Science.gov

Sample records for emergency treatment

  1. [Diabetic nephropathy: emerging treatments].

    PubMed

    Gueutin, Victor; Gauthier, Marion; Cazenave, Maud; Izzedine, Hassane

    2014-07-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. The mainstay of treatment has been management of hyperglycaemia, blood pressure and proteinuria using hypoglycemic agents, ACE inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor blockers. Since 2000, new therapeutic strategies began to emerge targeting the biochemical activity of glucose molecules on the renal tissue. Various substances have been studied with varying degrees of success, ranging from vitamin B to camel's milk. Silymarin reduces urinary excretion of albumin, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and malondialdehyde in patients with diabetic nephropathy and may be considered as a novel addition to the anti-diabetic nephropathy armamentarium. Although some results are promising, studies on a larger scale are needed to validate the utility of these molecules in the treatment of the DN. PMID:24938412

  2. Emerging Pollutants - Part II: Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bo, Liu; Shengen, Zhang; Chang, Chein-Chi; Zhanfeng, Dong; Hongxiang, Li

    2015-10-01

    Emerging contaminants are considered as some substances of actual or potential threat to human health or environment, which include endocrine disruptors, pharmaceutical, personal care products, nanoparticles, antibiotic resistance genes and chemicals used in packaging products, etc. The disposal and treatment of emerging contaminants has become a key problem in the field of water pollution control. The purpose of this review is to summarize published researches on emerging pollutants treatment in 2014. PMID:26420107

  3. Emerging Pollutants - Part II: Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bo, Liu; Shengen, Zhang; Chang, Chein-Chi

    2016-10-01

    Emerging contaminants are considered as some substances of actual or potential threat to human health or environment, which include endocrine disruptors, pharmaceutical, personal care products, nanoparticles, antibiotic resistance genes and chemicals used in packaging products, etc. The disposal and treatment of emerging contaminants has become a key problem in the field of water pollution control. The purpose of this review is to summarize published researches on emerging pollutants treatment in 2015. PMID:27620112

  4. Treatment of diving emergencies.

    PubMed

    Moon, R E

    1999-04-01

    Recognition of condition attributable to the environmental changes experienced by divers will facilitate appropriate treatment. The diagnosis of these conditions rarely requires sophisticated imaging or electrophysiologic testing. Divers who have suspected DCI, in addition to general supportive measures, should be administered fluids and oxygen and transported to a recompression chamber. For diving-related conditions, on-line consultation is available from the Divers Alert Network, Durham, NC (919-684-8111). PMID:10331136

  5. Emerging Treatments for Choroidal Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Connie J.; McCoy, Allison N.; Brahmer, Julie; Handa, James T.

    2015-01-01

    It has been over a century since Perls described the first case of choroidal metastasis. For the next six decades only 230 cases were described in the literature. Today, however, ocular metastasis is recognized as the most common intraocular malignancy. Thanks to recent advances in treatment options for metastatic disease, patients are living longer, and choroidal metastases will become an increasingly important issue for oncologists and ophthalmologists alike. We summarize the current knowledge of choroidal metastases and examine their emerging systemic and local therapies. Targeted therapies for metastatic lung, breast, and colon cancer—the most common causes of choroidal metastases—are reviewed in detail with the goal of identifying the most effective treatment strategies. PMID:22117885

  6. Emergency Planning for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemon, R. A.; And Others

    This manual for the development of emergency operating plans for municipal wastewater treatment systems was compiled using information provided by over two hundred municipal treatment systems. It covers emergencies caused by natural disasters, civil disorders and strikes, faulty maintenance, negligent operation, and accidents. The effects of such…

  7. Emerging Treatments for Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, Bruno L; Escudeiro, Gabriel; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M

    2015-12-01

    Neuropathic pain is a series of well-known conditions caused by diseases or lesions to the somatosensory system. Due to the better understanding of the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain, previously unexplored therapies have been used with encouraging results. As such, Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC), Alpha-lipoic-acid (ALA), cannabinoids, Clonidine, EMA401, Botulinum Toxin type A, and new voltage-gated sodium channel blockers, can be cited. Furthermore, new modalities in neuromodulation such as high-frequency spinal cord stimulation, burst stimulation, dorsal root ganglion stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, and many others have been showing exciting results. Besides, changing paradigms may occur with the advent of optogenetics and a better understanding of epigenetic regulation. This article reviews the published literature on the treatment of NP. Despite the interesting results, randomized controlled trials are demanded for the majority of the therapies previously mentioned. PMID:26530058

  8. Emerging Treatments for Motor Rehabilitation After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Chandramouli; Khot, Sandeep P.

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous treatments are available to improve cerebral perfusion after acute stroke and prevent recurrent stroke, few rehabilitation treatments have been conclusively shown to improve neurologic recovery. The majority of stroke survivors with motor impairment do not recover to their functional baseline, and there remains a need for novel neurorehabilitation treatments to minimize long-term disability, maximize quality of life, and optimize psychosocial outcomes. In recent years, several novel therapies have emerged to restore motor function after stroke, and additional investigational treatments have also shown promise. Here, we familiarize the neurohospitalist with emerging treatments for poststroke motor rehabilitation. The rehabilitation treatments covered in this review will include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications, constraint-induced movement therapy, noninvasive brain stimulation, mirror therapy, and motor imagery or mental practice. PMID:25829989

  9. [The emergency treatment of the psychotic patient].

    PubMed

    Naumann, Ute; Mavrogiorgou, Paraskevi; Pajonk, Frank-Gerald B; Juckel, Georg

    2012-06-01

    Psychosis can cause multiple psychiatric and somatic emergencies. Due to the complex character of the disease the communication and accessibility of the patient can be severely disturbed. In the pre-clinical emergency medical care the etiology of a psychosis remains often unclear, the most common causes are schizophrenia and drug-induced psychosis. Frequent emergencies are states of psychomotor agitation, self-endangerment and endangerment of others including suicidal tendencies/acts as well as catatonic and manic states. Antipsychotic drugs and benzodiazepines are the most efficient pharmacotherapeutic treatments. Extrapyramidal side effects of the prescribed medication can also cause the need for urgent medical care. In any case needs to be considered a severe somatic comorbidity. It is particularly necessary that all available information at the scene of emergency should be transferred to the clinicians since the further diagnostic and therapeutic assessment will rely hereon. PMID:22744852

  10. Chronic rhinosinusitis and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Piromchai, Patorn; Kasemsiri, Pornthep; Laohasiriwong, Supawan; Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak

    2013-01-01

    This review describes the epidemiology and various treatments in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and CRS without nasal polyps (CRSsNP). Evidence for short-term use of systemic corticosteroids has been shown to be favorable in CRSwNP, but still limited in CRSsNP. Topical corticosteroids improve symptom scores in both CRS subgroups. The role of microbes in CRS is still controversial. Culture-directed antibiotics are recommended for CRSsNP with exacerbation. Long-term use of low dosage antibiotics is recommended for CRSsNP for their anti-inflammatory effects. Other emerging treatment options are also discussed. PMID:23785241

  11. [Emergency treatment in decompression accidents in shipyards].

