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Sample records for emergency obstetric hysterectomy

  1. [Indications and risk factors for emergency obstetric hysterectomy].

    PubMed

    Nava Flores, Jorge; Paez Angulo, José Antonio; Veloz Martínez, Guadalupe; Sánchez Valle, Verónica; Hernández-Valencia, Marcelino

    2002-06-01

    Emergency obstetric hysterectomy is a procedure that potentially preserves the life and the postpartum bleeding is the direct cause of its indication, the hemorrhage postpartum happens in 1% of obstetric patients. This study was carried out to identify women with potential risk for this event and to prevent this obstetric problem. The most frequent indications for hysterectomy were identified, as well as the sociodemographic characteristic of the patients. The surgical procedure carried out was extra-fascial technique with type Richardson hysterectomy modified; the surgical pieces went to the pathology service, to obtain the histopathological diagnosis. 43 cases of obstetric hysterectomy, were analyzed; the characteristics of this group showed that bigger percentage of this event was more frequent in 31 to 35 years (39.5%), with pregnancies at term (51.1%) in third pregnancies(27.9%), nulliparas (60.4%), with first cesarean section (39.5%), without previous abortions (79.0%). The most frequent obstetric complications were uterine atony and placenta accreta. The cause for uterine atony could be interstitial edema, as well as myometrial hypertrophy, because such histopathological diagnoses were the most common. Odds ratio showed that a patient with cesarean section has 1.16 more probabilities of suffering hysterectomy than a woman with childbirth. This study describes the histological presence of interstitial edema and myometrial hypertrophy as possible causes of uterine atony in the histological study of surgical specimen. This could be related to no response of myometrial to the uterus-tonic effect of oxytocin. Obstetric uterine dysfunction has multifactorial cause. Patients with the characteristics described in this study should be considered as high risk. PMID:12148472

  2. Emergency Obstetric Hysterectomy: A Retrospective Study from a Teaching Hospital in North India over Eight Years

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Jaya; Arora, D.; Paul, Mohini; Ajmani, Sangita N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We sought to determine the frequency, demographic characteristics, indications, and feto-maternal outcomes associated with emergency peripartum hysterectomy in an easily accessible urban center. Methods We conducted a retrospective, observational, and analytical study over a period of eight years, from August 2006 to July 2014. A total of 56 cases of emergency obstetric hysterectomy (EOH) were studied in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kasturba Hospital, New Delhi. Results The incidence of EOH in our study was 30 per 100,000 following vaginal delivery and 270 per 100,000 following cesarean section. The overall incidence was 83 per 100,000 deliveries. Atonic postpartum hemorrhage (25%) was the most common indication followed by placenta accreta (21%) and uterine rupture (17.5%). The most frequent sequelae were febrile morbidity (19.2%) and disseminated intravascular coagulation (13.5%). Maternal mortality was 17.7% whereas perinatal mortality was 37.5%. Conclusions A balanced approach to EOH can prove to be lifesaving at times when conservative surgical modalities fail and interventional radiology is not immediately available. Our study highlights the place of extirpative surgery in modern obstetrics in the face of rising rates of cesarean section and multiple pregnancies particularly in urban settings in developing countries. PMID:26171124

  3. Successful Embolization of an Ovarian Artery Pseudoaneurysm Complicating Obstetric Hysterectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Rathod, Krantikumar R Deshmukh, Hemant L; Asrani, Ashwin; Salvi, Vinita S; Prabhu, Santoshi

    2005-01-15

    Transcatheter arterial embolization is becoming the therapy of choice for controlling obstetric hemorrhage, affording the ability to control persistent bleeding from pelvic vessels while avoiding the morbidity of surgical exploration. The clinicians are left with little choice if pelvic hemorrhage continues after hysterectomy and ligation of anterior division of both internal iliac arteries. We present one such case of intractable post-obstetric hysterectomy hemorrhage in which an ovarian artery pseudoaneurysm was diagnosed angiographically and successfully embolized, highlighting the role of transcatheter embolization.

  4. Changing trends in emergency peripartum hysterectomy in a tertiary obstetric center in Turkey during 2000–2013

    PubMed Central

    Temizkan, Osman; Angın, Doğukan; Karakuş, Resul; Şanverdi, İlhan; Polat, Mesut; Karateke, Ateş

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate emergency peripartum hysterectomy (EPH) cases over a 14-year period in a tertiary center in İstanbul, Turkey. Material and Methods In this retrospective descriptive study, the records of all cases of EPH performed at the Zeynep Kamil Women and Children’s Training and Research Hospital between January 2000 and January 2014 were analyzed. Results for 2000–2006 and 2007–2013 were compared to identify changing trends. Demographic and clinical factors associated with EPH were assessed. Results During the 14-year study period, a total of 161,836 births occurred, out of which 104,783 (64.8%) were vaginal deliveries and 57,053 (35.2%) were cesarean section (CS). EPH was performed in 81 patients with an overall incidence of 0.5 in 1000 deliveries. The EPH rate in 2007–2013 (0.07%) was significantly higher than in 2000–2006 (0.03%). The major difference in the EPH populations between the two periods was the higher number of previous CS in 2007–2013 compared with 2000–2006 (p=0.01). Indications for EPH did not differ between the two periods. There were 7 (8.6%) maternal deaths in 2000–2013, with significantly fewer maternal deaths in 2007–2013 than in 2000–2006 (19.2% vs. 3.6%). Conclusion Rate of EPH increased considerably from 2000 to 2013. This increase was mostly related to the increasing rate of CS. Indications for EPH did not change over the study period, and the number of maternal deaths markedly decreased. PMID:27026776

  5. Emergency peripartum hysterectomy: Incidence, indications, risk factors and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Lovina S.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Peripartum hysterectomy is a major operation and is invariably performed in the presence of life threatening hemorrhage during or immediately after abdominal or vaginal deliveries. Material and Methods: A Medline search was conducted to review the recent relevant articles in English literature on emergency peripartum hysterectomy. The incidence, indications, risk factors and outcome of emergency peripartum hysterectomy were reviewed. Results: The incidence of emergency peripartum hysterectomy ranged from 0.24 to 8.7 per 1000 deliveries. Emergency peripartum hysterectomy was found to be more common following cesarean section than vaginal deliveries. The predominant indication for emergency peripartum hysterectomy was abnormal placentation (placenta previa/accreta) which was noted in 45 to 73.3%, uterine atony in 20.6 to 43% and uterine rupture in 11.4 to 45.5 %. The risk factors included previous cesarean section, scarred uterus, multiparity, older age group. The maternal morbidity ranged from 26.5 to 31.5% and the mortality from 0 to 12.5% with a mean of 4.8%. The decision of performing total or subtotal hysterectomy was influenced by the patient's condition. Conclusion: Emergency peripartum hysterectomy is a most demanding obstetric surgery performed in very trying circumstances of life threatening hemorrhage. The indication for emergency peripartum hysterectomy in recent years has changed from traditional uterine atony to abnormal placentation. Antenatal anticipation of the risk factors, involvement of an experienced obstetrician at an early stage of management and a prompt hysterectomy after adequate resuscitation would go a long way in reducing morbidity and mortality. PMID:22171242

  6. Hysterectomy

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal hysterectomy; Abdominal hysterectomy; Supracervical hysterectomy; Radical hysterectomy; Removal of the uterus; Laparoscopic hysterectomy; Laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy; LAVH; ...

  7. Emergency preparedness in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Haeri, Sina; Marcozzi, David

    2015-04-01

    During and after disasters, focus is directed toward meeting the immediate needs of the general population. As a result, the routine health care and the special needs of some vulnerable populations such as pregnant and postpartum women may be overlooked within a resource-limited setting. In the event of hazards such as natural disasters, manmade disasters, and terrorism, knowledge of emergency preparedness strategies is imperative for the pregnant woman and her family, obstetric providers, and hospitals. Individualized plans for the pregnant woman and her family should include knowledge of shelter in place, birth at home, and evacuation. Obstetric providers need to have a personal disaster plan in place that accounts for work responsibilities in case of an emergency and business continuity strategies to continue to provide care to their communities. Hospitals should have a comprehensive emergency preparedness program utilizing an "all hazards" approach to meet the needs of pregnant and postpartum women and other vulnerable populations during disasters. With lessons learned in recent tragedies such as Hurricane Katrina in mind, we hope this review will stimulate emergency preparedness discussions and actions among obstetric providers and attenuate adverse outcomes related to catastrophes in the future. PMID:25751222

  8. A Marked Increase in Obstetric Hysterectomy for Placenta Accreta

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Yu-Ping; Zheng, Zheng; Tian, Yan; Hu, Ying-Ying; Han, Su-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obstetric hysterectomy (OH) as a lifesaving measure to manage uncontrolled uterine hemorrhage appears to be increasing recently. The objective of this study was to determine the etiology and changing trends of OH and to identify those at particular risk of OH to enhance the early involvement of multidisciplinary intensive care. Methods: A retrospective study was carried out in patients who had OH in China-Japan Friendship Hospital from 2004 to 2014. Maternal characteristics, preoperative evaluation, operative reports, and prenatal outcomes were studied in detail. Results: There were 19 cases of OH among a total of 18,838 deliveries. Comparing the study periods between 2004–2010 and 2011–2014, OH increased from 0.8/1000 (10/12,890) to 1.5/1000 (9/5948). Indications for OH have changed significantly during this study period with uterine atony decreasing from 50.0% (5/10) to 11.1% (1/9) (P < 0.05), and placenta accreta as the indication for OH has increased significantly from 20.0% (2/10) to 77.8% (7/9) (P < 0.05). Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been used to make an exact antepartum diagnosis of placenta accreta. A multidisciplinary management led to improved outcomes for patients with placenta accreta. Conclusion: As the multiple cesarean delivery rates have risen, there has been a dramatic increase in OH for placenta accreta. An advance antenatal diagnosis of ultrasonography, and MRI, and a multidisciplinary teamwork can maximize patients’ safety and outcome. PMID:26265612

  9. [Shoulder dystocia: an obstetrical emergency].

    PubMed

    Marques, Joana Borges; Reynolds, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Shoulder dystocia is one of the most feared obstetric emergencies due to related maternal and neonatal complications and therefore, the growing of medico-legal litigation that it entails. Although associated with risk factors such as fetal macrossomia, gestacional diabetes and instrumented delivery, the majority of cases are unpredictable. The lack of a consensus on shoulder dystocia diagnosis causes variations on its incidence and hampers a more comprehensive analysis. Management guidelines described for its resolution include several manoeuvres but the ideal sequence of procedures is not clearly defined in more severe cases. Hands-on and team training, through simulation-based techniques applied to medicine, seems to be a promising method to learn how to deal with shoulder dystocia having in mind a reduction in related maternal or neonatal morbidity and mortality. The main goal of this paper is to provide a comprehensive revision of shoulder dystocia highlighting its relevance as an obstetric emergency. A reflection on the management is presented emphasising the importance of simulation-based training. PMID:22521019

  10. Hysterectomy

    MedlinePlus

    A hysterectomy is surgery to remove a woman's uterus or womb. The uterus is the place where a baby grows when a woman is pregnant. After a hysterectomy, you no longer have menstrual periods and can' ...

  11. Emergency Peripartum Hysterectomies at a District General Hospital in United Kingdom: 10-Year Review of Practice

    PubMed Central

    Chester, J.; Sidhu, P.; Sharma, S.; Israfil-Bayli, F.

    2016-01-01

    Peripartum haemorrhage is an obstetric emergency which requires effective and timely management. A retrospective analysis was conducted at a single centre district hospital, over a 10-year period to describe factors that would lead to a peripartum hysterectomy. We sought to establish intraoperative and postoperative risks and review outcomes and complications associated with the procedure. A total of 29 cases (incidence 0.8 per 1000) were reviewed over 2001–2011. The mean parity was 1.8 and the mean maternal age was 33 years. Uterine atony was the most common indication for hysterectomy (12/29) followed by placenta praevia and accreta (4/29 and 5/29 cases, resp.). The commonest postoperative complications were sepsis and paralytic ileus. EPH most commonly occurs due to uterine atony but remains difficult to predict. Hospitals should continue to have robust systems and the necessary resources available to perform EPH where clinically indicated. PMID:27190690

  12. Hysterectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... hysterectomy is performed with the help of a robotic machine controlled by the surgeon. In general, it ... in a better outcome than laparoscopy performed without robotic assistance. What are the benefits and risks of ...

  13. Emergency Peripartum Hysterectomy: A Multicenter Study of Incidence, Indications and Outcomes in Southwestern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akintayo, A A; Olagbuji, B N; Aderoba, A K; Akadiri, O; Olofinbiyi, B A; Bakare, B

    2016-06-01

    Objective To determine the incidence, indications and outcomes of emergency peripartum hysterectomy (EPH) in three tertiary institutions in south-west Nigeria between January, 2010 and December , 2013. Methods A retrospective review of all cases of EPH over a 4 year period was done. EPH was defined as hysterectomy performed at the time of delivery or within 24 h of delivery for uncontrollable postpartum bleeding not responsive to conservative measures. Relevant information was extracted from the hospital records and operation notes. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS software version 17.0. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results There were 102 EPHs performed among 39,738 deliveries within the study period, giving a rate of 2.6 per thousand deliveries. Indications were uterine rupture (44.1 %), uterine atony (37.3 %), morbidly adherent placenta (17.6 %) and extension of caesarean section incision involving the uterine arteries (1 %). Subtotal hysterectomy was performed in most cases (67.6 %).Maternal case fatality rate was 11.8 % and perinatal mortality rate was 55.9 %. Blood transfusion, severe postoperative anaemia, wound sepsis, febrile morbidity and acute kidney injury were common morbidities associated with the procedure. Following multivariate logistic regression, the unbooked status [odds-ratio 95 % CI = 12.80 (1.22-133.97) p = 0.03] was the only variable that significantly predicted maternal death. Conclusion The incidence of EPH from our study is high. Much more needs to be done in maternal health services, particularly provision of quality obstetric care to reduce the rates of EPH and the associated high maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. PMID:26961244

  14. Postoperative outcome of caesarean sections and other major emergency obstetric surgery by clinical officers and medical officers in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Chilopora, Garvey; Pereira, Caetano; Kamwendo, Francis; Chimbiri, Agnes; Malunga, Eddie; Bergström, Staffan

    2007-01-01

    Background Clinical officers perform much of major emergency surgery in Malawi, in the absence of medical officers. The aim of this study was to validate the advantages and disadvantages of delegation of major obstetric surgery to non-doctors. Methods During a three month period, data from 2131 consecutive obstetric surgeries in 38 district hospitals in Malawi were collected prospectively. The interventions included caesarean sections alone and those that were combined with other interventions such as subtotal and total hysterectomy repair of uterine rupture and tubal ligation. All these surgeries were conducted either by clinical officers or by medical officers. Results During the study period, clinical officers performed 90% of all straight caesarean sections, 70% of those combined with subtotal hysterectomy, 60% of those combined with total hysterectomy and 89% of those combined with repair of uterine rupture. A comparable profile of patients was operated on by clinical officers and medical officers, respectively. Postoperative outcomes were almost identical in the two groups in terms of maternal general condition – both immediately and 24 hours postoperatively – and regarding occurrence of pyrexia, wound infection, wound dehiscence, need for re-operation, neonatal outcome or maternal death. Conclusion Clinical officers perform the bulk of emergency obstetric operations at district hospitals in Malawi. The postoperative outcomes of their procedures are comparable to those of medical officers. Clinical officers constitute a crucial component of the health care team in Malawi for saving maternal and neonatal lives given the scarcity of physicians. PMID:17570847

  15. Obstetric training in Emergency Medicine: a needs assessment

    PubMed Central

    Janicki, Adam James; MacKuen, Courteney; Hauspurg, Alisse; Cohn, Jamieson

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification and management of obstetric emergencies is essential in emergency medicine (EM), but exposure to pregnant patients during EM residency training is frequently limited. To date, there is little data describing effective ways to teach residents this material. Current guidelines require completion of 2 weeks of obstetrics or 10 vaginal deliveries, but it is unclear whether this instills competency. Methods We created a 15-item survey evaluating resident confidence and knowledge related to obstetric emergencies. To assess confidence, we asked residents about their exposure and comfort level regarding obstetric emergencies and eight common presentations and procedures. We assessed knowledge via multiple-choice questions addressing common obstetric presentations, pelvic ultrasound image, and cardiotocography interpretation. The survey was distributed to residency programs utilizing the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD) listserv. Results The survey was completed by 212 residents, representing 55 of 204 (27%) programs belonging to CORD and 11.2% of 1,896 eligible residents. Fifty-six percent felt they had adequate exposure to obstetric emergencies. The overall comfort level was 2.99 (1–5 scale) and comfort levels of specific presentations and procedures ranged from 2.58 to 3.97; all increased moderately with postgraduate year (PGY) level. Mean overall percentage of items answered correctly on the multiple-choice questions was 58% with no statistical difference by PGY level. Performance on individual questions did not differ by PGY level. Conclusions The identification and management of obstetric emergencies is the cornerstone of EM. We found preliminary evidence of a concerning lack of resident comfort regarding obstetric conditions and knowledge deficits on core obstetrics topics. EM residents may benefit from educational interventions to increase exposure to these topics. PMID:27357908

  16. [Simulation in obstetrics and gynecology - a new method to improve the management of acute obstetric emergencies].

    PubMed

    Blum, Ronja; Gairing Bürglin, Anja; Gisin, Stefan

    2008-11-01

    In medical specialties, such as anaesthesia, the use of simulation has increased over the past 15 years. Medical simulation attempts to reproduce important clinical situations to practise team training or individual skills in a risk free environment. For a long time simulators have only been used by the airline industry and the military. Simulation as a training tool for practicing critical situations in obstetrics is not very common yet. Experience and routine are crucial to evaluate a medical emergency correctly and to take the appropriate measures. Nowadays the obstetrician requires a combination of manual and communication skills, fast emergency management and decision-making skills. Therefore simulation may help to attain these skills. This may not only satisfy the high expectations and demands of the patients towards doctors and midwives but would also help to keep calm in difficult situations and avoid mistakes. The goal is a risk free delivery for mother and child. Therefore we developed a simulation- based curricular unit for hands-on training of four different obstetric emergency scenarios. In this paper we describe our results about the feedback of doctors and midwives on their personal experiences due to this simulation-based curricular unit. The results indicate that simulation seems to be an accepted method for team training in emergency situations in obstetrics. Whether patient security increases after the regularly use of drill training needs to be investigated in further studies. PMID:18979433

  17. Barriers to formal emergency obstetric care services' utilization.

    PubMed

    Essendi, Hildah; Mills, Samuel; Fotso, Jean-Christophe

    2011-06-01

    Access to appropriate health care including skilled birth attendance at delivery and timely referrals to emergency obstetric care services can greatly reduce maternal deaths and disabilities, yet women in sub-Saharan Africa continue to face limited access to skilled delivery services. This study relies on qualitative data collected from residents of two slums in Nairobi, Kenya in 2006 to investigate views surrounding barriers to the uptake of formal obstetric services. Data indicate that slum dwellers prefer formal to informal obstetric services. However, their efforts to utilize formal emergency obstetric care services are constrained by various factors including ineffective health decision making at the family level, inadequate transport facilities to formal care facilities and insecurity at night, high cost of health services, and inhospitable formal service providers and poorly equipped health facilities in the slums. As a result, a majority of slum dwellers opt for delivery services offered by traditional birth attendants (TBAs) who lack essential skills and equipment, thereby increasing the risk of death and disability. Based on these findings, we maintain that urban poor women face barriers to access of formal obstetric services at family, community, and health facility levels, and efforts to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality among the urban poor must tackle the barriers, which operate at these different levels to hinder women's access to formal obstetric care services. We recommend continuous community education on symptoms of complications related to pregnancy and timely referral. A focus on training of health personnel on "public relations" could also restore confidence in the health-care system with this populace. Further, we recommend improving the health facilities in the slums, improving the services provided by TBAs through capacity building as well as involving TBAs in referral processes to make access to services timely. Measures can also be

  18. Multidisciplinary Obstetric Simulated Emergency Scenarios (MOSES): Promoting Patient Safety in Obstetrics with Teamwork-Focused Interprofessional Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeth, Della; Ayida, Gubby; Berridge, Emma Jane; Mackintosh, Nicola; Norris, Beverley; Sadler, Chris; Strachan, Alasdair

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: We describe an example of simulation-based interprofessional continuing education, the multidisciplinary obstetric simulated emergency scenarios (MOSES) course, which was designed to enhance nontechnical skills among obstetric teams and, hence, improve patient safety. Participants' perceptions of MOSES courses, their learning, and…

  19. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module XI. Obstetric/Gynecologic Emergencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on obstetric/gynecologic emergencies is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Six units of study are presented: (1) anatomy and physiology of the female reproductive system; (2) patient assessment; (3) pathophysiology and management of gynecologic…

  20. Rural-Urban Inequity in Unmet Obstetric Needs and Functionality of Emergency Obstetric Care Services in a Zambian District

    PubMed Central

    Ng’anjo Phiri, Selia; Fylkesnes, Knut; Moland, Karen Marie; Byskov, Jens; Kiserud, Torvid

    2016-01-01

    Background Zambia has a high maternal mortality ratio, 398/100,000 live births. Few pregnant women access emergency obstetric care services to handle complications at childbirth. We aimed to assess the deficit in life-saving obstetric services in the rural and urban areas of Kapiri Mposhi district. Method A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2011 as part of the ‘Response to Accountable priority setting for Trust in health systems’ (REACT) project. Data on all childbirths that occurred in emergency obstetric care facilities in 2010 were obtained retrospectively. Sources of information included registers from maternity ward admission, delivery and operation theatre, and case records. Data included age, parity, mode of delivery, obstetric complications, and outcome of mother and the newborn. An approach using estimated major obstetric interventions expected but not done in health facilities was used to assess deficit of life-saving interventions in urban and rural areas. Results A total of 2114 urban and 1226 rural childbirths occurring in emergency obstetric care facilities (excluding abortions) were analysed. Facility childbirth constituted 81% of expected births in urban and 16% in rural areas. Based on the reference estimate that 1.4% of childbearing women were expected to need major obstetric intervention, unmet obstetric need was 77 of 106 women, thus 73% (95% CI 71–75%) in rural areas whereas urban areas had no deficit. Major obstetric interventions for absolute maternal indications were higher in urban 2.1% (95% CI 1.60–2.71%) than in rural areas 0.4% (95% CI 0.27–0.55%), with an urban to rural rate ratio of 5.5 (95% CI 3.55–8.76). Conclusions Women in rural areas had deficient obstetric care. The likelihood of under-going a life-saving intervention was 5.5 times higher for women in urban than rural areas. Targeting rural women with life-saving services could substantially reduce this inequity and preventable deaths. PMID:26824599

  1. Public Private Partnerships for Emergency Obstetric Care: Lessons from Maharashtra

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Sarika; Randive, Bharat

    2011-01-01

    Background: The National Rural Health Mission of India advocates public private partnerships (PPPs) to meet its “service guarantee” of Emergency obstetric care (EmOC) provision. The Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY) has a provision of Rs. 1500 for contracting in obstetric specialists. Objectives: The study aimed to understand the issues in the design and implementation of the PPPs for EmOC under the JSY in Maharashtra and how they affect the availability of EmOC services to women. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study using the rapid assessment approach was conducted in Ahmednagar district of Maharashtra spanning 1-year duration ending in June 2009. Primary data were obtained through interviews with women, providers, and administrators at various levels. Data were analyzed thematically. Results: The PPP scheme for EmOC is restricted to deliveries by Caesarean section.The administrators prefer subsidization of costs for services in private facilities to contracting in. There are no PPPs executed in the study district. This study identifies barriers to women in accessing the benefit and the difficulties faced by administrators in implementing the scheme. Conclusion: The PPPs for EmOC under the JSY have minimally influenced the out-of-pocket payments for EmOC. Infrastructural inadequacies and passive support of the implementers are major barriers to the implementation of contracting-in model of PPPs. Capacities in the public health system are inadequate to design and manage PPPs. PMID:21687376

  2. Effects of changes in copayment for obstetric emergency room visits on the utilization of obstetric emergency rooms.

    PubMed

    Raz, Iris; Novack, Lena; Yitshak-Sade, Maayan; Shahar, Yemima; Wiznitzer, Arnon; Sergienko, Ruslan; Warshawsky-Livne, Lora

    2015-10-01

    In view of the growing proportion of "non-urgent" admissions to obstetric emergency rooms (OERs) and recent changes in copayment policies for OER visits in Israel, we assessed factors contributing to OER overcrowding. The changes investigated were (a) exemption from copayment for women with birth contractions, (b) allowing phone referrals to the OER and (c) exemption from copayment during primary care clinic closing hours. We analyzed data of a large tertiary hospital with 37 deliveries per day. Counts of women discharged to home from the OER were an indicator of "non-urgent" visits. The annual number of non-urgent visits increased at a higher rate (3.4%) than the natural increase in deliveries (2.1%). Exemption from copayment for visits during non-working hours of primary care clinics was associated with increases in OER admissions (IRR=1.22) and in non-urgent OER visits (IRR=1.54). Younger and first-time mothers with medically unjustified complaints were more likely to be discharged to home. We showed that the changes in the policy for OER copayment meant to attract new clients to the HMO had an independent impact on OER utilization, and hence, added to the workload of medical personnel. The change in HMO policy regulating OER availability requires rigorous assessment of possible health system implications. PMID:26341842

  3. Community involvement in obstetric emergency management in rural areas: a case of Rukungiri district, Western Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality is a major public health problem worldwide especially in low income countries. Most causes of maternal deaths are due to direct obstetric complications. Maternal mortality ratio remains high in Rukungiri district, western Uganda estimated at 475 per 100,000 live births. The objectives were to identify types of community involvement and examine factors influencing the level of community involvement in the management of obstetric emergencies. Methods We conducted a descriptive study during 2nd to 28th February 2009 in rural Rukungiri district, western Uganda. A total of 448 heads of households, randomly selected from 6/11 (54.5%) of sub-counties, 21/42 (50.0%) parishes and 32/212 (15.1%) villages (clusters), were interviewed. Data were analysed using STATA version 10.0. Results Community pre-emergency support interventions available included community awareness creation (sensitization) while interventions undertaken when emergency had occurred included transportation and referring women to health facility. Community support programmes towards health care (obstetric emergencies) included establishment of community savings and credit schemes, and insurance schemes. The factors associated with community involvement in obstetric emergency management were community members being employed (AOR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.02 - 3.54) and rating the quality of maternal health care as good (AOR = 2.22, 95% CI: 1.19 - 4.14). Conclusions Types of community involvement in obstetric emergency management include practices and support programmes. Community involvement in obstetric emergency management is influenced by employment status and perceived quality of health care services. Policies to promote community networks and resource mobilization strategies for health care should be implemented. There is need for promotion of community support initiatives including health insurance schemes and self help associations; further community sensitization by empowered

  4. Obstetric emergencies at the United States–Mexico border crossings in El Paso, Texas

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Jill A.; Rishel, Karen; Escobedo, Miguel A.; Arellano, Danielle E.; Cunningham, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the frequency, characteristics, and patient outcomes for women who accessed Emergency Medical Services (EMS) for obstetric emergencies at the ports of entry (POE) between El Paso, Texas, United States of America, and Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico. Methods A descriptive study of women 12–49 years of age for whom an EMS ambulance was called to an El Paso POE location from December 2008–April 2011 was conducted. Women were identified through surveillance of EMS records. EMS and emergency department (ED) records were abstracted for all women through December 2009 and for women with an obstetric emergency through April 2011. For obstetric patients admitted to the hospital, additional prenatal and birth characteristics were collected. Frequencies and proportions were estimated for each variable; differences between residents of the United States and Mexico were tested. Results During December 2008–December 2009, 47.6% (68/143) of women receiving EMS assistance at an El Paso POE had an obstetric emergency, nearly 20 times the proportion for Texas overall. During December 2008–April 2011, 60.1% (66/109) of obstetric patients with ED records were admitted to hospital and 52 gave birth before discharge. Preterm birth (23.1%; No. = 12), low birth weight (9.6%; No. = 5), birth in transit (7.7%; No. = 4), and postpartum hemorrhage (5.8%; No. = 3) were common; fewer than one-half the women (46.2%; No. = 24) had evidence of prenatal care. Conclusions The high proportion of obstetric EMS transports and high prevalence of complications in this population suggest a need for binational risk reduction efforts. PMID:25915011

  5. [Hysterectomies at the Conakry university hospitals: social, demographic, and clinical characteristics, types, indications, surgical approaches, and prognosis].

    PubMed

    Baldé, I S; Sy, T; Diallo, B S; Diallo, Y; Mamy, M N; Diallo, M H; Bah, E M; Diallo, T S; Keita, N

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to calculate the frequency of hysterectomies at the Conakry university hospitals (Donka Hospital and Ignace Deen Hospital), describe the women's social, demographic, and clinical characteristics, and identify the key indications, the surgical techniques used, and the prognosis. This was a 2-year descriptive study, retrospective for the first year (May 2011-April 2012) and prospective for the second (May 2012-April 2013), of 333 consecutive hysterectomies performed in the obstetrics and gynecology departments of these two hospitals. Hysterectomy is one of the surgical procedures most commonly performed in these departments (following cesarean deliveries), with frequency of 4.4% interventions. The profile of the women undergoing this surgery was that of a woman aged younger than 49 years (61%), married (75.7%), multiparous (33%), of childbearing age (61%), and with no history of abdominal or pelvic surgery (79.6%). Nearly all hysterectomies were total (95%, compared with 5% subtotal; the approach was abdominal in 82.25% of procedures and vaginal in 17.75%. The most common indication for surgery was uterine fibroids (39.6%), followed by genital prolapse (22.2%), and obstetric emergencies (17.8%). The average duration of surgery was 96 minutes for abdominal and 55 minutes for vaginal hysterectomies. The principal intraoperative complication was hemorrhage (12.31%), and the main postoperative complication parietal suppuration (21.02%). The average length of hospital stay was 10.3 days for abdominal hysterectomies and 7.15 days for vaginal procedures. We recorded 14 deaths for a lethality rate of 4.2%; most of these deaths were associated with hemorrhagic shock during or after an obstetric hysterectomy (93%). Hysterectomy remains a common intervention in developing countries. Its indications are common during the pregnancy and postpartum period, with high morbidity and mortality rates. Improving obstetric coverage could reduce its

  6. Hysterectomy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hysterectomy is surgical removal of the uterus, resulting in inability to become pregnant. This surgery may be ... pelvic inflammatory disease, uterine fibroids and cancer. A hysterectomy may be done through an abdominal or a ...

  7. Reducing maternal mortality on a countrywide scale: The role of emergency obstetric training.

    PubMed

    Moran, Neil F; Naidoo, Mergan; Moodley, Jagidesa

    2015-11-01

    Training programmes to improve health worker skills in managing obstetric emergencies have been introduced in various countries with the aim of reducing maternal mortality through these interventions. In South Africa, based on an ongoing confidential enquiry system started in 1997, detailed information about maternal deaths is published in the form of regular 'Saving Mothers' reports. This article tracks the recommendations made in successive Saving Mothers reports with regard to emergency obstetric training, and it assesses the impact of these recommendations on reducing maternal mortality. Since 2009, South Africa has had its own training package, Essential Steps in the Management of Obstetric Emergencies (ESMOE), which the last three Saving Mothers reports have specifically recommended for all doctors and midwives working in maternity units. A special emphasis has been placed on the need for the simulation training component of ESMOE, also called obstetric 'fire drills', to be integrated into the clinical routines of all maternity units. The latest Saving Mothers report (2011-2013) suggests there has been little progress so far in improving emergency obstetric skills, indicating a need for further scale-up of ESMOE training in the country. The example of the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa is used to illustrate the process of scale-up and factors likely to facilitate that scale-up, including the introduction of ESMOE into the undergraduate medical training curriculum. Additional factors in the health system that are required to convert improved skills levels into improved quality of care and a reduction in maternal mortality are discussed. These include intelligent government health policies, formulated with input from clinical experts; strong clinical leadership to ensure that doctors and nurses apply the skills they have learnt appropriately, and work professionally and ethically; and a culture of clinical governance. PMID:26363737

  8. Hysterectomy - laparoscopic - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Supracervical hysterectomy - discharge; Removal of the uterus - discharge; Laparoscopic hysterectomy - discharge; Total laparoscopic hysterectomy - discharge; TLH - discharge; Laparoscopic supracervical ...

  9. Sudden chest pain and cardiac emergencies in the obstetric patient.

    PubMed

    Mabie, W C; Freire, C M

    1995-03-01

    The differential diagnosis and work-up of a patient with chest pain during pregnancy is presented in this article. This is followed by discussions of cardiac emergencies including hypertensive crisis, pulmonary edema, arrhythmias, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, myocardial infarction, and aortic dissection. PMID:7784039

  10. What is needed for taking emergency obstetric and neonatal programmes to scale?

    PubMed

    Bergh, Anne-Marie; Allanson, Emma; Pattinson, Robert C

    2015-11-01

    Scaling up an emergency obstetric and neonatal care (EmONC) programme entails reaching a larger number of people in a potentially broader geographical area. Multiple strategies requiring simultaneous attention should be deployed. This paper provides a framework for understanding the implementation, scale-up and sustainability of such programmes. We reviewed the existing literature and drew on our experience in scaling up the Essential Steps in the Management of Obstetric Emergencies (ESMOE) programme in South Africa. We explore the non-linear change process and conditions to be met for taking an existing EmONC programme to scale. Important concepts cutting across all components of a programme are equity, quality and leadership. Conditions to be met include appropriate awareness across the board and a policy environment that leads to the following: commitment, health systems-strengthening actions, allocation of resources (human, financial and capital/material), dissemination and training, supportive supervision and monitoring and evaluation. PMID:25921973

  11. [Preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome as an obstetric emergency].

