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Sample records for emergency care settings

  1. Patient safety in the pediatric emergency care setting.

    PubMed

    Krug, Steven E; Frush, Karen

    2007-12-01

    Patient safety is a priority for all health care professionals, including those who work in emergency care. Unique aspects of pediatric care may increase the risk of medical error and harm to patients, especially in the emergency care setting. Although errors can happen despite the best human efforts, given the right set of circumstances, health care professionals must work proactively to improve safety in the pediatric emergency care system. Specific recommendations to improve pediatric patient safety in the emergency department are provided in this policy statement. PMID:18055687

  2. Paediatric emergency and acute care in resource poor settings.

    PubMed

    Duke, Trevor; Cheema, Baljit

    2016-02-01

    Acute care of seriously ill children is a global public health issue, and there is much scope for improving quality of care in hospitals at all levels in many developing countries. We describe the current state of paediatric emergency and acute care in the least developed regions of low and middle income countries and identify gaps and requirements for improving quality. Approaches are needed which span the continuum of care: from triage and emergency treatment, the diagnostic process, identification of co-morbidities, treatment, monitoring and supportive care, discharge planning and follow-up. Improvements require support and training for health workers and quality processes. Effective training is that which is ongoing, combining good technical training in under-graduate courses and continuing professional development. Quality processes combine evidence-based guidelines, essential medicines, appropriate technology, appropriate financing of services, standards and assessment tools and training resources. While initial emergency treatment is based on common clinical syndromes, early differentiation is required for specific treatment, and this can usually be carried out clinically without expensive tests. While global strategies are important, it is what happens locally that makes a difference and is too often neglected. In rural areas in the poorest countries in the world, public doctors and nurses who provide emergency and acute care for children are revered by their communities and demonstrate daily that much can be carried out with little. PMID:27062627

  3. How to protect incompetent clinical research subjects involved in critical care or emergency settings.

    PubMed

    Zamperetti, Nereo; Piccinni, Mariassunta; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Citerio, Giuseppe; Mistraletti, Giovanni; Gristina, Giuseppe; Giannini, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Clinical research is an essential component of medical activity, and this is also true in intensive care. Adequate information and consent are universally considered necessary for the protection of research subjects. However, in emergency situations, the majority of critical patients are unable to consent and a valid legal representative is often unavailable. The situation is even more complex in Italy, where the relevant legislation fails to specify how investigators should manage research in emergency or critical care setting when it involves incompetent patients who do not have an appointed legal representative. While special measures for the protection of incompetent subjects during emergency research are necessary, not allowing such research at all dooms critically ill patients to receive non-evidence-based treatments without the prospect of improvement. The recently-issued EU Regulation n. 536/2014 will probably help shed light on this situation. Indeed, it specifically addresses the issue of "research in emergency situations" and introduces detailed rules aimed at protecting patients while allowing research. In this article, we argue that obtaining informed consent during emergency research on incompetent subjects in unrealistic, and that in most cases substituted judgment on the part of a proxy carries major flaws. Strict criteria in evaluating the risk-benefit ratio of proposed intervention and a careful evaluation of the trial by a local or national Research Ethics Committee are perhaps the most practicable solution. PMID:26154445

  4. Improved triage and emergency care for children reduces inpatient mortality in a resource-constrained setting.

    PubMed Central

    Molyneux, Elizabeth; Ahmad, Shafique; Robertson, Ann

    2006-01-01

    PROBLEM: Early assessment, prioritization for treatment and management of sick children attending a health service are critical to achieving good outcomes. Many hospitals in developing countries see large numbers of patients and have few staff, so patients often have to wait before being assessed and treated. APPROACH: We present the example of a busy Under-Fives Clinic that provided outpatient services, immunizations and treatment for medical emergencies. The clinic was providing an inadequate service resulting in some inappropriate admissions and a high case-fatality rate. We assessed the deficiencies and sought resources to improve services. LOCAL SETTING: A busy paediatric outpatient clinic in a public tertiary care hospital in Blantyre, Malawi. RELEVANT CHANGES: The main changes we made were to train staff in emergency care and triage, improve patient flow through the department and to develop close cooperation between inpatient and outpatient services. Training coincided with a restructuring of the physical layout of the department. The changes were put in place when the department reopened in January 2001. LESSONS LEARNED: Improvements in the process and delivery of care and the ability to prioritize clinical management are essential to good practice. Making the changes described above has streamlined the delivery of care and led to a reduction in inpatient mortality from 10-18% before the changes were made (before 2001) to 6-8% after. PMID:16628305

  5. Emergency and urgent care capacity in a resource-limited setting: an assessment of health facilities in western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Thomas F; Hines, Rosemary; Ahn, Roy; Walters, Michelle; Young, David; Anderson, Rachel Eleanor; Tom, Sabrina M; Clark, Rachel; Obita, Walter; Nelson, Brett D

    2014-01-01

    Objective Injuries, trauma and non-communicable diseases are responsible for a rising proportion of death and disability in low-income and middle-income countries. Delivering effective emergency and urgent healthcare for these and other conditions in resource-limited settings is challenging. In this study, we sought to examine and characterise emergency and urgent care capacity in a resource-limited setting. Methods We conducted an assessment within all 30 primary and secondary hospitals and within a stratified random sampling of 30 dispensaries and health centres in western Kenya. The key informants were the most senior facility healthcare provider and manager available. Emergency physician researchers utilised a semistructured assessment tool, and data were analysed using descriptive statistics and thematic coding. Results No lower level facilities and 30% of higher level facilities reported having a defined, organised approach to trauma. 43% of higher level facilities had access to an anaesthetist. The majority of lower level facilities had suture and wound care supplies and gloves but typically lacked other basic trauma supplies. For cardiac care, 50% of higher level facilities had morphine, but a minority had functioning ECG, sublingual nitroglycerine or a defibrillator. Only 20% of lower level facilities had glucometers, and only 33% of higher level facilities could care for diabetic emergencies. No facilities had sepsis clinical guidelines. Conclusions Large gaps in essential emergency care capabilities were identified at all facility levels in western Kenya. There are great opportunities for a universally deployed basic emergency care package, an advanced emergency care package and facility designation scheme, and a reliable prehospital care transportation and communications system in resource-limited settings. PMID:25260371

  6. Expanding the Application of Group Interventions: Emergence of Groups in Health Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drum, David; Becker, Martin Swanbrow; Hess, Elaine

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the health care arena and within the specialty of group work are contributing to the increased utilization of groups in health care settings. Psychoeducational, theme, and interpersonal therapy groups are highlighted for their contributions to treating challenging health conditions. An understanding of the evolution of these group…

  7. An assessment of priority setting process and its implication on availability of emergency obstetric care services in Malindi District, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Nyandieka, Lilian Nyamusi; Kombe, Yeri; Ng'ang'a, Zipporah; Byskov, Jens; Njeru, Mercy Karimi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In spite of the critical role of Emergency Obstetric Care in treating complications arising from pregnancy and childbirth, very few facilities are equipped in Kenya to offer this service. In Malindi, availability of EmOC services does not meet the UN recommended levels of at least one comprehensive and four basic EmOC facilities per 500,000 populations. This study was conducted to assess priority setting process and its implication on availability, access and use of EmOC services at the district level. Methods A qualitative study was conducted both at health facility and community levels. Triangulation of data sources and methods was employed, where document reviews, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with health personnel, facility committee members, stakeholders who offer and/ or support maternal health services and programmes; and the community members as end users. Data was thematically analysed. Results Limitations in the extent to which priorities in regard to maternal health services can be set at the district level were observed. The priority setting process was greatly restricted by guidelines and limited resources from the national level. Relevant stakeholders including community members are not involved in the priority setting process, thereby denying them the opportunity to contribute in the process. Conclusion The findings illuminate that consideration of all local plans in national planning and budgeting as well as the involvement of all relevant stakeholders in the priority setting exercise is essential in order to achieve a consensus on the provision of emergency obstetric care services among other health service priorities. PMID:26889337

  8. Health care in a unique setting: applying emergency medicine at music festivals

    PubMed Central

    McQueen, Carl; Davies, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    The last 25 years has seen an explosion in the popularity of outdoor music festivals, especially in the UK. Coupled with this has been the development of the trend for major sporting events that were once confined to stadia to be accompanied by mass gatherings of spectators and fans in “fan parks” and public places. The majority of music festivals and sporting events are considered to be mass gatherings, using the popular definition of more than 1000 people in one place.1 Despite the increasing popularity of music festivals and other mass gathering events, there is a lack of scientifically robust data concerning the provision of medical care in these circumstances. Published studies are almost exclusively retrospective reviews or case studies of the care provided at individual events. Prospective studies analyzing the role of medical professionals and the quality of care provided at mass gathering events are extremely rare. This literature review aims to summarize the current literature and provide an opportunity to identify new and exciting avenues for research into this unique field. PMID:27147863

  9. Tariffs in emergency care.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Thomas; Higginson, Ian; Mann, Clifford

    2014-11-01

    The crisis in emergency medicine in the UK was no surprise to staff in the specialty, but was not expected by the Department of Health. This article explains how chronic, systematic under-resourcing of emergency care has caused emergency departments to decompensate, and discusses actions that are necessary to prevent recurrence. PMID:25383433

  10. PAin SoluTions In the Emergency Setting (PASTIES)—patient controlled analgesia versus routine care in emergency department patients with pain from traumatic injuries: randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Rockett, Mark; Squire, Rosalyn; Hayward, Chris; Ewings, Paul; Barton, Andy; Pritchard, Colin; Eyre, Victoria; Cocking, Laura; Benger, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether patient controlled analgesia (PCA) is better than routine care in patients presenting to emergency departments with moderate to severe pain from traumatic injuries. Design Pragmatic, multicentre, parallel group, randomised controlled trial. Setting Five English hospitals. Participants 200 adults (71% (n=142) male), aged 18 to 75 years, who presented to the emergency department requiring intravenous opioid analgesia for the treatment of moderate to severe pain from traumatic injuries and were expected to be admitted to hospital for at least 12 hours. Interventions PCA (n=99) or nurse titrated analgesia (treatment as usual; n=101). Main outcome measures The primary outcome was total pain experienced over the 12 hour study period, derived by standardised area under the curve (scaled from 0 to 100) of each participant’s hourly pain scores, captured using a visual analogue scale. Pre-specified secondary outcomes included total morphine use, percentage of study period in moderate/severe pain, percentage of study period asleep, length of hospital stay, and satisfaction with pain management. Results 200 participants were included in the primary analyses. Mean total pain experienced was 47.2 (SD 21.9) for the treatment as usual group and 44.0 (24.0) for the PCA group. Adjusted analyses indicated slightly (but not statistically significantly) lower total pain experienced in the PCA group than in the routine care group (mean difference 2.7, 95% confidence interval −2.4 to 7.8). Participants allocated to PCA used more morphine in total than did participants in the treatment as usual group (mean 44.3 (23.2) v 27.2 (18.2) mg; mean difference 17.0, 11.3 to 22.7). PCA participants spent, on average, less time in moderate/severe pain (36.2% (31.0) v 44.1% (31.6)), but the difference was not statistically significant. A higher proportion of PCA participants reported being perfectly or very satisfied compared with the treatment as usual group (86

  11. Assessing School Emergency Care Preparedness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Charles; Varnes, Jill

    A study assessed the emergency health care preparedness of a north central Florida public school district in light of seven criteria: (1) school policies regarding delivery of emergency health care; (2) identification of school personnel responsible for rendering emergency care; (3) training levels of emergency health care providers (first aid and…

  12. SETTING UP TRIAGE SERVICES IN THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT: EXPERIENCE FROM A TERTIARY CARE INSTITUTE OF PAKISTAN. A JOURNEY TOWARD EXCELLENCE.

    PubMed

    Khursheed, Munawar; Fayyaz, Jabeen; Jamil, Ahsan

    2015-01-01

    The history of triage started from the French battle field for prioritizing patients. Emergency triage was started in early 1950's in USA in order to treat the sickest first. It has now become an integral component of all emergency departments (ED). The basic aim of triage is not only to sort out patients according to the criticality of their illness, but it also serves to streamline the patient flow. This will ultimately enable the ED physician to provide right management at the right time to the right patient in the available resources. In turn has a positive impact in reducing the ED overcrowding. The history of triage at AKUH-ED dated back in 2000. In the beginning physicians and nurse both were assigned to triage desk where they use to sort out the patient according to presenting complaints. At that time the documentation was manual with locally developed triage priorities. With the expansion of ED in 2008, responsibility of triage was shifted to nursing services. Triage policy was established and implemented. Specific triage protocols were developed for guidance and uniformity of care. Manual recording system was replaced by computerized triage data entry software. Enabling the department to monitor patient quality care indicators like total number of patients triaged, triage category, lag time reports and left without being seen by physicians. PMID:26721057

  13. Settings for Terminal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corless, Inge B.

    1988-01-01

    Examines topics related to delivery of terminal care services: ability of various hospice programs to survive financially, contributions of various models of hospice care, impact of Medicare legislation on hospice movement, demonstration of unique hospice intervention, integration of spiritual care into hospice, and role of hospice in care of…

  14. Emergency time: caring in Congo.

    PubMed

    Reading, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Midwifery practice in rural central Africa is full of joys (an abundance of twins, births by candlelight and resilience and stoicism that would leave even the very experienced birth practitioner speechless), but also a lot of challenges (every obstetric emergency in your wildest nightmares and worse) that are compounded by a lack of access to a skilled birth attendant. Women here have a strong culture of traditional practices and remedies, and hospital is often not the first port of call. Caring for women who cannot, themselves, consent to emergency life-saving caesarean sections, is a cultural aspect that we accept and respect as medical professionals working in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). In a busy maternity ward in a low-resource setting, in a hospital supported by emergency humanitarian medical organisation Médecins sans Frontières (MSF), just how are obstetric emergencies managed--and are the outcomes what you would expect? PMID:26975127

  15. SYMPTEK homemade foam models for client education and emergency obstetric care skills training in low-resource settings.

    PubMed

    Deganus, Sylvia A

    2009-10-01

    Clinical training for health care workers using anatomical models and simulation has become an established norm. A major requirement for this approach is the availability of lifelike training models or simulators for skills practice. Manufactured sophisticated human models such as the resuscitation neonatal dolls, the Zoë gynaecologic simulator, and other pelvic models are very expensive, and are beyond the budgets of many training programs or activities in low-resource countries. Clinical training programs in many low-resource countries suffer greatly because of this cost limitation. Yet it is also in these same poor countries that the need for skilled human resources in reproductive health is greatest. The SYMPTEK homemade models were developed in response to the need for cheaper, more readily available humanistic models for training in emergency obstetric skills and also for client education. With minimal training, a variety of cheap SYMPTEK models can easily be made, by both trainees and facilitators, from high-density latex foam material commonly used for furnishings. The models are reusable, durable, portable, and easily maintained. The uses, advantages, disadvantages, and development of the SYMPTEK foam models are described in this article. PMID:19941722

  16. Addressing Unmet Need for HIV Testing in Emergency Care Settings: A Role for Computer-facilitated Rapid HIV Testing?

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Ann E.; Severynen, Anneleen; Spielberg, Freya

    2014-01-01

    HIV testing in emergency departments (EDs) remains underutilized. We evaluated a computer tool to facilitate rapid HIV testing in an urban ED. Randomly assigned non-acute adult ED patients to computer tool (‘CARE’) and rapid HIV testing before standard visit (n=258) or to standard visit (n=259) with chart access. Assessed intervention acceptability and compared noted HIV risks. Participants were 56% non-white, 58% male; median age 37 years. In the CARE arm nearly all (251/258) completed the session and received HIV results; 4 declined test consent. HIV risks were reported by 54% of users and there was one confirmed HIV-positive and 2 false-positives (seroprevalence 0.4%, 95% CI 0.01–2.2%). Half (55%) preferred computerized, over face-to-face, counseling for future HIV testing. In standard arm, one HIV test and 2 referrals for testing occurred. Computer-facilitated HIV testing appears acceptable to ED patients. Future research should assess cost-effectiveness compared with staff-delivered approaches. PMID:23837807

  17. Outbreaks in Health Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Sood, Geeta; Perl, Trish M

    2016-09-01

    Outbreaks and pseudo-outbreaks in health care settings can be complex and should be evaluated systematically using epidemiologic tools. Laboratory testing is an important part of an outbreak evaluation. Health care personnel, equipment, supplies, water, ventilation systems, and the hospital environment have been associated with health care outbreaks. Settings including the neonatal intensive care unit, endoscopy, oncology, and transplant units are areas that have specific issues which impact the approach to outbreak investigation and control. Certain organisms have a predilection for health care settings because of the illnesses of patients, the procedures performed, and the care provided. PMID:27515142

  18. Primary care and public emergency department overcrowding.

    PubMed Central

    Grumbach, K; Keane, D; Bindman, A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Our objective was to evaluate whether referral to primary care settings would be clinically appropriate for and acceptable to patients waiting for emergency department care for nonemergency conditions. METHODS. We studied 700 patients waiting for emergency department care at a public hospital. Access to alternative sources of medical care, clinical appropriateness of emergency department use, and patients' willingness to use nonemergency services were measured and compared between patients with and without a regular source of care. RESULTS. Nearly half (45%) of the patients cited access barriers to primary care as their reason for using the emergency department. Only 13% of the patients waiting for care had conditions that were clinically appropriate for emergency department services. Patients with a regular source of care used the emergency department more appropriately than did patients without a regular source of care. Thirty-eight percent of the patients expressed a willingness to trade their emergency department visit for an appointment with a physician within 3 days. CONCLUSIONS. Public emergency departments could refer large numbers of patients to appointments at primary care facilities. This alternative would be viable only if the availability and coordination of primary care services were enhanced for low-income populations. PMID:8438975

  19. [Non invasive ventilation in the emergency setting].

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Laetitia; Della Santa, Vincent; Hanhart, Walter-Alexandre

    2015-08-12

    Before the development of non invasive ventilation (NIV), endotracheal intubation was the only ventilatory therapy available in case of severe respiratory distress and acute respiratory failure. NIV used to be employed in intensive care settings only. Nowadays, the use of NIV has been democratized to include the emergency room, and the pre-hospital care setting for treatment of acute respiratory failure. Cardiogenic pulmonary edema and acute exacerbation of COPD are indications of choice, since NIV improves mortality. The efficiency of the therapy depends on early treatment; however, endotracheal intubation should not be delayed when it becomes necessary. PMID:26449102

  20. Reptile Critical Care and Common Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Music, Meera Kumar; Strunk, Anneliese

    2016-05-01

    Reptile emergencies are an important part of exotic animal critical care, both true emergencies and those perceived as emergencies by owners. The most common presentations for reptile emergencies are addressed here, with information on differential diagnoses, helpful diagnostics, and approach to treatment. In many cases, reptile emergencies are actually acute presentations originating from a chronic problem, and the treatment plan must include both clinical treatment and addressing husbandry and dietary deficiencies at home. Accurate owner expectations must be set in order to have owner compliance to long-term treatment plans. PMID:27131163

  1. Doing challenging research studies in a patient-centred way: a qualitative study to inform a randomised controlled trial in the paediatric emergency care setting

    PubMed Central

    Woolfall, Kerry; Young, Bridget; Frith, Lucy; Appleton, Richard; Iyer, Anand; Messahel, Shrouk; Hickey, Helen; Gamble, Carrol

    2014-01-01

    Objective To inform the design of a randomised controlled trial (called EcLiPSE) to improve the treatment of children with convulsive status epilepticus (CSE). EcLiPSE requires the use of a controversial deferred consent process. Design Qualitative interview and focus group study. Setting 8 UK support groups for parents of children who have chronic or acute health conditions and experience of paediatric emergency care. Participants 17 parents, of whom 11 participated in telephone interviews (10 mothers, 1 father) and 6 in a focus group (5 mothers, 1 father). 6 parents (35%) were bereaved and 7 (41%) had children who had experienced seizures, including CSE. Results Most parents had not heard of deferred consent, yet they supported its use to enable the progress of emergency care research providing a child's safety was not compromised by the research. Parents were reassured by tailored explanation, which focused their attention on aspects of EcLiPSE that addressed their priorities and concerns. These aspects included the safety of the interventions under investigation and how both EcLiPSE interventions are used in routine clinical practice. Parents made recommendations about the appropriate timing of a recruitment discussion, the need to individualise approaches to recruiting bereaved parents and the use of clear written information. Conclusions Our study provided information to help ensure that a challenging trial was patient centred in its design. We will use our findings to help EcLiPSE practitioners to: discuss potentially threatening trial safety information with parents, use open-ended questions and prompts to identify their priorities and concerns and clarify related aspects of written trial information to assist understanding and decision-making. PMID:24833694

  2. [Severe infection in critical emergency care].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Naoyuki; Takatani, Yudai; Higashi, Tomoko; Inaba, Masato; Ejima, Tadashi

    2016-02-01

    In the emergency and critical care medicine, infection is easy to merge to various basic conditions and diseases. In the social structure aging in critical care, the immune weakness was revealed as the result of severe infection and septic shock in the reduced function of neutrophils and lymphocytes. In the life-saving emergency care, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, chronic renal failure and lever dysfunction are often observed, and the underlying diseases have the foundation of biological invasion after a first inflammatory attack of surgery, trauma, burn, and systemic injury. It will be placed into a susceptible situation such as artificial respiratory management. In this review, we discussed severe infection in emergency and critical care. It is necessary to pay attention to the drug resistance bacterias in own critical care setting by trends. PMID:26915247

  3. A cohort study of influences, health outcomes and costs of patients’ health-seeking behaviour for minor ailments from primary and emergency care settings

    PubMed Central

    Watson, M C; Ferguson, J; Barton, G R; Maskrey, V; Blyth, A; Paudyal, V; Bond, C M; Holland, R; Porteous, T; Sach, T H; Wright, D; Fielding, S

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare health-related and cost-related outcomes of consultations for symptoms suggestive of minor ailments in emergency departments (EDs), general practices and community pharmacies. Design Observational study; prospective cohort design. Setting EDs (n=2), general practices (n=6) and community pharmacies (n=10) in a mix of rural/urban and deprived/affluent areas across North East Scotland and East Anglia. Participants Adults (≥18 years) presenting between 09:00 and 18:00 (Monday–Friday) in general practices and 09:00–18:00 (Monday–Saturday) in pharmacies and EDs with ≥1 of the following: musculoskeletal pain; eye discomfort; gastrointestinal disturbance; or upper respiratory tract-related symptoms. Interventions Participants completed three questionnaires: baseline (prior to index consultation); satisfaction with index consultation and follow-up (2 weeks after index consultation). Main outcome measures Symptom resolution, quality of life, costs, satisfaction and influences on care-seeking behaviour. Results 377 patients participated, recruited from EDs (81), general practices (162) and community pharmacies (134). The 2-week response rate was 70% (264/377). Symptom resolution was similar across all three settings: ED (37.3%), general practice (35.7%) and pharmacy (44.3%). Mean overall costs per consultation were significantly lower for pharmacy (£29.30 (95% CI £21.60 to £37.00)) compared with general practice (£82.34 (95% CI £63.10 to £101.58)) and ED (£147.09 (95% CI £125.32 to £168.85)). Satisfaction varied across settings and by measure used. Compared with pharmacy and general practice use, ED use was significantly (p<0.001) associated with first episode and short duration of symptom(s), as well as higher levels of perceived seriousness and urgency for seeking care. Convenience of location was the most common reason for choice of consultation setting. Conclusions These results suggest similar health-related outcomes and

  4. Prehospital emergency trauma care and management.

    PubMed

    Kerby, Jeffrey D; Cusick, Marianne V

    2012-08-01

    Prehospital care of the trauma patient is continuing to evolve; however, the principles of airway maintenance, hemorrhage control, and appropriate resuscitative maneuvers remain central to the role of the emergency medical care provider. Recent changes in the regulations for research in emergency settings will allow randomized trials to proceed to test new devices, drugs, and resuscitative strategies in the prehospital environment. The creation of prehospital research networks will provide the appropriate infrastructure to greatly facilitate the development of new protocols and the execution of large-scale randomized trials with the potential to change current prehospital practice. PMID:22850149

  5. Emergent burn care.

    PubMed

    Harvey, J S; Watkins, G M; Sherman, R T

    1984-02-01

    The estimated 32,600,000 fires that occur annually in the United States produce over 300,000 injuries and 7,500 deaths. Ten percent of hospitalized burn victims die as a direct result of the burn. Initial evaluation and management of the burn patient are critical. The history should include the burn source, time of injury, burn environment, and combustible products. The burn size is best estimated by the Lund and Browder chart, and the burn depth is determined by clinical criteria. Pulmonary involvement and circumferential thoracic or extremity burns require detection and aggressive treatment to maintain organ viability. Hospitalization is usually necessary for adults with burns larger than 10% of the total body surface area (TBSA) or children with burns larger than 5% of TBSA. Major burns, those of 25% or more of TBSA or of 10% or more of full thickness, should be considered for treatment at a burn center, as well as children or elderly victims with burns of greater than 10% TBSA. Lactated Ringer's solution, infused at 4 ml/kg/% TBSA, is generally advocated for initial fluid restoration. After the acute phase (48 hours), replacement of evaporative and hypermetabolic fluid loss is necessary. These losses may constitute 3 to 5 liters per day for a 40% to 70% TBSA burn. Blood transfusion is often required because of persistent loss of red blood cells (8% per day for about ten days). Many electrolyte abnormalities may occur in the first two weeks. Pulmonary injury commonly is lethal. Circumoral burns, oropharyngeal burns, and carbonaceous sputum are indicative of inhalation injury, but arterial blood gas determinations, fiberoptic bronchoscopy, and xenon lung scans are useful for confirming the diagnosis. Humidified oxygen, intubation, positive-pressure ventilation, and pulmonary toilet are the mainstays of therapy for inhalation injury. Wound care is initially directed at preservation of vital function by escharotomy, if restrictive eschar impairs ventilatory or

  6. Measles in health-care settings.

    PubMed

    Maltezou, Helena C; Wicker, Sabine

    2013-07-01

    Despite the availability of an effective and safe vaccine for almost half a century, measles is re-emerging in several developed countries because of the insufficient vaccination coverage among specific subpopulations, the emerging anti-vaccination movement, and the increasing movement of humans across borders. In this context, health-care settings play a critical role in the transmission of infection and generation of numerous cases. Health-care-associated outbreaks may be associated with severe morbidity and mortality among specific groups of patients, disruption of health-care services, and considerable costs. Misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis of a measles case and inadequate implementation of infection control measures are common in almost all events of nosocomial spread. Measles vaccination of health-care workers is an effective means of prevention of nosocomial measles outbreaks. Eliminating measles by 2010 has not been accomplished. Stronger recommendations and higher vaccination coverage against measles in health-care workers could contribute to eliminate measles in the general population. PMID:23352075

  7. Safety Hazards in Child Care Settings. CPSC Staff Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consumer Product Safety Commission, Washington, DC.

    Each year, thousands of children in child care settings are injured seriously enough to need emergency medical treatment. This national study identified potential safety hazards in 220 licensed child care settings in October and November 1998. Eight product areas were examined: cribs, soft bedding, playground surfacing, playground surface…

  8. [Obesity in prehospital emergency care].

