteria. Measured toxicities of clean and copper sulfate-spiked sediments were negatively but nonlinearly related with percent silt and percent clay, but no significant relationship existed between measured toxicity and sediment composition for methyl parathion-spiked formulations. Results suggest that solid-phase sediment bioassays using bioluminescence bacteria may be useful for testing the toxicities of single contaminants in formulated artificial sediments of known particle-size composition, and for repeated samples collected from the same site. However, extreme caution must be taken when testing sediments of varying composition or which may be differentially contaminated or contain a suite of contaminants.

  12. Cumulative bioluminescence; A potential rapid test of drilling fluid toxicity: development study

    SciTech Connect

    Stiffey, A.V. )

    1992-03-01

    A new rapid test of drilling fluid toxicity is based on the spontaneous bioluminescence of Pyrocystis lunula, an easy-to-culture alga that vigorously responds to shear stress (mixing) by emitting a sharp burst of light. In contrast to other bioluminescence methods, a cumulative flux of light is measured with a photomultiplier that eliminates the effect of exposure time on test results. Light quenching, caused by the presence of a toxicant, results in the dose/response relationship (DSR) typical for the enzymatic reaction kinetics. The Michaelis-Menten (dissociation) constant is used as a direct measure of toxicity. The evaluation study involved multiple experiments with 60 samples of drilling fluids from the U.S. gulf coast, as well as such typical toxicants as diesel oil, mineral oil, and chrome lignosulfonate (CLS). In this paper, the results of the test error analysis and comparisons with the Microtox and Mysid shrimp assays are reported.

  13. Field Validation of Toxicity Tests to Evaluate the Potential for Beneficial Use of Produced Water

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Bidwell; Jonathan Fisher; Naomi Cooper

    2008-03-31

    This study investigated potential biological effects of produced water contamination derived from occasional surface overflow and possible subsurface intrusion at an oil production site along the shore of Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma. We monitored basic chemistry and acute toxicity to a suite of standard aquatic test species (fathead minnow-Pimephales promelas, Daphnia pulex, Daphnia magna, and Ceriodaphnia dubia) in produced water and in samples taken from shallow groundwater wells on the site. Toxicity identification evaluations and ion toxicity modeling were used to identify toxic constituents in the samples. Lake sediment at the oil production site and at a reference site were also analyzed for brine intrusion chemically and by testing sediment toxicity using the benthic invertebrates, Chironomus dilutus, and Hyallela azteca. Sediment quality was also assessed with in situ survival and growth studies with H. azteca and the Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea, and by benthic macroinvertebrate community sampling. The produced water was acutely toxic to the aquatic test organisms at concentrations ranging from 1% to 10% of the whole produced water sample. Toxicity identification evaluation and ion toxicity modeling indicated major ion salts and hydrocarbons were the primary mixture toxicants. The standardized test species used in the laboratory bioassays exhibited differences in sensitivity to these two general classes of contaminants, which underscores the importance of using multiple species when evaluating produced water toxicity. Toxicity of groundwater was greater in samples from wells near a produced water injection well and an evaporation pond. Principle component analyses (PCA) of chemical data derived from the groundwater wells indicated dilution by lake water and possible biogeochemical reactions as factors that ameliorated groundwater toxicity. Elevated concentrations of major ions were found in pore water from lake sediments, but toxicity from these ions was limited to sediment depths of 10 cm or greater, which is outside of the primary zone of biological activity. Further, exposure to site sediments did not have any effects on test organisms, and macroinvertebrate communities did not indicate impairment at the oil production site as compared to a reference site. In situ experiments with H. azteca and C. fluminea, indicated a sublethal site effect (on growth of both species), but these could not be definitively linked with produced water infiltration. Severe weather conditions (drought followed by flooding) negatively influenced the intensity of lake sampling aimed at delineating produced water infiltration. Due to the lack of clear evidence of produced water infiltration into the sub-littoral zone of the lake, it was not possible to assess whether the laboratory bioassays of produced water effectively indicate risk in the receiving system. However, the acutely toxic nature of the produced water and general lack of biological effects in the lake at the oil production site suggest minimal to no produced water infiltration into surficial lake sediments and the near-shore water column. This study was able to demonstrate the utility of ion toxicity modeling to support data from toxicity identification evaluations aimed at identifying key toxic constituents in produced water. This information could be used to prioritize options for treating produced water in order to reduce toxic constituents and enhance options for reuse. The study also demonstrated how geographic information systems, toxicity modeling, and toxicity assessment could be used to facilitate future site assessments.

  14. TPK Sarimukti, Cipatat, West Bandung compost toxicity test using Allium test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardini, Trimurti Hesti; Notodarmojo, Peni Astrini

    2015-09-01

    TPK Sarimukti, Cipatat, West Bandung produced 2 kinds of compost from traditional market waste, liquid and solid compost. The aim of this research is to evaluate toxicity of compost produced in TPK Sarimukti using shallots (Allium cepa). Tests carried out by treated shallots with liquid compost (2,5%, 5%, 10% and 12,5% (w/v)) or solid compost (25%, 50%, 75% and 100% (w/v)) for 48 hours. Results showed reduced root growth rate and mitotic index (MI) in accordance with increased concentrations of compost. Sub lethal concentrations are liquid compost 5% and 10% and solid compost 75%. Lethal concentrations are liquid compost 12,5 % and solid compost 100%. Micronuclei (MN) increased with increase in liquid compost concentration. MN found at very high frequencies in highest solid compost concentration (100%), but very low at lower concentrations. Cells with binuclei and cell necrosis increased with increasing concentrations of given compost. Nuclear anomalies (NA) found in high frequency in 75% and 100% solid compost. Based on research, we can conclude that liquid compost is more toxic because it can reduce MI and root growth rate at lower concentrations than solid compost. Both types of compost have genotoxic properties because it can induce chromosome aberration (CA), MN, binuclei and NA formation.

  15. Toxicity tests of soil contaminated by recycling of scrap plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, M.H.; Chui, V.W. )

    1990-03-01

    The present investigation studied the toxicity of soil contaminated by untreated discharge from a factory that recycles used plastics. The nearby agricultural areas and freshwater fish ponds were polluted with high concentrations of Cu, Ni, and Mn. Water extracts from the contaminated soil retarded root growth of Brassica chinensis (Chinese white cabbage) and Cynodon dactylon (Bermuda grass) where their seeds were obtained commercially. The contaminated populations of C. dactylon, Panicum repen (panic grass), and Imperata cylindrica (wooly grass) were able to withstand higher concentrations of Cu, Ni, and Mn, especially C. dactylon, when compared with their uncontaminated counterparts.

  16. EPA’s ToxCast Program for Predicting Toxicity and Prioritizing Chemicals for Further Screening and Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Testing of environmental and industrial chemicals for toxicity potential is a daunting task because of the wide range of possible toxicity mechanisms. Although animal testing is one means of achieving broad toxicity coverage, evaluation of large numbers of chemicals is challengin...

  17. Establishment of quality assurance procedures for aquatic toxicity testing with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, M.N.; Marse, T.J.; Williams, P.L.

    1998-12-31

    In this study initial data were generated to develop laboratory control charts for aquatic toxicity testing using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Tests were performed using two reference toxicants: CdCl{sub 2} and CuCl{sub 2}. All tests were performed for 24 h without a food source and of 48 h with a food source in a commonly used nematode aquatic medium. Each test was replicated 6 times with each replicate having 6 wells per concentration with 10 {+-} 1 worms per well. Probit analysis was used to estimate LC{sub 50} values for each test. The data were used to construct a mean ({bar x}) laboratory control chart for each reference toxicant. The coefficient of variation (CV) for three of the four reference toxicant tests was less than 20%, which demonstrates an excellent degree of reproducibility. These CV values are well within suggested standards for determination of organism sensitivity and overall test system credibility. A standardized procedure for performing 24 h and 48 h aquatic toxicity studies with C. elegans is proposed.

  18. Revolutionizing Toxicity Testing For Predicting Developmental Outcomes (DNT4)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Characterizing risk from environmental chemical exposure currently requires extensive animal testing; however, alternative approaches are being researched to increase throughput of chemicals screened, decrease reliance on animal testing, and improve accuracy in predicting adverse...

  19. 40 CFR 797.1930 - Mysid shrimp acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... concentration of test substance that is calculated to kill 50 percent of a test population during continuous..., growth and reproduction of the mysids. A recommended food is live Artemia spp. (48-hour-old nauplii)....

  20. 40 CFR 797.1930 - Mysid shrimp acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... concentration of test substance that is calculated to kill 50 percent of a test population during continuous..., growth and reproduction of the mysids. A recommended food is live Artemia spp. (48-hour-old nauplii)....

  1. 40 CFR 797.1930 - Mysid shrimp acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... concentration of test substance that is calculated to kill 50 percent of a test population during continuous..., growth and reproduction of the mysids. A recommended food is live Artemia spp. (48-hour-old nauplii)....

  2. 40 CFR 797.1930 - Mysid shrimp acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... concentration of test substance that is calculated to kill 50 percent of a test population during continuous..., growth and reproduction of the mysids. A recommended food is live Artemia spp. (48-hour-old nauplii)....

  3. 40 CFR 797.1930 - Mysid shrimp acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... concentration of test substance that is calculated to kill 50 percent of a test population during continuous... reproduction of the mysids. A recommended food is live Artemia spp. (48-hour-old nauplii). (2)...

  4. Comparative Toxicity of Eight Oil Dispersants, Louisiana Sweet Crude Oil (LSC) and Chemically Dispersed LSC to Two Aquatic Test Species

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study describes the acute toxicity of eight commercial oil dispersants, Louisiana sweet crude oil (LSC), and chemically dispersed LSC. The approach utilized consistent test methodologies within a single laboratory in assessing the relative acute toxicity of the eight dispers...

  5. 40 CFR 795.120 - Gammarid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... definitions also apply to this guideline: Death means the lack of reaction of a test organism to gentle... determining concentrations in the definitive test can be obtained in less time. Nominal concentrations of the... minimizes loss of test substance through microbial degradation, photogradation, chemical...

  6. 40 CFR 797.1300 - Daphnid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... distributed among test chambers in such a manner that test results show no significant bias from the...., conductivity, hardness, pH, etc.) and a description of any pretreatment. (4) Detailed information about the... than ±20 percent. (5) (6) Analytical measurements. (i) Test chemical. Deionized water should be used...

  7. Application of leaching tests for toxicity evaluation of coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiridis, V.; Samaras, P.; Kungolos, A.; Sakellaropoullos, G.P.

    2006-08-15

    The toxic properties of coal fly ash samples obtained from various coal combustion power plants were evaluated in this work using physicochemical analyses and bioassays. Physicochemical analyses showed that heavy metals present in solid samples included Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn. The results of the chemical analysis of eluates deduced by the application of standard leaching tests according to EN 12457-2 and Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) methods indicated that the compounds contained in fly ashes could potentially be transferred to the liquid phase depending upon the leaching method used. Heavy metal concentrations were higher in TCLP eluates, indicating that the initial pH value of the leaching medium significantly affected the transfer of these elements to the liquid phase. Tests conducted with the photobacterium Vibrio fischeri (Microtox test), the crustacean Daphnia magna, and the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus were used to assess toxicity of eluates obtained by both leaching tests. Daphnia magna was the most sensitive test organism. The EN 12457-2 method proved to be more reliable for toxicity evaluation of eluates. In contrast, the TCLP method showed some interference owing to acetic acid toxicity, and precipitation occurred after pH adjustment of eluates from acid to neutral range. The toxicity of both fly ashes and the corresponding solid leaching residues of EN 12457-2 and TCLP leaching tests was also measured using the Microtox Basic Solid phase Test. The results generated with this bioassay indicated that toxicity was greatly influenced by the pH status of the solid samples.

  8. Relative toxicity testing of spacecraft materials. 2: Aircraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    The relative toxicity of thermodegradation (pyrolysis/combustion) products of aircraft materials was studied. Two approaches were taken to assess the biological activity of the pyrolysis/combustion products of these materials: (1) determine the acute lethality to rats from inhalation of these pyrolysates and (2) examine the tendency for sublethal exposure to the pyrolysates to disrupt behavioral (shock avoidance) performance of exposed rats. The ralative importance of lethality vs. behavioral effects in selection of a material may be dictated by whether or not individuals potentially exposed to such products, would have an opportunity to escape if they were behaviorally capable of doing so. If so, the second parameter would assume greater importance, but if not the first parameter may be of much greater importance in selecting materials.

  9. SIMULTANEOUS MULTIPLE SPECIES TESTING: ACUTE TOXICITY OF 13 CHEMICALS TO 12 DIVERSE FRESHWATER AMPHIBIAN, FISH, AND INVERTEBRATE FAMILIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The test series developed methods for testing a compliment of aquatic organisms in a single test that satisfies the freshwater acute toxicity requirements for setting water quality criteria. Species tested included fathead minnows Pimephales promelas, rainbow trout Salmo gairdner...

  10. 9 CFR 113.37 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...the product. Each lot of antiserum shall be demonstrated by virus neutralization tests not to inhibit other viruses known to be possible contaminants. (c) After neutralization, 0.2 ml of the vaccine-serum mixture shall be inoculated...

  11. 9 CFR 113.37 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...the product. Each lot of antiserum shall be demonstrated by virus neutralization tests not to inhibit other viruses known to be possible contaminants. (c) After neutralization, 0.2 ml of the vaccine-serum mixture shall be inoculated...

  12. 9 CFR 113.37 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...the product. Each lot of antiserum shall be demonstrated by virus neutralization tests not to inhibit other viruses known to be possible contaminants. (c) After neutralization, 0.2 ml of the vaccine-serum mixture shall be inoculated...

  13. 9 CFR 113.37 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...the product. Each lot of antiserum shall be demonstrated by virus neutralization tests not to inhibit other viruses known to be possible contaminants. (c) After neutralization, 0.2 ml of the vaccine-serum mixture shall be inoculated...

  14. 9 CFR 113.37 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken embryo inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...the product. Each lot of antiserum shall be demonstrated by virus neutralization tests not to inhibit other viruses known to be possible contaminants. (c) After neutralization, 0.2 ml of the vaccine-serum mixture shall be inoculated...