    PubMed

    Tallarek, A-C; Stepan, H

    2012-03-01

    Preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome are multisystemic hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. A causative treatment is not yet available. The obstetrician has to choose between the risk of prolongation of pregnancy for mother and fetus on the one hand and the hazard of prematurity on the other, when iatrogenic delivery is considered. As the clinical severity and progression of both diseases is very difficult to predict, an emergency situation can develop rapidly and unexpectedly. In this scenario a good interdisciplinary cooperation between obstetricians and intensive care physicians ensures an optimal outcome for the pregnant woman. This article gives an insight into both diseases and the clinical management. PMID:22349532

  12. Cesarean Hysterectomy and Uterine-Preserving Alternatives.

    PubMed

    Huls, Christopher Kevin

    2016-09-01

    Hysterectomy at the time of an obstetric delivery or postpartum is an uncommon time to perform one of the most common gynecologic procedures. Hysterectomy associated with pregnancy is often unplanned and undesired. Postpartum complications associated with the need for hysterectomy carry significant risks, which pose challenges for mother-infant bonding and can signify an unexpected end to fertility. The most common indication for hysterectomy is postpartum hemorrhage. Postpartum hemorrhage is caused by uterine atony, genital tract laceration, uterine rupture, invasive placentation, infection, or coagulopathy. Multidisciplinary teams improve outcomes and are capable of managing complex medical and surgical complications that occur postpartum. PMID:27521882

  13. Myths and realities of training in obstetric emergencies.

    PubMed

    Draycott, Timothy J; Collins, Katherine J; Crofts, Joanna F; Siassakos, Dimitrios; Winter, Cathy; Weiner, Carl P; Donald, Fiona

    2015-11-01

    Training for intrapartum emergencies is a promising strategy to reduce preventable harm during birth; however, not all training is clinically effective. Many myths have developed around such training. These principally derive from misinformed beliefs that all training must be effective, cheap, independent of context and sustainable. The current evidence base for effective training supports local, unit-based and multi-professional training, with appropriate mannequins, and practice-based tools to support the best care. Training programmes based on these principles are associated with improved clinical outcomes, but we need to understand how and why that is, and also why some training is associated with no improvements, or even deterioration in outcomes. Effective training is not cheap, but it can be cost-effective. Insurers have the fiscal power to incentivise training, but they should demand the evidence of clinical effect; aspiration and proxies alone should no longer be sufficient for funding, in any resource setting. PMID:26254842

  14. Primary cesarean delivery results in emergency hysterectomy due to placenta accreta: a case study.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Jaclyn

    2015-02-01

    Placenta accreta is a major cause of obstetric hemorrhage, a situation that remains the most significant cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is generally recognized that a previous cesarean delivery increases the risk of placenta accreta. However, the risk also increases with previous intrauterine procedures. In 2010, The Joint Commission released a sentinel event alert regarding the prevention of maternal death, which recommended the adoption of protocols to treat postpartum hemorrhage. This case study demonstrates the success of quickly initiating protocol interventions necessary to prevent disseminated intravascular coagulation and maternal mortality, while reviewing current literature on risk identification, management, and treatment of obstetric hemorrhage resulting from placenta accreta. PMID:25842631

  15. Affordability of emergency obstetric and neonatal care at public hospitals in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Honda, Ayako; Randaoharison, Pierana Gabriel; Matsui, Mitsuaki

    2011-05-01

    Timely access to emergency obstetric care is necessary to save the lives of women experiencing complications at delivery, and for newborn babies. Out-of-pocket costs are one of the critical factors hindering access to such services in low- and middle-income countries. This study measured out-of-pocket costs for caesarean section and neonatal care at an urban tertiary public hospital in Madagascar, assessed affordability in relation to household expenditure and investigated where families found the money to cover these costs. Data were collected for 103 women and 73 newborns at the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Mahajanga in the Boeny region of Madagascar between September 2007 and January 2008. Out-of-pocket costs for caesarean section were catastrophic for middle and lower socio-economic households, and treatment for neonatal complications also created a big financial burden, with geographical and other financial barriers further limiting access to hospital care. This study identified 12 possible cases where the mother required an emergency caesarean section and her newborn required emergency care, placing a double burden on the household. In an effort to make emergency obstetric and neonatal care affordable and available to all, including those living in rural areas and those of medium and lower socio-economic status, well-designed financial risk protection mechanisms and a strong commitment by the government to mobilise resources to finance the country's health system are necessary. PMID:21555082

  16. Postpartum Prolapsed Leiomyoma with Uterine Inversion Managed by Vaginal Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Pieh-Holder, Kelly L.; DeVente, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Uterine inversion is a rare, but life threatening, obstetrical emergency which occurs when the uterine fundus collapses into the endometrial cavity. Various conservative and surgical therapies have been outlined in the literature for the management of uterine inversions. Case. We present a case of a chronic, recurrent uterine inversion, which was diagnosed following spontaneous vaginal delivery and recurred seven weeks later. The uterine inversion was likely due to a leiomyoma. This late-presenting, chronic, recurring uterine inversion was treated with a vaginal hysterectomy. Conclusion. Uterine inversions can occur in both acute and chronic phases. Persistent vaginal bleeding with the appearance of a prolapsing fibroid should prompt further investigation for uterine inversion and may require surgical therapy. A vaginal hysterectomy may be an appropriate management option in select populations and may be considered in women who do not desire to maintain reproductive function. PMID:25379314

  17. Hysterectomy - vaginal - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal hysterectomy - discharge; Laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy - discharge; LAVH - discharge ... you were in the hospital, you had a vaginal hysterectomy. Your surgeon made a cut in your ...

  18. Hysterectomy - vaginal - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal hysterectomy - discharge; Laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy - discharge; LAVH - discharge ... were in the hospital, you had a vaginal hysterectomy. Your surgeon made a cut in your vagina. ...

  19. Radical Hysterectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the base of her partner’s penis during intercourse. Orgasm after radical hysterectomy Women who have had a ... the surgery will affect their ability to have orgasms. This has not been studied a great deal, ...

  20. Emergency Obstetric Care in a Rural Hospital: On-call Specialists Can Manage C-sections

    PubMed Central

    Ashtekar, Shyam V; Kulkarni, Madhav B; Ashtekar, Ratna S; Sadavarte, Vaishali S

    2012-01-01

    Background: Institutional birth and Emergency Obstetric Care (EmOC) are important strategies of the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM). While the Community Health Center (CHC) is expected to serve EmOC needs in NRHM, the CHCs are hamstrung due to chronic shortage of specialist doctors. Alternative strategies are therefore needed for ensuring EmOC. Objectives: This study aims to estimate the EmOC needs in a private rural hospital from case records and find some useful predictors for caesarian section (C-section) and to assess C-section needs in the context of on-call specialist support. Materials and Methods: We analyzed a two-decade series of 2587 obstetric cases in a private rural hospital for normal deliveries and EmOC including C-section. Results: About 80% of the obstetric cases were normal deliveries. Of the remaining 20% cases that required EmOC, nearly one-third required C-section. In the series, two maternal deaths occurred due to hemorrhage. About 13% case records showed past abortion, which adds to EmOC workload. Primipararous mothers with higher age had a greater incidence (23%) of C-section. The C-section rate shows a steady rise from 3% to above 10% in the series. Conclusions: This rural hospital required C-section in 6.4% cases. This C-section workload was managed with the help of on-call specialists. The local hospital team could manage 93.6% of the cases and abortions with only two maternal deaths. This strategy of an on-call specialist team can be an option for CHCs till resident specialists are adequately available. PMID:23112445

  1. Governing the implementation of Emergency Obstetric Care: experiences of Rural District Health Managers, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many health policies developed internationally often become adopted at the national level and are implemented locally at the district level. A decentralized district health system led by a district health management team becomes responsible for implementing such policies. This study aimed at exploring the experiences of a district health management team in implementing Emergency Obstetric Care (EmOC) related policies and identifying emerging governance aspects. Methods The study used a qualitative approach in which data was obtained from thirteen individual interviews and one focus group discussion (FGD). Interviews were conducted with members of the district health management team, district health service boards and NGO representatives. The FGD included key informants who were directly involved in the work of implementing EmOC services in the district. Documentary reviews and observation were done to supplement the data. All the materials were analysed using a qualitative content analysis approach. Results Implementation of EmOC was considered to be a process accompanied by achievements and challenges. Achievements included increased institutional delivery, increased number of ambulances, training service providers in emergency obstetric care and building a new rural health centre that provides comprehensive emergency obstetric care. These achievements were associated with good leadership skills of the team together with partnerships that existed between different actors such as the Non-Governmental Organization (NGO), development partners, local politicians and Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs). Most challenges faced during the implementation of EmOC were related to governance issues at different levels and included delays in disbursement of funds from the central government, shortages of health workers, unclear mechanisms for accountability, lack of incentives to motivate overburdened staffs and lack of guidelines for partnership development

  2. An analysis comparing "Sim Huddles" to traditional simulation for obstetric emergency preparedness.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Jennifer; Maietta, Renee; Olson, Karla

    2015-01-01

    Health care professionals in obstetrics must be prepared to respond when emergencies arise. Simulation provides the opportunity to train in a team setting but can be resource-intensive. A postprogram implementation analysis compared high-fidelity in-situ simulation to a novel approach called "Sim Huddles." Sim Huddles are conducted in a quick, informal, low-fidelity staff huddle format incorporating concepts of TeamSTEPPS®. Postsimulation participant surveys from nine Sim Huddles were compared to nine traditional in-situ simulations. Results show similar achievement of learning goals and statistically significant improvement in self-reported confidence (p = .002) from the traditional in-situ format (mean = 4.32, sd = .771) compared to the Sim Huddle format (mean = 4.74, sd = .480). Sim Huddles can provide effective training with less time and fewer resources than what is required of traditional, high-fidelity simulation. PMID:25690812

  3. Reducing Neonatal Mortality in India: Critical Role of Access to Emergency Obstetric Care

    PubMed Central

    Rammohan, Anu; Iqbal, Kazi; Awofeso, Niyi

    2013-01-01

    Background Neonatal mortality currently accounts for 41% of all global deaths among children below five years. Despite recording a 33% decline in neonatal deaths between 2000 and 2009, about 900,000 neonates died in India in 2009. The decline in neonatal mortality is slower than in the post-neonatal period, and neonatal mortality rates have increased as a proportion of under-five mortality rates. Neonatal mortality rates are higher among rural dwellers of India, who make up at least two-thirds of India's population. Identifying the factors influencing neonatal mortality will significantly improve child survival outcomes in India. Methods Our analysis is based on household data from the nationally representative 2008 Indian District Level Household Survey (DLHS-3). We use probit regression techniques to analyse the links between neonatal mortality at the household level and households' access to health facilities. The probability of the child dying in the first month of birth is our dependent variable. Results We found that 80% of neonatal deaths occurred within the first week of birth, and that the probability of neonatal mortality is significantly lower when the child's village is closer to the district hospital (DH), suggesting the critical importance of specialist hospital care in the prevention of newborn deaths. Neonatal deaths were lower in regions where emergency obstetric care was available at the District Hospitals. We also found that parental schooling and household wealth status improved neonatal survival outcomes. Conclusions Addressing the main causes of neonatal deaths in India – preterm deliveries, asphyxia, and sepsis – requires adequacy of specialised workforce and facilities for delivery and neonatal intensive care and easy access by mothers and neonates. The slow decline in neonatal death rates reflects a limited attention to factors which contribute to neonatal deaths. The suboptimal quality and coverage of Emergency Obstetric Care

  4. Quality improvement in emergency obstetric referrals: qualitative study of provider perspectives in Assin North district, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Afari, Henrietta; Hirschhorn, Lisa R; Michaelis, Annie; Barker, Pierre; Sodzi-Tettey, Sodzi

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe healthcare worker (HCW)-identified system-based bottlenecks and the value of local engagement in designing strategies to improve referral processes related to emergency obstetric care in rural Ghana. Design Qualitative study using semistructured interviews of participants to obtain provider narratives. Setting Referral systems in obstetrics in Assin North Municipal Assembly, a rural district in Ghana. This included one district hospital, six health centres and four local health posts. This work was embedded in an ongoing quality improvement project in the district addressing barriers to existing referral protocols to lessen delays. Participants 18 HCWs (8 midwives, 4 community health officers, 3 medical assistants, 2 emergency room nurses, 1 doctor) at different facility levels within the district. Results We identified important gaps in referral processes in Assin North, with the most commonly noted including recognising danger signs, alerting receiving units, accompanying critically ill patients, documenting referral cases and giving and obtaining feedback on referred cases. Main root causes identified by providers were in four domains: (1) transportation, (2) communication, (3) clinical skills and management and (4) standards of care and monitoring, and suggested interventions that target these barriers. Mapping these challenges allowed for better understanding of next steps for developing comprehensive, evidence-based solutions to identified referral gaps within the district. Conclusions Providers are an important source of information on local referral delays and in the development of approaches to improvement responsive to these gaps. Better engagement of HCWs can help to identify and evaluate high-impact holistic interventions to address faulty referral systems which result in poor maternal outcomes in resource-poor settings. These perspectives need to be integrated with patient and community perspectives. PMID:24833695

  5. A qualitative assessment of the impact of a uterine balloon tamponade package on decisions regarding the role of emergency hysterectomy in women with uncontrolled postpartum haemorrhage in Kenya and Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Pendleton, Anna Alaska; Natarajan, Abirami; Ahn, Roy; Eckardt, Melody J; Burke, Thomas F

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the impact of a every second matters for mothers and babies uterine balloon tamponade package (ESM-UBT) on provider decisions regarding emergency hysterectomy in cases of uncontrolled postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). Design Qualitative assessment and analysis of a subgroup extracted from a larger database that contains all UBT device uses among ESM-UBT trained health providers. Setting Health facilities in Kenya and Senegal with ESM-UBT training and capable of performing emergency hysterectomies. Participants All medical doctors who had placed a UBT for uncontrolled PPH subsequent to implementation of ESM-UBT at their facility, and who also had the capabilities of performing emergency hysterectomies. Primary outcome measures The impact of ESM-UBT on decisions regarding emergency hysterectomy in cases of uncontrolled PPH. Results 30 of the 31 medical doctors (97%) who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were independently interviewed. Collectively the interviewed medical doctors had placed over 80 UBT devices for uncontrolled PPH since ESM-UBT implementation. All 30 responded that UBT devices immediately controlled haemorrhage and prevented women from being taken to emergency hysterectomy. All 30 would continue to use UBT devices in future cases of uncontrolled PPH. Conclusions These preliminary data suggest that following ESM-UBT implementation, emergency hysterectomy for uncontrolled PPH may be averted by use of uterine balloon tamponade. PMID:26747039

  6. Pilot study of radical hysterectomy versus radical trachelectomy on sexual distress.

    PubMed

    Brotto, Lori A; Smith, Kelly B; Breckon, Erin; Plante, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Radical trachelectomy, which leaves the uterus intact, has emerged as a desirable surgical option for eligible women with early-stage cervical cancer who wish to preserve fertility. The available data suggest excellent obstetrical outcomes with radical trachelectomy, and no differences in sexual responding between radical trachelectomy and radical hysterectomy. There is a need to examine the effect of radical hysterectomy on sexual distress given that it is distinct from sexual function. Participants were 34 women diagnosed with early-stage cervical cancer. The authors report 1-month postsurgery data for 29 women (radical hysterectomy group: n = 17, M age = 41.8 years; radical trachelectomy group: n = 12, M age = 31.8 years), and 6-month follow-up data on 26 women. Whereas both groups experienced an increase in sex-related distress immediately after surgery, distress continued to increase 6 months after surgery for the radical hysterectomy group but decreased in the radical trachelectomy group. There were no between-group differences in mood, anxiety, or general measures of health. The decrease in sex-related distress in the radical trachelectomy but not in the radical hysterectomy group suggests that the preservation of fertility may have attenuated sex-related distress. Care providers should counsel women exploring surgical options for cervical cancer about potential sex distress-related sequelae. PMID:23656625

  7. [Non elective cesarean section: use of a color code to optimize management of obstetric emergencies].

    PubMed

    Rudigoz, René-Charles; Huissoud, Cyril; Delecour, Lisa; Thevenet, Simone; Dupont, Corinne

    2014-06-01

    The medical team of the Croix Rousse teaching hospital maternity unit has developed, over the last ten years, a set of procedures designed to respond to various emergency situations necessitating Caesarean section. Using the Lucas classification, we have defined as precisely as possible the degree of urgency of Caesarian sections. We have established specific protocols for the implementation of urgent and very urgent Caesarean section and have chosen a simple means to convey the degree of urgency to all team members, namely a color code system (red, orange and green). We have set time goals from decision to delivery: 15 minutes for the red code and 30 minutes for the orange code. The results seem very positive: The frequency of urgent and very urgent Caesareans has fallen over time, from 6.1 % to 1.6% in 2013. The average time from decision to delivery is 11 minutes for code red Caesareans and 21 minutes for code orange Caesareans. These time goals are now achieved in 95% of cases. Organizational and anesthetic difficulties are the main causes of delays. The indications for red and orange code Caesarians are appropriate more than two times out of three. Perinatal outcomes are generally favorable, code red Caesarians being life-saving in 15% of cases. No increase in maternal complications has been observed. In sum: Each obstetric department should have its own protocols for handling urgent and very urgent Caesarean sections. Continuous monitoring of their implementation, relevance and results should be conducted Management of extreme urgency must be integrated into the management of patients with identified risks (scarred uterus and twin pregnancies for example), and also in structures without medical facilities (birthing centers). Obstetric teams must keep in mind that implementation of these protocols in no way dispenses with close monitoring of labour. PMID:26983190

  8. Hysterectomy use: the correspondence between self-reports and hospital records.

    PubMed Central

    Brett, K M; Madans, J H

    1994-01-01

    Studies of the relationship between hysterectomy use and sociodemographic factors tend to use self-reported data. In the current study, data were collected from a representative sample of US women who have been prospectively followed since 1971. Hysterectomy status was obtained by self-report and from hospital records. Although these two measures of hysterectomy were highly related, more women reported hysterectomy than could be confirmed by hospital records. The two measures showed similar associations between several obstetric and demographic characteristics and hysterectomy status, suggesting that the use of self-reported hysterectomy data does not bias analyses of potentially associated factors. PMID:7943489

  9. Making It Happen: Training health-care providers in emergency obstetric and newborn care.

    PubMed

    Ameh, Charles A; van den Broek, Nynke

    2015-11-01

    An estimated 289,000 maternal deaths, 2.6 million stillbirths and 2.4 million newborn deaths occur globally each year, with the majority occurring around the time of childbirth. The medical and surgical interventions to prevent this loss of life are known, and most maternal and newborn deaths are in principle preventable. There is a need to build the capacity of health-care providers to recognize and manage complications during pregnancy, childbirth and the post-partum period. Skills-and-drills competency-based training in skilled birth attendance, emergency obstetric care and early newborn care (EmONC) is an approach that is successful in improving knowledge and skills. There is emerging evidence of this resulting in improved availability and quality of care. To evaluate the effectiveness of EmONC training, operational research using an adapted Kirkpatrick framework and a theory of change approach is needed. The Making It Happen programme is an example of this. PMID:25911056

  10. Availability and Quality of Emergency Obstetric and Newborn Care in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Wichaidit, Wit; Alam, Mahbub-Ul; Halder, Amal K; Unicomb, Leanne; Hamer, Davidson H; Ram, Pavani K

    2016-08-01

    Bangladesh's maternal mortality and neonatal mortality remain unacceptably high. We assessed the availability and quality of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) and emergency newborn care (EmNC) services at health facilities in Bangladesh. We randomly sampled 50 rural villages and 50 urban neighborhoods throughout Bangladesh and interviewed the director of eight and nine health facilities nearest to each sampled area. We categorized health facilities into different quality levels (high, moderate, low, and substandard) based on staffing, availability of a phone or ambulance, and signal functions (six categories for EmOC and four categories for EmNC). We interviewed the directors of 875 health facilities. Approximately 28% of health facilities did not have a skilled birth attendant on call 24 hours per day. The least commonly performed EmOC signal function was administration of anticonvulsants (67%). The quality of EmOC services was high in 33% and moderate in 52% of the health facilities. The least common EmNC signal function was kangaroo mother care (7%). The quality of EmNC was high in 2% and moderate in 33% of the health facilities. Approximately one-third of health facilities lack 24-hour availability of skilled birth attendants, increasing the risk of peripartum complications. Most health facilities offered moderate to high quality services for EmOC and low to substandard quality for EmNC. PMID:27273640

  11. Barriers to Emergency Obstetric Care Services in Perinatal Deaths in Rural Gambia: A Qualitative In-Depth Interview Study

    PubMed Central

    Jammeh, Abdou; Sundby, Johanne; Vangen, Siri

    2011-01-01

    Objective. The Gambia has one of the world's highest perinatal mortality rates. We explored barriers of timely access to emergency obstetric care services resulting in perinatal deaths and in survivors of severe obstetric complications in rural Gambia. Method. We applied the “three delays” model as a framework for assessing contributing factors to perinatal deaths and obstetric complications. Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with 20 survivors of severe obstetric complications at home settings within three to four weeks after hospital discharge. Family members and traditional birth attendants were also interviewed. The interviews were translated into English and transcribed verbatim. We used content analysis to identify barriers of care. Results. Transport/cost-related delays are the major contributors of perinatal deaths in this study. A delay in recognising danger signs of pregnancy/labour or decision to seek care outside the home was the second important contributor of perinatal deaths. Decision to seek care may be timely, but impaired access precluded utilization of EmOC services. Obtaining blood for transfusion was also identified as a deterrent to appropriate care. Conclusion. Delays in accessing EmOC are critical in perinatal deaths. Thus, timely availability of emergency transport services and prompt decision-making are warranted for improved perinatal outcomes in rural Gambia. PMID:21766039

  12. Lifesaving emergency obstetric services are inadequate in south-west Ethiopia: a formidable challenge to reducing maternal mortality in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most maternal deaths take place during labour and within a few weeks after delivery. The availability and utilization of emergency obstetric care facilities is a key factor in reducing maternal mortality; however, there is limited evidence about how these institutions perform and how many people use emergency obstetric care facilities in rural Ethiopia. We aimed to assess the availability, quality, and utilization of emergency obstetric care services in the Gamo Gofa Zone of south-west Ethiopia. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of three hospitals and 63 health centres in Gamo Gofa. Using a retrospective review, we recorded obstetric services, documents, cards, and registration books of mothers treated and served in the Gamo Gofa Zone health facilities between July 2009 and June 2010. Results There were three basic and two comprehensive emergency obstetric care qualifying facilities for the 1,740,885 people living in Gamo Gofa. The proportion of births attended by skilled attendants in the health facilities was 6.6% of expected births, though the variation was large. Districts with a higher proportion of midwives per capita, hospitals and health centres capable of doing emergency caesarean sections had higher institutional delivery rates. There were 521 caesarean sections (0.8% of 64,413 expected deliveries and 12.3% of 4,231 facility deliveries). We recorded 79 (1.9%) maternal deaths out of 4,231 deliveries and pregnancy-related admissions at institutions, most often because of post-partum haemorrhage (42%), obstructed labour (15%) and puerperal sepsis (15%). Remote districts far from the capital of the Zone had a lower proportion of institutional deliveries (<2% of expected births compared to an overall average of 6.6%). Moreover, some remotely located institutions had very high maternal deaths (>4% of deliveries, much higher than the average 1.9%). Conclusion Based on a population of 1.7 million people, there should be 14 basic and four

  13. The emergence of a global right to health norm – the unresolved case of universal access to quality emergency obstetric care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The global response to HIV suggests the potential of an emergent global right to health norm, embracing shared global responsibility for health, to assist policy communities in framing the obligations of the domestic state and the international community. Our research explores the extent to which this global right to health norm has influenced the global policy process around maternal health rights, with a focus on universal access to emergency obstetric care. Methods In examining the extent to which arguments stemming from a global right to health norm have been successful in advancing international policy on universal access to emergency obstetric care, we looked at the period from 1985 to 2013 period. We adopted a qualitative case study approach applying a process-tracing methodology using multiple data sources, including an extensive literature review and limited key informant interviews to analyse the international policy agenda setting process surrounding maternal health rights, focusing on emergency obstetric care. We applied John Kingdon's public policy agenda setting streams model to analyse our data. Results Kingdon’s model suggests that to succeed as a mobilising norm, the right to health could work if it can help bring the problem, policy and political streams together, as it did with access to AIDS treatment. Our analysis suggests that despite a normative grounding in the right to health, prioritisation of the specific maternal health entitlements remains fragmented. Conclusions Despite United Nations recognition of maternal mortality as a human rights issue, the relevant policy communities have not yet managed to shift the policy agenda to prioritise the global right to health norm of shared responsibility for realising access to emergency obstetric care. The experience of HIV advocates in pushing for global solutions based on right to health principles, including participation, solidarity and accountability; suggest potential avenues for

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging - A troubleshooter in obstetric emergencies: A pictorial review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rohini; Bajaj, Sunil Kumar; Kumar, Nishith; Chandra, Ranjan; Misra, Ritu Nair; Malik, Amita; Thukral, Brij Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    The application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in pregnancy faced initial skepticism of physicians because of fetal safety concerns. The perceived fetal risk has been found to be unwarranted and of late, the modality has attained acceptability. Its role in diagnosing fetal anomalies is well recognized and following its safety certification in pregnancy, it is finding increasing utilization during pregnancy and puerperium. However, the use of MRI in maternal emergency obstetric conditions is relatively limited as it is still evolving. In early gestation, ectopic implantation is one of the major life-threatening conditions that are frequently encountered. Although ultrasound (USG) is the accepted mainstay modality, the diagnostic predicament persists in many cases. MRI has a role where USG is indeterminate, particularly in the extratubal ectopic pregnancy. Later in gestation, MRI can be a useful adjunct in placental disorders like previa, abruption, and adhesion. It is a good problem-solving tool in adnexal masses such as ovarian torsion and degenerated fibroid, which have a higher incidence during pregnancy. Catastrophic conditions like uterine rupture can also be preoperatively and timely diagnosed. MRI has a definite role to play in postpartum and post-abortion life-threatening conditions, e.g., retained products of conception, and gestational trophoblastic disease, especially when USG is inconclusive or inadequate. PMID:27081223

  15. Training of midwives in advanced obstetrics in Liberia

    PubMed Central

    Dolo, Obed; Clack, Alice; Gibson, Hannah; Lewis, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Problem The shortage of doctors in Liberia limits the provision of comprehensive emergency obstetric and neonatal care. Approach In a pilot project, two midwives were trained in advanced obstetric procedures and in the team approach to the in-hospital provision of advanced maternity care. The training took two years and was led by a Liberian consultant obstetrician with support from international experts. Local setting The training took place in CB Dunbar Maternity Hospital. This rural hospital deals with approximately 2000 deliveries annually, many of which present complications. In February 2015 there were just 117 doctors available in Liberia. Relevant changes In the first 18 months of training, the trainees were involved with 236 caesarean sections, 35 manual evacuations of products of conception, 25 manual removals of placentas, 21 vaginal breech deliveries, 14 vacuum deliveries, four repairs of ruptured uteri, the management of four cases of shoulder dystocia, three hysterectomies, two laparotomies for ruptured ectopic pregnancies and numerous obstetric ultrasound examinations. The trainees also managed 41 cases of eclampsia or severe pre-eclampsia, 25 of major postpartum haemorrhage and 21 of shock. Although, initially they only assisted senior doctors, the trainees subsequently progressed from direct to indirect supervision and then to independent management. Lessons learnt To compensate for a shortage of doctors able to undertake comprehensive emergency obstetric and neonatal care, experienced midwives can be taught to undertake advanced obstetric care and procedures. Their team work with doctors can be particularly valuable in rural hospitals in resource-poor countries. PMID:27147768

  16. Radiologist, obstetric patient, and emergency department provider survey: radiologist-patient interaction in the emergency department setting.

    PubMed

    Erlichman, David B; Stein, Marjorie W; Weiss, Amanda; Mazzariol, Fernanda

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and acceptance of a model of direct interaction between radiologist and patients in the emergency department (ED) setting. The study population was comprised of pregnant patients accrued in a non-consecutive prospective manner from June 2014 to September 2015, who had an obstetrical ultrasound performed in the radiology department of an inner-city tertiary care hospital at the request of the ED. The feasibility and approval of direct communication between radiologist and patient were evaluated by means of a questionnaire presented by an independent observer to the ED provider, patient, and radiologist. The exam enrolled 54 patients. Ultrasound (US) exam results were divided into (31) normal live intrauterine gestation (group 1), (7) abnormal failed intrauterine gestation or ectopic pregnancy (group 2), and (16) indeterminate pregnancies that could not be placed in the former categories and may require a follow-up exam (group 3). Forty-five (83 %) ED providers approved of the radiologist's direct communication with patients. Fifty (93 %) patients stated a better understanding of the radiologist's role in their care after than before the interaction. The radiologists found the interaction with patients to be positive in 52 (96 %) cases. Direct communication between radiologist and patient yielded a good acceptance by the radiologist, ED provider, and patient. More importantly, after the encounter, the vast majority of patients reported a better understanding of the radiologist's role in their care. PMID:26965006

  17. Referrals between Public Sector Health Institutions for Women with Obstetric High Risk, Complications, or Emergencies in India - A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Samiksha; Doyle, Pat; Campbell, Oona M; Mathew, Manu; Murthy, G V S

    2016-01-01

    Emergency obstetric care (EmOC) within primary health care systems requires a linked referral system to be effective in reducing maternal death. This systematic review aimed to summarize evidence on the proportion of referrals between institutions during pregnancy and delivery, and the factors affecting referrals, in India. We searched 6 electronic databases, reviewed four regional databases and repositories, and relevant program reports from India published between 1994 and 2013. All types of study or reports (except editorials, comments and letters) which reported on institution-referrals (out-referral or in-referral) for obstetric care were included. Results were synthesized on the proportion and the reasons for referral, and factors affecting referrals. Of the 11,346 articles identified by the search, we included 232 articles in the full text review and extracted data from 16 studies that met our inclusion criteria Of the 16, one was RCT, seven intervention cohort (without controls), six cross-sectional, and three qualitative studies. Bias and quality of studies were reported. Between 25% and 52% of all pregnancies were referred from Sub-centres for antenatal high-risk, 14% to 36% from nurse run delivery or basic EmOC centres for complications or emergencies, and 2 to 7% were referred from doctor run basic EmOC centres for specialist care at comprehensive EmOC centres. Problems identified with referrals from peripheral health centres included low skills and confidence of staff, reluctance to induce labour, confusion over the clinical criteria for referral, non-uniform standards of care at referral institutions, a tendency to by-pass middle level institutions, a lack of referral communication and supervision, and poor compliance. The high proportion of referrals from peripheral health centers reflects the lack of appropriate clinical guidelines, processes, and skills for obstetric care and referral in India. This, combined with inadequate referral communication

  18. Effectiveness of lifesaving skills training and improving institutional emergency obstetric care readiness in Lam Dong, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Nancy L; Nguyen, Thi Nhu Ngoc; Do, Trong Hieu; Quimby, Charlotte; Winikoff, Beverly; Fassihian, Goli

    2005-01-01

    Essential obstetric care is promoted as the prime strategy to save women's lives in developing countries. We measured the effect of improving lifesaving skills (LSS) capacity in Vietnam, a country in which most women deliver in health facilities. A quasi-experimental study was implemented to assess the impact of LSS training and readiness (availability of essential obstetric equipment, supplies, and medication) on the diagnosis of life-threatening obstetric conditions and appropriate management of labor and birth. The intervention (LSS training and readiness) was provided to all clinics and hospitals from 1 of 3 demographically similar districts in southcentral Vietnam, to hospitals only in another district, with the third district serving as the comparison group. Detection of life-threatening obstetric conditions increased in both experimental clinics and hospitals, but the intervention only improved the management of these conditions in hospitals. Management of life-threatening obstetric conditions is most effective in hospitals. The intervention did not clearly benefit women delivering in clinics. PMID:15973269

  19. Managing Obstetric Emergencies and Trauma (MOET) structured skills training in Armenia, utilising models and reality based scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Johanson, Richard B; Menon, Vijay; Burns, Ethel; Kargramanya, Eduard; Osipov, Vardges; Israelyan, Musheg; Sargsyan, Karine; Dobson, Sarah; Jones, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Background Mortality rates in Western Europe have fallen significantly over the last 50 years. Maternal mortality now averages 10 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births but in some of the Newly Independent States of the former Soviet Union, the ratio is nearly 4 times higher. The availability of skilled attendants to prevent, detect and manage major obstetric complications may be the single most important factor in preventing maternal deaths. A modern, multidisciplinary, scenario and model based training programme has been established in the UK (Managing Obstetric Emergencies and Trauma (MOET)) and allows specialist obstetricians to learn or revise the undertaking of procedures using models, and to have their skills tested in scenarios. Methods Given the success of the MOET course in the UK, the organisers were keen to evaluate it in another setting (Armenia). Pre-course knowledge and practice questionnaires were administered. In an exploratory analysis, post-course results were compared to pre-course answers obtained by the same interviewer. Results All candidates showed an improvement in post-course scores. The range was far narrower afterwards (167–188) than before (85–129.5). In the individual score analysis only two scenarios showed a non-significant change (cord prolapse and breech delivery). Conclusion This paper demonstrates the reliability of the model based scenarios, with a highly significant improvement in obstetric emergency management. However, clinical audit will be required to measure the full impact of training by longer term follow up. Audit of delays, specific obstetric complications, referrals and near misses may all be amenable to review. PMID:12020355

  20. Utilization of Emergency Service of Obstetrics and Gynecology: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of a Training Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Huseyin; Aksoy, Ulku; Ozturk, Mustafa; Ozyurt, Sezin; Acmaz, Gokhan; Karadag, Ozge Idem; Yucel, Burak; Aydin, Turgut

    2015-01-01

    Background Overutilization and inappropriate use of emergency departments (EDs) by patients with non-urgent health problems has become a major concern worldwide. This study aims to describe the characteristics of obstetric and gynecologic patients admitted to the Department of Emergency Obstetric and Gynecology. Methods A retrospective and cross-sectional study was designed at our Emergency Service of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Kayseri Education and Research Hospital of Medicine between January 1 and December 31, 2013. A total of 30,853 patients applying to emergency service were retrospectively analyzed from the admission charts, patient files and hospital automation system. Patients were assessed in terms of demographic features, presentation times, complaints, admission type (with own facilities, with consultation or with ambulance), diagnoses (urgent or non-ergent), discharge rates, clinical admission, rejection rate of examination, and rejection rate of hospitalization. Results A total of 30,853 patients were analyzed retrospectively. The mean age of patients was 27.69 ± 8.44 years; 51% of patients were between 20 and 29 years old. The categories of patients in urgent and non-urgent were 69% and 31% respectively. Most common presentation time period was between 19:00 and 21:00. Labor pain, pain and bleeding during pregnency, routine antenatal control, pelvic pain and menstrual irregularity were the most common complaints. Labor pain with the rate of 21% was the most common cause of ED admission. All patients who presented with labor pain were hospitalized. Patients hospitalized for labor constituted 56% of all hospitalized patients. Among patients, 62% were treated on an outpatient basis and 38% were hospitalized. Of patients, 3.54% refused to hospitalization. The cases using the ambulance to admission constituted 1.07% of all ED patients. Of these patients who have used ambulance 3.65% refused to the patient examination. Conclusions To improve the

  1. Maternal mortality and its relationship to emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in a tertiary care hospital in South India

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the trends in maternal mortality ratio over 5 years at JIPMER Hospital and to find out the proportion of maternal deaths in relation to emergency admissions. Methods: A retrospective analysis of maternal deaths from 2008 to 2012 with respect to type of admission, referral and ICU care and cause of death according to WHO classification of maternal deaths. Results: Of the 104 maternal deaths 90% were emergency admissions and 59% of them were referrals. Thirty two percent of them died within 24 hours of admission. Forty four percent could be admitted to ICU and few patients could not get ICU bed. The trend in cause of death was increasing proportion of indirect causes from 2008 to 2012. Conclusion: The trend in MMR was increasing proportion of indirect deaths. Ninety percent of maternal deaths were emergency admissions with complications requiring ICU care. Hence comprehensive EmOC facilities should incorporate Obstetric ICU care. PMID:27512460

  2. Hysterectomy - abdominal - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... fibroids Patient Instructions Getting out of bed after surgery Hysterectomy - laparoscopic - discharge Hysterectomy - vaginal - discharge Update Date 1/16/2015 Updated by: Cynthia D. White, MD, Fellow American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Group Health Cooperative, Bellevue, WA. ...