    PubMed

    Comet, M

    1989-08-01

    The Comex company has underwater workplaces scattered over the whole world, which are therefore very often far away from a medical center equipped for the treatment of decompression sickness. However, the subsequent evolution of such an event depends mainly on how fast the first aid is given to the patient. Therefore, the scientific and medical departments of our company developed a medical handbook to be used by chiefs of working platforms. The text which has to be easily understandable, mentions: a cursory description of the clinical signs of the different decompression accidents the measures which have to be taken in each case, depending on: the moment of the emergency: after or during decompression, the presence of an insufficient decompression, or a "blow-up". The handbook contains several recompression tables, first aid treatment recommendations and drugs. It has to be stressed that these procedures are only emergency steps. They should be performed before the patient can be transferred to a medical center with expertise in the treatment of decompression accidents. PMID:2799360

  12. Emerging treatment options for meibomian gland dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Jing; Yan, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is one of the most common diseases observed in clinics; it influences a great number of people, and is the leading cause of evaporative dry eye. Given the increased recognition of the importance of MGD, a great amount of attention has been paid to therapies targeting this condition. The traditional treatments of MGD consist of warm compresses and lid hygiene for removing an obstructed meibum, as well as antibiotics and anti-inflammatory agents to improve the quality of the meibum. However, each of these treatments has a different shortcoming and the treatment of MGD remains challenging. Despite the numerous possible treatment options for MGD, it is still difficult to obtain complete relief of signs and symptoms. This review focuses on current emerging treatment options for MGD including intraductal meibomian gland probing, emulsion eye drops containing lipids, the LipiFlow® thermal pulsation system, N-acetyl-cysteine, azithromycin, oral supplementation with omega-3 essential fatty acids, and cyclosporine A. PMID:24043929

  13. 7 CFR 205.672 - Emergency pest or disease treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Emergency pest or disease treatment. 205.672 Section... Exclusion from Sale § 205.672 Emergency pest or disease treatment. When a prohibited substance is applied to a certified operation due to a Federal or State emergency pest or disease treatment program and...

  14. 7 CFR 205.672 - Emergency pest or disease treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Emergency pest or disease treatment. 205.672 Section... Exclusion from Sale § 205.672 Emergency pest or disease treatment. When a prohibited substance is applied to a certified operation due to a Federal or State emergency pest or disease treatment program and...

  15. 7 CFR 205.672 - Emergency pest or disease treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Emergency pest or disease treatment. 205.672 Section... Exclusion from Sale § 205.672 Emergency pest or disease treatment. When a prohibited substance is applied to a certified operation due to a Federal or State emergency pest or disease treatment program and...

  16. 7 CFR 205.672 - Emergency pest or disease treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Emergency pest or disease treatment. 205.672 Section... Exclusion from Sale § 205.672 Emergency pest or disease treatment. When a prohibited substance is applied to a certified operation due to a Federal or State emergency pest or disease treatment program and...

  17. New and Emerging Treatments for Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Barry, Peter J; Jones, Andrew M

    2015-07-01

    Recently, a significant number of additional key medications have become licensed in Europe for the treatment of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), including a number of inhaled antibiotics, such as nebulised aztreonam and dry powder versions of colistin and tobramycin for inhalation; dry powder inhaled mannitol, an agent to improve airway hydration and aid airway clearance; and ivacaftor, an oral therapy that directly acts on dysfunctional CFTR to correct the basic defect encountered in CF patients with the G551D CF gene mutation. The marked success of ivacaftor both in clinical trials and in post-licensing evaluation studies in treating patients with G551D and other gating mutations has greatly encouraged the ongoing development of similar therapies that can directly target the underlying cause of CF. Other therapies, including a number of anti-infectives, anti-inflammatories and replacement pancreatic enzymes, are currently undergoing clinical studies. This article reviews those treatments that have been recently licensed for CF and highlights some of the exciting emerging therapies presently under evaluation in clinical trials. In addition, it discusses some of the potential challenges being encountered by research and clinical teams in developing and delivering treatments for this condition. PMID:26091951

  18. Treatment of hypertension in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Brigitte M; Cline, David M; Pimenta, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    This review updates concepts of hypertension evaluation and management in patients presenting to the emergency department. It outlines the current challenges faced by emergency physicians in the identification and management of hypertensive patients: In spite of published emergency care guidelines, identification and referral rates remain low in patients presenting to the emergency department with moderate blood pressure (BP) elevations. In patients with severely elevated BP, the evaluation for acute end organ damage remains inconsistent and is symptom-based. Using current consensus guidelines, this review provides an algorithm for the management of the hypertensive emergency department patient. The final section of this review outlines management strategies for specific hypertensive emergencies. PMID:21719370

  19. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Adhvaryu, Meghna; Vakharia, Bhasker

    2011-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis has emerged worldwide, with an increasing incidence due to failure of implementation of apparently effective first-line antituberculous therapy as well as primary infection with drug-resistant strains. Failure of current therapy is attributed to a long duration of treatment leading to nonadherence and irregular therapy, lack of patient education about the disease, poverty, irregular supply by care providers, drug–drug interactions in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), inadequate regulations causing market overlap and irresponsible drug usage in the private sector, and lack of research, with no addition of new drugs in the last four decades. Present standards of care for the treatment of drugsusceptible tuberculosis, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, tuberculosis-HIV coinfection, and latent tuberculosis infection are all unsatisfactory. Since 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) has focused on drug development for tuberculosis, as well as research in all relevant aspects to discover new regimens by 2015 and to eliminate tuberculosis as a public health concern by 2050. As a result, some 20 promising compounds from 14 groups of drugs have been discovered. Twelve candidates from eight classes are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Ongoing research should prioritize identification of novel targets and newer application of existing drugs, discovery of multitargeted drugs from natural compounds, strengthening host factors by immunopotentiation with herbal immunomodulators, as well as protective vaccines before and after exposure, consideration of surgical measures when indicated, development of tools for rapid diagnosis, early identification of resistant strains, and markers for adequacy of treatment and an integrative approach to fulfill WHO goals. However, regulatory control over the drug market, as well as public-private partnership to use health program facilities to track patients and ensure

  20. Mobile Emergency Response Water Treatment Technology Results

    EPA Science Inventory

    When natural disasters like hurricanes, floods and earthquakes occur, safe drinking water can be compromised, limited or unavailable. Under such situations, communities have emergency response plans. One of many options for providing safe drinking water during emergency situati...

  1. Emerging Drugs for Migraine Prophylaxis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bigal, Marcelo E.; Krymchantowski, Abouch V.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract and Background Abstract Migraine is a chronic neurologic disorder with heterogeneous characteristics resulting in a range of symptom profiles, burden, and disability. Migraine affects nearly 12% of the adult population in occidental countries, imposing considerable economic and social losses. The pharmacologic treatment of migraine includes preventive and acute strategies. A better understanding of the migraine pathophysiology along with the discovery of novel molecular targets has lead to a growing number of upcoming therapeutic proposals. This review focuses on new and emerging agents for the treatment of migraine. Background Migraine is a highly prevalent, disabling, undiagnosed, and undertreated disease.[1] The phenomenon is a primary neurologic disorder with a clear genetic basis.[2,3] For some uncommon forms of migraine, such as familial hemiplegic migraine, specific pathogenic genes have been identified. The most common mutation affects a gene on chromosome 19 that encodes for a neuronal calcium channel.[4] This observation suggests that other forms of migraine may also be ion channelopathies. During the migraine attack, neural events result in the dilatation of meningeal blood vessels that, in turn, causes pain, further nerve activation, and inflammation.[5] Because neural events are linked to vascular events, migraine is considered a neurovascular headache disorder. Migraine probably results from dysfunction of brainstem areas involved in the modulation of craniovascular afferent fibers.[2–5] Brainstem activation may also lead to activation of ascending and descending pathways, with initiation of a perimeningeal vasodilatation and neurogenic inflammation. The pain is understood as a combination of altered perception (related to peripheral or central sensitization) of stimuli that are usually not painful, and the activation of a feed-forward neurovascular dilator mechanism in the first (ophthalmic) division of the trigeminal nerve. Cortical

  2. Current and emerging treatments for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Ba, Jenny Lin; Jandial, Rahul; Nesbit, Amanda; Badie, Behnam; Chen, Mike

    2015-04-01

    Brain metastasis in patients with cancer can be indicative of multisystem spread or lead to neurological demise if not locally controlled, and is associated with poor survival and high morbidity. Compared with metastasis to other areas of the body, brain metastasis possesses a unique biology that confers high resistance to systemic therapies. This phenomenon has been historically attributed to the inability of chemotherapeutic agents to pass through the blood-brain barrier. Recent studies challenge this premise, revealing other potentially targetable mechanism(s). Therapies that exploit recent advances in the understanding of brain metastasis are still in early stages of development. Encouragingly, and discovered by happenstance, some molecularly targeted drugs already appear to have efficacy against certain tumors and accompanying cerebral edema. In the meantime, conventional treatment modalities such as surgery and radiation have iteratively reached new levels of refinement. However, these achievements are somewhat muted by the emergence of magnetic resonance (MR)-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy, a minimally invasive neuroablative technique. On the horizon, MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery is similarly intriguing. Even in the absence of further advances, local control is frequently achieved with state-of-the-art therapies. Dramatic improvements will likely require sophisticated approaches that account for the particular effects of the microenvironment of the central nervous system on metastasis. PMID:25952487

  3. [Emergency treatment and management of anaphylaxis].