    PubMed

    Kruska, Patricia; Kappus, Stefan; Kerner, Thoralf

    2012-09-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased steadily in recent years. Obese people often suffer from diseases which acute decompensation requires a prompt prehospital therapy. The Emergency Medical Service will be confronted with difficulties in clinical diagnostic, therapy and especially with a delayed management of rescue and transport. It is most important to avoid prehospital depreciation in quality and time management. This article reviews the specific requirements of prehospital care of obese persons and discusses possible solutions to optimize the prehospital therapy. PMID:22968983

  9. Emergency Medical Care Training and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topham, Charles S.

    1982-01-01

    Describes an 11-week emergency medical care training program for adolescents focusing on: pretest results; factual emergency instruction and first aid; practical experience training; and assessment. (RC)

  10. Health systems organization for emergency care.

    PubMed

    Pedroto, Isabel; Amaro, Pedro; Romãozinho, José Manuel

    2013-10-01

    The increasing number of acute and severe digestive diseases presenting to hospital emergency departments, mainly related with an ageing population, demands an appropriate answer from health systems organization, taking into account the escalating pressure on cost reduction. However, patients expect and deserve a response that is appropriate, effective, efficient and safe. The huge variety of variables which can influence the evolution of such cases warranting intensive monitoring, and the coordination and optimization of a range of human and technical resources involved in the care of these high-risk patients, requires their admission in hospital units with conveniently equipped facilities, as is done for heart attack and stroke patients. Little information of gastroenterology emergencies as a function of structure, processes and outcome is available at the organizational level. Surveys that have been conducted in different countries just assess local treatment outcome and question the organizational structure and existing resources but its impact on the outcome is not clear. Most studies address the problem of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and the out-of-hours endoscopy services in the hospital setting. The demands placed on emergency (part of the overall continuum of care) are obvious, as are the needs for the efficient use of resources and processes to improve the quality of care, meaning data must cover the full care cycle. Gastrointestinal emergencies, namely gastrointestinal bleeding, must be incorporated into the overall emergency response as is done for heart attack and stroke. This chapter aims to provide a review of current literature/evidence on organizational health system models towards a better management of gastroenterology emergencies and proposes a research agenda. PMID:24160936

  11. Hypoglycemia Revisited in the Acute Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shih-Hung; Lin, Yen-Yue; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Cheng, Chien-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common finding in both daily clinical practice and acute care settings. The causes of severe hypoglycemia (SH) are multi-factorial and the major etiologies are iatrogenic, infectious diseases with sepsis and tumor or autoimmune diseases. With the advent of aggressive lowering of HbA1c values to achieve optimal glycemic control, patients are at increased risk of hypoglycemic episodes. Iatrogenic hypoglycemia can cause recurrent morbidity, sometime irreversible neurologic complications and even death, and further preclude maintenance of euglycemia over a lifetime of diabetes. Recent studies have shown that hypoglycemia is associated with adverse outcomes in many acute illnesses. In addition, hypoglycemia is associated with increased mortality among elderly and non-diabetic hospitalized patients. Clinicians should have high clinical suspicion of subtle symptoms of hypoglycemia and provide prompt treatment. Clinicians should know that hypoglycemia is associated with considerable adverse outcomes in many acute critical illnesses. In order to reduce hypoglycemia-associated morbidity and mortality, timely health education programs and close monitoring should be applied to those diabetic patients presenting to the Emergency Department with SH. ED disposition strategies should be further validated and justified to achieve balance between the benefits of euglycemia and the risks of SH. We discuss relevant issues regarding hypoglycemia in emergency and critical care settings. PMID:22028152

  12. Characterizing emergency departments to improve understanding of emergency care systems

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    International emergency medicine aims to understand different systems of emergency care across the globe. To date, however, international emergency medicine lacks common descriptors that can encompass the wide variety of emergency care systems in different countries. The frequent use of general, system-wide indicators (e.g. the status of emergency medicine as a medical specialty or the presence of emergency medicine training programs) does not account for the diverse methods that contribute to the delivery of emergency care both within and between countries. Such indicators suggest that a uniform approach to the development and structure of emergency care is both feasible and desirable. One solution to this complex problem is to shift the focus of international studies away from system-wide characteristics of emergency care. We propose such an alternative methodology, in which studies would examine emergency department-specific characteristics to inventory the various methods by which emergency care is delivered. Such characteristics include: emergency department location, layout, time period open to patients, and patient type served. There are many more ways to describe emergency departments, but these characteristics are particularly suited to describe with common terms a wide range of sites. When combined, these four characteristics give a concise but detailed picture of how emergency care is delivered at a specific emergency department. This approach embraces the diversity of emergency care as well as the variety of individual emergency departments that deliver it, while still allowing for the aggregation of broad similarities that might help characterize a system of emergency care. PMID:21756328

  13. The Affordable Care Act and emergency care.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Mark; Asplin, Brent; Epstein, Stephen K; Kocher, Keith Eric; Pilgrim, Randy; Pines, Jesse; Rabin, Elaine Judith; Rathlev, Niels Kumar

    2014-10-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) will have far-reaching effects on the way health care is designed and delivered. Several elements of the ACA will directly affect both demand for ED care and expectations for its role in providing coordinated care. Hospitals will need to employ strategies to reduce ED crowding as the ACA expands insurance coverage. Discussions between EDs and primary care physicians about their respective roles providing acute unscheduled care would promote the goals of the ACA. PMID:25121814

  14. Emergency care for children in the United States.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, James M; Krug, Steven; Shaw, Kathy N

    2013-12-01

    A formal emergency care system for children in the United States began in the 1980s with the establishment of specialized training programs in academic children's hospitals. The ensuing three decades have witnessed the establishment of informal regional networks for clinical care and a federally funded research consortium that allows for multisite research on evidence-based practices. However, pediatric emergency care suffers from problems common to emergency departments (EDs) in general, which include misaligned incentives for care, overcrowding, and wide variation in the quality of care. In pediatric emergency care specifically, there are problems with low-volume EDs that have neither the experience nor the equipment to treat children, poor adherence to clinical guidelines, lack of resources for mental health patients, and a lack of widely accepted performance metrics. We call for policies to address these issues, including providing after-hours care in other settings and restructuring payment and reimbursement policies to better address patients' needs. PMID:24301393

  15. [Relations with emergency medical care and primary care doctor, home health care].

    PubMed

    Azuma, Kazunari; Ohta, Shoichi

    2016-02-01

    Medical care for an ultra-aging society has been shifted from hospital-centered to local community-based. This shift has yielded the so-called Integrated Community Care System. In the system, emergency medical care is considered important, as primary care doctors and home health care providers play a crucial role in coordinating with the department of emergency medicine. Since the patients move depending on their physical condition, a hospital and a community should collaborate in providing a circulating service. The revision of the medical payment system in 2014 clearly states the importance of "functional differentiation and strengthen and coordination of medical institutions, improvement of home health care". As part of the revision, the subacute care unit has been integrated into the community care unit, which is expected to have more than one role in community coordination. The medical fee has been set for the purpose of promoting the home medical care visit, and enhancing the capability of family doctors. In the section of end-of-life care for the elderly, there have been many issues such as reduction of the readmission rate and endorsement of a patient's decision-making, and judgment for active emergency medical care for patient admission. The concept of frailty as an indicator of prognosis has been introduced, which might be applied to the future of emergency medicine. As described above, the importance of a primary doctor and a family doctor should be identified more in the future; thereby it becomes essential for doctors to closely work with the hospital. Advancing the cooperation between a hospital and a community for seamless patient-centered care, the emergency medicine as an integrated community care will further develop by adapting to an ultra-aging society. PMID:26915240

  16. Procalcitonin testing to guide antibiotic therapy for the treatment of sepsis in intensive care settings and for suspected bacterial infection in emergency department settings: a systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Westwood, Marie; Ramaekers, Bram; Whiting, Penny; Tomini, Florian; Joore, Manuela; Armstrong, Nigel; Ryder, Steve; Stirk, Lisa; Severens, Johan; Kleijnen, Jos

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Determination of the presence or absence of bacterial infection is important to guide appropriate therapy and reduce antibiotic exposure. Procalcitonin (PCT) is an inflammatory marker that has been suggested as a marker for bacterial infection. OBJECTIVES To assess the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of adding PCT testing to the information used to guide antibiotic therapy in adults and children (1) with confirmed or highly suspected sepsis in intensive care and (2) presenting to the emergency department (ED) with suspected bacterial infection. METHODS Twelve databases were searched to June 2014. Randomised controlled trials were assessed for quality using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Summary relative risks (RRs) and weighted mean differences (WMDs) were estimated using random-effects models. Heterogeneity was assessed visually using forest plots and statistically using the I (2) and Q statistics and investigated through subgroup analysis. The cost-effectiveness of PCT testing in addition to current clinical practice was compared with current clinical practice using a decision tree with a 6 months' time horizon. RESULTS Eighteen studies (36 reports) were included in the systematic review. PCT algorithms were associated with reduced antibiotic duration [WMD -3.19 days, 95% confidence interval (CI) -5.44 to -0.95 days, I (2) = 95.2%; four studies], hospital stay (WMD -3.85 days, 95% CI -6.78 to -0.92 days, I (2) = 75.2%; four studies) and a trend towards reduced intensive care unit (ICU) stay (WMD -2.03 days, 95% CI -4.19 to 0.13 days, I (2) = 81.0%; four studies). There were no differences for adverse clinical outcomes. PCT algorithms were associated with a reduction in the proportion of adults (RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.87; seven studies) and children (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.80 to 0.93) receiving antibiotics, reduced antibiotic duration (two studies). There were no differences for adverse clinical outcomes. All but one of the

  17. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 11--Childbirth, Pediatric Emergencies. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This training manual for emergency medical technicians, one of 14 modules that comprise the Emergency Victim Care textbook, covers childbirth and pediatric emergencies. Objectives stated for the two chapters are for the students to be able to describe: emergency procedures for normal childbirth, unusual childbirth emergencies, emergency care for…

  18. MIDAS questionnaire in the emergency setting.

    PubMed

    Aliprandi, A; Frigerio, R; Santoro, P; Frigo, M; Iurlaro, S; Vaccaro, M; Tremolizzo, L; Beghi, E; Ferrarese, C; Agostoni, E

    2004-10-01

    Migraine is a common disorder and is a major cause of disability and loss of working performance in western countries. Therefore, many tools have been developed to assess migraine related disability. Among these, the Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS) questionnaire has been shown to be of particular interest, as it is valid, reliable and useful for therapeutic decisions. In this pilot study, we address the validity of the MIDAS questionnaire in an unselected population of migraine patients in the emergency setting. We found that the MIDAS scores in the emergency room were similar to those collected in a specialised headache centre. This result suggests that the MIDAS questionnaire could be reliably used in the emergency setting, hence avoiding unnecessary delays in the treatment of migraine patients. PMID:15549558

  19. Setting up terminal care units *

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Bridget

    1980-01-01

    From my experience the main problems found by developing terminal care units have been: initial acceptance from existing medical disciplines; communication difficulties and misunderstandings because of them; mistakes in planning and design, possibly due to lack of experience or attention to detail; occasionally, the appointment of staff that have proved unsuitable; problems in the siting of a unit, usually due to shortage of available land. The ideal site is centrally placed in the community it serves and easily accessible to public transport. PMID:7452580

  20. Psychopharmacology in Primary Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Benich, Joseph J; Bragg, Scott W; Freedy, John R

    2016-06-01

    Psychopharmacology requires clinicians to stay current on the latest guidelines and to use dynamic treatment strategies. Psychiatric conditions are prevalent in the primary care population. Choice of treatment with psychopharmacology should be based on controlling the patient's predominant symptoms while taking into consideration patient age, treatment compliance, patient past response to treatments, dosing frequency, patient preference, medication side effects, potential medication interactions, drug precautions/warnings, and cost. Response to therapy, as well as side effects, needs to be evaluated at regular intervals. The goal is to minimize symptoms and return patients to their maximal level of functioning. PMID:27262011

  1. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 7--Medical Emergencies. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This training manual for emergency medical technicians, one of 14 modules that comprise the Emergency Victim Care textbook, covers medical emergencies. The objectives for the chapter are for students to be able to describe the causes, signs, and symptoms for specified medical emergencies and to describe emergency care for them. Informative…

  2. 42 CFR 460.100 - Emergency care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency care. 460.100 Section 460.100 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY...

  3. 42 CFR 460.100 - Emergency care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emergency care. 460.100 Section 460.100 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY...

  4. 42 CFR 460.100 - Emergency care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency care. 460.100 Section 460.100 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY...

  5. 42 CFR 460.100 - Emergency care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emergency care. 460.100 Section 460.100 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY...

  6. EMERGENCY VICTIM CARE AND RESCUE, INSTRUCTOR'S MANUAL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MORANDO, ROCCO V.; STOVER, WILBUR F.

    DEVELOPED AT THE STATE LEVEL BY SQUADMEN AND TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL PERSONNEL, THIS MANUAL IS FOR USE BY A QUALIFIED SQUADMAN IN TEACHING FULL-TIME AND VOLUNTEER EMERGENCY AND RESCUE WORKERS IN AN EMERGENCY SQUAD STATION OR TRAINING CENTER. TEACHING GUIDES ARE PROVIDED FOR A 30-HOUR COURSE ON EMERGENCY VICTIM CARE AND A 20-HOUR COURSE ON VICTIM…

  7. Cardiac emergency simulation: drilling for success in the ambulatory setting.

    PubMed

    Kusler-Jensen, Jane A

    2014-03-01

    The "see one, do one, teach one" method of clinical teaching is no longer practical for preparing perioperative personnel to respond to emergency situations. Teaching with simulation trains team members to respond to unexpected events and enables them to provide care when an emergency situation arises. Simulation drills resemble clinical practice and allow personnel to apply and integrate skills, teamwork, and critical thinking. This article provides information and tools for performing cardiac simulation drills in the ambulatory setting. Tools included are a 10-step guide to simulation drills, a scenario, roles and duties to assign during a drill, and a drill evaluation form. PMID:24581645

  8. Harnessing the Affordable Care Act to Catalyze Delivery System Reform and Strengthen Emergency Care in America

    PubMed Central

    Maa, John

    2015-01-01

    As health care reform in the US evolves beyond insurance reform to encompass delivery system reform, the opportunity arises to harness the Affordable Care Act to strengthen patient care in America. One area for dedicated individuals to lead this effort is by improving transitions in patient care across the continuum of team members, specialties, settings, and systems. This article will describe innovations of the surgicalist and acute care surgeon that have emerged in response to the challenges facing surgery in specialization, geography, and the need to comply with health care reform mandates. Three ways will be described to integrate these innovations with pilot programs in the Affordable Care Act: to promote teamwork, to reduce readmissions, and to strengthen emergency care because the key location where the joint efforts intersect most acutely with patient need is in our nation’s Emergency Departments. PMID:25663212

  9. An update on emergency care and emergency medicine in Russia.

    PubMed

    Rodigin, Anthony

    2015-12-01

    Russia's national healthcare system is undergoing significant changes. Those changes which affect healthcare financing are particularly vital. As has often been the case in other nations, the emergency care field is at the forefront of such reforms. The ongoing challenges constitute the environment in which the hospital-based specialty of emergency medicine needs to develop as part of a larger system. Emergency care has to evolve in order to match true needs of the population existing today. New federal regulations recently adopted have recognized emergency departments as the new in-hospital component of emergency care, providing the long-needed legal foundation upon which the new specialty can advance. General knowledge of Western-style emergency departments in terms of their basic setup and function has been widespread among Russia's medical professionals for some time. Several emergency departments are functioning in select regions as pilots. Preliminary data stemming from their operation have supported a positive effect on efficiency of hospital bed utilization and on appropriate use of specialists and specialized hospital departments. In the pre-hospital domain, there has been a reduction of specialized ambulance types and of the number of physicians staffing all ambulances in favor of midlevel providers. Still, a debate continues at all levels of the medical hierarchy regarding the correct future path for emergency care in Russia with regard to adaptation and sustainability of any foreign models in the context of the country's unique national features. PMID:26608599

  10. Wildlife Emergency and Critical Care.

    PubMed

    Riley, Jennifer; Barron, Heather

    2016-05-01

    Wildlife patients often present as emergencies. For veterinarians who do not typically treat wildlife, it is important to be able to stabilize and determine the underlying cause of the animal's signs. This article discusses initial assessment, stabilization, and treatment of common emergency presentations in wild birds, reptiles, and mammals. PMID:26948268

  11. Treatment of Neurocritical Care Emergencies in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Sangini S; Sheth, Kevin N

    2012-02-01

    OPINION STATEMENT: Neurologic emergencies are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in pregnant women. In part because the patient population is young, the nihilistic approach that often accompanies neurologically devastating disorders in other contexts is largely absent. A number of studies have demonstrated improved patient outcomes in the setting of aggressive care delivered by neurointensivists in a specialty-specific environment. It stands to reason that young, pregnant women who suffer from neurologically devastating disorders and who have a wide range of prognosis may also benefit from such specialized care. Close collaboration between obstetricians and neurointensivists is critical in this context. A number of unique considerations in diagnosis and management present dilemmas in the context of pregnancy, such as radiation dose from diagnostic neuroimaging, choice of pharmacotherapy for seizures, anticoagulation, and the method of delivery in the context of cerebral mass lesions and elevated intracranial pressure. Patients and their physicians are often faced with the additional challenge of balancing the relative risks and benefits of the impact of a management approach on both mother and fetus. In general, this balance tends to favor the interests of the mother, but the impact on the fetus becomes more relevant over the course of the pregnancy, especially in the third trimester. A low threshold for admission to an intensive care unit (ideally one that specializes in neurointensive care) should be used for pregnant patients. Because of the limited information regarding long-term outcomes in this population, rigid prognosis formation and early care limitations should be deferred in the immediate period. After the patient is stabilized and a plan has been charted for the remainder of the pregnancy, every effort should be made to engage patients in aggressive, urgent neurologic rehabilitation. PMID:22298283

  12. Eating Disorders in the Primary Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Sangvai, Devdutta

    2016-06-01

    Eating disorders are a complex set of illnesses most commonly affecting white adolescent girls and young women. The most common eating disorders seen in the primary care setting are anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. Treatment in the primary care environment ideally involves a physician, therapist, and nutritionist, although complex cases may require psychiatric and other specialist care. Early diagnosis and treatment are associated with improved outcomes, whereas the consequences of untreated eating disorders, particularly anorexia nervosa, can be devastating, including death. PMID:27262009

  13. [Renal colic: new care in emergency centers].

    PubMed

    Morandi, Eléonore; Kherad, Omar; Chollet, Yves; Dussoix, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of renal colic is increasing in industrialized countries, representing a frequent reason for consultation in emergencies. Most patients have simple renal colic that will require analgesia and ambulatory monitoring. Doctors working in emergency centers play a key role in the diagnosis, care and guidance of these patients. They must identify factors of gravity and request urological advice if necessary. This article summarizes the recent diagnostic and therapeutic innovations in the management and guidance of renal colic in emergency centers. PMID:26999995

  14. Living forensics: a natural evolution in emergency care.

    PubMed

    McCracken, L M

    1999-10-01

    'Throughout history, health care professionals have been called upon to assist the legal system in the prosecution of cases where patient care overlaps with the law and physiological realities collide' (Lynch 1995). Working for the last 21 years in the Accident & Emergency setting, the author is dedicated to increasing the awareness and assisting in the establishment of basic forensic evidence collection guidelines for the emergency care provider. Due to the nature of the clientele and setting, emergency personnel will inevitably care for 'victims of violence'. Domestic violence injuries, abuse and neglect in the elderly and young, the addictive client seeking emergency care, the sexual assault victim, and sufferers of occupational injuries, are but a few of the cases that would be classified in the forensic arena. Holistic care dictates looking after the patient as a whole. The nurse must meet the patient's physical and psychosocial needs. The forensic nurse ensures that the patient's civil and constitutional rights are also met. This forensic health care role can be achieved and strengthened by recognizing potential evidence and maintaining a 'chain of custody' of this evidence. PMID:10808761

  15. Priority setting for health in emerging markets.

    PubMed

    Glassman, Amanda; Giedion, Ursula; McQueston, Kate

    2013-05-01

    The use of health technology assessment research in emerging economies is becoming an increasingly important tool to determine the uses of health spending. As low- and middle-income countries' gross domestic product grows, the funding available for health has increased in tandem. There is growing evidence that comparative effectiveness research and cost-effectiveness can be used to improve health outcomes within a predefined financial space. The use of these evaluation tools, combined with a systematized process of priority setting, can help inform national and global health payers. This review of country institutions for health technology assessment illustrates two points: the efforts underway to use research to inform priorities are widespread and not confined to wealthier countries; and many countries' efforts to create evidence-based policy are incomplete and more country-specific research will be needed. Further evidence shows that there is scope to reduce these gaps and opportunity to support better incorporation of data through better-defined priority-setting processes. PMID:24236627

  16. Prevention Opportunities in Health Care Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Suzanne Bennett; Millstein, Susan G.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews changing patterns of health and illness that have led to increased interest in the role of patient and provider behaviors, discussing the advantages of using health care settings as prevention sites. Presents examples of successful behaviorally-based prevention programs, offering evidence supporting their cost-effectiveness. Describes…

  17. Professionalism in Long-Term Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubinski, Rosemary

    2006-01-01

    Speech-language pathologists who serve elders in a variety of long-term care settings have a variety of professional skills and responsibilities. Fundamental to quality service is knowledge of aging and communication changes and disorders associated with this process, institutional alternatives, and the changing nature of today's elders in…

  18. Dilemma in the emergency setting: hypomagnesemia mimicking acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rico, María; Martinez-Rodriguez, Laura; Larrosa-Campo, Davinia; Calleja, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Background Stroke mimics may account for up to 30% of all acute stroke consultations. However, in the emergency setting, accurate diagnosis is not always possible. Methods Case report and review of the literature. Results A 73-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with acute aphasia and right hemiparesis. The National Institute of Health Stroke Score was 21, compatible with severe stroke, so she received thrombolysis. Laboratory testing demonstrated severe hypomagnesemia. She had been taking proton pump inhibitors for years and neuroimaging did not demonstrate signs of acute ischemic disease. After correcting the metabolic alterations with intravenous and oral supplemental magnesium, the patient was discharged asymptomatic. No further episodes have been registered to date. Conclusion Hypomagnesemia might cause acute neurological symptoms that could be confused with stroke. A careful history is essential for diagnosis but suspicion of stroke mimic should not prevent tPA administration. PMID:27354832

  19. Palliative Care in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    McEwan, Alyssia; Silverberg, Joshua Z

    2016-08-01

    As the geriatric population increases in the United States, there is an increase in number of visits to emergency departments for end-of-life and palliative care. This provides the emergency physician with a unique opportunity to alleviate and prevent further suffering in this vulnerable population. Competency in communication strategies that support shared decision making and familiarity with medicolegal terminology increase physician confidence about addressing complaints at the end of life. Familiarity with evidence-based recommendations for symptom management of pain at the end of life aids the emergency physician in creating a positive experience for the patient and their loved ones. PMID:27475020

  20. Emerging infections - implications for dental care.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, N P

    2016-07-01

    Over the last 20 years the majority of emerging infections which have spread rapidly across the globe have been respiratory infections that are spread via droplets, a trend which is likely to continue. Aerosol spray generation in the dental surgery has the potential to spread such infections to staff or other patients. Although the diseases may differ, some common approaches can reduce the risk of transmission. Dental professionals should be aware of areas affected by emerging infections, the incubation period and the recent travel history of patients. Elective dental care for those returning from areas affected by emerging infections should be delayed until the incubation period for the infection is over. PMID:27388077

  1. Involvement of Pharmacists in Medical Care in Emergency and Critical Care Centers.

    PubMed

    Imai, Toru; Yoshida, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Emergency and critical care centers provide multidisciplinary therapy for critically ill patients by centralizing the expertise and technology of many medical professionals. Because the patients' conditions vary, different drug treatments are administered along with surgery. Therefore, the role of pharmacists is important. Critically ill patients who receive high-level invasive treatment undergo physiological changes differing from their normal condition along with variable therapeutic effects and pharmacokinetics. Pharmacists are responsible for recommending the appropriate drug therapy using their knowledge of pharmacology and pharmacokinetics. Further, pharmacists need to determine the general condition of patients by understanding vital signs, blood gas analysis results, etc. It is therefore necessary to conduct consultations with physicians and nurses. The knowledge required for emergency medical treatment is not provided during systematic training in pharmaceutical education, meaning that pharmacists acquire it in the clinical setting through trial and error. To disseminate the knowledge of emergency medical care to pharmacy students, emergency care training has been started in a few facilities. I believe that medical facilities and universities need to conduct joint educational sessions on emergency medical care. Moreover, compared with other medical fields, there are fewer studies on emergency medical care. Research-oriented pharmacists must resolve this issue. This review introduces the work conducted by pharmacists for clinical student education and clinical research at the Emergency and Critical Care Center of Nihon University Itabashi Hospital and discusses future prospects. PMID:27374959

  2. Identifying and managing patients with delirium in acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Bond, Penny; Goudie, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is an acute medical emergency affecting about one in eight acute hospital inpatients. It is associated with poor outcomes, is more prevalent in older people and it is estimated that half of all patients receiving intensive care or surgery for a hip fracture will be affected. Despite its prevalence and impact, delirium is not reliably identified or well managed. Improving the identification and management of patients with delirium has been a focus for the national improving older people's acute care work programme in NHS Scotland. A delirium toolkit has been developed, which includes the 4AT rapid assessment test, information for patients and carers and a care bundle for managing delirium based on existing guidance. This toolkit has been tested and implemented by teams from a range of acute care settings to support improvements in the identification and immediate management of delirium. PMID:26511424

  3. Emergency Care Skills for Occupational Health Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Community Colleges, Raleigh. Occupational Information Center.

    Designed for use in community colleges, technical colleges, and technical institutes, this manual contains a course for teaching emergency care skills to both licensed practical and registered nurses employed in occupational health. The manual consists of three sections. In section 1 the need for the course, its content, objectives, length,…

  4. Providing high-quality care in primary care settings

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Geneau, Robert; Grande, Claudio Del; Denis, Jean-Louis; Hudon, Éveline; Haggerty, Jeannie L.; Bonin, Lucie; Duplain, Réjean; Goudreau, Johanne; Hogg, William

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To gain a deeper understanding of how primary care (PC) practices belonging to different models manage resources to provide high-quality care. Design Multiple-case study embedded in a cross-sectional study of a random sample of 37 practices. Setting Three regions of Quebec. Participants Health care professionals and staff of 5 PC practices. Methods Five cases showing above-average results on quality-of-care indicators were purposefully selected to contrast on region, practice size, and PC model. Data were collected using an organizational questionnaire; the Team Climate Inventory, which was completed by health care professionals and staff; and 33 individual interviews. Detailed case histories were written and thematic analysis was performed. Main findings The core common feature of these practices was their ongoing effort to make trade-offs to deliver services that met their vision of high-quality care. These compromises involved the same 3 areas, but to varying degrees depending on clinic characteristics: developing a shared vision of high-quality care; aligning resource use with that vision; and balancing professional aspirations and population needs. The leadership of the physician lead was crucial. The external environment was perceived as a source of pressure and dilemmas rather than as a source of support in these matters. Conclusion Irrespective of their models, PC practices’ pursuit of high-quality care is based on a vision in which accessibility is a key component, balanced by appropriate management of available resources and of external environment expectations. Current PC reforms often create tensions rather than support PC practices in their pursuit of high-quality care. PMID:24829023

  5. Palliative Care in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Mierendorf, Susanne M; Gidvani, Vinita

    2014-01-01

    The Emergency Department (ED) is the place where people most frequently seek urgent care. For patients living with chronic disease or malignancy who may be in a crisis, this visit may be pivotal in determining the patients’ trajectory. There is a large movement in education of emergency medicine physicians, hospitalists, and intensivists from acute aggressive interventions to patient-goal assessment, recognizing last stages of life and prioritizing symptom management. Although the ED is not considered an ideal place to begin palliative care, hospital-based physicians may assist in eliciting the patient’s goals of care and discussing prognosis and disease trajectory. This may help shift to noncurative treatment. This article will summarize the following: identification of patients who may need palliation, discussing prognosis, eliciting goals of care and directives, symptom management in the ED, and making plans for further care. These efforts have been shown to improve outcomes and to decrease length of stay and cost. The focus of this article is relieving “patient” symptoms and family distress, honoring the patient’s goals of care, and assisting in transition to a noncurative approach and placement where this may be accomplished. PMID:24694318

  6. [Quality improvement of health care services in Croatian emergency medicine].