  3. Hysterectomy - Series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A hysterectomy is the removal of the uterus, resulting in the inability to become pregnant (sterility). May be done through the abdomen or the vagina. Hysterectomy may be recommended for: severe, long-term (chronic) ...

  4. Getting women to hospital is not enough: a qualitative study of access to emergency obstetric care in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Pitchforth, E; van Teijlingen, E; Graham, W; Dixon‐Woods, M; Chowdhury, M

    2006-01-01

    Objective To explore what happened to poor women in Bangladesh once they reached a hospital providing comprehensive emergency obstetric care (EmOC) and to identify support mechanisms. Design Mixed methods qualitative study. Setting Large government medical college hospital in Bangladesh. Sample Providers and users of EmOC. Methods Ethnographic observation in obstetrics unit including interviews with staff and women using the unit and their carers. Results Women had to mobilise significant financial and social resources to fund out of pocket expenses. Poorer women faced greater challenges in receiving treatment as relatives were less able to raise the necessary cash. The official financial support mechanism was bureaucratic and largely unsuitable in emergency situations. Doctors operated a less formal “poor fund” system to help the poorest women. There was no formal assessment of poverty; rather, doctors made “adjudications” of women's need for support based on severity of condition and presence of friends and relatives. Limited resources led to a “wait and see” policy that meant women's condition could deteriorate before help was provided. Conclusions Greater consideration must be given to what happens at health facilities to ensure that (1) using EmOC does not further impoverish families; and (2) the ability to pay does not influence treatment. Developing alternative finance mechanisms to reduce the burden of out of pocket expenses is crucial but challenging. Increased investment in EmOC must be accompanied by an increased focus on equity. PMID:16751473

  5. Evidence Basis for Hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, Jenifer N; Trabuco, Emanuel C

    2016-09-01

    Although vaginal hysterectomy has long been championed by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists as the preferred mode of uterine removal, nationwide vaginal hysterectomy utilization has steadily declined. This article reviews the evidence comparing vaginal with other modes of hysterectomy and highlights areas of ongoing controversy regarding contraindications to vaginal surgery, risk of subsequent prolapse development, and impacts of changing hysterectomy trends on resident education. PMID:27521881

  6. Current Issues with Hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Barker, Matthew A

    2016-09-01

    Hysterectomy is one of the most common gynecologic surgeries. Early adoption of surgical advancements in hysterectomies has raised concerns over safety, quality, and costs. The risk of potential leiomyosarcoma in women undergoing minimally invasive hysterectomy led the US Food and Drug Administration to discourage the use of electronic power morcellator. Minimally invasive hysterectomies have increased substantially despite lack of data supporting its use over other forms of hysterectomy and increased costs. Health care reform is incentivizing providers to improve quality, improve safety, and decrease costs through standardized outcomes and process measures. PMID:27521886

  7. Availability and Distribution of Emergency Obstetric Care Services in Karnataka State, South India: Access and Equity Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Mony, Prem K.; Krishnamurthy, Jayanna; Thomas, Annamma; Sankar, Kiruba; Ramesh, B. M.; Moses, Stephen; Blanchard, James; Avery, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Background As part of efforts to reduce maternal deaths in Karnataka state, India, there has been a concerted effort to increase institutional deliveries. However, little is known about the quality of care in these healthcare facilities. We investigated the availability and distribution of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) services in eight northern districts of Karnataka state in south India. Methods & Findings We undertook a cross-sectional study of 444 government and 422 private health facilities, functional 24-hours-a-day 7-days-a-week. EmOC availability and distribution were evaluated for 8 districts and 42 taluks (sub-districts) during the year 2010, based on a combination of self-reporting, record review and direct observation. Overall, the availability of EmOC services at the sub-state level [EmOC = 5.9/500,000; comprehensive EmOC (CEmOC) = 4.5/500,000 and basic EmOC (BEmOC) = 1.4/500,000] was seen to meet the benchmark. These services however were largely located in the private sector (90% of CEmOC and 70% of BemOC facilities). Thirty six percent of private facilities and six percent of government facilities were EmOC centres. Although half of eight districts had a sufficient number of EmOC facilities and all eight districts had a sufficient number of CEmOC facilities, only two-fifths of the 42 taluks had a sufficient number of EmOC facilities. With the private facilities being largely located in select towns only, the ‘non-headquarter’ taluks and ‘backward’ taluks suffered from a marked lack of coverage of these services. Spatial mapping further helped identify the clustering of a large number of contiguous taluks without adequate government EmOC facilities in northeastern Karnataka. Conclusions In conclusion, disaggregating information on emergency obstetric care service availability at district and subdistrict levels is critical for health policy and planning in the Indian setting. Reducing maternal deaths will require greater

  8. Successes and Challenges of Interprofessional Physiologic Birth and Obstetric Emergency Simulations in a Nurse-Midwifery Education Program.

    PubMed

    Shaw-Battista, Jenna; Belew, Cynthia; Anderson, Deborah; van Schaik, Sandrijn

    2015-01-01

    This article describes childbirth simulation design and implementation within the nurse-midwifery education program at the University of California, San Francisco. Nurse-midwife and obstetrician faculty coordinators were supported by faculty from multiple professions and specialties in curriculum review and simulation development and implementation. The primary goal of the resulting technology-enhanced simulations of normal physiologic birth and obstetric emergencies was to assist learners' development of interprofessional competencies related to communication, teamwork, and patient-centered care. Trainees included nurse-midwifery students; residents in obstetrics, pediatrics, and family medicine; medical students; and advanced practice nursing students in pediatrics. The diversity of participant types and learning levels provided benefits and presented challenges to effective scenario-based simulation design among numerous other theoretical and logistical considerations. This project revealed practical solutions informed by emerging health sciences and education research literature, faculty experience, and formal course evaluations by learners. Best practices in simulation development and implementation were incorporated, including curriculum revision grounded in needs assessment, case- and event-based clinical scenarios, optimization of fidelity, and ample time for participant debriefing. Adequate preparation and attention to detail increased the immersive experience and benefits of simulation. Suggestions for fidelity enhancement are provided with examples of simulation scenarios, a timeline for preparations, and discussion topics to facilitate meaningful learning by maternity and newborn care providers and trainees in clinical and academic settings. Pre- and postsimulation measurements of knowledge, skills, and attitudes are ongoing and not reported. This article is part of a special series of articles that address midwifery innovations in clinical practice

  9. An assessment of priority setting process and its implication on availability of emergency obstetric care services in Malindi District, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Nyandieka, Lilian Nyamusi; Kombe, Yeri; Ng'ang'a, Zipporah; Byskov, Jens; Njeru, Mercy Karimi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In spite of the critical role of Emergency Obstetric Care in treating complications arising from pregnancy and childbirth, very few facilities are equipped in Kenya to offer this service. In Malindi, availability of EmOC services does not meet the UN recommended levels of at least one comprehensive and four basic EmOC facilities per 500,000 populations. This study was conducted to assess priority setting process and its implication on availability, access and use of EmOC services at the district level. Methods A qualitative study was conducted both at health facility and community levels. Triangulation of data sources and methods was employed, where document reviews, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with health personnel, facility committee members, stakeholders who offer and/ or support maternal health services and programmes; and the community members as end users. Data was thematically analysed. Results Limitations in the extent to which priorities in regard to maternal health services can be set at the district level were observed. The priority setting process was greatly restricted by guidelines and limited resources from the national level. Relevant stakeholders including community members are not involved in the priority setting process, thereby denying them the opportunity to contribute in the process. Conclusion The findings illuminate that consideration of all local plans in national planning and budgeting as well as the involvement of all relevant stakeholders in the priority setting exercise is essential in order to achieve a consensus on the provision of emergency obstetric care services among other health service priorities. PMID:26889337

  10. [Peripartal hysterectomy - review].

    PubMed

    Pálová, E; Borovsky, M

    2012-06-01

    Peripartal hysterectomy is one of the life - threatening procedures needed to be performed in an urgent situation. Women at highest risk of peripartal hysterectomy are multiparas, women who had a caesarian delivery in either previous or present pregnancy or women who had an abnormal placentation. This report presents the basic issues and brief review of the major indications of peripartal hysterectomy. It also compares the effectiveness of the selected types of operation. PMID:22779724

  11. Has Chiranjeevi Yojana changed the geographic availability of free comprehensive emergency obstetric care services in Gujarat, India?

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Kranti Suresh; Yasobant, Sandul; Patel, Amit; Upadhyay, Ashish; Mavalankar, Dileep V.

    2015-01-01

    Background The high rate of maternal mortality in India is of grave concern. Poor rural Indian women are most vulnerable to preventable maternal deaths primarily because they have limited availability of affordable emergency obstetric care (EmOC) within reasonable geographic proximity. Scarcity of obstetricians in the public sector combined with financial barriers to accessing private sector obstetrician services preclude this underserved population from availing lifesaving functions of comprehensive EmOC such as C-section. In order to overcome this limitation, Government of Gujarat initiated a unique public–private partnership program called Chiranjeevi Yojana (CY) in 2005. The program envisaged leveraging private sector providers to increase availability and thereby accessibility of EmOC care for vulnerable sections of society. Under CY, private sector providers render obstetric care services to poor women at no cost to patients. This paper examines the CY's effectiveness in improving availability of CEmOC services between 2006 and 2012 in three districts of Gujarat, India. Methods Primary data on facility locations, EmOC functionality, and obstetric bed availability were collected in the years 2012 and 2013 in three study districts. Secondary data from Census 2001 and 2011 were used along with required geographic information from Topo sheets and Google Earth maps. ArcGIS version 10 was used to analyze the availability of services using two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) method. Results Our analysis suggests that the availability of CEmOC services within reasonable travel distance has greatly improved in all three study districts as a result of CY. We also show that the declining participation of the private sector did not result in an increase in distance to the nearest facility, but the extent of availability of providers for several villages was reduced. Spatial and temporal analyses in this paper provide a comprehensive understanding of trends in the

  12. Essential basic and emergency obstetric and newborn care: from education and training to service delivery and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Otolorin, Emmanuel; Gomez, Patricia; Currie, Sheena; Thapa, Kusum; Dao, Blami

    2015-06-01

    Approximately 15% of expected births worldwide will result in life-threatening complications during pregnancy, delivery, or the postpartum period. Providers skilled in emergency obstetric and newborn care (EmONC) services are essential, particularly in countries with a high burden of maternal and newborn mortality. Jhpiego and its consortia partners have implemented three global programs to build provider capacity to provide comprehensive EmONC services to women and newborns in these resource-poor settings. Providers have been educated to deliver high-impact maternal and newborn health interventions, such as prevention and treatment of postpartum hemorrhage and pre-eclampsia/eclampsia and management of birth asphyxia, within the broader context of quality health services. This article describes Jhpiego's programming efforts within the framework of the basic and expanded signal functions that serve as indicators of high-quality basic and emergency care services. Lessons learned include the importance of health facility strengthening, competency-based provider education, global leadership, and strong government ownership and coordination as essential precursors to scale-up of high impact evidence-based maternal and newborn interventions in low-resource settings. PMID:26115858

  13. Hysterectomy throughout history.

    PubMed

    Sparić, Radmila; Hudelist, Gernot; Berisava, Milica; Gudović, Aleksandra; Buzadzić, Snezana

    2011-01-01

    Hysterectomy, which is one of the most common surgeries performed on women, dates back to ancient times. The history of hysterectomy comprises biographies of many humble men and the significant individual efforts that they made to fight the skepticism of the medical communities of their times. Many of the pioneers were ignored. Although there are a number of alternatives to hysterectomy available, it remains one of the most frequently performed gynaecological operations. The introduction of antisepsis, anaesthesia, antibiotics and blood transfusion made hysterectomy a safe procedure. Nowadays, we distinguish three different surgical approaches to hysterectomy: vaginal, abdominal and laparoscopic. The limitations of conventional laparoscopy have led to the development of robotic surgery, which has evolved over the past decade from simple adjustable arms to support cameras in laparoscopic surgery to more sophisticated four-armed machines now being in use worldwide. PMID:22519184

  14. Kaqchikel midwives, home births, and emergency obstetric referrals in Guatemala: contextualizing the choice to stay at home.

    PubMed

    Berry, Nicole S

    2006-04-01

    Maternal mortality is highest in those countries whose health budgets are restricted. Practical strategies employed in the International Safe Motherhood Initiative, therefore, must be both effective and economical. Investing in emergency obstetric care resources has been touted as one such strategy. This investment aims to insure significant improvements are made in regional health centers, and a chain of referral is put into place so that only problem cases are attended by the most skilled health workers. This article examines how this model of referral functions in Sololá, Guatemala, where most Kaqchikel Mayan women give birth at home with a traditional midwife, and no skilled biomedical attendant is available at the birth to make a referral. Ethnographic data is used to explore reasons why women do not go to the hospital at the first sign of difficulty. I argue that the problem frequently is not that Mayan midwives, their clients and families fail to understand the biomedical information about dangers in birth, but rather that this information fails to fit into an already existing social system of understanding birth and birth-related knowledge. PMID:16225975

  15. SYMPTEK homemade foam models for client education and emergency obstetric care skills training in low-resource settings.

    PubMed

    Deganus, Sylvia A

    2009-10-01

    Clinical training for health care workers using anatomical models and simulation has become an established norm. A major requirement for this approach is the availability of lifelike training models or simulators for skills practice. Manufactured sophisticated human models such as the resuscitation neonatal dolls, the Zoë gynaecologic simulator, and other pelvic models are very expensive, and are beyond the budgets of many training programs or activities in low-resource countries. Clinical training programs in many low-resource countries suffer greatly because of this cost limitation. Yet it is also in these same poor countries that the need for skilled human resources in reproductive health is greatest. The SYMPTEK homemade models were developed in response to the need for cheaper, more readily available humanistic models for training in emergency obstetric skills and also for client education. With minimal training, a variety of cheap SYMPTEK models can easily be made, by both trainees and facilitators, from high-density latex foam material commonly used for furnishings. The models are reusable, durable, portable, and easily maintained. The uses, advantages, disadvantages, and development of the SYMPTEK foam models are described in this article. PMID:19941722

  16. Promoting cultural humility during labor and birth: putting theory into action during PRONTO obstetric and neonatal emergency training.

    PubMed

    Fahey, Jenifer O; Cohen, Susanna R; Holme, Francesca; Buttrick, Elizabeth S; Dettinger, Julia C; Kestler, Edgar; Walker, Dilys M

    2013-01-01

    Maternal and neonatal mortality in Northern Guatemala, a region with a high percentage of indigenous people, is disproportionately high. Initiatives to improve quality of care at local health facilities equipped for births, and increasing the number of births attended at these facilities will help address this problem. PRONTO (Programa de Rescate Obstétrico y Neonatal: Tratamiento Óptimo y Oportuno) is a low-tech, high-fidelity, simulation-based, provider-to-provider training in the management of obstetric and neonatal emergencies. This program has been successfully tested and implemented in Mexico. PRONTO will now be implemented in Guatemala as part of an initiative to decrease maternal and perinatal mortality. Guatemalan health authorities have requested that the training include training on cultural humility and humanized birth. This article describes the process of curricular adaptation to satisfy this request. The PRONTO team adapted the existing program through 4 steps: (a) analysis of the problem and context through a review of qualitative data and stakeholder interviews, (b) literature review and adoption of a theoretical framework regarding cultural humility and adult learning, (c) adaptation of the curriculum and design of new activities and simulations, and (d) implementation of adapted and expanded curriculum and further refinement in response to participant response. PMID:23360940

  17. Skilled birth attendants in Tanzania: a descriptive study of cadres and emergency obstetric care signal functions performed.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Etsuko; Adegoke, Adetoro A; Masenga, Gileard; Fimbo, Janeth; Msuya, Sia E

    2015-01-01

    Although most developing countries monitor the proportion of births attended by skilled birth attendants (SBA), they lack information on the availability and performance of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) signal functions by different cadres of health care providers (HCPs). The World Health Organisation signal functions are set of key interventions that targets direct obstetric causes of maternal deaths. Seven signal functions are required for health facilities providing basic EmOC and nine for facilities providing comprehensive EmOC. Our objectives were to describe cadres of HCPs who are considered SBAs in Tanzania, the EmOC signal functions they perform and challenges associated with performance of EmOC signal functions. We conducted a cross-sectional study of HCPs offering maternity care services at eight health facilities in Moshi Urban District in northern Tanzania. A questionnaire and health facility assessment forms were used to collect information from participants and health facilities. A total of 199 HCPs working at eight health facilities in Moshi Urban District met the inclusion criteria. Out of 199, 158 participated, giving a response rate of 79.4 %. Ten cadres of HCPs were identified as conducting deliveries regardless of the level of health facilities. Most of the participants (81 %) considered themselves SBAs, although some were not considered SBAs by the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MOHSW). Only two out of the eight facilities provided all of the required EmOC signal functions. While Assistant Medical Officers are expected to perform all the signal functions, only 38 % and 13 % had performed vacuum extraction or caesarean sections respectively. Very few registered and enrolled nurse-midwives had performed removal of retained products (22 %) or assisted vaginal delivery (24 and 11 %). Inadequate equipment and supplies, and lack of knowledge and skills in performing EmOC were two main challenges identified by health care providers in all

  18. Availability and quality of emergency obstetric care, an alternative strategy to reduce maternal mortality: experience of Tongji Hospital, Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Bangoura, Ismael Fatou; Hu, Jian; Gong, Xun; Wang, Xuanxuan; Wei, Jingjing; Zhang, Wenbin; Zhang, Xiang; Fang, Pengqian

    2012-04-01

    The burden of maternal mortality (MM) and morbidity is especially high in Asia. However, China has made significant progress in reducing MM over the past two decades, and hence maternal death rate has declined considerably in last decade. To analyze availability and quality of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) received by women at Tongji Hospital, Wuhan, China, this study retrospectively analyzed various pregnancy-related complications at the hospital from 2000 to 2009. Two baseline periods of equal length were used for the comparison of variables. A total of 11 223 obstetric complications leading to MM were identified on a total of 15 730 hospitalizations, either 71.35% of all activities. No maternal death was recorded. Mean age of women was 29.31 years with a wide range of 14-52 years. About 96.26% of women had higher levels of schooling, university degrees and above and received the education of secondary school or college. About 3.74% received primary education at period two (P2) from 2005 to 2009, which was significantly higher than that of period one (P1) from 2000 to 2004 (P<0.05) (OR: 0.586; 95% CI: 0.442 to 0.776). About 65.69% were employed as skilled or professional workers at P2, which was significantly higher than that of P1 (P<0.05). About 34.31% were unskilled workers at P2, which was significantly higher than that of P1 (P<0.05). Caesarean section was performed for 9,930 women (88.48%) and the percentage of the procedure increased significantly from 19.25% at P1 to 69.23% at P2 (P<0.05). We were led to conclude that, despite the progress, significant gaps in the performance of maternal health services between rural and urban areas remain. However, MM reduction can be achieved in China. Priorities must include, but not limited to the following: secondary healthcare development, health policy and management, strengthening primary healthcare services. PMID:22528213

  19. Assessing skilled birth attendants and emergency obstetric care in rural Tanzania: the inadequacy of using global standards and indicators to measure local realities.

    PubMed

    Spangler, Sydney A

    2012-06-01

    Current efforts to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity in low-resource settings often depend on global standards and indicators to assess obstetric care, particularly skilled birth attendants and emergency obstetric care. This paper describes challenges in using these standards to assess obstetric services in the Kilombero Valley of Tanzania. A health facility survey and extensive participant observation showed existing services to be complicated and fluid, involving a wide array of skills, resources, and improvisations. Attempts to measure these services against established standards and indicators were not successful. Some aspects of care were over-valued while others were under-valued, with significant neglect of context and quality. This paper discusses the implications of these findings for ongoing maternal health care efforts in unique and complex settings, questioning the current reliance on generic (and often obscure) archetypes of obstetric care in policy and programming. It suggests that current indicators may be insufficient to assess services in low-resource settings, but not that these settings should settle for lower standards of care. In addition to global benchmarks, assessment approaches that emphasize quality of care and recognize available resources might better account for local realities, leading to more effective, more sustainable service delivery. PMID:22789091

  20. Obstetric life support.

    PubMed

    Puck, Andrea Lorraine; Oakeson, Ann Marie; Morales-Clark, Ana; Druzin, Maurice

    2012-01-01

    The death of a woman during pregnancy is devastating. Although the incidence of maternal cardiac arrest is increasing, it continues to be a comparatively rare event. Obstetric healthcare providers may go through their entire career without participating in a maternal cardiac resuscitation. Concern has been raised that when an arrest does occur in the obstetric unit, providers who are trained in life support skills at 2-year intervals are ill equipped to provide the best possible care. The quality of resuscitation skills provided during cardiopulmonary arrest of inpatients often may be poor, and knowledge of critical steps to be followed during resuscitation may not be retained after life support training. The Obstetric Life Support (ObLS) training program is a method of obstetric nursing and medical staff training that is relevant, comprehensive, and cost-effective. It takes into consideration both the care needs of the obstetric patient and the adult learning needs of providers. The ObLS program brings obstetric nurses, obstetricians, and anesthesiologists together in multidisciplinary team training that is crucial to developing efficient emergency response. PMID:22551860

  1. Referrals between Public Sector Health Institutions for Women with Obstetric High Risk, Complications, or Emergencies in India – A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Samiksha; Doyle, Pat; Campbell, Oona M.; Mathew, Manu; Murthy, G. V. S.

    2016-01-01

    Emergency obstetric care (EmOC) within primary health care systems requires a linked referral system to be effective in reducing maternal death. This systematic review aimed to summarize evidence on the proportion of referrals between institutions during pregnancy and delivery, and the factors affecting referrals, in India. We searched 6 electronic databases, reviewed four regional databases and repositories, and relevant program reports from India published between 1994 and 2013. All types of study or reports (except editorials, comments and letters) which reported on institution-referrals (out-referral or in-referral) for obstetric care were included. Results were synthesized on the proportion and the reasons for referral, and factors affecting referrals. Of the 11,346 articles identified by the search, we included 232 articles in the full text review and extracted data from 16 studies that met our inclusion criteria Of the 16, one was RCT, seven intervention cohort (without controls), six cross-sectional, and three qualitative studies. Bias and quality of studies were reported. Between 25% and 52% of all pregnancies were referred from Sub-centres for antenatal high-risk, 14% to 36% from nurse run delivery or basic EmOC centres for complications or emergencies, and 2 to 7% were referred from doctor run basic EmOC centres for specialist care at comprehensive EmOC centres. Problems identified with referrals from peripheral health centres included low skills and confidence of staff, reluctance to induce labour, confusion over the clinical criteria for referral, non-uniform standards of care at referral institutions, a tendency to by-pass middle level institutions, a lack of referral communication and supervision, and poor compliance. The high proportion of referrals from peripheral health centers reflects the lack of appropriate clinical guidelines, processes, and skills for obstetric care and referral in India. This, combined with inadequate referral communication

  2. Hysterectomy - laparoscopic - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... called a hysterectomy. The surgeon made 3 to 5 small cuts in your belly. A laparoscope (a thin tube with a small camera on it) and other small surgical tools were inserted through those incisions. Part or all ...

  3. Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy and Laparoscopic-Assisted Vaginal Hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    King, Cara R; Giles, Dobie

    2016-09-01

    Vaginal hysterectomy has been shown to have the lowest complication rate, better cosmesis, and decreased cost compared with alternate routes of hysterectomy. However, there are times when a vaginal hysterectomy is not feasible and an open abdominal hysterectomy should be avoided. Minimally invasive surgery has evolved over the last several decades; with the improvement in optics and surgical instruments, laparoscopic hysterectomy is becoming increasingly common. A total laparoscopic hysterectomy is possible with proper training, including sound technique in laparoscopic suturing for closure of the vaginal cuff. PMID:27521879

  4. The Effectiveness of Emergency Obstetric Referral Interventions in Developing Country Settings: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Julia; Kanguru, Lovney; Astin, Margaret; Munjanja, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Background Pregnancy complications can be unpredictable and many women in developing countries cannot access health facilities where life-saving care is available. This study assesses the effects of referral interventions that enable pregnant women to reach health facilities during an emergency, after the decision to seek care is made. Methods and findings Selected bibliographic databases were searched with no date or language restrictions. Randomised controlled trials and quasi experimental study designs with a comparison group were included. Outcomes of interest included maternal and neonatal mortality and other intermediate measures such as service utilisation. Two reviewers independently selected, appraised, and extracted articles using predefined fields. Forest plots, tables, and qualitative summaries of study quality, size, and direction of effect were used for analysis. Nineteen studies were included. In South Asian settings, four studies of organisational interventions in communities that generated funds for transport reduced neonatal deaths, with the largest effect seen in India (odds ratio 0·48 95% CI 0·34–0·68). Three quasi experimental studies from sub-Saharan Africa reported reductions in stillbirths with maternity waiting home interventions, with one statistically significant result (OR 0.56 95% CI 0.32–0.96). Effects of interventions on maternal mortality were unclear. Referral interventions usually improved utilisation of health services but the opposite effect was also documented. The effects of multiple interventions in the studies could not be disentangled. Explanatory mechanisms through which the interventions worked could not be ascertained. Conclusions Community mobilisation interventions may reduce neonatal mortality but the contribution of referral components cannot be ascertained. The reduction in stillbirth rates resulting from maternity waiting homes needs further study. Referral interventions can have unexpected adverse effects

  5. Competence of health workers in emergency obstetric care: an assessment using clinical vignettes in Brong Ahafo region, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Lohela, Terhi Johanna; Nesbitt, Robin Clark; Manu, Alexander; Vesel, Linda; Okyere, Eunice; Kirkwood, Betty; Gabrysch, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess health worker competence in emergency obstetric care using clinical vignettes, to link competence to availability of infrastructure in facilities, and to average annual delivery workload in facilities. Design Cross-sectional Health Facility Assessment linked to population-based surveillance data. Setting 7 districts in Brong Ahafo region, Ghana. Participants Most experienced delivery care providers in all 64 delivery facilities in the 7 districts. Primary outcome measures Health worker competence in clinical vignette actions by cadre of delivery care provider and by type of facility. Competence was also compared with availability of relevant drugs and equipment, and to average annual workload per skilled birth attendant. Results Vignette scores were moderate overall, and differed significantly by respondent cadre ranging from a median of 70% correct among doctors, via 55% among midwives, to 25% among other cadres such as health assistants and health extension workers (p<0.001). Competence varied significantly by facility type: hospital respondents, who were mainly doctors and midwives, achieved highest scores (70% correct) and clinic respondents scored lowest (45% correct). There was a lack of inexpensive key drugs and equipment to carry out vignette actions, and more often, lack of competence to use available items in clinical situations. The average annual workload was very unevenly distributed among facilities, ranging from 0 to 184 deliveries per skilled birth attendant, with higher workload associated with higher vignette scores. Conclusions Lack of competence might limit clinical practice even more than lack of relevant drugs and equipment. Cadres other than midwives and doctors might not be able to diagnose and manage delivery complications. Checking clinical competence through vignettes in addition to checklist items could contribute to a more comprehensive approach to evaluate quality of care. Trial registration number NCT00623337

  6. The changing face of obstetric fistula surgery in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jeremy; Ayenachew, Fekade; Ballard, Karen D

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the incidence and type of obstetric fistula presenting to Hamlin Fistula Ethiopia over a 4-year period. Study design This is a 4-year retrospective survey of obstetric fistula treated at three Hamlin Fistula Hospitals in Ethiopia, where approximately half of all women in the country are treated. The operation logbook was reviewed to identify all new cases of obstetric fistula presenting from 2011 to 2015. New cases of urinary fistula were classified by fistula type (high or low), age, and parity of the woman. Results In total, 2,593 new cases of urinary fistulae were identified in the study period. The number of new cases fell by 20% per year over the 4 years (P<0.001). A total of 1,845 cases (71.1%) were low (ischemic) fistulae, and 804 cases (43.6%) of these had an extreme form of low circumferential fistula. A total of 638 (24.6%) women had a high bladder fistula, which predominantly occurs following surgery, specifically cesarean section or emergency hysterectomy, and 110 (4.2%) women had a ureteric fistula. The incidence of high fistulae increased over the study period from 26.9% to 36.2% (P<0.001). A greater proportion of multiparous women had a high bladder fistula (70.3%) compared with primigravid women (29.7%) (P<0.001). Conversely, a greater proportion of primiparous women experienced a low circumferential fistulae (68.6%) compared with multiparous women (31.4%) (P<0.001). Conclusion There appears to be a decline in the number of Ethiopian women being treated for new obstetric urinary fistulae. However, the type of fistula being presented for treatment is changing, with a rise in high fistulae that very likely occurred following cesarean section and a decline in the classic low fistulae that arise following obstructed childbirth. PMID:27445505

  7. Hysterectomy for Benign Conditions of the Uterus: Total Abdominal Hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Moen, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Hysterectomy is the most common major gynecologic procedure. Although alternatives to hysterectomy result in fewer procedures performed annually, and the use of endoscopic techniques and vaginal hysterectomy have resulted in a lower percentage performed by the open abdominal route, certain pelvic disorders require abdominal hysterectomy. Preoperative evaluation with informed consent and surgical planning are essential to select appropriate candidates. Prophylactic antibiotics, thromboprophylaxis, attention to surgical technique, and enhanced recovery protocols should be used to provide optimal outcomes. PMID:27521877

  8. Hysterectomy: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Sutton, C

    1997-03-01

    In the relatively long history of man, surgery has been a comparatively recent development; the abdomen was first deliberately opened to remove an ovarian cyst by Ephraim McDowell in Kentucky in 1809. The first abdominal hysterectomy was performed by Charles Clay in Manchester, England in 1843; unfortunately the diagnosis was wrong and the patient died in the immediate post-operative period. The following year, Charles Clay was almost the first to claim a surviving patient, however she died post-operatively and it was not until 1853 that Ellis Burnham from Lowell, Massachusetts achieved the first successful abdominal hysterectomy although again the diagnosis was wrong. Vaginal hysterectomy dates back to ancient times. The procedure was performed by Soranus of Ephesus 120 years after the birth of Christ, and the many reports of its use in the middle ages were nearly always for the extirpation of an inverted uterus and the patients rarely survived. The early hysterectomies were fraught with hazard and the patients usually died of haemorrhage, peritonitis, and exhaustion. Early procedures were performed without anaesthesia with a mortality of about 70%, mainly due to sepsis from leaving a long ligature to encourage the drainage of pus. Thomas Keith from Scotland realized the danger of this practice and merely cauterized the cervical stump and allowed it to fall internally, thereby bringing the mortality down to about 8%. Hysterectomy became safer with the introduction of anaesthesia, antibiotics and antisepsis, blood transfusions and intravenous therapy. During the 1930s, Richardson introduced the total abdominal hysterectomy to avoid serosanguineous discharge from the cervical remnant and the risk of cervical carcinoma developing in the stump. Apart from this innovation, and the transverse incision introduced by Johanns Pfannenstiel in the 1920s, there was little advance in hysterectomy techniques until the advent of endoscopic surgery and the performance of the

  9. Obstetrical Forceps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Marshall inventors Seth Lawson and Stanley Smeltzer display a pair of obstetrical forceps they designed. The forceps, made from composite space-age materials, measure the force applied during instrument-assisted delivery. The new forceps will help medical students get a feel for instrument-assisted deliveries before entering practice.

  10. Correlates of hysterectomy in Australia.

    PubMed

    Santow, G; Bracher, M

    1992-04-01

    With around one in five women undergoing hysterectomy by the age of 50, the prevalence of hysterectomy in Australia is greater than in Europe but less than in the United States. In this paper, data from a nationally representative sample survey of 2547 Australian women aged 20-59 years are employed to identify correlates of hysterectomy and tubal sterilization over the last 30 years. Physiological, socio-economic and supply-side factors all influence the propensity to undergo hysterectomy, and a comparison with the correlates of tubal sterilization reveals parallels and contrasts between the determinants of the two operations. Age and parity are important predictors of hysterectomy. In addition, use of oral contraceptives for at least five years reduces the risk of hysterectomy, as do tubal sterilization, tertiary education and birthplace in Southern Europe. Conversely, risk increases after experiencing side effects with the IUD or repeated foetal losses, or after bearing a third child before the age of 25. PMID:1604382

  11. Haemorrhagia post partum; an implementation study on the evidence-based guideline of the Dutch Society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (NVOG) and the MOET (Managing Obstetric Emergencies and Trauma-course) instructions; the Fluxim study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background One of the most important causes of maternal mortality and severe morbidity worldwide is post partum haemorrhage (PPH). Factors as substandard care are frequently reported in the international literature and there are similar reports in the Netherlands. The incidence of PPH in the Dutch population is 5% containing 10.000 women a year. The introduction of an evidence-based guideline on PPH by the Dutch society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (NVOG) and the initiation of the MOET course (Managing Obstetrics Emergencies and Trauma) did not lead to a reduction of PPH. This implies the possibility of an incomplete implementation of both the NVOG guideline and MOET-instructions. Therefore, the aim of this study is to develop and test a tailored strategy to implement both the NVOG guideline and MOET-instructions Methods/Design One step in the development procedure is to evaluate the implementation of the guideline and MOET-instructions in the current care. Therefore measurement of the actual care will be performed in a representative sample of 20 hospitals. This will be done by prospective observation of the third stage of labour of 320 women with a high risk of PPH using quality indicators extracted from the NVOG guideline and MOET instructions. In the next step barriers and facilitators for guideline adherence will be analyzed by performance of semi structured interviews with 30 professionals and 10 patients, followed by a questionnaire study among all Dutch gynaecologists and midwives to quantify the barriers mentioned. Based on the outcomes, a tailored strategy to implement the NVOG guideline and MOET-instructions will be developed and tested in a feasibility study in 4 hospitals, including effect-, process- and cost evaluation. Discussion This study will provide insight into current Dutch practice, in particular to what extent the PPH guidelines of the NVOG and the MOET-instructions have been implemented in the actual care, and into the barriers and

  12. Potentially Avoidable Peripartum Hysterectomies in Denmark: A Population Based Clinical Audit

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Lone; Langhoff-Roos, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Objective To audit the clinical management preceding peripartum hysterectomy and evaluate if peripartum hysterectomies are potentially avoidable and by which means. Material and Methods We developed a structured audit form based on explicit criteria for the minimal mandatory management of the specific types of pregnancy and delivery complications leading to peripartum hysterectomy. We evaluated medical records of the 50 Danish women with peripartum hysterectomy identified in the Nordic Obstetric Surveillance Study 2009–2012 and made short narratives of all cases. Results The most frequent indication for hysterectomy was hemorrhage. The two main initial causes were abnormally invasive placenta (26%) and lacerations (26%). Primary atony was third and occurred in 20%. Before hysterectomy another 26% had secondary atony following complications such as lacerations, retained placental tissue or coagulation defects. Of the 50 cases, 24% were assessed to be avoidable and 30% potentially avoidable. Hysterectomy following primary and secondary atony was assessed to be avoidable in 4/10 and 4/13 cases, respectively. Early sufficient suturing of lacerations and uterine ruptures, as well as a more widespread use of intrauterine balloons alone or in combination with uterine compression sutures (the sandwich model), could presumably have prevented about one fourth of the peripartum hysterectomies. Conclusion More than 50% of peripartum hysterectomies seem to be avoidable by simple measures. In order to minimize the number of unnecessary peripartum hysterectomies, obstetricians and anesthesiologists should investigate individual cases by structured clinical audit, and disseminate and discuss the results for educational purposes. An international collaboration is warranted to strengthen our recommendations and reveal if they are generally applicable. PMID:27560802

  13. The End of the Hysterectomy Epidemic and Endometrial Cancer Incidence: What Are the Unintended Consequences of Declining Hysterectomy Rates?