  15. Clinical validity of a DPYD-based pharmacogenetic test to predict severe toxicity to fluoropyrimidines.

    PubMed

    Toffoli, Giuseppe; Giodini, Luciana; Buonadonna, Angela; Berretta, Massimiliano; De Paoli, Antonino; Scalone, Simona; Miolo, Gianmaria; Mini, Enrico; Nobili, Stefania; Lonardi, Sara; Pella, Nicoletta; Lo Re, Giovanni; Montico, Marcella; Roncato, Rossana; Dreussi, Eva; Gagno, Sara; Cecchin, Erika

    2015-12-15

    Pre-therapeutic DPYD pharmacogenetic test to prevent fluoropyrimidines (FL)-related toxicities is not yet common practice in medical oncology. We aimed at investigating the clinical validity of DPYD genetic analysis in a large series of oncological patients. Six hundred three cancer patients, treated with FL, have been retrospectively tested for eight DPYD polymorphisms (DPYD-rs3918290, DPYD-rs55886062, DPYD-rs67376798, DPYD-rs2297595, DPYD-rs1801160, DPYD-rs1801158, DPYD-rs1801159, DPYD-rs17376848) for association with Grade ?3 toxicity, developed within the first three cycles of therapy. DPYD-rs3918290 and DPYD-rs67376798 were associated to Grade ?3 toxicity after bootstrap validation and Bonferroni correction (p?=?0.003, p?=?0.048). DPYD-rs55886062 was not significant likely due to its low allelic frequency, nonetheless one out of two heterozygous patients (compound heterozygous with DPYD-rs3918290) died from toxicity after one cycle. Test specificity for the analysis of DPYD-rs3918290, DPYD-rs55886062 and DPYD-rs67376798 was assessed to 99%. Among the seven patients carrying one variant DPYD-rs3918290, DPYD-rs55886062 or DPYD-rs67376798 allele, not developing Grade ?3 toxicity, 57% needed a FL dose or schedule modification for moderate chronic toxicity. No other DPYD polymorphism was associated with Grade ?3 toxicity. Our data demonstrate the clinical validity and specificity of the DPYD-rs3918290, DPYD-rs55886062, DPYD-rs67376798 genotyping test to prevent FL-related Grade ?3 toxicity and to preserve treatment compliance, and support its introduction in the clinical practice. PMID:26099996

  16. 40 CFR Appendix Ix to Part 268 - Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and Structural Integrity Test (Method 1310B)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Extraction Procedure (EP) Toxicity Test Method and Structural Integrity Test (Method 1310B) IX Appendix IX to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS...

  17. Determining the relative sensitivity of benthic diatoms to atrazine using rapid toxicity testing: a novel method.

    PubMed

    Wood, Rebecca J; Mitrovic, Simon M; Kefford, Ben J

    2014-07-01

    Herbicides pose a potential threat to aquatic ecosystems, especially to phototrophic organisms such as benthic diatoms. Benthic diatoms may be a valuable indicator of the toxic impacts of herbicides in aquatic systems. However, this requires information on the herbicide sensitivity of a wide range of freshwater benthic diatom taxa. Unfortunately this information is only available for a limited number of species as current methods of developing new algae toxicity tests on individual taxa are lengthy and costly. To address this issue, we developed a new rapid toxicity test method to test natural benthic communities, from which the relative herbicide sensitivity of many individual taxa can be derived. This involved the collection of natural benthic communities from rocks in situ, which were placed directly into laboratory toxicity tests. Sensitivity data for several diatom genera in a 48 hour exposure toxicity test were produced, without the need for cultures or multiple site visits. After exposure to the highest treatment of atrazine (500 ?g L(-1)) there were significant declines of healthy cells in the most sensitive genera: Gomphonema declined by 74%, Amphora by 62%, Cymbella by 54% and Ulnaria by 34% compared to control levels. In contrast, the genera, Eunotia, Achnanthidium and Navicula, had no statistically significant decline in cell health. This method can identify the diatom taxa most at risk of herbicide toxicity within the natural benthic diatom community. The rapid toxicity testing method presented is a simple and effective method to obtain sensitivity data for multiple taxa within a natural benthic diatom community in a relatively short period of time. PMID:24742551

  18. Correlation of the five test methods to assess chemical toxicity and relation to physical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshioka, Y.; Ose, Y.; Sato, T.

    1986-08-01

    Biological tests using Orizias latipes (LC50 and oxygen uptake test), Moina macrocopa (LC50), and Dugesia japonica (head regeneration test and LC50) were carried out in order to clarify the mutual relationship of these test methods. The oxygen uptake rate of O. latipes was not effective to assess chemical toxicity. Adding the results of the growth inhibition test of Tetrahymena pyriformis (Yoshioka, Y., Ose, Y., and Sato, T. (1985). Sci. Total Environ. 43, 149-157), the correlation coefficients between each two test methods were calculated. The test results except EC50 and LC50 of D. japonica showed a good relation to each other. We determined the solubility and the n-octanol/water partition coefficient (P) of some chemicals used in the test. Log P interpreted the toxicity in mol/liter unit but not in mg/liter. Solubility was not a useful descripter neither in mol/liter nor in mg/liter unit.

  19. Dispersed oil toxicity tests with biological species indigenous to the Gulf of Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fucik, K.W.; Carr, K.A.; Balcom, B.J.

    1994-08-01

    Static and flowthrough aquatic acute toxicity testing protocols were utilized on eggs and larvae of seven commercially important invertebrates and fishes from the Gulf of Mexico. Test organisms were exposed to Central and Western Gulf oils, dispersed oil, and Corexit 9527. Species included brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus), white shrimp (Penaeus setiferus), blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica), red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), inland silverside (Menidia berylina), and spot (Leiosomus xanthurus). Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) was also tested because gulf menhaden were not available. Mysids (Mysidopsis bahia) were evaluated as part of a chronic toxicity assessment.

  20. Determination of the number of cells in preimplantation embryos by using noninvasive optical quadrature microscopy in conjunction with differential interference contrast microscopy.

    PubMed

    Newmark, Judith A; Warger, William C; Chang, ChihChing; Herrera, Gustavo E; Brooks, Dana H; DiMarzio, Charles A; Warner, Carol M

    2007-04-01

    The number of cells in a preimplantation embryo is directly correlated to the health and viability of the embryo. There are currently no methods to count the number of cells in late-stage preimplantation embryos noninvasively. We assessed the ability of optical quadrature microscopy (OQM) to count the number of cells in mouse preimplantation embryos noninvasively. First, to test for possible light toxicity, we exposed two-cell mouse embryos to OQM and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy and assessed their ability to develop to the blastocyst stage. We found no inhibition of development from either mode of microscopy for up to 2 h of light exposure. We also imaged eight-cell to morula stage mouse preimplantation embryos by OQM nd developed two methods for counting the number of cells. The contour signature method (CSM) used OQM images alone and the phase subtraction method (PSM) used both OQM and DIC images. We compared both methods to standard cell counting techniques and found that the PSM was superior to all other noninvasive cell counting methods. Our work on mouse embryos should be applicable to human embryos. The ability to correctly count the number of cells in human preimplantation embryos could lead to the transfer of fewer embryos in in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics and consequently a lower rate of high-risk multiple-infant births. PMID:17367551

  1. Determination of the Number of Cells in Preimplantation Embryos by Using Noninvasive Optical Quadrature Microscopy in Conjunction with Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Newmark, Judith A.; Warger, William C.; Chang, ChihChing; Herrera, Gustavo E.; Brooks, Dana H.; DiMarzio, Charles A.; Warner, Carol M.

    2008-01-01

    The number of cells in a preimplantation embryo is directly correlated to the health and viability of the embryo. There are currently no methods to count the number of cells in late-stage preimplantation embryos noninvasively. We assessed the ability of optical quadrature microscopy (OQM) to count the number of cells in mouse preimplantation embryos noninvasively. First, to test for possible light toxicity, we exposed two-cell mouse embryos to OQM and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy and assessed their ability to develop to the blastocyst stage. We found no inhibition of development from either mode of microscopy for up to 2 h of light exposure. We also imaged eight-cell to morula stage mouse preimplantation embryos by OQM nd developed two methods for counting the number of cells. The contour signature method (CSM) used OQM images alone and the phase subtraction method (PSM) used both OQM and DIC images. We compared both methods to standard cell counting techniques and found that the PSM was superior to all other noninvasive cell counting methods. Our work on mouse embryos should be applicable to human embryos. The ability to correctly count the number of cells in human preimplantation embryos could lead to the transfer of fewer embryos in in vitro fertilization (IVF)clinics and consequently a lower rate of high-risk multiple-infant births. PMID:17367551

  2. A battery of toxicity tests as indicators of decontamination in composting oily waste.

    PubMed

    Juvonen, R; Martikainen, E; Schultz, E; Joutti, A; Ahtiainen, J; Lehtokari, M

    2000-10-01

    Heterogeneous oily waste from an old dumping site was composted in three windrows constructed from different proportions of waste, sewage sludge, and bark. The objectives of this pilot study were to examine the usefulness of composting as a treatment method for this particular waste and to study decontamination in the composting process by using a battery of toxicity tests. Five samples from the windrow having intermediate oil concentrations were tested with toxicity tests based on microbes (Pseudomonas putida growth inhibition test, ToxiChromotest, MetPLATE, and three different modifications of a luminescent bacterial test), enzyme inhibition (reverse electron transport), plants (duckweed growth inhibition and red clover seed germination), and soil animals (Folsomia candida, Enchytraeus albidus, and Enchytraeus sp.). The luminescent bacterial tests were used as prescreening tests. Chemical analyses of samples were carried out simultaneously. Both toxicity and oil concentration, including those of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were reduced during composting and soil quality improved significantly. The total oil hydrocarbon concentration decreased from 90,000 to 19,000 mg/kg, measured with the IR method, in 4 months, and from 86,000 to 1400 mg/kg, measured with GC method. The concentration of PAHs decreased from 135 to 23.5 mg/kg. During the fourth month of composting (stabilization stage), the proportion of the heaviest oil fractions (asphaltenes) became dominant. Toxicity varied between different samples and between different bioassays; however, the first sample was significantly more toxic than the others, and most of the tests revealed a decrease in toxicity during the composting process. PMID:11023694

  3. TOXICITY TESTING IN THE 21ST CENTURY: A VISION AND A STRATEGY

    PubMed Central

    Krewski, Daniel; Acosta, Daniel; Andersen, Melvin; Anderson, Henry; Bailar, John C.; Boekelheide, Kim; Brent, Robert; Charnley, Gail; Cheung, Vivian G.; Green, Sidney; Kelsey, Karl T.; Kerkvliet, Nancy I.; Li, Abby A.; McCray, Lawrence; Meyer, Otto; Patterson, Reid D.; Pennie, William; Scala, Robert A.; Solomon, Gina M.; Stephens, Martin; Yager, James; Zeise, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    With the release of the landmark report Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and a Strategy, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, in 2007, precipitated a major change in the way toxicity testing is conducted. It envisions increased efficiency in toxicity testing and decreased animal usage by transitioning from current expensive and lengthy in vivo testing with qualitative endpoints to in vitro toxicity pathway assays on human cells or cell lines using robotic high-throughput screening with mechanistic quantitative parameters. Risk assessment in the exposed human population would focus on avoiding significant perturbations in these toxicity pathways. Computational systems biology models would be implemented to determine the dose-response models of perturbations of pathway function. Extrapolation of in vitro results to in vivo human blood and tissue concentrations would be based on pharmacokinetic models for the given exposure condition. This practice would enhance human relevance of test results, and would cover several test agents, compared to traditional toxicological testing strategies. As all the tools that are necessary to implement the vision are currently available or in an advanced stage of development, the key prerequisites to achieving this paradigm shift are a commitment to change in the scientific community, which could be facilitated by a broad discussion of the vision, and obtaining necessary resources to enhance current knowledge of pathway perturbations and pathway assays in humans and to implement computational systems biology models. Implementation of these strategies would result in a new toxicity testing paradigm firmly based on human biology. PMID:20574894

  4. 40 CFR 797.1400 - Fish acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...calculate LC50 's and their 95 percent confidence limits, and to plot concentration-response curves for each time interval whenever...test substance shall be used to calculate all LC60 's and to plot all concentration-response curves. (d) Test...

  5. 40 CFR 797.1400 - Fish acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...calculate LC50 's and their 95 percent confidence limits, and to plot concentration-response curves for each time interval whenever...test substance shall be used to calculate all LC60 's and to plot all concentration-response curves. (d) Test...

  6. 40 CFR 797.1400 - Fish acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...calculate LC50 's and their 95 percent confidence limits, and to plot concentration-response curves for each time interval whenever...test substance shall be used to calculate all LC60 's and to plot all concentration-response curves. (d) Test...

  7. 40 CFR 797.1400 - Fish acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...calculate LC50 's and their 95 percent confidence limits, and to plot concentration-response curves for each time interval whenever...test substance shall be used to calculate all LC60 's and to plot all concentration-response curves. (d) Test...

  8. 40 CFR 797.1400 - Fish acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...calculate LC50 's and their 95 percent confidence limits, and to plot concentration-response curves for each time interval whenever...test substance shall be used to calculate all LC60 's and to plot all concentration-response curves. (d) Test...

  9. 16 CFR 1500.40 - Method of testing toxic substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...around the trunk of the animal. The ends of the...subjects. In the testing of unctuous...one-half of the animals are further prepared...c) Procedures for testing. The sleeve is slipped onto the animal which is then...

  10. Perspectives on Validation of High-Throughput Assays Supporting 21st Century Toxicity Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) assays are seeing increasing use in toxicity testing. HTS assays can simultaneously test many chemicals but have seen limited use in the regulatory arena, in part because of the need to undergo rigorous, time-consuming formal validation. ...

  11. DREDGED MATERIAL EFFECTS ASSESSMENT: SINGLE-SPECIES TOXICITY/BIOACCUMULATION AND MACROBENTHOS COLONIZATION TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity tests and bioaccumulation tests conducted according to methods established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency/Corps of Engineers in 1977 have been used to evaluate potential environmental impacts of ocean disposal of dredged materials. ur objective was to compar...

  12. SALINITY TOLERANCE OF DAPHNIA MAGNA AND POTENTIAL USE FOR ESTUARINE SEDIMENT TOXICITY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Daphnia magna Straus, a common organism used for freshwater sediment toxicity tests, was evaluated to determine its tolerance to salinity and suitability for tests with estuarine water and sediments. Daphnids were exposed for 2 to 21 days to salinity in a variety of water-only te...

  13. Handbook of acute toxicity of chemicals to fish and aquatic invertebrates : summaries of toxicity tests conducted at Columbia National Fisheries Research Laboratory, 1965-78

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, W. Waynon; Finley, Mack T.