    PubMed

    Predavec, Sanja; Sogorić, Selma; Jurković, Drazen

    2010-12-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) in the Republic of Croatia are currently organized as part of the existing health care system and delivered in the form of pre-hospital and hospital EMS. The pre-hospital EMS are delivered by standalone EMS Centers, EMS units set up in community health centers, and by general practitioners working in shifts and on call in remote and scarcely populated areas. In hospitals, each ward usually has its own emergency reception area, and only in a couple of cases there is an integrated emergency admission unit for the entire hospital. The current EMS structure does not meet the basic requirements that would make an EMS system optimal, i.e. equal quality, equal access, effectiveness and appropriate equipment. The EMS Restructuring Project is part of the Croatian health care system reform and is addressed by the National Health Development Strategy 2006-2011. As part of restructuring efforts, the Croatian National Institute of Emergency Medicine, 21 County Institutes of Emergency Medicine and county-level call centers are going to be set up. In addition, the project will introduce the following: integrated emergency admission areas at hospitals; telemedicine as part of emergency medicine; emergency medicine specialty for physicians and additional specialized training for nurses/technicians; separation of emergency and non-emergency transport; standards for vehicles and equipment and guidelines/protocols/algorithms for care. The Croatian National Institute of Emergency Medicine is an umbrella EMS organization. It shapes the EMS in Croatia and proposes, plans, monitors and analyzes EMS actions in Croatia. In addition, it submits a proposal of the Emergency Medicine Network to the minister, sets standards for EMS transport, and coordinates, guides and supervises the work of County Institutes of Emergency Medicine. County Institutes organize and deliver pre-hospital EMS in their counties. Integrated hospital emergency admission units represent a

  7. Facilitating emergent change in a healthcare setting.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    During my doctoral research, I identified new ways of thinking about complexity in organizations. This involved embracing the capacity of complex systems to find their own form of order and coherence, often referred to as self-organization, and then asking the question, "What can organizational leaders do to create the systems and structures that would facilitate emergent change?" Emergent change comes from within and through the active members of a system and not according to some external prompting or design. This results in the sort of change capacity that enables an organization to be agile and resilient through a high level of employee engagement. The question was answered by identifying and validating organizational-specific factors that facilitate emergent change. PMID:24409579

  8. Death anxiety among emergency care workers.

    PubMed

    Brady, Mike

    2015-07-01

    Death anxiety, or 'thanatophobia', is a state in which people experience negative emotional reactions in recognition of their own mortality. Emergency and unscheduled healthcare workers, such as emergency nurses and paramedics, are constantly reminded of death and therefore of their own mortality, and this makes them susceptible to death anxiety. This article introduces the concept of death anxiety, and highlights the need for staff, employers and universities to recognise its signs and symptoms. It also suggests some interventions that could prevent the debilitating effects of death anxiety, to improve staff's mental health and the care they provide to patients. PMID:26159347

  9. Computed radiography in an emergency department setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriole, Katherine P.; Gould, Robert G.; Arenson, Ronald L.

    1997-05-01

    Evaluation of radiologist and non-radiologist physician acceptance of computed radiography (CR) as an alternative to film-based radiography in an emergency department (ED) is performed. All emergency department radiographs are performed using photostimulable phosphor plates and rad by a computed radiography laser reader placed in the former emergency department darkroom. Soft copy images are simultaneously transmitted to high- and medium-resolution dual-monitor display stations located in radiology and ED reading rooms respectively. The on-call radiologist is automatically paged by the Radiology Information System (RIS) upon exam completion, to read the new ED imaging study. Patient demographic information including relevant clinical history is conveyed to the radiologist via the RIS. A 'wet read' preliminary radiology report is immediately transmitted back to the ED. Radiology and ED physicians are surveyed to ascertain preferences for CR or traditional screen-film, based on system implementation, image viewing and clinical impact issues. Preliminary results indicate a preference for filmless CR among the ED physicians if digital reliability and speed issues are met. This preference appears to be independent of physician level of experience. Inexperienced radiologists-in-training appear to have less comfort with softcopy reading for primary diagnosis. However, additional training in softcopy reading techniques can improve confidences. Image quality issues are most important tot he radiologist, while speed and reliability are the major issues for ED physicians. Reasons for CR preference include immediate access to images on display stations, near-zero exam retake rates, and improved response time and communication between radiology and the emergency department clinician.

  10. Assessing the Assessment in Emergency Care Training

    PubMed Central

    Dankbaar, Mary E. W.; Stegers-Jager, Karen M.; Baarveld, Frank; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.; Norman, Geoff R.; Rutten, Frans L.; van Saase, Jan L. C. M.; Schuit, Stephanie C. E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Each year over 1.5 million health care professionals attend emergency care courses. Despite high stakes for patients and extensive resources involved, little evidence exists on the quality of assessment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of commonly used formats in assessing emergency care skills. Methods Residents were assessed at the end of a 2-week emergency course; a subgroup was videotaped. Psychometric analyses were conducted to assess the validity and inter-rater reliability of the assessment instrument, which included a checklist, a 9-item competency scale and a global performance scale. Results A group of 144 residents and 12 raters participated in the study; 22 residents were videotaped and re-assessed by 8 raters. The checklists showed limited validity and poor inter-rater reliability for the dimensions “correct” and “timely” (ICC = .30 and.39 resp.). The competency scale had good construct validity, consisting of a clinical and a communication subscale. The internal consistency of the (sub)scales was high (α = .93/.91/.86). The inter-rater reliability was moderate for the clinical competency subscale (.49) and the global performance scale (.50), but poor for the communication subscale (.27). A generalizability study showed that for a reliable assessment 5–13 raters are needed when using checklists, and four when using the clinical competency scale or the global performance scale. Conclusions This study shows poor validity and reliability for assessing emergency skills with checklists but good validity and moderate reliability with clinical competency or global performance scales. Involving more raters can improve the reliability substantially. Recommendations are made to improve this high stakes skill assessment. PMID:25521702

  11. Management competencies required in ambulatory care settings.

    PubMed

    Brooke, P P; Hudak, R P; Finstuen, K; Trounson, J

    1998-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the most important competencies physician executives in medical groups and other ambulatory settings will need to have in the next five years. The specific job skills, knowledge, and abilities (SKA) that physician executives will need to acquire these competencies were also explored. The Delphi techniques were used to analyze responses from two surveys from members of the American College of Medical Practice Executives. The most important competencies were grouped into 13 management domains, each with specific SKAs. "Managing health care resources to create quality and value" and "fundamentals of business and finance" were rated as the most important competencies. The most frequently rated SKA was the "ability to build and maintain credibility and trust." PMID:10185642

  12. 32 CFR 1656.20 - Expenses for emergency medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Expenses for emergency medical care. 1656.20... ALTERNATIVE SERVICE § 1656.20 Expenses for emergency medical care. (a) Claims for payment of actual and reasonable expenses for emergency medical care, including hospitalization, of ASWs who suffer illness...

  13. 32 CFR 1656.20 - Expenses for emergency medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Expenses for emergency medical care. 1656.20... ALTERNATIVE SERVICE § 1656.20 Expenses for emergency medical care. (a) Claims for payment of actual and reasonable expenses for emergency medical care, including hospitalization, of ASWs who suffer illness...

  14. 32 CFR 1656.20 - Expenses for emergency medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Expenses for emergency medical care. 1656.20... ALTERNATIVE SERVICE § 1656.20 Expenses for emergency medical care. (a) Claims for payment of actual and reasonable expenses for emergency medical care, including hospitalization, of ASWs who suffer illness...

  15. 32 CFR 1656.20 - Expenses for emergency medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Expenses for emergency medical care. 1656.20... ALTERNATIVE SERVICE § 1656.20 Expenses for emergency medical care. (a) Claims for payment of actual and reasonable expenses for emergency medical care, including hospitalization, of ASWs who suffer illness...

  16. 32 CFR 1656.20 - Expenses for emergency medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Expenses for emergency medical care. 1656.20... ALTERNATIVE SERVICE § 1656.20 Expenses for emergency medical care. (a) Claims for payment of actual and reasonable expenses for emergency medical care, including hospitalization, of ASWs who suffer illness...

  17. Infection Control in Alternative Health Care Settings: An Update.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Elaine; Cassone, Marco; Montoya, Ana; Mody, Lona

    2016-09-01

    With changing health care delivery, patients receive care at various settings including acute care hospitals, nursing homes, outpatient primary care and specialty clinics, and at home, exposing them to pathogens in various settings. Various health care settings face unique challenges, requiring individualized infection control programs. Infection control programs in nursing homes should address surveillance for infections and antimicrobial resistance, outbreak investigation and control plan for epidemics, isolation precautions, hand hygiene, staff education, and employee and resident health programs. PMID:27515148

  18. 32 CFR 732.16 - Emergency care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... MEDICAL AND DENTAL CARE Medical and Dental Care From Nonnaval Sources § 732.16 Emergency care requirements. Only in a bona fide emergency will medical, maternity, or dental services be obtained under this part... dental care. A situation where the need or apparent need for medical or dental attention does not...

  19. Palliative Care Patients in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    LAWSON, BEVERLEY J.; BURGE, FREDERICK I.; MCINTYRE, PAUL; FIELD, SIMON; MAXWELL, DAVID

    2016-01-01

    Although end-of-life care is not a primary function of the emergency department (ED), in reality, many access this department in the later stages of illness. In this study, ED use by patients registered with the Capital Health Integrated Palliative Care Service (CHIPCS) is examined and CHIPCS patient characteristics associated with ED use identified. Overall, 27% of patients made at least one ED visit while registered with CHIPCS; 54% of these resulted in a hospital admission. ED visiting was not associated with time of day or day of the week. Multivariate logistic regression results suggest older patients were significantly less likely to make an ED visit. Making an ED visit was associated with hospital death, rural residence (particularly for women), and having a parent or relative other than a spouse or child as the primary caregiver. Further research may suggest strategies to reduce unnecessary ED visits during the end of life. PMID:19227016

  20. Rivaroxaban and Hemostasis in Emergency Care

    PubMed Central

    Koscielny, Jürgen; Rutkauskaite, Edita

    2014-01-01

    Rivaroxaban is an oral, direct Factor Xa inhibitor, approved for the prevention and treatment of several thromboembolic disorders. Rivaroxaban does not require routine coagulation monitoring and has a short half-life. However, confirmation of rivaroxaban levels may be required in circumstances such as life-threatening bleeding or perioperative management. Here, we explore the management strategies in patients receiving rivaroxaban who have a bleeding emergency or require emergency surgery. Rivaroxaban plasma concentrations can be assessed quantitatively using anti-Factor Xa chromogenic assays, or qualitatively using prothrombin time assays (using rivaroxaban-sensitive reagents). In patients receiving long-term rivaroxaban therapy who require elective surgery, discontinuation of rivaroxaban 20–30 hours beforehand is normally sufficient to minimize bleeding risk. For emergency surgery, we advise against prophylactic use of hemostatic blood products, even with high rivaroxaban concentrations. Temporary rivaroxaban discontinuation is recommended if minor bleeding occurs; for severe bleeding, rivaroxaban withdrawal may be necessary, along with compression or appropriate surgical treatment. Supportive measures such as blood product administration might be beneficial. Life-threatening bleeding demands comprehensive hemostasis management, including potential use of agents such as prothrombin complex concentrate. Patients taking rivaroxaban who require emergency care for bleeding or surgery can be managed using established protocols and individualized assessment. PMID:24696784

  1. Assessment of suicidal intent in emergency care.

    PubMed

    Bethel, James

    The assessment of suicidal intent in first-contact settings, including the emergency department, can be challenging. Inaccurate assessment can lead to increased incidence of self-harm and completion of suicide. This article focuses on factors that may affect review of this patient group, including healthcare professionals' personal and professional standards and values. Strategies to aid assessment of people presenting with suicidal ideation are discussed. PMID:24063487

  2. Optimizing antibiotic therapy in the intensive care unit setting

    PubMed Central

    Kollef, Marin H

    2001-01-01

    Antibiotics are one of the most common therapies administered in the intensive care unit setting. In addition to treating infections, antibiotic use contributes to the emergence of resistance among pathogenic microorganisms. Therefore, avoiding unnecessary antibiotic use and optimizing the administration of antimicrobial agents will help to improve patient outcomes while minimizing further pressures for resistance. This review will present several strategies aimed at achieving optimal use of antimicrobial agents. It is important to note that each intensive care unit should have a program in place which monitors antibiotic utilization and its effectiveness. Only in this way can the impact of interventions aimed at improving antibiotic use (e.g. antibiotic rotation, de-escalation therapy) be evaluated at the local level. PMID:11511331

  3. Emergency care and health systems: consensus-based recommendations and future research priorities.

    PubMed

    Calvello, Emilie J B; Broccoli, Morgan; Risko, Nicholas; Theodosis, Christian; Totten, Vicken Y; Radeos, Michael S; Seidenberg, Phil; Wallis, Lee

    2013-12-01

    The theme of the 14th annual Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference was "Global Health and Emergency Care: A Research Agenda." The goal of the conference was to create a robust and measurable research agenda for evaluating emergency health care delivery systems. The concept of health systems includes the organizations, institutions, and resources whose primary purpose is to promote, restore, and/or maintain health. This article further conceptualizes the vertical and horizontal delivery of acute and emergency care in low-resource settings by defining specific terminology for emergency care platforms and discussing how they fit into broader health systems models. This was accomplished through discussion surrounding four principal questions touching upon the interplay between health systems and acute and emergency care. This research agenda is intended to assist countries that are in the early stages of integrating emergency services into their health systems and are looking for guidance to maximize their development and health systems planning efforts. PMID:24341583

  4. Aligning payment reform and delivery innovation in emergency care.

    PubMed

    Pines, Jesse M; McStay, Frank; George, Meaghan; Wiler, Jennifer L; McClellan, Mark

    2016-08-01

    Current alternative payment models (APMs) that move away from traditional fee-for-service payment often have explicit goals to reduce utilization in episodic settings, such as emergency departments (ED). We apply the new HHS payment reform taxonomy to illustrate a pathway to success for EDs in APMs. Despite the unique challenges faced by EDs, a variety of category 2 and 3 APMs may be applicable to EDs in the short- and long term to improve efficiency and value. Full and partially capitated models create incentives for longitudinal and episodic ED providers and payers to unite to create interventions to reduce costs. However, prospective attribution remains a challenge for EDs because of exogenous demand, which makes it important for EDs to be one of the components of capitated payment along with longitudinal providers who can exert greater control on overall care demands. The goal of payment and delivery reforms in ED care is to improve population health across the continuum of acute and longitudinal care. In order to deliver cost-conscious care, ED providers will need additional resources, expanded information, and new processes and metrics to facilitate cost-conscious decisions. Improved availability of electronic information across settings, evidence generated from developing and testing acute care-specific payment models, and engaging acute care providers directly in reform efforts will help meet these goals. PMID:27541697

  5. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 6. Bleeding Control, Wounds and Bandaging, Shock. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This student manual, the sixth in a set of 14 modules, is designed to train emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in Ohio. The module contains three sections covering the following course content: control of bleeding, caring for wounds and bandaging various body parts, and caring for shock victims. Each section contains objectives, an introduction,…

  6. Mental Health in Long Term Care Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Herbert

    1978-01-01

    There are many ways in which long-term care facilities attempt to cope with the mental health problems of the elderly. The author reviews five factors crucial to effective care for the aged in these facilities. (Author/RK)

  7. Substance use disorder patient privacy and comprehensive care in integrated health care settings.

    PubMed

    Schaper, Elizabeth; Padwa, Howard; Urada, Darren; Shoptaw, Steven

    2016-02-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) expands health insurance coverage for substance use disorder (SUD) treatment, underscoring the value of improving SUD service integration in primarily physical health care settings. It is not yet known to what degree specialized privacy regulations-Code of Federal Regulations Title 42, Part 2 (42 CFR Part 2), in particular-will affect access to or the utilization and delivery of SUD treatment in primary care. In addition to exploring the emerging benefits and barriers that specialized confidentiality regulations pose to treatment in early adopting integrated health care settings, this article introduces and explicates 42 CFR Part 2 to support provider and administrator implementation of SUD privacy regulations in integrated settings. The authors also argue that, although intended to protect patients with SUD, special SUD information protection may inadvertently reinforce stigma against patients by purporting the belief that SUD is different from other health problems and must be kept private. In turn, this stigma may inhibit the delivery of comprehensive integrated care. PMID:26845493

  8. Emergency medicine physician attitudes toward HPV vaccine uptake in an emergency department setting

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Mandy; Okugo, Glory

    2014-01-01

    A physician's recommendation is the most effective published method of motivating HPV vaccination initiation. The emergency department (ED) is the 'public health safety net', and often the only access to care for underserved populations. Recommendation of the HPV vaccine in the ED is a potential avenue to improve vaccination rates among sub-populations who do not have access to routine medical care. We assessed willingness of EM physicians to recommend the vaccine, target high-risk women, and disclose perceived barriers to vaccination in the ED. A cross sectional study using an 11-item survey, was used to assess physician attitudes toward recommending the HPV vaccine in an ED setting to age eligible patients. 67.4% stated they would recommend the vaccine, 23.9% were neutral, and 8.7% would not recommend the vaccine to age eligible patients in the ED. 41% noted lack of adequate reimbursement for vaccination as a barrier to vaccination in the ED (P < 0.05). Physicians were comfortable targeting women at high risk for cervical cancer for vaccination (P < 0.05). EM physicians are comfortable targeting high-risk women for HPV vaccination in an ED setting. Support of EM physicians in the national effort to improve HPV vaccine uptake is an important step in eradicating a largely preventable yet lethal cancer. PMID:25483493

  9. Android-based access to holistic emergency care record.

    PubMed

    Koufi, Vassiliki; Malamateniou, Flora; Prentza, Andriana; Vassilacopoulos, George

    2013-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of an Emergency Medical Services (EMS) system which interfaces with a Holistic Emergency Care Record (HECR) that aims at managing emergency care holistically by supporting EMS processes and is accessible by Android-enabled mobile devices. PMID:23823406

  10. Terrorism and the ethics of emergency medical care.

    PubMed

    Pesik, N; Keim, M E; Iserson, K V

    2001-06-01

    The threat of domestic and international terrorism involving weapons of mass destruction-terrorism (WMD-T) has become an increasing public health concern for US citizens. WMD-T events may have a major effect on many societal sectors but particularly on the health care delivery system. Anticipated medical problems might include the need for large quantities of medical equipment and supplies, as well as capable and unaffected health care providers. In the setting of WMD-T, triage may bear little resemblance to the standard approach to civilian triage. To address these issues to the maximum benefit of our patients, we must first develop collective forethought and a broad-based consensus that these decisions must reach beyond the hospital emergency department. Critical decisions like these should not be made on an individual case-by-case basis. Physicians should never be placed in a position of individually deciding to deny treatment to patients without the guidance of a policy or protocol. Emergency physicians, however, may easily find themselves in a situation in which the demand for resources clearly exceeds supply. It is for this reason that emergency care providers, personnel, hospital administrators, religious leaders, and medical ethics committees need to engage in bioethical decision making before an acute bioterrorist event. PMID:11385335

  11. Perceptions of emergency care in Kenyan communities lacking access to formalised emergency medical systems: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Broccoli, Morgan C; Calvello, Emilie J B; Skog, Alexander P; Wachira, Benjamin; Wallis, Lee A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We undertook this study in Kenya to understand the community's emergency care needs and barriers they face when trying to access care, and to seek community members’ thoughts regarding high impact solutions to expand access to essential emergency services. Design We used a qualitative research methodology to conduct 59 focus groups with 528 total Kenyan community member participants. Data were coded, aggregated and analysed using the content analysis approach. Setting Participants were uniformly selected from all eight of the historical Kenyan provinces (Central, Coast, Eastern, Nairobi, North Eastern, Nyanza, Rift Valley and Western), with equal rural and urban community representation. Results Socioeconomic and cultural factors play a major role both in seeking and reaching emergency care. Community members in Kenya experience a wide range of medical emergencies, and seem to understand their time-critical nature. They rely on one another for assistance in the face of substantial barriers to care—a lack of: system structure, resources, transportation, trained healthcare providers and initial care at the scene. Conclusions Access to emergency care in Kenya can be improved by encouraging recognition and initial treatment of emergent illness in the community, strengthening the pre-hospital care system, improving emergency care delivery at health facilities and creating new policies at a national level. These community-generated solutions likely have a wider applicability in the region. PMID:26586324

  12. Comparative Effectiveness Research: Alternatives to "Traditional" Computed Tomography Use in the Acute Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Moore, Christopher L; Broder, Joshua; Gunn, Martin L; Bhargavan-Chatfield, Mythreyi; Cody, Dianna; Cullison, Kevin; Daniels, Brock; Gans, Bradley; Kennedy Hall, M; Gaines, Barbara A; Goldman, Sarah; Heil, John; Liu, Rachel; Marin, Jennifer R; Melnick, Edward R; Novelline, Robert A; Pare, Joseph; Repplinger, Michael D; Taylor, Richard A; Sodickson, Aaron D

    2015-12-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanning is an essential diagnostic tool and has revolutionized care of patients in the acute care setting. However, there is widespread agreement that overutilization of CT, where benefits do not exceed possible costs or harms, is occurring. The goal was to seek consensus in identifying and prioritizing research questions and themes that involve the comparative effectiveness of "traditional" CT use versus alternative diagnostic strategies in the acute care setting. A modified Delphi technique was used that included input from emergency physicians, emergency radiologists, medical physicists, and an industry expert to achieve this. PMID:26576033

  13. Primary Care in Secondary Settings: Inherent Strains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Henry W.; Garfat, Thom

    2005-01-01

    There is an ever present struggle associated with reconciling "primary" care requirements for children and young people living in group care programs with "secondary" organizational demands imposed by external agency expectations and administrative requirements. That struggle finds its expression and potential balance in the daily work of staff.…

  14. Conflicts between managed care organizations and emergency departments in California.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, L A; Derlet, R W

    1996-01-01

    To control costs, managed care organizations have begun to restrict the use of hospital emergency departments by their enrollees. They are doing this by educating enrollees, providing better access to 24-hour urgent care, denying preauthorizations for care for some patients who do present to emergency departments, and retrospectively denying payment for certain patients who use emergency services. Changing traditional use of emergency departments has resulted in conflicts between managed care organizations and these departments. Because federal law mandates access to emergency care for all persons, disagreements occur over the precise definition of an emergency medical condition. In addition, conflicts occur over the scope and payment for the medical screening examination required by federal law of persons presenting to an emergency department. Finally, issues arise related to the safety of patients who present to emergency departments and request care but are denied care because the managed care organization does not authorize the visit. Recent legislation in California has attempted to reconcile differences between managed care practices and federal and state laws; however, areas of continued conflict need to be resolved to prevent possible adverse consequences for patients actually needing emergency care. PMID:8775727

  15. Patient and public involvement in emergency care research.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Enid; Irving, Andy; Goodacre, Steve

    2016-09-01

    Patients participate in emergency care research and are the intended beneficiaries of research findings. The public provide substantial funding for research through taxation and charitable donations. If we do research to benefit patients and the public are funding the research, then patients and the public should be involved in the planning, prioritisation, design, conduct and oversight of research, yet patient and public involvement (or more simply, public involvement, since patients are also members of the public) has only recently developed in emergency care research. In this article, we describe what public involvement is and how it can help emergency care research. We use the development of a pioneering public involvement group in emergency care, the Sheffield Emergency Care Forum, to provide insights into the potential and challenges of public involvement in emergency care research. PMID:27044949

  16. [Position paper for a reform of medical emergency care in German emergency departments].