    PubMed Central

    Temkin, Sarah M.; Minasian, Lori; Noone, Anne-Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Population-level cancer incidence rates are one measure to estimate the cancer burden. The goal is to provide information on trends to measure progress against cancer at the population level and identify emerging patterns signifying increased risk for additional research and intervention. Endometrial cancer is the most common of the gynecologic malignancies but capturing the incidence of disease among women at risk (i.e., women with a uterus) is challenging and not routinely published. Decreasing rates of hysterectomy increase the number of women at risk for disease, which should be reflected in the denominator of the incidence rate calculation. Furthermore, hysterectomy rates vary within the United States by multiple factors including geographic location, race, and ethnicity. Changing rates of hysterectomy are important to consider when looking at endometrial cancer trends. By correcting for hysterectomy when calculating incidence rates of cancers of the uterine corpus, many of the disparities that have been assumed for this disease are diminished. PMID:27148481

  14. Obstetric (nonfetal) complications.

    PubMed

    Shanbhogue, Alampady K P; Menias, Christine O; Lalwani, Neeraj; Lall, Chandana; Khandelwal, Ashish; Nagar, Arpit

    2013-11-01

    Pregnancy predisposes women to a wide array of obstetric and gynecological complications which are often complex, challenging and sometimes life-threatening. While some of these are unique to pregnancy, a few that occur in nonpregnant women are more common during pregnancy. Imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of pregnancy-related obstetric and gynecologic complications. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging confer the least risk to the fetus and should be the preferred examinations for evaluating these complications. Multidetector computed tomography should be used after carefully weighing the risk-benefit ratio based on the clinical condition in question. Interventional radiology is emerging as a preferred, noninvasive or minimally invasive treatment option that can obviate surgery and its antecedent short term and long term complications. Knowledge of appropriateness of imaging and image guided intervention is necessary for accurate patient management. PMID:24210440

  15. Availability of drugs and medical supplies for emergency obstetric care: experience of health facility managers in a rural District of Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Provision of quality emergency obstetric care relies upon the presence of skilled health attendants working in an environment where drugs and medical supplies are available when needed and in adequate quantity and of assured quality. This study aimed to describe the experience of rural health facility managers in ensuring the timely availability of drugs and medical supplies for emergency obstetric care (EmOC). Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with a total of 17 health facility managers: 14 from dispensaries and three from health centers. Two members of the Council Health Management Team and one member of the Council Health Service Board were also interviewed. A survey of health facilities was conducted to supplement the data. All the materials were analysed using a qualitative thematic analysis approach. Results Participants reported on the unreliability of obtaining drugs and medical supplies for EmOC; this was supported by the absence of essential items observed during the facility survey. The unreliability of obtaining drugs and medical supplies was reported to result in the provision of untimely and suboptimal EmOC services. An insufficient budget for drugs from central government, lack of accountability within the supply system and a bureaucratic process of accessing the locally mobilized drug fund were reported to contribute to the current situation. Conclusion The unreliability of obtaining drugs and medical supplies compromises the timely provision of quality EmOC. Multiple approaches should be used to address challenges within the health system that prevent access to essential drugs and supplies for maternal health. There should be a special focus on improving the governance of the drug delivery system so that it promotes the accountability of key players, transparency in the handling of information and drug funds, and the participation of key stakeholders in decision making over the allocation of locally collected drug funds. PMID

  16. 'Maybe it was her fate and maybe she ran out of blood': final caregivers' perspectives on access to care in obstetric emergencies in rural Indonesia.

    PubMed

    D'Ambruoso, Lucia; Byass, Peter; Qomariyah, Siti Nurul

    2010-03-01

    Maternal mortality persists in low-income settings despite preventability with skilled birth attendance and emergency obstetric care. Poor access limits the effectiveness of life-saving interventions and is typical of maternal health care in low-income settings. This paper examines access to care in obstetric emergencies from the perspectives of service users, using established and contemporary theoretical frameworks of access and a routine health surveillance method. The implications for health planning are also considered. The final caregivers of 104 women who died during pregnancy or childbirth were interviewed in two rural districts in Indonesia using an adapted verbal autopsy. Qualitative analysis revealed social and economic barriers to access and barriers that arose from the health system itself. Health insurance for the poor was highly problematic. For providers, incomplete reimbursements, and low public pay, acted as disincentives to treat the poor. For users, the schemes were poorly socialized and understood, complicated to use and led to lower quality care. Services, staff, transport, equipment and supplies were also generally unavailable or unaffordable. The multiple barriers to access conferred a cumulative disadvantage that culminated in exclusion. This was reflected in expressions of powerlessness and fatalism regarding the deaths. The analysis suggests that conceiving of access as a structurally determined, complex and dynamic process, and as a reciprocally maintained phenomenon of disadvantaged groups, may provide useful explanatory concepts for health planning. Health planning from this perspective may help to avoid perpetuating exclusion on social and economic grounds, by health systems and services, and help foster a sense of control at the micro-level, among peoples' feelings and behaviours regarding their health. Verbal autopsy surveys provide an opportunity to routinely collect information on the exclusory mechanisms of health systems

  17. Assessment of selected perioperative parameters in patients undergoing laparoscopic and abdominal supracervical hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Skręt-Magierło, Joanna; Kluz, Tomasz; Barnaś, Edyta; Sobolewski, Marek; Raś, Renata; Skręt, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Subtotal hysterectomy is a method of treatment of patients with mild changes in the uterine body. Laparoscopic methods are increasingly used in surgical gynaecology. One of the limitations of laparoscopy is the proper level of operating surgeon's training, which may be assessed with the use of the learning curve. The aim of the study was to compare data regarding the perioperative period in patients who underwent subtotal hysterectomy with the two methods, and to establish a learning curve for laparoscopic subtotal hysterectomy. Material and methods One hundred and twenty-seven patients qualified for subtotal hysterectomy due to mild disturbances in the uterine body participated in the study. The study was conducted at the Clinical Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics of Fryderyk Chopin Provincial Specialist Hospital in Rzeszów in 2012-2013. Results The time of laparoscopic subtotal hysterectomy is longer than that of the classical surgical procedure. Uterine myomas are the main indication for subtotal hysterectomy. Laparoscopic operation results in lower blood loss compared to the classical surgical method. The mean age of the patients operated due to mild changes in the uterine body is similar in both groups. Patients who are obese or have undergone Caesarean sections are more frequently qualified for the classical surgery. The study revealed a reduction in time of laparoscopic subtotal hysterectomy by ca. 31 minutes (33%). Conclusions Laparoscopic subtotal hysterectomy is a method chosen by operating surgeons for patients with a lower perioperative risk. The period of the study made it possible to determine a learning curve for laparoscopic subtotal hysterectomy. PMID:26848296

  18. Factors Contributing to Massive Blood Loss on Peripartum Hysterectomy for Abnormally Invasive Placenta: Who Bleeds More?

    PubMed Central

    Usui, Rie; Suzuki, Hirotada; Baba, Yosuke

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. To identify factors that determine blood loss during peripartum hysterectomy for abnormally invasive placenta (AIP-hysterectomy). Methods. We reviewed all of the medical charts of 11,919 deliveries in a single tertiary perinatal center. We examined characteristics of AIP-hysterectomy patients, with a single experienced obstetrician attending all AIP-hysterectomies and using the same technique. Results. AIP-hysterectomy was performed in 18 patients (0.15%: 18/11,919). Of the 18, 14 (78%) had a prior cesarean section (CS) history and the other 4 (22%) were primiparous women. Planned AIP-hysterectomy was performed in 12/18 (67%), with the remaining 6 (33%) undergoing emergent AIP-hysterectomy. Of the 6, 4 (4/6: 67%) patients were primiparous women. An intra-arterial balloon was inserted in 9/18 (50%). Women with the following three factors significantly bled less in AIP-hysterectomy than its counterpart: the employment of an intra-arterial balloon (4,448 ± 1,948 versus 8,861 ± 3,988 mL), planned hysterectomy (5,003 ± 2,057 versus 9,957 ± 4,485 mL), and prior CS (5,706 ± 2,727 versus 9,975 ± 5,532 mL). Patients with prior CS (−) bled more: this may be because these patients tended to undergo emergent surgery or attempted placental separation. Conclusion. Patients with intra-arterial balloon catheter insertion bled less on AIP-hysterectomy. Massive bleeding occurred in emergent AIP-hysterectomy without prior CS.

  19. Hysterectomy for Benign Conditions of the Uterus: Total Vaginal Hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, Jenifer N; Occhino, John A

    2016-09-01

    As minimally invasive technology continues to be developed and refined, surgeons must be discerning in choosing the safest, cost-effective surgical approach associated with the best outcomes for each individual patient. Vaginal hysterectomy can be successfully accomplished even in challenging situations, such as previous pelvic surgery, nulliparity, uterine enlargement, or obesity. Vaginal hysterectomy should be considered the primary route for treatment of benign disease. PMID:27521878

  20. Preoperative teaching and hysterectomy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Oetker-Black, Sharon L; Jones, Susan; Estok, Patricia; Ryan, Marian; Gale, Nancy; Parker, Carla

    2003-06-01

    This study used a theoretical model to determine whether an efficacy-enhancing teaching protocol was effective in improving immediate postoperative behaviors and selected short- and long-term health outcomes in women who underwent abdominal hysterectomies. The model used was the self-efficacy theory of Albert Bandura, PhD. One hundred eight patients in a 486-bed teaching hospital in the Midwest who underwent hysterectomies participated. The participation rate was 85%, and the attrition rate was 17% during the six-month study. The major finding was that participants in the efficacy-enhancing teaching group ambulated significantly longer than participants in the usual care group. This is an important finding because the most prevalent postoperative complications after hysterectomy are atelectasis, pneumonia, paralytic ileus, and deep vein thrombosis, and postoperative ambulation has been shown to decrease or prevent all of these complications. This finding could affect the overall health status of women undergoing hysterectomies. PMID:12817743

  1. Impact of a low-technology simulation-based obstetric and newborn care training scheme on non-emergency delivery practices in Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Anna; Kestler, Edgar; Dettinger, Julia C.; Zelek, Sarah; Holme, Francesca; Walker, Dilys

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of a low-technology simulation-based training scheme for obstetric and perinatal emergency management (PRONTO; Programa de Rescate Obstétrico y Neonatal: Tratamiento Óptimo y Oportuno) on non-emergency delivery practices at primary level clinics in Guatemala. Methods A paired cross-sectional birth observation study was conducted with a convenience sample of 18 clinics (nine pairs of intervention and control clinics) from June 28 to August 7, 2013. Outcomes included implementation of practices known to decrease maternal and/or neonatal mortality and improve patient care. Results Overall, 25 and 17 births occurred in intervention and control clinics, respectively. Active management of the third stage of labor was appropriately performed by 20 (83%) of 24 intervention teams versus 7 (50%) of 14 control teams (P = 0.015). Intervention teams implemented more practices to decrease neonatal mortality than did control teams (P < 0.001). Intervention teams ensured patient privacy in 23 (92%) of 25 births versus 11 (65%) of 17 births for control teams (P = 0.014). All 15 applicable intervention teams kept patients informed versus 6 (55%) of 11 control teams (P = 0.001). Differences were also noted in teamwork; in particular, skill-based tools were used more often at intervention sites than control sites (P = 0.012). Conclusion Use of PRONTO enhanced non-emergency delivery care by increasing evidence-based practice, patient-centered care, and teamwork. PMID:26797198

  2. The Role of Interventional Radiology in Obstetric Hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, M. Belli, A.

    2010-10-15

    Obstetric hemorrhage remains a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Traditionally, in cases of obstetric hemorrhage refractory to conservative treatment, obstetricians have resorted to major surgery with the associated risks of general anesthesia, laparotomy, and, in the case of hysterectomy, loss of fertility. Over the past two decades, the role of pelvic arterial embolization has evolved from a novel treatment option to playing a key role in the management of obstetric hemorrhage. To date, interventional radiology offers a minimally invasive, fertility-preserving alternative to conventional surgical treatment. We review current literature regarding the role of interventional radiology in postpartum hemorrhage, abnormal placentation, abortion, and cervical ectopic pregnancy. We discuss techniques, success rates, and complications.

  3. Tocolytic Drugs for Use in Veterinary Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, L.

    1984-01-01

    The author presents a literature review of two tocolytic agents used in veterinary obstetrics: isoxsuprine and clenbuterol. The medical background from which these drugs emerged for human use and to which is linked their application in animal medicine is described. Each drug is reviewed according to its pharmacology, basic considerations for its clinical use and the reports on its application in the treatment and management of obstetrical disorders in veterinary medicine. PMID:17422462

  4. Assessing emergency obstetric care provision in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review of the application of global guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Banke-Thomas, Aduragbemi; Wright, Kikelomo; Sonoiki, Olatunji; Banke-Thomas, Oluwasola; Ajayi, Babatunde; Ilozumba, Onaedo; Akinola, Oluwarotimi

    2016-01-01

    Background Lack of timely and quality emergency obstetric care (EmOC) has contributed significantly to maternal morbidity and mortality, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Since 2009, the global guideline, referred to as the ‘handbook’, has been used to monitor availability, utilization, and quality of EmOC. Objective To assess application and explore experiences of researchers in LMICs in assessing EmOC. Design Multiple databases of peer-reviewed literature were systematically reviewed on EmOC assessments in LMICs, since 2009. Following set criteria, we included articles, assessed for quality based on a newly developed checklist, and extracted data using a pre-designed extraction tool. We used thematic summaries to condense our findings and mapped patterns that we observed. To analyze experiences and recommendations for improved EmOC assessments, we took a deductive approach for the framework synthesis. Results Twenty-seven studies met our inclusion criteria, with 17 judged as high quality. The highest publication frequency was observed in 2015. Most assessments were conducted in Nigeria and Tanzania (four studies each) and Bangladesh and Ghana (three each). Most studies (17) were done at subnational levels with 23 studies using the ‘handbook’ alone, whereas the others combined the ‘handbook’ with other frameworks. Seventeen studies conducted facility-based surveys, whereas others used mixed methods. For different reasons, intrapartum and very early neonatal death rate and proportion of deaths due to indirect causes in EmOC facilities were the least reported indicators. Key emerging themes indicate that data quality for EmOC assessments can be improved, indicators should be refined, a holistic approach is required for EmOC assessments, and assessments should be conducted as routine processes. Conclusions There is clear justification to review how EmOC assessments are being conducted. Synergy between researchers, EmOC program

  5. Obstetric Staffing in Small Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Chance, G.W.; Campbell, M.K.

    1992-01-01

    Responses from 82 of the 100 Ontario hospitals with fewer than 750 births annually showed that a sufficient number of general practice obstetricians are replacing those who leave. However, we found a worsening shortage of general practice anesthetists and specialists required for obstetric emergencies, which could threaten care in such hospitals. Implications for training programs, physician remuneration, pregnancy risk determination, and regionalized perinatal care are briefly discussed.

  6. Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Valverde, E; Ferrer-Oliveras, R; Alijotas-Reig, J

    2016-04-01

    Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome is an acquired autoimmune disorder that is associated with various obstetric complications and, in the absence of prior history of thrombosis, with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies directed against other phospholipids, proteins called cofactors or PL-cofactor complexes. Although the obstetric complications have been related to the procoagulant properties of antiphospholipid antibodies, pathological studies of human placenta have shown the proinflammatory capacity of antiphospholipid antibodies via the complement system and proinflammatory cytokines. There is no general agreement on which antiphospholipid antibodies profile (laboratory) confers the greatest obstetric risk, but the best candidates are categories I and IIa. Combined treatment with low doses of aspirin and heparin achieves good obstetric and maternal outcomes. In this study, we also review the therapeutic possibilities in refractory cases, although the likelihood of progressing to other autoimmune diseases is low. We briefly comment on incomplete obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome, also known as antiphospholipid antibody-mediated pregnancy morbidity syndrome. PMID:26603476

  7. Review article: late post-hysterectomy ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Saad Aldin, Ehab; Saadeh, Joanna; Ghulmiyyah, Labib; Hitti, Eveline

    2012-06-01

    Ectopic pregnancy after hysterectomy is a rare but potentially life-threatening condition requiring prompt diagnosis to prevent the increased mortality associated with rupture. Twenty-seven cases of late post-hysterectomy ectopic pregnancy reported in the English literature since 1918 were reviewed and analysed for presenting symptoms, missed diagnosis rate at initial presentation, location of ectopic and rupture rate at diagnosis. The presenting symptoms were found to be non-specific. The diagnosis in this population is twice more likely to be missed than in women with intact uteri. The rupture rate is 63%, compared with 37% in women with intact uteri. The majority of late post-hysterectomy ectopic pregnancies (62%) were located in the fallopian tubes. Because of the potential risk of mortality, emergency physicians should always consider the possibility of ectopic pregnancy in childbearing women whose surgical history includes hysterectomy without oophorectomy. Evaluation of abdominal pain in this population should include a pregnancy test to ensure prompt diagnosis when the possibility of pregnancy exists clinically. PMID:22672163

  8. Barriers in the Delivery of Emergency Obstetric and Neonatal Care in Post-Conflict Africa: Qualitative Case Studies of Burundi and Northern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Primus Che; Bulage, Patience; Urdal, Henrik; Sundby, Johanne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity rates are particularly grim in conflict, post-conflict and other crisis settings, a situation partly blamed on non-availability and/or poor quality of emergency obstetric and neonatal care (EmONC) services. The aim of this study was to explore the barriers to effective delivery of EmONC services in post-conflict Burundi and Northern Uganda, in order to provide policy makers and other relevant stakeholders context-relevant data on improving the delivery of these lifesaving services. Methods This was a qualitative comparative case study that used 42 face-to-face semi-structured in-depth interviews and 4 focus group discussions for data collection. Participants were 32 local health providers and 37 staff of NGOs working in the area of maternal health. Data was analysed using the framework approach. Results The availability, quality and distribution of EmONC services were major challenges across the sites. The barriers in the delivery of quality EmONC services were categorised into two major themes; human resources-related challenges, and systemic and institutional failures. While some of the barriers were similar, others were unique to specific sites. The common barriers included shortage of qualified staff; lack of essential installations, supplies and medications; increasing workload, burn-out and turnover; and poor data collection and monitoring systems. Barriers unique to Northern Uganda were demoralised personnel and lack of recognition; poor referral system; inefficient drug supply system; staff absenteeism in rural areas; and poor coordination among key personnel. In Burundi, weak curriculum; poor harmonisation and coordination of training; and inefficient allocation of resources were the unique challenges. To improve the situation across the sites, efforts are ongoing to improve the training and recruitment of more staff; harmonise and strengthen the curriculum and training; increase the number of Em

  9. Competence of birth attendants at providing emergency obstetric care under India’s JSY conditional cash transfer program for institutional delivery: an assessment using case vignettes in Madhya Pradesh province

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Access to emergency obstetric care by competent staff can reduce maternal mortality. India has launched the Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY) conditional cash transfer program to promote institutional births. During implementation of the JSY, India witnessed a steep increase in the proportion of institutional deliveries-from 40% in 2004 to 73% in 2012. However, maternal mortality reduction follows a secular trend. Competent management of complications, when women deliver in facilities under the JSY, is essential for reduction in maternal mortality and therefore to a successful program outcome. We investigate, using clinical vignettes, whether birth attendants at institutions under the program are competent at providing appropriate care for obstetric complications. Methods A facility based cross-sectional study was conducted in three districts of Madhya Pradesh (MP) province. Written case vignettes for two obstetric complications, hemorrhage and eclampsia, were administered to 233 birth attendant nurses at 73 JSY facilities. Their competence at (a) initial assessment, (b) diagnosis, and (c) making decisions on appropriate first-line care for these complications was scored. Results The mean emergency obstetric care (EmOC) competence score was 5.4 (median = 5) on a total score of 20, and 75% of participants scored below 35% of the maximum score. The overall score, although poor, was marginally higher in respondents with Skilled Birth Attendant (SBA) training, those with general nursing and midwifery qualifications, those at higher facility levels, and those conducting >30 deliveries a month. In all, 14% of respondents were competent at assessment, 58% were competent at making a correct clinical diagnosis, and 20% were competent at providing first-line care. Conclusions Birth attendants in the JSY facilities have low competence at EmOC provision. Hence, births in the JSY program cannot be considered to have access to competent EmOC. Urgent efforts are

  10. Imaging modalities in obstetrics and gynecology.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Benjamin P; Crystal, Chad S

    2003-08-01

    The practicing emergency physician often encounters diagnostic dilemmas involving the choice of the most appropriate radiologic study to evaluate patients in the emergency department. In addition, the uncertainty of potentially harmful fetal effects of radiation in the pregnant patient may add unnecessary delay and concern in the workup of obstetric emergencies. An emergency physician's in-depth understanding of the strengths, limitations, and potentially harmful effects of radiologic studies allows the safest and most appropriate studies to be ordered for the gynecologic and obstetric population. With the explosion of interest and growing level of expertise in focused emergency department ultrasonography during the last decade, the practicing emergency physician should add this skill to his or her armamentarium in the future. Many emergency physicians are already comfortable in using radiologic technologies in their daily practice and have discovered how quickly vital and specific information can be obtained. PMID:12962355

  11. Abnormal uterine bleeding in perimenopausal women: Correlation with sonographic findings and histopathological examination of hysterectomy specimens

    PubMed Central

    Talukdar, Bharat; Mahela, Sangita

    2016-01-01

    Background: Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a frequently encountered gynecologic complaint in perimenopausal woman and also the most common cause of hysterectomy in this age group. Objective: Evaluation of various clinical presentations of perimenopausal AUB and it is ultrasonographic and histopathological correlation of hysterectomy specimens. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology among perimenopausal women who underwent hysterectomy for AUB. The clinical presentations, ultrasonographic findings, and histopathological reports of hysterectomy specimen were correlated. Results: Among 103 number of hysterectomized cases for AUB, most of the patients were between 40 and 45 years of age (67.97%) and menorrhagia was the dominant clinical presentation. The majority (45.63%) of cases were diagnosed as fibroid uterus by ultrasonography with 89.13% sensitivity and 89.47% specificity. Histopathological reports of myometrium showed 44.66% fibromyoma, followed by 34.95% of the normal myometrium. Histopathology of endometrium revealed hyperplasia in the most cases (56.31%) where simple typical type was the predominant. Conclusion: Uterine fibroid was the leading cause of AUB and radiological, pathological evaluation correlated well to diagnose fibroid. PMID:27499594

  12. Tubal ectopic pregnancy two years after laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ectopic pregnancy after hysterectomy is a very rare condition, but it must be kept in mind in women with history of hysterectomy who present with abdominal pain and ecographic adnexal heterogeneous images. Since first described by Wendeler in 1895, at least 67 ectopic pregnancies (tubal, ovarian and abdominal) have been described in patients subjected to prior hysterectomy. Case presentation We describe the case of a 41-year-old white caucasian woman admitted to the emergency room due to abdominal pain for two days. The ultrasounds scan and the quantification of beta-HCG led to the diagnosis of tubal ectopic pregnancy, although she had been hysterectomized two years before. An emergency laparoscopy was performed for salpingectomy. The pathology report indicated trophoblastic tubal implantation and hematosalpinx. Conclusions Ectopic pregnancy is one of the conditions to be considered in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in women of child bearing potential, and the absence of the uterus does not rule out its diagnosis. PMID:24886255

  13. Pakistan: the Faisalabad Obstetric Flying Squad.

    PubMed

    Andina, M M; Fikree, F F

    1995-01-01

    The Faisalabad Obstetric Flying Squad was established in 1988 and provides access to emergency obstetric services for the poor women of Faisalabad. The service is highly appreciated by both women and participating dais. The latter receive training from the Mother and Child Welfare Association of Faisalabad and form an integral part of the obstetric care team. While problems in accessing communication facilities exist, the project has made a lasting impact on the provision of emergency obstetric services in the city. Improved recording and reporting mechanisms would permit a more precise assessment of the impact of the service on the reduction of maternal morbidity and mortality. It would also permit an assessment of the operating costs of the service. One of the reasons the service functions effectively is that it is fully integrated into the general operations of the Allied Hospital. If similar institutional mechanisms can be established there is good reason to think that the Faisalabad Obstetric Flying Squad could be replicated in other developing country settings. PMID:7571713

  14. Laparoscopic Supracervical Hysterectomy versus Laparoscopic-Assisted Vaginal Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Heidi C.; Pan, Katy; Subramanian, Dhinagar; Sedgley, Robert C.; Raff, Gregory J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the incidence of perioperative complications and postoperative healthcare utilization and costs in laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy (LSH) versus laparoscopic-assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH) patients. Methods: Women ≥18 years with LSH or LAVH were extracted using a large national commercial claims database from 1/1/2007 through 9/30/2008. Outcome was perioperative complications and gynecologic-related postoperative resource use and costs. Multivariate analysis was performed to compare postsurgical outcomes between the cohorts. Results: The final sample consisted of 6,198 LSH patients and 14,181 LAVH patients. LSH patients were significantly more likely to have dysfunctional uterine bleeding and leiomyomas and less likely to have endometriosis and prolapse as the primary diagnosis, and also significantly more likely to have a uterus that weighed >250 grams than LAVH patients. Compared with LAVH patients, LSH patients had significantly lower overall infection rates (7.4% versus 6.2%, P=.002) and lower total gynecologic-related postoperative costs ($252 versus $385, P<.001, within 30 days of follow-up and $350 versus $569, P<.001, within 180 days of follow-up). Significant cost differences remained following multivariate adjustment for patient characteristics. Conclusions: LSH patients demonstrated fewer perioperative complications and lower GYN-related postoperative costs compared to LAVH patients. PMID:22643499

  15. Biosocial determinants of hysterectomy in New Zealand.

    PubMed Central

    Dharmalingam, A; Pool, I; Dickson, J

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the prevalence and biosocial correlates of hysterectomy. METHODS: Data were from a 1995 national survey of women aged 20 to 59 years. We applied piecewise nonparametric exponential hazards models to a subsample aged 25 to 59 to estimate the effects of biosocial correlates on hysterectomy likelihood. RESULTS: Risks of hysterectomy for 1991 through 1995 were lower than those before 1981. University-educated and professional women were less likely to undergo hysterectomy. Higher parity and intrauterine device side effects increased the risk. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms international results, especially those on education and occupation, but also points to ethnicity's mediating role. Education and occupation covary independently with hysterectomy. Analysis of time variance and periodicity showed declines in likelihood from 1981. PMID:10983207

  16. Gynecologists' sex, clinical beliefs, and hysterectomy rates.

    PubMed Central

    Bickell, N A; Earp, J A; Garrett, J M; Evans, A T

    1994-01-01

    This study determined how gynecologists' sex, beliefs, appropriateness ratings, and practice characteristics influence hysterectomy rates in North Carolina. Gynecologists who performed hysterectomies at higher rates were further from training, practiced in areas with fewer gynecologists, and had more patients with abnormal bleeding or cancer. Male gynecologists performed 60% more hysterectomies than female gynecologists, but this may have been because they were further from their training. Appropriateness ratings were affected by gynecologists' attitudes toward surgery, recency of training, and practice case mix, and by patients' expressed desire to avoid surgery, but they did not predict hysterectomy rates. To decrease their chances of undergoing hysterectomy, patients should express their preferences and possibly seek the opinion of more recently trained gynecologists. PMID:7943488

  17. Laparoscopic Hysterectomy and Prolapse: A Multiprocedural Concept

    PubMed Central

    Mettler, Liselotte; Peters, Goentje; Noé, Günter; Holthaus, Bernd; Jonat, Walter; Schollmeyer, Thoralf

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Today, laparoscopic intrafascial hysterectomy and laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy are well-accepted techniques. With our multimodal concept of laparoscopic hysterectomy for benign indications, preservation of the pelvic floor as well as reconstruction of pelvic floor structures and pre-existing prolapse situations can be achieved. Methods: The multimodal concept consists of 3 steps: Intrafascial hysterectomy with preservation of existing structures Technique 1: Primary uterine artery ligationTechnique 2: Classic intrafascial hysterectomyA technique for the stable fixation of the vaginal or cervical stumpA new method of pectopexy to correct a pre-existing descensus situation Results and Conclustion: This well-balanced concept can be used by advanced endoscopic gynecologic surgeons as well as by novices in our field. PMID:24680150

  18. Obstetric ultrasound simulation.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Joshua F; Brost, Brian C

    2013-06-01

    Obstetric ultrasound is becoming an increasingly important part of the practice of maternal-fetal medicine. Thus, it is important to develop rigorous and effective training curricula for obstetrics and gynecology residents and maternal-fetal medicine fellows. Traditionally, this training has come almost entirely from exposure to ultrasound in the clinical setting. However, with the increased complexity of modern ultrasound and advent of duty-hour restrictions, a purely clinical training model is no longer viable. With the advent of high-fidelity obstetric ultrasound simulators, a significant amount of training can occur in a non-clinical setting which allows learners to obtain significant skill prior to their first patient ultrasound encounter and obtain proficiency in a shorter period of time. In this manuscript we discuss the available obstetric ultrasound simulators and ways to construct a comprehensive ultrasound training curricula to meet the increasing demands of modern maternal-fetal medicine. PMID:23721777

  19. The usage of blood components in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Adukauskienė, Dalia; Veikutienė, Audronė; Adukauskaitė, Agnė; Veikutis, Vincentas; Rimaitis, Kęstutis

    2010-01-01

    Major obstetric hemorrhage remains the leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Even though blood transfusion may be a life-saving procedure, an inappropriate usage of blood products in obstetric emergencies especially in cases of massive bleeding is associated with increased morbidity and risk of death. Thorough knowledge of the etiology, pathophysiology, and optimal therapeutic options of major obstetric hemorrhage may help to avoid lethal outcomes. There are evidence-based data about some risks related with transfusion of blood components: acute or delayed hemolytic, febrile, allergic reactions, transfusion-related acute lung injury, negative immunomodulative effect, transmission of infectious diseases, dissemination of cancer. This is why the indications for allogeneic blood transfusion are restricted, and new safer methods are being discovered to decrease the requirement for it. Red cell alloimmunization may develop in pregnancy; therefore, all pregnant women should pass screening for irregular antibodies. Antierythrocytic irregular antibodies may occur due to previous pregnancies or allogeneic red blood cell transfusions, and it is important for blood cross-matching in the future. Under certain circumstances, such as complicated maternal history, severe coagulation abnormalities, severe anemia, the preparation of cross-matched blood is necessary. There is evidence of very significant variation in the use of blood products (red cells, platelets, fresh frozen plasma, or cryoprecipitate) among clinicians in various medical institutions, and sometimes indications for transfusion are not correctly motivated. The transfusion of each single blood product must be performed only in case of evaluation of expected effect. The need for blood products and for their combination is necessary to estimate for each patient individually in case of obstetric emergencies either. Indications for transfusion of blood components in obstetrics are presented in

  20. Vasopressors in obstetric anesthesia: A current perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Deb Sanjay; Samaddar, Devi Prasad; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Kumar, Himanshu; Dembla, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    Vasopressors are routinely used to counteract hypotension after neuraxial anesthesia in Obstetrics. The understanding of the mechanism of hypotension and the choice of vasopressor has evolved over the years to a point where phenylephrine has become the preferred vasopressor. Due to the absence of definitive evidence showing absolute clinical benefit of one over the other, especially in emergency and high-risk Cesarean sections, our choice of phenylephrine over the other vasopressors like mephentermine, metaraminol, and ephedrine is guided by indirect evidence on fetal acid-base status. This review article evaluates the present day evidence on the various vasopressors used in obstetric anesthesia today. PMID:25610851

  1. Depression Following Hysterectomy and the Influencing Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bahri, Narjes; Tohidinik, Hamid Reza; Fathi Najafi, Tahereh; Larki, Mona; Amini, Thoraya; Askari Sartavosi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background Hysterectomy is one of the most common gynecological surgeries performed worldwide. However, women undergoing this surgery often experience negative emotional reactions. Objectives This study was done with the aim of investigating the relationship between hysterectomy and postoperative depression, three months after the procedure. Materials and Methods This longitudinal study was conducted in the province of Khorasan-Razavi in Iran, using multistage sampling. At first, three cities were selected from the province by cluster sampling; then, five hospitals were randomly selected from these cities. The participants included 53 women who were hysterectomy candidates in one of the five selected hospitals. The participants’ demographics and hysterectomy procedure information were entered into two separate questionnaires, and the Beck depression inventory (BDI) was employed to measure their severity of depression before and three months after the surgery. The statistical package for the social sciences (SPSS) version 16 was used for the statistical analysis, and a P value of < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results The means and standard deviations of the participants’ depression scores before and three months after their hysterectomies were 13.01 ± 10.1 and 11.02 ± 10.3, respectively. Although the mean score of depression decreased three months after the hysterectomy, the difference was not statistically significant. However, a significant relationship was found between the satisfaction with the outcome of the hysterectomy and the postoperative depression score (P = 0.04). Conclusions In this study, undergoing a hysterectomy did not show a relationship with postoperative depression three months after the surgery. Moreover, the only factor related to depression following a hysterectomy was satisfaction with the surgery. PMID:27066267

  2. The sonographic appearance and obstetric management of placenta accreta

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Charleen Sze-yan; Chan, Ben Chong-pun

    2012-01-01

    Placenta accreta is a condition of abnormal placental implantation in which the placental tissue invades beyond the decidua basalis. It may invade into or even through the myometrium and adjacent organs, such as the urinary bladder. The incidence has been rising in recent years. It is one of the important obstetric complications nowadays, leading to significant maternal morbidity and mortality. In the past, this condition was often diagnosed at the time of delivery when massive and unexpected hemorrhage occurred. Hysterectomy, associated with significant physical and psychological consequences, was usually the only management option. As more obstetricians have become aware of this condition, early identification with antenatal imaging diagnostic technology has become possible. Ultrasound scan plays an important role in the antenatal diagnosis. Various sonographic features with different specificity and sensitivity have been described in the literature. In equivocal cases, magnetic resonance imaging may be helpful. With such information, more accurate counseling can be offered to the mothers and their families before delivery. The delivery can also be arranged at a favorable time and in an institution where multidisciplinary support is available. Input from a hematologist, interventional radiologist, intensive care physician, urology surgeon, and/or other specialist are desirable. Apart from hysterectomy, various forms of conservative management can also be considered when the diagnosis is made prior to delivery. Fertility can therefore be preserved. After delivery, with or without hysterectomy performed, psychological support to the mothers and their families is essential. PMID:23239929

  3. Alternatives to Hysterectomy: Management of Uterine Fibroids.

    PubMed

    Laughlin-Tommaso, Shannon K

    2016-09-01

    Uterine fibroids are a common condition that can be debilitating and are the leading benign cause of hysterectomy. Women often live with the symptoms rather than choose hysterectomy, but survey studies have shown that work, social life, and physical activities are hindered by fibroid symptoms. Offering alternative therapies tailored to a woman's symptoms will allow her to choose a treatment that fits her needs and to preserve her uterus and fertility. The minimally invasive treatment options have a faster recovery and lower surgical risk than hysterectomy, but may require reintervention. One pharmacologic treatment offers short-term, intermittent therapy with lasting effects. PMID:27521875

  4. Pain following hysterectomy: epidemiological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Brandsborg, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that different surgical procedures like amputation, thoracotomy, inguinal herniotomy, and mastectomy are associated with a risk of developing chronic postsurgical pain. Hysterectomy is the most frequent gynecological procedure with an annual frequency of 5000 hysterectomies for a benign indication in Denmark, but is has not previously been documented in detail to what extent this procedure leads to chronic pain. The aim of this PhD thesis was therefore to describe the epidemiology, type of pain, risk factors, and predictive factors associated with chronic pain after hysterectomy for a benign indication. The thesis includes four papers, of which one is based on a questionnaire study, two are based on a prospective clinical study, and one is a review of chronic pain after hysterectomy. The questionnaire paper included 1135 women one year after hysterectomy. A postal questionnaire about pain before and after hysterectomy was combined with data from the Danish Hysterectomy Database. Chronic postoperative pain was described by 32%, and the identified risk factors were preoperative pelvic pain, previous cesarean section, other pain problems and pain as an indication for hysterectomy. Spinal anesthesia was associated with a decreased risk of having pain after one year. The type of surgery (i.e. abdominal or vaginal hysterectomy) did not influence chronic pain. The prospective paper included 90 women referred for a hysterectomy on benign indication. The tests were performed before, on day 1, and 4 months after surgery and included questionnaires about pain, coping, and quality of life together with quantitative sensory testing of pain thresholds. Seventeen percent had pain after 4 months, and the risk factors were preoperative pain problems elsewhere and a high intensity of acute postoperative pain. Type of surgery was not a risk factor. Preoperative brush-evoked allodynia, pinprick hyperalgesia, and vaginal pain threshold were associated with a high

  5. Hysterectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... made in either your abdomen or your vagina. Robotic surgery. Your doctor guides a robotic arm to ... made in either your abdomen or your vagina. Robotic surgery. Your doctor guides a robotic arm to ...