    1980-01-01

    Acute toxicity is a major subject of research at Columbia National Fisheries Research Laboratory for evaluating the impact of toxic chemicals on fishery resources. The Laboratory has played a leading role in developing research technology for toxicity testing and data interpretation. In 1965-78, more than 400 chemicals were tested against a variety of invertebrates and fish species representative of both cold- and warm-water climates. The use of acute toxicity tests for assessing the potential hazard of chemical contaminants to aquatic organisms is well documented (Boyd 1957; Henderson et al. 1960; Sanders and Cope 1966; Macek and McAllister 1970). Static acute toxicity tests provide rapid and (within limits) reproducible concentration-response curves for estimating toxic effects of chemicals on aquatic organisms. These tests provide a database for determining relative toxicity of a large number of chemicals to a variety of species and for estimating acute effects of chemical spills on natural aquatic systems; they also assist in determining priority and design of additional toxicity studies. Acute toxicity tests usually provide estimates of the exposure concentration causing 50% mortality (LC50) to test organisms during a specified period of time. For certain invertebrates, the effective concentration is based on immobilization, or some other identifiable endpoint, rather than on lethality. The application of the LC50 has gained acceptance among toxicologists and is generally the most highly rated test for assessing potential adverse effects of chemical contaminants to aquatic life (Brungs and Mount 1978; American Institute for Biological Sciences 1978a). The literature contains numerous papers dealing with the acute toxicity of chemicals to freshwater organisms. However, there is a tremendous need for a concise compendium of toxicity data covering a large variety of chemicals and test species. This Handbook is a compilation of a large volume of acute toxicity data from the Columbia Laboratory and its field laboratories. It presents definitive acute toxicity data on 271 chemicals tested against a variety of freshwater invertebrates and fishes. The chemicals represent all major groups of pesticides, as well as numerous industrial chemicals. This compilation should serve as a useful database for the many agencies and organizations dealing with research and management programs concerned with the impact of chemicals on aquatic resources. The Columbia Laboratory has played a major role in developing currently used standard methodology for static acute toxicity testing. The use of standardized methodology greatly reduces variation in results. The data presented here have been carefully scrutinized to eliminate tests that failed to follow acceptable procedures. Handling of test organisms and procedures for static toxicity tests followed those described by Lennon and Walker (1964) and Macek and McAllister (1970), and conform well with those recommended by Brauhn and Schoettger (1975) and the Committee on Methods for Toxicity Tests with Aquatic Organisms (1975). The species of fish and invertebrates that were tested are listed in phylogenetic order in Tables 1 and 2. Fish were obtained from Federal and State hatcheries as either eggs or fry. Original stocks of invertebrates were collected and cultured from wild populations with no known source of contamination; these populations were replenished regularly. The invertebrates were cultured in the Laboratory by methods similar to those described by Sanders and Cope (1966). Test chemicals usually consisted of technical or analytical grade samples of known purity. Formulations of the chemicals were also tested when available. When purity of test chemicals was known, all calculated concentrations were based on percent active ingredients. Stock solutions were prepared immediately before each test, with commercial grade acetone as the carrier solvent. Occasionally, ethanol or dimethyl-formamide was substituted. Solvent concentrations did not exceed 0.5 mL/L in final dilution water. Test

  14. The expression of an immune-related phenoloxidase gene is modulated in Ciona intestinalis ovary, test cells, embryos and larva.

    PubMed

    Parrinello, Daniela; Sanfratello, Maria A; Vizzini, Aiti; Cammarata, Matteo

    2015-03-01

    Two distinct Ciona intestinalis phenoloxidases (CinPO1, 2) had previously been cloned and sequenced. The CinPO2 is involved in innate immunity and is expressed by inflammatory hemocytes that populate the tunic and pharynx vessels as a response to LPS inoculation. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry assays on histological section, showed that the expression of this gene and the produced protein are shared with oogenesis, embryogenesis and larval morphogenesis. Intriguingly, upregulation of gene transcription was found in the test cell layer that envelopes the ovary follicle, ovulated egg, and gastrula, as well as it was modulated in the zygotic nucleus of outer balstomers of 32-cell embryo, neurula presumptive epidermis tissue and larval mesenchyme. The anti-CinPO2 antibodies, specific for adult inflammatory cells, recognize epitopes in the cytoplasm of ovarian oocytes, ovulated eggs, development stages and larval mesenchyme. The overall findings disclose the precocious activation of the CinPO2 immunity-related gene, and show a developmentally programmed expression of this phenoloxidase. Furthermore, these findings support the multifunctional roles of immunity-related genes and allows us to explore new perspectives on ascidian development and immunity. PMID:25786783

  15. Genomic structure, promoter identification, and chromosomal mapping of a mouse nuclear orphan receptor expressed in embryos and adult testes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.H.; Wei, Li-Na; Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J.; Jenkins, N.A.

    1995-11-01

    We have isolated and characterized overlapping genomic clones containing the complete transcribed region of a newly isolated mouse cDNA encoding an orphan receptor expressed specifically in midgestation embryos and adult testis. This gene spans a distance of more than 50 kb and is organized into 13 exons. The transcription initiation site is located at the 158th nucleotide upstream from the translation initiation codon. All the exon/intron junction sequences follow the GT/AG rule. Based upon Northern blot analysis and the size of the transcribed region of the gene, its transcript was determined to be approximately 2.5 kb. Within approximately 500 hp upstream from the transcription initiation site, several immune response regulatory elements were identified but no TATA box was located. This gene was mapped to the distal region of mouse chromosome 10 and its locus has been designated Tr2-11. Immunohistochemical studies show that the Tr2-11 protein is present mainly in advanced germ cell populations of mature testes and that Tr2-11 gene expression is dramatically decreased in vitamin A-depleted animals. 23 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Considerations related to the use of toxicity testing in Canada`s ocean disposal program

    SciTech Connect

    Riebel, P.; Rowland, A.; Samant, H.; Doe, K.

    1995-12-31

    As part of its Ocean Disposal Program, Environment Canada is proposing the use of sediment and porewater toxicity tests to evaluate the acceptability of estuarine and marine sediments for ocean disposal. Under a tiered testing approach, sediments which fail the regulated chemical limits would be subjected to toxicity testing using 5 different type of tests: a 10-day amphipod acute test, a bacterial bioluminescence test, an echinoid fertilization test, a 28-day bioaccumulation test and a polychaete growth test which is still in development. In the past year, the use of the first four of these tests in ocean disposal projects on Canada`s west and east coasts has generated several issues which need to be addressed. Among these is the need for more guidance on the selection of reference sediments and on the selection of appropriate test species. Also, the interpretation of toxicity due to unregulated parameters such as sulfides and ammonia must be considered. Pass/fail criteria based on sound scientific rationale must be established to justify land confinement or capping of sediments, and a weight-of-evidence approach (e.g. Triad) using site-specific studies should be considered to support the results of laboratory tests. Techniques such as Ecological Risk Assessment should be considered to predict potential biological effects at an ocean dump site.

  17. Controlling silver nanoparticle exposure in algal toxicity testing – A matter of timing

    PubMed Central

    Baun, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The aquatic ecotoxicity testing of nanoparticles is complicated by unstable exposure conditions resulting from various transformation processes of nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions. In this study, we investigated the influence of exposure timing on the algal test response to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), by reducing the incubation time and by aging the AgNPs in algal medium prior to testing. The freshwater green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata were exposed to AgNO3, NM-300?K (a representative AgNP) and citrate stabilized AgNPs from two different manufacturers (AgNP1 and AgNP2) in a standard algal growth inhibition test (ISO 8692:2004) for 48?h and a short-term (2?h) 14C-assimilation test. For AgNO3, similar responses were obtained in the two tests, whereas freshly prepared suspensions of citrate stabilized AgNPs were less toxic in the 2-h tests compared to the 48-h tests. The 2-h test was found applicable for dissolved silver, but yielded non-monotonous concentration–response relationships and poor reproducibility for freshly prepared AgNP suspensions. However, when aging AgNPs in algal medium 24?h prior to testing, clear concentration–response patterns emerged and reproducibility increased. Prolonged aging to 48?h increased toxicity in the 2-h tests whereas aging beyond 48?h reduced toxicity. Our results demonstrate that the outcome of algal toxicity testing of AgNPs is highly influenced not only by the test duration, but also by the time passed from the moment AgNPs are added to the test medium. This time-dependency should be considered when nanomaterial dispersion protocols for ecotoxicity testing are developed. PMID:24842597

  18. Arabian killifish (Aphanius dispar) embryos: A model organism for the risk assessment of the Arabian Gulf coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Suhur; Al-Naema, Nayla; Butler, Josh D; Febbo, Eric J

    2015-12-01

    Fish embryos are excellent models for studies aimed at understanding toxic mechanisms and indications of possible acute and chronic effects. For the past 3 yr, an Arabian killifish (Aphanius dispar) fish embryo test has been developed in the authors' laboratory as a routine ecotoxicological test that can be used to support risk assessment of potential contaminants in Arabian Gulf coastal waters. Tests were conducted with 3 reference toxicants (3,4-dichloroaniline [DCA], sodium dodecyl sulfate, and zinc sulfate [Zn]) and chlorine, a disinfectant used widely in industrial cooling systems around the Arabian Gulf region. The 50% effect concentration (EC50) for DCA was 0.47?mg/L and 1.89?mg/L for embryos exposed before 6 hpf and after 168 hpf, respectively. Sublethal effects were mainly observed at concentrations above 2.5?mg/L, the effects included severe pericardial edema and tail shortage. The sodium dodecyl sulfate ionic surfactant caused mortality at both early and late stages of embryo development; it caused coagulation, severe deformity, and hemolysis. Both the EC50 and the 50% lethal concentration (LC50) for sodium dodecyl sulfate were 9.37?mg/L. Salinity influenced the toxicity of Zn to killifish embryos: at 40 psu Zn was found not to be toxic, whereas at 20 psu toxicity had increased significantly (p < 0.05). Values of EC50 and LC50 were 2.5?mg/L and 4?mg/L, respectively. Concentrations above 15?mg/L in embryos were often accompanied by upper abdominal edema and inhibition of growth, especially evident in the tail. Chlorine caused mortality at a lower concentration; for example, at 0.05?mg/L 33% of embryos were found dead at the end of the experiment. The LC50 for chlorine was determined to be 0.08?mg/L. Examination of the existing literature showed similar results to the present study's findings. The results suggest a more comparable sensitivity of killifish embryos to that of other fish embryo test recommended species. The present study's findings support the ability of killifish to be an indicator organism for environmental risk assessments of Arabian Gulf waters. Benefits include sensitivity to a wide range of substances and conditions, animal alternative, ease of fish breeding, and clarity of the embryos. Environ Toxicol Chem 2015;34:2898-2905. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26184573

  19. Use of tracheal organ cultures in toxicity testing.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, B P; Miller, S L; Drummond, E J

    1976-01-01

    Fragments of tracheal epithelium alone or in continuity with connective tissues, can be maintained in culture medium and used for short term or long term studies of toxicity of a variety of chemicals. Large numbers of uniform cultures are prepared with the aid of a slicing device or by application of simple method for dissecting sheets of epithelium free from underlying cartilage. The cultures may be placed in an exposure chamber-incubator mounted on a microscope stage and monitored continually for ciliostasis and exfoliation of cells. Morphology is further studied by fixation of selected specimens and preparation for light microscopy and electron microscopy. Synthetic functions are evaluated by autoradiographic measurement of incorporation of radioactive precursors into macromolecules and other dynamic features are indirectly assessed by histochemical and histoenzymatic methods. Short-term studies using these several techniques have shown that ciliostasis does not correlate with cell injury in all instances, and a long-term study has demonstrated dose dependence of a cytotoxic agent when duration of culture viability is measured. The method lends itself to a broad range of investigations in which dose, period of exposure, and role of cofactors must be independently and quantitatively assessed. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. FIGURE 12. PMID:1017423

  20. Toxic effects of occupational and environmental chemicals on the testes

    SciTech Connect

    Sever, L.E.; Hessol, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper examines evidence for effects of occupational chemicals on male reproduction. We consider primarily human data, and much of that from epidemiologic studies. We use animal studies to illustrate points, but the theme is the human experience. The approach is based on examining reproductive function as an indicator of toxic effects. Testicular structure and function is briefly discussed. We provide a brief review of relevant structure, function and hormonal control. We describe the anatomy of the testis and its histological structure. We then discuss the testis from the point of view of exocrine and endocrine function and the relationship of the testis to other endocrinological organs. This is followed by a review of methods for assessing human testicular function, including reproductive histories, sperm analysis, assessment of hormonal status, and histological studies. Although the primary focus is on human studies, we consider briefly general categories of chemicals shown to have a testicular effect in animal studies and also animal evidence of mechanisms of action associated with testicular toxicology. Specific chemicals shown to affect reproduction in the human male are reviewed and directions for future research in this area discussed.

  1. 16 CFR 1500.40 - Method of testing toxic substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...dimensions of sleeves and the approximate body surface exposed to the test substance. The sleeves may vary in size to accommodate smaller or larger...centimeters) Average percentage of total body surface 7.0 12.5...

  2. 16 CFR 1500.40 - Method of testing toxic substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...dimensions of sleeves and the approximate body surface exposed to the test substance. The sleeves may vary in size to accommodate smaller or larger...centimeters) Average percentage of total body surface 7.0 12.5...

  3. 40 CFR 797.1930 - Mysid shrimp acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...and test periods; (3 ) apparatus for straining particulate matter, removing gas bubbles, or aerating the water, as necessary...an apparatus for providing a 14-hour light and 10-hour dark photoperiod with a 15 to 30 minute transition...

  4. 40 CFR 797.1930 - Mysid shrimp acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...and test periods; (3 ) apparatus for straining particulate matter, removing gas bubbles, or aerating the water, as necessary...an apparatus for providing a 14-hour light and 10-hour dark photoperiod with a 15 to 30 minute transition...

  5. NEXT GENERATION SEDIMENT TOXICITY TESTING VIA DNA MICROARRAYS - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current SBIR solicitation states that the EPA is seeking “better sampling, analysis, and monitoring technologies” to improve hazardous waste management.  Development of new methods for testing contaminated sediments is an area of particular concern because many industri...

  6. 40 CFR 797.1050 - Algal acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...property of inhibiting algal growth. (3) ECx means the...the test criterion. (4) Growth means a relative measure of the viability of an algal population based on the number and...and control containers in the growth chambers. Environmental...

  7. 40 CFR 797.1050 - Algal acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...property of inhibiting algal growth. (3) ECx means the...the test criterion. (4) Growth means a relative measure of the viability of an algal population based on the number and...and control containers in the growth chambers. Environmental...

  8. 40 CFR 797.1950 - Mysid shrimp chronic toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...young per female and growth are used as measures...50 percent of a test population during continuous exposure...effects of a chemical on growth and reproduction during...mysids from the same population or culture...

  9. 40 CFR 797.1950 - Mysid shrimp chronic toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...young per female and growth are used as measures...50 percent of a test population during continuous exposure...effects of a chemical on growth and reproduction during...mysids from the same population or culture...

  10. 40 CFR 797.1950 - Mysid shrimp chronic toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...young per female and growth are used as measures...50 percent of a test population during continuous exposure...effects of a chemical on growth and reproduction during...mysids from the same population or culture...

  11. 40 CFR 797.1950 - Mysid shrimp chronic toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...young per female and growth are used as measures...50 percent of a test population during continuous exposure...effects of a chemical on growth and reproduction during...mysids from the same population or culture...

  12. 40 CFR 797.1050 - Algal acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...property of inhibiting algal growth. (3) ECx means the...the test criterion. (4) Growth means a relative measure of the viability of an algal population based on the number and...and control containers in the growth chambers. Environmental...

  13. 40 CFR 797.1050 - Algal acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...property of inhibiting algal growth. (3) ECx means the...the test criterion. (4) Growth means a relative measure of the viability of an algal population based on the number and...and control containers in the growth chambers. Environmental...

  14. 40 CFR 797.1050 - Algal acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...property of inhibiting algal growth. (3) ECx means the...the test criterion. (4) Growth means a relative measure of the viability of an algal population based on the number and...and control containers in the growth chambers. Environmental...