    PubMed

    Brockow, K; Ring, J

    2013-02-01

    Anaphylaxis, the maximal manifestation of an immediate allergic reaction, is a life-threatening systemic reaction. The immediate therapy is chosen according to the clinical manifestations and new German guidelines are in preparation. Required measures include immediate removal of allergen, adequate positioning, assessment of severity and organ involvement and activation of emergency medical services. In anaphylaxis with primarily cardiovascular involvement, epinephrine is the treatment of choice and given together with volume substitution, oxygen, H(1)-antihistamines and corticosteroids. Obstruction of the airways is treated with intramuscular and inhaled epinephrine, or alternatively β(2)-sympathicomimetics, and oxygen. Abdominal or cutaneous involvement, such as generalized urticaria, usually can be treated with intravenous H(1)-antihistamines, glucocorticoids and surveillance. In patients with anaphylaxis, the elicitor of the reaction has to be diagnosed by allergy testing. Patients with sustained risk for anaphylaxis should receive a self-medication kit and should be educated about behavioral patterns needed for prophylaxis and therapy of anaphylactic reactions. Patient educational intervention increases knowledge about anaphylaxis, and practical competence and thus, is a basis of a successful management of anaphylaxis. PMID:23385622

  4. [Emergence delirium in children - prophylaxis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Wermelt, Julius Z; Ellerkmann, Richard K

    2016-07-01

    Emergence Delirium in children after general anesthesia is a common and self limitating event. Although it might be seen as being harmless it can cause other serious complications and might leave both parents and other caregivers with a negative impression behind. Although the cause may still not be clear, potential predictors can be named: preschool age, the use of fast acting volatile anesthestics, higher preoperative anxiety levels and postoperative pain.A child-focused approach to reduce preoperative anxiety focusing on distraction methods rather than pharmacological sedation may be the key as well as sufficient postoperative pain control and the use of total intravenous anesthesia. Parenteal presence during induction of anaesthesia (PPIA) may be beneficial to reduce preoperative anxiety levels, but has failed to prove a better outcome regarding ED.The use of age adopted scores/scales to diagnose ED and Pain are mandatory.In the case of an ED event it is most important to protect the child from self injury and the loss of the iv-line. Postoperative pian needs to be ruled out before treating ED. Most cases can be treated by interrupting the situation and putting the child "back to sleep". Short acting drugs as Propofol have been used successfully due to its pharmacodynamics and short acting profile. Alternatively alpha-agonists or ketamin may be preferred by other authors. If potential predictors and a positive history are present, prophylactic treatment should be considered. A TIVA or the use of alpha-2-agonists have proven to be successful in reducing the risk of an ED. Midazolam may reduce preoperative anxiety but not the incidence of ED and should therefore be used carefully and is not a good choice in PACU for the treatment of ED.Parents who witnessed ED in their children should be guided and followed up. Explaining this phenomenon to parents beforehand should be part of the pre anaesthesia clinic talk and written consent.Standard protocols should be in

  5. 38 CFR 17.165 - Emergency outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... dental treatment. 17.165 Section 17.165 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.165 Emergency outpatient dental treatment. When outpatient emergency dental care is provided, as a humanitarian service, to individuals who have no established...

  6. 38 CFR 17.165 - Emergency outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... dental treatment. 17.165 Section 17.165 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.165 Emergency outpatient dental treatment. When outpatient emergency dental care is provided, as a humanitarian service, to individuals who have no established...

  7. 38 CFR 17.165 - Emergency outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... dental treatment. 17.165 Section 17.165 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.165 Emergency outpatient dental treatment. When outpatient emergency dental care is provided, as a humanitarian service, to individuals who have no established...

  8. 38 CFR 17.165 - Emergency outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... dental treatment. 17.165 Section 17.165 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.165 Emergency outpatient dental treatment. When outpatient emergency dental care is provided, as a humanitarian service, to individuals who have no established...

  9. 38 CFR 17.165 - Emergency outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... dental treatment. 17.165 Section 17.165 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.165 Emergency outpatient dental treatment. When outpatient emergency dental care is provided, as a humanitarian service, to individuals who have no established...

  10. [Diagnosis and treatment of hypertensive emergencies].

    PubMed

    Burnier, M; Waeber, B; Brunner, H R

    1995-11-25

    In hospital as well as in the office, the physician is often confronted with clinical situations in which blood pressure values are very high. In each case, he will have to evaluate rapidly the degree of emergency and the need for immediate antihypertensive therapy. In the last few years, the therapeutic approach to some hypertensive emergencies has changed. The purpose of the present article is to review: 1) the clinical situations where immediate control of blood pressure is necessary, 2) the present therapeutic approaches and 3) the cardiac and cerebral risks linked to an excessive and too rapid fall in blood pressure. PMID:8539574

  11. Emergency Medical Treatment for the "Wilderness" Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Search and Rescue, Fairfax, VA.

    This paper offers a brief outline of the training curriculum developed by the National Association for Search and Rescue (NASAR) for its Wilderness Medicine Programs. The training modules are designed for wilderness search and rescue units, rural emergency medical services (EMS) squads, military medics, backcountry rangers, epedition leaders,…

  12. Emerging pharmacologic targets and treatments for myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Lionel D; Marchant, David J

    2016-05-01

    Myocarditis is a heterogeneous group of disorders defined by inflammation of the heart muscle. The primary clinical manifestations of myocarditis are heart failure and sudden death in children and young adults. Numerous interventions have been investigated for the treatment of myocarditis, including broad spectrum alteration of the immune response and antiviral treatments; however, success has been limited. Since the myocarditis treatment trials in the 1990s there has been an improved understanding of disease progression and new facets of the immune response have been discovered. This new information provides fresh opportunities to develop therapeutics to treat myocarditis. This review analyzes previous pharmacologic approaches including immunosuppression, high dose intravenous immunoglobulin treatment, immunoadsorption and antiviral treatments, and looks forward toward recently identified immune factors that can be exploited as targets for new treatments. Such strategies include bolstering beneficial regulatory T cells or mitigating the detrimental Th17 T cells which can drive autoimmunity in the heart. The surging interest of the application of humanized monoclonal antibodies makes targeting deleterious arms of the immune response like Th17 cells a tangible goal in the near future. Promising constituents of herbal remedies have also been identified that may hold potential as new pharmacological treatments for myocarditis, however, significant work remains to elucidate the pharmacokinetics and side-effects of these compounds. Finally, advances in our understanding of the function of Matrix Metalloproteinases yield another target for altering disease progression given their role in the development of fibrosis during Dilated Cardiomyopathy. In bringing to light the various new targets and treatments available since the last myocarditis treatment trials, the aim of this review is to explore the new treatments that are possible in new myocarditis treatment trials

  13. New and emerging treatments in dermatology: acne.

    PubMed

    Katsambas, A; Dessinioti, C

    2008-01-01

    Topical retinoids, benzoyl peroxide, azelaic acid, and topical and oral antibiotics remain the milestone of treatment for mild to moderate acne vulgaris. Oral isotretinoin is useful for the treatment of severe nodular acne, treatment-resistant acne, and acne with a risk of physical or psychological scarring. Hormonal treatment in female acne is useful in resistant or late-onset acne. With increasing concerns regarding teratogenicity of isotretinoin and increasing antibiotic resistance, there is a clear need for therapeutic alternatives to these long-used treatments. Research in the pathogenesis of acne has allowed for new therapies and future perspectives regarding acne to evolve. They include low-dose long-term isotretinoin regimens, insulin-sensitizing agents, 5alpha-reductase type 1 inhibitors, topical photodynamic therapy, new combination formulations, dietary interventions, and antiinflammatory agents such as lipoxygenase inhibitors. PMID:18394082