  6. Hysterectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cuts in the belly, in order to perform robotic surgery You and your doctor will decide which ... through the vagina using a laparoscope or after robotic surgery. When a larger surgical cut (incision) in ...

  7. Hysterectomy: treatment for secondary infertility.

    PubMed

    Wani, Reena; Patra, Chinmayee; Dusane, Veena

    2014-01-01

    Infertility is a distressing condition but extenuating circumstances sometimes make the choice of treatment seem paradoxical. Here is discussed a challenging case of a 30-year-old woman with no living child and secondary infertility who presented with a large abdominal mass and severe abdominal pain, sequelae of previous obstructed labour. There was complex management dilemma. She was young, had no living child, had undergone vesicovaginal fistula (VVF) repair and vaginoplasty yet was wanting fertility; however she was distressed with the abdominal pain and desired a complete cure. Both she and her spouse were counselled about the high possibility of failure if repeat attempt at vaginoplasty was made, and possible damage to the VVF repair. Finally, decision of exploratory laparotomy with total abdominal hysterectomy was taken after counselling the couple about adoption as an option for childbearing. PMID:25935952

  8. Obstetrical data management systems.

    PubMed

    1997-03-01

    Obstetrical data management systems (OBDMSs) are computer systems designed to interface with fetal and maternal monitors. This allows monitoring and charting records to be created and maintained electronically and to be viewed from centralized workstations. In theory, these systems could eliminate paper record keeping from the obstetrics department altogether, although currently at least some paper documentation, such as fetal monitoring strips, is being kept. We evaluated five OBDMSs, one of which is no longer on the market and which we did not rate. Of the remaining systems, three were rated Acceptable; the fourth was rated Acceptable-Not Recommended because it lacks several important features and functions. This Evaluation also includes a Technology Overview, in which we discuss how OBDMSs function. The Overview incorporates a supplementary article, "Obstetrical Care Monitoring and Documentation," describing the monitoring and documentation typically performed during a pregnancy. And in the Selection and Use Guide, we discuss issues involved in choosing, purchasing, and implementing an OBDMS. PMID:9067726

  9. Expanding Patient Options: Minilaparotomy for Hysterectomy

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Expanding Patient Options: Minilaparotomy for Hysterectomy Covidien Energy Based Devices Concord, California May 26, 2010 Welcome to this OR Live program presented by Covidien energy-based devices. Good evening, and thank ...

  10. Persistent Bleeding After Laparoscopic Supracervical Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cholkeri-Singh, Aarathi; Sulo, Suela; Miller, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: In our clinical experience, there seemed to be a correlation between cervical stump bleeding and adenomyosis. Therefore, we wanted to conduct a study to determine whether there was an actual correlation and to identify other risk factors for persistent bleeding after a laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy. Methods: The study included women who underwent laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy from January 1, 2003, through December 31, 2012. Data were collected on age, postmenopausal status, body mass index (BMI), uterine weight, indication for hysterectomy, concomitant bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO), presence of endometriosis, surgical ablation of the endocervix, adenomyosis, presence of endocervix in the specimen, and postoperative bleeding. Results: The study included 256 patients, of whom 187 had no postoperative bleeding after the operation, 40 had bleeding within 12 weeks, and 29 had bleeding after 12 weeks. The 3 groups were comparable in BMI, postmenopausal status, uterine weight, indication for hysterectomy, BSO, surgical ablation of the endocervix, adenomyosis, and the presence of endocervix. However, patients who had postoperative bleeding at more than 12 weeks were significantly younger (P = .002) and had a higher rate of endometriosis (P < .001). Conclusions: Risks factors for postoperative bleeding from the cervical stump include a younger age at the time of hysterectomy and the presence of endometriosis. Therefore, younger patients and those with endometriosis who desire to have no further vaginal bleeding may benefit from total hysterectomy over supracervical hysterectomy. All patients who are undergoing supracervical hysterectomy should be counseled about the possible alternatives, benefits, and risks, including continued vaginal bleeding from the cervical stump and the possibility of requiring future treatment and procedures. PMID:25516706

  11. A Comparison Between Non-Descent Vaginal Hysterectomy and Total Abdominal Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Dibyajyoti, Gharphalia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hysterectomy is one of the most common gyneacological surgeries performed worldwide. The vaginal technique has been introduced and performed centuries back, but has been less successful due to lack of experience and enthusiasm among Gynaecologists, due to a misconception that the abdominal route is safer and easier. Aim To evaluate the most efficient route of hysterectomy in women with mobile nonprolapsed uteri of 12 weeks or lesser by comparing the intra and postoperative complications of vaginal and abdominal hysterectomies. Materials and Methods A prospective, randomized controlled trial was performed wherein, 300 consecutive patients requiring hysterectomy for benign diseases were analysed over a period of 2 years (December 2012–November 2014). Group A (n = 150) underwent vaginal hysterectomy (non descent vaginal hysterectomy, NDVH) which was compared with group B (n = 150) who had abdominal hysterectomy. The primary outcome measures were operative time, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative analgesia, hospital stay, postoperative mobility, blood transfusion, wound infection, febrile morbidity and postoperative systemic infections. Secondary outcome measures were conversion of vaginal to abdominal route and re-laparotomy. Results Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. There were no intraoperative complications in either group. Regarding operation duration, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative pain, postoperative blood transfusion, mobilization in post operative ward, postoperative wound infection, febrile morbidity, duration of hospital stay, p-value was significant in vaginal hysterectomy compared to abdominal hysterectomy. Regarding postoperative systemic infections, p-value was not significant. None of the cases in the vaginal group were converted to abdominal route and none of the cases in the whole study group underwent re-laparotomy. Conclusion The present study concludes that patients requiring hysterectomy

  12. Prevention in Obstetrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children in the Tropics, 1984

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this issue of "Children in the Tropics" is to describe work that may be done by a motivated health team having only the strict minimum of material resources. While not a handbook of obstetrics, this text serves as a reminder of basic information and procedures workers must be able to perform. Following a review of the educational and…

  13. Supracervical hysterectomy versus total abdominal hysterectomy: perceived effects on sexual function

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Jyot; Kuczynski, Edward; Gretz, Herbert F; Sills, E Scott

    2002-01-01

    Background Our investigation sought to compare changes in sexual function following supracervical hysterectomy (SCH) and total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH). Methods A retrospective chart review was performed to identify all patients who underwent supracervical hysterectomy or total abdominal hysterectomy at a tertiary care center. Patients who met criteria for participation were sent a one page confidential, anonymous questionnaire to assess sexual function experienced both pre- and postoperatively. A total of 69 patients in each group were eligible for participation. A multiple logistic regression model was used to analyze measured variables. Results Forty-eight percent (n = 33) of women undergoing a SCH returned the questionnaire, while 39% (n = 27) of those undergoing a TAH chose to participate. There were no significant demographic differences between the two groups. Patients who underwent TAH reported worse postoperative sexual outcome than SCH patients with respect to intercourse frequency, orgasm frequency and overall sexual satisfaction (P = 0.01, 0.03, and 0.03, respectively). Irrespective of type of hysterectomy, 35% of patients who underwent bilateral salpingoophorectomy (BSO) with hysterectomy experienced worse overall sexual satisfaction compared to 3% of patients who underwent hysterectomy alone (P = 0.02). Conclusions Our data suggest that TAH patients experienced worse postoperative sexual function than SCH patients with respect to intercourse frequency and overall sexual satisfaction. Irrespective of type of hysterectomy, patients who underwent bilateral salpingoophorectomy experienced worse overall sexual satisfaction. PMID:11825343

  14. Prohemostatic interventions in obstetric hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Marie-Pierre; Basso, Olga

    2012-04-01

    Obstetric hemorrhage is a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Pregnancy is associated with substantial hemostatic changes, resulting in a relatively hypercoagulable state. Acquired coagulopathy can, however, develop rapidly in severe obstetric hemorrhage. Therefore, prohemostatic treatments based on high fresh frozen plasma and red blood cell (FFP:RBC) ratio transfusion and procoagulant agents (fibrinogen concentrates, recombinant activated factor VII, and tranexamic acid) are crucial aspects of management. Often, evidence from trauma patients is applied to obstetric hemorrhage management, although distinct differences exist between the two situations. Therefore, until efficacy and safety are demonstrated in obstetric hemorrhage, clinicians should be cautious about wholesale adoption of high FFP:RBC ratio products. Applications of transfusion protocols, dedicated to massive obstetric hemorrhage and multidisciplinarily developed, currently remain the best available option. Similarly, while procoagulant agents appear promising in treatment of obstetric hemorrhage, caution is nonetheless warranted as long as clear evidence in the context of obstetric hemorrhage is lacking. PMID:22510859

  15. CHALLENGES OF OBSTETRIC ANESTHESIA: DIFFICULT LARYNGEAL VISUALIZATION.

    PubMed

    Alanoğlu, Zekeriyya; Erkoç, Süheyla Karadağ; Güçlü, Çiğdem Yildirim; Meço, Başak Ceyda Orbey; Baytaş, Volkan; Can, Özlem Selvi; Alkiş, Neslihan

    2016-03-01

    Obstetric anesthesia is one of the high risk subspecialties of anesthesia practice. Anesthesia related complications are the sixth leading cause of maternal mortality. Difficult or failed intubation following induction of general anesthesia for CS remains the major contributory factor to anesthesia-related maternal complications. The airway management of obstetric patients is a challenging issue for several reasons. Anatomic and physiologic changes related to pregnancy may increase the difficult and failed intubation rates compared to the general surgical population. Proper evaluation of the airway anatomy and airway structures is vital to prevent airway management related catastrophes. In addition to basic airway and intubation equipment, each anesthesia department must have difficult intubation equipment cart including fiber optic laryngoscope, video laryngoscopes, and different types of laryngeal masks. It is essential that all anesthesiologists have a preconceived and well thought-out algorithm and emergency airway equipment to deal with airway emergencies during difficult or failed intubation of a parturient. PMID:27276775

  16. The impact of a simulation-based training lab on outcomes of hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Asoğlu, Mehmet Reşit; Achjian, Tamar; Akbilgiç, Oğuz; Borahay, Mostafa A.; Kılıç, Gökhan S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of a simulation-based training lab on surgical outcomes of different hysterectomy approaches in a resident teaching tertiary care center. Material and Methods This retrospective cohort study was conducted at The University of Texas, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. In total, 1397 patients who had undergone total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH), vaginal hysterectomy (VH), total laparoscopy-assisted hysterectomy (TLH), or robot-assisted hysterectomy (RAH) for benign gynecologic conditions between 2009 and 2014 were included in the study. The comparison was made according to the year when the surgeries were performed: 2009 (before simulation training) and the combination of 2010–2014 (after simulation training) for each technique (TAH, VH, and LAH). Since a simulation lab for robotic surgery was introduced in 2010 at our institute, the comparison for robotic surgery was made between the combination of 2009–2010 as the control and the combination of 2010–2014 as the study group. Results The average estimated blood loss before and after simulation-based training was significantly different in TAH and RAH groups (317±170 mL versus 257±146 mL, p=0.003 and 154±107 mL versus 102±88 mL, p=0.004, respectively), but no difference was found for TLH and VH. The mean of length of hospital stay was significantly different before and after simulation-based training for each technique: 3.7±2.3 versus 2.9±2.2 days for TAH, 2.0±1.2 versus 1.3±0.9 days for VH, 2.4±1.3 versus 1.9±2.5 days for TLH, and 2.0±1.3 versus 1.4±1.7 days for RAH (p<0.01). Conclusion Based on our data, simulator-based training may play an integrative role in developing the residents’ surgical skills and thus improving the surgical outcomes of hysterectomy. PMID:27403070

  17. Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Galarza-Maldonado, Claudio; Kourilovitch, Maria R; Pérez-Fernández, Oscar M; Gaybor, Mariana; Cordero, Christian; Cabrera, Sonia; Soroka, Nikolai F

    2012-02-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in pregnancy has a serious impact on maternal and fetal morbidity. It causes recurrent pregnancy miscarriage and it is associated with other adverse obstetric findings like preterm delivery, intrauterine growth restriction, preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome and others. The 2006 revised criteria, which is still valid, is used for APS classification. Epidemiology of obstetric APS varies from one population group to another largely due to different inclusion criteria and lack of standardization of antibody detection methods. Treatment is still controversial. This topic should include a multidisciplinary team and should be individualized. Success here is based on strict control and monitoring throughout pregnancy and even in the preconception and postpartum periods. Further research in this field and unification of criteria are required to yield better therapeutic strategies in the future. PMID:22001418

  18. Cell Salvage in Obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Goucher, Haley; Wong, Cynthia A; Patel, Samir K; Toledo, Paloma

    2015-08-01

    Intraoperative cell salvage is a strategy to decrease the need for allogeneic blood transfusion. Traditionally, cell salvage has been avoided in the obstetric population because of the perceived risk of amniotic fluid embolism or induction of maternal alloimmunization. With advances in cell salvage technology, the risks of cell salvage in the obstetric population parallel those in the general population. Levels of fetal squamous cells in salvaged blood are comparable to those in maternal venous blood at the time of placental separation. No definite cases of amniotic fluid embolism have been reported and appear unlikely with modern equipment. Cell salvage is cost-effective in patients with predictably high rates of transfusion, such as parturients with abnormal placentation. PMID:26197375

  19. Blood transfusion in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Nigam, A; Prakash, A; Saxena, P

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion of blood and blood components is a common practice in obstetric wards but it is not without risk. The incidence of transfusion reactions varies from 4 in every hundred transfusions for non-haemolytic reactions to one in every 40,000 for haemolytic transfusion reactions. The physiological basis of blood transfusion is outlined in this article. Most of the donated blood is processed into components: packed red cells (PRBCs), platelets, and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) or cryoprecipitate. Various alternatives to blood transfusion exist and include autotransfusion, pre-autologous blood storage, use of oxygen carrying blood substitutes and intraoperative cell salvage. Despite the risks associated with transfusions, obstetricians are frequently too aggressive in transfusing blood and blood products to their patients. Acute blood loss in obstetrics is usually due to placenta praevia, postpartum blood loss and surgery related. An early involvement of a consultant obstetrician, anaesthetist, haematologist and the blood bank is essential. There are no established criteria for initiating red cell transfusions and the decision is purely based on clinical and haematological parameters, which have been discussed along with the general principles of blood transfusion in obstetrics and some practical guidelines. PMID:24899337

  20. Laparoscopic hysterectomy with morcellation versus abdominal hysterectomy for presumed fibroids in premenopausal women: a decision analysis

    PubMed Central

    SIEDHOFF, Matthew T.; WHEELER, Stephanie B.; RUTSTEIN, Sarah E.; GELLER, Elizabeth J.; DOLL, Kemi M.; WU, Jennifer M.; CLARKE-PEARSON, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To model outcomes in laparoscopic hysterectomy with morcellation compared to abdominal hysterectomy for the presumed fibroid uterus, examining short-and long-term complications, as well as mortality. Study Design A decision tree was constructed to compare outcomes for a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 premenopausal women undergoing hysterectomy for presumed fibroids over a 5-year time horizon. Parameter and quality of life utility estimates were determined from published literature for postoperative complications, leiomyosarcoma incidence, death related to leiomyomsarcoma, and procedure-related death. Results The decision analysis predicted fewer overall deaths with laparoscopic hysterectomy compared to abdominal hysterectomy (98 vs. 103 per 100,000). While there were more deaths from leiomyosarcoma following laparoscopic hysterectomy (86 vs. 71 per 100,000), there were more hysterectomy-related deaths with abdominal hysterectomy (32 vs. 12 per 100,000). The laparoscopic group had lower rates of transfusion (2,400 vs. 4,700 per 100,000), wound infection (1,500 vs 6,300 per 100,000), venous thromboembolism (690 vs. 840 per 100,000) and incisional hernia (710 vs. 8,800 per 100,000), but a higher rate of vaginal cuff dehiscence (640 vs. 290 per 100,000). Laparoscopic hysterectomy resulted in more quality-adjusted life years (499,171 vs. 490,711 over five years). Conclusion The risk of leiomyosarcoma morcellation is balanced by procedure-related complications associated with laparotomy, including death. This analysis provides patients and surgeons with estimates of risk and benefit, upon which patient-centered decisions can be made. PMID:25817518

  1. 42 CFR 441.255 - Sterilization by hysterectomy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sterilization by hysterectomy. 441.255 Section 441... Sterilizations § 441.255 Sterilization by hysterectomy. (a) FFP is not available in expenditures for a hysterectomy if— (1) It was performed solely for the purpose of rendering an individual permanently...

  2. 42 CFR 441.255 - Sterilization by hysterectomy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sterilization by hysterectomy. 441.255 Section 441... Sterilizations § 441.255 Sterilization by hysterectomy. (a) FFP is not available in expenditures for a hysterectomy if— (1) It was performed solely for the purpose of rendering an individual permanently...

  3. 42 CFR 441.255 - Sterilization by hysterectomy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sterilization by hysterectomy. 441.255 Section 441... Sterilizations § 441.255 Sterilization by hysterectomy. (a) FFP is not available in expenditures for a hysterectomy if— (1) It was performed solely for the purpose of rendering an individual permanently...

  4. Endoluminal release of ureteral ligature after hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Jen; Lin, Victor Chia-Hsiang; Huang, Ching-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic ureteral injury is a well-recognized complication of abdominal total hysterectomy. We report a case of a 57-year-old female who underwent abdominal total hysterectomy for a uterine myoma and experienced severe right flank pain postoperatively. The imaging study displayed an obstruction of the right distal ureter. Under ureteroscopy, an extraluminal ligature was released with a holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. The stenotic segment was immediately relieved. Two months later, the intravenous urogram illustrated patency of the distal ureter with regression of right hydronephrosis. There was no recurrent hydronephrosis during 1 year of follow-up. PMID:25241286

  5. Termination of pregnancy as emergency obstetric care: the interpretation of Catholic health policy and the consequences for pregnant women: an analysis of the death of Savita Halappanavar in Ireland and similar cases.

    PubMed

    Berer, Marge

    2013-05-01

    Issues arising from the death of Savita Halappanavar in Ireland in October 2012 include the question of whether it is unethical to refuse to terminate a non-viable pregnancy when the woman's life may be at risk. In Catholic maternity services, this decision intersects with health professionals' interpretation of Catholic health policy on treatment of miscarriage as well as the law on abortion. This paper explores how these issues came together around Savita's death and the consequences for pregnant women and maternity services worldwide. It discusses cases not only in Ireland but also the Americas. Many of the events presented are recent, and most of the sources are media and individual reports. However, there is a very worrying common thread across countries and continents. If further research unearths more cases like Savita's, any Catholic health professionals and/or hospitals refusing to terminate a pregnancy as emergency obstetric care should be stripped of their right to provide maternity services. In some countries these are the main or only existing maternity services. Even so, governments should refuse to fund these services, and either replace them with non-religious services or require that non-religious staff are available at all times specifically to take charge of such cases to prevent unnecessary deaths. At issue is whether a woman's life comes first or not at all. PMID:23684182

  6. The history of imaging in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Benson, Carol B; Doubilet, Peter M

    2014-11-01

    During the past century, imaging of the pregnant patient has been performed with radiography, scintigraphy, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasonography (US). US imaging has emerged as the primary imaging modality, because it provides real-time images at relatively low cost without the use of ionizing radiation. This review begins with a discussion of the history and current status of imaging modalities other than US for the pregnant patient. The discussion then turns to an in-depth description of how US technology advanced to become such a valuable diagnostic tool in the obstetric patient. Finally, the broad range of diagnostic uses of US in these patients is presented, including its uses for distinguishing an intrauterine pregnancy from a failed or ectopic pregnancy in the first trimester; assigning gestational age and assessing fetal weight; evaluating the fetus for anomalies and aneuploidy; examining the uterus, cervix, placenta, and amniotic fluid; and guiding obstetric interventional procedures. PMID:25340440

  7. Minilaparotomy Hysterectomy as a Suitable Choice of Hysterectomy for Large Myoma Uteri: Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kenichiro; Fukushima, Yasuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to propose minilaparotomy hysterectomy as the suitable choice for large uterus on the basis of our experienced case of performed minilaparotomy hysterectomy to 4,500 g myoma uteri and review published cases about this clinical condition. We presented a 44-year-old woman (gravida 0, virgin) who consulted our hospital because of the chief complaints of abnormal genital bleeding and hypermenorrhea. Transabdominal ultrasonography revealed that abdominal solid tumor reached over the navel. Her tumor was an indication of surgery; to do minilaparotomy hysterectomy with laparoscope was decided because her informed consent was obtained. A 6 cm transverse incision (Maylard incision) was made to the skin above the pubic hairline. At the end of surgery, the length of abdominal wound was 8.5 cm, operating time was 128 min, weight of resected myoma uteri was 4,500 g, and intraoperative blood loss was 895 mL. Blood transfusion was not done; postsurgical course was not a problem without anemia. We propose that a large uterine case in which it is difficult to perform vaginal or laparoscopic hysterectomy should be considered in order to select minilaparotomy hysterectomy up to around 5 kg weight of uterus, and the length of skin incision in minilaparotomy hysterectomy is necessarily <9 cm particularly in large uterus. PMID:26925276

  8. Hysterectomy - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Việt) Hysterectomy Cắt Bỏ Tử Cung - Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Characters not displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues . Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information ...

  9. Hysterectomy - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Korean (한국어) Portuguese (português) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) Vietnamese ( ... 한국어 (Korean) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Portuguese (português) Hysterectomy Histerectomia - português (Portuguese) Bilingual PDF Health Information ...

  10. Interval Between Hysterectomy and Start of Radiation Treatment Is Predictive of Recurrence in Patients With Endometrial Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cattaneo, Richard; Hanna, Rabbie K.; Jacobsen, Gordon; Elshaikh, Mohamed A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) has been shown to improve local control in patients with endometrial carcinoma. We analyzed the impact of the time interval between hysterectomy and RT initiation in patients with endometrial carcinoma. Methods and Materials: In this institutional review board-approved study, we identified 308 patients with endometrial carcinoma who received adjuvant RT after hysterectomy. All patients had undergone hysterectomy, oophorectomy, and pelvic and para-aortic lymph node evaluation from 1988 to 2010. Patients' demographics, pathologic features, and treatments were compared. The time interval between hysterectomy and the start of RT was calculated. The effects of time interval on recurrence-free (RFS), disease-specific (DSS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated. Following univariate analysis, multivariate modeling was performed. Results: The median age and follow-up for the study cohort was 65 years and 72 months, respectively. Eighty-five percent of the patients had endometrioid carcinoma. RT was delivered with high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone (29%), pelvic RT alone (20%), or both (51%). Median time interval to start RT was 42 days (range, 21-130 days). A total of 269 patients (74%) started their RT <9 weeks after undergoing hysterectomy (group 1) and 26% started ≥9 weeks after surgery (group 2). There were a total of 43 recurrences. Tumor recurrence was significantly associated with treatment delay of ≥9 weeks, with 5-year RFS of 90% for group 1 compared to only 39% for group 2 (P<.001). On multivariate analysis, RT delay of ≥9 weeks (P<.001), presence of lymphovascular space involvement (P=.001), and higher International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics grade (P=.012) were independent predictors of recurrence. In addition, RT delay of ≥9 weeks was an independent significant predictor for worse DSS and OS (P=.001 and P=.01, respectively). Conclusions: Delay in administering adjuvant RT after hysterectomy was

  11. A comparison of abdominal and vaginal hysterectomies in Benghazi, Libya.

    PubMed

    Agnaeber, K; Bodalal, Z

    2013-08-01

    We performed a comparative study between abdominal and vaginal hysterectomies using clinical data from Al-Jamhouria hospital (one of the largest maternity hospitals in Eastern Libya). Various parameters were taken into consideration: the rates of each type (and their subtypes); average age of patients; indications; causes; postoperative complications; and duration of stay in the hospital afterwards. Conclusions and recommendations were drawn from the results of this study. In light of the aforementioned parameters, it was found that: (1) abdominal hysterectomies were more common than vaginal hysterectomies (p < 0.001); (2) patients admitted for abdominal hysterectomies are younger than those admitted for vaginal hysterectomies (p < 0.001); (3) the most common indication for an abdominal hysterectomy was menstrual disturbances, while for vaginal hysterectomies it was vaginal prolapse; (4) the histopathological cause for abdominal and vaginal hysterectomies were observed and the most common were found to be leiomyomas and atrophic endometrium; (5) there was no significant difference between the two routes in terms of postoperative complications; (6) patients who were admitted for abdominal hysterectomies spent a longer amount of time in the hospital (p < 0.01). It was concluded that efforts should be made to further pursue vaginal and laparoscopic hysterectomies as a viable option to the more conventional abdominal route. PMID:23919862

  12. Can training non-physician clinicians/associate clinicians (NPCs/ACs) in emergency obstetric, neonatal care and clinical leadership make a difference to practice and help towards reductions in maternal and neonatal mortality in rural Tanzania? The ETATMBA project

    PubMed Central

    Ellard, David R; Shemdoe, Aloisia; Mazuguni, Festo; Mbaruku, Godfrey; Davies, David; Kihaile, Paul; Pemba, Senga; Bergström, Staffan; Nyamtema, Angelo; Mohamed, Hamed-Mahfoudh; O'Hare, Joseph Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives During late 2010, 36 trainees including 19 assistant medical officers (AMOs) 1 senior clinical officer (CO) and 16 nurse midwives/nurses were recruited from districts across rural Tanzania and invited to join the Enhancing Human Resources and Use of Appropriate Technologies for Maternal and Perinatal Survival in the sub-Saharan Africa (ETATMBA) training programme. The ETATMBA project was training associate clinicians (ACs) as advanced clinical leaders in emergency obstetric care. The trainees returned to health facilities across the country with the hope of being able to apply their new skills and knowledge. The main aim of this study was to explore the impact of the ETATMBA training on health outcomes including maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality in their facilities. Secondly, to explore the challenges faced in working in these health facilities. Design The study is a pre-examination/postexamination of maternal and neonatal health indicators and a survey of health facilities in rural Tanzania. The facilities surveyed were those in which ETATMBA trainees were placed post-training. The maternal and neonatal indicators were collected for 2011 and 2013 and the survey of the facilities was in early 2014. Results 16 of 17 facilities were surveyed. Maternal deaths show a non-significant downward trend over the 2 years (282–232 cases/100 000 live births). There were no significant differences in maternal, neonatal and birth complication variables across the time-points. The survey of facilities revealed shortages in key areas and some are a serious concern. Conclusions This study represents a snapshot of rural health facilities providing maternal and neonatal care in Tanzania. Enhancing knowledge, practical skills, and clinical leadership of ACs may have a positive impact on health outcomes. However, any impact may be confounded by the significant challenges in delivering a service in terms of resources. Thus, training may be beneficial, but it

  13. Obesity and obstetric anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Mace, H S; Paech, M J; McDonnell, N J

    2011-07-01

    Obesity is increasing in the population as a whole, and especially in the obstetric population, among whom pregnancy-induced physiological changes impact on those already present due to obesity. In particular, changes in the cardiovascular and respiratory systems during pregnancy further alter the physiological effects and comorbidities of obesity. Obese pregnant women are at increased risk of diabetes, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, ischaemic heart disease, congenital malformations, operative delivery postpartum infection and thromboembolism. Regional analgesia and anaesthesia is usually preferred but may be challenging. Obese pregnant women appear to have increased morbidity and mortality associated with caesarean delivery and general anaesthesia for caesarean delivery in particular, and more anaesthesia-related complications. This article summarises the physiological and pharmacological implications of obesity and pregnancy and describes the issues surrounding the management of these women for labour and delivery. PMID:21823371

  14. Accounts of severe acute obstetric complications in Rural Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As maternal deaths have decreased worldwide, increasing attention has been placed on the study of severe obstetric complications, such as hemorrhage, eclampsia, and obstructed labor, to identify where improvements can be made in maternal health. Though access to medical care is considered to be life-saving during obstetric emergencies, data on the factors associated with health care decision-making during obstetric emergencies are lacking. We aim to describe the health care decision-making process during severe acute obstetric complications among women and their families in rural Bangladesh. Methods Using the pregnancy surveillance infrastructure from a large community trial in northwest rural Bangladesh, we nested a qualitative study to document barriers to timely receipt of medical care for severe obstetric complications. We conducted 40 semi-structured, in-depth interviews with women reporting severe acute obstetric complications and purposively selected for conditions representing the top five most common obstetric complications. The interviews were transcribed and coded to highlight common themes and to develop an overall conceptual model. Results Women attributed their life-threatening experiences to societal and socioeconomic factors that led to delays in seeking timely medical care by decision makers, usually husbands or other male relatives. Despite the dominance of male relatives and husbands in the decision-making process, women who underwent induced abortions made their own decisions about their health care and relied on female relatives for advice. The study shows that non-certified providers such as village doctors and untrained birth attendants were the first-line providers for women in all categories of severe complications. Coordination of transportation and finances was often arranged through mobile phones, and referrals were likely to be provided by village doctors. Conclusions Strategies to increase timely and appropriate care seeking

  15. Total Laparoscopic Versus Laparotomic Radical Hysterectomy and Lymphadenectomy in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Meizhu; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article aims to review our 13-year experience in the treatment of patients with cervical cancer by comparing total laparoscopic radical hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy with laparotomy. We reviewed all patients undergoing total laparoscopic or laparotomic radical hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy because of cervical cancer between 2001 and 2014 in our hospital. In total, 154 eligible patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Ia–IIb were enrolled, including 106 patients undergoing total laparoscopic procedure and 48 patients undergoing laparotomic procedure. In the present study, patients in total laparoscopy group were associated with superior surgical outcomes, such as significantly lower blood transfusion compared to those in laparotomy group. Furthermore, patients had significantly lower postoperative complication rate in total laparoscopy group compared with that in laparotomy group (24.5% vs 52.1%) (P = 0.001). Three patients (2.8%) in total laparoscopy group had unplanned conversion to laparotomy. Disease-free survival rates were 89.7% and 88.9% in total laparoscopy and laparotomy groups (P = 0.39), respectively, and overall survival rates were 90.2% in total laparoscopy group and 91.3% in laparotomy group (P = 0.40). Total laparoscopic procedure is a surgically and oncologically safe and reliable alternative to laparotomic procedure in the treatment for cervical cancer. PMID:26222868