  15. Current Development in Reproductive Toxicity Testing of Pesticides

    EPA Science Inventory

    A protocol to evaluate the potential developmental and reproductive effects of test chemicals has been developed by the Life Stages Task Force of the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI)/Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) Agricultural Chemical Safety Asses...

  16. Consensus report on the future of animal-free systemic toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Leist, Marcel; Hasiwa, Nina; Rovida, Costanza; Daneshian, Mardas; Basketter, David; Kimber, Ian; Clewell, Harvey; Gocht, Tilman; Goldberg, Alan; Busquet, Francois; Rossi, Anna-Maria; Schwarz, Michael; Stephens, Martin; Taalman, Rob; Knudsen, Thomas B; McKim, James; Harris, Georgina; Pamies, David; Hartung, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Since March 2013, animal use for cosmetics testing for the European market has been banned. This requires a renewed view on risk assessment in this field. However, in other fields as well, traditional animal experimentation does not always satisfy requirements in safety testing, as the need for human-relevant information is ever increasing. A general strategy for animal-free test approaches was outlined by the US National Research Council`s vision document for Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century in 2007. It is now possible to provide a more defined roadmap on how to implement this vision for the four principal areas of systemic toxicity evaluation: repeat dose organ toxicity, carcinogenicity, reproductive toxicity and allergy induction (skin sensitization), as well as for the evaluation of toxicant metabolism (toxicokinetics) (Fig. 1). CAAT-Europe assembled experts from Europe, America and Asia to design a scientific roadmap for future risk assessment approaches and the outcome was then further discussed and refined in two consensus meetings with over 200 stakeholders. The key recommendations include: focusing on improving existing methods rather than favoring de novo design; combining hazard testing with toxicokinetics predictions; developing integrated test strategies; incorporating new high content endpoints to classical assays; evolving test validation procedures; promoting collaboration and data-sharing of different industrial sectors; integrating new disciplines, such as systems biology and high throughput screening; and involving regulators early on in the test development process. A focus on data quality, combined with increased attention to the scientific background of a test method, will be important drivers. Information from each test system should be mapped along adverse outcome pathways. Finally, quantitative information on all factors and key events will be fed into systems biology models that allow a probabilistic risk assessment with flexible adaptation to exposure scenarios and individual risk factors. PMID:25061899

  17. Development of marine sediment bioassays and toxicity tests for monitoring and regulation in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Thain, J.; Matthiessen, P.

    1995-12-31

    There is a need in Europe and elsewhere for a broad suite of whole-sediment bioassays and toxicity tests which can be used for routine monitoring and assessment of the marine environment and for evaluating the toxic effects of chemicals which may find their way into sediments. Until recently, few European species had been incorporated into such tests but the availability of suitable methodologies is now increasing rapidly. Perhaps the most important recent activity in this area consisted of an international ring test of acute sediment toxicity test methods which was organized by the Oslo and Paris Commissions in 1993, using up to 4 offshore chemicals as test materials. It evaluated the performance of 4 acute (5--10 day) tests involving: the sea urchin Echinocardium cordatum, the bivalve mollusc Abra alba, the amphipod crustacean Corophium volutator, and the polychaete worm Arenicola marina. The ring test concluded that the C. volutator test was the most appropriate for evaluating offshore chemicals, but all these methods are now widely used in Europe, both as toxicity tests and as bioassays. For example, the A. marina procedure (which has both lethal and sublethal endpoints), in combination with the C. volutator method, is now routinely used in the UK for monitoring the toxicity of estuarine sediments. Further activities are in progress. Perhaps the most important is the development of chronic marine sediment tests and bioassays which can be used to assess the long-term effects of the many sedimentary contaminants which are able to persist in this type of habitat and possibly cause delayed effects on the growth and reproduction, etc. of benthic fauna.

  18. U-937 Toxicity Testing of Lunar Dust Stimulant (JSC-1A-vf)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, Kristyn; Hammond, Dianne; Wallace, William; Jeevarajan, Antony

    2007-01-01

    With NASA planning to extend the human presence to the moon by 2020, the dangers of the lunar environment must be assessed and appropriate countermeasures must be developed. Possible toxic effects of the lunar dust are of particular importance to human health because of the dust's chemical composition, reactivity, and small size. This project focuses on the toxicity of lunar dust stimulant (JSC-1A-vf), in both its active and passive forms, using U-937 human monocyte cells. Simulant was mechanically activated from its passive form by grinding, and its ability to produce hydroxyl radicals was determined. To test for toxicity, active and passivated simulant was diluted in media and applied to the cells for various time periods. Toxicity was then estimated using flow cytometry on the Guava Personal Cell Analysis system. Preliminary results suggest that passivated stimulant is slightly toxic, with an increase in toxicity for activated stimulant. Toxicity results may be affected by cell lysing behavior and quenching of hydroxyl radical production by the cell media.

  19. An evaluation of the seven-day toxicity test with Americamysis bahia (formerly Mysidopsis bahia)

    SciTech Connect

    Lussier, S.M.; Kuhn, A.; Comeleo, R.

    1999-12-01

    The 7-d test measuring survival, growth, and fecundity of Americamysis bahia (formerly Mysidopsis bahia) was developed for estimating the chronic toxicity of effluents and associated receiving waters for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permits. Currently, this test and its derivatives are also used in toxicity identification evaluation (TIE), risk assessment, and other applications. To evaluate the relative sensitivity of three measurement endpoints (survival, growth, and fecundity), the authors analyzed results from 115 tests with effluents, organic or inorganic chemicals, and receiving waters suspected of being toxic. Controls for 78 of these achieved acceptable survival and growth. Fifty of these 78 tests also achieved acceptable control fecundity. In the 47 tests with significant effects, survival was the most sensitive response in 57%, fecundity in 30%, and growth in 30%. There was little duplication in responses. Improving pretest holding conditions by decreasing the maximum density from {approximately}20 to 10 animals/L and increasing the temperature from {approximately}26 C to a range of 26 to 27 C improved the growth and fecundity in controls. Although the percentage of tests achieving acceptable control survival and growth decreased from 93 to 86%, the percentage achieving acceptable fecundity in controls increased from 60 to 97%. Seasonal differences in fecundity were detected among control groups. Although variable, fecundity is often the most sensitive measure of response. The 7-d mysid test estimates the chronic toxicity of effluents most effectively when all three endpoints are used.

  20. Quick, portable toxicity testing of marine or terrigenous fluids, sediments, or chemicals with bioluminescent organism

    SciTech Connect

    Sabate, R.W.; Stiffey, A.V.; Dewailly, E.L.

    1995-12-31

    A hand-held, battery-operated instrument, which measures bioluminescence inhibition of the microscopic marine dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunula, is capable of field-testing substances for toxicity. The organism is sensitive to ppb of strong toxicants. It tolerates some solvents in concentrations necessary for testing lipophylic samples. A test consumes only micrograms of sample. This method requires no adjustments for salinity, pH, color, or turbidity. It has been used successfully to test oil-well drilling fluids, brines produced with oil, waters and sediments from streams and lakes and petroleum-plant effluents containing contaminants such as benzene. The test is non-specific; however, if the substance is known, the end-point effects a direct measurement of its concentration. One-hour toxicity screening tests in the field produce results comparable to the standard four-hour laboratory test. Keeping the sample in the dark during incubation and testing, together with shortness of the overall procedure, eliminates anomalies from light-sensitive substances. Day-to-day variation, as well as among test replicates, is less than 10%. This quick method yields results comparable with a quick test that uses Photobacterium phosphoria, and with 96-hour tests that use Mysidopsis bahia, Artemia salina, Gonyaulax polyedra, Pimephales promelas, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and Cyprinodon variegatus.

  1. Efficacy of the hatching event in assessing the embryo toxicity of the nano-sized TiO? particles in zebrafish: a comparison between two different classes of hatching-derived variables.

    PubMed

    Samaee, Seyed-Mohammadreza; Rabbani, Shahram; Jovanovi?, Boris; Mohajeri-Tehrani, Mohammad Reza; Haghpanah, Vahid

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the nano-TiO2 toxicity to zebrafish embryos through evaluating the success in hatching in relationship with hours post-exposure instead of considering just the total hatching rate. Zebrafish embryos 4h post-fertilization were exposed to nTiO2 (0, 0.01, 10, and 1000 µg mL(-1)) for 130 h. The hatching rate (HR) was calculated for each concentration (treatment). The HR magnitude was significantly (p<0.001) correlated (using simple regression) to hours post-exposure time interval (hpe; 34, 58, 82, 106, and 130), noted as HR.hpe. The HR descriptive statistics (HRds) and the parameters of the regression models (i.e., constant, x, F, and r(2)) were recruited to define 15 HRds- and 4 h.hpe-derived variables, respectively. The efficacy of the variables was evaluated. Exposure to nTiO2 led to a significant: premature hatching and general decrease in time required for normal hatching; and change in HR and hpe interrelations in a dose-dependent manner. The major change in hatchability between the treatment and control occurred at 58 hpe (62 hpf), when the treatment with nTiO2 induced significant premature hatching compared to only 6% of the hatched embryos in the control at the same time point. EC10 and EC50 values that cause premature hatching at 58 hpe for nTiO2 are 0.073 µg mL(-1) and 107.2 µg mL(-1) respectively. In general(,) this study shows multivariate differences among exposure concentrations of nTiO2 recruiting hatching-derived endpoints. PMID:25795996

  2. Effects of diet on seven-day Ceriodaphnia dubia toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Cerda, B.; Olive, J.H. )

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of four diets on the results of seven-day Ceriodaphnia dubia toxicity tests. Survival and reproduction were used as indices to detect the sensitivity of this species to acute and chronic copper stress. All toxicity tests were conducted using the moderately hard reconstituted water recommended in 1989 by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Diet differentially affected the acute and chronic toxicity of copper. Daphnids fed Selenastrum capricornutum (alga) showed the greatest sensitivity, followed by those fed the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardti, then by animals fed a Yeast-Cerophyll[sup TM]-Trout Food (YCTF) mixture plus Selenastrum, and finally by animals fed YCTF alone. These differences may result from the poor nutritional adequacy of Selenastrum when fed alone, the different caloric contents of the diets, the increased toxicant uptake by the organisms through ingestion of copper-laden algal cells, and/or copper ions sequestered by fats and insoluble substances in YCTF. The authors recognize that diet is an important variable in seven-day toxicity tests, and that the selection of a diet should not be based only on its effects on long-term culturing of C. dubia, but also on its possible effects on test results.

  3. Screening the toxicity of phosphorous-removal adsorbents using a bioluminescence inhibition test.

    PubMed

    Duranceau, Steven J; Biscardi, Paul G; Barnhill, Danielle K

    2014-10-28

    When found in excess, phosphorus (P) has been linked to surface water eutrophication. As a result, adsorbents are now used in P remediation efforts. However, possible secondary toxicological impacts on the use of new materials for P removal from surface water have not been reported. This study evaluated the toxicity of adsorbent materials used in the removal of P from surface water including: fly ash, bottom ash, alum sludge, a proprietary mix of adsorbents, and a proprietary engineered material. Toxicity screening was conducted by performing solid-liquid extractions (SLEs) followed by the bacterial bioluminescence inhibition test with a Microtox® M500. Of the materials tested, the samples extracted at lower pH levels demonstrated higher toxicity. The material exhibiting the most toxic response was the iron and aluminum oxide coated engineered material registering a 66-67% 15-min EC50 level for pH 4 and 5 SLEs, respectively. However, for SLEs prepared at pH 7, toxic effects were not detected for this engineered material. Fly ash and bottom ash demonstrated between 82 and 84% 15-min EC50 level, respectively, for pH 4 SLE conditions. Dried alum sludge and the proprietary mix of adsorbents were classified as having little to no toxicity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol, 2014. PMID:25348491

  4. Sensitivity of screening-level toxicity tests using soils from a former petroleum refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Pauwels, S.; Bureau, J.; Roy, Y.; Allen, B.; Robidoux, P.Y.; Soucy, M.

    1995-12-31

    The authors tested five composite soil samples from a former refinery. The samples included a reference soil (Mineral Oil and Grease, MO and G < 40 ppm), thermally-treated soil, biotreated soil, and two untreated soils. They evaluated toxicity using the earthworm E. foetida, lettuce, cress, barley, Microtox, green algae, fathead minnow, and D. magna. The endpoints measured were lethality, seed germination, root elongation, growth, and bioluminescence. Toxicity, as measured by the number of positive responses, increased as follows: biotreated soil < untreated soil No. 1 < reference soil < thermally-treated soil and untreated soil No. 2. The biotreated soil generated only one positive response, whereas the thermally-treated soil and untreated soil No. 2 generated five positive responses. The most sensitive and discriminant terrestrial endpoint was lettuce root elongation which responded to untreated soil No. 1, thermally-treated soil, and reference soil. The least sensitive was barley seed germination for which no toxicity was detected. The most sensitive and discriminant aquatic endpoint was green algae growth which responded to untreated soil No. 1, thermally-treated soil, and reference soil. The least sensitive was D. magna for which no toxicity was detected. Overall, soil and aqueous extract toxicity was spotty and no consistent patterns emerged to differentiate the five soils. Biotreatment significantly reduced the effects of the contamination. Aqueous toxicity was measured in the reference soil, probably because of the presence of unknown dissolved compounds in the aqueous extract. Finally, clear differences in sensitivity existed among the test species.

  5. A toxicity identification evaluation of silty marine harbor sediments to characterize persistent and non-persistent constituents.

    PubMed

    Stronkhorst, Joost; Schot, Marlies E; Dubbeldam, Marco C; Ho, Kay T

    2003-01-01

    Sediment toxicity in silty marine harbor sediments is frequently dominated by ammonia or sulfide, leaving the adverse effects of persistent toxic substances unnoticed. To investigate the latter, we subjected interstitial water from three contaminated silty sediments to toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) phase I manipulations and tested for toxicity with four bioassays: the amphipod Corophium volutator (survival as an endpoint), the sea urchin Psammechinus miliaris (fertilization, embryo development) and the bacterium Vibrio fischeri (bioluminescence inhibition). The graduated pH manipulations identified the prominent toxicity of ammonia in the amphipod and sea urchin embryo tests, and also sulfide toxicity in the bacterium test. In two of the three samples tested with the amphipods, sea urchin embryos and bacteria, a small but significant reduction in interstitial water toxicity was achieved by removing persistent compounds through C(18) solid phase extraction. EDTA chelation resulted in a slight detoxification of the interstitial water for the amphipods and sea urchin embryos, but this was not related to any measured trace metals. Despite the presence of toxic levels of ammonia and sulfide in the harbor sediments, we established the adverse biological effects of persistent constituents by means of the TIE manipulations and in vivo interstitial water bioassays. PMID:12535970

  6. Marine microalgae toxicity test for linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) and alkylphenol ethoxylate (APEO).