  14. Emerging treatment options for early mycosis fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Guarino, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides is a candidate for skin-directed therapies in its initial stages. In recent years, therapeutic options outside of the normal treatment recommendations such as topical imiquimod, topical tazarotene, topical methotrexate, excimer light sources, and photodynamic therapy have been published with variable results. These alternatives have been useful in cases of localized mycosis fungoides that do not respond to routine treatments; nevertheless, more studies on these methods are still needed. This article summarizes the literature and data that are known so far about these treatments. PMID:23450851

  15. New and Emerging Treatments for Rosacea.

    PubMed

    Gold, Lauren M; Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2015-12-01

    Rosacea is a common chronic inflammatory disorder that affects approximately 16 million Americans. The multifactorial pathophysiology of rosacea is not fully understood. Several new treatment options were recently US Food and Drug Administration approved or are in clinical trials. This paper reviews new treatment options including ivermectin, brimonidine, the new foam formulation of azelaic acid, and oxymetazoline. The potential role in therapy, patient selection, and adverse effects of these agents are discussed. PMID:26396117

  16. Migraine preventive therapy: current and emerging treatment options.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, A M; Bigal, M E

    2005-05-01

    In this paper we review new treatment options for migraine prevention. We start with an overview about migraine and then briefly discuss current indications for migraine prevention and new and emerging preventive medications. PMID:15926007

  17. Emerging treatment strategies for glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Steven K; Brothers, Shaun P; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the deadliest form of brain tumor with a more than 90% 5-year mortality. GBM has a paltry median survival of 12.6 months attributed to the unique treatment limitations such as the high average age of onset, tumor location, and poor current understandings of the tumor pathophysiology. The resection techniques, chemotherapic strategies, and radiation therapy currently used to treat GBM have slowly evolved, but the improvements have not translated to marked increases in patient survival. Here, we will discuss the recent progress in our understanding of GBM pathophysiology, and the diagnostic techniques and treatment options. The discussion will include biomarkers, tumor imaging, novel therapies such as monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule inhibitors, and the heterogeneity resulting from the GBM cancer stem cell population. PMID:25312641

  18. Current and emerging treatments for severe asthma

    PubMed Central

    Al Efraij, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Severe asthma, which is poorly controlled despite the elimination of modifiable factors and the correct use of standard therapy, accounts only for 5% of people with asthma but it contributes to approximately 50% of the economic costs of asthma. Because of this unmet need, novel therapies have been developed for optimal treatment of these patients. The use of tiotropium, omalizumab, mepolizumab and thermoplasty in well-selected patients provides better control and most importantly a reduction in asthma exacerbations. PMID:26716048

  19. Emerging therapies for treatment of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Corboy, John R; Miravalle, Augusto A

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade, a new armamentarium of immune-based therapies have been developed and tested in patients with multiple sclerosis. Some of these therapies are showing a high level of efficacy, with an acceptable adverse effect profile. Because present therapies have significant limitations in slowing disease progression, require injections, are sometimes associated with significant side effects of immunosuppression, and do little to reverse disability, identifying more effective treatments is an important goal for clinical research in multiple sclerosis. However, in order to improve our current approach to disease-modifying therapies, it is imperative to promote the development of individualized therapy strategies. PMID:22096357

  20. Evaluation of semidecentralized emergency drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Eloidin, Océane; Dorea, Caetano C

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the potential for a novel semidecentralized approach that uses coagulant disinfectant products (CDPs) for humanitarian water treatment, by testing two commercially available products (CDP-W and CDP-T). Their performances were evaluated against the relevant water quality treatment objectives (The Sphere Project) under laboratory conditions, using a standardized testing protocol with both synthetic and natural surface test waters. Tests indicated a satisfactory performance by one of the products (CDP-W) with respect to humanitarian water quality objectives, (i.e., free chlorine residual, pH, and turbidity) that was dependent on initial water quality characteristics. Adequate bacterial inactivation (final thermotolerant coliform concentration of < 1 cfu/100 mL) was always attained and log reductions of up to 5 were achieved. The other product (CDP-T) did not exhibit any measurable coagulation and disinfection properties, indicating the variability of product quality and the need to conduct evaluations such as the ones presented in this study. Such results are of relevance to relief agencies delivering water supply interventions. PMID:26121019

  1. Treatment of Neurocritical Care Emergencies in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Sangini S; Sheth, Kevin N

    2012-02-01

    OPINION STATEMENT: Neurologic emergencies are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in pregnant women. In part because the patient population is young, the nihilistic approach that often accompanies neurologically devastating disorders in other contexts is largely absent. A number of studies have demonstrated improved patient outcomes in the setting of aggressive care delivered by neurointensivists in a specialty-specific environment. It stands to reason that young, pregnant women who suffer from neurologically devastating disorders and who have a wide range of prognosis may also benefit from such specialized care. Close collaboration between obstetricians and neurointensivists is critical in this context. A number of unique considerations in diagnosis and management present dilemmas in the context of pregnancy, such as radiation dose from diagnostic neuroimaging, choice of pharmacotherapy for seizures, anticoagulation, and the method of delivery in the context of cerebral mass lesions and elevated intracranial pressure. Patients and their physicians are often faced with the additional challenge of balancing the relative risks and benefits of the impact of a management approach on both mother and fetus. In general, this balance tends to favor the interests of the mother, but the impact on the fetus becomes more relevant over the course of the pregnancy, especially in the third trimester. A low threshold for admission to an intensive care unit (ideally one that specializes in neurointensive care) should be used for pregnant patients. Because of the limited information regarding long-term outcomes in this population, rigid prognosis formation and early care limitations should be deferred in the immediate period. After the patient is stabilized and a plan has been charted for the remainder of the pregnancy, every effort should be made to engage patients in aggressive, urgent neurologic rehabilitation. PMID:22298283

  2. Emerging surgical treatments for renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Husain, Fatima Z; Badani, Ketan K; Sfakianos, John P; Mehrazin, Reza

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of renal cell carcinoma has evolved considerably over the last few years. While total nephrectomy is necessary at times, nephron-sparing surgery, with a goal of renal function preservation, should always be considered. Although open partial nephrectomy is considered the gold standard approach for nephron-sparing surgery, laparoscopic- or robotic-assisted techniques allow urologists to perform renal surgery less invasively, with excellent long-term oncological outcomes. Cryotherapy and radiofrequency ablation are less invasive management approaches for carefully selected patients with small renal masses. Active surveillance should be considered in elderly or patients who are unfit for surgery. Ultimately, the method chosen for management of a renal mass is an informed decision made by the physician and patient. PMID:26892144

  3. Renal calculi: emergency department diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Carter, Michelle R; Green, Brad R

    2011-07-01

    The acute treatment of kidney stones (urolithiasis) addresses pain management and focuses on the effects of the morbidity associated with an obstructed renal system. Minimal fluid intake, resulting in decreased urine production and a high concentration of stone-forming salts, is a leading factor in renal calculi development. Radio-opaque calcareous stones account for 70% to 75% of renal calculi. Microscopic hematuria in the presence of acute flank pain is suggestive of renal colic, but the absence of red blood cells does not exclude urolithiasis. Furthermore, many inflammatory and infectious conditions cause hematuria, demonstrating the low specificity of urinalysis testing. The diagnostic modality of choice is a noncontrast computed tomography (CT); ultrasonography s preferred in pregnant patients and children. Combining opioids with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is the optimal evidence-based regimen to treat severe symptoms. Rapid intravenous (IV) hydration has not shown a benefit. Potentially life-threatening diagnoses including abdominal aortic aneurysm, ovarian torsion, and appendicitis may mimic renal colic and must be ruled out. PMID:22164398