    PubMed

    Riessen, R; Gries, A; Seekamp, A; Dodt, C; Kumle, B; Busch, H-J

    2015-06-01

    The hospital emergency departments play a central role for the in- and outpatient care of patients with medical emergencies in Germany. In this position paper we point out some general financial and organizational problems of German emergency departments and urge for a higher significance of emergency care in the German health system as an element of public services. The corresponding reform proposals include a change in hospital financing towards a more budget-based system for the emergency departments, an improved structural planning for regional and transregional emergency care, an intensified cooperation with the emergency services of the ambulatory care physicians, a better organizational representation of emergency care within the hospitals and an advancement of emergency medicine in postgraduate medical education. PMID:26024948

  17. Suicide screening in schools, primary care and emergency departments

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Lisa M.; Ballard, Elizabeth D.; Pao, Maryland

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Every year, suicide claims the lives of tens of thousands of young people worldwide. Despite its high prevalence and known risk factors, suicidality is often undetected. Early identification of suicide risk may be an important method of mitigating this public health crisis. Screening youth for suicide may be a critical step in suicide prevention. This paper reviews suicide screening in three different settings: schools, primary care clinics and emergency departments (EDs). Recent findings Unrecognized and thus untreated suicidality leads to substantial morbidity and mortality. With the onus of detection falling on nonmental health professionals, brief screening tools can be used to initiate more in-depth evaluations. Nonetheless, there are serious complexities and implications of screening all children and adolescents for suicide. Recent studies show that managing positive screens is a monumental challenge, including the problem of false positives and the burden subsequently posed on systems of care. Furthermore, nearly 60% of youth in need of mental health services do not receive the care they need, even after suicide attempt. Schools, primary care clinics and EDs are logical settings where screening that leads to intervention can be initiated. Summary Valid, brief and easy-to-administer screening tools can be utilized to detect risk of suicide in children and adolescents. Targeted suicide screening in schools, and universal suicide screening in primary care clinics and EDs may be the most effective way to recognize and prevent self-harm. These settings must be equipped to manage youth who screen positive with effective and timely interventions. Most importantly, the impact of suicide screening in various settings needs to be further assessed. PMID:19617829

  18. Point of Care Cardiac Ultrasound Applications in the Emergency Department and Intensive Care Unit - A Review

    PubMed Central

    Arntfield, Robert T; Millington, Scott J

    2012-01-01

    The use of point of care echocardiography by non-cardiologist in acute care settings such as the emergency department (ED) or the intensive care unit (ICU) is very common. Unlike diagnostic echocardiography, the scope of such point of care exams is often restricted to address the clinical questions raised by the patient’s differential diagnosis or chief complaint in order to inform immediate management decisions. In this article, an overview of the most common applications of this focused echocardiography in the ED and ICU is provided. This includes but is not limited to the evaluation of patients experiencing hypotension, cardiac arrest, cardiac trauma, chest pain and patients after cardiac surgery. PMID:22894759

  19. Hazardous waste compliance in health care settings.

    PubMed

    Marcoux, Rita M; Vogenberg, F Randy

    2015-02-01

    Pharmaceutical waste has become an urgent public health and environmental protection issue in recent years, leading to a variety of sometimes-conflicting federal and state legislation and regulations that health care entities must take seriously. PMID:25673960

  20. The emerging role of cell phone technology in ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    Boland, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Three factors are coinciding to reshape the ambulatory care market: chronic disease prevalence, workforce shortages, and the availability of cell phone technology with very high consumer penetration. These factors will disproportionately drive the business strategies and practices of ambulatory care providers, payers, and delivery systems this decade. Market dynamics are driving the healthcare industry to adopt new strategies to deal with the swelling prevalence of chronic disease. Healthcare organizations are constrained by money and inadequate tools to systematically manage chronic care patients. As a result, traditional notions of ambulatory care are changing from being provider-centered to becoming more patient-centric. A host of new remote monitoring and communication technologies are available so that providers can now interact with patients "anywhere, anytime." The traditional care setting is shifting to where the patient is rather than where the physician is located. Patients are the most underutilized resource in healthcare, and patient engagement is the key to managing chronic illness. Cell phones are particularly suited for leveraging the time and expertise of providers while engaging patients in their own self-care. To demonstrate this concept, data are presented that illustrate how cell phone applications significantly reduced the cost of treating severely asthmatic children and teens in 2 ways: through more frequent communication between patients and their medical teams, and by motivating patients to become more engaged and knowledgeable about their care. The healthcare industry can support consumer choice by making available as many options as possible for engaging patients in their care. Consumers like having choices and patients are no different: they are not all one type. This suggests an emerging role for cell phone applications and platforms that enable both Internet and medical device connectivity where appropriate for managing chronic

  1. Point-of-care ultrasonography by pediatric emergency physicians. Policy statement.

    PubMed

    Marin, Jennifer R; Lewiss, Resa E

    2015-04-01

    Point-of-care ultrasonography is increasingly being used to facilitate accurate and timely diagnoses and to guide procedures. It is important for pediatric emergency physicians caring for patients in the emergency department to receive adequate and continued point-of-care ultrasonography training for those indications used in their practice setting. Emergency departments should have credentialing and quality assurance programs. Pediatric emergency medicine fellowships should provide appropriate training to physician trainees. Hospitals should provide privileges to physicians who demonstrate competency in point-of-care ultrasonography. Ongoing research will provide the necessary measures to define the optimal training and competency assessment standards. Requirements for credentialing and hospital privileges will vary and will be specific to individual departments and hospitals. As more physicians are trained and more research is completed, there should be one national standard for credentialing and privileging in point-of-care ultrasonography for pediatric emergency physicians. PMID:25805037

  2. Emergency Victim Care. A Textbook for Emergency Medical Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Trade and Industrial Education Service.

    This textbook for emergency medical personnel should be useful to fire departments, private ambulance companies, industrial emergency and rescue units, police departments, and nurses. The 30 illustrated chapters cover topics such as: (1) Emergency Medical Service Vehicles, (2) Safe Driving Practices, (3) Anatomy and Physiology, (4) Closed Chest…

  3. [Latex allergy - an emerging health care problem.].

    PubMed

    Gislason, D; Bjornsdottir, U S

    1996-08-01

    Since immediate hypersensitivity reaction to natural rubber was described 17 years ago, the incidence of latex allergy has been increasing rapidly. This is in part due to a growing awareness of the problem along with improved diagnostic methods. Additionally, in accordance with universal health care plans and the HIV epidemic, more rubber products such as latex gloves and condoms are in general use. Changes in methods of rubber production may also contribute to the increasing prevalence in latex allergy. Individuals at greatest risk for developing latex allergy are patients who have undergone multiple operations. These include children with myelomeningocele (spina bifida) and congenital defects of the urinary tract. Another high risk group includes health care providers and individuals working in rubber production. Latex containing products are in general use in the hospital setting as well as in the home environment. They can therefore pose a great risk to sensitized patients if prophylactic measures are not undertaken. Defining high risk patients and subsequent diagnosis with appropriate skin tests are important. Patients with latex allergy must then be provided with self-administered adrenalin (Epi-pen) and instructed in avoidance measures. In this article we describe 23 individuals who have been diagnosed allergic to latex in Iceland. PMID:20065424

  4. Hospital emergency care teams: our solution to out of hours emergency care.

    PubMed

    Carberry, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The implementation of the European Working Time Directive and the compulsory reduction in junior doctors hours provided the main driver and background for this project. The project aim was to implement Hospital Emergency Care Teams (HECT) on three District General Hospitals (DGHs) to provide emergency out-of-hours care. The project strategy centred on the recruitment, training and preparation of critical care nurses to undertake advanced assessment roles. Methods used to monitor and evaluate activity include the use of innovative hand-held computers. Main outcomes include, the conclusion that a multidisciplinary HECT of five could manage the overnight workload and level of acuity in a DGH of 420-500 beds, and that critical care nursing staff can be prepared for advanced supporting roles. Experiences gained provide valuable learning that could be used to influence similar projects. Implications for practice include the development of a national framework to inform areas such as multidisciplinary competency-based education and training. Scientific evidence is required to evaluate the effect of HECT on hospital mortality and morbidity and quantify the staff, inpatient experiences. PMID:16869524

  5. On priority setting in preventive care resources.

    PubMed

    Courbage, Christophe

    2010-04-01

    Using an expected utility approach, we show that within a population that differs with respect to the probability of developing a disease, the allocation of preventive care resources should be prioritized based on the efficiency of prevention and not on whether individuals are at high or low risk of developing the disease. Should the efficiency of prevention be the same within the population, we show that the gravity of the disease, the presence of co-morbidities and the existence of uncertainty on health status can alternatively be considered so as to prioritize among preventive care resources. PMID:19353516

  6. Aesthetics in Asian Child Care Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice S.

    This speech presents observations, made on a trip in June 1976, of the aesthetic environments of children in China, Japan, and Hong Kong. Home, school and day care environments are compared in terms of living and play space, room decor, the presence of art and toys, dramatic play and performance, music, nature and outdoor appreciation, food and…

  7. Emerging organisms in a tertiary healthcare set up

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Inam Danish; Sahni, Ajay Kumar; Bharadwaj, Reena; Lall, Mahima; Jindal, A.K.; Sashindran, V.K.

    2013-01-01

    Background One-tenth of all infectious diseases are attributable to emerging organisms. As emerging organisms sporadically affect a relatively small percentage of population they are not studied at large. This study was aimed at studying the characteristics of emerging organisms encountered from various clinical samples in an apex tertiary care multispeciality teaching and research hospital. Methods 16,918 positive isolates obtained from 66,323 culture samples processed in the clinical microbiology lab of an apex multispeciality hospital during 2011–2012 were included after a pilot study. Both manual and automated systems were used for identification and antimicrobial susceptibility. The frequency of isolation, sources, referring centers, resistance and susceptibility profiles, phenotypic characteristics and number of reports in PubMed were studied. Results Out of 16,918 isolates, 13,498 (79.78%) were Gram negative bacteria, 3254 (19.23%) were Gram positive bacteria and 166 (0.98%) were yeasts. A total of 483 (2.85%, 95% CI 2.6%–3.1%) emerging organisms including 116 (0.69%, 95% CI 0.57%–0.81%) emerging species were identified comprising 54 genera. Conclusion Emerging organisms are likely to evade routine identification or be disregarded as non-contributory. Astute efforts directed at identification of emerging isolates, decisions by clinical microbiologists and treating physicians and containment of infection are required. PMID:24843199

  8. Managed dental care in the HMO setting.

    PubMed

    Gong, C C

    1995-01-01

    DHMOs are gaining in popularity, and are the fastest-growing dental managed-care product, primarily because of their ability to reduce premium and patient costs. Dentistry, because of the strong correlation between prevention and disease control, is more suited to a managed-care system than medicine. However, there remains a wide gulf between theory and practice, as the DHMO industry continues to evolve. Poorly designed programs will save money but create problems with patient satisfaction and unmet treatment needs. Well-designed programs use the principles of population management to bring large numbers of patients to maintenance oral health levels. In any event, the continuing growth and development of DHMOs will benefit patients, group purchasers, and the dentists who can understand and embrace the concepts of dentistry in the HMO environment. PMID:9161149

  9. Designing Groups to Meet Evolving Challenges in Health Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Christopher J.; Hart, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the special issue on groups in health care settings and describes how each contribution addresses challenges and opportunities in the health care field for group work. Fundamental criteria for evaluating groups in such settings are applied to each contribution. Finally, trends and opportunities about the future…

  10. What Should I Do? A Safety and Emergency Care Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crist, Mary Jo; And Others

    One of a series written especially for parents and other caregivers, this handbook offers an overview of emergency care and safety considerations. The discussion of emergency care focuses on supplies for the first aid kit and provides guidelines for dealing with bleeding, bites, burns, suffocation, eye injury, broken bones, head injuries, fevers,…

  11. Interactional aspects of care during hospitalization: perspectives of family caregivers of psychiatrically ill in a tertiary care setting in India.

    PubMed

    Dinakaran, P; Mehrotra, Seema; Bharath, Srikala

    2014-12-01

    There are very few studies on user-perspectives about mental health care services that explore perspectives of family caregivers in India. An exploratory study was undertaken to understand the perceived importance of various aspects of interactions with mental health service providers during hospitalization, from the perspectives of family caregivers. In addition, it also aimed at documenting their actual experience of interactional aspects of care during the hospitalization of their relatives. The study was conducted on fifty family caregivers of patients with varied psychiatric diagnoses hospitalized in a tertiary psychiatric care setting in South India. Measures of Interactional aspects of care were developed to assess perceived importance of six different interactional domains of care and the actual experience of care in these domains. Provision of informational inputs and addressing of concerns raised emerged as the domains of care given highest importance. The item pertaining to 'sharing with the caregiver about different alternatives for treatment' received negative ratings in terms of actual experience by maximum number of participants (18%). Significant differences on perceived importance of four domains of interactional aspects of care (dignity, confidentiality and fairness, addressing concerns raised, informational inputs and prompt attention and consistent care) emerged between caregiver subgroups based on educational level of the caregiver, socio-economic status, hospitalization history and broad diagnostic categories. In addition, the care givers of patients with psychoses assigned significantly more positive ratings on actual experience for all the domains of interactional aspects of care. The findings have implications for further research and practice. PMID:25440563

  12. Emerging Technologies for Pediatric and Adult Trauma Care

    PubMed Central

    Moulton, Steven L.; Haley-Andrews, Stephanie; Mulligan, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the Review Current EMS protocols rely on provider directed care for evaluation, management and triage of injured patients from the field to a trauma center. New methods to quickly diagnose, support and coordinate the movement of trauma patients from the field to the most appropriate trauma center are in development. These methods will enhance trauma care and promote trauma system development. Recent Findings Recent advances in machine learning, statistical methods, device integration and wireless communication are giving rise to new methods for vital sign data analysis and a new generation of transport monitors. These monitors will collect and synchronize exponentially growing amounts of vital sign data with electronic patient care information. The application of advanced statistical methods to these complex clinical data sets has the potential to reveal many important physiological relationships and treatment effects. Summary Several emerging technologies are converging to yield a new generation of smart sensors and tightly integrated transport monitors. These technologies will assist pre-hospital providers in quickly identifying and triaging the most severely injured children and adults to the most appropriate trauma centers. They will enable the development of real-time clinical support systems of increasing complexity, able to provide timelier, more cost-effective, autonomous care. PMID:20407375

  13. Understanding Emerging Adulthood from a Goal-Setting Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulman, Shmuel; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2010-01-01

    The chapter first introduces the concept of emerging adulthood as a period of life that is characterized by instabilities and fluctuations. Then, the role of goal setting and aspirations in individual development during this stage of life is discussed. Following this, seven chapters of the present special issue are introduced, and the ways in…

  14. 64. FORWARD EMERGENCY DIESEL GENERATOR SET STARBOARD LOOKING TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    64. FORWARD EMERGENCY DIESEL GENERATOR SET - STARBOARD LOOKING TO PORT SHOWING BOTTOM HALF OF FAIRBANKS MORSE 36D81/8 TEN CYLINDER DIESEL ENGINE SERIAL #951230 AND GENERAL ELECTRIC 1,000KW GENERATOR KVA 1250, RPM 720, SERIAL #6920274. - U.S.S. HORNET, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Sinclair Inlet, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  15. 65. FORWARD EMERGENCY DIESEL GENERATOR SET AFT LOOKING FORWARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. FORWARD EMERGENCY DIESEL GENERATOR SET - AFT LOOKING FORWARD SHOWING TOP HALF OF FAIRBANKS MORSE 36D81/8 TEN CYLINDER DIESEL ENGINE SERIAL #951230 AND EXHAUST SYSTEM. - U.S.S. HORNET, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Sinclair Inlet, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  16. Quality Care and Patient Safety in the Pediatric Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Johanna R; Suresh, Srinivasan; Saladino, Richard A

    2016-04-01

    Over the past 15 years, with alarming and illustrative reports released from the Institute of Medicine, quality improvement and patient safety have come to the forefront of medical care. This article reviews quality improvement frameworks and methodology and the use of evidence-based guidelines for pediatric emergency medicine. Top performance measures in pediatric emergency care are described, with examples of ongoing process and quality improvement work in our pediatric emergency department. PMID:27017034

  17. Emerging Trends of Herbal Care in Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Gunjan; Jalaluddin, Md.; Rout, Purnendu; Mohanty, Rajat; Dileep, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    Herbs are staging a comeback and herbal ‘renaissance’ is happening all over the globe. The herbal products, today, symbolize safety, in contrast to the synthetics that are regarded as unsafe to humans and the environment. A herb, botanically speaking, is any plant that lacks the woody tissue which is characteristic of shrubs or trees. More specifically, herbs are plants which are used medicinally or for their flavour or scent. Herbs with medicinal properties are a useful and an effective source of treatment for various disease processes. Herbal extracts have been successfully used in dentistry as tooth cleaning and antimicrobial plaque agents. The use of herbal medicines continues to expand rapidly across the world. Many people take herbal medicines or herbal products now for their health care in different national healthcare settings. Herbal extracts have been used in dentistry for reducing inflammation, as antimicrobial plaque agents, for preventing release of histamine and as antiseptics, antioxidants, antimicrobials, antifungals, antibacterials, antivirals and analgesics. They also aid in healing and are effective in controlling microbial plaque in gingivitis and periodontitis, thereby improving immunity. PMID:24086929

  18. Emerging trends of herbal care in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gunjan; Jalaluddin, Md; Rout, Purnendu; Mohanty, Rajat; Dileep, C L

    2013-08-01

    Herbs are staging a comeback and herbal 'renaissance' is happening all over the globe. The herbal products, today, symbolize safety, in contrast to the synthetics that are regarded as unsafe to humans and the environment. A herb, botanically speaking, is any plant that lacks the woody tissue which is characteristic of shrubs or trees. More specifically, herbs are plants which are used medicinally or for their flavour or scent. Herbs with medicinal properties are a useful and an effective source of treatment for various disease processes. Herbal extracts have been successfully used in dentistry as tooth cleaning and antimicrobial plaque agents. The use of herbal medicines continues to expand rapidly across the world. Many people take herbal medicines or herbal products now for their health care in different national healthcare settings. Herbal extracts have been used in dentistry for reducing inflammation, as antimicrobial plaque agents, for preventing release of histamine and as antiseptics, antioxidants, antimicrobials, antifungals, antibacterials, antivirals and analgesics. They also aid in healing and are effective in controlling microbial plaque in gingivitis and periodontitis, thereby improving immunity. PMID:24086929

  19. Respiratory protection in the health care setting.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, J A

    1997-01-01

    Respiratory protection is of increased importance due to the resurgence of tuberculosis. This chapter examines protective devices and regulations and explains how a program can be designed to minimize workplace hazards. Of particular value is a table detailing 12 high-efficiency particulate air respirators that meet criteria set by the Centers for Disease Control and the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health. PMID:9353814

  20. Building a transdisciplinary approach to palliative care in an acute care setting.

    PubMed

    Daly, Donnelle; Matzel, Stephen Chavez

    2013-01-01

    A transdisciplinary team is an essential component of palliative and end-of-life care. This article will demonstrate how to develop a transdisciplinary approach to palliative care, incorporating nursing, social work, spiritual care, and pharmacy in an acute care setting. Objectives included: identifying transdisciplinary roles contributing to care in the acute care setting; defining the palliative care model and mission; identifying patient/family and institutional needs; and developing palliative care tools. Methods included a needs assessment and the development of assessment tools, an education program, community resources, and a patient satisfaction survey. After 1 year of implementation, the transdisciplinary palliative care team consisted of seven palliative care physicians, two social workers, two chaplains, a pharmacist, and End-of-Life Nursing Consortium (ELNEC) trained nurses. Palomar Health now has a palliative care service with a consistent process for transdisciplinary communication and intervention for adult critical care patients with advanced, chronic illness. PMID:23977778

  1. Innovations to reduce demand and crowding in emergency care; a review study.

    PubMed

    Mason, Suzanne; Mountain, Gail; Turner, Janette; Arain, Mubashir; Revue, Eric; Weber, Ellen J

    2014-01-01

    Emergency Department demand continues to rise in almost all high-income countries, including those with universal coverage and a strong primary care network. Many of these countries have been experimenting with innovative methods to stem demand for acute care, while at the same time providing much needed services that can prevent Emergency Department attendance and later hospital admissions. A large proportion of patients comprise of those with minor illnesses that could potentially be seen by a health care provider in a primary care setting. The increasing number of visits to Emergency Departments not only causes delay in urgent care provision but also increases the overall cost. In the UK, the National Health Service (NHS) has made a number of efforts to strengthen primary healthcare services to increase accessibility to healthcare as well as address patients' needs by introducing new urgent care services. PMID:25212060

  2. Confronting Ethical and Regulatory Challenges of Emergency Care Research With Conscious Patients.

    PubMed

    Dickert, Neal W; Brown, Jeremy; Cairns, Charles B; Eaves-Leanos, Aaliyah; Goldkind, Sara F; Kim, Scott Y H; Nichol, Graham; O'Conor, Katie J; Scott, Jane D; Sinert, Richard; Wendler, David; Wright, David W; Silbergleit, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Barriers to informed consent are ubiquitous in the conduct of emergency care research across a wide range of conditions and clinical contexts. They are largely unavoidable; can be related to time constraints, physical symptoms, emotional stress, and cognitive impairment; and affect patients and surrogates. US regulations permit an exception from informed consent for certain clinical trials in emergency settings, but these regulations have generally been used to facilitate trials in which patients are unconscious and no surrogate is available. Most emergency care research, however, involves conscious patients, and surrogates are often available. Unfortunately, there is neither clear regulatory guidance nor established ethical standards in regard to consent in these settings. In this report-the result of a workshop convened by the National Institutes of Health Office of Emergency Care Research and Department of Bioethics to address ethical challenges in emergency care research-we clarify potential gaps in ethical understanding and federal regulations about research in emergency care in which limited involvement of patients or surrogates in enrollment decisions is possible. We propose a spectrum of approaches directed toward realistic ethical goals and a research and policy agenda for addressing these issues to facilitate clinical research necessary to improve emergency care. PMID:26707358

  3. Nosocomial infection control in healthcare settings: Protection against emerging infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chuanxi; Wang, Shengyong

    2016-01-01

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) outbreak in Korea in 2015 may be attributable to poor nosocomial infection control procedures implemented. Strict infection control measures were taken in the hospital where an imported case with MERS was treated in southern China and 53 health care workers were confirmed to be MERS-CoV negative. Infection control in healthcare settings, in which patients with emerging infectious diseases such as MERS, Ebola virus disease, and the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) are diagnosed and treated, are often imperfect. When it comes to emerging or unknown infectious diseases, before the imported case was finally identified or community transmission was reported, cases have often occurred in clusters in healthcare settings. Nosocomial infection control measures should be further strengthened among the workers and inpatients in designated healthcare settings that accommodate suspected cases suffering from emerging or unknown infectious diseases. PMID:27068809

  4. Asthma Care in Resource-Poor Settings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Asthma prevalence in low-to middle-income countries is at least the same or higher than in rich countries, but with increased severity. Lack of control in these settings is due to various factors such as low accessibility to effective medications, multiple and uncoordinated weak infrastructures of medical services for the management of chronic diseases such as asthma, poor compliance with prescribed therapy, lack of asthma education, and social and cultural factors. There is an urgent requirement for the implementation of better ways to treat asthma in underserved populations, enhancing the access to preventive medications and educational approaches with modern technological methods. PMID:23282401

  5. Sedation in the intensive care setting

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Christopher G; McGrane, Stuart; Pandharipande, Pratik P

    2012-01-01

    Critically ill patients are routinely provided analgesia and sedation to prevent pain and anxiety, permit invasive procedures, reduce stress and oxygen consumption, and improve synchrony with mechanical ventilation. Regional preferences, patient history, institutional bias, and individual patient and practitioner variability, however, create a wide discrepancy in the approach to sedation of critically ill patients. Untreated pain and agitation increase the sympathetic stress response, potentially leading to negative acute and long-term consequences. Oversedation, however, occurs commonly and is associated with worse clinical outcomes, including longer time on mechanical ventilation, prolonged stay in the intensive care unit, and increased brain dysfunction (delirium and coma). Modifying sedation delivery by incorporating analgesia and sedation protocols, targeted arousal goals, daily interruption of sedation, linked spontaneous awakening and breathing trials, and early mobilization of patients have all been associated with improvements in patient outcomes and should be incorporated into the clinical management of critically ill patients. To improve outcomes, including time on mechanical ventilation and development of acute brain dysfunction, conventional sedation paradigms should be altered by providing necessary analgesia, incorporating propofol or dexmedetomidine to reach arousal targets, and reducing benzodiazepine exposure. PMID:23204873

  6. Point-of-care ultrasonography by pediatric emergency medicine physicians.

    PubMed

    Marin, Jennifer R; Lewiss, Resa E

    2015-04-01

    Emergency physicians have used point-of-care ultrasonography since the 1990 s. Pediatric emergency medicine physicians have more recently adopted this technology. Point-of-care ultrasonography is used for various scenarios, particularly the evaluation of soft tissue infections or blunt abdominal trauma and procedural guidance. To date, there are no published statements from national organizations specifically for pediatric emergency physicians describing the incorporation of point-of-care ultrasonography into their practice. This document outlines how pediatric emergency departments may establish a formal point-of-care ultrasonography program. This task includes appointing leaders with expertise in point-of-care ultrasonography, effectively training and credentialing physicians in the department, and providing ongoing quality assurance reviews. PMID:25825532

  7. [Structure, organization and capacity problems in emergency medical services, emergency admission and intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Dick, W

    1994-01-01

    Emergency medicine is subjected worldwide to financial stringencies and organizational evaluations of cost-effectiveness. The various links in the chain of survival are affected differently. Bystander assistance or bystander CPR is available in only 30% of the emergencies, response intervals--if at all required by legislation--are observed to only a limited degree or are too extended for survival in cardiac arrest. A single emergency telephone number is lacking. Too many different phone numbers for emergency reporting result in confusion and delays. Organizational realities are not fully overcome and impair efficiency. The position of the emergency physician in the EMS System is inadequately defined, the qualification of too many emergency physicians are unsatisfactory. In spite of this, emergency physicians are frequently forced to answer out-of-hospital emergency calls. Conflicts between emergency physicians and EMTs may be overcome by providing both groups with comparable qualifications as well as by providing an explicit definition of emergency competence. A further source of conflict occurs at the juncture of prehospital and inhospital emergency care in the emergency department. Deficiencies on either side play a decisive role. At least in principle there are solutions to the deficiencies in the EMSS and in intensive care medicine. They are among others: Adequate financial compensation of emergency personnel, availability of sufficient numbers of highly qualified personnel, availability of a central receiving area with an adjacent emergency ward, constant information flow to the dispatch center on the number of available emergency beds, maintaining 5% of all beds as emergency beds, establishing intermediate care facilities. Efficiency of emergency physician activities can be demonstrated in polytraumatized patients or in patients with ventricular fibrillation or acute myocardial infarction, in patients with acute myocardial insufficiency and other emergency

  8. Noddings's caring ethics theory applied in a paediatric setting.

    PubMed

    Lundqvist, Anita; Nilstun, Tore

    2009-04-01

    Since the 1990s, numerous studies on the relationship between parents and their children have been reported on in the literature and implemented as a philosophy of care in most paediatric units. The purpose of this article is to understand the process of nurses' care for children in a paediatric setting by using Noddings's caring ethics theory. Noddings's theory is in part described from a theoretical perspective outlining the basic idea of the theory followed by a critique of her work. Important conceptions in her theory are natural caring (reception, relation, engrossment, motivational displacement, reciprocity) and ethical caring (physical self, ethical self, and ethical ideal). As a nurse one holds a duty of care to patients and, in exercising this duty, the nurse must be able to develop a relationship with the patient including giving the patient total authenticity in a 'feeling with' the patient. Noddings's theory is analysed and described in three examples from the paediatrics. In the first example, the nurse cared for the patient in natural caring while in the second situation, the nurse strived for the ethical caring of the patient. In the third example, the nurse rejected the impulse to care and deliberately turned her back to ethics and abandoned her ethical caring. According to the Noddings's theory, caring for the patient enables the nurse to obtain ethical insights from the specific type of nursing care which forms an important contribution to an overall increase of an ethical consciousness in the nurse. PMID:19291199

  9. [Setting up supportive care in oncology: reflexions and suggestions.].

    PubMed

    Colombat, P; Antoun, S; Aubry, R; Banterla-Dadon, I; Barruel, F; Bonel, J-M; Bonnin, J-C; Chassignol, L; Chollet, A; Chvetzoff, G; D'Hérouville, D; Drouart, M; Gaillet, H; Ganem, G; Krakowski, I; Morigault, M-O; Nallet, G; Rolland, J; Suc, A

    2009-09-01

    A group of 19 health professionals implicated in supportive care wanted to suggest some reflexions for organization, setting and evaluation of the supportive care in institutions and health territories. The suggested organization must be applicable to any cancer patient and the place of the care whatever the age, the stage of the disease; in the future, must be applicable to any patient with serious chronic illness. This organization must allow to optimize the accompaniment and the care of the patients and their close relations by 1) precise and regular analysis of their needs; 2) the respect of the continuity of the health care; 3) the setting of collaborative practice and transversality in the care. It is not a new medical speciality but a coordination of competences for patients and their families. PMID:19903599

  10. Examination of Negative Peer Contagion in a Residential Care Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huefner, Jonathan C.; Ringle, Jay L.