    PubMed

    Moreno-Garrido, I; Hampel, M; Lubián, L M; Blasco, J

    2001-10-01

    Different microalgal species have been used in growth-inhibition tests to determine the toxic concentrations of anionic and non-ionic surfactants to phytoplankton. The species used were selected from different taxonomic groups, all of considerable ecological relevance to marine environments. The toxicity of the C13 LAS homologue to the microalgal species selected was usually one order of magnitude greater than that of the C11 homologue. The toxicity of a commercial LAS mixture to different microalgal species was also checked. For this material and C. gracilis, cellular counting by means of a Neubauer chamber and by use of a flow cytometer were compared; differences between the two methods were insignificant. The toxicity of decaethoxylated nonylphenol non-ionic surfactant to C. gracilis was also checked; the EC50 value for this compound was 1.0 mg L(-1). PMID:11760055

  7. Testing of CFC replacement fluids for arc-induced toxic by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Cravey, W.R.; Goerz, D.A.; Hawley-Fedder, R.A.

    1993-06-01

    The authors have developed a unique test-stand for quantifying the generation of perfluoroisobutylene (PFIB) in chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) replacement fluids when they are subjected to high electrical stress/breakdown environments. PFIB is an extremely toxic gas with a threshold limit value of 10 ppbv as set by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. They have tested several new fluids from various manufacturers for their potential to generate PFIB. Their goal is to determine breakdown characteristics and quantify toxic by-products of these replacement fluids to determine a safe, usable alternative for present CFC`s.

  8. 40 CFR 797.1930 - Mysid shrimp acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Dilution water. (A) Natural or artificial seawater is acceptable as dilution...microns prior to use in a test. (C) Artificial seawater can be prepared by adding commercially...at 12 °C is acceptable for making artificial seawater. When deionized water...

  9. 40 CFR 797.1930 - Mysid shrimp acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Dilution water. (A) Natural or artificial seawater is acceptable as dilution...microns prior to use in a test. (C) Artificial seawater can be prepared by adding commercially...at 12 °C is acceptable for making artificial seawater. When deionized water...

  10. 40 CFR 797.1300 - Daphnid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...with no recycling. (5) Immobilization means the lack of movement by the test organisms except for minor activity of the appendages...iv) Feeding. A variety of foods (e.g., unicellular green algae) have been demonstrated to be adequate for daphnid...

  11. 40 CFR 797.1300 - Daphnid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...with no recycling. (5) Immobilization means the lack of movement by the test organisms except for minor activity of the appendages...iv) Feeding. A variety of foods (e.g., unicellular green algae) have been demonstrated to be adequate for daphnid...

  12. 40 CFR 797.1300 - Daphnid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...with no recycling. (5) Immobilization means the lack of movement by the test organisms except for minor activity of the appendages...iv) Feeding. A variety of foods (e.g., unicellular green algae) have been demonstrated to be adequate for daphnid...

  13. 40 CFR 797.1300 - Daphnid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...with no recycling. (5) Immobilization means the lack of movement by the test organisms except for minor activity of the appendages...iv) Feeding. A variety of foods (e.g., unicellular green algae) have been demonstrated to be adequate for daphnid...

  14. 40 CFR 797.1300 - Daphnid acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...with no recycling. (5) Immobilization means the lack of movement by the test organisms except for minor activity of the appendages...iv) Feeding. A variety of foods (e.g., unicellular green algae) have been demonstrated to be adequate for daphnid...

  15. 40 CFR 797.1050 - Algal acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... stain blue (indicating cell mortality). A staining control shall be performed concurrently using heat... and sterilization. New test containers may contain substances which inhibit growth of algae. They.... (A) Formulation and sterilization of nutrient medium used for algal culture and preparation of...

  16. 40 CFR 797.1050 - Algal acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... stain blue (indicating cell mortality). A staining control shall be performed concurrently using heat... and sterilization. New test containers may contain substances which inhibit growth of algae. They.... (A) Formulation and sterilization of nutrient medium used for algal culture and preparation of...

  17. 40 CFR 797.1050 - Algal acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... stain blue (indicating cell mortality). A staining control shall be performed concurrently using heat... and sterilization. New test containers may contain substances which inhibit growth of algae. They.... (A) Formulation and sterilization of nutrient medium used for algal culture and preparation of...

  18. 40 CFR 797.1050 - Algal acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... stain blue (indicating cell mortality). A staining control shall be performed concurrently using heat... and sterilization. New test containers may contain substances which inhibit growth of algae. They.... (A) Formulation and sterilization of nutrient medium used for algal culture and preparation of...

  19. 40 CFR 797.1050 - Algal acute toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... stain blue (indicating cell mortality). A staining control shall be performed concurrently using heat... and sterilization. New test containers may contain substances which inhibit growth of algae. They.... (A) Formulation and sterilization of nutrient medium used for algal culture and preparation of...

  20. Toxics testing performance evaluation for GB and GD

    SciTech Connect

    O`Neill, H.J.; Schneider, J.F.; Brubaker, K.L.; Kimmell, T.A.; Anderson, A.W.

    1997-10-01

    Residues resulting from demilitarization, treatment, cleanup, and testing of military chemical agents at Dugway Proving Ground (DPG), Utah, are currently listed as hazardous wastes by the State of Utah Department of Environmental Quality. The US Army Test and Evaluation Command believes that certain categories of waste generated at DPG are not hazardous. To demonstrate this, analytical methods capable of quantitatively measuring the concentrations of chemical agents, including GB and GD, in the different waste media must be available. Argonne National Laboratory has developed methods to analyze metal substrate, spent hypochlorite decontamination fluid, and soil matrices for GB and GD. These methods involve the use of sorbent cartridge preconcentration and thermal desorption combined with gas chromatography using flame photometric detection to achieve the desired sensitivity and specificity. This report describes the methods and presents results for these three common waste matrices. The test results indicate that these methods can be used to quantitatively determine concentrations of GB and GD in the low parts-per-billion range in all sample media tested.

  1. 40 CFR 797.1950 - Mysid shrimp chronic toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... concentration-response curves, LC50 values, and effects of a chemical on growth and reproduction during chronic... mysids in each chamber shall be recorded on days 7, 14, 21, and 28 of the test. At the time when sexual... treatment groups. This time cannot be specified because of possible delays in sexual maturation of...

  2. 40 CFR 797.1950 - Mysid shrimp chronic toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... concentration-response curves, LC50 values, and effects of a chemical on growth and reproduction during chronic... mysids in each chamber shall be recorded on days 7, 14, 21, and 28 of the test. At the time when sexual... treatment groups. This time cannot be specified because of possible delays in sexual maturation of...

  3. 40 CFR 797.1950 - Mysid shrimp chronic toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... concentration-response curves, LC50 values, and effects of a chemical on growth and reproduction during chronic... mysids in each chamber shall be recorded on days 7, 14, 21, and 28 of the test. At the time when sexual... treatment groups. This time cannot be specified because of possible delays in sexual maturation of...

  4. 40 CFR 797.1950 - Mysid shrimp chronic toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... concentration-response curves, LC50 values, and effects of a chemical on growth and reproduction during chronic... mysids in each chamber shall be recorded on days 7, 14, 21, and 28 of the test. At the time when sexual... treatment groups. This time cannot be specified because of possible delays in sexual maturation of...

  5. 40 CFR 797.1950 - Mysid shrimp chronic toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...In this test, mortality, number of young per female and growth are used as measures...as adults; G2 (Generation 2) are the young produced by G1. (5) “LC50 ...approximately 13 to 16 days in controls), the young shall be counted and separated...

  6. 40 CFR 797.1330 - Daphnid chronic toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...reproduction (and optionally, growth) are the criteria of...50 percent of a test population during continuous exposure...daphnids from the same population (culture container...from the same culture population. (B) Daphnids shall...sufficient to support normal growth and development...

  7. Static renewal tests using Anodonta imbecillus (freshwater mussels). Anodonta imbecillis copper sulfate reference toxicant test, Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP)

    SciTech Connect

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    Reference toxicant testing using juvenile freshwater mussels was conducted as part of the CR-ERP biomonitoring study of Clinch River sediments to assess the sensitivity of test organisms and the overall performance of the test. Tests were conducted using moderately hard synthetic water spiked with known concentrations of copper as copper sulfate. Toxicity testing of copper sulfate reference toxicant was conducted from May 12--21, 1993. The organisms used for testing were juvenile fresh-water mussels (Anodonta imbecillis). Results from this test showed an LC{sub 50} value of 1.12 mg Cu/L which is lower than the value of 2.02 mg Cu/L obtained in a previous test. Too few tests have been conducted with copper as the toxicant to determine a normal range of values. Attachments to this report include: Toxicity test bench sheets and statistical analyses; Copper analysis request and results; and Personnel training documentation.

  8. Comparison of techniques for the isolation of sediment pore water for toxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Ankley, G.T.; Schubauer-Berigan, M.K.; Monson, P.D.

    1994-12-31

    The objective of this study was to define an interstitial (pore) water isolation technique suitable for sediment toxicity testing and Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) research. Pore water was prepared from sediments from two sites (Saginaw River, Keweenaw Waterway) using five different techniques, and the samples were compared with respect to toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia and several inorganic chemical parameters. Methods evaluated were: high speed g and low speed centrifugation, syringe extraction, compression, and dialysis. Both high speed and low speed centrifugation resulted in adequate volumes of pore water for routine testing with relatively minimal effort, while the other three techniques were labor intensive and/or yielded small quantities of pore water. Filtration of samples either during preparation or subsequent to initial isolation resulted in significant losses of toxicity. Low speed centrifugation generally resulted in much higher metal concentrations compared to samples prepared by high speed centrifugation or dialysis. Based on these studies, as well as the work of others, recommend that sediment pore water for toxicity testing and/or TIE analyses be prepared by centrifugation without subsequent filtration.

  9. Rat liver mitochondrial and microsomal tests for the assessment of quinone toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, L.A.; Boardman, G.D.; Dietrich, A.M. . Dept. of Civil Engineering); Bevan, D.R. . Dept. of Biochemistry)

    1994-02-01

    Short-term toxicity tests using mitochondrial and microsomal metabolism were developed and applied to a series of eight quinones. In the mitochondrial assay, the degree to which test compounds inhibited mitochondrial respiration varied from an effective concentration (EC50) of 9 to 125 [mu]M. In the microsomal assay, the maximum percentage of increase over control oxygen consumption rates elicited by the quinones ranged from 8 to 837%. The ability of the compounds to stimulate microsomal oxygen uptake reflects their capability to redox cycle and form reactive oxygen species. Results of the mitochondrial and microsomal assay were statistically correlated with several quinone physicochemical parameters and qualitatively compared to reduction potential. The biological response observed in both test systems appeared to be most strongly influenced by the reduction potential of the quinone. Biomechanisms of action were suggested on the basis of this relationship. To assess the ability of the mitochondrial and microsomal assays to indicate toxicity of the quinonoid compounds, results were statistically correlated with literature-derived toxicity data. It was concluded that the mitochondrial assay appears to be a valid indicator of acute toxicity, whereas the microsomal assay better portends the potential for chronic toxicity.

  10. Relating results from earthworm toxicity tests to agricultural soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beyer, W.N.

    1992-01-01

    The artificial soil tests of the European Economic Community and of the Organization for Economic Cooperation produce data relating earthworm mortality to pesticide concentrations in soil under laboratory conditions. To apply these results to agricultural soils it is necessary to relate these concentrations to amounts of pesticide applied per area. This paper reviews the relevant published literature and suggests a simple relation for regulatory use. Hazards to earthworms from pesticides are suggested to be greatest soon after application, when the pesticides may be concentrated in a soil layer a few millimeters thick. For estimating exposure of earthworms, however, a thicker soil layer should be considered, to account for their movement through soil. During favorable weather conditions, earthworms belonging to species appropriate to the artificial soil test have been reported to confine their activity to a layer about 5 cm. If a 5-cm layer is accepted as relevant for regulatory purposes, then an application of 1 kg/ha would be equivalent to 1-67 ppm (dry) in the artificial soil test.

  11. Effect of test conditions on the toxicity of copper to juvenile unionid mussels

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, A.E.; Ruessler, D.S.; Kernaghan, N.J.

    1999-07-01

    During the past twenty years, unionid mussels have declined in both abundance and diversity throughout the eastern United States. As a result, there has been an increased call to evaluate the toxicity of various pollutants to unionids in an attempt to separate habitat-caused losses from those precipitated by aquatic contaminants. Few toxicity data for unionids were available until recently because unionids are not easily cultured and no test method had been developed for these animals. Therefore, water quality criteria developed by the USEPA in the 1970s and 1980s were derived from data lacking any information on unionid mussel sensitivities. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has advocated the use of a 9-day toxicity test method its scientists developed in the late 1980s. This method, which requires the use of silt, an algal mixture for food and daily changes of water, is not only more labor intensive, it also introduces sources of variation with the use of silt and algae, as well as being substantially different from the standard 96-h fathead minnow or zooplankton tests. The evaluation of TVA's suggested test conditions indicate that the use of a 16L:8D light regime, with or without silt or algae did not result in a change in the toxicity of dissolved copper to juvenile Utterbackia imbecillis mussels compared to that recorded using TVA's test conditions.

  12. 40 CFR 797.1600 - Fish early life stage toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...of their early development. (7) “Embryo cup” a small glass jar or similar container with a screened bottom in which the embryos of some species (i.e., minnow...involves exposure of newly fertilized embryos to various concentrations of a...

  13. 40 CFR 797.1600 - Fish early life stage toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...of their early development. (7) “Embryo cup” a small glass jar or similar container with a screened bottom in which the embryos of some species (i.e., minnow...involves exposure of newly fertilized embryos to various concentrations of a...

  14. 40 CFR 797.1600 - Fish early life stage toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...of their early development. (7) “Embryo cup” a small glass jar or similar container with a screened bottom in which the embryos of some species (i.e., minnow...involves exposure of newly fertilized embryos to various concentrations of a...

  15. 40 CFR 797.1600 - Fish early life stage toxicity test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...of their early development. (7) “Embryo cup” a small glass jar or similar container with a screened bottom in which the embryos of some species (i.e., minnow...involves exposure of newly fertilized embryos to various concentrations of a...