  4. Psychopharmacologic treatment of eating disorders: emerging findings.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Susan L; Guerdjikova, Anna I; Mori, Nicole; Keck, Paul E

    2015-05-01

    Psychopharmacologic treatment is playing a greater role in the management of patients with eating disorders. In this paper, we review randomized, placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder (BED), and other eating disorders over the past 3 years. Fluoxetine remains the only medication approved for an eating disorder, that being BN. RCTs of antipsychotics in AN have had mixed results; the only agent with some evidence of efficacy is olanzapine. One study suggests dronabinol may induce weight gain in AN. Preliminary studies suggest lack of efficacy of alprazolam, dehydroepiandrosterone, or physiologic estrogen replacement in AN; erythromycin in BN; and the opioid antagonist ALKS-33 in BED. In BED with obesity or overweight, bupropion may cause mild weight loss without seizures, and chromium may improve glucose regulation. Also in BED, three RCTs suggest the stimulant prodrug lisdexamfetamine may reduce binge eating episodes, and another RCT suggests intranasal naloxone may decrease time spent binge eating. There remains a disconnection between the size of eating disorders as a public health problem and the lack of pharmacotherapy research of these conditions. PMID:25796197

  5. Diabetic neuropathy: mechanisms, emerging treatments, and subtypes.

    PubMed

    Albers, James W; Pop-Busui, Rodica

    2014-08-01

    Diabetic neuropathies (DNs) differ in clinical course, distribution, fiber involvement (type and size), and pathophysiology, the most typical type being a length-dependent distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP) with differing degrees of autonomic involvement. The pathogenesis of diabetic DSP is multifactorial, including increased mitochondrial production of free radicals due to hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. Mechanisms that impact neuronal activity, mitochondrial function, membrane permeability, and endothelial function include formation of advanced glycosylation end products, activation of polyol aldose reductase signaling, activation of poly(ADP ribose) polymerase, and altered function of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase pump. Hyperglycemia-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress triggers several neuronal apoptotic processes. Additional mechanisms include impaired nerve perfusion, dyslipidemia, altered redox status, low-grade inflammation, and perturbation of calcium balance. Successful therapies require an integrated approach targeting these mechanisms. Intensive glycemic control is essential but is insufficient to prevent onset or progression of DSP, and disease-modifying treatments for DSP have been disappointing. Atypical forms of DN include subacute-onset sensory (symmetric) or motor (asymmetric) predominant conditions that are frequently painful but generally self-limited. DNs are a major cause of disability, associated with reduced quality of life and increased mortality. PMID:24954624

  6. Pediatric multiple sclerosis: Escalation and emerging treatments.

    PubMed

    Chitnis, Tanuja; Ghezzi, Angelo; Bajer-Kornek, Barbara; Boyko, Alexey; Giovannoni, Gavin; Pohl, Daniela

    2016-08-30

    Over the last 20 years, there have been significant advances in multiple sclerosis (MS) therapeutics, with regulatory approval for 13 therapies in adults by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and Food and Drug Administration. However, there is only limited approval for interferon-β and glatiramer acetate use in children 12 years and older by the EMA. Availability of disease-modifying therapies to children and adolescents with MS is variable by region, and is extremely limited in some regions of the world. Up to 30% of children experience breakthrough disease requiring therapies beyond traditional first-line agents. Recent legislation in both the United States and Europe has mandated clinical studies for all new therapeutics applicable to children. Several clinical trials in children are underway that will provide important information regarding the efficacy and safety of newer drugs. This review summarizes the current knowledge of breakthrough disease, escalation, and induction treatment approaches in children with MS, especially pertaining to disease course and disability outcomes in this group of patients. In addition, ongoing clinical trials and approaches and challenges in conducting clinical trials in the pediatric population are discussed. PMID:27572854

  7. Current and emerging treatments for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Regine, W F; John, W J; Mohiuddin, M

    1997-10-01

    The worldwide annual pancreatic cancer death rate equals its estimated annual incidence. Surgery has been considered the only curative modality for this disease, but only 5 to 15% of patients are candidates for potentially curative resection. Evidence that postoperative adjuvant treatment improves outcome has been limited to a single randomised trial of a well tolerated split-course chemoradiation regimen. More intensive regimens have since been developed and are associated with, at best, a modest improvement in patient outcome. The potentially significant morbidity associated with pancreaticoduodenectomy, which can compromise the delivery of postoperative adjuvant chemoradiation, has led to the development of preoperative adjuvant ('neoadjuvant') chemoradiation in these patients. Although experience suggests that such an approach is feasible, its ultimate impact awaits further evaluation. Combined modality therapy has produced the most promising results in patients with unresectable or locally advanced disease. However, only modest improvements in median survival and minimal increases in long term survival have so far been achieved. This observation has encouraged many investigators to devise innovative methods of delivering therapy, including radioisotope implantation and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Combined modality therapy with radioisotope implantation appears to have the greatest potential for improving local control and survival in these patients. IORT may be associated with lower morbidity than radioisotope implantation, but its impact may be limited by the radiobiological disadvantage associated with single dose boost therapy. Although new radiosensitising drugs are being tested, the problem of distant metastasis remains significant. New chemotherapeutic agents such as gemcitabine appear to have the potential to produce better results than those achieved over the last 35 years with fluorouracil. Investigations into the optimal integration of

  8. Birdshot uveitis: current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Menezo, Victor; Taylor, Simon RJ

    2014-01-01

    Birdshot chorioretinopathy is a relatively uncommon subtype of idiopathic posterior uveitis with distinct clinical characteristics and a strong genetic association with the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-A29 allele. The diagnosis remains clinical and is based on the presence of typical clinical features, including multiple, distinctive, hypopigmented choroidal lesions throughout the fundus. The long-term visual prognosis of this disorder, however, remains guarded – central visual acuity can be preserved until late in the disease and it is not uncommon for patients to receive inadequate immunosuppressive treatment, leading to a poor long-term outcome in which peripheral retinal damage eventually leads to visual deterioration. Birdshot chorioretinopathy has proven a particularly attractive area of study within the field of uveitis, as it is a relatively easily defined disease with an associated human leukocyte antigen haplotype. Despite this, however, the immune mechanisms involved in its pathogenesis remain unclear, and some patients continue to lose retinal function despite therapy with corticosteroids and conventional immunosuppressive agents. Laboratory research continues to investigate the underlying mechanisms of disease, and clinical research is now being driven to improve the phenotyping and monitoring of this condition as, in the era of so-called personalized medicine, it is becoming increasingly important to identify patients at risk of visual loss early so that they can be treated more aggressively with targeted therapies such as the newer biological agents. This approach requires the formation of collaborative groups, as the relative rarity of the condition makes it difficult for one center to accumulate enough patients for worthwhile studies. Nevertheless, results obtained with newer therapies, such as biological agents directed against particular cytokines or cell-surface receptors, demonstrate ever improving control of the inflammation in refractory

  9. [A historical retrospect of Pre-hospital emergency treatment].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Peng; Cui, Yong-Ying; Wang, Zhen-E

    2013-07-01

    In 1240, the first organization of first aid medical service for rescuing and transferring the wounded in the world was established at Florence, Italy. The stations of Air Ambulances were set up in most of the developed countries at the end of the 1960s. In the middle of the 1970s, the International Red Cross put forward the principles of internationalization, international cooperation and its standardization, thus, promoting the development of pre-hospital emergency treatment. In 1972, the first Emergency Medical Service Center was established and in 1973, Congress of the United States passed the Emergency Medical Services Act (EMSS). In 1976, the legislative procedure was finished and the National Emergency Network was formed, afterwards, pre-hospital emergency treatment, on-site rescue and transfer care, patient monitoring system of ICU-CCU were set up successively. Since the first rescue group of "three failure" (heart failure, lung failure and renal failure) was first formed at Tianjin First Center Hospital in August 1974, the pre-hospital emergency of China had been developing gradually. PMID:24345547

  10. Current and Emerging Directions in the Treatment of Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Tiffany A.; Keel, Pamela K.