    2012-01-01

    There has been ongoing concern about the negative impact of residential treatment on youth in care. Research examining the impact of negative peer influence in juvenile justice, education, and residential care settings is reviewed. A study was conducted to examine the impact of negative peer contagion on the level of problem behavior in a…

  11. Social Antecedents of Learned Helplessness in the Health Care Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Kenneth

    1982-01-01

    Examines social factors that lead to the development of learned helplessness in elderly persons in the health care setting, including stereotyping elderly by health care professionals, effects of unequal interpersonal exchange, and behaviors associated with sick and healer roles. Discusses programatic and educational prophylaxis and solutions to…

  12. Management of Teenage Pregnancies in Three Different Health Care Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatelbaum, Robert

    1978-01-01

    This paper reports a retrospective study undertaken to determine if differences existed in obstetric outcome, contraceptive usage, and repeat pregnancy rates of teenage patients cared for in three different health care settings: the Rochester Adolescent Maternity Project (RAMP), a traditional obstetric clinic, and a neighborhood health center.…

  13. Assessing Health Literacy in Diverse Primary Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCune, Renee L.

    2010-01-01

    Patient health literacy skills are critical to effective healthcare communication and safe care delivery in primary care settings. Methods and strategies to identify patient health literacy (HL) capabilities and provider/staff knowledge, attitudes and beliefs (KAB) regarding HL must be known before addressing provider/staff communication skills.…

  14. The Role of Child Care Settings in Obesity Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Story, Mary; Kaphingst, Karen M.; French, Simone

    2006-01-01

    Mary Story, Karen Kaphingst, and Simone French argue that researchers and policymakers focused on childhood obesity have paid insufficient attention to child care. Although child care settings can be a major force in shaping children's dietary intake, physical activity, and energy balance--and thus in combating the childhood obesity…

  15. The current scenario of emergency care policies in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The regulation of emergency care has featured prominently in Brazil’s federal health agenda since the 2000s. The aim of this study was to review up to the present day the implementation of the National Emergency Care Policy. Methods The methods employed were documental review, analysis of official data and 11 interviews conducted with federal, state and local managers. The results were analyzed using Giddens’ Structuration Theory, relating the cognitive abilities of the agents to their action strategies, in view of the structural dimensions, rules and resources provided by the federal administration. Results Federal policy for emergency care in Brazil can be divided into three stages: from 1998 to 2003, the initial regulation; from 2004 to 2008, the expansion of the Mobile Emergency Medical Services (SAMU, in Brazil); and from 2009 onwards, the implementation of stationary pre-hospital care facilities, known as Emergency Care Units (UPA). The structuration elements identified for the emergency care policy were the public health system guidelines, legislation, standards and federal financing. Significant restrictions were found such as lack of hospital beds and intensive care treatment, gaps in the information system for producing evidence for management, ineffective Management Committees, as well as a low degree of commitment among physicians to the services. Conclusion Considering the financial constraints imposed on the SUS (Brazilian Unified Health System), emergency care was identified as a political priority with financial support. The individual actions by emergency care workers and governmental agents typified the first period of the policy, structuring the basis and producing changes in the circumstances of action. Federal strategies can be equated to the rules and resources provided to support the implementation process of the policy. PMID:23425342

  16. Providing adolescent sexual health care in the pediatric emergency department: views of health care providers

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Melissa K.; Mollen, Cynthia J.; O’Malley, Donna; Owens, Rhea L.; Maliszewski, Genevieve A.; Goggin, Kathy; Patricia, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to explore health care providers’ (HCPs) attitudes and beliefs about adolescent sexual health care provision in the emergency department (ED) and to identify barriers to a role of a health educator-based intervention. Methods We conducted focused, semi-structured interviews of HCPs from the ED and Adolescent Clinic of a children’s hospital. The interview guide was based on the Theory of Planned Behavior and its constructs: attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and intention to facilitate care. We used purposive sampling and enrollment continued until themes were saturated. Interviews were recorded and transcribed. Transcripts were analyzed using directed content analysis. Results Twenty-nine interviews were required for saturation. Participants were 12 physicians, 12 nurses, 3 nurse practitioners and 2 social workers; the majority (83%) were female. Intention to facilitate care was influenced by HCP perception of 1) their professional role, 2) the role of the ED (focused vs. expanded care), and 3) need for patient safety. HCPs identified three practice referents: patients/families, peers and administrators, and professional organizations. HCPs perceived limited behavioral control over care delivery because of time constraints, confidentiality issues, and comfort level. There was overall support for a health educator and many felt the educator could help overcome barriers to care. Conclusion Despite challenges unique to the ED, HCPs were supportive of the intervention and perceived the health educator as a resource to improve adolescent care and services. Future research should evaluate efficacy and costs of a health educator in this setting. PMID:24457494

  17. Emergency medical care in developing countries: is it worthwhile?

    PubMed Central

    Razzak, Junaid A.; Kellermann, Arthur L.

    2002-01-01

    Prevention is a core value of any health system. Nonetheless, many health problems will continue to occur despite preventive services. A significant burden of diseases in developing countries is caused by time-sensitive illnesses and injuries, such as severe infections, hypoxia caused by respiratory infections, dehydration caused by diarrhoea, intentional and unintentional injuries, postpartum bleeding, and acute myocardial infarction. The provision of timely treatment during life-threatening emergencies is not a priority for many health systems in developing countries. This paper reviews evidence indicating the need to develop and/or strengthen emergency medical care systems in these countries. An argument is made for the role of emergency medical care in improving the health of populations and meeting expectations for access to emergency care. We consider emergency medical care in the community, during transportation, and at first-contact and regional referral facilities. Obstacles to developing effective emergency medical care include a lack of structural models, inappropriate training foci, concerns about cost, and sustainability in the face of a high demand for services. A basic but effective level of emergency medical care responds to perceived and actual community needs and improves the health of populations. PMID:12481213

  18. Emergency Wound Care After a Natural Disaster

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: About CDC.gov . Natural Disasters and Severe Weather Earthquakes Being Prepared Emergency Supplies Home Hazards Indoor ... Heat Prevention Guide (Part 3 of 3) Hot Weather Tips Heat Stress in Older Adults FAQs Extreme ...

  19. The Influence of Setting on Care Coordination for Childhood Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, R. Patrick; Stoll, Shelley C.; Bryant-Stephens, Tyra; Janevic, Mary R.; Lara, Marielena; Ohadike, Yvonne U.; Persky, Victoria; Ramos-Valencia, Gilberto; Uyeda, Kimberly; Malveaux, Floyd J.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma affects 7.1 million children in the United States, disproportionately burdening African American and Latino children. Barriers to asthma control include insufficient patient education and fragmented care. Care coordination represents a compelling approach to improve quality of care and address disparities in asthma. The sites of The Merck Childhood Asthma Network Care Coordination Programs implemented different models of care coordination to suit specific settings—school district, clinic or health care system, and community—and organizational structures. A variety of qualitative data sources were analyzed to determine the role setting played in the manifestation of care coordination at each site. There were inherent strengths and challenges of implementing care coordination in each of the settings, and each site used unique strategies to deliver their programs. The relationship between the lead implementing unit and entities that provided (1) access to the priority population and (2) clinical services to program participants played a critical role in the structure of the programs. The level of support and infrastructure provided by these entities to the lead implementing unit influenced how participants were identified and how asthma care coordinators were integrated into the clinical care team. PMID:26232778

  20. Use of the emergency department for nonurgent care during regular business hours.

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, M G; Grover, S A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize the patient population seeking care for nonurgent medical problems at an emergency department during regular business hours and to determine why these patients chose the emergency department over alternative care sites. DESIGN: Patient survey (self-administered questionnaire). SETTING: Emergency department at a tertiary care hospital in Montreal. PATIENTS: All ambulatory patients presenting on weekdays between 8 am and 5 pm from Nov. 10 to Dec. 8, 1993, whose condition was determined to be nonurgent. Eligible patients had to be residents of Montreal, who did not have a pre-arranged consultation at the emergency department. Of 202 consecutive eligible patients, 200 agreed to participate. OUTCOME MEASURES: Description of events leading to the visit, including possible attempts by patients to contact their regular physician; patients' knowledge of alternative care options such as provincial CLSGs (centres locaux des services communautaires) and private walk-in clinics. RESULTS: Of the 200 patients 152 (76%) stated that they had not visited an emergency department within the previous month, and only 10 (5%) stated that they were in extreme pain. At least 70% were aware of alternative care options, however, 120 (60%) felt that the emergency department was the best place for them to receive care for their medical problem. In all, 81 patients (40%) were referred to the emergency department; 62 (77%) were referred by a health care professional, 46 (57%) by a physician. CONCLUSION: Most patients are aware of alternatives to the emergency department for care of nonurgent medical problems. Nevertheless, a large number are being referred to the emergency department during regular business hours by health care professionals. This inefficient use of expensive hospital resources requires further investigation. PMID:8616737

  1. Creating Discursive Order at the End of Life: The Role of Genres in Palliative Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schryer, Catherine; McDougall, Allan; Tait, Glendon R.; Lingard, Lorelei

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates an emerging practice in palliative care: dignity therapy. Dignity therapy is a psychotherapeutic intervention that its proponents assert has clinically significant positive impacts on dying patients. Dignity therapy consists of a physician asking a patient a set of questions about his or her life and returning to the…

  2. Emerging trends in health care finance.

    PubMed

    Sterns, J B

    1994-01-01

    Access to capital will become more difficult. Capital access is dependent on ability to repay debt, which, in turn, is dependent on internally generated cash flows. Under any health care reform proposal, revenue inflows will be slowed. The use of corporate finance techniques to limit financial risk and lower cost will be a permanent response to fundamental changes to the health care system. These changes will result in greater balance sheet management, centralized capital allocation, and alternative sources of capital. PMID:7614219

  3. [Specific features of emergency dental care in pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Anisimova, E N; Axamit, L A; Manukhina, E I; Letunova, N Yu; Golikova, A M; Fedotova, T M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the algorithm of safe emergency dental care in pregnant patients. Eighty-five pregnant women aged 20-35 were included in the study. The paper presents elaborated state-of-the-art guidelines for emergency dental care in pregnant patients. Articaine 4% with epinephrine 1:200,000 is recommended as a choice agent for local anesthesia in these patients. PMID:27239992

  4. Health reform: setting the agenda for long term care.

    PubMed

    Hatch, O G; Wofford, H; Willging, P R; Pomeroy, E

    1993-06-01

    The White House Task Force on National Health Care Reform, headed by First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, is expected to release its prescription for health care reform this month. From the outset, Clinton's mandate was clear: to provide universal coverage while reining in costs for delivering quality health care. Before President Clinton was even sworn into office, he had outlined the major principles that would shape the health reform debate. Global budgeting would establish limits on all health care expenditures, thereby containing health costs. Under a system of managed competition, employers would form health alliances for consumers to negotiate for cost-effective health care at the community level. So far, a basic approach to health care reform has emerged. A key element is universal coverage--with an emphasis on acute, preventive, and mental health care. Other likely pieces are employer-employee contributions to health care plans, laws that guarantee continued coverage if an individual changes jobs or becomes ill, and health insurance alliances that would help assure individual access to low-cost health care. What still is not clear is the extent to which long term care will be included in the basic benefits package. A confidential report circulated by the task force last month includes four options for long term care: incremental Medicaid reform; a new federal/state program to replace Medicaid; a social insurance program for home and community-based services; or full social insurance for long term care. Some work group members have identified an additional option: prefunded long term care insurance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:10126659

  5. Cognitive design of a digital desk for the emergency room setting

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Magnus; Prytz, Erik; Rybing, Jonas; Timpka, Toomas

    2014-01-01

    Digital desk technology has a still mainly unexplored potential to support the everyday work of collaborating clinicians. This paper presents ER Desk – a digital desk that was designed to specifically support a team of healthcare professionals working in an emergency room setting. The underlying design requirements were elicited in a comprehensive distributed cognition study of paper-based practices in an emergency room of a middle-sized Swedish hospital. We present the user interface and visualization requirements for digital desks for small clinical emergency room teams. Moreover, we discuss key design issues more generally with a focus on supporting team awareness, cognition, and collaborative routines of healthcare personnel working in clinical environments such as emergency rooms and intensive care units. PMID:25954329

  6. Evidence Based Order Sets as a Nursing Care Planning System

    PubMed Central

    LaCrosse, Lisa M.; Heermann, Judith; Azevedo, Karen; Sorrentino, Catherine; Straub, Dawn; O'Dowd, Gloria

    2002-01-01

    The process for developing the nursing care planning (NCP) function for integration into a clinical information system (CIS) will be described. This NCP system uses evidence based order sets or interventions that are specific to a problem with associated patient focused goals or outcomes. The problem, order set, goal framework will eventually be used by all disciplines in the patient focused record.

  7. Comparing Chronic Pain Treatment Seekers in Primary Care versus Tertiary Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Fink-Miller, Erin L.; Long, Dustin M.; Gross, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients frequently seek treatment for chronic nonmalignant pain in primary care settings. Compared with physicians who have completed extensive specialization (eg, fellowships) in pain management, primary care physicians receive much less formal training in managing chronic pain. While chronic pain represents a complicated condition in its own right, the recent increase in opioid prescriptions further muddles treatment. It is unknown whether patients with chronic pain seeking treatment in primary care differ from those seeking treatment in tertiary care settings. This study sought to determine whether patients with chronic pain in primary care reported less pain, fewer psychological variables related to pain, and lower risk of medication misuse/abuse compared with those in tertiary care. Methods Data collected from patients with chronic pain in primary care settings and tertiary care settings were analyzed for significant differences using Wilcoxon rank sum tests, Fisher exact tests, and linear regression. A host of variables among populations, including demographics, self-reported pain severity, psychological variables related to pain, and risk for opioid misuse and abuse, were compared. Results Findings suggest that primary care patients with chronic pain were similar to those in tertiary care on a host of indices and reported more severe pain. There were no significant group differences for risk of medication misuse or abuse. Conclusion It seems that primary care physicians care for a complicated group of patients with chronic pain that rivals the complexity of those seen in specialized tertiary care pain management facilities. PMID:25201929

  8. Estimating Uncompensated Care Charges at Rural Hospital Emergency Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Kevin J.; Moore, Charity G.; Probst, Janice C.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Rural hospitals face multiple financial burdens. Due to federal law, emergency departments (ED) provide a gateway for uninsured and self-pay patients to gain access to treatment. It is unknown how much uncompensated care in rural hospitals is due to ED visits. Purpose: To develop a national estimate of uncompensated care from patients…

  9. A patient classification system for emergency events in home care.

    PubMed

    Sienkiewicz, Josephine; Wilkinson, Ginny; Cubbage, Betsy

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the development of a uniform classification system that provides a way for home care agencies to classify patient priority needs for evacuation, transport, supportive care, and use of staffing resources in an emergency/disaster situation/bioterroristic event. PMID:17556919

  10. Pediatric Mental Health Emergencies and Special Health Care Needs

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Thomas H.; Katz, Emily R.; Duffy, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Children with mental health problems are increasingly being evaluated and treated by both pediatric primary care and pediatric emergency physicians. This article focuses on the epidemiology, evaluation, and management of the two most common pediatric mental health emergencies, suicidal and homicidal/aggressive patients, as well as the equally challenging population of children with autism or other developmental disabilities. PMID:24093903

  11. Ethical matters in rural integrated primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Mullin, Daniel; Stenger, Joseph

    2013-03-01

    Integrated primary care is particularly valuable to rural communities. Behavioral health care is often in short supply, and small or close-knit communities can intensify the stigma of seeking specialty mental health in rural settings. These and other barriers result in reduced access to needed behavioral health care. Nonetheless, rural practice of integrated primary care presents unique challenges to practitioners of multiple disciplines, including issues of competence, confidentiality, and dual relationships. This article provides an illustrative vignette to describe ethical issues in the rural practice of integrated primary care. It will review discipline-specific guidance in approaching these challenges and will offer recommendations for addressing disparities in the approaches of various disciplines engaged in the practice of integrated primary care. PMID:23566130

  12. Emergent Subjectivity in Caring Institutions for Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severinsson, Susanne; Nord, Catharina

    2015-01-01

    We investigate how different mealtime situations help shape teenager and staff subjectivities in two Swedish residential care homes and a special school for girls and boys, 12-15 years old, with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties. Three mealtime networks are analysed using concepts from actor-network theory, treating architectural…

  13. Customer care. Patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting.

    PubMed

    Doering, G T

    1998-09-01

    The focus of the study was to prioritize six emergency medical service treatment factors in terms of their impact upon patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting. The six treatment areas analyzed were: EMS response time; medical care provided on scene; explanation of care by the provider; the provider's ability to reduce patient anxiety; the provider's ability to meet the patient's non-medical needs; and the level of courtesy/politeness shown by the EMS provider toward the patient. Telephone interviews were conducted with both patients and bystanders to obtain their perception of how well the system met their needs. The study analyzed how the six issues were rated and then evaluated the impact an individual's low score in a category had on that person's overall rating of the service provided. The overall satisfaction rating is not a calculated score, but an overall score specified by the respondent. The effect each issue had on the respondent's overall rating was determined by averaging the overall ratings for a category's low scorers, averaging the overall ratings for high scorers and then measuring the difference. Results of the study indicate that the factor with the greatest negative impact on patient satisfaction came from a perceived lack of crew courtesy and politeness. Respondents who indicated a fair to poor score in this category decreased their overall score by 60.2%. Ratings in other categories yielded the following results: When respondents rated the response time as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed an 18.4% decrease. When respondents rated the quality of medical care as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed a decrease of 22.6%. When the crew's ability to explain what was happening to the patient was rated as fair to poor, the average overall score dropped 33.6%. When the EMT's and medic's ability to reduce the patient's anxiety was rated fair to poor, average overall score declined by 32.6%. Finally, when the crew

  14. Skills required for maritime pre-hospital emergency care.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Pre-hospital emergency care (PHEC) in the military has undergone major changes during the last 10 years of warfighting in the land environment. Providing this care in the maritime environment presents several unique challenges. This paper examines the clinical capabilities required of a PHEC team in the maritime environment and how this role can be fulfilled as part of Role 2 Afloat. It applies to Pre-hospital emergency care projected from a hospital not to General Duties Medical Officers at Role 1. PMID:22558737

  15. Emergency neurological care of strokes and bleeds

    PubMed Central

    Birenbaum, Dale

    2010-01-01

    Ischemic stroke and brain hemorrhage are common and challenging problems faced by emergency physicians. In this article, important details in the diagnosis and clinical management of these neurological emergencies are presented with the following goals: 1) To provide a more comprehensive understanding of the approach to the identification and management of patients who have sustained ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes; 2) to explain the importance and application of commonly used national stroke scoring and outcome scales; 3) to improve the ability to recognize important aspects in the approach and comprehensive treatment of ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms; and 4) to demonstrate the difficulties in the neurological, neurosurgical, and endovascular treatment of these catastrophic diseases. PMID:20165722

  16. Getting a charge out of emergency care.

    PubMed

    Barton, Stephen; Bieker, Michael

    2007-10-01

    To help emergency department (ED) nurses effectively capture charge information, hospitals should create a one-page form that contains a list of possible charges for selection. Hospitals should use and maintain a formal protocol for ED visit charges so they can be consistently assigned. Hospitals that use coders to enter ED charges should give them workspace in the department so they can answer questions for the clinical staff and provide documentation training as needs arise. PMID:17953182

  17. Trampoline injury in New Zealand: emergency care.

    PubMed Central

    Hume, P A; Chalmers, D J; Wilson, B D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine trampoline related injuries resulting in emergency department attendance. METHODS: Cases were identified by searching free text descriptions of the circumstances of injury contained in the records of the emergency department of a large city hospital. RESULTS: 114 cases were identified for a 12 month period, giving an incidence rate of 108 per 100,000 population per year (95% confidence interval = 89 to 129) compared with 9.3 hospital admissions per 100,000 population per year (95% confidence interval = 8.3 to 10.4) for a corresponding period reported in earlier research from New Zealand. This suggested that for every one hospital admission there are approximately 12 emergency department attendances. Of the cases, 95% were aged less than 20 years. As for the earlier research, falls from the trampoline to the surrounding surface were the commonest cause of injury. In the present study, sprains and strains were the commonest type of injury (40%), and the body site most frequently involved was the lower limb (46%). CONCLUSIONS: The findings support the conclusion from earlier research that although existing trampoline standards address many of the issues relating to trampoline safety, the need remains for measures to reduce the impact of falls from the trampoline to the ground surface and to prohibit the use of trampolines as unsupervised "play equipment". PMID:9015596

  18. Emergency cardiac care. Moral, legal, and ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Peskin, R M; Siegelman, L I

    1995-07-01

    because the limited hours of training in conscious sedation provide less medical background than is acquired during training in deep sedation and general anesthesia. In addition, the dentist is ultimately responsible for the demeanor of his or her office and staff. In the prehospital dental office setting, the matter of converting a dental office team geared to efficient delivery of dental procedures, into a team primed to perform emergency cardiac care seems daunting. This is especially so if the dentist has little undergraduate or clinical preparation for managing life-threatening emergencies. Therefore, an emergency management plan (with oversight for its implementation by the dentist) is of paramount importance. PMID:7556798

  19. Research priorities for the influence of gender on diagnostic imaging choices in the emergency department setting.

    PubMed

    Ashurst, John V; Cherney, Alan R; Evans, Elizabeth M; Kennedy Hall, Michael; Hess, Erik P; Kline, Jeffrey A; Mitchell, Alice M; Mills, Angela M; Weigner, Michael B; Moore, Christopher L

    2014-12-01

    Diagnostic imaging is a cornerstone of patient evaluation in the acute care setting, but little effort has been devoted to understanding the appropriate influence of sex and gender on imaging choices. This article provides background on this issue and a description of the working group and consensus findings reached during the diagnostic imaging breakout session at the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Gender-specific Research in Emergency Care: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes." Our goal was to determine research priorities for how sex and gender may (or should) affect imaging choices in the acute care setting. Prior to the conference, the working group identified five areas for discussion regarding the research agenda in sex- and gender-based imaging using literature review and expert consensus. The nominal group technique was used to identify areas for discussion for common presenting complaints to the emergency department where ionizing radiation is often used for diagnosis: suspected pulmonary embolism, suspected kidney stone, lower abdominal pain with a concern for appendicitis, and chest pain concerning for coronary artery disease. The role of sex- and gender-based shared decision-making in diagnostic imaging decisions is also raised. PMID:25420885

  20. The Chronic Care Model and Diabetes Management in US Primary Care Settings: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Stellefson, Michael; Stopka, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Chronic Care Model (CCM) uses a systematic approach to restructuring medical care to create partnerships between health systems and communities. The objective of this study was to describe how researchers have applied CCM in US primary care settings to provide care for people who have diabetes and to describe outcomes of CCM implementation. Methods We conducted a literature review by using the Cochrane database of systematic reviews, CINAHL, and Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition and the following search terms: “chronic care model” (and) “diabet*.” We included articles published between January 1999 and October 2011. We summarized details on CCM application and health outcomes for 16 studies. Results The 16 studies included various study designs, including 9 randomized controlled trials, and settings, including academic-affiliated primary care practices and private practices. We found evidence that CCM approaches have been effective in managing diabetes in US primary care settings. Organizational leaders in health care systems initiated system-level reorganizations that improved the coordination of diabetes care. Disease registries and electronic medical records were used to establish patient-centered goals, monitor patient progress, and identify lapses in care. Primary care physicians (PCPs) were trained to deliver evidence-based care, and PCP office–based diabetes self-management education improved patient outcomes. Only 7 studies described strategies for addressing community resources and policies. Conclusion CCM is being used for diabetes care in US primary care settings, and positive outcomes have been reported. Future research on integration of CCM into primary care settings for diabetes management should measure diabetes process indicators, such as self-efficacy for disease management and clinical decision making. PMID:23428085

  1. Care of spinal cord injury in non-specialist settings.

    PubMed

    Rodger, Sian

    Patient with spinal cord injuries have individualised care routines to help prevent complications. Disruption to these routines following admission to non-specialist settings can have long-term consequences. This article focuses on the key long-term problems of pressure ulcers, bladder and bowel dysfunction, and autonomic dysreflexia. Nurses working on general wards need to consider how to manage these problems when caring for patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:27544957

  2. Methodology for developing quality indicators for the care of older people in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Compared with younger people, older people have a higher risk of adverse health outcomes when presenting to emergency departments. As the population ages, older people will make up an increasing proportion of the emergency department population. Therefore it is timely that consideration be given to the quality of care received by older persons in emergency departments, and to consideration of those older people with special needs. Particular attention will be focused on important groups of older people, such as patients with cognitive impairment, residents of long term care and patients with palliative care needs. This project will develop a suite of quality indicators focused on the care of older persons in the emergency department. Methods/design Following input from an expert panel, an initial set of structural, process, and outcome indicators will be developed based on thorough systematic search in the scientific literature. All initial indicators will be tested in eight emergency departments for their validity and feasibility. Results of the data from the field studies will be presented to the expert panel at a second meeting. A suite of Quality Indicators for the older emergency department population will be finalised following a formal voting process. Discussion The predicted burgeoning in the number of older persons presenting to emergency departments combined with the recognised quality deficiencies in emergency department care delivery to this population, highlight the need for a quality framework for the care of older persons in emergency departments. Additionally, high quality of care is associated with improved survival & health outcomes of elderly patients. The development of well-selected, validated and economical quality indicators will allow appropriate targeting of resources (financial, education or quality management) to improve quality in areas with maximum potential for improvement. PMID:24314126

  3. Computerized databases for emergency care: what impact on patient care?

    PubMed

    Pugh, G E; Tan, J K

    1994-12-01

    A field-based evaluation is conducted of a Clinical Computerized Information System (CCIS). Following training, the use of the CCIS database, word processing and other programs by thirteen full-time practicing emergency physicians in two urban emergency departments of a University-associated teaching hospital was studied over a one-year period. A tracking program automatically logged frequency and duration of use by the physicians, and user satisfaction was assessed by a reliable and validated questionnaire instrument. Based on utilization data and verbal reports of these physicians, CCIS database searching was not only found to be easy-to-learn but was readily accessible during emergency shifts. Individual physicians were found to perform an average of 3.5 searches per month lasting a mean search time of 8 min. Positive notes about the CCIS system included ease-of-use, accuracy of data, accessibility of system, and value of output while negative perceptions included a lack of integration with other systems, a lack of system completeness, and a high subscription cost. It was suggested that a less costly telephone link to a high-volume Centre would be desirable in actual implementation of the system. PMID:7869949

  4. Considerations for emergencies & disasters in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Ronni; Pouletsos, Cheryl; Combs, Adriann

    2008-01-01

    This article outlines outside principles of emergency and disaster planning for neonatal intensive care units and includes resources available to organizations to support planning and education, and considerations for nurses developing hospital-specific neonatal intensive care unit disaster plans. Hospital disaster preparedness programs and unit-specific policies and procedures are essential in facilitating an effective response to major incidents or disasters, whether they are man-made or natural. All disasters place extraordinary stress on existing resources, systems, and personnel. If nurses in neonatal intensive care units work collaboratively to identify essential services in disasters, the result could be safer care for vulnerable patients. PMID:18664900