  16. Application of multiple toxicity tests in monitoring of landfill leachate treatment efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kal?íková, Gabriela; Zupan?i?, Marija; Levei, Erika Andrea; Miclean, Mirela; Englande, Andrew J; Žgajnar Gotvajn, Andreja

    2015-08-01

    Leachate from a closed landfill used for co-disposal of municipal and tannery waste was submitted to coagulation treatment, air stripping, adsorption on granular activated carbon, and Fenton oxidation with the aim to reduce toxicity of the leachate. Optimal operational conditions for each process were identified. The performance of the treatment was monitored by determination of organic matter (COD, DOC, BOD5), inorganic components (N-NH4(+), Cl(-), alkalinity, metals), organic compounds (BTEX, PAHs, PCBs, OCPs) while changes in toxicity were followed by multiple toxicity tests. Among the applied treatment techniques, adsorption on granular activated carbon was the most efficient method for removal of organic matter and metals while air stripping was the most efficient for removal of N-NH4(+) and reduction of toxicity. Lower reduction of organic matter content and toxicity was obtained during coagulation treatment. Fenton oxidation was effective for removal of COD; however, it negatively affected toxicity reduction. The combination of adsorption on granular activated carbon and air stripping led to an appreciable reduction of organic and inorganic pollutants and to leachate detoxification. Application of bioassays was helpful for assessing suitability of treatment methods and demonstrated that they are, together with physicochemical parameters, an indispensable part for monitoring of treatment efficiency. PMID:26148689

  17. PREDICTING CHRONIC LETHALITY OF CHEMICALS TO FISHES FROM ACUTE TOXICITY TEST DATA: THEORY OF ACCELERATED LIFE TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method for modeling aquatic toxicity date based on the theory of accelerated life testing and a procedure for maximum likelihood fitting the proposed model is presented. he procedure is computerized as software, which can predict chronic lethality of chemicals using data from a...

  18. Acute toxicity of metals and reference toxicants to a freshwater ostracod, Cypris subglobosa Sowerby, 1840 and correlation to EC(50) values of other test models.

    PubMed

    Khangarot, B S; Das, Sangita

    2009-12-30

    The ostracod Cypris subglobosa Sowerby, 1840 static bioassay test on the basis of a 48h of 50% of immobilization (EC(50)) has been used to measure the toxicity of 36 metals and metalloids and 12 reference toxicants. Among the 36 metals and metalloids, osmium (Os) was found to be the most toxic in the test while boron (B), the least toxic. The EC(50) values of this study revealed positive linear relationship with the established test models of cladoceran (Daphnia magna), sludge worm (Tubifex tubifex), chironomid larvae (Chironomus tentans), protozoan (Tetrahymena pyriformis), fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), and aquatic macrophyte duckweed (Lemna minor). Correlation coefficients (r(2)) for 17 physicochemical properties of metals or metal ions and EC(50)s (as pM) were examined by linear regression analysis. The electronegativity, ionization potential, melting point, solubility product of metal sulfides (pK(sp)), softness parameter and some other physicochemical characteristics were significantly correlated with EC(50)s of metals to C. subglobosa. The reproducibility of toxicity test was determined using 12 reference toxicants. The coefficient of variability of the EC(50)s ranged from 6.95% to 55.37% and variability was comparable to that noticed for D. magna and other aquatic test models. The study demonstrated the need to include crustacean ostracods in a battery of biotests to detect the presence of hazardous chemicals in soils, sewage sludges, sediments and aquatic systems. PMID:19683870

  19. Predicting aquatic toxicities of chemical pesticides in multiple test species using nonlinear QSTR modeling approaches.

    PubMed

    Basant, Nikita; Gupta, Shikha; Singh, Kunwar P

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we established nonlinear quantitative-structure toxicity relationship (QSTR) models for predicting the toxicities of chemical pesticides in multiple aquatic test species following the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) guidelines. The decision tree forest (DTF) and decision tree boost (DTB) based QSTR models were constructed using a pesticides toxicity dataset in Selenastrum capricornutum and a set of six descriptors. Other six toxicity data sets were used for external validation of the constructed QSTRs. Global QSTR models were also constructed using the combined dataset of all the seven species. The diversity in chemical structures and nonlinearity in the data were evaluated. Model validation was performed deriving several statistical coefficients for the test data and the prediction and generalization abilities of the QSTRs were evaluated. Both the QSTR models identified WPSA1 (weighted charged partial positive surface area) as the most influential descriptor. The DTF and DTB QSTRs performed relatively better than the single decision tree (SDT) and support vector machines (SVM) models used as a benchmark here and yielded R(2) of 0.886 and 0.964 between the measured and predicted toxicity values in the complete dataset (S. capricornutum). The QSTR models applied to six other aquatic species toxicity data yielded R(2) of >0.92 (DTF) and >0.97 (DTB), respectively. The prediction accuracies of the global models were comparable with those of the S. capricornutum models. The results suggest for the appropriateness of the developed QSTR models to reliably predict the aquatic toxicity of chemicals and can be used for regulatory purpose. PMID:26142614

  20. Reproductive and Developmental Toxicity of Orally Administered Botanical Composition, UP446-Part I: Effects on Embryo-Fetal Development in New Zealand White Rabbits and Sprague Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Yimam, Mesfin; Lee, Young-Chul; Hyun, Eu-Jin; Jia, Qi

    2015-08-01

    The pharmacotoxicology impacts of dietary supplements taken at the time of pregnancy have remained alarming since women are the frequent herbal medicine users in many countries as a complement to the conventional pregnancy management. The use of herbal medicines and diet supplements in expectant mothers linked closely to the health of the childbearing mothers and the fetuses where the lack of developmental safety data imposes a challenge to make the right choices. Here, we describe the potential adverse effects of UP446, a standardized bioflavonoid composition from the roots of Scutellaria baicalensis and the heartwoods of Acacia catechu, on embryo-fetal development following maternal exposure during the critical period of major organogenesis in rabbits and rats. Pregnant dams were treated orally with UP446 at doses of 250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg/day during gestation. The number of resorptions, implantations, litter size, body weights, and skeletal development was evaluated. Maternal food intake and body, tissue, and placenta weight were also assessed. There were no statistically significant differences in implantation, congenital malformation, embryo-fetal mortalities, and fetuses sex ratios in all dosing groups of both species. Therefore, the no observed adverse effect level of UP446 was considered to be greater than 1000 mg/kg in both the maternal and fetus in both species. PMID:26303163

  1. High Throughput Prioritization for Integrated Toxicity Testing Based on ToxCast Chemical Profiling

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rational prioritization of chemicals for integrated toxicity testing is a central goal of the U.S. EPA’s ToxCast™ program (http://epa.gov/ncct/toxcast/). ToxCast includes a wide-ranging battery of over 500 in vitro high-throughput screening assays which in Phase I was used to...

  2. What Food and Feeding Rates are Optimum for the Chironomus dilutus Sediment Toxicity Test Method?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory tests with benthic macroinvertebrates are commonly used to assess the toxicity of both contaminated sediments and individual chemicals. Among the standard procedures for benthic macroinvertebrates are 10-d, 20-d, and life cycle exposures using the midge, Chironomus ...

  3. EARLY LIFE-STAGE TOXICITY TEST WITH TIDEWATER SILVERSIDES (MENIDIA PENINSULAE) AND CHLORINE-PRODUCED OXIDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Early life-stage toxicity tests (continuous exposure from embryonic stage to approximately three weeks or more into the exogenous feeding stage) with North American marine fishes have been conducted almost exclusively with cyprinodontids. In this paper, the authors present method...

  4. Modeling Reproductive Toxicity for Chemical Prioritization into an Integrated Testing Strategy

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA ToxCast research program uses a high-throughput screening (HTS) approach for predicting the toxicity of large numbers of chemicals. Phase-I tested 309 well-characterized chemicals in over 500 assays of different molecular targets, cellular responses and cell-states. Of th...

  5. Tox21: Putting a Lens on the Vision of Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to the release of the NRC report on "Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century, a Vision and Strategy" (NRC, 2007), two NIH institutes and EPA formed a collaboration (Tox21) to 1) identify mechanisms of chemically induced biological activity, 2) prioritize chemicals for mo...

  6. USE OF THE GRASS SHRIMP 'PALAEMONETES PUGIO' IN A LIFE-CYCLE TOXICITY TEST

    EPA Science Inventory

    A methodology for using the estuarine grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) in life-cycle toxicity tests was successfully developed. Life-cycle exposures of juvenile shrimp (12 to 19 mm in rostrum-telson length) to the chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticide endrin were begun in November 1...

  7. Modifying Foods and Feeding Regimes to Optimize the Performance of Hyalella azteca during Chronic Toxicity Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    The amphipod Hyalella azteca is commonly used to assess the toxicity of sediments and waters. However, laboratories have reported varying success in maintaining healthy cultures and in obtaining consistent growth and reproduction (where applicable), especially during tests...

  8. PREDICTION OF POPULATION-LEVEL RESPONSE FROM MYSID TOXICITY TEST DATA USING POPULATION MODEL TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute and chronic bioassay statistics are used to evaluate the toxicity and the risks of chemical stressors to mysid shrimp Americamysis bahia (formerly Mysidopsis bahia). These include LC50 values from acute tests, chronic values (the geometric mean of the no-obsderved-effect co...

  9. The Future of Toxicity Testing - the NRC Vision and EPA’s ToxCast Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA requested the National Research Council (NRC) to develop a vision and strategic plan for toxicity testing in the 21st century. The 2007 report called for transforming toxicology to provide a robust scientific basis for assessing adverse health effects of environmental age...

  10. Comparative Toxicity of Eight Oil Dispersant Products on Two Gulf of Mexico Aquatic Test Species

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is the first of a round of toxicity testing data for eight oil dispersants that have been authorized for use on the National Contingency Plan (NCP) Product Schedule, which is a list of authorized dispersants and other chemicals that may be used to respond to oil disch...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix 2 to Subpart A of... - Drilling Fluids Toxicity Test (EPA Method 1619)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... saturation. Maximum allowable aeration time is 5 minutes using a generic commercial air pump and air stone.... The delivery method, surface area of the aeration stone, and flow characteristics shall be documented... a known age (3-6 days old). (5) For each toxicity test, assign two suitable containers...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix 2 to Subpart A of... - Drilling Fluids Toxicity Test (EPA Method 1619)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... saturation. Maximum allowable aeration time is 5 minutes using a generic commercial air pump and air stone.... The delivery method, surface area of the aeration stone, and flow characteristics shall be documented... a known age (3-6 days old). (5) For each toxicity test, assign two suitable containers...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix 2 to Subpart A of... - Drilling Fluids Toxicity Test (EPA Method 1619)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... saturation. Maximum allowable aeration time is 5 minutes using a generic commercial air pump and air stone.... The delivery method, surface area of the aeration stone, and flow characteristics shall be documented... a known age (3-6 days old). (5) For each toxicity test, assign two suitable containers...

  14. Fireflies in the Coalmine: Luciferase Technologies in Next-Generation Toxicity Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Whole-animal studies have been the mainstay of toxicity testing for decades. These approaches are too expensive and laborious to effectively characterize all of the chemicals currently in commercial use. In addition, there are social and ethical pressures to reduce, refine and re...

  15. Development of a Complete Life Cycle Sediment Toxicity Test for the Sheepshead Minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Existing sediment toxicity test methods are limited to acute and chronic exposure of invertebrates and acute exposure of vertebrates, with limited guidance on the chronic exposure of vertebrates, specifically fishes. A series of life stage-specific studies were conducted to dete...

  16. ISSUES IN DEVELOPING A TWO-GENERATION AVIAN TOXICITY TEST WITH JAPANESE QUAIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a subgroup of the OECD Expert Group on Assessment of Endocrine Disrupting Effects in Birds, we reviewed unresolved methodological issures important for the development of a two-generation toxicity test, discussed advantages and disadvantages of alternative approaches, and prop...

  17. Critique on the use of the standardized avian acute oral toxicity test for first generation anticoagulant rodenticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vyas, Nimish B.; Rattner, Barnett A.

    2012-01-01

    Avian risk assessments for rodenticides are often driven by the results of standardized acute oral toxicity tests without regards to a toxicant's mode of action and time course of adverse effects. First generation anticoagulant rodenticides (FGARs) generally require multiple feedings over several days to achieve a threshold concentration in tissue and cause adverse effects. This exposure regimen is much different than that used in the standardized acute oral toxicity test methodology. Median lethal dose values derived from standardized acute oral toxicity tests underestimate the environmental hazard and risk of FGARs. Caution is warranted when FGAR toxicity, physiological effects, and pharmacokinetics derived from standardized acute oral toxicity testing are used for forensic confirmation of the cause of death in avian mortality incidents and when characterizing FGARs' risks to free-ranging birds.

  18. Using medaka embryos as a model system to study biological effects of the electromagnetic fields on development and behavior.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wenjau; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2014-10-01

    The electromagnetic fields (EMFs) of anthropogenic origin are ubiquitous in our environments. The health hazard of extremely low frequency and radiofrequency EMFs has been investigated for decades, but evidence remains inconclusive, and animal studies are urgently needed to resolve the controversies regarding developmental toxicity of EMFs. Furthermore, as undersea cables and technological devices are increasingly used, the lack of information regarding the health risk of EMFs to aquatic organisms needs to be addressed. Medaka embryos (Oryzias latipes) have been a useful tool to study developmental toxicity in vivo due to their optical transparency. Here we explored the feasibility of using medaka embryos as a model system to study biological effects of EMFs on development. We also used a white preference test to investigate behavioral consequences of the EMF developmental toxicity. Newly fertilized embryos were randomly assigned to four groups that were exposed to an EMF with 3.2kHz at the intensity of 0.12, 15, 25, or 60µT. The group exposed to the background 0.12µT served as the control. The embryos were exposed continually until hatch. They were observed daily, and the images were recorded for analysis of several developmental endpoints. Four days after hatching, the hatchlings were tested with the white preference test for their anxiety-like behavior. The results showed that embryos exposed to all three levels of the EMF developed significantly faster. The endpoints affected included the number of somites, eye width and length, eye pigmentation density, midbrain width, head growth, and the day to hatch. In addition, the group exposed to the EMF at 60µT exhibited significantly higher levels of anxiety-like behavior than the other groups did. In conclusion, the EMF tested in this study accelerated embryonic development and heightened anxiety-like behavior. Our results also demonstrate that the medaka embryo is a sensitive and cost-efficient in vivo model system to study developmental toxicity of EMFs. PMID:25084399

  19. Biochemical markers of contamination in fish toxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Haluzová, Ivana; Modrá, Helena; Blahová, Jana; Havelková, Marcela; Siroká, Zuzana; Svobodová, Zde?ka

    2011-06-01

    Markers of xenobiotic metabolization (cytochrome P450, ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase, glutathione and glutathione-S-transferase) were investigated in the liver of the common carp Cyprinus carpio after 28-day exposure to different pesticide formulations.The fish exposed to herbicide Sencor 70 WG (metribuzin 700 g/kg) of 0.25 and 2.5 mg/l showed no change in cytochrome P450 and activity of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase when compared to control.Successor 600 (pethoxamid 600 g/l) of 0.06; 0.22 and 0.60 mg/l did not affect either cytochrome P450 or the activity of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase. However, in fish exposed to Successor 600 of 0.22 and 0.60 mg/l, there was a rise in glutathione and in the activity of glutathione-S-transferase (p<0.05), with Spearman's correlation r = 0.23 at p<0.05.Spartakus (prochloraz 450 g/l) of 0.36 and 1.08 mg/l induced cytochrome P450 and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (p<0.05), with Spearman's correlation r=0.49 at p<0.01. Glutathione increased in fish exposed to 1.08 mg/l (p<0.05), the activity of glutathione-S-transferase rose (p<0.05) in all concentrations tested (0.108; 0.36 and 1.08 mg/l). Spearman's correlation between glutathione and GST was r=0.38; p<0.01).The obtained data contribute to a better understanding of detoxification of the selected xenobitics in fish. Although biomarkers of the first phase of metabolization are considered to be more sensitive, our results indicate higher sensitivity of the second phase biomarkers. PMID:21753904