    2012-01-01

    Eating disorders are a significant source of psychiatric morbidity in young women and demonstrate high comorbidity with mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders. Thus, clinicians may encounter eating disorders in the context of treating other conditions. This review summarizes the efficacy of current and emerging treatments for anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge eating disorder (BED). Treatment trials were identified using electronic and manual searches and by reviewing abstracts from conference proceedings. Family based therapy has demonstrated superiority for adolescents with AN but no treatment has established superiority for adults. For BN, both 60 mg fluoxetine and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) have well-established efficacy. For BED, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, CBT, and interpersonal psychotherapy have demonstrated efficacy. Emerging directions for AN include investigation of the antipsychotic olanzapine and several novel psychosocial treatments. Future directions for BN and BED include increasing CBT disseminability, targeting affect regulation, and individualized stepped-care approaches. PMID:22879753

  11. Current and emerging directions in the treatment of eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Brown, Tiffany A; Keel, Pamela K

    2012-01-01

    Eating disorders are a significant source of psychiatric morbidity in young women and demonstrate high comorbidity with mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders. Thus, clinicians may encounter eating disorders in the context of treating other conditions. This review summarizes the efficacy of current and emerging treatments for anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge eating disorder (BED). Treatment trials were identified using electronic and manual searches and by reviewing abstracts from conference proceedings. Family based therapy has demonstrated superiority for adolescents with AN but no treatment has established superiority for adults. For BN, both 60 mg fluoxetine and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) have well-established efficacy. For BED, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, CBT, and interpersonal psychotherapy have demonstrated efficacy. Emerging directions for AN include investigation of the antipsychotic olanzapine and several novel psychosocial treatments. Future directions for BN and BED include increasing CBT disseminability, targeting affect regulation, and individualized stepped-care approaches. PMID:22879753

  12. Acute dental pain, Part II: Diagnosis and emergency treatment.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, J R

    1990-09-01

    Part II of this two-part series differentiates and explores endodontic-related emergencies with reversible and irreversible pulpitis. Indications and contra-indications for vital pulp therapy are explained, and treatment is outlined. The inflammatory process involved in irreversible pulpal disease is summarized, and the clinical signs, symptoms, and treatment of irreversible pulpitis (with and without acute periradicular involvement, with pulp necrosis, and acute periradicular abscess with and without cellulitis) are discussed. PMID:2097056

  13. Current and emerging treatment options for myopic choroidal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    El Matri, Leila; Chebil, Ahmed; Kort, Fedra

    2015-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is the main cause of visual impairment in highly myopic patients younger than 50 years of age. There are different treatments for myopic CNV (mCNV), with 5- to 10-year outcomes currently. Chorioretinal atrophy is still the most important determinant factor for visual outcome. The purpose of this study is to provide an overview of the current treatments for mCNV, including laser, surgical management, verteporfin photodynamic therapy, and mainly anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy. Emerging treatment options are also discussed. PMID:25987831

  14. Current and emerging treatment options for myopic choroidal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    El Matri, Leila; Chebil, Ahmed; Kort, Fedra

    2015-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is the main cause of visual impairment in highly myopic patients younger than 50 years of age. There are different treatments for myopic CNV (mCNV), with 5- to 10-year outcomes currently. Chorioretinal atrophy is still the most important determinant factor for visual outcome. The purpose of this study is to provide an overview of the current treatments for mCNV, including laser, surgical management, verteporfin photodynamic therapy, and mainly anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy. Emerging treatment options are also discussed. PMID:25987831

  15. A review of emerging trends in the treatment of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manpreet; Garg, Tarun; Narang, R K

    2016-01-01

    This review attempts to summarize the information available on emerging trends in the treatment of tuberculosis caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Nanostructured biomaterials, liposomes, microparticles and solid lipid nanoparticles have unique physicochemical properties such as particularly small and convenient size, sustained release, great surface area to mass ratio and high reactivity with structure. These properties can be useful in easing the administration of antimicrobial drugs, thereby reducing the number of limitations in long-established antimicrobial therapeutics. In recent years, the encapsulation of antimicrobial drugs in all carrier systems has emerged as an innovative and promising change that increases therapeutic efficiency and reduces undesirable side effects of the drugs. PMID:25365354

  16. New and emerging treatments for symptomatic tardive dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Abdul Qayyum; Chaudry, Zishan M; Blanchet, Pierre J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to assess new, emerging, and experimental treatment options for tardive dyskinesia (TD). The methods to obtain relevant studies for review included a MEDLINE search and a review of studies in English, along with checking reference lists of articles. The leading explanatory models of TD development include dopamine receptor supersensitivity, GABA depletion, cholinergic deficiency, neurotoxicity, oxidative stress, changes in synaptic plasticity, and defective neuroadaptive signaling. As such, a wide range of treatment options are available. To provide a complete summary of choices we review atypical antipsychotics along with resveratrol, botulinum toxin, Ginkgo biloba, tetrabenazine, clonazepam, melatonin, essential fatty acids, zonisamide, levetiracetam, branched-chain amino acids, drug combinations, and invasive surgical treatments. There is currently no US Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment for TD; however, prudent use of atypical antipsychotics with routine monitoring remain the cornerstone of therapy, with experimental treatment options available for further management. PMID:24235816

  17. Optimising the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension patients: emergency treatments.

    PubMed

    Delcroix, M; Naeije, R

    2010-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare and potentially fatal disease whose management is usually restricted to a few specialised centres. As patients do not necessarily live in the neighbourhood of these centres, daily care and emergencies have to be delegated to first and second lines. Treatment guidelines do not usually provide recommendations for acute emergency situations as evidence is scarce. This short review provides a description of our therapeutic protocols based on available data. A model of transmural organisation of care for PAH patients, currently applied in Belgium, is described. Thereafter, based on an analysis of the reasons of death in the PAH population, a review of the main emergencies is provided. Cardiac arrest and resuscitation, decompensated right heart failure, respiratory failure, arrhythmia, pericardial effusion, haemoptysis, surgery and drug-related adverse events will be discussed successively. Case reports showing the precariousness of PAH patients will enforce our thesis of the need for optimal patient management organisation. PMID:20956193

  18. Antibacterial treatment of bacterial vaginosis: current and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Menard, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a common cause of malodorous vaginal discharge. It is also associated with sexually transmitted infections and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The magnitude of the gynecological and obstetrical consequences has stimulated therapeutic research and led to the testing of several therapies. The objective of this work is to present the currently available therapeutic strategies for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis and associated recommendations, and discuss the emerging therapies. PMID:21976983

  19. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Feasibility and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lagana, Domenico Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Caronno, Roberto; Castelli, Patrizio; Cuffari, Salvatore; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of emergency endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Methods. During 36 months we treated, on an emergency basis, 30 AAAs with endovascular exclusion. In 21 hemodynamically stable patients preoperative CT angiography (CTA) was performed to confirm the diagnosis and to plan the treatment; 9 patients with hemorrhagic shock were evaluated with angiography performed in the operating room. Twenty-two Excluder (Gore) and 8 Zenith (Cook) stent-grafts (25 bifurcated and 5 aorto-uni-iliac) were used. The follow-up was performed by CTA at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results. Technical success was achieved in 100% of cases with a 10% mortality rate. The total complication rate was 23% (5 increases in serum creatinine level and 2 wound infections). During the follow-up, performed in 27 patients (1-36 months, mean 15.2 months), 4 secondary endoleaks (15%) (3 type II, 2 spontaneously thrombosed and 1 under observation, and 1 type III treated by iliac extender insertion) and 1 iliac leg occlusion (treated with femoro-femoral bypass) occurred. We observed a shrinkage of the aneurysmal sac in 8 of 27 cases and stability in 19 of 27 cases; we did not observe any endotension. Conclusions. Endovascular repair is a good option for emergency treatment of AAAs. The team's experience allows correct planning of the procedure in emergency situations also, with technical results comparable with elective repair. In our experience the bifurcated stent-graft is the device of choice in patients with suitable anatomy because the procedure is less time-consuming than aorto-uni-iliac stent-grafting with surgical crossover, allowing faster aneurysm exclusion. However, further studies are required to demonstrate the long-term efficacy of endovascular repair compared with surgical treatment.