  5. Dependence on Emergency Care among Young Adults in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Brett W.; Mani, Nandini; Halterman, Jill S.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Young adults have a high prevalence of many preventable diseases and frequently lack a usual source of ambulatory care, yet little is known about their use of the emergency department. OBJECTIVE To characterize care provided to young adults in the emergency department. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Cross-sectional analysis of visits from young adults age 20 to 29 presenting to emergency departments (N = 17,048) and outpatient departments (N = 14,443) in the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. MAIN MEASURES Visits to the emergency department compared to ambulatory offices. RESULTS Emergency department care accounts for 21.6% of all health care visits from young adults, more than children/adolescents (12.6%; P < 0.001) or patients 30 years and over (8.3%; P < 0.001). Visits from young adults were considerably more likely to occur in the emergency department for both injury-related and non-injury-related reasons compared to children/adolescents (P < 0.001) or older adults (P < 0.001). Visits from black young adults were more likely than whites to occur in the emergency department (36.2% vs.19.2%; P < 0.001) rather than outpatient offices. The proportion of care delivered to black young adults in the emergency department increased between 1996 and 2006 (25.9% to 38.5%; P = 0.001 for trend). In 2006, nearly half (48.5%) of all health care provided to young black men was delivered through emergency departments. The urgency of young adult emergency visits was less than other age groups and few (4.7%) resulted in hospital admission. CONCLUSIONS A considerable amount of care provided to young adults is delivered through emergency departments. Trends suggest that young adults are increasingly relying on emergency departments for health care, while being seen for less urgent indications. PMID:20306149

  6. Variation in Readmission Rates by Emergency Departments and Emergency Department Providers Caring for Patients After Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Siddhartha; Lin, Yu-Li; Nattinger, Ann B.; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Goodwin, James S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The role of the emergency department (ED) provider and ED facility in readmissions of recently discharged patients who visit the ED has not been studied. OBJECTIVE To determine the variation in readmission rates by ED facility and ED providers caring for patients after discharge. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study using multilevel, multi-variable models of 100% Texas Medicare claims data from the years 2007 to 2011. SETTING Texas acute-care hospitals and ED facilities. PATIENTS Medicare beneficiaries who visited an ED within 30 days of discharge from a hospital. INTERVENTION None. MEASUREMENT Readmission after an ED visit within 30 days of discharge from an initial hospitalization defined as a hospitalization starting the day of or the day following the ED visit. RESULTS The mean readmission rate following an ED visit was 52.67%. In 2-level models, 14.2% of ED providers readmitted significantly more patients (mean readmission rate of 67.2%) than the mean; 14.7% of ED providers readmitted significantly fewer patients (mean readmission rate of 36.8%) than the mean. After accounting for the ED facility in 3-level models, the variance for the ED providers decreased 65% from 0.2532 to 0.0893. CONCLUSIONS The risk of readmission varies by ED provider caring for patients after discharge. A large part of this variation is explained by the ED facility in which the ED providers practice. Thus, ED provider practices patterns and ED facility systems of care may be a target for interventions to reduce readmissions. PMID:26130443

  7. Health effects of training laypeople to deliver emergency care in underserviced populations: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Orkin, Aaron M; Curran, Jeffrey D; Fortune, Melanie K; McArthur, Allison; Mew, Emma J; Ritchie, Stephen D; Van de Velde, Stijn; VanderBurgh, David

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Disease Control Priorities Project recommends emergency care training for laypersons in low-resource settings, but evidence for these interventions has not yet been systematically reviewed. This review will identify the individual and community health effects of educating laypeople to deliver prehospital emergency care interventions in low-resource settings. Methods and analysis This systematic review addresses the following question: in underserviced populations and low-resource settings (P), does first aid or emergency care training or education for laypeople (I) confer any individual or community health benefit for emergency health conditions (O), in comparison with no training or other forms of education (C)? We restrict this review to studies reporting quantitatively measurable outcomes, and search 12 electronic bibliographic databases and grey literature sources. A team of expert content and methodology reviewers will conduct title and abstract screening and full-text review, using a custom-built online platform. Two investigators will independently extract methodological variables and outcomes related to patient-level morbidity and mortality and community-level effects on resilience or emergency care capacity. Two investigators will independently assess external validity, selection bias, performance bias, measurement bias, attrition bias and confounding. We will summarise the findings using a narrative approach to highlight similarities and differences between the gathered studies. Ethics and dissemination Formal ethical approval is not required. Results The results will be disseminated through a peer-reviewed publication and knowledge translation strategy. Review registration number CRD42014009685. PMID:27194315

  8. CURVES: a mnemonic for determining medical decision-making capacity and providing emergency treatment in the acute setting.

    PubMed

    Chow, Grant V; Czarny, Matthew J; Hughes, Mark T; Carrese, Joseph A

    2010-02-01

    The evaluation of medical decision-making capacity and provision of emergency treatment in the acute care setting may present a significant challenge for both physicians-in-training and attending physicians. Although absolutely essential to the proper care of patients, recalling criteria for decision-making capacity may prove cumbersome during a medical emergency. Likewise, the requirements for providing emergency treatment must be fulfilled. This article presents a mnemonic (CURVES: Choose and Communicate, Understand, Reason, Value, Emergency, Surrogate) that addresses the abilities a patient must possess in order to have decision-making capacity, as well as the essentials of emergency treatment. It may be used in conjunction with, or in place of, lengthier capacity-assessment tools, particularly when time is of the essence. In addition, the proposed tool assists the practitioner in deciding whether emergency treatment may be administered, and in documenting medical decisions made during an acute event. PMID:20133288

  9. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 13--Extrication from Automobiles. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This training manual for emergency medical technicians, one of 14 modules that comprise the Emergency Victim Care textbook, covers extrication of victims from automobiles. Objectives stated for the chapter are for the student to be able to describe how to use extrication equipment properly and the correct use of the long and short backboards to…

  10. Primary health care vs. emergency medical assistance: a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, W I M; Van Lerberghe, W I M; Boelaert, Marleen

    2002-03-01

    Primary health care (PHC) and emergency medical assistance (EMA) are discussed as two fundamentally different strategies of delivering health care. PHC is conceptualized as part of overall development, while EMA is delivered in disaster or emergency situations. The article contrasts the underlying paradigms, and the characteristics of care in PHC and EMA. It then analyzes the characteristics of PHC and EMA health services, their structure, management and support systems. In strategic aspects, it contrasts how managerial and financial sustainability are fundamentally different, and how the term accountability is used differently in development and disaster situations. However, while PHC and EMA, development and disaster, are clear opposite poles, many field situations in the developing world are today somewhere in-between. In such non-development, non-emergency situations, the objectives and approach will have to vary and an adapted strategy combining characteristics from PHC and EMA will have to be developed. PMID:11861586

  11. Suicide Prevention: An Emerging Priority For Health Care.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Michael F; Grumet, Julie Goldstein

    2016-06-01

    Suicide is a significant public health problem. It is the tenth leading cause of death in the United States, and the rate has risen in recent years. Many suicide deaths are among people recently seen or currently under care in clinical settings, but suicide prevention has not been a core priority in health care. In recent years, new treatment and management strategies have been developed, tested, and implemented in some organizations, but they are not yet widely used. This article examines the feasibility of improving suicide prevention in health care settings. In particular, we consider Zero Suicide, a model for better identification and treatment of patients at risk for suicide. The approach incorporates new tools for screening, treatment, and support; it has been deployed with promising results in behavioral health programs and primary care settings. Broader adoption of improved suicide prevention care may be an effective strategy for reducing deaths by suicide. PMID:27269026

  12. [Problems in the development of the emergency health care system].

    PubMed

    Hasić, Z; Sisić, I

    2000-01-01

    Since February 1994, during and after 4-years supervision of American specialists, Emergency department of Zenica hospital has been trying to implement Anglo-American working system within the hospital framework (video). Principles of quality functioning of Emergency Medical Service (EMS) are based on: Population that depends on different demographic factors and prevention programme (education of population, quality functioning of health legislation). Pre-hospital treatment depends on good quality communication and transport. Hospital treatment based on good functioning of Emergency department and Intensive care unit as well as proper coordination with other specialties. Proper implementation of items stated above depends on top-class teaching and compulsory periodical screening of attained knowledge and skills, properly organized communication, transport and technical equipment. Emergency medicine is not only a sum of urgencies from the existing conditions but a special medical discipline and it has special and unique approach to diagnosis and therapy of acute health disorders. Therefore, a main weakness in the development of emergency medicine is: no recognition of emergency medicine as a unique specialty in the most European countries, non-existing departments of emergency medicine at medical faculties, no unification of BiH emergency medicine system, undeveloped monitoring and development evaluation of emergency medicine etc. The World Association of Emergency Medicine should have an important role for emergency medicine recognition, and in its future development through links with health legislation and educational associations (ACLS, ATLS, APLS). PMID:11117025

  13. Identification of the development needs for the emergency care nursing workforce.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Val

    2008-01-01

    In 2000, the government launched their agenda to modernise the National Health Service to deliver high quality care. Within this agenda, Emergency Care provision was seen as a priority. Primarily national targets were set to reduce waiting times in Accident and Emergency (A&E) departments to no more than 4h from arrival to admission, transfer or discharge. National targets to improve access were further expanded into other facets of Emergency Care which together has resulted in major changes in the provision and delivery of emergency care. These changes have resulted in new ways of working across traditional professional and organisational boundaries resulting in the development of new professional roles; new services such as nurse led minor injury units, walk in centres, nurse practitioners and telephone triage in Out of Hours services. Locally, emergency care was a key priority in Shropshire and Staffordshire Strategic Health Authority. As a result the Workforce Development Directorate commissioned this project to scope the nursing workforce to identify nursing staff numbers; roles and titles; and educational preparation. Variations of new nursing roles and titles: educational preparation for all nursing staff; nursing staff establishments compared to national recommendations in particular Emergency Nurse Practitioners, Registered Children's Nurses and Healthcare Assistants and Out of Hours provision are key themes that have been presented together with recommendations. PMID:18519049

  14. Doctoral Clinical Geropsychology Training in a Primary Care Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zweig, Richard A.; Siegel, Lawrence; Hahn, Steven; Kuslansky, Gail; Byrne, Kathy; Fyffe, Denise; Passman, Vicki; Stewart, Douglas; Hinrichsen, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    Most older adults diagnosed with a mental disorder receive treatment in primary care settings that lack personnel skilled in geropsychological diagnosis and treatment. The Ferkauf Older Adult Program of Yeshiva University endeavors to bridge this gap by providing training in geriatric psychology, through coursework and diverse clinical practica,…

  15. Assessing the Physical and Architectural Features of Sheltered Care Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moos, Rudolf H.; Lemke, Sonne

    1980-01-01

    The Physical and Architectural Features Checklist (PAF) measures physical resources of sheltered care settings in terms of nine derived dimensions. Data show that facilities which have more physical resources are seen as attractive by outside observers and pleasant by residents. Cost is not related to any PAF dimension. (Author)

  16. Filipino Arts among Elders in Institutionalized Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Satuito, James Cyril B.; Satumba, Miko Anne E.; Segui, Diego Rey A.; Serquina, Faith Evelyn C.; Serrano, Lawrence Jan P.; Sevilla, Madelyn D.

    2011-01-01

    The use of traditional art in recreational therapies is unexplored. This paper, thus, attempts to surface the unique power of traditional Filipino arts (TFA) as synergizing lens in capturing the individual and the collective experiences of a select group of Filipino elderly in an institutionalized care setting relative to their feelings of…

  17. A Setting for Growth. Caring for Children No. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Lois B.; Leeper, Ethel M.

    Discussed are issues in the development of a physical setting for child care facilities to encourage the physical and psychological growth of preschool children. Questions to be considered in selecting a location are given to include available space and nearness to the neighborhood being served. Encouraged is consideration of mental stimulation,…

  18. Improving Quality of Emergency Care Through Integration of Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Martha; Wrenn, Glenda; Ede, Victor; Wilson, Nana; Custer, William; Risby, Emile; Claeys, Michael; Shelp, Frank E; Atallah, Hany; Mattox, Gail; Satcher, David

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to better integrate emergency medical and psychiatric care at a large urban public hospital, identify impact on quality improvement metrics, and reduce healthcare cost. A psychiatric fast track service was implemented as a quality improvement initiative. Data on disposition from the emergency department from January 2011 to May 2012 for patients impacted by the pilot were analyzed. 4329 patients from January 2011 to August 2011 (pre-intervention) were compared with 4867 patients from September 2011 to May 2012 (intervention). There was a trend of decline on overall quality metrics of time to triage and time from disposition to discharge. The trend analysis of the psychiatric length of stay and use of restraints showed significant reductions. Integrated emergency care models are evidence-based approach to ensuring that patients with mental health needs receive proper and efficient treatment. Results suggest that this may also improve overall emergency department's throughput. PMID:26711094

  19. Healing Environments: Integrative Medicine and Palliative Care in Acute Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Estores, Irene M; Frye, Joyce

    2015-09-01

    Conventional medicine is excellent at saving lives; however, it has little to offer to address the physical, mental, and emotional distress associated with life-threatening or life-limiting disease. An integrative approach to palliative care in acute care settings can meet this need by creating healing environments that support patients, families, and health care professionals. Mindful use of language enhances the innate healing response, improves communication, and invites patients and families to participate in their care. Staff should be offered access to skills training to cultivate compassion and mindful practice to enhance both patient and self-care. PMID:26333757

  20. Medication administration in the domiciliary care setting: whose role?

    PubMed

    Bradford, Jennie

    2012-11-01

    Unqualified social care workers are increasingly delegated the responsibility of both assisting with and administering medication in the domiciliary care setting. This article discusses the considerations required before the delegation of these roles by both commissioners and nurses. In particular, variations in training, policies and provision are explored with reference to the Care Quality Commission guidance and Nursing and Midwifery Council standards. The levels of support and their definitions are clarified for use in policy documents, and the effectiveness of devices used to support self-care are critiqued within a legal framework. The importance of joint working to provide a seamless medication management service are highlighted using reflections on examples from practice. PMID:23124424

  1. Caring for the injured child in settings of limited resource.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Jacob

    2016-02-01

    Children represent the most vulnerable members of our global society, a truth that is magnified when they are physically wounded. In much of the developed world, society has responded by offering protection in the form of law, injury prevention guidelines, and effective trauma systems to provide care for the injured child. Much of our world, though, remains afflicted by poverty and a lack of protective measures. As the globe becomes smaller by way of ease of travel and technology, surgeons are increasingly able to meet these children where they live and in doing so offer their hands and voices to care and protect these young ones. This article is intended as an overview of current issues in pediatric trauma care in the developing world as well as to offer some tips for the volunteer surgeon who may be involved in the care of the injured child in a setting of limited resource availability. PMID:26831134

  2. Emergencies and Critical Care of Commonly Kept Fowl.

    PubMed

    Sabater González, Mikel; Calvo Carrasco, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Fowl are birds belonging to one of the 2 biological orders, the game fowl or land fowl (Galliformes) and the waterfowl (Anseriformes). Studies of anatomic and molecular similarities suggest these two groups are close evolutionary relatives. Multiple fowl species have a long history of domestication. Fowl are considered food-producing animals in most countries and clinicians should follow legislation regarding reportable diseases and antibiotic use, even if they are pets. This article reviews aspects of emergency care for most commonly kept fowl, including triage, patient assessment, diagnostic procedures, supportive care, short-term hospitalization, and common emergency presentations. PMID:26948266

  3. Architecture of a prehospital emergency patient care report system (PEPRS).

    PubMed

    Majeed, Raphael W; Stöhr, Mark R; Röhrig, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, prehospital emergency care adapted to the technology shift towards tablet computers and mobile computing. In particular, electronic patient care report (e-PCR) systems gained considerable attention and adoption in prehospital emergency medicine [1]. On the other hand, hospital information systems are already widely adopted. Yet, there is no universal solution for integrating prehospital emergency reports into electronic medical records of hospital information systems. Previous projects either relied on proprietary viewing workstations or examined and transferred only data for specific diseases (e.g. stroke patients[2]). Using requirements engineering and a three step software engineering approach, this project presents a generic architecture for integrating prehospital emergency care reports into hospital information systems. Aim of this project is to describe a generic architecture which can be used to implement data transfer and integration of pre hospital emergency care reports to hospital information systems. In summary, the prototype was able to integrate data in a standardized manner. The devised methods can be used design generic software for prehospital to hospital data integration. PMID:23920925

  4. Assuring Quality Health Care in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Letvak, Susan; Rhew, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The provision of quality healthcare is an international mandate. The provision of quality healthcare for mental health patients poses unique challenges. Nowhere is this challenge greater than in the emergency department. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe evidence-based initiatives for improving the quality of care of mental health patients in the emergency department. Specifically, the use of telepsychiatry and reducing provider biases will be presented.

  5. [Collaboration with specialists and regional primary care physicians in emergency care at acute hospitals provided by generalists].

    PubMed

    Imura, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    A role of acute hospitals providing emergency care is becoming important more and more in regional comprehensive care system led by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. Given few number of emergent care specialists in Japan, generalists specializing in both general internal medicine and family practice need to take part in the emergency care. In the way collaboration with specialists and regional primary care physicians is a key role in improving the quality of emergency care at acute hospitals. A pattern of collaborating function by generalists taking part in emergency care is categorized into four types. PMID:26915241

  6. Patient satisfaction with emergency oral health care in rural Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Ntabaye, M K; Scheutz, F; Poulsen, S

    1998-10-01

    Emergency oral health care, as conceived in Tanzania, is an on-demand service provided at a rural health center or dispensary by a Rural Medical Aide. The service includes: simple tooth extraction under local anesthesia, draining of abscesses, control of acute oral infection with appropriate drug therapy, first aid for maxillo-facial trauma, and recognition of oral conditions requiring patient referral for further care at the district or regional hospital dental clinic. The objective of the present study was to describe patient satisfaction with emergency oral health care services in rural Tanzania and determine the relative importance of factors influencing patient satisfaction. The study was carried out as a cross-sectional interview survey between April 1993 and May 1994 using a patient satisfaction questionnaire in rural villages in the Rungwe district of Tanzania. It included 206 patients aged 18 years or more who had received emergency oral health care between April 1993 and March 1994. Overall, 92.7% of the respondents reported that they were satisfied with the service. Patients who were married, had no formal education and lived more than 3 km from the dispensary were more likely to be satisfied with treatment. In a logistic regression model, a good working atmosphere at the dispensary, a good relationship between care provider and patients (art of care) and absence of post-treatment complications significantly influenced patient satisfaction with odds ratios of 10.3, 17.4 and 6.2, respectively. PMID:9792119

  7. Report on the International Conference on Emergency Health Care Development.

    PubMed Central

    Dines, G B

    1990-01-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) provide rescue, field stabilization, transportation to medical facilities, and definitive care for persons experiencing medical emergencies. In order to advance worldwide development and refinement of EMS systems, and their integration with emergency preparedness and response programs, the International Conference on Emergency Health Care Development was held in Crystal City, Arlington, VA, August 15-19, 1989. The conference was supported by the Department of Health and Human Services and its Health Resources and Services Administration; the Department of Transportation and its National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration; and the Pan American Health Organization. Objectives of the conference were to clarify linkages between various levels of emergency response, to present methods for developing or improving EMS systems within societies with different resources, to demonstrate processes by which EMS systems have been developed, and to propose international emergency health care development goals. Topics included development of services in developing nations, case studies of underdeveloped countries' responses to natural disasters, and a method for updating disaster response through use of available medical resources. PMID:1968669

  8. [Essential data set's archetypes for nursing care of endometriosis patients].

    PubMed

    Spigolon, Dandara Novakowski; Moro, Claudia Maria Cabral

    2012-12-01

    This study aimed to develop an Essential Data Set for Nursing Care of Patients with Endometriosis (CDEEPE), represented by archetypes. An exploratory applied research with specialists' participation that was carried out at Heath Informatics Laboratory of PUCPR, between February and November of 2010. It was divided in two stages: CDEEPE construction and evaluation including Nursing Process phases and Basic Human Needs, and archetypes development based on this data set. CDEEPE was evaluated by doctors and nurses with 95.9% of consensus and containing 51 data items. The archetype "Perception of Organs and Senses" was created to represents this data set. This study allowed identifying important information for nursing practices contributing to computerization and application of nursing process during care. The CDEEPE was the basis for archetype creation, that will make possible structured, organized, efficient, interoperable, and semantics records. PMID:23596913

  9. Setting up and functioning of an Emergency Medicine Department: Lessons learned from a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Asish, K; Suresh, Varun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Tertiary care teaching hospitals remain referral centres for victims of trauma and mass casualty. Often specialists from various disciplines manage these crowded casualty areas. These age old casualty areas are being replaced, throughout the country by Emergency Medicine Departments (EMDs), presumed to be better planned to confront a crisis. We aimed to gather basic data contributive in setting up of an EMD at a tertiary care teaching hospital from the lessons learned from functioning existent systems. Methods: This is primarily a questionnaire-based descriptive study at tertiary care referral centres across the country, which was purposively selected. The study models included one from a hospital without designated EMD and the other four from hospitals with established EMDs. Direct observation and focus group meetings with experienced informants at these hospitals contributed to the data. In the absence of a validated hospital preparedness assessment scale, comparison was done with regard to quantitative, qualitative and corroborative parameters using descriptive analysis. Results: The EMDs at best practice models were headed by specialist in Emergency Medicine assisted by organised staff, had protocols for managing mass casualty incident (MCI), separate trauma teams, ergonomic use of infrastructure and public education programmes. In this regard, these hospitals seemed well organised to manage MCIs and disasters. Conclusion: The observation may provide a preliminary data useful in setting up an EMD. In the absence of published Indian literature, this may facilitate further research in this direction. Anaesthesiologists, presently an approved Faculty in Emergency Medicine training can provide creative input with regard to its initial organisation and functioning, thus widening our horizons in a country where there is a severe dearth of trained emergency physicians. PMID:27013749

  10. Mobile Integrated Health Care and Community Paramedicine: An Emerging Emergency Medical Services Concept.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bryan Y; Blumberg, Charles; Williams, Kenneth

    2016-03-01

    Mobile integrated health care and community paramedicine are models of health care delivery that use emergency medical services (EMS) personnel to fill gaps in local health care infrastructure. Community paramedics may perform in an expanded role and require additional training in the management of chronic disease, communication skills, and cultural sensitivity, whereas other models use all levels of EMS personnel without additional training. Currently, there are few studies of the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of mobile integrated health care and community paramedicine programs. Observations from existing program data suggest that these systems may prevent congestive heart failure readmissions, reduce EMS frequent-user transports, and reduce emergency department visits. Additional studies are needed to support the clinical and economic benefit of mobile integrated health care and community paramedicine. PMID:26169927

  11. Implementation of newly adopted technology in acute care settings: a qualitative analysis of clinical staff.

    PubMed

    Langhan, Melissa L; Riera, Antonio; Kurtz, Jordan C; Schaeffer, Paula; Asnes, Andrea G

    2015-01-01

    Technologies are not always successfully implemented into practice. This study elicited experiences of acute care providers with the introduction of technology and identified barriers and facilitators in the implementation process. A qualitative study using one-on-one interviews among a purposeful sample of 19 physicians and nurses within 10 emergency departments and intensive care units was performed. Grounded theory, iterative data analysis and the constant comparative method were used to inductively generate ideas and build theories. Five major categories emerged: decision-making factors, the impact on practice, technology's perceived value, facilitators and barriers to implementation. Barriers included negative experiences, age, infrequent use and access difficulties. A positive outlook, sufficient training, support staff and user friendliness were facilitators. This study describes strategies implicated in the successful implementation of newly adopted technology in acute care settings. Improved implementation methods and evaluation of implementation processes are necessary for successful adoption of new technology. PMID:25367721

  12. Implementation of newly adopted technology in acute care settings: a qualitative analysis of clinical staff

    PubMed Central

    Langhan, Melissa L.; Riera, Antonio; Kurtz, Jordan C.; Schaeffer, Paula; Asnes, Andrea G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Technologies are not always successfully implemented into practise. We elicited experiences of acute care providers with the introduction of technology and identified barriers and facilitators in the implementation process. Methods A qualitative study using one-on-one interviews among a purposeful sample of 19 physicians and nurses within ten emergency departments and intensive care units was performed. Grounded theory, iterative data analysis and the constant comparative method were used to inductively generate ideas and build theories. Results Five major categories emerged: decision-making factors, the impact on practise, technology's perceived value, facilitators and barriers to implementation. Barriers included negative experiences, age, infrequent use, and access difficulties. A positive outlook, sufficient training, support staff, and user friendliness were facilitators. Conclusions This study describes strategies implicated in the successful implementation of newly adopted technology in acute care settings. Improved implementation methods and evaluation of implementation processes are necessary for successful adoption of new technology. PMID:25367721

  13. A national survey of board-certified emergency physicians: quality of care and practice structure issues.

    PubMed

    Plantz, S H; Kreplick, L W; Panacek, E A; Mehta, T; Adler, J; McNamara, R M

    1998-01-01

    The opinions and experiences of board-certified emergency physicians regarding employment structure and finances, professional society policies, and quality of patient care have never been formally studied. A survey questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 1,050 emergency physicians certified by the American Board of Emergency Medicine. The survey contained 29 multiple choice questions. Of the 1,050, 465 (44.3%) of the surveys were returned. Respondents averaged 13.5 years of emergency medicine practice, 83% were members of the American College of Emergency Physicians, and 44% were emergency medicine residency trained. Seventy-five percent felt they had been financially exploited by the emergency department contract holder and 49% considered leaving their employer because of unfair business practices. Fifteen percent have been terminated without due process/peer review, and 11% have been forced to leave a position, move, or pay compensation because of noncompete clauses. The majority reported encountering instances of substandard emergency medical care, most commonly in settings with multihospital contract company coverage. The majority also believe their specialty societies should address issues of employment structure and quality of patient care standards. PMID:9451304

  14. An Expanded Theoretical Framework of Care Coordination Across Transitions in Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Radwin, Laurel E; Castonguay, Denise; Keenan, Carolyn B; Hermann, Cherice

    2016-01-01

    For many patients, high-quality, patient-centered, and cost-effective health care requires coordination among multiple clinicians and settings. Ensuring optimal care coordination requires a clear understanding of how clinician activities and continuity during transitions affect patient-centeredness and quality outcomes. This article describes an expanded theoretical framework to better understand care coordination. The framework provides clear articulation of concepts. Examples are provided of ways to measure the concepts. PMID:26595361