  20. Biochemical markers of contamination in fish toxicity tests

    PubMed Central

    Haluzová, Ivana; Modrá, Helena; Blahová, Jana; Havelková, Marcela; Široká, Zuzana; Svobodová, Zde?ka

    2011-01-01

    Markers of xenobiotic metabolization (cytochrome P450, ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase, glutathione and glutathione-S-transferase) were investigated in the liver of the common carp Cyprinus carpio after 28-day exposure to different pesticide formulations. The fish exposed to herbicide Sencor 70 WG (metribuzin 700 g/kg) of 0.25 and 2.5 mg/l showed no change in cytochrome P450 and activity of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase when compared to control. Successor 600 (pethoxamid 600 g/l) of 0.06; 0.22 and 0.60 mg/l did not affect either cytochrome P450 or the activity of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase. However, in fish exposed to Successor 600 of 0.22 and 0.60 mg/l, there was a rise in glutathione and in the activity of glutathione-S-transferase (p<0.05), with Spearman's correlation r = 0.23 at p<0.05. Spartakus (prochloraz 450 g/l) of 0.36 and 1.08 mg/l induced cytochrome P450 and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (p<0.05), with Spearman's correlation r=0.49 at p<0.01. Glutathione increased in fish exposed to 1.08 mg/l (p<0.05), the activity of glutathione-S-transferase rose (p<0.05) in all concentrations tested (0.108; 0.36 and 1.08 mg/l). Spearman's correlation between glutathione and GST was r=0.38; p<0.01). The obtained data contribute to a better understanding of detoxification of the selected xenobitics in fish. Although biomarkers of the first phase of metabolization are considered to be more sensitive, our results indicate higher sensitivity of the second phase biomarkers. PMID:21753904

  1. CELL DEATH IN RAT AND MOUSE EMBRYOS EXPOSED TO METHANOL IN WHOLEEMBRYO CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methanol induces developmental toxicity in rats and mice producing exencephaly, cleft palate, cervical ribs, sternebral defects, reduced body weight, and increased embryo/fetal death. xposure to methanol in whole embryo culture also induces developmental retardation, dysmorphogen...

  2. Critical predicted no effect concentrations (PNECs) should not be based on a single toxicity test.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Peter M; Elphick, James R

    2015-05-01

    Predicted no-effect concentrations (PNECs), which represent the concentration of a substance below which an unacceptable effect most likely will not occur, are widely used for risk assessment and in environmental policy and regulation. They are typically based on single-species laboratory toxicity tests; often, a single test result for the most sensitive endpoints drives the derivation of a PNEC. In the present study, the authors provide a case study emphasizing the importance of determining the reliability of those most sensitive endpoints. Five 21-d Daphnia magna toxicity tests conducted using the same procedures by 2 laboratories gave 20% inhibitory concentration responses to a specific ionic composition of total dissolved solids that varied from 684?mg/L to more than 1510?mg/L. The concentration-response curve was shallow; thus, these differences could have been attributable to chance alone. The authors strongly recommend that the most sensitive endpoints that determine PNECs not be based on a single toxicity test result but rather on the geometric mean of at least 3 test results to adequately assess and bound test variability, especially when the concentration-response curve is shallow. PMID:25615521

  3. Effect of indigenous animals on chronic end points in freshwater sediment toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Reynoldson, T.B.; Day, K.E.; Clarke, C.; Milani, D. )

    1994-06-01

    Sediment toxicity tests were conducted using three species of benthic invertebrates, Chironomus riparius, Hyalella azteca, and Hexagenia limbata, with various densities of the oligochaete worm Tubifex tubifex. It was shown that indigenous animals, simulated by the presence of Tubifex tubifex, did not affect survival of the test species (P [>=] 0.05) but did reduce growth in all three test species and in two species at the lowest tested densities, equivalent to 1,460 worms per square meter. At densities of Tubifex tubifex equivalent to 20,000 m[sup [minus]2], the growth of Chironomus riparius was reduced by >90%, Hyalella azteca by >60%, and Hexagenia limbata by almost 50%. The densities of oligochaetes are equivalent to those found in many contaminated sites. Therefore, it is concluded that the presence of indigenous organisms can confound the interpretation of toxicity test results, based on chronic end points. It is recommended that removal of organisms by considered before toxicity tests are conducted with freshwater sediments from sites with large populations of benthic invertebrates, especially oligochaete worms.

  4. Optimizing the performance of Hyalella azteca in chronic toxicity tests: Results of feeding studies with various foods and feeding regimes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca is a common organism used for sediment toxicity testing in the United States and elsewhere. Standard methods for 10-d and 42-d toxicity tests with H. azteca were last revised and published by USEPA/ASTM in 2000. Under the methods in the man...

  5. A portable cell-based impedance sensor for toxicity testing of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Theresa M; Widder, Mark W; Brennan, Linda M; Schwager, Steven J; van der Schalie, William H; Fey, Julien; Salazar, Noe

    2009-08-01

    A major limitation to using mammalian cell-based biosensors for field testing of drinking water samples is the difficulty of maintaining cell viability and sterility without an on-site cell culture facility. This paper describes a portable automated bench-top mammalian cell-based toxicity sensor that incorporates enclosed fluidic biochips containing endothelial cells monitored by Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) technology. Long-term maintenance of cells on the biochips is made possible by using a compact, self-contained disposable media delivery system. The toxicity sensor monitors changes in impedance of cell monolayers on the biochips after the introduction of water samples. The fluidic biochip includes an ECIS electronic layer and a polycarbonate channel layer, which together reduce initial impedance disturbances seen in commercially available open well ECIS chips caused by the mechanics of pipetting while maintaining the ability of the cells to respond to toxicants. A curve discrimination program was developed that compares impedance values over time between the control and treatment channels on the fluidic biochip and determines if they are significantly different. Toxicant responses of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells grown on fluidic biochips are similar to cells on commercially-available open well chips, and these cells can be maintained in the toxicity sensor device for at least nine days using an automated media delivery system. Longer-term cell storage is possible; bovine lung microvessel endothelial cells survive for up to four months on the fluidic biochips and remain responsive to a model toxicant. This is the first demonstration of a portable bench top system capable of both supporting cell health over extended periods of time and obtaining impedance measurements from endothelial cell monolayers after toxicant exposure. PMID:19606294

  6. Implications of variability in sediment systems for interpreting the results of sediment toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect

    Jacoby, C.; Ward, T.

    1995-12-31

    The physics, chemistry and biology of even simple sediment systems (e.g., sand habitats along a semi-exposed coast) are complex. In part, this complexity is due to the natural spatio-temporal variability in most measures. The authors investigated porewater chemistry, microphytobenthic biomass and meiofaunal abundance in a sandy habitat along the coast of Western Australia and in 2,000 liter mesocosms that contained transplanted patches of this habitat. One aim was to document the response how systems in the mesocosms responded, but another key outcome was to determine spatio-temporal variation at local scales in the field and among mesocosms. The results of these investigations have implications for the interpretation of estimates of toxicity arising from laboratory-based sediment toxicity tests. In particular, the importance of toxicity estimates to environmental managers relies on a comparison to background levels of variation.

  7. Comparison of feeding strategies in acute toxicity tests of crude oil and commercial bioremediation agents

    SciTech Connect

    Cavender, R.C.; Cherry, D.S.; Yeager, M.M.; Bidwell, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Proposed modifications to the National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan have prompted examinations of the methodology used in toxicity testing of the water soluble fraction (WSF) of oil, commercial bioremediation agents (CBA), and a combination of the two. The organisms currently used in acute (96 hr) testing of these agents are the inland silverside, Menidia beryllina, and an estuarine mysid, Mysidopsis bahia. The mysid is a carnivorous species that must be fed during a test in order to prevent predation within the test chambers. Currently proposed methodology for silverside testing also includes feeding. The high oxygen demand of CBAs and the WSF of oil causes dissolved oxygen to be a factor in toxicity. This effect can be intensified by the addition of brine shrimp (Artemia sp.) to the test chambers. The purpose of this study was to compare the toxicity of CBAs in combination with the WSF of oil to silversides with and without the addition of food. Tests were conducted using both 24-hour and 14-day spinning times for the CBA/WSF mixture. With the 24-hour spinning time, LC50 values from each day of the 4-day test were consistently lower in the Artemia fed test (47.8--22.6%) as compared to the unfed test (72.1--43.0%). A similar trend was seen in the 24 and 48 hour LC50`s in the 14-day spinning time. Overall, low dissolved oxygen was found to be most relevant at the highest CBA/WSF concentrations where D.O. dropped below 2 mg/l in Artemia fed tests.

  8. Acute toxicity assessment of ANAMMOX substrates and antibiotics by luminescent bacteria test.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shuang; Wu, Junwei; Zhang, Meng; Lu, Huifeng; Mahmood, Qaisar; Zheng, Ping

    2015-12-01

    Acute toxicities of anaerobic ammonia oxidation (ANAMMOX) substrates and four antibiotics from pharmaceutical wastewaters on ANAMMOX process were reported. Individual and joint acute toxicity assays were performed using 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50). Results showed that IC50 values and their 95% confidence interval of ammonium chloride (A), sodium nitrite (B), penicillin G-Na (C), polymyxin B sulfate (D), chloramphenicol (E) and kanamycin sulfate (F) were 2708.9 (2247.9-3169.9), 1475.4 (1269.9-1680.9), 5114.4 (4946.4-5282.4), 10.2 (1.8-18.6), 409.9 (333.7-486.1) and 5254.1 (3934.4-6573.8) mgL(-1) respectively, suggesting toxicities were in the order of D>E>B>A>C>F. Joint acute toxicities of bicomponent mixtures A and B, C and D, C and F, D and F were independent; D and E, E and F were additive while C and E were synergistic. Joint acute toxicities of multicomponent mixtures were synergistic or additive. Luminescent bacteria test is an easy and robust method for forecasting the feasibility of ANAMMOX process for pharmaceutical wastewater treatment. PMID:25912634

  9. Expectant Fathers, Abortion, and Embryos.

    PubMed

    Purvis, Dara E

    2015-01-01

    One thread of abortion criticism, arguing that gender equality requires that men be allowed to terminate legal parental status and obligations, has reinforced the stereotype of men as uninterested in fatherhood. As courts facing disputes over stored pre-embryos weigh the equities of allowing implantation of the pre-embryos, this same gender stereotype has been increasingly incorporated into a legal balancing test, leading to troubling implications for ART and family law. PMID:26242955

  10. Water quality-based toxics evaluation of Reconquista River, Province of Buenos Aires, Argentina

    SciTech Connect

    Herkovits, J.; Herkovits, F.D.; Perez-Coll, C.S.

    1995-12-31

    The water quality based toxics control is essential to evaluate the aggregate toxicity, bioavailability as well as for the detection and/or prediction of ecological impacts. Reconquista River valley is situated in the north area of Great Buenos Aires with a population of three million inhabitants. The river is loaded with industrial and municipal waste water. In the present preliminary study the authors report the toxicity found in surface water at a 6 sample stations (including a reference point and a stream) all of them downstream from mixing zone areas. The ecotoxicological study was performed with three native species (Bufo arenarum embryos, Cnesterodon decemmaculatus and a species of shrimp collected in an upstream reference site) during a 7 day renewal toxicity test conducted with 10 individuals (by duplicate) for each condition plus control. The results point out that the Bufo arenarum embryos test is the most sensitive to toxic substances as well as the better adapted species to the changing physico-chemical conditions of this river. The results obtained with embryos, expressed in Acute and Chronic Toxicity Units (according USEPA) range between <0.3--2 and <1--5 respectively (recommended magnitudes for industrial effluents according USEPA: 0.3 and 1 toxicity units respectively). Therefore, the toxicity found in Reconquista River ecosystem was up to 6 times higher than the maximal value recommended for industrial effluents. It is noteworthy that in the place where toxicity starts to rise, a large number of dead fishes were found and from that place downstream, no macroorganisms were found in the river. The results confirm the high sensitivity of Bufo arenarum embryos for continental waters ecotoxicological studies and the possibility of using this test as a short-term chronic toxicity method for water quality-based toxics control.

  11. Comparison of the 10-day freshwater sediment toxicity tests using Hyalella azteca and Chironomus tentans

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, D.S.; Bigham, G.N.; Rose, C.D.

    1995-12-01

    Comparisons were made of the performance of the 10-d freshwater sediment toxicity tests using the amphipod Hyalella azteca and midge Chironomus tentans. Sediments were collected from eight stations in Onondaga Lake, New York, and represented a wide range of toxicity. The biological end points were survival, biomass, and body length. The two tests were compared on the basis of correspondence among relative values of the end points and ability to statistically discriminate adverse effects relative to control responses (i.e., discriminatory ability). Minimum detectable differences (MDDs) and adverse response ranges of the end points were used to further evaluate the discriminatory ability of the end points. Relative responses and discriminatory abilities of the end points of both tests were similar, despite numerous differences that exist among characteristics of the test species and end points. Significant concordance was found among all end points with respect to relative toxicity of sediments from the eight stations. Although MDDs and adverse response ranges of the various end points differed substantially, the observed positive correlation between those two variables resulted in all end points having similar discriminatory ability. Although amphipod biomass and body length have rarely been used as end points in 10-d tests, both end points provided results comparable to those of the other end points evaluated in the present study.

  12. Influence of potentially confounding factors on sea urchin porewater toxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Carr, R S; Biedenbach, J M; Nipper, M

    2006-11-01

    The influence of potentially confounding factors has been identified as a concern for interpreting sea urchin porewater toxicity test data. The results from >40 sediment-quality assessment surveys using early-life stages of the sea urchin Arbacia punctulata were compiled and examined to determine acceptable ranges of natural variables such as pH, ammonia, and dissolved organic carbon on the fertilization and embryological development endpoints. In addition, laboratory experiments were also conducted with A. punctulata and compared with information from the literature. Pore water with pH as low as 6.9 is an unlikely contributor to toxicity for the fertilization and embryological development tests with A. punctulata. Other species of sea urchin have narrower pH tolerance ranges. Ammonia is rarely a contributing factor in pore water toxicity tests using the fertilization endpoint, but the embryological development endpoint may be influenced by ammonia concentrations commonly found in porewater samples. Therefore, ammonia needs to be considered when interpreting results for the embryological development test. Humic acid does not affect sea urchin fertilization at saturation concentrations, but it could have an effect on the embryological development endpoint at near-saturation concentrations. There was no correlation between sediment total organic carbon concentrations and porewater dissolved organic carbon concentrations. Because of the potential for many varying substances to activate parthenogenesis in sea urchin eggs, it is recommended that a no-sperm control be included with every fertilization test treatment. PMID:16988866

  13. Comprehensive In Vitro Toxicity Testing of a Panel of Representative Oxide Nanomaterials: First Steps towards an Intelligent Testing Strategy.