  16. How Has the Free Obstetric Care Policy Impacted Unmet Obstetric Need in a Rural Health District in Guinea?

    PubMed Central

    Delamou, Alexandre; Dubourg, Dominique; Beavogui, Abdoul Habib; Delvaux, Thérèse; Kolié, Jacques Seraphin; Barry, Thierno Hamidou; Camara, Bienvenu Salim; Edginton, Mary; Hinderaker, Sven; De Brouwere, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In 2010, the Ministry of Health (MoH) of Guinea introduced a free emergency obstetric care policy in all the public health facilities of the country. This included antenatal checks, normal delivery and Caesarean section. Objective This study aims at assessing the changes in coverage of obstetric care according to the Unmet Obstetric Need concept before (2008) and after (2012) the implementation of the free emergency obstetric care policy in a rural health district in Guinea. Methods We carried out a descriptive cross-sectional study involving the retrospective review of routine programme data during the period April to June 2014. Results No statistical difference was observed in women’s sociodemographic characteristics and indications (absolute maternal indications versus non-absolute maternal indications) before and after the implementation of the policy. Compared to referrals from health centers of patients, direct admissions at hospital significantly increased from 49% to 66% between 2008 and 2012 (p = 0.001). In rural areas, this increase concerned all maternal complications regardless of their severity, while in urban areas it mainly affected very severe complications. Compared to 2008, there were significantly more Major Obstetric Interventions for Maternal Absolute Indications in 2012 (p<0.001). Maternal deaths decreased between 2008 and 2012 from 1.5% to 1.1% while neonatal death increased from 12% in 2008 to 15% in 2012. Conclusion The implementation of the free obstetric care policy led to a significant decrease in unmet obstetric need between 2008 and 2012 in the health district of Kissidougou. However, more research is needed to allow comparisons with other health districts in the country and to analyse the trends. PMID:26047472

  17. Three-dimensional obstetric ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Tache, Veronique; Tarsa, Maryam; Romine, Lorene; Pretorius, Dolores H

    2008-04-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasound has gained a significant popularity in obstetrical practice in recent years. The advantage of this modality in some cases is in question, however. This article provides a basic review of volume acquisition, mechanical positioning, and display modalities. Multiple uses of this technique in obstetrical care including first trimester applications and its utility in clarification of fetal anatomy such as brain, face, heart, and skeleton is discussed. PMID:18450140

  18. Doing obstetrics and staying alive.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    Many family physicians have a love-hate relationship with childbirth care and struggle to balance their personal and family needs with the need to provide high-quality personal care during labour and birth. Many false assumptions undermine family practice obstetrics. Strategies are presented to simplify obstetric care for women and families while promoting reasoned self-care for physicians. Images p1948-a PMID:8219843

  19. Safety Assurance in Obstetrical Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Douglas L

    2008-01-01

    Safety assurance for diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics began with a tacit assumption of safety allowed by a federal law enacted in 1976 for then-existing medical ultrasound equipment. The implementation of the 510(k) pre-market approval process for diagnostic ultrasound resulted in the establishment of guideline upper limits for several examination categories in 1985. The obstetrical category has undergone substantial evolution from initial limits (I. e., 46 mW/cm2 spatial peak temporal average (SPTA) intensity) set in 1985. Thermal and mechanical exposure indices, which are displayed on-screen according to an Output Display Standard (ODS), were developed for safety assurance with relaxed upper limits. In 1992, with the adoption of the ODS, the allowable output for obstetrical ultrasound was increased both in terms of the average exposure (e. g. to a possible 720 mW/cm2 SPTA intensity) and of the peak exposure (via the Mechanical Index). There has been little or no subsequent research with the modern obstetrical ultrasound machines to systematically assess potential risks to the fetus using either relevant animal models of obstetrical exposure or human epidemiology studies. The assurance of safety for obstetrical ultrasound therefore is supported by three ongoing means: (I) review of a substantial but uncoordinated bioeffect research literature, (ii) the theoretical evaluation of diagnostic ultrasound exposure in terms of thermal and nonthermal mechanisms for bioeffects, and (iii) the skill and knowledge of professional sonographers. At this time, there is no specific reason to suspect that there is any significant health risk to the fetus or mother from exposure to diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics. This assurance of safety supports the prudent use of diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics by trained professionals for any medically indicated examination. PMID:18450141

  20. Safety assurance in obstetrical ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L

    2008-04-01

    Safety assurance for diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics began with a tacit assumption of safety allowed by a federal law enacted in 1976 for then-existing medical ultrasound equipment. The implementation of the 510(k) pre-market-approval process for diagnostic ultrasound resulted in the establishment of guideline upper limits for several examination categories in 1985. The obstetrical category has undergone substantial evolution from initial limits (ie, 46 mW/cm2 spatial peak temporal average [SPTA] intensity) set in 1985. Thermal and mechanical exposure indices, which are displayed onscreen according to an Output Display Standard, were developed for safety assurance with relaxed upper limits. In 1992, with the adoption of the Output Display Standard, the allowable output for obstetrical ultrasound was increased in terms of both the average exposure (eg, to a possible 720 mW/cm2 SPTA intensity) and the peak exposure (via the Mechanical Index). There has been little or no subsequent research with the modern obstetrical ultrasound machines to systematically assess potential risks to the fetus using either relevant animal models of obstetrical exposure or human epidemiology studies. The assurance of safety for obstetrical ultrasound therefore is supported by three ongoing means: (1) review of a substantial but uncoordinated bioeffect research literature; (2) the theoretical evaluation of diagnostic ultrasound exposure in terms of thermal and nonthermal mechanisms for bioeffects; and (3) the skill and knowledge of professional sonographers. At this time, there is no specific reason to suspect that there is any significant health risk to the fetus or mother from exposure to diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics. This assurance of safety supports the prudent use of diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics by trained professionals for any medically indicated examination. PMID:18450141

  1. Obstetric management of conjoined twins.

    PubMed

    Sakala, E P

    1986-03-01

    Three cases of conjoined twins are presented: two thorocopagus and one craniopagus. The diagnosis of conjoining varied from late second trimester to time of term delivery. Delivery mode was both by vaginal and cesarean routes, and occurred at both level one and level three hospitals. Antenatal diagnostic procedures and issues in obstetric management are discussed. A suggested obstetric management sequence for conjoined twins is proposed. PMID:3511423

  2. Experience from the use of absorbable type I collagen as haemostatic agent in obstetric and gynecological operations

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannis, V; Daniilidis, A; Rousso, D; Palapelas, V; Karagiannis, T; Kiskinis, D

    2006-01-01

    During the third stage of labour there are a lot of causes of significant hemorrhage. The commonest causes of acute hemorrhage are the uterine atony, the retained placenta, the lower tract lacerations, uterine rupture, placenta accreta, hereditary coagulopathy. Also, there could be significant bleeding, during caesarian section, usually at the time of removal of the placenta in cases of low lying placenta or placenta previa. A lot of times we have to confront serious hemorrhages in gynecological procedures like hysterectomies in cases of cervical, uterine or ovarian cancers. In order to deal with these problems successfully, general and specific measures are being taken. In cases of atonic uterus when all the other methods are unsuccessful we have to proceed to ligation of the internal iliac artery or even hysterectomy. Material-Methods: We have tried to use the hemostatic type I collagen in obstetrical and gynecological cases in order to control the bleeding. We have used the collagen type I totally in 8 cases. Five of them were cases of atonic uterus after normal delivery or caesarian section and three of them were gynecological cases of uterine fibroids and ovarian cancer. Results: By placing the collagen type I over the bleeding surfaces we have realized that in a very short period of time, there has been satisfactory control of the bleeding and immediate clinical improvement of the patient. In four out of five obstetrical cases that we have used the type I collagen, we have managed to avoid the hysterectomy. PMID:22087058

  3. Cost comparison of robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy versus standard laparoscopic hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Winter, Marc L; Leu, Szu-Yun; Lagrew, David C; Bustillo, Gerardo

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess if the cost of robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy is similar to the cost of standard laparoscopic hysterectomy when performed by surgeons past their initial learning curve. A retrospective chart review of all hysterectomies was performed for benign indications without concomitant major procedures at Orange Coast Memorial Medical Center (OCMMC) and Saddleback Memorial Medical Center between January 1, 2013 and September 30, 2013. Robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomies (RTLH) and standard laparoscopic hysterectomies (LAVH and TLH) were compared. Data analyzed included only those hysterectomies performed by surgeons past their initial learning curve (minimum of 30 previous robotic cases). The primary outcome was the direct total cost of patient's hospitalization related to hysterectomy. The secondary outcomes were estimated blood loss, surgery time, and days in hospital post-surgery. A multiple linear regression model was applied to evaluate the difference between RTLH and LAVH/TLH in hospital cost, blood loss, and surgery time, while adjusting for hospital, patient's age, body mass index (BMI), whether or not the patient had previous abdominal/pelvic surgery, and uterine weight. The χ (2) test was applied to examine the association between hospital stay and surgery type. There were 93 hysterectomies (5 LAVH, 88 RTLH) performed at OCMMC and 90 hysterectomies (6 LAVH, 17 TLH, 67 RTLH) performed at Saddleback Memorial Medical Center. The hospitalization total cost result showed that, after adjusting for hospital, age, BMI, previous abdominal/pelvic surgery, and uterine weight, RTLH was not significantly more expensive than LAVH/TLH (mean diff. = $283.1, 95 % CI = [-569.6, 1135.9]; p = 0.51) at the 2 study hospitals. However, the cost at OCMMC was significantly higher than Saddleback Memorial Medical Center (mean diff. = $2008.7, 95 % CI = [1380.6, 2636.7]; p < 0.0001); and the cost increased

  4. Analgesia in Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Heesen, M.; Veeser, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: An effective relief of labour pain has become an important part of obstetric medicine. Therefore regional nerve blocks, systemic analgesic and non-pharmacologic techniques are commonly used. This review article gives a summary of pathophysiology and anatomy of labour pain as well as advantages, disadvantages, risks and adverse reactions of analgesic techniques in newborns and parturients. Methods: We performed a selective literature search in Medline via PubMed using the search-terms “Analgesia” and “Obstetrics”. We also included the current guidelines of the German Society for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine. Results: PDA and CSE are safe techniques for the relief of labour pain if contraindications are excluded. The risk for instrumental delivery but not for caesarean section is increased under neuraxial analgesia. PDA and CSE should be performed in an early stage of labour using low doses of local anaesthetics if possible. It is not necessary to wait for a defined cervical dilatation before starting neuraxial analgesia. Anesthesiologists and obstetricians should inform patients as soon as possible before the situation of stress during labour. Systemic opioid analgesia is a possible alternative for neuraxial techniques. Because of possible side effects systemic remifentanil analgesia should only be performed under continuous monitoring. Several nonpharmacologic methods can also relieve labour pain, but results of studies about their effectiveness are inconsistent. PMID:25264376

  5. Placenta Increta Complicating Persistent Cesarean Scar Ectopic Pregnancy following Failed Excision with Subsequent Preterm Cesarean Hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Malik, M F; Hoyos, L R; Rodriguez-Kovacs, J; Gillum, J; Johnson, S C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Cesarean scar pregnancies (CSPs) are one of the rarest forms of ectopic pregnancy. Given their rarity, there is lack of consensus regarding the management and natural course of CSPs. Case. A 37-year-old G10 P3063 female with a history of two prior cesarean deliveries was diagnosed with her second CSP at 6 weeks and 5 days in her tenth pregnancy. The patient underwent vertical hysterotomy, excision of a gestational sac implanted in the cesarean sac, and bilateral salpingectomy via a laparotomy incision. The histopathology report confirmed immature chorionic villi. The patient returned 10 weeks later and was found to be still pregnant. Obstetric ultrasound confirmed a viable fetus of 19 weeks and 4 days of gestational age with a thin endometrium and an anteroposterior and right lateral placenta with multiple placental lakes. The patient ruptured her membranes at 31 weeks of gestation and pelvic MRI revealed an anterior placenta invading the myometrium and extending to the external serosal surface consistent with placenta increta. Following obstetric interventions, a live female infant was delivered by cesarean hysterectomy (because of placenta increta) at 32 weeks of gestation. Conclusion. Development of standardized guidelines for management of CSPs, as well as heightened vigilance for possible complications, is required for proper care and avoidance of potential morbidity and mortality. PMID:27375911

  6. Placenta Increta Complicating Persistent Cesarean Scar Ectopic Pregnancy following Failed Excision with Subsequent Preterm Cesarean Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Cesarean scar pregnancies (CSPs) are one of the rarest forms of ectopic pregnancy. Given their rarity, there is lack of consensus regarding the management and natural course of CSPs. Case. A 37-year-old G10 P3063 female with a history of two prior cesarean deliveries was diagnosed with her second CSP at 6 weeks and 5 days in her tenth pregnancy. The patient underwent vertical hysterotomy, excision of a gestational sac implanted in the cesarean sac, and bilateral salpingectomy via a laparotomy incision. The histopathology report confirmed immature chorionic villi. The patient returned 10 weeks later and was found to be still pregnant. Obstetric ultrasound confirmed a viable fetus of 19 weeks and 4 days of gestational age with a thin endometrium and an anteroposterior and right lateral placenta with multiple placental lakes. The patient ruptured her membranes at 31 weeks of gestation and pelvic MRI revealed an anterior placenta invading the myometrium and extending to the external serosal surface consistent with placenta increta. Following obstetric interventions, a live female infant was delivered by cesarean hysterectomy (because of placenta increta) at 32 weeks of gestation. Conclusion. Development of standardized guidelines for management of CSPs, as well as heightened vigilance for possible complications, is required for proper care and avoidance of potential morbidity and mortality. PMID:27375911

  7. 42 CFR 441.255 - Sterilization by hysterectomy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sterilization by hysterectomy. 441.255 Section 441.255 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Sterilizations § 441.255 Sterilization by hysterectomy. (a) FFP is not available in expenditures for...

  8. 42 CFR 50.207 - Sterilization by hysterectomy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sterilization by hysterectomy. 50.207 Section 50... GENERAL APPLICABILITY Sterilization of Persons in Federally Assisted Family Planning Projects § 50.207 Sterilization by hysterectomy. (a) Programs or projects to which this subpart applies shall not perform...

  9. Are hysterectomies necessary? Racial-ethnic differences in women's attitudes.

    PubMed

    Dillaway, Heather E

    2016-01-01

    There is a dearth of comparative information about how women from diverse social locations think about, talk about, and experience the various types of reproductive aging. In this article I analyze racial-ethnic differences in attitudes toward surgically induced menopause (hysterectomy) utilizing data from an interview study of 130 menopausal women. African American women in this study were more suspect of doctors' initial offers of hysterectomies than European American women, with the former group of interviewees still fearing a legacy of racial-ethnic discrimination within medical institutions. Only after seeking a second opinion or finding a trustworthy doctor did African American women feel comfortable accepting a hysterectomy. European American interviewees were not as wary as their African American counterparts and sometimes reported wishing for a hysterectomy. I argue that attitudes toward hysterectomy must be contextualized within women's experiences of racial-ethnic oppression and privilege to be fully understood. PMID:27045199

  10. Surgeon volume and outcomes in benign hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Doll, Kemi M; Milad, Magdy P; Gossett, Dana R

    2013-01-01

    Annual surgeon case volume has been linked to patient outcome in a variety of surgical fields, although limited data focus on gynecologic surgery performed by general gynecologists. Herein we review the literature addressing the associations between intraoperative injury, postoperative morbidity, and resource use among surgeons performing a low vs high volume of hysterectomies. Although study design and populations differ, individual and composite morbidity outcomes consistently favored high-volume surgeons. Given the growing emphasis on competency-based evaluation in surgery, gynecology departments may soon consider volume requirements a component of privileging. PMID:23622760

  11. Composite redesign of obstetrical forceps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Seth W.; Smeltzer, Stan S.

    1994-01-01

    Due to the increase in the number of children being born recently, medical technology has struggled to keep pace in certain areas. In these areas, particular needs have arisen to which the subject of this paper is directed. In the area of obstetrics, the forceps design and function has remained relatively unchanged for a number of years. In an effort to advance the technology, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has been asked by the obstetrical community to help in a redesign of the obstetric forceps. Traditionally the forceps design has been of tubular stainless steel, constructed in two halves which interlock and hinge to provide the gripping force necessary to aid in the delivery of an infant. The stainless steel material was used to provide for ease of cleaning and sterilization. However, one of the drawbacks of the non-flexible steel design is that excessive force can be placed upon an infants head which could result in damage or injury to the infant. The redesign of this particular obstetric tool involves applying NASA's knowledge of advanced materials and state of the art instrumentation to create a tool which can be used freely throughout the obstetrics community without the fear of injury to an infant being delivered.

  12. Development of ovarian pathology after hysterectomy without oophorectomy.

    PubMed

    Plöckinger, B; Kölbl, H

    1994-06-01

    This study was done to determine the occurrence of disease in retained ovaries after hysterectomy. A retrospective analysis of patient charts was performed, comparing the patient reports of women who had secondary ovarian lesions with those whose ovaries showed no pathologic findings during the ten year period of observation (1980 to 1990). The study included 1,265 women with at least one ovary saved after hysterectomy for benign indications. Main outcome measures were ovarian pathologic findings after hysterectomy requiring repeat operation. The overall incidence of lesions in retained ovaries was 3.95 percent. There was a 3 percent risk of having secondary ovarian pathologic findings within three years after hysterectomy, with a decreased risk for the following seven years (mean follow-up time of 60 months, range of three to 120 months). Histologic findings at reoperation included common benign conditions of the ovary. No instance of carcinoma of the ovary was found. The risk of having pathology in the retained ovaries after hysterectomy was significantly higher in women who had only one ovary saved, compared with those who had both ovaries saved (7.63 versus 3.47 percent; p < 0.05). The mean age at hysterectomy was significantly lower in women who had ovarian disorders subsequent to hysterectomy than in those who did not (39.3 versus 43.9 years; p < 0.001). In the group of women with secondary ovarian lesions, mean parity was significantly lower than in those without reoperation (1.22 versus 1.94; p < 0.0001). Women with unilateral oophorectomy at the time of hysterectomy had twice the risk of secondary ovarian lesions, compared with those without oophorectomy at hysterectomy. Determinants, such as age, parity and gravidity must be considered when deciding whether or not to perform oophorectomy at hysterectomy. PMID:8193751

  13. Bilateral Carpal Spasm Under Spinal Anaesthesia During Abdominal Hysterectomy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Naithani, Udita; Betkekar, Sneha Arun; Verma, Devendra; Dindor, Basant Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Acute hypocalcaemia is a medical emergency that can have catastrophic implications like tetany, seizures, cardiac arrythmias or laryngospasm if left untreated. We are presenting a case of a 30-year-old female patient undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingoopherectomy under spinal anaesthesia. She developed unexpected bilateral carpal spasm intraoperatively which was promptly diagnosed and successfully managed with intravenous calcium administration. We conclude that the anaesthetist should be aware of the clinical presentation of acute hypocalcaemia, its causes and emergency management in the perioperative period to prevent any adverse outcomes. PMID:26894157

  14. Obstetric Thromboprophylaxis: The Swedish Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, Pelle G.; Hellgren, Margareta

    2011-01-01

    Obstetric thromboprophylaxis is difficult. Since 10 years Swedish obstetricians have used a combined risk estimation model and recommendations concerning to whom, at what dose, when, and for how long thromboprophylaxis is to be administrated based on a weighted risk score. In this paper we describe the background and validation of the Swedish guidelines for obstetric thromboprophylaxis in women with moderate-high risk of VTE, that is, at similar or higher risk as the antepartum risk among women with history of thrombosis. The risk score is based on major risk factors (i.e., 5-fold increased risk of thromboembolism). We present data on the efficacy of the model, the cost-effectiveness, and the lifestyle advice that is given. We believe that the Swedish guidelines for obstetric thromboprophylaxis aid clinicians in providing women at increased risk of VTE with effective and appropriate thromboprophylaxis, thus avoiding both over- and under-treatment. PMID:22162688

  15. Obstetric toxicology: teratogens.

    PubMed

    Levine, Michael; O'Connor, Ayrn D

    2012-11-01

    The emergency physician frequently encounters women who seek care because of pregnancy- and nonpregnancy-related complaints. Many medications are safe for use during pregnancy, including several that are listed as potential teratogens based on the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) pregnancy classification; but it is important that the emergency physician know and recognize which drugs can be given in pregnancy and which drugs are absolutely contraindicated. Expert resources should be identified and used because the FDA's classification of drugs based on pregnancy risk does not represent the most up-to-date or accurate assessment of a drug's safety. PMID:23137407

  16. Definitions of Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalists.

    PubMed

    McCue, Brigid; Fagnant, Robert; Townsend, Arthur; Morgan, Meredith; Gandhi-List, Shefali; Colegrove, Tanner; Stosur, Harriet; Olson, Rob; Meyer, Karenmarie; Lin, Andrew; Tessmer-Tuck, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    The obstetric hospitalist and the obstetric and gynecologic hospitalist evolved in response to diverse forces in medicine, including the need for leadership on labor and delivery units, an increasing emphasis on quality and safety in obstetrics and gynecology, the changing demographics of the obstetric and gynecologic workforce, and rising liability costs. Current (although limited) research suggests that obstetric and obstetric and gynecologic hospitalists may improve the quality and safety of obstetric care, including lower cesarean delivery rates and higher vaginal birth after cesarean delivery rates as well as lower liability costs and fewer liability events. This research is currently hampered by the use of varied terminology. The leadership of the Society of Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalists proposes standardized definitions of an obstetric hospitalist, an obstetric and gynecologic hospitalist, and obstetric and gynecologic hospital medicine practices to standardize communication and facilitate program implementation and research. Clinical investigations regarding obstetric and gynecologic practices (including hospitalist practices) should define inpatient coverage arrangements using these standardized definitions to allow for fair conclusions and comparisons between practices. PMID:26942370

  17. Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy Utilizing a Robotic Surgical System

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Keith H.; Daucher, James A.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the use of a robotic surgical system for total laparoscopic hysterectomy. Methods: We report a series of laparoscopic hysterectomies performed using the da Vinci Robotic Surgical System. Participants were women eligible for hysterectomy by standard laparoscopy. Operative times and complications are reported. Results: We completed 10 total laparoscopic hysterectomies between November 2001 and December 2002 with the use of the da Vinci Robotic Surgical System. Operative results were similar to those of standard laparoscopic hysterectomy. Operative time varied from 2 hours 28 minutes to 4 hours 37 minutes. Blood loss varied from 25 mL to 350 mL. Uterine weights varied from 49 g to 227 g. A cystotomy occurred in a patient with a history of a prior cystotomy unrelated to the robotic system. Conclusion: Total laparoscopic hysterectomy is a complex surgical procedure requiring advanced laparoscopic skills. Tasks like lysis of adhesions, suturing, and knot tying were enhanced with the robotic surgical system, thus providing unique advantages over existing standard laparoscopy. Total laparoscopic hysterectomy can be performed using robotic surgical systems. PMID:15791963

  18. Foetal Gender and Obstetric Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Schildberger, B.; Leitner, H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Data on specific characteristics based on the gender of the unborn baby and their significance for obstetrics are limited. The aim of this study is to analyse selected parameters of obstetric relevance in the phases pregnancy, birth and postpartum period in dependence on the gender of the foetus. Materials and Methods: The selected study method comprised a retrospective data acquisition and evaluation from the Austrian birth register of the Department of Clinical Epidemiology of Tyrolean State Hospitals. For the analysis all inpatient singleton deliveries in Austria during the period from 2008 to 2013 were taken into account (live and stillbirths n = 444 685). The gender of the baby was correlated with previously defined, obstetrically relevant parameters. Results: In proportions, significantly more premature births and sub partu medical interventions (vaginal and abdominal surgical deliveries. episiotomies) were observed for male foetuses (p < 0.001). The neonatal outcome (5-min Apgar score, umbilical pH value less than 7.1, transfer to a neonatal special unit) is significantly poorer for boys (p < 0.001). Discussion: In view of the vulnerability of male foetuses and infants, further research is needed in order to be able to react appropriately to the differing gender-specific requirements in obstetrics. PMID:27065487

  19. Intraoperative cell salvage in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Grainger, Hannah; Catling, Sue

    2011-08-01

    The use of Intraoperative Cell Salvage (ICS) in obstetrics has been slow to develop as a result of theoretical concerns relating to amniotic fluid embolism and fetal red cell contamination. In this article we examine the current UK position on the use of ICS in this clinical speciality and the recommendations for its safe and appropriate use. PMID:22029206

  20. Court-ordered obstetrical interventions.

    PubMed

    Kolder, V E; Gallagher, J; Parsons, M T

    1987-05-01

    In a national survey, we investigated the scope and circumstances of court-ordered obstetrical procedures in cases in which the women had refused therapy deemed necessary for the fetus. We also solicited the opinions of leading obstetricians regarding such cases. Court orders have been obtained for cesarean sections in 11 states, for hospital detentions in 2 states, and for intrauterine transfusions in 1 state. Among 21 cases in which court orders were sought, the orders were obtained in 86 percent; in 88 percent of those cases, the orders were received within six hours. Eighty-one percent of the women involved were black, Asian, or Hispanic, 44 percent were unmarried, and 24 percent did not speak English as their primary language. All the women were treated in a teaching-hospital clinic or were receiving public assistance. No important maternal morbidity or mortality was reported. Forty-six percent of the heads of fellowship programs in maternal-fetal medicine thought that women who refused medical advice and thereby endangered the life of the fetus should be detained. Forty-seven percent supported court orders for procedures such as intrauterine transfusions. We conclude from these data that court-ordered obstetrical procedures represent an important and growing problem that evokes sharply divided responses from faculty members in obstetrics. Such procedures are based on dubious legal grounds, and they may have far-reaching implications for obstetrical practice and maternal and infant health. PMID:3574370

  1. Shared decision making and informed consent for hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Ogburn, Tony

    2014-03-01

    This article provides an overview of the components of the informed consent process for surgery including the components specific to hysterectomy. Shared decision making and informed consent for hysterectomy rely on a mutual understanding by the patient and surgeon of the goals, risks, benefits, and alternatives as well as the choice of hysterectomy technique. The importance of a patient-centered approach is emphasized with an explanation of several communication methods and resources for decision aids that will help to ensure that patients have a good understanding of the items listed above and are able to provide informed consent. PMID:24145363

  2. Gender and power: the Irish hysterectomy scandal.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Joan; Murphy, Sharon; Loughrey, Mark

    2008-09-01

    In April 2004 the Irish Government commissioned Judge Maureen Harding Clark to compile a report to ascertain the rate of caesarean hysterectomies at Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital in Drogheda, Republic of Ireland. The report came about as a result of complaints by midwives into questionable practices that were mainly (but not solely) attributed to one particular obstetrician. In this article we examine the findings of this Report through a feminist lens in order to explore what a feminist reading of the Report and the events that led to the inquiry will bring to light. We consider how sex and gender feature in the Lourdes case, draw attention to the deeply gendered asymmetries of power and privilege that existed between the men and women at the centre of this inquiry, and explore the impact such asymmetries had on this particular situation. PMID:18687818

  3. Large Abdominal Wall Endometrioma Following Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Borncamp, Erik; Mehaffey, Philip; Rotman, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis is a common condition in women that affects up to 45% of patients in the reproductive age group by causing pelvic pain. It is characterized by the presence of endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity and is rarely found subcutaneously or in abdominal incisions, causing it to be overlooked in patients with abdominal pain. Methods: A 45-year-old woman presented with lower abdominal pain 2 years following a laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy. She was found to have incidental cholelithiasis and a large abdominal mass suggestive of a significant ventral hernia on CT scan. Results: Due to the peculiar presentation, surgical intervention took place that revealed a large 9cm×7.6cm×6.2cm abdominal wall endometrioma. Conclusion: Although extrapelvic endometriosis is rare, it should be entertained in the differential diagnosis for the female patient who presents with an abdominal mass and pain and has a previous surgical history. PMID:21902990

  4. Learning curve analysis of laparoscopic radical hysterectomy for gynecologic oncologists without open counterpart experience

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Tae-Wook; Paek, Jiheum; Park, Hyogyeong; Kang, Seong Woo; Ryu, Hee-Sug

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the learning curve of laparoscopic radical hysterectomy (LRH) for gynecologic oncologists who underwent residency- and fellowship-training on laparoscopic surgery without previous experience in performing abdominal radical hysterectomy (ARH). Methods We retrospectively reviewed 84 patients with FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) stage IB cervical cancer who underwent LRH (Piver type III) between April 2006 and March 2014. The patients were divided into two groups (surgeon A group, 42 patients; surgeon B group, 42 patients) according to the surgeon with or without ARH experience. Clinico-pathologic data were analyzed between the 2 groups. Operating times were analyzed using the cumulative sum technique. Results The operating time in surgeon A started at 5 to 10 standard deviations of mean operating time and afterward steeply decreased with operative experience (Pearson correlation coefficient=-0.508, P=0.001). Surgeon B, however, showed a gentle slope of learning curve within 2 standard deviations of mean operating time (Pearson correlation coefficient=-0.225, P=0.152). Approximately 18 cases for both surgeons were required to achieve surgical proficiency for LRH. Multivariate analysis showed that tumor size (>4 cm) was significantly associated with increased operating time (P=0.027; odds ratio, 4.667; 95% confidence interval, 1.187 to 18.352). Conclusion After completing the residency- and fellowship-training course on gynecologic laparoscopy, gynecologic oncologists, even without ARH experience, might reach an acceptable level of surgical proficiency in LRH after approximately 20 cases and showed a gentle slope of learning curve, taking less effort to initially perform LRH. PMID:26430662

  5. Robotic single site versus robotic multiport hysterectomy in early endometrial cancer: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare surgical outcomes and cost of robotic single-site hysterectomy (RSSH) versus robotic multiport hysterectomy (RMPH) in early stage endometrial cancer. Methods This is a retrospective case-control study, comparing perioperative outcomes and costs of RSSH and RMPH in early stage endometrial cancer patients. RSSH were matched 1:2 according to age, body mass index, comorbidity, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetric (FIGO) stage, type of radical surgery, histologic type, and grading. Mean hospital cost per discharge was calculated summarizing the cost of daily hospital room charges, operating room, cost of supplies and length of hospital stay. Results A total of 23 women who underwent RSSH were matched with 46 historic controls treated by RMPH in the same institute, with the same surgical team. No significant differences were found in terms of age, histologic type, stage, and grading. Operative time was similar: 102.5 minutes in RMPH and 110 in RSSH (p=0.889). Blood loss was lower in RSSH than in RMPH (respectively, 50 mL vs. 100 mL, p=0.001). Hospital stay was 3 days in RMPH and 2 days in RSSH (p=0.001). No intraoperative complications occurred in both groups. Early postoperative complications were 2.2% in RMPH and 4.3% in RSSH. Overall cost was higher in RMPH than in RSSH (respectively, $7,772.15 vs. $5,181.06). Conclusion Our retrospective study suggests the safety and feasibility of RSSH for staging early endometrial cancer without major differences from the RMPH in terms of surgical outcomes, but with lower hospital costs. Certainly, further studies are eagerly warranted to confirm our findings. PMID:27171672

  6. 42 CFR 441.255 - Sterilization by hysterectomy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... hysterectomy if— (1) It was performed solely for the purpose of rendering an individual permanently incapable... performed but for the purpose of rendering the individual permanently incapable of reproducing. (b) FFP...