  20. Wait time for treatment in hospital emergency departments: 2009.

    PubMed

    Hing, Esther; Bhuiya, Farida

    2012-08-01

    From 1999 through 2009, the number of visits to emergency departments (EDs) increased 32%, from 102.8 million visits in 1999 to 136.1 million visits in 2009 (1,2). In some hospitals, increased ED visit volume has resulted in ED crowding and increased wait times for minor and sometimes serious problems, such as myocardial infarction (3–7). This report describes the recent trend in wait times for treatment in EDs, and focuses on how wait times for treatment varied by two ED crowding measures: ambulance diversions and boarding of admitted patients. PMID:23101886

  1. Emerging therapeutics for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Brenneman, Jehrod; Hill, Jon; Pullen, Steve

    2016-09-15

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common pathology contributing to the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). DN caused by hypertension and unmitigated inflammation in diabetics, renders the kidneys unable to perform normally, and leads to renal fibrosis and organ failure. The increasing global prevalence of DN has been directly attributed to rising incidences of Type II diabetes, and is now the largest non-communicable cause of death worldwide. Despite the high morbidity, successful new treatments for DN are lacking. This review seeks to provide new insight on emerging clinical candidates under investigation for the treatment of DN. PMID:27520943

  2. Emergence agitation in children: risk factors, prevention, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Akihiro

    2016-04-01

    Emergence agitation (EA) in children is a major postoperative issue that increases the risk of patient self-harm, places a burden on nursing staff, and reduces parent satisfaction with treatment. Risk factors for EA include age, preoperative anxiety, patient personality, pain, anesthesia method, and surgical procedure. Sevoflurane and desflurane are widely used anesthetics due to their low blood/gas partition coefficients, but they have recently been posited as a cause of EA in children. The perioperative administration of opioids, midazolam, ketamine, alpha-2 agonist sedatives, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has demonstrated efficacy in the prevention and treatment of EA. Maintenance of anesthesia using propofol has also been shown to prevent EA. In children, anesthesia methods that are unlikely to cause EA should be selected, with the prompt adminstration of appropriate treatment in cases of EA. PMID:26601849

  3. Current and Emerging Treatment Options in Diabetes Care.

    PubMed

    Clemmensen, Christoffer; Müller, Timo D; Finan, Brian; Tschöp, Matthias H; DiMarchi, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes constitutes an increasing threat to human health, particularly in newly industrialized and densely populated countries. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes arise from different etiologies but lead to similar metabolic derangements constituted by an absolute or relative lack of insulin that results in elevated plasma glucose. In the last three decades, a set of new medicines built upon a deeper understanding of physiology and diabetic pathology have emerged to enhance the clinical management of the disease and related disorders. Recent insights into insulin-dependent and insulin-independent molecular events have accelerated the generation of a series of novel medicinal agents, which hold the promise for further advances in the management of diabetes. In this chapter, we provide a historical context for what has been accomplished to provide perspective for future research and novel emerging treatment options. PMID:25903416

  4. The rise of food allergy: Environmental factors and emerging treatments.

    PubMed

    Benedé, Sara; Blázquez, Ana Belen; Chiang, David; Tordesillas, Leticia; Berin, M Cecilia

    2016-05-01

    Food allergy has rapidly increased in prevalence, suggesting an important role for environmental factors in disease susceptibility. The immune response of food allergy is characterized by IgE production, and new findings from mouse and human studies indicate an important role of the cytokine IL-9, which is derived from both T cells and mast cells, in disease manifestations. Emerging evidence suggests that route of exposure to food, particularly peanut, is important. Exposure through the skin promotes sensitization while early exposure through the gastrointestinal tract promotes tolerance. Evidence from mouse studies indicate a role of the microbiome in development of food allergy, which is supported by correlative human studies showing a dysbiosis in food allergy. There is no approved treatment for food allergy, but emerging therapies are focused on allergen immunotherapy to provide desensitization, while pre-clinical studies are focused on using adjuvants or novel delivery approaches to improve efficacy and safety of immunotherapy. PMID:27322456

  5. Emerging New Approaches for the Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae; Jurcic, Joseph G.; Rosenblat, Todd; Tallman, Martin S.

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in the late 1980s combined with anthracycline-based chemotherapy has revolutionized the prognosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) with more than 90% complete response rates and cure rates of approximately 80%. The subsequent advent of arsenic trioxide (ATO) in 1990s and progress in the treatment of APL have changed its course from a highly fatal to a highly curable disease. Despite the dramatic improvement in clinical outcome of APL, treatment failure still occurs due most often to early death. Relapse has become increasingly less frequent, most commonly occurring in patients with high-risk disease. A major focus of research for the past decade has been to develop risk-adapted and rationally targeted nonchemotherapy treatment strategies to reduce treatment-related morbidity and mortality to low- and intermediate-risk or older patients while targeting more intensive or alternative therapy to those patients at most risk of relapse. In this review, emerging new approaches to APL treatment with special emhasis on strategies to reduce early deaths, risk-adapted therapy during induction, consolidation and maintenance, as well as an overview of current and future clinical trials in APL will be discussed. PMID:23556100

  6. Tumor bed radiosurgery: an emerging treatment for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Amsbaugh, Mark J; Boling, Warren; Woo, Shiao

    2015-06-01

    While typically used for treating small intact brain metastases, an increasing body of literature examining tumor bed directed stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is emerging. There are now over 1000 published cases treated with this approach, and the first prospective trial was recently published. The ideal sequencing of tumor bed SRS is unclear. Current approaches include, a neoadjuvant treatment before resection, alone as an adjuvant after resection, and following surgery combined with whole brain radiotherapy either as an adjuvant or salvage treatment. Based on available evidence, adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery improves local control following surgery, reduces the number of patients who require whole brain radiotherapy, and is well tolerated. While results from published series vary, heterogeneity in both patient populations and methods of reporting results make comparisons difficult. Additional prospective data, including randomized trials are needed to confirm equivalent outcomes to the current standard of care. We review the current literature, identify areas of ongoing contention, and highlight ongoing studies. PMID:25911296

  7. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis: current and emerging treatment options.

    PubMed

    Ihler, Friedrich; Canis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Ragweed (Ambrosia spp.) is an annually flowering plant whose pollen bears high allergenic potential. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis has long been seen as a major immunologic condition in Northern America with high exposure and sensitization rates in the general population. The invasive occurrence of ragweed (A. artemisiifolia) poses an increasing challenge to public health in Europe and Asia as well. Possible explanations for its worldwide spread are climate change and urbanization, as well as pollen transport over long distances by globalized traffic and winds. Due to the increasing disease burden worldwide, and to the lack of a current and comprehensive overview, this study aims to review the current and emerging treatment options for ragweed-induced rhinoconjunctivitis. Sound clinical evidence is present for the symptomatic treatment of ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis with oral third-generation H1-antihistamines and leukotriene antagonists. The topical application of glucocorticoids has also been efficient in randomized controlled clinical trials. Combined approaches employing multiple agents are common. The mainstay of causal treatment to date, especially in Northern America, is subcutaneous immunotherapy with the focus on the major allergen, Amb a 1. Beyond this, growing evidence from several geographical regions documents the benefit of sublingual immunotherapy. Future treatment options promise more specific symptomatic treatment and fewer side effects during causal therapy. Novel antihistamines for symptomatic treatment are aimed at the histamine H3-receptor. New adjuvants with toll-like receptor 4 activity or the application of the monoclonal anti-immunoglobulin E antibody, omalizumab, are supposed to enhance conventional immunotherapy. An approach targeting toll-like receptor 9 by synthetic cytosine phosphate-guanosine oligodeoxynucleotides promises a new treatment paradigm that aims to modulate the immune response, but it has