  15. Incentivizing health care behaviors in emerging adults: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Catherine H; Guarna, Giuliana; Tsao, Pamela; Jesuthasan, Jude R; Lau, Adrian NC; Siddiqi, Ferhan S; Gilmour, Julie Anne; Ladha, Danyal; Halapy, Henry; Advani, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose For emerging adults with chronic medical diseases, the transition from pediatric to adult health care is often a time of great upheaval, commonly associated with unhealthy self-management choices, loss to follow-up, and adverse outcomes. We conducted a systematic review to examine the use of incentive strategies to promote positive health-related behaviors in young adults with chronic medical diseases. Methods The Medline, CINAHL, Embase, PsycInfo, and Cochrane databases were searched through June 2014. Studies of any design where an incentive was used to achieve a target behavior or outcome in a pediatric or emerging adult population (age <30 years) with chronic medical conditions including addictions, were included. Results A total of 26 studies comprising 10,880 patients met our inclusion criteria after screening 10,305 abstracts and 301 full-text articles. Of these studies, 20 examined the effects of behavioral incentives on cigarette smoking or substance abuse, including alcohol; four studies explored behavioral incentives in the setting of HIV or sexual health; and two articles studied individuals with other chronic medical conditions. Seventeen articles reported a statistically significant benefit of the behavioral incentive on one or more outcomes, although only half reported follow-up after the incentive period was terminated. Conclusion While the majority of studies reported positive outcomes, these studies focused on promoting the cessation of adverse behaviors rather than promoting positive behaviors. In addition, conclusions were limited by the high risk of bias present in the majority of studies, as well as lack of follow-up after the incentive period. Whether behavioral incentives facilitate the adoption of positive health choices in this population remains to be determined. PMID:27069356

  16. Dissociative Spectrum Disorders in the Primary Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, James L.

    2000-01-01

    Dissociative disorders have a lifetime prevalence of about 10%. Dissociative symptoms may occur in acute stress disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, somatization disorder, substance abuse, trance and possession trance, Ganser's syndrome, and dissociative identity disorder, as well as in mood disorders, psychoses, and personality disorders. Dissociative symptoms and disorders are observed frequently among patients attending our rural South Carolina community mental health center. Given the prevalence of mental illness in primary care settings and the diagnostic difficulties encountered with dissociative disorders, such illness may be undiagnosed or misdiagnosed in primary care settings. We developed an intervention model that may be applicable to primary care settings or helpful to primary care physicians. Key points of the intervention are identification of dissociative symptoms, patient and family education, review of the origin of the symptoms as a method of coping with trauma, and supportive reinforcement of cognitive and relaxation skills during follow-up visits. Symptom recognition, Education of the family, Learning new skills, and Follow-up may be remembered by the mnemonic device SELF. We present several cases to illustrate dissociative symptoms and our intervention. Physicians and other professionals using the 4 steps and behavioral approaches will be able to better recognize and triage patients with dissociative symptoms. Behaviors previously thought to be secondary to psychosis or personality disorders may be seen in a new frame of reference, strengthening the therapeutic alliance while reducing distress and acting-out behaviors. PMID:15014580

  17. Dissociative Spectrum Disorders in the Primary Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Elmore, James L.

    2000-04-01

    Dissociative disorders have a lifetime prevalence of about 10%. Dissociative symptoms may occur in acute stress disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, somatization disorder, substance abuse, trance and possession trance, Ganser's syndrome, and dissociative identity disorder, as well as in mood disorders, psychoses, and personality disorders. Dissociative symptoms and disorders are observed frequently among patients attending our rural South Carolina community mental health center. Given the prevalence of mental illness in primary care settings and the diagnostic difficulties encountered with dissociative disorders, such illness may be undiagnosed or misdiagnosed in primary care settings. We developed an intervention model that may be applicable to primary care settings or helpful to primary care physicians. Key points of the intervention are identification of dissociative symptoms, patient and family education, review of the origin of the symptoms as a method of coping with trauma, and supportive reinforcement of cognitive and relaxation skills during follow-up visits. Symptom recognition, Education of the family, Learning new skills, and Follow-up may be remembered by the mnemonic device SELF. We present several cases to illustrate dissociative symptoms and our intervention. Physicians and other professionals using the 4 steps and behavioral approaches will be able to better recognize and triage patients with dissociative symptoms. Behaviors previously thought to be secondary to psychosis or personality disorders may be seen in a new frame of reference, strengthening the therapeutic alliance while reducing distress and acting-out behaviors. PMID:15014580

  18. Health Care Aides' Struggle to Build and Maintain Relationships with Families in Complex Continuing Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGilton, Katherine S.; Guruge, Sepali; Librado, Ruby; Bloch, Lois; Boscart, Veronique

    2008-01-01

    Research on the relationships between health care aides (HCAs) and families of clients has been situated mainly in long-term care settings and includes scant findings about the perceptions of HCAs. Based on the findings of a larger qualitative study using a grounded theory approach, this paper addresses the topic of HCA-family relationships in…

  19. A Profile of Child Care Settings: Early Education and Care in 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisker, Ellen Eliason; And Others

    This volume combines an executive summary, a report, and appendixes, all of which comprise the findings of the Profile of Child Care Settings Study. The study collected information on the supply of formal early education and care programs by means of telephone interviews with a national sample of center directors and home-based providers of early…

  20. Managing insomnia in the primary care setting: raising the issues.

    PubMed

    Richardson, G S

    2000-02-01

    The optimal management of insomnia in the primary care setting should be viewed as a public health problem that will require specific attention. Important recent strides in the understanding of insomnia, its consequences, and its treatment do not always provide a basis for management strategies in a setting with distinct practical limitations. A somewhat different research focus will be needed if the scientific advances are to be translated into practical improvements in therapy. In primary care today, multiple agendas compete for the physician's time. Therefore, it is necessary to view diagnosis and management in terms of both what is efficient and what is optimally effective. Much can be learned from experience with medical risk factors of broad prevalence, such as hypercholesterolemia and hypertension. Large outcome trials demonstrating the benefits of drug therapy were required before pharmacologic management became standard care in the primary care setting. For insomnia, specific issues that must be addressed include the components of diagnosis that will guide therapy and affect prognosis. How can the 10% of adults with insomnia in the primary care practice be subdivided to identify those most in need of therapy? Stated another way, what are the features of insomnia that predict risk? Is duration important? Severity? Frequency? Which treatments are most effective? Which are most efficient in terms of the time required of patient and practitioner? Do treatments for insomnia produce patient satisfaction? Do they prevent adverse outcomes, such as depression and automobile accidents? Studies are now addressing many of these questions. In selecting research priorities, however, the practical application of this information in the clinical setting is important if the ultimate goal is to reduce the number of patients suffering from insomnia and its consequences. PMID:10755803

  1. Provider workload and quality of care in primary care settings: moderating role of relational climate.

    PubMed

    Mohr, David C; Benzer, Justin K; Young, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    Primary care providers are increasingly under pressure to do more with fewer resources. We examined the effect of workload on patients' experiences of quality of care, measured through approximately 44,000 patient experience surveys in a sample of 222 primary care clinics in the Veterans Health Administration. We tested the extent to which relational climate, a measure of teamwork, moderated the relationship between workload and patient ratings of quality of care. Our outcome measures included patient complaints, time spent with provider, and overall visit quality. Workload was negatively associated with patients' quality of care ratings and relational climate moderated the relation between workload and quality of care ratings. Patients seen in clinics with higher workload and greater relational climate reported better care compared with patients in clinics with higher workload but lower relational climate. Findings highlight the importance of relational climate as an important teamwork factor when managing and developing clinic policies, practices, and procedures in resource-constrained settings. PMID:23222471

  2. [Reflections concerning the care process in the emergency medical services].

    PubMed

    Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Barrientos-Fortes, Tomás; Polanco-González, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we share some reflections regarding the care process in the emergency medical services, as well as some of the challenges with which these fundamental services deal. We highlight the increasing amount of patients and the complexity of some of the clinical cases, which are some of the causes that lead to the overcrowding of these services. PMID:27100984

  3. EMERGENCY VICTIM CARE AND RESCUE, TEXTBOOK FOR SQUADMEN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Trade and Industrial Education Service.

    DESIGNED FOR TRAINING EMERGENCY SQUAD PERSONNEL IN RESCUE PROCEDURES AND VICTIM CARE BEYOND BASIC FIRST AID, THIS TEXTBOOK WAS DEVELOPED BY A COMMITTEE OF SQUADMEN, DOCTORS, NURSES, FIREMEN, AND STATE TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL PERSONNEL TO BE USED IN ADULT TRAINING CLASSES OF FULL-TIME OR VOLUNTEER SQUADMEN. THE INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIAL INCLUDES 26…

  4. Maternal Care and Attachment Security in Ordinary and Emergency Contexts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posada, German; Jacobs, Amanda; Carbonell, Olga A.; Alzate, Gloria; Bustamante, Maria R.; Arenas, Angela

    1999-01-01

    Two studies examined the relationship between maternal sensitivity and infant security of attachment in home and hospital contexts. Results are discussed in terms of links between methodology and effect sizes, the generality of links between maternal care and child security, need for research on caregiving in ordinary and emergency situations, and…

  5. Availability of ambulance patient care reports in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Dominick; Sinclair, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Clinical handovers of patient care among healthcare professionals is vulnerable to the loss of important clinical information. A verbal report is typically provided by paramedics and documented by emergency department (ED) triage nurses. Paramedics subsequently complete a patient care report which is submitted electronically. This emergency medical system (EMS) patient care report often contains details of paramedic assessment and management that is not all captured in the nursing triage note. EMS patient care reports are often unavailable for review by emergency physicians and nurses. Two processes occur in the distribution of EMS patient care reports. The first is an external process to the ED that is influenced by the prehospital emergency medical system and results in the report being faxed to the ED. The second process is internal to the ED that requires clerical staff to distribute the fax report to accompany patient charts. A baseline audit measured the percentage of EMS patient care reports that were available to emergency physicians at the time of initial patient assessments and showed a wide variation in the availability of EMS reports. Also measured were the time intervals from patient transfer from EMS to ED stretcher until the EMS report was received by fax (external process measure) and the time from receiving the EMS fax report until distribution to patient chart (internal process measure). These baseline measures showed a wide variation in the time it takes to receive the EMS reports by fax and to distribute reports. Improvement strategies consisted of: 1. Educating ED clerical staff about the importance of EMS reports 2. Implementing a new process to minimize ED clerical staff handling of EMS reports for nonactive ED patients 3. Elimination of the automatic retrieval of old hospital charts and their distribution for ED patients 4. Introduction of an electronic dashboard for patients arriving by ambulance to facilitate more efficient distribution of

  6. Availability of ambulance patient care reports in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Dominick; Sinclair, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Clinical handovers of patient care among healthcare professionals is vulnerable to the loss of important clinical information. A verbal report is typically provided by paramedics and documented by emergency department (ED) triage nurses. Paramedics subsequently complete a patient care report which is submitted electronically. This emergency medical system (EMS) patient care report often contains details of paramedic assessment and management that is not all captured in the nursing triage note. EMS patient care reports are often unavailable for review by emergency physicians and nurses. Two processes occur in the distribution of EMS patient care reports. The first is an external process to the ED that is influenced by the prehospital emergency medical system and results in the report being faxed to the ED. The second process is internal to the ED that requires clerical staff to distribute the fax report to accompany patient charts. A baseline audit measured the percentage of EMS patient care reports that were available to emergency physicians at the time of initial patient assessments and showed a wide variation in the availability of EMS reports. Also measured were the time intervals from patient transfer from EMS to ED stretcher until the EMS report was received by fax (external process measure) and the time from receiving the EMS fax report until distribution to patient chart (internal process measure). These baseline measures showed a wide variation in the time it takes to receive the EMS reports by fax and to distribute reports. Improvement strategies consisted of: 1. Educating ED clerical staff about the importance of EMS reports 2. Implementing a new process to minimize ED clerical staff handling of EMS reports for nonactive ED patients 3. Elimination of the automatic retrieval of old hospital charts and their distribution for ED patients 4. Introduction of an electronic dashboard for patients arriving by ambulance to facilitate more efficient distribution of

  7. Prevalence of Respiratory Protective Devices in U.S. Health Care Facilities: Implications for Emergency Preparedness.

    PubMed

    Wizner, Kerri; Stradtman, Lindsay; Novak, Debra; Shaffer, Ronald

    2016-08-01

    An online questionnaire was developed to explore respiratory protective device (RPD) prevalence in U.S. health care facilities. The survey was distributed to professional nursing society members in 2014 and again in 2015 receiving 322 and 232 participant responses, respectively. The purpose of this study was to explore if the emergency preparedness climate associated with Ebola virus disease changed the landscape of RPD use and awareness. Comparing response percentages from the two sampling time frames using bivariate analysis, no significant changes were found in types of RPDs used in health care settings. N95 filtering facepiece respirators continue to be the most prevalent RPD used in health care facilities, but powered air-purifying respirators are also popular, with regional use highest in the West and Midwest. Understanding RPD use prevalence could ensure that health care workers receive appropriate device trainings as well as improve supply matching for emergency RPD stockpiling. PMID:27462029

  8. Radiologist, obstetric patient, and emergency department provider survey: radiologist-patient interaction in the emergency department setting.

    PubMed

    Erlichman, David B; Stein, Marjorie W; Weiss, Amanda; Mazzariol, Fernanda

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and acceptance of a model of direct interaction between radiologist and patients in the emergency department (ED) setting. The study population was comprised of pregnant patients accrued in a non-consecutive prospective manner from June 2014 to September 2015, who had an obstetrical ultrasound performed in the radiology department of an inner-city tertiary care hospital at the request of the ED. The feasibility and approval of direct communication between radiologist and patient were evaluated by means of a questionnaire presented by an independent observer to the ED provider, patient, and radiologist. The exam enrolled 54 patients. Ultrasound (US) exam results were divided into (31) normal live intrauterine gestation (group 1), (7) abnormal failed intrauterine gestation or ectopic pregnancy (group 2), and (16) indeterminate pregnancies that could not be placed in the former categories and may require a follow-up exam (group 3). Forty-five (83 %) ED providers approved of the radiologist's direct communication with patients. Fifty (93 %) patients stated a better understanding of the radiologist's role in their care after than before the interaction. The radiologists found the interaction with patients to be positive in 52 (96 %) cases. Direct communication between radiologist and patient yielded a good acceptance by the radiologist, ED provider, and patient. More importantly, after the encounter, the vast majority of patients reported a better understanding of the radiologist's role in their care. PMID:26965006

  9. Introducing herbal medicine into conventional health care settings.

    PubMed

    Lee, L

    1999-01-01

    Herbal therapy is one of several holistic therapies gaining recognition within the health care community in the United States. As a discipline, herbal medicine is in its infancy regarding educational standards for credentialling, standardization, and regulation of products and clinical applications within this health care system. This article discusses professional considerations for midwives who are interested in integrating herbal healing into their clinical practices, and offers examples of how to incorporate herbal medicine into midwifery care. Resources for practitioners including books, newsletters, journals, courses, computer sites, and databases are presented. The author offers guidance for creating an herbal practice manual for the midwifery office as well as the hospital setting and for documenting herbal healing in the medical record. Collegial support, barriers to practice, liability, and insurance issues are discussed. A clinical applications section includes specific herbal formulas for preconception health, pregnancy-induced hypertension, gestational diabetes, and postdates pregnancy. PMID:10380444

  10. Supporting the Integration of HIV Testing Into Primary Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Bradley-Springer, Lucy; Kang Dufour, Mi-Suk; Koester, Kimberly A.; Beane, Stephanie; Warren, Nancy; Beal, Jeffrey; Frank, Linda Rose

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the efforts of the US network of AIDS Education and Training Centers (AETCs) to increase HIV testing capacity across a variety of clinical settings. Methods. We used quantitative process data from 8 regional AETCs for July 1, 2008, to June 30, 2009, and qualitative program descriptions to demonstrate how AETC education helped providers integrate HIV testing into routine clinical care with the goals of early diagnosis and treatment. Results. Compared with other AETC training, HIV testing training was longer and used a broader variety of strategies to educate more providers per training. During education, providers were able to understand their primary care responsibility to address public health concerns through HIV testing. Conclusions. AETC efforts illustrate how integration of the principles of primary care and public health can be promoted through professional training. PMID:22515867

  11. Implementing culture change in long-term dementia care settings.

    PubMed

    McGreevy, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    The approach to nursing in long-term care settings for people living with dementia continues to evolve from a traditional, task-oriented culture to one that is person-centred. Such change can be difficult to manage and may encounter considerable opposition; having an understanding of change management and leadership styles may help to make this transition easier. This article discusses the differences between task-oriented and person-centred care, theories of management, motivation and leadership styles, and focuses on those that are most appropriate for this type of change. An improved understanding of these theories will enable nurses to support others in the delivery of person-centred care. PMID:26938420

  12. Reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescribing in the residential care setting: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ching Jou; Kong, David CM; Stuart, Rhonda L

    2014-01-01

    Residential aged care facilities are increasingly identified as having a high burden of infection, resulting in subsequent antibiotic use, compounded by the complexity of patient demographics and medical care. Of particular concern is the recent emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms among this vulnerable population. Accordingly, antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programs have started to be introduced into the residential aged care facilities setting to promote judicious antimicrobial use. However, to successfully implement AMS programs, there are unique challenges pertaining to this resource-limited setting that need to be addressed. In this review, we summarize the epidemiology of infections in this population and review studies that explore antibiotic use and prescribing patterns. Specific attention is paid to issues relating to inappropriate or suboptimal antibiotic prescribing to guide future AMS interventions. PMID:24477218

  13. Reforming emergency care: Experts put focus on value, better alignment.

    PubMed

    2015-07-01

    While most healthcare reforms have thus far been focused outside of the ED, they nonetheless have big implications for emergency providers, according to a panel of experts who discussed the future of emergency care at a conference sponsored by the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC. Going forward, the experts noted that emergency providers need to engage on how to most-effectively deliver higher value while also achieving better alignment with primary care providers. And they highlighted reforms that are already delivering results in pioneering EDs. Through the use of high-risk care plans, a specialized protocol for chest pain, and other reforms, the ED at the University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health System, based in Bel Air, MD, has been able to prevent more than 500 hospital admissions in the past year. Working with partners, emergency physicians in Washington state have managed to save the state more than $32 million while also slashing narcotic prescribing to Medicaid recipients by 24%. Their interventions include a prescription drug monitoring program, a mechanism for information sharing on key data points, and the development of care plans for frequent ED utilizers. A program called Bridges to Care in Denver, CO, has thus far been able to reduce ED and hospital utilization among frequent utilizers by 40%, generating $2 million in cost-savings to the health care system. The program focuses on identifying the key drivers of utilization, and then addressing these drivers with interventions. Program developers say connecting with patients while they are still in the ED, as opposed to making follow-up phone calls, is key to the program's success. PMID:26131537

  14. Intimate Partner Violence in an Outpatient Palliative Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Wygant, Carmella; Bruera, Eduardo; Hui, David

    2013-01-01

    Although a few studies have evaluated intimate partner violence (IPV) in the oncology setting, to our knowledge no studies exist of IPV among palliative care patients. IPV may be exacerbated at the end of life because patients and their caregivers often experience significant stressors associated with physical, emotional, social, and financial burdens. We discuss IPV in the palliative care setting using the example of a patient with advanced cancer who experienced IPV. A better understanding and awareness of IPV at the end of life could help clinicians support and counsel patients and ameliorate the suffering caused by this “unspoken” trauma. We further discuss 1) the prevalence and indicators of IPV, 2) how to initiate conversations about IPV, 3) the resources available to clinicians, and 4) various management strategies. PMID:23948161

  15. The Development of Sustainable Emergency Care in Ghana: Physician, Nursing and Prehospital Care Training Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Martel, John; Oteng, Rockefeller; Mould-Millman, Nee-Kofi; Bell, Sue Anne; Zakariah, Ahmed; Oduro, George; Kowalenko, Terry; Donkor, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Ghana’s first Emergency Medicine residency and nursing training programs were initiated in 2009 and 2010, respectively, at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in the city of Kumasi in association with Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology and the Universities of Michigan and Utah. In addition, the National Ambulance Service was commissioned initially in 2004 and has developed to include both prehospital transport services in all regions of the country and Emergency Medical Technician training. Over a decade of domestic and international partnership has focused on making improvements in emergency care at a variety of institutional levels, culminating in the establishment of comprehensive emergency care training programs. Objective We describe the history and status of novel post-graduate emergency physician, nurse and prehospital provider training programs as well as the prospect of creating a board certification process and formal continuing education program for practicing emergency physicians. Discussion Significant strides have been made in the development of emergency care and training in Ghana over the last decade, resulting in the first group of Specialist level EM physicians as of late 2012, as well as development of accredited emergency nursing curricula and continued expansion of a national EMS. Conclusion This work represents a significant move toward in-country development of sustainable, interdisciplinary, team-based emergency provider training programs designed to retain skilled healthcare workers in Ghana and may serve as a model for similar developing nations. PMID:25066956

  16. Emergency Protocol and Violence Prevention in a University Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rust, Dylan

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzed the emergency protocol and violence prevention methods utilized at an American university. The four research questions were: (1) What are the sources of violence at the university? a. How has the university addressed these sources? (2) What constitutes an emergency in the eyes of the university? (3) How do emergency protocols…

  17. Qualitative research: Observational methods in health care settings.

    PubMed Central

    Mays, N.; Pope, C.

    1995-01-01

    Clinicians used to observing individual patients, and epidemiologists trained to observe the course of disease, may be forgiven for misunderstanding the term observational method as used in qualitative research. In contrast to the clinician or epidemiologist, the qualitative researcher systematically watches people and events to find out about behaviours and interactions in natural settings. Observation, in this sense, epitomises the idea of the researcher as the research instrument. It involves "going into the field"--describing and analysing what has been seen. In health care settings this method has been insightful and illuminating, but it is not without pitfalls for the unprepared researcher. Images p183-a PMID:7613435

  18. Fluoride use in caries prevention in the primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Clark, Melinda B; Slayton, Rebecca L

    2014-09-01

    Dental caries remains the most common chronic disease of childhood in the United States. Caries is a largely preventable condition, and fluoride has proven effectiveness in the prevention of caries. The goals of this clinical report are to clarify the use of available fluoride modalities for caries prevention in the primary care setting and to assist pediatricians in using fluoride to achieve maximum protection against dental caries while minimizing the likelihood of enamel fluorosis. PMID:25157014

  19. [Blood transfusion in emergency settings: French military health service experience].

    PubMed

    Sailliol, A; Ausset, S; Peytel, E

    2010-12-01

    Blood transfusion is required in a number of emergency settings and the French military health service (FMHS) has issued specific guidelines for the treatment of war casualties. These guidelines take into account European standards and laws, NATO standards, and also public sentiment regarding transfusion. These guidelines reflect a determination to control the process and to avoid the improvisation frequently associated with wartime transfusion. The evolution in warfare (terrorism and bombing more frequent than gunshot) and the wide use of body armor have deeply changed the clinical presentation of war injuries. These now involve the extremities in 80% of cases, with extensive tissue damage and heavy blood loss. The FMHS recommends that war casualties with hemorrhagic shock be brought quickly to a medical treatment facility (MTF) after first-line treatment applied through buddy aid or by medics. In the MTF, before an early Medevac, a damage control surgery will be performed, with resuscitation using freeze-dried plasma, red blood cells and fresh whole blood. The French military blood bank is responsible for blood product supply, training and medical advice regarding transfusion therapy during wartime, as well as hemovigilance. All transfusion therapy practices are periodically assessed but research on whole blood pathogen reduction is being conducted in order to reduce the residual infectious risk associated with this product. PMID:21051268

  20. Chart Card: Feasibility of a Tool for Improving Emergency Department Care in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Neumayr, Lynne; Pringle, Steven; Giles, Stephen; Quirolo, Keith C.; Paulukonis, Susan; Vichinsky, Elliott P.; Treadwell, Marsha J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) are concerned with emergency department care, including time to treatment and staff attitudes and knowledge. Providers are concerned about rapid access to patient information and SCD treatment protocols. A software application that stores and retrieves encrypted personal medical information on a plastic credit card–sized Chart Card was designed. Objective To determine the applicability and feasibility of the Chart Card on patient satisfaction with emergency department care and provider accessibility to patient information and care protocols. Methods One-half of 44 adults (aged ~18 years) and 50 children with SCD were randomized to either the Chart Card or usual care. Patient satisfaction was surveyed pre and post implementation of the Chart Card program, and emergency department staff was surveyed about familiarity with SCD treatment protocols. Results Fifty-two percent of patients were female (mean age, 18.8 ± 15.6); 61% had SCD SS. Adults visited an emergency department 4.2 ± 4.0 times in the year prior to enrollment vs 2.7 ± 3.7 (p = .06) visits for children, most commonly for pain. Patient emergency department care ratings of very good or excellent increased from 47% to 66% (p < .05), and ratings of staff knowledge improved. Qualitative data reflected positive comments about patient and staff experiences with the Chart Card. Conclusion Patient satisfaction with emergency department care and efficacy in health care increased post Chart Card implementation. Providers valued immediate access to patient information and SCD treatment guidelines. The technology has potential for application in the treatment of other illnesses in other settings. PMID:21141289

  1. Cloud based emergency health care information service in India.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, N; Sukanesh, R

    2012-12-01

    A hospital is a health care organization providing patient treatment by expert physicians, surgeons and equipments. A report from a health care accreditation group says that miscommunication between patients and health care providers is the reason for the gap in providing emergency medical care to people in need. In developing countries, illiteracy is the major key root for deaths resulting from uncertain diseases constituting a serious public health problem. Mentally affected, differently abled and unconscious patients can't communicate about their medical history to the medical practitioners. Also, Medical practitioners can't edit or view DICOM images instantly. Our aim is to provide palm vein pattern recognition based medical record retrieval system, using cloud computing for the above mentioned people. Distributed computing technology is coming in the new forms as Grid computing and Cloud computing. These new forms are assured to bring Information Technology (IT) as a service. In this paper, we have described how these new forms of distributed computing will be helpful for modern health care industries. Cloud Computing is germinating its benefit to industrial sectors especially in medical scenarios. In Cloud Computing, IT-related capabilities and resources are provided as services, via the distributed computing on-demand. This paper is concerned with sprouting software as a service (SaaS) by means of Cloud computing with an aim to bring emergency health care sector in an umbrella with physical secured patient records. In framing the emergency healthcare treatment, the crucial thing considered necessary to decide about patients is their previous health conduct records. Thus a ubiquitous access to appropriate records is essential. Palm vein pattern recognition promises a secured patient record access. Likewise our paper reveals an efficient means to view, edit or transfer the DICOM images instantly which was a challenging task for medical practitioners in the

  2. Quality of emergency rooms and urgent care services: user satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Cássio de Almeida; dos Santos, Bruna Tatiane Prates; Andrade, Dina Luciana Batista; Barbosa, Francielle Alves; da Costa, Fernanda Marques; Carneiro, Jair Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the quality of emergency rooms and urgent care services according to the satisfaction of their users. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study with a quantitative approach. The sample comprised 136 users and was drawn at random. Data collection took place between October and November 2012 using a structured questionnaire. Results Participants were mostly male (64.7%) aged less than 30 years (55.8%), and the predominant level of education was high school (54.4%). Among the items evaluated, those that were statistically associated with levels of satisfaction with care were waiting time, confidence in the service, model of care, and the reason for seeking care related to acute complaints, cleanliness, and comfortable environment. Conclusion Accessibility, hospitality, and infrastructure were considered more relevant factors for patient satisfaction than the cure itself. PMID:26313440

  3. Measuring situation awareness in emergency settings: a systematic review of tools and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Simon; Porter, Joanne; Peach, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Background Nontechnical skills have an impact on health care outcomes and improve patient safety. Situation awareness is core with the view that an understanding of the environment will influence decision-making and performance. This paper reviews and describes indirect and direct measures of situation awareness applicable for emergency settings. Methods Electronic databases and search engines were searched from 1980 to 2010, including CINAHL, Ovid Medline, Pro-Quest, Cochrane, and the search engine, Google Scholar. Access strategies included keyword, author, and journal searches. Publications identified were assessed for relevance, and analyzed and synthesized using Oxford evidence levels and the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme guidelines in order to assess their quality and rigor. Results One hundred and thirteen papers were initially identified, and reduced to 55 following title and abstract review. The final selection included 14 papers drawn from the fields of emergency medicine, intensive care, anesthetics, and surgery. Ten of these discussed four general nontechnical skill measures (including situation awareness) and four incorporated the Situation Awareness Global Assessment Technique. Conclusion A range of direct and indirect techniques for measuring situation awareness is available. In the medical literature, indirect approaches are the most common, with situation awareness measured as part of a nontechnical skills assessment. In simulation-based studies, situation awareness in emergencies tends to be suboptimal, indicating the need for improved training techniques to enhance awareness and improve decision-making. PMID:27147872

  4. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 12. Water Accidents, Electrical Emergencies, Hazardous Materials and Radiation Accidents. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This training manual for emergency medical technicians, one of 14 modules that comprise the Emergency Victim Care textbook, covers water accidents, electrical emergencies, and hazardous materials and radiation accidents. Objectives stated for the three chapters are for the students to be able to describe: emergency care for specified water…

  5. 75 FR 49507 - Recovery Policy, RP9525.4, Emergency Medical Care and Medical Evacuations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Recovery Policy, RP9525.4, Emergency Medical Care and Medical..., Emergency Medical Care and Medical Evacuations. This is an existing policy that is scheduled for review to... policy identifies the extraordinary emergency medical care and medical evacuation expenses that...