    PubMed

    Farcal, Lucian; Torres Andón, Fernando; Di Cristo, Luisana; Rotoli, Bianca Maria; Bussolati, Ovidio; Bergamaschi, Enrico; Mech, Agnieszka; Hartmann, Nanna B; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Riego-Sintes, Juan; Ponti, Jessica; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Rossi, François; Oomen, Agnes; Bos, Peter; Chen, Rui; Bai, Ru; Chen, Chunying; Rocks, Louise; Fulton, Norma; Ross, Bryony; Hutchison, Gary; Tran, Lang; Mues, Sarah; Ossig, Rainer; Schnekenburger, Jürgen; Campagnolo, Luisa; Vecchione, Lucia; Pietroiusti, Antonio; Fadeel, Bengt

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) display many unique and useful physico-chemical properties. However, reliable approaches are needed for risk assessment of NMs. The present study was performed in the FP7-MARINA project, with the objective to identify and evaluate in vitro test methods for toxicity assessment in order to facilitate the development of an intelligent testing strategy (ITS). Six representative oxide NMs provided by the EC-JRC Nanomaterials Repository were tested in nine laboratories. The in vitro toxicity of NMs was evaluated in 12 cellular models representing 6 different target organs/systems (immune system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal system, reproductive organs, kidney and embryonic tissues). The toxicity assessment was conducted using 10 different assays for cytotoxicity, embryotoxicity, epithelial integrity, cytokine secretion and oxidative stress. Thorough physico-chemical characterization was performed for all tested NMs. Commercially relevant NMs with different physico-chemical properties were selected: two TiO2 NMs with different surface chemistry - hydrophilic (NM-103) and hydrophobic (NM-104), two forms of ZnO - uncoated (NM-110) and coated with triethoxycapryl silane (NM-111) and two SiO2 NMs produced by two different manufacturing techniques - precipitated (NM-200) and pyrogenic (NM-203). Cell specific toxicity effects of all NMs were observed; macrophages were the most sensitive cell type after short-term exposures (24-72h) (ZnO>SiO2>TiO2). Longer term exposure (7 to 21 days) significantly affected the cell barrier integrity in the presence of ZnO, but not TiO2 and SiO2, while the embryonic stem cell test (EST) classified the TiO2 NMs as potentially 'weak-embryotoxic' and ZnO and SiO2 NMs as 'non-embryotoxic'. A hazard ranking could be established for the representative NMs tested (ZnO NM-110 > ZnO NM-111 > SiO2 NM-203 > SiO2 NM-200 > TiO2 NM-104 > TiO2 NM-103). This ranking was different in the case of embryonic tissues, for which TiO2 displayed higher toxicity compared with ZnO and SiO2. Importantly, the in vitro methodology applied could identify cell- and NM-specific responses, with a low variability observed between different test assays. Overall, this testing approach, based on a battery of cellular systems and test assays, complemented by an exhaustive physico-chemical characterization of NMs, could be deployed for the development of an ITS suitable for risk assessment of NMs. This study also provides a rich source of data for modeling of NM effects. PMID:25996496

  14. Comprehensive In Vitro Toxicity Testing of a Panel of Representative Oxide Nanomaterials: First Steps towards an Intelligent Testing Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Farcal, Lucian; Torres Andón, Fernando; Di Cristo, Luisana; Rotoli, Bianca Maria; Bussolati, Ovidio; Bergamaschi, Enrico; Mech, Agnieszka; Hartmann, Nanna B.; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Riego-Sintes, Juan; Ponti, Jessica; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Rossi, François; Oomen, Agnes; Bos, Peter; Chen, Rui; Bai, Ru; Chen, Chunying; Rocks, Louise; Fulton, Norma; Ross, Bryony; Hutchison, Gary; Tran, Lang; Mues, Sarah; Ossig, Rainer; Schnekenburger, Jürgen; Campagnolo, Luisa; Vecchione, Lucia; Pietroiusti, Antonio; Fadeel, Bengt

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) display many unique and useful physico-chemical properties. However, reliable approaches are needed for risk assessment of NMs. The present study was performed in the FP7-MARINA project, with the objective to identify and evaluate in vitro test methods for toxicity assessment in order to facilitate the development of an intelligent testing strategy (ITS). Six representative oxide NMs provided by the EC-JRC Nanomaterials Repository were tested in nine laboratories. The in vitro toxicity of NMs was evaluated in 12 cellular models representing 6 different target organs/systems (immune system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal system, reproductive organs, kidney and embryonic tissues). The toxicity assessment was conducted using 10 different assays for cytotoxicity, embryotoxicity, epithelial integrity, cytokine secretion and oxidative stress. Thorough physico-chemical characterization was performed for all tested NMs. Commercially relevant NMs with different physico-chemical properties were selected: two TiO2 NMs with different surface chemistry – hydrophilic (NM-103) and hydrophobic (NM-104), two forms of ZnO – uncoated (NM-110) and coated with triethoxycapryl silane (NM-111) and two SiO2 NMs produced by two different manufacturing techniques – precipitated (NM-200) and pyrogenic (NM-203). Cell specific toxicity effects of all NMs were observed; macrophages were the most sensitive cell type after short-term exposures (24-72h) (ZnO>SiO2>TiO2). Longer term exposure (7 to 21 days) significantly affected the cell barrier integrity in the presence of ZnO, but not TiO2 and SiO2, while the embryonic stem cell test (EST) classified the TiO2 NMs as potentially ‘weak-embryotoxic’ and ZnO and SiO2 NMs as ‘non-embryotoxic’. A hazard ranking could be established for the representative NMs tested (ZnO NM-110 > ZnO NM-111 > SiO2 NM-203 > SiO2 NM-200 > TiO2 NM-104 > TiO2 NM-103). This ranking was different in the case of embryonic tissues, for which TiO2 displayed higher toxicity compared with ZnO and SiO2. Importantly, the in vitro methodology applied could identify cell- and NM-specific responses, with a low variability observed between different test assays. Overall, this testing approach, based on a battery of cellular systems and test assays, complemented by an exhaustive physico-chemical characterization of NMs, could be deployed for the development of an ITS suitable for risk assessment of NMs. This study also provides a rich source of data for modeling of NM effects. PMID:25996496

  15. Test Results for a Non-toxic, Dual Thrust Reaction Control Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Philip J.; Veith, Eric M.; Turpin, Alicia A.

    2005-01-01

    A non-toxic, dual thrust reaction control engine (RCE) was successfully tested over a broad range of operating conditions at the Aerojet Sacramento facility. The RCE utilized LOX/Ethanol propellants; and was tested in steady state and pulsing modes at 25-lbf thrust (vernier) and at 870-lbf thrust (primary). Steady state vernier tests vaned chamber pressure (Pc) from 0.78 to 5.96 psia, and mixture ratio (MR) from 0.73 to 1.82, while primary steady state tests vaned Pc from 103 to 179 psia and MR from 1.33 to 1.76. Pulsing tests explored EPW from 0.080 to 10 seconds and DC from 5 to 50 percent at both thrust levels. Vernier testing accumulated a total of 6,670 seconds of firing time, and 7,215 pulses, and primary testing accumulated a total of 2,060 seconds of firing time and 3,646 pulses.

  16. An empirical comparison of effective concentration estimators for evaluating aquatic toxicity test responses

    SciTech Connect

    Bailer, A.J.; Hughes, M.R.; Denton, D.L.; Oris, J.T.

    2000-01-01

    Aquatic toxicity tests are statistically evaluated by either hypothesis testing procedures to derive a no-observed-effect concentration or by inverting regression models to calculate the concentration associated with a specific reduction from the control response. These latter methods can be described as potency estimation methods. Standard US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) potency estimation methods are based on two different techniques. For continuous or count response data, a nominally nonparametric method that assumes monotonic decreasing responses and piecewise linear patterns between successive concentration groups is used. For quantal responses, a probit regression model with a linear dose term is fit. These techniques were compared with a recently developed parametric regression-based estimator, the relative inhibition estimator, RIp. This method is based on fitting generalized linear models, followed by estimation of the concentration associated with a particular decrement relative to control responses. These estimators, with levels of inhibition (p) of 25 and 50%, were applied to a series of chronic toxicity tests in a US EPA region 9 database of reference toxicity tests. Biological responses evaluated in these toxicity tests included the number of young produced in three broods by the water flea (Ceriodaphnia dubia) and germination success and tube length data from the giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera). The greatest discrepancy between the RIp and standard US EPA estimators was observed for C. dubia. The concentration-response pattern for this biological endpoint exhibited nonmonotonicity more frequently than for any of the other endpoint. Future work should consider optimal experimental designs to estimate these quantities, methods for constructing confidence intervals, and simulation studies to explore the behavior of these estimators under known conditions.

  17. Modified whole effluent toxicity test to assess and decouple wastewater effects from environmental gradients.

    PubMed

    Sauco, Sebastián; Gómez, Julio; Barboza, Francisco R; Lercari, Diego; Defeo, Omar

    2013-01-01

    Environmental gradients and wastewater discharges produce aggregated effects on marine populations, obscuring the detection of human impact. Classical assessment methods do not include environmental effects in toxicity tests designs, which could lead to incorrect conclusions. We proposed a modified Whole Effluent Toxicity test (mWET) that includes environmental gradients in addition to effluent dilutions, together with the application of Generalized Linear Mixed Models (GLMM) to assess and decouple those effects. We tested this approach, analyzing the lethal effects of wastewater on a marine sandy beach bivalve affected by an artificial canal freshwater discharge used for rice crops irrigation. To this end, we compared bivalve mortality between canal water dilutions (CWd) and salinity controls (SC: without canal water). CWd were prepared by diluting the water effluent (sampled during the pesticide application period) with artificial marine water. The salinity gradient was included in the design by achieving the same final salinities in both CWd and SC, allowing us to account for the effects of salinity by including this variable as a random factor in the GLMM. Our approach detected significantly higher mortalities in CWd, indicating potential toxic effects of the effluent discharge. mWET represents an improvement over the internationally standardized WET tests, since it considers environmental variability and uses appropriate statistical analyses. PMID:23755304

  18. Use of the Syrian hamster embryo cell transformation assay for carcinogenicity prediction of chemical currently being tested by the National Toxicology Program in rodent bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Kerckaert, G.A.; LeBoeuf, R.A.; Isfort, R.J.; Brauninger, R.

    1996-10-01

    The Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cell transformation assay was used to predict the carcinogenicity of 26 chemicals currently being tested in the rodent bioassay by the National Toxicology Program as part of its program titled {open_quotes}Strategies for Predicting Chemical Carcinogenesis in Rodents.{close_quotes} Of these 26 chemicals, 17 were found to be positive in the SHE cell transformation assay while 9 were negative. Carcinogenicity predictions were made for these chemicals, based upon the SHE cell transformation assay results. Our predictions will be compared with the rodent bioassay results as they become available. 11 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. Toxicity of C{sub 10}-, C{sub 11}-, C{sub 12}-, and C{sub 14}-polychlorinated alkanes to Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, A.T.; Tomy, G.T.; Muir, D.C.G.

    1999-12-01

    Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) eggs were exposed to aqueous concentrations of six polychlorinated n-alkane (PCA) standards (C{sub 10}H{sub 15.5}Cl{sub 6.5}, C{sub 10}H{sub 15.3}Cl{sub 6.7}, C{sub 11}H{sub 18.4}Cl{sub 5.6}, C{sub 12}H{sub 19.5}Cl{sub 6.5}, C{sub 14}H{sub 24.9}Cl{sub 5.1}, and C{sub 14}H{sub 23.3}Cl{sub 6.7}) of known carbon chain length and chlorine content to assess their toxicity. Eggs were also exposed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) to act as a positive control. Chlorinated paraffins are complex industrial products for which there is a lack of toxicological data on individual congeners. High aqueous concentrations of C{sub 10}H{sub 15.5}Cl{sub 6.5} and C{sub 10}H{sub 15.3}Cl{sub 6.7} caused 100% mortality in eggs, but no other significant mortalities or lesions were observed at lower concentrations or in any eggs exposed to the other PCAs. Larvae from eggs exposed to high concentrations of the C{sub 10}-, C{sup 11}- and C{sub 12}-PCAs were extremely lethargic or did not move, although a heart beat was present. The concentrations in these exposures and the tissue concentrations of the larvae were at levels that should elicit narcosis. Concentrations of the C{sub 14}-PCAs in larvae did not reach narcotic levels, and larvae in these exposures appeared normal with no signs of narcosis. The TCDD was found to be extremely embryotoxic, consistent with past work using Japanese medaka eggs. The ratio of LC50 to TCDD to the LC50 of the PCAs, based on acute toxicity and TCDD results, were all <0.0001, and most were <0.000001. These results suggest that the acute mechanism of toxicity of lower chlorinated, short (C{sub 10--13}) and medium (C{sub 14--18}) carbon chain PCAs is narcosis and that chlorine substitution on the terminal carbons of PCAs does not significantly increase nor decrease the toxicity of C{sub 10} and C{sub 14}-PCAs. However, additional work is needed to assess a greater range of PCAs as well as their sublethal effects and chronic toxicity.

  20. Potent Phototoxicity of Marine Bunker Oil to Translucent Herring Embryos after Prolonged Weathering

    PubMed Central

    Incardona, John P.; Vines, Carol A.; Linbo, Tiffany L.; Myers, Mark S.; Sloan, Catherine A.; Anulacion, Bernadita F.; Boyd, Daryle; Collier, Tracy K.; Morgan, Steven; Cherr, Gary N.; Scholz, Nathaniel L.

    2012-01-01

    Pacific herring embryos (Clupea pallasi) spawned three months following the Cosco Busan bunker oil spill in San Francisco Bay showed high rates of late embryonic mortality in the intertidal zone at oiled sites. Dead embryos developed to the hatching stage (e.g. fully pigmented eyes) before suffering extensive tissue deterioration. In contrast, embryos incubated subtidally at oiled sites showed evidence of sublethal oil exposure (petroleum-induced cardiac toxicity) with very low rates of mortality. These field findings suggested an enhancement of oil toxicity through an interaction between oil and another environmental stressor in the intertidal zone, such as higher levels of sunlight-derived ultraviolet (UV) radiation. We tested this hypothesis by exposing herring embryos to both trace levels of weathered Cosco Busan bunker oil and sunlight, with and without protection from UV radiation. Cosco Busan oil and UV co-exposure were both necessary and sufficient to induce an acutely lethal necrotic syndrome in hatching stage embryos that closely mimicked the condition of dead embryos sampled from oiled sites. Tissue levels of known phototoxic polycyclic aromatic compounds were too low to explain the observed degree of phototoxicity, indicating the presence of other unidentified or unmeasured phototoxic compounds derived from bunker oil. These findings provide a parsimonious explanation for the unexpectedly high losses of intertidal herring spawn following the Cosco Busan spill. The chemical composition and associated toxicity of bunker oils should be more thoroughly evaluated to better understand and anticipate the ecological impacts of vessel-derived spills associated with an expanding global transportation network. PMID:22312421