  7. Vaginal route for breast cancer induced hysterectomy with oophorectomy.

    PubMed

    Sheth, S S

    2011-08-01

    A previous history of breast cancer can induce problems in some women, which may necessitate hysterectomy as well as oophorectomy. This study included 20 women with a history of breast cancer with endometrial hyperplasia and recurrent vaginal bleeding or the need for oophorectomy because of metastatic breast cancer along with concomitant hysterectomy. The aim of this study is to show that benign indications for hysterectomy with oophorectomy, arising out of management of breast cancer in the past, can be dealt with by the least invasive approach via the vaginal route, provided vaginal hysterectomy is not contraindicated and the abdomino-pelvic area is free of metastasis. All 20 women had an uneventful postoperative period with rapid recovery, economic benefit and short hospital stay. PMID:21823858

  8. Applying the generic errors modeling system to obstetric hemorrhage quality improvement efforts.

    PubMed

    Bingham, Debra

    2012-01-01

    Obstetric hemorrhage is an emergency situation in which clinicians can make errors that cause women to suffer preventable maternal morbidity and mortality. Scrutinizing commonly occurring obstetric hemorrhage-related practice errors by applying the generic errors modeling system, a research-based framework, to quality improvement efforts facilitates the identification of error specific reduction strategies. The common types of errors are skill-based, rule-based, and knowledge-based active and latent errors. PMID:22548710

  9. Tubal ligation, hysterectomy and ovarian cancer: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this meta-analysis was to determine the strength of the association between gynecologic surgeries, tubal ligation and hysterectomy, and ovarian cancer. Methods We searched the PubMed, Web of Science, and Embase databases for all English-language articles dated between 1969 through March 2011 using the keywords “ovarian cancer” and “tubal ligation” or “tubal sterilization” or “hysterectomy.” We identified 30 studies on tubal ligation and 24 studies on hysterectomy that provided relative risks for ovarian cancer and a p-value or 95% confidence interval (CI) to include in the meta-analysis. Summary RRs and 95% CIs were calculated using a random-effects model. Results The summary RR for women with vs. without tubal ligation was 0.70 (95%CI: 0.64, 0.75). Similarly, the summary RR for women with vs. without hysterectomy was 0.74 (95%CI: 0.65, 0.84). Simple hysterectomy and hysterectomy with unilateral oophorectomy were associated with a similar decrease in risk (summery RR = 0.62, 95%CI: 0.49-0.79 and 0.60, 95%CI: 0.47-0.78, respectively). In secondary analyses, the association between tubal ligation and ovarian cancer risk was stronger for endometrioid tumors (summary RR = 0.45, 95%CI: 0.33, 0.61) compared to serous tumors. Conclusion Observational epidemiologic evidence strongly supports that tubal ligation and hysterectomy are associated with a decrease in the risk of ovarian cancer, by approximately 26-30%. Additional research is needed to determine whether the association between tubal ligation and hysterectomy on ovarian cancer risk differs by individual, surgical, and tumor characteristics. PMID:22587442

  10. Outcome of hysterectomy for pelvic pain in premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Tay, S K; Bromwich, N

    1998-02-01

    The outcome of abdominal hysterectomy for pelvic pain in premenopausal women was studied retrospectively in 228 women. In 17 women, pelvic pain was the sole indication while in the others, pelvic pain was one of the contributory indications for hysterectomy. The most common surgical histopathological diagnoses were uterine leiomyoma (73.9%), uterine adenomyosis (40.4%), benign ovarian cyst (19.3%) and endometriosis (7.9%); 118 (51.8%) patients had single pathology and 48.2% had multiple pathologies. The agreement between operative clinical diagnosis and histopathological diagnosis was 66.1% for leiomyoma, 57.1% for uterine adenomyosis and 30% for endometriosis. The incidence of early postoperative complication was 20.6%, mainly minor morbidities including urinary tract infection (3.9%), wound infection (3.1%) and unexplained fever (6.0%). These complications significantly prolonged the duration of hospital stay from an average of 7 days to 9-17 days. Of 98 patients with pain as the sole or the most predominant indication for hysterectomy, 72% responded to an outcome survey 12 or more months after hysterectomy. Of these, 62 (87%) were satisfied with the operation, 8 were unsure and 1 was dissatisfied; 68 (95.8%) patients reported relief of their symptoms. Relief of symptoms did not correlate with the patient's report of her satisfaction with hysterectomy. Pain in the abdominal wound a year or more after surgery was one of the commonest reasons cited for dissatisfaction with hysterectomy. We conclude that in well-selected cases, hysterectomy is an appropriate and satisfactory treatment for premenopausal women with pelvic pain irrespective of clinical evidence of associated pathology. Effective measures to reduce postoperative complications and wound pain are needed to further improve the outcome of abdominal hysterectomy. PMID:9521396

  11. Cervical removal at hysterectomy for benign disease. Risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Hasson, H M

    1993-10-01

    An assessment of the risks and benefits of total and subtotal hysterectomy for benign disease was performed using the published literature, including a MEDLINE search, on all studies dealing with hysterectomy and related topics from 1946 to 1992. The shift from subtotal to total hysterectomy occurred before cytologic screening was accepted. Currently, SIL is diagnosed by cytology, evaluated by colposcopy and treated preferentially with cone biopsy. Prophylactic removal of the cervix does not eliminate the risk of cancer: it may shift the risk to the vaginal epithelium. The cervix has a role in sexual arousal and orgasm, probably due to stimulation of the Frankenhauser uterovaginal plexus. Bladder and bowel dysfunction following total hysterectomy may be related to loss of nerve ganglia closely associated with the cervix. Increased operative and postoperative morbidity, vaginal shortening, vault prolapse, abnormal cuff granulations and oviductal prolapse are other disadvantages of total hysterectomy. The cervix is not a useless organ and should not be removed during hysterectomy without a proper indication. PMID:8263867

  12. Fallopian Tube Prolapse after Hysterectomy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ouldamer, Lobna; Caille, Agnès; Body, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    Background Prolapse of the fallopian tube into the vaginal vault is a rarely reported complication that may occur after hysterectomy. Clinicians can miss the diagnosis of this disregarded complication when dealing with post-hysterectomy vaginal bleeding. Objectives We performed a systematic review in order to describe the clinical presentation, therapeutic management and outcome of fallopian tube prolapse occurring after hysterectomy. Search Strategy A systematic search of MEDLINE and EMBASE references from January 1980 to December 2010 was performed. We included articles that reported cases of fallopian tube prolapse after hysterectomy. Data from eligible studies were independently extracted onto standardized forms by two reviewers. Results Twenty-eight articles including 51 cases of fallopian tube prolapse after hysterectomy were included in this systematic review. Clinical presentations included abdominal pain, dyspareunia, post- coital bleeding, and/or vaginal discharge. Two cases were asymptomatic and diagnosed at routine checkup. The surgical management reported comprised partial or total salpingectomy, with vaginal repair in some cases combined with oophorectomy using different approaches (vaginal approach, combined vaginal-laparoscopic approach, laparoscopic approach, or laparotomy). Six patients were initially treated by silver nitrate application without success. Conclusions This systematic review provided a precise summary of the clinical characteristics and treatment of patients presenting with fallopian tube prolapse following hysterectomy published in the past 30 years. We anticipate that these results will help inform current investigations and treatment. PMID:24116117

  13. Teamwork in obstetric critical care

    PubMed Central

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Segel, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Whether seeing a patient in the ambulatory clinic environment, performing a delivery or managing a critically ill patient, obstetric care is a team activity. Failures in teamwork and communication are among the leading causes of adverse obstetric events, accounting for over 70% of sentinel events according to the Joint Commission. Effective, efficient and safe care requires good teamwork. Although nurses, doctors and healthcare staff who work in critical care environments are extremely well trained and competent medically, they have not traditionally been trained in how to work well as part of a team. Given the complexity and acuity of critical care medicine, which often relies on more than one medical team, teamwork skills are essential. This chapter discusses the history and importance of teamwork in high-reliability fields, reviews key concepts and skills in teamwork, and discusses approaches to training and working in teams. PMID:18701352

  14. Cost-effectiveness of radical hysterectomy with adjuvant radiotherapy versus radical radiotherapy for FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Yanlan; Wang, Juan; Wang, Tao; Shi, Fan; Wang, Jiquan; Su, Jin; Yang, Yunyi; Zhou, Xi; Ma, Hailin; He, Bin; Liu, Zi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recent literature reports that radical hysterectomy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy has comparable progression-free survival and overall survival compared to radical radiotherapy for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIB cervical cancer. Now, we evaluate the cost-effectiveness (CE) of these two treatment regimens. Primary and secondary outcome measures A decision-tree model was constructed comparing CE between treatment arms using the published studies for overall survival rates and treatment-related toxicity rates for 5 years. The cost data were obtained from the hospital system of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University. Effectiveness was measured as quality-adjusted life year (QALY). Treatment arms were compared with regard to costs and life expectancy using incremental CE ratio, and the results were presented using costs per QALY. Results The mean cost was $10,872 for radical hysterectomy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy versus $5,702 for radical radiotherapy. The incremental CE ratio for surgery-based treatment compared to radiotherapy-based treatment was –$76,453 per QALY. Conclusion Radical radiotherapy would be a cost-effective method for FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer and would be favored in settings where resources are limited. PMID:26855584

  15. Community awareness about risk factors, presentation and prevention and obstetric fistula in Nabitovu village, Iganga district, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obstetric fistula is a worldwide problem that is devastating for women in developing countries. The cardinal cause of obstetric fistula is prolonged obstructed labour and delay in seeking emergency obstetric care. Awareness about obstetric fistula is still low in developing countries. The objective was to assess the awareness about risk factors of obstetric fistulae in rural communities of Nabitovu village, Iganga district, Eastern Uganda. Methods A qualitative study using focus group discussion for males and females aged 18-49 years, to explore and gain deeper understanding of their awareness of existence, causes, clinical presentation and preventive measures for obstetric fistula. Data was analyzed by thematic analysis. Results The majority of the women and a few men were aware about obstetric fistula, though many had misconceptions regarding its causes, clinical presentation and prevention. Some wrongly attributed fistula to misuse of family planning, having sex during the menstruation period, curses by relatives, sexually transmitted infections, rape and gender-based violence. However, others attributed the fistula to delays to access medical care, induced abortions, conception at an early age, utilization of traditional birth attendants at delivery, and some complications that could occur during surgical operations for difficult deliveries. Conclusion Most of the community members interviewed were aware of the risk factors of obstetric fistula. Some respondents, predominantly men, had misconceptions/myths about risk factors of obstetric fistula as being caused by having sex during menstrual periods, poor usage of family planning, being a curse. PMID:24321441

  16. Robot-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy vs traditional laparoscopic hysterectomy: five metaanalyses.

    PubMed

    Scandola, Michele; Grespan, Lorenzo; Vicentini, Marco; Fiorini, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    To assess differences between laparoscopic hysterectomy performed with or without robot-assistance, we performed metaanalyses of 5 key indices strongly associated with societal and hospital costs, patient safety, and intervention quality. The 5 indexes included estimated blood loss (EBL), operative time, number of conversions to laparotomy, hospital length of stay (LOS), and number of postoperative complications. A search of PubMed, Medline, Embase, and Science citation index online databases yielded a total of 605 studies. After a systematic review, we proceeded with meta-analysis of 14 articles for EBL, with a summary effect of -0.61 (95% confidence interval [CI], -42.42 to 46.20); 20 for operative time, with a summary effect of 0.66 (95% CI, -15.72 to 17.04); 17 for LOS, with a summary effect of -0.43 (95% CI, -0.68 to -0.17); 15 for conversion to laparotomy (odds ratio, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.31 to 0.79 with a random model); and 14 for postoperative complications (odds ratio, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.43 to 1.09 with a random model). In conclusion, compared with traditional laparoscopic hysterectomy, robot-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy was associated with shorter LOS and fewer postoperative complications and conversions to laparotomy; there were no differences in EBL and operative time. These results confirm that robot-assisted laparoscopy has less deletorious effect on hospital, society, and patient stress and leads to better intervention quality. PMID:22024259

  17. Obstetric Sphincter Injury Interacts with Diarrhea and Urgency to Increase the Risk of Fecal Incontinence in Women with IBS

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Barbara L.; Matthews, Catherine A.; Palsson, Olafur S; Geller, Elizabeth; Turner, Marsha; Parnell, Brent; Crane, Andrea; Jannelli, Mary; Wells, Ellen; Connolly, AnnaMarie; Lin, Feng-Chang; Whitehead, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To confirm that fecal urgency and diarrhea are independent risk factors for fecal incontinence (FI), to identify obstetrical risk factors associated with FI in women with IBS (irritable bowel syndrome), and to determine whether obstetric anal sphincter injuries interact with diarrhea or urgency to explain the occurrence of FI. Methods The study is a supplement to a diary study of bowel symptoms in 164 female patients with IBS. Subjects completed daily bowel symptom diaries for 90 consecutive days and rated each bowel movement (BM) for stool consistency and presence of urgency, pain, and FI. All female participants from the parent study were invited to complete a telephone-administered 33-item bowel symptom and obstetric history questionnaire which included the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index (FISI). Results Out of 164 women in the parent study, 115 (70.1%) completed the interview. Seventy-four (45.1%) reported FI on their diary including 34 (29.6%) who reported at least one episode per month, 112 (97.4%) reported episodes of urgency, and 106 (92.2%) reported episodes of diarrhea. The mean FISI score was 13.9±9.7. Upon multivariable analysis, FI was significantly associated with parity (p=0.007), operative vaginal delivery (p=0.049), obstetrical sphincter lacerations (p=0.007), fecal urgency (p=0.005), diarrhea (p=0.008), and hysterectomy (p=0.004), but was not associated with episiotomy, pelvic organ prolapse, or urinary incontinence. The synergistic interactions of obstetric anal sphincter laceration with urgency (p=0.002) and diarrhea (p=0.004) were significant risk factors for FI. Conclusion Fecal urgency and diarrhea are independent risk factors for FI, and they interact with obstetric anal sphincter laceration to amplify the risk of FI. PMID:23321658

  18. Vaginal Cuff Dehiscence in Robotic-Assisted Total Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kashani, Shabnam; Gallo, Taryn; Sargent, Anita; ElSahwi, Karim; Silasi, Dan-Arin

    2012-01-01

    Study Objective: The aim of this study was to estimate the cumulative incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence in robotic-assisted total hysterectomies in our patients and to provide recommendations to decrease the incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence. Methods: This was an observational case series, Canadian Task Force Classification II-3 conducted at an academic and community teaching hospital. A total of 654 patients underwent robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy for both malignant and benign reasons from September 1, 2006 to March 1, 2011 performed by a single surgeon. The da Vinci Surgical System was used for robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy. Results: There were 3 cases of vaginal cuff dehiscence among 654 robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomies, making our cumulative incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence 0.4%. The mean time between the procedures and vaginal cuff dehiscence was 44.3 d (6.3 wk). All patients were followed up twice after surgery, at 3 to 4 wk and 12 to 16 wk. Conclusion: In our study, the incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence after robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy compares favorably to that of total abdominal and vaginal hysterectomy. Our study suggests that the incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence is more likely related to the technique of colpotomy and vaginal cuff suturing than to robotic-assisted total hysterectomy per se. With proper technique and patient education, our vaginal dehiscence rate has been 0.4%, which is 2.5 to 10 times less than the previously reported vaginal cuff dehiscence rate in the literature. PMID:23484559

  19. Maternal and Perinatal Outcome of Life Threatening Obstetrical Complications Requiring Multiple Transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Khatuja, Ritu; Radhakrishnan, Gita; Radhika, AG; Juneja, Atul; Singh, Bharat

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obstetrical haemorrhage is the direct cause of maternal mortality, which can be prevented by timely recognition followed by quick and adequate treatment. Aim To evaluate maternal and perinatal outcome of life threatening obstetric complications requiring multiple transfusions. Materials and Methods It is an observational study conducted on 112 antenatal and postnatal women admitted in a tertiary level hospital, requiring blood and blood products transfusion of >1.5 liters in 24 hours, over a period of 15 months (Aug 2011 to Oct 2012). The demographic and obstetrical profile, amount transfused, mode of delivery, duration of hospital stay, maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality was evaluated. Statistical Analysis Statistical analysis of the data was performed using chi-squared test. Results There were 95 women who presented in antepartum period and 17 in the postpartum. Multigravidas comprised of 70 women, 81 had unsupervised pregnancies and 33 women presented in shock. At admission, 76 peripartum women had severe anaemia and 62 had coagulopathy. Obstetrical hysterectomy was done for 33 women and total 17 women expired. Haemorrhage was the most common indication for transfusion. The mean blood transfusion and volume replacement in 24 hours was 4.2 units & 2.25 liters respectively. The mean hospital stay was 10-15 days. Intra-uterine death at the time of admission was present in 40 women and 72 had live births. After birth, 21 babies required neonatal intensive care, of which 6 expired. Conclusion Antenatal care is important to prevent complications though pregnancy is always unpredictable. Patients’ condition at admission is single most important factor often influencing the maternal and perinatal outcome. PMID:26673661

  20. Obstetric Scar Endometriosis: Retrospective Study on 19 Cases and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Kaplanoglu, Mustafa; Kaplanoğlu, Dilek Kaya; Dincer Ata, Ceren; Buyukkurt, Selim

    2014-01-01

    Endometriosis is defined as the presence of functioning endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity. This disease is one of the most common gynecologic disorders in reproductive age women. It generally occurs in pelvic cavity. But extrapelvic location has been defined (such as extremities, central nervous system, lungs, pleurae, liver, umbilicus, pericardium, urinary tract, intestines, and surgical scar tissue). Scar endometriosis is a rare disease and defined as presence of endometriotic lesions on the abdominal (such as cesarean section and hysterectomy) or vaginal (episiotomy) excision line. It is difficult to diagnose due to the extreme variability in presentation. The symptoms are nonspecific, typically involving pain, swelling at the incision site at the time of menstruation. Excision and histopathologic examination are necessary for diagnosis. We present a case series of obstetric scar endometriosis and review of the literature. PMID:27379258

  1. Committee Opinion No. 657: The Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalist.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    The term "hospitalist" refers to physicians whose primary professional focus is the general medical care of hospitalized patients. Their activities may include patient care, teaching, research, and inpatient leadership. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists supports the continued development and study of the obstetric and gynecologic (ob-gyn) hospitalist model as one potential approach to improve patient safety and professional satisfaction across delivery settings. Effective patient handoffs, updates on progress, and clear follow-up instructions between ob-gyn hospitalists and patients, nurses, and other health care providers are vital to maintaining patient safety. Hospitals and other health care organizations should ensure that candidates for positions as ob-gyn hospitalists are drawn from those with documented training and experience appropriate for the management of the acute and potentially emergent clinical circumstances that may be encountered in obstetric care. PMID:26942392

  2. Committee Opinion No. 657 Summary: The Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalist.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    The term "hospitalist" refers to physicians whose primary professional focus is the general medical care of hospitalized patients. Their activities may include patient care, teaching, research, and inpatient leadership. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists supports the continued development and study of the obstetric and gynecologic (ob-gyn) hospitalist model as one potential approach to improve patient safety and professional satisfaction across delivery settings. Effective patient handoffs, updates on progress, and clear follow-up instructions between ob-gyn hospitalists and patients, nurses, and other health care providers are vital to maintaining patient safety. Hospitals and other health care organizations should ensure that candidates for positions as ob-gyn hospitalists are drawn from those with documented training and experience appropriate for the management of the acute and potentially emergent clinical circumstances that may be encountered in obstetric care. PMID:26942385

  3. Risk model in stage IB1-IIB cervical cancer with positive node after radical hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhilan; Huang, Kecheng; Lu, Zhiyong; Deng, Song; Xiong, Jiaqiang; Huang, Jia; Li, Xiong; Tang, Fangxu; Wang, Zhihao; Sun, Haiying; Wang, Lin; Zhou, Shasha; Wang, Xiaoli; Jia, Yao; Hu, Ting; Gui, Juan; Wan, Dongyi; Ma, Ding; Li, Shuang; Wang, Shixuan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors in patients with surgically treated node-positive IB1-IIB cervical cancer and to establish a risk model for disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). A total of 170 patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy as primary treatment for node-positive International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB1-IIB cervical cancer from January 2002 to December 2008 were retrospectively analyzed. Five published risk models were evaluated in this population. The variables, including common iliac lymph node metastasis and parametrial invasion, were independent predictors of outcome in a multivariate analysis using a Cox regression model. Three distinct prognostic groups (low, intermediate, and high risk) were defined using these variables. Five-year DFS rates for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 73.7%, 60.0%, and 25.0%, respectively (P<0.001), and 5-year OS rates were 81.9%, 42.8%, and 25.0%, respectively (P<0.001). The risk model derived in this study provides a novel means for assessing prognosis of patients with node-positive stage IB1-IIB cervical cancer. Future study will focus on external validation of the model and refinement of the risk scoring systems by adding new biologic markers. PMID:27313462

  4. Laparoscopic hysterectomy of large uteri using three-trocar technique

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wenjie; Chen, Liyou; Du, Weijie; Hu, Jinghui; Fang, Xiangming; Zhao, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The uterus with its size exceeds 12 weeks of gestation have been considered a relative contraindication to laparoscopic hysterectomy. With surgical techniques progressed and laparoscopic instruments improved, laparoscopic hysterectomy for large uteri have been performed safely and effectively. The aim of this study is to assess the feasibility and safety of laparoscopic hysterectomy on uterus more than 800 g using a three-trocar technique on 18 patients. Methods: From June 2011 to June 2013 a total of 18 consecutive patients underwent laparoscopic hysterectomy for benign gynaecological conditions. All of the 18 consecutive cases were successfully completed by laparoscopy with the instruction of the procedure. Results: All of the 18 cases were completed by laparoscopy without major complication. The average time of the surgery was 107 min (65-180), the average blood lost was 225 ml (50-800 ml), the average weight of the uterus was 1105 g (820-1880 g), and the average HGB drop was 0.9 g/dl (0.2-1.9 g/dl). Conclusion: Based on appropriate techniques and careful operate, Laparoscopic hysterectomies for large uteri using three-trocar is safe and feasible to most of the patients. PMID:26131249

  5. An evaluation of obstetrical analgesia.

    PubMed

    FIST, H S

    1954-02-01

    Relief of pain and safety of mother and child are fundamentals in obstetrical analgesia. Elimination of those drugs which are ineffective or dangerous is the best guide to proper medication. Morphine, codeine, or similar opium derivatives should be avoided as they depress fetal respiration. Barbiturates have the same fault, despite their popularity. Demerol in small dosage is safe and effective. Scopolamine yields excellent results with safety. Magnesium sulfate potentiates and reinforces the action of scopolamine and involves no danger. This combination of drugs may be used by any competent general practitioner in the home or hospital. PMID:13126811

  6. Adjuvant chemotherapy for endometrial cancer after hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nick; Bryant, Andrew; Miles, Tracie; Hogberg, Thomas; Cornes, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Endometrial adenocarcinoma (womb cancer) is a malignant growth of the lining (endometrium) of the womb (uterus). It is distinct from sarcomas (tumours of the uterine muscle). Survival depends the risk of microscopic metastases after surgery. Adjuvant (postoperative) chemotherapy improves survival from some other adenocarcinomas, and there is evidence that endometrial cancer is sensitive to cytotoxic therapy. This systematic review examines the effect of chemotherapy on survival after hysterectomy for endometrial cancer. Objectives To assess efficacy of adjuvant (postoperative) chemotherapy for endometrial cancer. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 3), MEDLINE and EMBASE up to August 2010, registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing adjuvant chemotherapy with any other adjuvant treatment or no other treatment. Data collection and analysis We used a random-effects meta-analysis to assess hazard ratios (HR) for overall and progression-free survival and risk ratios (RR) to compare death rates and site of initial relapse. Main results Five RCTs compared no additional treatment with additional chemotherapy after hysterectomy and radiotherapy. Four trials compared platinum based combination chemotherapy directly with radiotherapy. Indiscriminate pooling of survival data from 2197 women shows a significant overall survival advantage from adjuvant chemotherapy (RR (95% CI) = 0.88 (0.79 to 0.99)). Sensitivity analysis focused on trials of modern platinum based chemotherapy regimens and found the relative risk of death to be 0.85 ((0.76 to 0.96); number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNT) = 25; absolute risk reduction = 4% (1% to 8%)). The HR for overall survival is 0.74 (0.64 to 0.89), significantly

  7. Pain Characteristics after Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong Bum; Kang, Kyeongjin; Song, Mi Kyung; Seok, Suhyun; Kim, Yoon Hee; Kim, Ji Eun

    2016-01-01

    Background. Total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH) causes various types of postoperative pain, and the pain pattern has not been evaluated in detail to date. This prospective observational study investigated the types of postoperative pain, intensity in the course of time, and pain characteristics during the first postoperative 72 hr after TLH. Methods. Sixty four female patients undergoing TLH were enrolled, which finally 50 patients were included for the data analyses. The locations of pain included overall pain, abdominal visceral and incisional pains, shoulder pain, and perineal pain. Assessments were made at rest and in motion, and pain level was scored with the use of the 100 mm visual analog scale. The pain was assessed at baseline, and at postoperative 30 min, 1 hr, 3 hr, 6 hr, 24 hr, 48 hr, and 72 hr. Results. Overall, visceral, and incisional pains were most intense on the day of operation and then decreased following surgery. In contrast, shoulder pain gradually increased, peaking at postoperative 24 hr. Shoulder pain developed in 90% of all patients (44/50). It was not more aggravated in motion than at rest, in comparison with other pains, and right shoulder pain was more severe than left shoulder pain (p=0.006). In addition, the preoperative exercise habit of patients increased the threshold of shoulder pain. Most patients (46/50) had perineal pain, which was more severe than abdominal pain in approximately 30% of patients (17/50). Conclusion. Pain after TLH showed considerably different duration, severity, and characteristics, compared with other laparoscopic procedures. Shoulder pain was most intense at postoperative 24 hr, and the intensity was associated with the prior exercise habit of patients and the high level of analgesic request. PMID:27499688

  8. Malpractice Burden, Rural Location, and Discontinuation of Obstetric Care: A Study of Obstetric Providers in Michigan

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao; Siefert, Kristine A.; Jacobson, Peter D.; Lori, Jody R.; Gueorguieva, Iana; Ransom, Scott B.

    2011-01-01

    Context It has long been a concern that professional liability problems disproportionately affect the delivery of obstetrical services to women living in rural areas. Michigan, a state with a large number of rural communities, is considered to be at risk for a medical liability crisis. Purpose This study examined whether higher malpractice burden on obstetric providers was associated with an increased likelihood of discontinuing obstetric care and whether there were rural-urban differences in the relationship. Methods Data on 500 obstetrician-gynecologists and family physicians who had provided obstetric care at some point in their career (either currently or previously) were obtained from a statewide survey in Michigan. Statistical tests and multivariate regression analyses were performed to examine the interrelationship among malpractice burden, rural location, and discontinuation of obstetric care. Findings After adjusting for other factors that might influence a physician’s decision about whether to stop obstetric care, our results showed no significant impact of malpractice burden on physicians’ likelihood to discontinue obstetric care. Rural-urban location of the practice did not modify the nature of this relationship. However, family physicians in rural Michigan had a nearly four fold higher likelihood of withdrawing obstetric care when compared to urban family physicians. Conclusions The higher likelihood of rural family physicians to discontinue obstetric care should be carefully weighed in future interventions to preserve obstetric care supply. More research is needed to better understand the practice environment of rural family physicians and the reasons for their withdrawal from obstetric care. PMID:19166559

  9. Fast MR imaging in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Masako; Watanabe, Yuji; Okumura, Akira; Amoh, Yoshiki; Nakashita, Satoru; Dodo, Yoshihiro

    2002-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is the initial imaging modality of choice for evaluation of patients in obstetrics. However, the results of US are not always sufficient. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, which uses no ionizing radiation, may be an ideal method for further evaluation. Although MR imaging is not recommended during the first trimester and use of contrast material is not recommended in pregnant patients, fast MR imaging is useful in various obstetric settings and can provide more specific information with excellent tissue contrast and multiplanar views. In pregnant patients with acute conditions, various diseases (eg, red degeneration of a uterine leiomyoma) may be diagnosed. MR imaging allows characterization of pelvic masses discovered during pregnancy and diagnosis of postpartum complications (eg, abscess, hematoma, ovarian vein thrombosis). In pregnant patients with hydronephrosis, MR urography can demonstrate the site of obstruction and the cause (eg, a ureteral stone). MR pelvimetry may be beneficial in cases of breech presentation. Contrast material-enhanced dynamic MR imaging allows one to evaluate the vascularity of a placental polyp, detect the viable component of a gestational trophoblastic tumor, and diagnose a uterine arteriovenous malformation. MR imaging enables diagnosis of rare forms of ectopic pregnancy and early diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy. PMID:12006687

  10. Robotic Trachelectomy After Supracervical Hysterectomy for Benign Gynecologic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Joelle; Hanna, Rabbie; Papalekas, Eleni; Schiff, Lauren; Theoharis, Evan; Eisenstein, David

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: A renewed interest in the supra cervical approach to hysterectomy has created a cohort of patients with a retained cervix at risk of persistent symptoms requiring a subsequent trachelectomy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of robotic trachelectomy after a previous supracervical hysterectomy. Methods: This is a retrospective chart review of women who had robotic trachelectomy after supracervical hysterectomy for benign gynecologic disease from January 2009 through October 2014. Results: Eleven patients underwent robotic trachelectomy for benign conditions during the observed period. Prior supracervical hysterectomy had been performed for pelvic pain (8/11, 73%), abnormal uterine bleeding (7/11, 64%), and dysmenorrhea (5/11, 45%). In 10 of 11 patients, the symptoms leading to robotic trachelectomy were the same as those leading to supracervical hysterectomy. The time from hysterectomy to recurrence of symptoms ranged from 0.5 to 26 months (median, 6), whereas the time interval from previous surgery to robotic trachelectomy ranged from 1 to 57 months (median, 26). Mean age and body mass index at robotic trachelectomy were 42 ± 5.4 years and 32 ± 6.1 kg/m2. Mean length of surgery was 218 ± 88 minutes (range, 100–405). There was 1 major postoperative complication involving bladder perforation and subsequent vesicovaginal fistula (VVF). Endometriosis was seen in 27% of pathologic specimens and cervicitis in another 27%; 45% showed normal tissue histology. In 6 (55%) cases, symptoms leading to trachelectomy resolved completely after surgery, and the other 5 (45%) patients reported a significant improvement. Conclusions: Although trachelectomy can be a challenging surgery, our experience suggests that the robotic approach may be a valuable means of achieving safe and reproducible outcomes. PMID:27493470

  11. The Essential Elements of a Robotic-Assisted Laparoscopic Hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Khara M; Advincula, Arnold P

    2016-09-01

    Robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomies are being performed at higher rates since the da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical, Inc, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) received US Food and Drug Administration approval in 2005 for gynecologic procedures. Despite the technological advancements over traditional laparoscopy, a discrepancy exists between what the literature states and what the benefits are as seen through the eyes of the end-user. There remains a significant learning curve in the adoption of safe and efficient robotic skills. The authors present important considerations when choosing to perform a robotic hysterectomy and a step-by-step technique. The literature on perioperative outcomes is also reviewed. PMID:27521880

  12. Obstetric Provider Maldistribution: Georgia, USA, 2011.

    PubMed

    Spelke, Bridget; Zertuche, Adrienne D; Rochat, Roger

    2016-07-01

    Objectives In 2010, Georgia had the nation's highest maternal mortality rate, sixteenth highest infant mortality rate, and a waning obstetrician/gynecologist (ob/gyn) workforce. Statewide ob/gyn workforce data, however, masked obstetric-specific care shortages and regional variation in obstetric services. The Georgia Maternal and Infant Health Research Group thereby assessed each Georgia region's obstetric provider workforce to identify service-deficient areas. Methods We identified 63 birthing facilities in the 82 Primary Care Service Areas (PCSAs) outside metropolitan Atlanta and interviewed nurse managers and others to assess the age, sex, and expected departure year of each delivering professional. Using accepted annual delivery rates of 155 per obstetrician (OB), 100 per certified nurse midwife (CNM), and 70 per family medicine physician (FP) we converted obstetric providers into "OB equivalents" to standardize obstetric services available in any given area. Using facility births and computed OB equivalents (contemporary and 2020 estimates), we calculated current and projected average annual births per provider (AABP) for each PCSA, categorizing its obstetric provider workforce as "adequate" (AABP < 144), "at risk" (144 ≤ AABP ≤ 166), or "deficient" (AABP > 166). We mapped results using ArcGIS. Results Of 82 surveyed PCSAs, 52 % (43) were deficient in obstetric care; 16 % (13) had a shortage and 37 % (30) lacked obstetric providers entirely. There were no delivering FPs in 89 % (73) of PCSAs and no CNMs in 70 % (56). If Georgia fails to recruit delivering providers, 72 % (58/77) of PCSAs will have deficient or no obstetric care by 2020. Conclusions Obstetric provider shortages in Georgia hinder access to prenatal and delivery services. Care-deficient areas will expand if recruitment and retention of delivering professionals does not improve. PMID:27084367

  13. Recovery 3 and 12 months after hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Theunissen, Maurice; Peters, Madelon L.; Schepers, Jan; Maas, Jacques W.M.; Tournois, Fleur; van Suijlekom, Hans A.; Gramke, Hans-Fritz; Marcus, Marco A.E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP) is 1 important aspect of surgical recovery. To improve perioperative care and postoperative recovery knowledge on predictors of impaired recovery is essential. The aim of this study is to assess predictors and epidemiological data of CPSP, physical functioning (SF-36PF, 0–100), and global surgical recovery (global surgical recovery index, 0–100%) 3 and 12 months after hysterectomy for benign indication. A prospective multicenter cohort study was performed. Sociodemographic, somatic, and psychosocial data were assessed in the week before surgery, postoperatively up to day 4, and at 3- and 12-month follow-up. Generalized linear model (CPSP) and linear-mixed model analyses (SF-36PF and global surgical recovery index) were used. Baseline data of 468 patients were collected, 412 (88%) patients provided data for 3-month evaluation and 376 (80%) patients for 12-month evaluation. After 3 and 12 months, prevalence of CPSP (numeric rating scale ≥ 4, scale 0–10) was 10.2% and 9.0%, respectively, SF-36PF means (SD) were 83.5 (20.0) and 85.9 (20.2), global surgical recovery index 88.1% (15.6) and 93.3% (13.4). Neuropathic pain was reported by 20 (5.0%) patients at 3 months and 14 (3.9%) patients at 12 months. Preoperative pain, surgery-related worries, acute postsurgical pain on day 4, and surgery-related infection were significant predictors of CPSP. Baseline level, participating center, general psychological robustness, indication, acute postsurgical pain, and surgery-related infection were significant predictors of SF-36PF. Predictors of global surgical recovery were baseline expectations, surgery-related worries, American Society of Anesthesiologists classification, type of anesthesia, acute postsurgical pain, and surgery-related infection. Several predictors were identified for CPSP, physical functioning, and global surgical recovery. Some of the identified factors are modifiable and optimization of patients’ preoperative

  14. A computerized obstetric medical record.

    PubMed

    Stead, W W; Brame, R G; Hammond, W E; Jelovsek, F R; Estes, E H; Parker, R T

    1977-04-01

    Duke University has utilized computerized obstetric medical records since 1971. System evolution is described. Deficiencies in the current system appear to evolve from the computer/human interface rather than from basic system design. Critical elements in system success are physician acceptance of the appearance of data collection sheets and printed notes and continual rapid response in programing modification to allow for physician individuality and changes in medical practice. The limiting factor in the potential usefulness of such a system is the rate of incomplete data collection. It is suggested that if the physician were to enter data directly into the computer through a terminal, data collection would be more accurate and complete. PMID:854253

  15. [HYPNOSIS IN OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY].