  6. The aspects of safety in future care settings.

    PubMed

    Pharow, Peter; Blobel, Bernd G M E; Savastano, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Communication and cooperation processes in the growing healthcare and welfare domain require a well-defined set of security services provided by a standards-based interoperable security infrastructure. Any communication and collaboration procedures require a verifiable purpose. Without such a purpose for communicating with each other, there's no need to communicate at all. But security is not the only aspect that needs to carefully be investigated. More and more, aspects of safety, privacy, and quality get importance while discussing about future-proof health information systems and health networks--regardless whether local, regional and national ones or even pan-European networks. The patient needs to be moved into the center of each care process. During the course of the current paradigm change from an organization centered via a process-related to a person-centered healthcare and welfare system approach, different new technologies need to be applied in order to meet the new challenges arising from both legal and technical circumstances. International organizations like WHO, UNESCO and the European Parliament increasingly aim at enhancing the safety aspect in future care settings, and so do many projects and studies. Beside typical information and communication devices, extended use of modern IT technology in healthcare and welfare includes large medical devices like, e.g., CT, X-ray and MR but also very tiny devices like sensors worn or implemented in a person's clothing. Safety gets on top of the nations priority list for several reasons. The paper aims at identifying some of these reasons along with possible solutions on how to increase patient's awareness, confidence, and acceptance in future care settings. PMID:17901619

  7. Does audit improve diabetes care in a primary care setting? A management tool to address health system gaps

    PubMed Central

    Pruthu, T. K.; Majella, Marie Gilbert; Nair, Divya; Ramaswamy, Gomathi; Palanivel, C.; Subitha, L.; Kumar, S. Ganesh; Kar, Sitanshu Sekhar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is one of the emerging epidemics. Regular clinical and biochemical monitoring of patients, adherence to treatment and counseling are cornerstones for prevention of complications. Clinical audits as a process of improving quality of patient care and outcomes by reviewing care against specific criteria and then reviewing the change can help in optimizing care. Objective: We aimed to audit the process of diabetes care using patient records and also to assess the effect of audit on process of care indicators among patients availing diabetes care from a rural health and training center in Puducherry, South India. Materials and Methods: A record based study was conducted to audit diabetes care among patients attending noncommunicable disease clinic in a rural health center of South India. Monitoring of blood pressure (BP), blood glucose, lipid profile and renal function test were considered for auditing in accordance with standard guidelines. Clinical audit cycle (CAC), a simple management tool was applied and re-audit was done after 1-year. Results: We reviewed 156 and 180 patients records during year-1 and year-2, respectively. In the audit year-1, out of 156 patients, 78 (50%), 70 (44.9%), 49 (31.4%) and 19 (12.2%) had got their BP, blood glucose, lipid profile and renal function tests done. Monitoring of blood glucose, BP, lipid profile and renal function improved significantly by 35%, 20.7%, 36.4% and 56.1% over 1-year. Conclusion: CAC improves process of diabetes care in a primary care setting with existing resources. PMID:26604621

  8. Improving the governance of patient safety in emergency care: a systematic review of interventions

    PubMed Central

    Hesselink, Gijs; Berben, Sivera; Beune, Thimpe

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To systematically review interventions that aim to improve the governance of patient safety within emergency care on effectiveness, reliability, validity and feasibility. Design A systematic review of the literature. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and PsychInfo were searched for studies published between January 1990 and July 2014. We included studies evaluating interventions relevant for higher management to oversee and manage patient safety, in prehospital emergency medical service (EMS) organisations and hospital-based emergency departments (EDs). Two reviewers independently selected candidate studies, extracted data and assessed study quality. Studies were categorised according to study quality, setting, sample, intervention characteristics and findings. Results Of the 18 included studies, 13 (72%) were non-experimental. Nine studies (50%) reported data on the reliability and/or validity of the intervention. Eight studies (44%) reported on the feasibility of the intervention. Only 4 studies (22%) reported statistically significant effects. The use of a simulation-based training programme and well-designed incident reporting systems led to a statistically significant improvement of safety knowledge and attitudes by ED staff and an increase of incident reports within EDs, respectively. Conclusions Characteristics of the interventions included in this review (eg, anonymous incident reporting and validation of incident reports by an independent party) could provide useful input for the design of an effective tool to govern patient safety in EMS organisations and EDs. However, executives cannot rely on a robust set of evidence-based and feasible tools to govern patient safety within their emergency care organisation and in the chain of emergency care. Established strategies from other high-risk sectors need to be evaluated in emergency care settings, using an

  9. Tuberculosis diagnosis: primary health care or emergency medical services?

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Rubia Laine de Paula; Scatolin, Beatriz Estuque; Wysocki, Anneliese Domingues; Beraldo, Aline Ale; Monroe, Aline Aparecida; Scatena, Lúcia Marina; Villa, Tereza Cristina Scatena

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess primary health care and emergency medical services performance for tuberculosis diagnosis. METHODS Cross-sectional study were conducted with 90 health professionals from primary health care and 68 from emergency medical services, in Ribeirao Preto, SP, Southeastern Brazil, in 2009. A structured questionnaire based on an instrument of tuberculosis care assessment was used. The association between health service and the variables of structure and process for tuberculosis diagnosis was assessed by Chi-square test, Fisher's exact test (both with 5% of statistical significance) and multiple correspondence analysis. RESULTS Primary health care was associated with the adequate provision of inputs and human resources, as well as with the sputum test request. Emergencial medical services were associated with the availability of X-ray equipment, work overload, human resources turnover, insufficient availability of health professionals, unavailability of sputum collection pots and do not request sputum test. In both services, tuberculosis diagnosis remained as a physician's responsibility. CONCLUSIONS Emergencial medical services presented weaknesses in its structure to identify tuberculosis suspects. Gaps on the process were identified in both primary health care and emergencial medical services. This situation highlights the need for qualification of health services that are the main gateway to health system to meet sector reforms that prioritize the timely diagnosis of tuberculosis and its control. PMID:24626553

  10. Using Electronic Health Record Systems in Diabetes Care: Emerging Practices.

    PubMed

    Veinot, Tiffany C; Zheng, Kai; Lowery, Julie C; Souden, Maria; Keith, Rosalind

    2010-01-01

    While there has been considerable attention devoted to the deployment of electronic health record (EHR) systems, there has been far less attention given to their appropriation for use in clinical encounters - particularly in the context of complex, chronic illness. The Department of Veterans' Affairs (VA) has been at the forefront of EHR adoption and, as such, provides a unique opportunity to examine a mature EHR system in widespread use. Moreover, with a high prevalence of diabetes in its patient population, the VA provides a useful platform for examining EHR use in the context of chronic disease care. We conducted a sequential, exploratory qualitative study at two VA Medical Centers in the Midwest. First, we conducted observations of 64 clinical consultations with diabetes patients. These observations involved 31 different health care providers. Second, using insights from these observations, we conducted in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 39 health care providers focusing on their use of information in diabetes patient care. Field notes and interview transcripts were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Our analysis generated several categories of EHR use in clinical encounters: priming, structuring, assessing, informing, and continuing. We also outline some mismatches between EHR system design and VA diabetes care practices. We conclude by discussing implications of these emergent system uses for improving the software design of EHRs to better support chronic disease care, as well as for our understanding of the integration of technologies in health care. PMID:25264545

  11. [Intraosseous access for in-hospital emergencies. Intensive medical care case study].

    PubMed

    Werner, M; Daniel, H-P; Hoitz, J

    2010-07-01

    Since the release of the 2005 resuscitation guidelines intraosseous infusion has been recognized as the favorite alternative vascular access in emergency patients. It is no longer restricted to paediatric emergencies but is also considered the vascular access of choice for adult patients with difficult venous access. Intraosseous access has been used in an increasing proportion of patients especially in an out-of-hospital emergency care setting while only limited experience exists for in-hospital usage of this technique. This article reports on a case of intraosseous access performed in a critically ill patient directly after admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) due to difficult peripheral venous access. Despite the extensive medical resources available in the ICU (i.e. central venous catheterization) less invasive means were used to render appropriate care. Based on this case different strategies of critical care and possible improvements will be discussed. Intraosseous infusion should be regarded as an infrequently needed but potentially life-saving procedure that is still too often considered as an option at later stages during in-hospital emergency care. PMID:20628712

  12. Nitrous oxide/oxygen analgesia in emergency care.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, K D; Culver, D; Prno, J M

    1980-01-01

    A method of analgesia relatively new to North American emergency care involves the use of a homogeneous gas composed of 50% nitrous oxide and 50% oxygen (Entonox). The gas is administered by the patient, who holds the Entonox apparatus mask to his face and triggers gas flow by exerting negative inspiratory pressure (-1 cm. H(2)O). Worthwhile analgesia (i.e. marked or partial pain relief) was achieved in 95% of 110 emergency department patients experiencing significant pain from various sources. PMID:21297843

  13. Nitrous Oxide/Oxygen Analgesia In Emergency Care

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, Kent D. L.; Culver, Denis; Prno, John M.

    1980-01-01

    A method of analgesia relatively new to North American emergency care involves the use of a homogeneous gas composed of 50% nitrous oxide and 50% oxygen (Entonox). The gas is administered by the patient, who holds the Entonox apparatus mask to his face and triggers gas flow by exerting negative inspiratory pressure (−1 cm. H2O). Worthwhile analgesia (i.e. marked or partial pain relief) was achieved in 95% of 110 emergency department patients experiencing significant pain from various sources. ImagesFig. 3 PMID:21297843

  14. Nurses' Comfort Level with Emergency Interventions in the Rural Hospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Erin L.; Bell, Sue E.

    2009-01-01

    Context: One quarter of the persons living in the United States receive their emergency care in a rural hospital. Nurses employed in these hospitals see few emergencies but must be prepared to provide expert and efficient care when they do occur. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of registered nurses' certifications…

  15. The occupational history in the primary care setting

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, D.A.; Wakefield, D.S.; Fieselmann, J.F.; Berger-Wesley, M.; Zeitler, R. )

    1991-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the need for services in occupational medicine, we determined the prevalence of reported occupational exposures in patients seen in the primary care setting. In addition, we evaluated the validity of our survey instrument. All patients (n = 1,112) seen over a 3-month period of time in the Primary Care Clinic at the Iowa City Veterans Affairs Medical Center were considered eligible for this study. A survey instrument was developed to obtain specific information regarding occupational exposures. The questionnaire was administered to 534 or 48% of all eligible patients. The validity of the survey instrument was evaluated by comparing chest radiographs in subjects with a history of exposure to asbestos, coal dust, or silica to those in patients who were not exposed to any of these agents. We found that almost 75% of the patients reported prior occupational exposure to at least one potentially toxic agent, and over 30% claimed exposure to at least four potentially toxic agents. The validation study indicated that the reported exposure history for asbestos, coal dust, and silica is significantly associated with anticipated changes on chest radiographs. These findings suggest that this easily administered survey instrument is valid for pneumoconiotic dust exposures and may also be valid for other potentially toxic exposures. Data from our study indicate that patients seen in the ambulatory care setting may have clinically significant occupational exposures that are relevant to their medical condition.

  16. Toward integrating a common nursing data set in home care to facilitate monitoring outcomes across settings.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Gail; Stocker, Julia; Barkauskas, Violet; Treder, Marcy; Heath, Crystal

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of our research is to identify a realistic subset of North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA), Nursing Outcome Classification (NOC), and Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) terms specific to the home care (HC) setting. A subset of 89 NOC outcomes were identified for study in HC through a baseline survey. Three research assistants then observed the care of 258 patients to whom the 89 NOC outcomes applied and recorded the associated NANDA and NIC terms. Follow-up surveys and focus groups were conducted with the nurses and research assistants. There were 81 different NANDA and 226 NIC labels used to describe study patients' care. Only 36 of the 89 NOC labels studied were deemed clinically useful for HC. We found that expert opinion about terminology usage before actual experience under practice conditions is unreliable. PMID:15274523

  17. Emergency care in 59 low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Abujaber, Samer; Makar, Maggie; Stoll, Samantha; Kayden, Stephanie R; Wallis, Lee A; Reynolds, Teri A

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To conduct a systematic review of emergency care in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Methods We searched PubMed, CINAHL and World Health Organization (WHO) databases for reports describing facility-based emergency care and obtained unpublished data from a network of clinicians and researchers. We screened articles for inclusion based on their titles and abstracts in English or French. We extracted data on patient outcomes and demographics as well as facility and provider characteristics. Analyses were restricted to reports published from 1990 onwards. Findings We identified 195 reports concerning 192 facilities in 59 countries. Most were academically-affiliated hospitals in urban areas. The median mortality within emergency departments was 1.8% (interquartile range, IQR: 0.2–5.1%). Mortality was relatively high in paediatric facilities (median: 4.8%; IQR: 2.3–8.4%) and in sub-Saharan Africa (median: 3.4%; IQR: 0.5–6.3%). The median number of patients was 30 000 per year (IQR: 10 296–60 000), most of whom were young (median age: 35 years; IQR: 6.9–41.0) and male (median: 55.7%; IQR: 50.0–59.2%). Most facilities were staffed either by physicians-in-training or by physicians whose level of training was unspecified. Very few of these providers had specialist training in emergency care. Conclusion Available data on emergency care in LMICs indicate high patient loads and mortality, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, where a substantial proportion of all deaths may occur in emergency departments. The combination of high volume and the urgency of treatment make emergency care an important area of focus for interventions aimed at reducing mortality in these settings. PMID:26478615

  18. Mental health-related stigma in health care and mental health-care settings.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Claire; Noblett, Jo; Parke, Hannah; Clement, Sarah; Caffrey, Alison; Gale-Grant, Oliver; Schulze, Beate; Druss, Benjamin; Thornicroft, Graham

    2014-11-01

    This Review considers the evidence for mental-health-related stigma in health-care and mental-health-care settings. Do mental-health-care and other health-care professionals stigmatise people using their services? If so, what are the effects on quality of mental and physical health care? How can stigma and discrimination in the context of health care be reduced? We show that the contact mental-health-care professionals have with people with mental illness is associated with positive attitudes about civil rights, but does not reduce stigma as does social contact such as with friends or family members with mental illness. Some evidence suggests educational interventions are effective in decreasing stigma especially for general health-care professionals with little or no formal mental health training. Intervention studies are needed to underpin policy; for instance, to decrease disparity in mortality associated with poor access to physical health care for people with mental illness compared with people without mental illness. PMID:26361202

  19. [Ethics in pediatric emergencies: Care access, communication, and confidentiality].

    PubMed

    Benoit, J; Berdah, L; Carlier-Gonod, A; Guillou, T; Kouche, C; Patte, M; Schneider, M; Talcone, S; Chappuy, H

    2015-05-01

    Children suffer most from today's increasing precariousness. In France, access to care is available for all children through various structures and existing measures. The support for foreign children is overseen by specific legislation often unfamiliar to caregivers. Pediatric emergencies, their location, organization, actors, and patient flow are a particular environment that is not always suitable to communication and may lead to situations of abuse. Communication should not be forgotten because of the urgency of the situation. The place of the child in the dialogue is often forgotten. Considering the triangular relationship, listening to the child and involving the parents in care are the basis for a good therapeutic alliance. Privacy and medical confidentiality in pediatric emergencies are governed by law. However, changes in treatments and medical practices along with the variety of actors involved imply both individual and collective limitations, to the detriment of medical confidentiality. PMID:25840466

  20. Comparison of Two Clinical Teaching Models for Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Instruction.

    PubMed

    Conner, Bobbi J; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Su, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Standards to oversee the implementation and assessment of clinical teaching of emergency and critical care for veterinary students do not exist. The purpose of this study was to assess differences in the learning environment between two veterinary emergency and critical care clinical rotations (one required, one elective) with respect to caseload, technical/procedural opportunities, direct faculty contact time, client communication opportunities, and students' perception of practice readiness. The authors designed a 22-item survey to assess differences in the learning environment between the two rotations. It was sent electronically to 35 third- and fourth-year veterinary medicine students. Bivariate analysis, including the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and the t-test, were used to compare differences between pre-test and post-test scores among students. Twenty-six students' responses were included from the required rotation and nine from the elective rotation. Findings showed that students preferred the elective community emergency department setting to the required academic setting and that there were statistically significantly more positive experiences related to the variables of interest. Students saw significantly more cases at the community emergency department setting. Findings from this study offer guidance to assess students' emergency department rotations, suggest how teaching interactions can be modified for optimal learning experiences, and ensure that students receive maximal opportunities to treat patients that are representative of what they would encounter in practice. PMID:26751912

  1. Micro-skills of group formulations in care settings.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Louisa J; Wood-Mitchell, Amy; James, Ian A

    2014-01-01

    This study examines some of the micro-skills associated with the moment-to-moment decisions and actions involved in delivering group formulation sessions in dementia care settings. We discuss the therapeutic framework used by therapists from a number of Challenging Behaviour Services in the UK (Newcastle, Northumberland, South Tyneside, Teesside, Sutton and Merton, Northern Ireland) which is frequently referred to as the Newcastle or Colombo approach. Through a theoretical review and practice illustration, the study pays particular attention to the role of therapists' questions and questioning styles in group formulation sessions, providing a framework which aims to facilitate care staffs' understanding, reflection and empathy regarding their residents who are displaying 'challenging behaviours'. The study also provides a potential guide to the training of therapists working in this area and thereby attempts to benefit clinical practices in an area where pharmacological approaches are usually the treatment of choice. PMID:24381037

  2. Pain management in the acute care setting: Update and debates.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Greta M

    2016-02-01

    Pain management in the paediatric acute care setting is underutilised and can be improved. An awareness of the analgesic options available and their limitations is an important starting point. This article describes the evolving understanding of relevant pharmacogenomics and safety data of the various analgesic agents with a focus on agents available in Australia and New Zealand. It highlights the concerns with the use of codeine in children and discusses alternative oral opioids. Key features of oral, parenteral, inhaled and intranasal analgesic agents are discussed, as well as evidence supported use of sweet tasting solutions and non-pharmacological interventions. One of the biggest changes in acute care pain management has been the advent of intranasal fentanyl providing reliable potent analgesia without the need for intravenous access. The article will also address the issue of multimodal analgesia where a single agent is insufficient. PMID:27062626

  3. Diabetes medication incidents in the care home setting.

    PubMed

    Milligan, Frank

    This article analyses data received from a Freedom of Information Act 2000 request made to the National Patient Safety Agency in June 2010. Information was requested about adverse drug event reports in relation to insulin therapy and oral glucose-lowering agents in the care home setting. Data identified were reported to the National Patient Safety Agency between January 12005 and December 312009 and were processed through the National Reporting and Learning Service. There were 684 reports related to insulin and 84 incidents related to oral glucose-lowering agents. The most common error involved wrong or unclear dose: 173 reports for insulin, including one death, and 20 reports for oral glucose-lowering agents. Evidence shows that residents with diabetes in care homes are at risk of harm from adverse drug events involving insulin and oral glucose-lowering agents. PMID:22662553

  4. Management of hypertensive emergencies: implications for the critical care nurse.

    PubMed

    Schulenburg, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    Hypertensive emergencies are characterized by acute blood pressure elevations and potential for end organ damage. The critical care nurse must understand the pathophysiology to appreciate the therapeutic management and complications associated with the devastating clinical event. Stroke, renal damage and failure, retinopathy, aortic dissection, and encephalopathy are among the sequelae of severe hypertensive episodes. Intravenous medications are the treatment of choice to lower the blood pressure without risking hypoperfusion of the brain and other vital organs. PMID:17356350

  5. A strategy to improve priority setting in health care institutions.

    PubMed

    Martin, Doug; Singer, Peter

    2003-03-01

    Priority setting (also known as resource allocation or rationing) occurs at every level of every health system and is one of the most significant health care policy questions of the 21st century. Because it is so prevalent and context specific, improving priority setting in a health system entails improving it in the institutions that constitute the system. But, how should this be done? Normative approaches are necessary because they help identify key values that clarify policy choices, but insufficient because different approaches lead to different conclusions and there is no consensus about which ones are correct, and they are too abstract to be directly used in actual decision making. Empirical approaches are necessary because they help to identify what is being done and what can be done, but are insufficient because they cannot identify what should be done. Moreover, to be really helpful, an improvement strategy must utilize rigorous research methods that are able to analyze and capture experience so that past problems are corrected and lessons can be shared with others. Therefore, a constructive, practical and accessible improvement strategy must be research-based and combine both normative and empirical methods. In this paper we propose a research-based improvement strategy that involves combining three linked methods: case study research to describe priority setting; interdisciplinary research to evaluate the description using an ethical framework; and action research to improve priority setting. This describe-evaluate-improve strategy is a generalizable method that can be used in different health care institutions to improve priority setting in that context. PMID:14510309

  6. Neurohospitalists: an emerging model for inpatient neurological care.

    PubMed

    Josephson, S Andrew; Engstrom, John W; Wachter, Robert M

    2008-02-01

    Over the past decade, the hospitalist model has become a dominant system for the delivery of general adult and pediatric inpatient care. Similar forces, including national mandates to improve safety and quality and intense pressure to safely reduce length of hospital stays, that led to the remarkable growth of hospitalist medicine are now exerting pressure on neurologists. A neurohospitalist model, in which inpatient neurology specialists deliver high-quality and efficient care to neurology patients, is emerging to meet these challenges. Benefits of this system may include more frequent, timely neurology consultations in the hospital and emergency department, as well as improved quality of inpatient neurological education for residents and medical students. Challenges will involve defining the relationship of neurohospitalists with primary stroke centers, the economic feasibility of such neurohospitalist systems, and how to train members of this new field. A neurohospitalist model of care is an emerging idea in neurology that would overcome many regulatory, educational, and economic challenges facing neurologists; further research is needed to gauge the effects of this innovative approach. PMID:18306369

  7. Recognizing/accepting futility: prehospital, emergency center, operating room, and intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, Raul; Lee, Jeanne; Bansal, Vishal; Hollingsworth-Fridlund, Peggy

    2007-01-01

    Trauma has been perceived by the public as occurring as an isolated event, always resulting in favorable outcomes. There has therefore been a lack of discussion of futility of care and termination of care when dealing with the sick trauma patient. Several stages exist where issues of futility and early termination of care must be considered. These include the prehospital setting and involve the emergency medical service system in recognizing those patients who are nonsurvivors. Next is in the emergency room, where heroic measures may not benefit the very sick patient. In the operating room, the surgeon must always reassess and recognize when massive resuscitation will not benefit a particular trauma patient. Lastly, the intensivist must recognize those patients who may or may not benefit from continued efforts to sustain life. PMID:17579324

  8. New care model targets high-utilizing, complex patients, frees up emergency providers to focus on acute care concerns.

    PubMed

    2013-11-01

    Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis, MN, has developed a new model of care, designed to meet the needs of high-utilizing hospital and ED patients with complex medical, social, and behavioral needs.The Coordinated Care Center (CCC) provides easy access to patients with a history of high utilization, and delivers multidisciplinary care in a one-stop-shop format. In one year, the approach has slashed ED visits by 37%, freeing up emergency providers to focus on patients with acute needs. In-patient care stays are down by 25%. The CCC focuses on patients with diagnoses that are primarily medical, such as CHF [congestive heart failure], COPD [chronic obstructive pulmonary disease], or diabetes. ED-based clinical coordinators keep an eye out for patients who world be good candidates for the CCC, and facilitate quick transitions when their needs would be better served in that setting. Administrators describe CCC as an ambulatory intensive care unit, with an on-site pharmacist, social worker, psychologist, and chemical health counselor as well as physicians, nurse practitioners, LPNs, and patient navigators--enough personnel to comprise two full care teams. While the model does not pay for itself under current payment models, administrators anticipate that the approach will work well under future payment reforms that focus on total cost of care. PMID:24195142

  9. Barriers to formal emergency obstetric care services' utilization.

    PubMed

    Essendi, Hildah; Mills, Samuel; Fotso, Jean-Christophe

    2011-06-01

    Access to appropriate health care including skilled birth attendance at delivery and timely referrals to emergency obstetric care services can greatly reduce maternal deaths and disabilities, yet women in sub-Saharan Africa continue to face limited access to skilled delivery services. This study relies on qualitative data collected from residents of two slums in Nairobi, Kenya in 2006 to investigate views surrounding barriers to the uptake of formal obstetric services. Data indicate that slum dwellers prefer formal to informal obstetric services. However, their efforts to utilize formal emergency obstetric care services are constrained by various factors including ineffective health decision making at the family level, inadequate transport facilities to formal care facilities and insecurity at night, high cost of health services, and inhospitable formal service providers and poorly equipped health facilities in the slums. As a result, a majority of slum dwellers opt for delivery services offered by traditional birth attendants (TBAs) who lack essential skills and equipment, thereby increasing the risk of death and disability. Based on these findings, we maintain that urban poor women face barriers to access of formal obstetric services at family, community, and health facility levels, and efforts to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality among the urban poor must tackle the barriers, which operate at these different levels to hinder women's access to formal obstetric care services. We recommend continuous community education on symptoms of complications related to pregnancy and timely referral. A focus on training of health personnel on "public relations" could also restore confidence in the health-care system with this populace. Further, we recommend improving the health facilities in the slums, improving the services provided by TBAs through capacity building as well as involving TBAs in referral processes to make access to services timely. Measures can also be

  10. 48 CFR 52.219-20 - Notice of Emerging Small Business Set-Aside.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Clauses 52.219-20 Notice of Emerging Small Business Set-Aside. As prescribed in 19.1008(b), insert the following provision: Notice of Emerging Small Business Set-Aside (JAN 1991) Offers or quotations under this acquisition are solicited from emerging small business concerns only. Offers that are not from an...