    PubMed

    Rabinerson, David; Yeoshua, Effi; Gabbay-Ben-Ziv, Rinat

    2015-05-01

    Hypnosis is an ancient method of treatment, in which an enhanced state of mind and elevated susceptibility for suggestion of the patient, are increased. Hypnosis is executed, either by a caregiver or by the person himself (after brief training). The use of hypnosis in alleviating labor pain has been studied as of the second half of the 20th century. In early studies, the use of hypnosis for this purpose has been proven quite effective. However, later studies, performed in randomized controlled trial terms, have shown controversial results. Other studies, in which the effect of hypnosis was tested in various aspects of both obstetrics and gynecology and with different levels of success, are elaborated on in this review. PMID:26168643

  16. Autologous blood storage in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Herbert, W N; Owen, H G; Collins, M L

    1988-08-01

    Autologous transfusion, storage of one's own blood for subsequent infusion if needed, is safe and effective in a variety of scheduled operative procedures. Obstetric involvement in such programs is very limited, however. Thirty pregnant women with placenta previa or other potential complications underwent 55 phlebotomies in an autologous transfusion program. Phlebotomies were performed at an average gestational age of 32.4 weeks (range 13-40). Changes in mean diastolic blood pressure and pulse were minimal. Electronic fetal monitoring tracings were normal during the 34 procedures in which it was used. The frequency of mild donor reactions (4%) was consistent with that in nonpregnant donors. After entry into this program, 15 patients received a total of 29 U of packed red blood cells (23 autologous; six homologous). Homologous transfusion was avoided in 86.7% of patients receiving blood. Selected pregnant women can participate safely in autologous blood collection programs, minimizing the need, and therefore the risks, of homologous transfusion. PMID:3292974

  17. Resuscitation in massive obstetric haemorrhage using an intraosseous needle.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, D J; Bukunola, B; Samuels, T L; Induruwage, L; Uncles, D R

    2011-04-01

    A 38-year-old woman experienced a massive postpartum haemorrhage 30 minutes after emergency caesarean delivery. The patient became severely haemodynamically compromised with an unrecordable blood pressure. Rapid fluid resuscitation was limited by the capacity of the intravenous cannula in place at the time and inability to establish additional vascular access using conventional routes in a timely manner. An intraosseous needle was inserted in the proximal humerus at the first attempt and administration of resuscitation fluid by this route subsequently enabled successful placement of further intravenous lines. Blood and blood products were deployed in conjunction with intra-operative cell salvage and transoesophageal Doppler cardiac output monitoring was used to assess adequacy of volume replacement. Haemorrhage control was finally achieved with the use of recombinant factor VIIa and hysterectomy. PMID:21401545

  18. Placenta Percreta at 17 Weeks with Consecutive Hysterectomy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Natasha; Gupta, Anu; Green, Marlene; Kang, Hyung Shik; Blankstein, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Placenta percreta in early pregnancy is an extremely rare but life-threatening complication, for which very few cases have been reported in the literature worldwide, none from the United States. We report a patient with two previous cesarean deliveries, who presented with incomplete abortion at 17 weeks and underwent dilatation and curettage. She was found to have retained, adherent placenta that led to extensive hemorrhage, requiring emergency supracervical hysterectomy. Postoperative course was also complicated by severe consumption coagulopathy, necessitating reexploration after hysterectomy. Pathology revealed a placenta percreta. Patient lost more than 8000 cc blood through the 2 surgeries, received massive transfusions due to severe disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC), and underwent a complicated surgery because of great difficulty in separating lower uterine segment and cervix from the bladder. Abnormal placentation in early pregnancy has increased in prevalence due to marked rise in cesarean deliveries and curettages in recent decades. We reviewed all reported cases of first and second trimester placenta percreta in the literature, to emphasize the early recognition of abnormal placentations in patients with risk factors, consider prenatal evaluation in such patients, anticipate complicated placental implantations during termination procedures, and prevent associated maternal morbidity and mortality. PMID:23082259

  19. All-Cause Cost Differences Between Robotic, Vaginal, and Abdominal Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Woelk, Joshua L.; Borah, Bijan J.; Trabuco, Emanuel C.; Gebhart, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the all-cause costs of vaginal and abdominal hysterectomy with robotically assisted hysterectomy. Methods We identified all cases of robotically assisted hysterectomy, with or without bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, treated at Mayo Clinic (Rochester, Minnesota) from January 1, 2007, through December 31, 2009. Cases were propensity score–matched (1:1) to cases of vaginal and abdominal hysterectomy, selected randomly from the 3 preceding years (before acquisition of the robotic surgical system). All-cause costs were abstracted through the sixth postoperative week from the Olmsted County Healthcare Expenditure and Utilization Database and compared between cohorts with a generalized linear modeling framework. Predicted costs were estimated with the recycled predictions method. Costs of operative complications also were compared. Results Predicted mean cost of robotically assisted hysterectomy was $2,253 more than that of vaginal hysterectomy ($13,619 vs $11,366; P<.001), although costs of complications were not significantly different. The predicted mean costs of robotically assisted vs abdominal hysterectomy were similar ($14,679 vs $15,588; P=.35), and the costs of complications were not significantly different. Conclusions Overall, vaginal hysterectomy was less costly than robotically assisted hysterectomy. Abdominal hysterectomy and robotically assisted hysterectomy had similar costs. PMID:24402586

  20. Robotic Hysterectomy Strategies in the Morbidly Obese Patient

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to present strategies for performing computer-enhanced telesurgery in the morbidly obese patient. Methods: This was a prospective, institutional review board-approved, descriptive feasibility study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2) conducted at a university-affiliated hospital. Twelve class III morbidly obese women with a body mass index of 40 kg/m2 or greater were selected to undergo robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy. Robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy, classified as type IVE, with complete detachment of the cardinal-uterosacral ligament complex, unilateral or bilateral, with entry into the vagina was performed. Results: The median estimated blood loss was 146.3 mL (range, 15–550 mL), the mean length of stay in the hospital was 25.3 hours (range, 23–48 hours), and the complication rate was 0%. The rate of conversion to laparotomy was 8%. The median surgical time was 109.6 minutes (range, 99–145 minutes). Conclusion: Robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy can be a safe and effective method of performing hysterectomies in select morbidly obese patients, allowing them the opportunity to undergo minimally invasive surgery without increased perioperative complications. PMID:24018079

  1. 42 CFR 50.207 - Sterilization by hysterectomy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sterilization by hysterectomy. 50.207 Section 50.207 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS POLICIES OF GENERAL APPLICABILITY Sterilization of Persons in Federally Assisted Family Planning Projects §...

  2. 42 CFR 50.207 - Sterilization by hysterectomy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sterilization by hysterectomy. 50.207 Section 50.207 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS POLICIES OF GENERAL APPLICABILITY Sterilization of Persons in Federally Assisted Family Planning Projects §...

  3. 42 CFR 50.207 - Sterilization by hysterectomy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sterilization by hysterectomy. 50.207 Section 50.207 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS POLICIES OF GENERAL APPLICABILITY Sterilization of Persons in Federally Assisted Family Planning Projects §...

  4. 42 CFR 50.207 - Sterilization by hysterectomy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sterilization by hysterectomy. 50.207 Section 50.207 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS POLICIES OF GENERAL APPLICABILITY Sterilization of Persons in Federally Assisted Family Planning Projects §...

  5. Body Mass Index and Its Role in Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Shilpa; Agrawal, Pallavi; Singh, Aparna

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate operative and perioperative outcomes in patients undergoing total laparoscopic hysterectomy according to their body mass index. Method. A retrospective study was performed for patients undergoing total laparoscopic hysterectomy at a tertiary care center for a period of 4 years. Patients were divided into two groups: obese (BMI > 30 Kg/m2) and nonobese (BMI < 30 Kg/m2). Duration of surgery, intraoperative blood loss, successful laparoscopic completion, and intraoperative complications were compared in two groups. Result. A total of 253 patients underwent total laparoscopic hysterectomy from January 2010 to December 2013. Out of them, 105 women (41.5%) had a BMI of more than 30 kg/m2. Overall, the mean blood loss was 85.79 ± 54.17 mL; the operative time was 54.17 ± 19.83 min. The surgery was completed laparoscopically in 244 (96.4%) women while laparotomy was done in 4 cases and vaginal suturing and closure of vault were done in 5 cases. Risk of vaginal assistance was higher in obese patients whereas out of the 4 conversions to laparotomy 3 had BMI < 30 kg/m2. The operative time was increased as the BMI of patient increased. Conclusions. Total laparoscopic hysterectomy is a safe and effective procedure for obese patients and can be performed with an efficacy similar to that in nonobese patients.

  6. Nonmalignant Sequelae of Unconfined Morcellation at Laparoscopic Hysterectomy or Myomectomy.

    PubMed

    Tulandi, Togas; Leung, Annie; Jan, Noran

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate nonmalignant sequelae of unconfined morcellation at hysterectomy and myomectomy. We performed a systematic review following the PRISMA statement key words of "morcellation, uterine leiomyoma, uterine fibroid, laparoscopic myomectomy, laparoscopic total hysterectomy, and laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy" and their combination. Fifty-one articles met the inclusion criteria: 11 articles were related to endometriosis, adenomyosis, and endometrial hyperplasia; 30 articles parasitic myoma; and 9 disseminated peritoneal leiomyomatosis (DPL) and 1 DPL and endometriosis. We found that laparoscopic hysterectomy or myomectomy with unconfined morcellation is associated with the risk of iatrogenic endometriosis (1.4%), adenomyosis (0.57%), parasitic myoma (0.9%), and rarely DPL. Our study showed that benign sequelae of uterine or myoma morcellation could be found in up to 1% of cases. This is much higher than the prevalence of uterine sarcoma after morcellation. Benign conditions have less consequences than malignancy, yet they are more common and might require another operation. Accordingly, if morcellation is required, confined morcellation should be considered. PMID:26802909

  7. A qualitative study of the experience of obstetric fistula survivors in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Gebresilase, Yenenesh Tadesse

    2014-01-01

    Research on obstetric fistula has paid limited attention to the lived experiences of survivors. This qualitative study explored the evolution of survivors’ perceptions of their social relationships and health since developing this obstetric complication. In-depth interviews were conducted with eight survivors who were selected based on purposive and snowball sampling techniques. Thematic categorization and content analysis was used to analyze the data. The resultant themes included participants’ understanding of factors predisposing to fistula, challenges they encounter, their coping responses, and the meaning of their experiences. First, the participants had a common understanding of the factors that predisposed them to obstetric fistula. They mentioned poor knowledge about pregnancy, early marriage, cultural practices, and a delay in or lack of access to emergency obstetric care. Second, the participants suffered from powerlessness experienced during their childhood and married lives. They also faced prolonged obstructed labor, physical injury, emotional breakdown, depression, erosion of social capital, and loss of healthy years. Third, to control their negative emotions, participants reported isolating themselves, having suicidal thoughts, positive interpretation about the future, and avoidance. To obtain relief from their disease, the women used their family support, sold their properties, and oriented to reality. Fourth, the participants were struggling to keep going, to accept their changed reality, and to change their perspectives on life. In conclusion, obstetric fistula has significant physical, psychosocial, and emotional consequences. The study participants were not passive victims but rather active survivors of these challenges. Adequate support was not provided by their formal or informal support systems. To prevent and manage obstetric fistula successfully, there should be family-based interventions that improve access to and provision of

  8. 21 CFR 884.4900 - Obstetric table and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Obstetric table and accessories. 884.4900 Section 884.4900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Surgical Devices § 884.4900 Obstetric table and...

  9. 21 CFR 884.4900 - Obstetric table and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Obstetric table and accessories. 884.4900 Section 884.4900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Surgical Devices § 884.4900 Obstetric table and...

  10. Resuscitation and Obstetrical Care to Reduce Intrapartum-Related Neonatal Deaths: A MANDATE Study.

    PubMed

    Kamath-Rayne, Beena D; Griffin, Jennifer B; Moran, Katelin; Jones, Bonnie; Downs, Allan; McClure, Elizabeth M; Goldenberg, Robert L; Rouse, Doris; Jobe, Alan H

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the impact of neonatal resuscitation and basic obstetric care on intrapartum-related neonatal mortality in low and middle-income countries, using the mathematical model, Maternal and Neonatal Directed Assessment of Technology (MANDATE). Using MANDATE, we evaluated the impact of interventions for intrapartum-related events causing birth asphyxia (basic neonatal resuscitation, advanced neonatal care, increasing facility birth, and emergency obstetric care) when implemented in home, clinic, and hospital settings of sub-Saharan African and India for 2008. Total intrapartum-related neonatal mortality (IRNM) was acute neonatal deaths from intrapartum-related events plus late neonatal deaths from ongoing intrapartum-related injury. Introducing basic neonatal resuscitation in all settings had a large impact on decreasing IRNM. Increasing facility births and scaling up emergency obstetric care in clinics and hospitals also had a large impact on decreasing IRNM. Increasing prevalence and utilization of advanced neonatal care in hospital settings had limited impact on IRNM. The greatest improvement in IRNM was seen with widespread advanced neonatal care and basic neonatal resuscitation, scaled-up emergency obstetric care in clinics and hospitals, and increased facility deliveries, resulting in an estimated decrease in IRNM to 2.0 per 1,000 live births in India and 2.5 per 1,000 live births in sub-Saharan Africa. With more deliveries occurring in clinics and hospitals, the scale-up of obstetric care can have a greater effect than if modeled individually. Use of MANDATE enables health leaders to direct resources towards interventions that could prevent intrapartum-related deaths. A lack of widespread implementation of basic neonatal resuscitation, increased facility births, and emergency obstetric care are missed opportunities to save newborn lives. PMID:25656720

  11. Perinatal Asphyxia from the Obstetric Standpoint: Diagnosis and Interventions.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Christina A; Silver, Robert M

    2016-09-01

    Perinatal asphyxia is a general term referring to neonatal encephalopathy related to events during birth. Asphyxia refers to a deprivation of oxygen for a duration sufficient to cause neurologic injury. Most cases of perinatal asphyxia are not necessarily caused by intrapartum events but rather associated with underlying chronic maternal or fetal conditions. Of intrapartum causes, obstetric emergencies are the most common and are not always preventable. Screening high-risk pregnancies with ultrasound, Doppler velocimetry, and antenatal testing can aid in identifying fetuses at risk. Interventions such as intrauterine resuscitation or operative delivery may decrease the risk of severe hypoxia from intrauterine insults and improve long-term neurologic outcomes. PMID:27524445

  12. Is Personalized Medicine Achievable in Obstetrics?

    PubMed Central

    Quinney, Sara K; Flockhart, David A; Patil, Avinash S

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine seeks to identify the right dose of the right drug for the right patient at the right time. Typically, individualization of therapy is based on the pharmacogenomic make-up of the individual and environmental factors that alter drug disposition and response. In addition to these factors, during pregnancy a woman’s body undergoes many changes that can impact the therapeutic efficacy of medications. Yet, there is minimal research regarding personalized medicine in obstetrics. Adoption of pharmacogenetic testing into the obstetrical care is dependent on evidence of analytical validity, clinical validity, and clinical utility. Here, we briefly present information regarding the potential utility of personalized medicine for treating the obstetric patient for pain with narcotics, hypertension, and preterm labor and discuss the impediments of bringing personalized medicine to the obstetrical clinic. PMID:25282474

  13. Robotic Radical Hysterectomy Versus Total Laparoscopic Radical Hysterectomy With Pelvic Lymphadenectomy for Treatment of Early Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Datta, M. Shoma; Liu, Connie; Chuang, Linus; Zakashansky, Konstantin

    2008-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To compare intraoperative, pathologic and postoperative outcomes of robotic radical hysterectomy (RRH) to total laparoscopic radical hysterectomy (TLRH) in patients with early stage cervical carcinoma. Methods: We prospectively analyzed cases of TLRH or RRH with pelvic lymphadenectomy performed for treatment of early cervical cancer between 2000 and 2008. Results: Thirty patients underwent TLRH and pelvic lymph-adenectomy for cervical cancer from August 2000 to June 2006. Thirteen patients underwent RRH and pelvic lymph-adenectomy for cervical cancer from April 2006 to January 2008. There were no differences between groups for age, tumor histology, stage, lymphovascular space involvement or nodal status. No statistical differences were observed regarding operative time (323 vs 318 min), estimated blood loss (157 vs 200 mL), or hospital stay (2.7 vs 3.8 days). Mean pelvic lymph node count was similar in the two groups (25 vs 31). None of the robotic or laparoscopic procedures required conversion to laparotomy. The differences in major operative and postoperative complications between the two groups were not significant. All patients in both groups are alive and free of disease at the time of last follow up. Conclusion: Based on our experience, robotic radical hysterectomy appears to be equivalent to total laparoscopic radical hysterectomy with respect to operative time, blood loss, hospital stay, and oncological outcome. We feel the intuitive nature of the robotic approach, magnification, dexterity, and flexibility combined with significant reduction in surgeon's fatigue offered by the robotic system will allow more surgeons to use a minimally invasive approach to radical hysterectomy. PMID:18765043

  14. The laryngeal mask airway in obstetrical anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Gataure, P S; Hughes, J A

    1995-02-01

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) has been used extensively to provide a safe airway in spontaneously breathing patients who are not at risk from aspiration of gastric contents. The role of the LMA in the event of a failed intubation in an obstetrical patient, and its place in a failed intubation drill remains unclear. Two hundred and fifty consultant obstetric anaesthetists in the United Kingdom were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire regarding their views about using the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in obstetrical anaesthesia. The LMA was available in 91.4% of obstetric units. Seventy-two per cent of anaesthetists were in favour of using the LMA to maintain oxygenation when tracheal intubation had failed and ventilation using a face mask was inadequate. Twenty-four respondents had had personal experience with the LMA in obstetrical anaesthesia, eight of whom stated that the LMA had proved to be a lifesaver. We believe that the LMA has a role in obstetrical anaesthesia when tracheal intubation has failed and ventilation using a face mask proves to be impossible, and it should be inserted before attempting cricothyroidectomy. PMID:7720155

  15. Regional Expansion of Minimally Invasive Surgery for Hysterectomy: Implementation and Methodology in a Large Multispecialty Group

    PubMed Central

    Andryjowicz, Esteban; Wray, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Approximately 600,000 hysterectomies are performed in the US each year, making hysterectomy the second most common major operation performed in women. Several methods can be used to perform this procedure. In 2009, a Cochrane Review concluded “that vaginal hysterectomy should be performed in preference to abdominal hysterectomy, where possible. Where vaginal hysterectomy is not possible, a laparoscopic approach may avoid the need for an abdominal hysterectomy. Risks and benefits of different approaches may however be influenced by the surgeon's experience. More research is needed, particularly to examine the long-term effects of the different types of surgery.” This article reviews the steps that a large multispecialty group used to teach non-open hysterectomy methods to improve the quality of care for their patients and to decrease the number of inpatient procedures and therefore costs. The percentages of each type of hysterectomy performed yearly between 2005 and 2010 were calculated, as well as the length of stay (LOS) for each method. Methods: A structured educational intervention with both didactic and hands-on exercises was created and rolled out to 12 medical centers. All patients undergoing hysterectomy for benign conditions through the Southern California Permanente Medical Group (a large multispecialty group that provides medical care to Kaiser Permanente patients in Southern California) between 2005 and 2010 were included. This amounted to 26,055 hysterectomies for benign conditions being performed by more than 350 obstetrician/gynecologists (Ob/Gyns). Results: More than 300 Ob/Gyns took the course across 12 medical centers. On the basis of hospital discharge data, the total number of hysterectomies, types of hysterectomies, and LOS for each type were identified for each year. Between 2005 and 2010, the rate of non-open hysterectomies has increased 120% (from 38% to 78%) and the average LOS has decreased 31%. PMID:22319415

  16. Obstetric audit: the Bradford way

    PubMed Central

    Lomas, Karen; Jaworskyj, Suzanne; Thomson, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound is widely used as a screening tool in obstetrics with the aim of reducing maternal and foetal morbidity. However, to be effective it is recommended that scanning services follow standard protocols based on national guidelines and that scanning practice is audited to ensure consistency. Bradford has a multi-ethnic population with one of the highest rates of birth defects in the UK and it requires an effective foetal anomaly screening service. We implemented a rolling programme of audits of dating scans, foetal anomaly scans and growth scans carried out by sonographers in Bradford. All three categories of scan were audited using measurable parameters based on national guidelines. Following feedback and re-training to address issues identified, re-audits of dating and foetal anomaly scans were carried out. In both cases, sonographers being re-audited had a marked improvement in their practice. Analysis of foetal abnormality detection rates showed that as a department, we were reaching the nationally agreed detection rates for the Fetal Anomaly Screening Programme auditable conditions. Audit has been shown to be a useful and essential process in achieving consistent scanning practices and high quality images and measurements.

  17. Obstetric hemorrhage: A global review.

    PubMed

    Goffman, Dena; Nathan, Lisa; Chazotte, Cynthia

    2016-03-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage remains the number one cause of maternal death globally despite the fact that it is largely a preventable and most often a treatable condition. While the global problem is appreciated, some may not realize that in the United States postpartum hemorrhage is a leading cause of mortality and unfortunately, the incidence is on the rise. In New York, obstetric hemorrhage is the second leading cause of maternal mortality in the state. National data suggests that hemorrhage is disproportionally overrepresented as a contributor to severe maternal morbidity and we suspect as we explore further this will be true in New York State as well. Given the persistent and significant contribution to maternal mortality, it may be useful to analyze the persistence of this largely preventable cause of death within the framework of the historic "Three Delays" model of maternal mortality. The ongoing national and statewide problem with postpartum hemorrhage will be reviewed in this context of delays in an effort to inform potential solutions. PMID:26742599

  18. Ovarian function and ovarian blood supply following premenopausal abdominal hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Abdelrazak, Khaled M.; Elbiaa, Assem A.M.; Farghali, Mohamed M.; Essam, Amr; Zhurabekova, Gulmira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The issue of conserving the ovaries at hysterectomy in premenopausal women with benign gynecologic disease has been the subject of considerable controversy. Some clinicians prefer prophylactic oophorectomy in premenopausal women during hysterectomy to prevent future development of malignant changes in conserved ovaries. Other clinicians prefer to conserve apparently normal ovaries, because bilateral oophorectomy in premenopausal women results in an abrupt imbalance, sudden onset of menopausal symptoms, decreased libido, increased cardiovascular risk and osteoporosis. Material and methods Two hundred and twenty multipara women (who had completed their families), with benign uterine pathology were included in this prospective study for abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral ovarian preservation. Pre-operative vaginal ultrasound, Doppler studies, diagnostic hysteroscopy and endometrial biopsy were done followed by laboratory studies including Anti-mullerian hormone (AMH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and estradiol for all studied women. Doppler studies, AMH, FSH and estradiol were repeated 6 and 12 months post-operative for assessment of the ovarian function and ovarian blood supply after hysterectomy. Results Pre-operative AMH, FSH and estradiol of the studied women were statistically insignificant compared to AMH, FSH and estradiol 6 and 12 months post-operative. Twelve months post-operative right and left ovarian volumes (6.92 ± 0.18 and 6.85 ± 0.19 cm3, respectively) were significantly larger than pre-operative right and left ovarian volumes (6.19 ± 0.22 and 5.86 ± 0.23 cm3, respectively), and, 12 months post-operative right and left ovarian pulsatility indices (2.92 ± 0.15 and 2.96 ± 0.16 cm/s, respectively) were significantly lower than pre-operative right and left ovarian pulsatility indices (3.45 ± 0.19 and 3.36 ± 0.2 cm/s, respectively). Eight (3.6%) cases of the studied women developed an ovarian cyst 6 months after hysterectomy, 3

  19. Nationwide population-based cohort study of uterine rupture in Belgium: results from the Belgian Obstetric Surveillance System

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberghe, G; De Blaere, M; Van Leeuw, V; Roelens, K; Englert, Y; Hanssens, M; Verstraelen, H

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to assess the prevalence of uterine rupture in Belgium and to evaluate risk factors, management and outcomes for mother and child. Design Nationwide population-based prospective cohort study. Setting Emergency obstetric care. Participation of 97% of maternity units covering 98.6% of the deliveries in Belgium. Participants All women with uterine rupture in Belgium between January 2012 and December 2013. 8 women were excluded because data collection forms were not returned. Results Data on 90 cases of confirmed uterine rupture were obtained, of which 73 had a previous Caesarean section (CS), representing an estimated prevalence of 3.6 (95% CI 2.9 to 4.4) per 10 000 deliveries overall and of 27 (95% CI 21 to 33) and 0.7 (95% CI 0.4 to 1.2) per 10 000 deliveries in women with and without previous CS, respectively. Rupture occurred during trial of labour after caesarean section (TOLAC) in 57 women (81.4%, 95% CI 68% to 88%), with a high rate of augmented (38.5%) and induced (29.8%) labour. All patients who underwent induction of labour had an unfavourable cervix at start of induction (Bishop Score ≤7 in 100%). Other uterine surgery was reported in the history of 22 cases (24%, 95% CI 17% to 34%), including 1 case of myomectomy, 3 cases of salpingectomy and 2 cases of hysteroscopic resection of a uterine septum. 14 cases ruptured in the absence of labour (15.6%, 95% CI 9.5% to 24.7%). No mothers died; 8 required hysterectomy (8.9%, 95% CI 4.6% to 16.6%). There were 10 perinatal deaths (perinatal mortality rate 117/1000 births, 95% CI 60 to 203) and perinatal asphyxia was observed in 29 infants (34.5%, 95% CI 25.2% to 45.1%). Conclusions The prevalence of uterine rupture in Belgium is similar to that in other Western countries. There is scope for improvement through the implementation of nationally adopted guidelines on TOLAC, to prevent use of unsafe procedures, and thereby reduce avoidable morbidity and mortality. PMID:27188805

  20. Planning a collaborative conference to provide interdisciplinary education with a focus on patient safety in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Jennifer; Newhouse, Linda; Flora, Robert; Burkett, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Collaboration is an important component of evidence-based practice in modern health care. A number of publications have touted the benefits of "team training" to improve obstetric outcomes during emergent situations. In August 2011, the Ohio sections of the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) held a joint conference that focused on interdisciplinary education to promote patient safety. This joint venture drew more than 120 attendees, 12 exhibitors and 17 poster displays. Evaluations were positive and attendees cited planned practice changes for themselves as well as for their respective institutions. PMID:24750652

  1. Clinical efficacy and safety of paclitaxel plus carboplatin as neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy for Stage IB2-IIB cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lu; Guo, Jianfeng; Shen, Yi; Cai, Jing; Xiong, Zhoufang; Dong, Weihong; Min, Jie; Wang, Zehua

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy and toxicity of the combination of paclitaxel plus carboplatin as neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) for locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC) prior to radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. Methods: We reviewed patients with cervical cancer of the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB2-IIB who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) with paclitaxel plus carboplatin followed by radical hysterectomy (NACT group) or only received primary radical surgery (PRS group) in our hospital between Jan 2007 and Jan 2012. Toxicity, NACT response, surgery pathological factors and survival data were collected and analyzed. Results: In the NACT group, the overall response rate was 71.3% (82/115). Eighteen (15.7%) patients achieved complete remission. Well differentiated tumors showed a more favorable response to NACT (P=0.011). Myelosuppression was the most common adverse effect (51.7%) and serious adverse effects were rare (3.4%). The median follow-up period was 44 months (range, 6-75). The NACT responders had significantly longer OS and PFS when compared to the non-NACT responders and patients in the PRS group. Conclusion: Patients with LACC can benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel plus carboplatin when they have response to the chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26550314

  2. The influence of number of high risk factors on clinical outcomes in patients with early-stage cervical cancer after radical hysterectomy and adjuvant chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Soyi; Lee, Seok-Ho; Park, Chan-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognosis according to the number of high risk factors in patients with high risk factors after radical hysterectomy and adjuvant chemoradiation therapy for early stage cervical cancer. Methods Clinicopathological variables and clinical outcomes of patients with FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) stage IB1 to IIA cervical cancer who had one or more high risk factors after radical hysterectomy and adjuvant chemoradiation therapy were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided into two groups according to the number of high risk factors (group 1, single high risk factor; group 2, two or more high risk factors). Results A total of 93 patients were enrolled in the present study. Forty nine out of 93 (52.7%) patients had a single high risk factor, and 44 (47.3%) had two or more high risk factors. Statistically significant differences in stage and stromal invasion were observed between group 1 and group 2. However, age, histology, tumor size, and lymphovascular space invasion did not differ significantly between the groups. Distant recurrence occurred more frequently in group 2, and the probability of recurrence and death was higher in group 2. Conclusion Patients with two or more high risk factors had worse prognosis in early stage cervical cancer. For these patients, consideration of new strategies to improve survival may be worthwhile. Conduct of further clinical trials is warranted for development of adjuvant treatment strategies individualized to each risk group. PMID:27200308

  3. Obstetrics in a Time of Violence: Mexican Midwives Critique Routine Hospital Practices.

    PubMed

    Zacher Dixon, Lydia

    2015-12-01

    Mexican midwives have long taken part in a broader Latin American trend to promote "humanized birth" as an alternative to medicalized interventions in hospital obstetrics. As midwives begin to regain authority in reproductive health and work within hospital units, they come to see the issue not as one of mere medicalization but of violence and violation. Based on ethnographic fieldwork with midwives from across Mexico during a time of widespread social violence, my research examines an emergent critique of hospital birth as a site of what is being called violencia obstétrica (obstetric violence). In this critique, women are discussed as victims of explicit abuse by hospital staff and by the broader health care infrastructures. By reframing obstetric practices as violent-as opposed to medicalized-these midwives seek to situate their concerns about women's health care in Mexico within broader regional discussions about violence, gender, and inequality. PMID:25411151

  4. A New Approach to Teaching Obstetric Anaesthesia in Low-Resource Areas.

    PubMed

    Enright, Angela; Grady, Kate; Evans, Faye

    2015-10-01

    Maternal mortality is high in many low- and middle-income countries. Unsafe anaesthesia contributes to this, especially for women requiring Caesarean section. Anaesthesia providers with limited skills and poor resources are often faced with complicated obstetric patients. A new course called SAFE-OB teaches a systematic approach to anticipating, preparing for, and dealing with obstetric anaesthetic emergencies. The course has now been taught in many African, Asian, and Latin countries. Initial follow-up suggests improvement in skills and knowledge, and effective translation of these to the workplace. Efforts are made to make the course locally owned and sustainable. We feel that SAFE-OB is an effective method of improving obstetric anaesthesia care. PMID:26606700

  5. [Prompt resuscitation by obstetric anesthesiologists saved a parturient with amniotic fluid embolism: a case report].

    PubMed

    Hyuga, Shunsuke; Kato, Rie; Okutomi, Toshiyuki

    2013-12-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a disorder with a high mortarity rate, because it often causes sudden respiratory failure, circulatory collapse and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). We present a case of AFE in which an obstetric anesthesiologist promptly initiated resuscitation of a parturient and saved her without any sequelae. Her fetus was diagnosed as intrauterine fetal demise on 25th gestational week and vaginal delivery under epidural analgesia was planned. One hundred and five minutes after induction of labor with prostaglandine E1, sudden tetanic convulsion occurred with a loss of consciousness. An obstetric anesthesiologist immediately started to resuscitate her and her consciousness was restored. However, noncoagulable vaginal bleeding followed. As the hemorrhage persisted, AFE was suspected. Anesthesiologists gave effective massive transfusion therapy, and she recovered from coagulopathy. Total blood loss was 5,524 g. This case was diagnosed as AFE with high serum sialyl-Tn antigen and zinc-coproporphyrin. The obstetric anesthesiologists are one of the best groups of physicans for resuscitation because they have skills in managing obstetric emergencies such as AFE. In this case, the crucial points for successful resuscitation were prompt obstetric anesthesiologist involvement and good communications with obstetricians and midwives. PMID:24498777

  6. Surgical treatment: Myomectomy and hysterectomy; Endoscopy: A major advancement.

    PubMed

    Thubert, Thibault; Foulot, Hervé; Vinchant, Marie; Santulli, Pietro; Marzouk, Paul; Borghese, Bruno; Chapron, Charles

    2016-07-01

    Uterine fibroids affect 25% of women worldwide. Symptomatic women can be treated by either medical or surgical treatment. Development of endoscopic surgery has widely changed the management of myoma. Currently, although laparoscopic or laparoscopic robot-assisted myomectomies or hysterectomies are common, there has been no consensual guideline concerning the surgical techniques, operative route, and usefulness of preoperative treatment. Hysteroscopy management is a major advancement avoiding invasive surgery. This study deals with a literature review concerning surgical management of fibroids. PMID:27400649

  7. Laparoscopic pelvic anatomy of nerve-sparing radical hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Park, Nae Yoon; Cho, Young Lae; Park, Il Soo; Lee, Yoon Soon

    2010-03-01

    Many reports regarding nerve-sparing radical hysterectomy have been published. However, most reports have been based on systematic descriptions via laparotomy or cadaver dissection. The aim of this work was to describe the pelvic anatomy of nerve-sparing radical hysterectomy via laparoscopy, with specific focus on the inferior hypogastric plexus. This study is based on 125 patients with FIGO stage IB cervical cancer who had undergone laparoscopic nerve-sparing radical hysterectomies since 1999. The inferior hypogastric plexus was demonstrated via laparoscopy and was comprised of afferent fibers from the sacral root (S2, S3, and S4), sacral sympathetic ganglion, and hypogastric nerve, and efferent fibers forming its vesical, uterovaginal, and rectal branches. During the dissection of the posterior leaf of the vesicouterine ligament, various vesical veins were identified. If the cut edge of an inferior vesical vein was pulled medially with upward traction, the vesical branches of the inferior hypogastric plexus were exposed and these were divided into medial and lateral branches. The magnified view of laparoscopy made it possible to dissect nerves and vessels meticulously and to secure a clear resection margin during the dissection of the deep part of the cardinal ligament, uterosacral ligament, and posterior leaf of the vesicouterine ligament. PMID:20108355

  8. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Syndromes in Obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, F Gary; Nelson, David B

    2015-11-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a syndrome that can be initiated by a myriad of medical, surgical, and obstetric disorders. Also known as consumptive coagulopathy, DIC is a common contributor to maternal morbidity and mortality and is associated with up to 25% of maternal deaths. The etiopathogenesis of DIC is complex and currently thought to be initiated by tissue factor or thromboplastin, which is released from trophoblastic or fetal tissue, or maternal decidua or endothelium. Tissue factor activates the coagulation sequence to cause fibrin clotting and its dissolution by the fibrinolysin system. The result of this process can range from mild, clinically insignificant laboratory derangements to marked coagulopathy with bleeding at sites of minimal trauma. Although clinical recognition varies by disease severity, several organizations have attempted to standardize the diagnosis through development of scoring systems. Several important--albeit not necessarily common--obstetric disorders associated with DIC include placental abruption, amniotic fluid embolism, sepsis syndrome, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy. More common disorders include severe preeclampsia, hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count syndrome, and massive obstetric hemorrhage. Importantly, many of these disorders either cause or are associated with substantive obstetric hemorrhage. Treatment of DIC is centered on two principles. The first is identification and treatment of the underlying disorder. Because many women with consumptive coagulopathy also have massive hemorrhage, the second tenet of treatment is that obstetric complications such as uterine atony or lacerations must be controlled simultaneously with prompt blood and component replacement for a salutary outcome. PMID:26444122

  9. Factors associated with hysterectomy among older women from Latin America and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Daniel A; Botero, Ana M; Cash, Miranda G; Reyes-Ortiz, Carlos A

    2016-07-01

    To identify factors associated with hysterectomy, data collected from 1999-2000 were assessed from seven cities of the Health, Well-Being and Aging in Latin America and the Caribbean Study on 6,549 women, aged 60 years and older. Hysterectomy prevalence ranged from 12.8% in Buenos Aires (Argentina) to 30.4% in Bridgetown (Barbados). The median age for having had a hysterectomy ranged from 45 to 50 years across the cities and was 47 years in the pooled sample. Ethnic differences in hysterectomy rates were partially explained by differences across cities. Factors significantly associated with lower odds for hysterectomy included older age, household crowding conditions, and having public/military or no health insurance, compared to having private health insurance. Women who had three or more children were less likely to have had a hysterectomy, a finding that differs from most previous studies. Socioeconomic position related to rates of hysterectomy in late life rather than hysterectomies earlier in life. However, the nature of these differences varied across birth cohorts. The findings suggested that adverse socioeconomic factors were most likely related to hysterectomy risk by affecting access to health care, whereas parity was most likely acting through an effect on decision-making processes. PMID:26478957

  10. The Effect of Hysterectomy on Women’s Sexual Function: a Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Danesh, Mahmonier; Hamzehgardeshi, Zeinab; Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Shabani-Asrami, Fereshteh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Regarding the contradictions about positive and negative effects of hysterectomy on women’s sexual functioning, this study was conducted to review the studies on the effect of hysterectomy on postoperative women’s sexual function. Method: This study was a narrative review and performed in 5 steps: a) Determining the research questions, b) Search methods for identification of relevant studies, c) Choosing the studies, d) Classifying, sorting out, and summarizing the data, and e) reporting the results. Findings: The review of the studies yielded 5 main categories of results as follows: The effect of hysterectomy on Sexual desire, the effect of hysterectomy on sexual arousal, the effect of hysterectomy on orgasm, the effect of hysterectomy on dyspareunia, and the effect of hysterectomy on sexual satisfaction. Conclusion: According to the studies reviewed in this study, most of the sexual disorders improve after hysterectomy for uterine benign diseases, and most of the patients who were sexually active before the surgery experienced the same or better sexual functioning after the surgery. An important solution for making these women ready to face with postoperative sexual complications is to train them on the basis of needs assessment in order that the patients undergoing hysterectomy be ready and capable of coping with the complications, and their sexual functioning improves after the surgery. PMID:26843731