  8. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis: current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Ihler, Friedrich; Canis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Ragweed (Ambrosia spp.) is an annually flowering plant whose pollen bears high allergenic potential. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis has long been seen as a major immunologic condition in Northern America with high exposure and sensitization rates in the general population. The invasive occurrence of ragweed (A. artemisiifolia) poses an increasing challenge to public health in Europe and Asia as well. Possible explanations for its worldwide spread are climate change and urbanization, as well as pollen transport over long distances by globalized traffic and winds. Due to the increasing disease burden worldwide, and to the lack of a current and comprehensive overview, this study aims to review the current and emerging treatment options for ragweed-induced rhinoconjunctivitis. Sound clinical evidence is present for the symptomatic treatment of ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis with oral third-generation H1-antihistamines and leukotriene antagonists. The topical application of glucocorticoids has also been efficient in randomized controlled clinical trials. Combined approaches employing multiple agents are common. The mainstay of causal treatment to date, especially in Northern America, is subcutaneous immunotherapy with the focus on the major allergen, Amb a 1. Beyond this, growing evidence from several geographical regions documents the benefit of sublingual immunotherapy. Future treatment options promise more specific symptomatic treatment and fewer side effects during causal therapy. Novel antihistamines for symptomatic treatment are aimed at the histamine H3-receptor. New adjuvants with toll-like receptor 4 activity or the application of the monoclonal anti-immunoglobulin E antibody, omalizumab, are supposed to enhance conventional immunotherapy. An approach targeting toll-like receptor 9 by synthetic cytosine phosphate–guanosine oligodeoxynucleotides promises a new treatment paradigm that aims to modulate the immune response, but it has

  9. [Diving accidents. Emergency treatment of serious diving accidents].

    PubMed

    Schröder, S; Lier, H; Wiese, S

    2004-11-01

    Decompression injuries are potentially life-threatening incidents mainly due to a rapid decline in ambient pressure. Decompression illness (DCI) results from the presence of gas bubbles in the blood and tissue. DCI may be classified as decompression sickness (DCS) generated from the liberation of gas bubbles following an oversaturation of tissues with inert gas and arterial gas embolism (AGE) mainly due to pulmonary barotrauma. People working under hyperbaric pressure, e.g. in a caisson for general construction under water, and scuba divers are exposed to certain risks. Diving accidents can be fatal and are often characterized by organ dysfunction, especially neurological deficits. They have become comparatively rare among professional divers and workers. However, since recreational scuba diving is gaining more and more popularity there is an increasing likelihood of severe diving accidents. Thus, emergency staff working close to areas with a high scuba diving activity, e.g. lakes or rivers, may be called more frequently to a scuba diving accident. The correct and professional emergency treatment on site, especially the immediate and continuous administration of normobaric oxygen, is decisive for the outcome of the accident victim. The definitive treatment includes rapid recompression with hyperbaric oxygen. The value of adjunctive medication, however, remains controversial. PMID:15565421

  10. [ENT emergency treatment and alcohol related head and neck injuries].

    PubMed

    Teudt, I; Grundmann, T; Pueschel, K; Hogan, B; Leventli, B

    2013-08-01

    The spectrum of ENT-diseases can differ widely among emergency departments (ED) of different geographic regions. Especially in terms of head and neck trauma a higher number of injuries can be expected in large cities due to alcohol related violence.The ED of a large hospital situated in the center of Hamburg Germany was analysed for ENT-emergency treatments in 2011 retrospectively. Beside usual patient statistics, the study focused on alcohol related injuries with an ENT-surgeon involved. All data were compared to reports by other EDs in Germany and alcohol related costs were approximated for initiation of prevention programs in the future.2 339 ENT-patients were admitted to the ED. 19% of all patients used an ambulance whereas 80% reached the ED by private transportation. The majority of patients were between 21 and 30 years of age. For 143 of all trauma cases alcohol involvement was documented. Subanalysis revealed male dominance and a high use of ambulance transportation.The high number of traumata differs considerably from other ENT studies. One reason is the hospital's close proximity to all time party districts like "Reeperbahn" and the "Port of Hamburg". In those areas high amounts of alcohol ingestion takes place leading to more injuries at the head- and neck region. Theoretically financial resources would be plenty after the initiation of those programs as the severe costs for alcohol related medical treatment would decline. PMID:23568584

  11. Technical Basis for Radiological Emergency Plan Annex for WTD Emergency Response Plan: West Point Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, Eva E.; Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-08-01

    Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document, Volume 3 of PNNL-15163 is the technical basis for the Annex to the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP) Emergency Response Plan related to responding to a radiological emergency at the WPTP. The plan primarily considers response to radioactive material that has been introduced in the other combined sanitary and storm sewer system from a radiological dispersion device, but is applicable to any accidental or deliberate introduction of materials into the system.

  12. Current and emerging treatment strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mah, Jean K

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in childhood. It is caused by mutations of the DMD gene, leading to progressive muscle weakness, loss of independent ambulation by early teens, and premature death due to cardiorespiratory complications. The diagnosis can usually be made after careful review of the history and examination of affected boys presenting with developmental delay, proximal weakness, and elevated serum creatine kinase, plus confirmation by muscle biopsy or genetic testing. Precise characterization of the DMD mutation is important for genetic counseling and individualized treatment. Current standard of care includes the use of corticosteroids to prolong ambulation and to delay the onset of secondary complications. Early use of cardioprotective agents, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, and other supportive strategies has improved the life expectancy and health-related quality of life for many young adults with DMD. New emerging treatment includes viral-mediated microdystrophin gene replacement, exon skipping to restore the reading frame, and nonsense suppression therapy to allow translation and production of a modified dystrophin protein. Other potential therapeutic targets involve upregulation of compensatory proteins, reduction of the inflammatory cascade, and enhancement of muscle regeneration. So far, data from DMD clinical trials have shown limited success in delaying disease progression; unforeseen obstacles included immune response against the generated mini-dystrophin, inconsistent evidence of dystrophin production in muscle biopsies, and failure to demonstrate a significant improvement in the primary outcome measure, as defined by the 6-minute walk test in some studies. The long-term safety and efficacy of emerging treatments will depend on the selection of appropriate clinical end points and sensitive biomarkers to detect meaningful changes in disease progression. Correction of the underlying

  13. Current and emerging treatment strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Jean K

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in childhood. It is caused by mutations of the DMD gene, leading to progressive muscle weakness, loss of independent ambulation by early teens, and premature death due to cardiorespiratory complications. The diagnosis can usually be made after careful review of the history and examination of affected boys presenting with developmental delay, proximal weakness, and elevated serum creatine kinase, plus confirmation by muscle biopsy or genetic testing. Precise characterization of the DMD mutation is important for genetic counseling and individualized treatment. Current standard of care includes the use of corticosteroids to prolong ambulation and to delay the onset of secondary complications. Early use of cardioprotective agents, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, and other supportive strategies has improved the life expectancy and health-related quality of life for many young adults with DMD. New emerging treatment includes viral-mediated microdystrophin gene replacement, exon skipping to restore the reading frame, and nonsense suppression therapy to allow translation and production of a modified dystrophin protein. Other potential therapeutic targets involve upregulation of compensatory proteins, reduction of the inflammatory cascade, and enhancement of muscle regeneration. So far, data from DMD clinical trials have shown limited success in delaying disease progression; unforeseen obstacles included immune response against the generated mini-dystrophin, inconsistent evidence of dystrophin production in muscle biopsies, and failure to demonstrate a significant improvement in the primary outcome measure, as defined by the 6-minute walk test in some studies. The long-term safety and efficacy of emerging treatments will depend on the selection of appropriate clinical end points and sensitive biomarkers to detect meaningful changes in disease progression. Correction of the underlying

  14. Current and Emerging Treatment Options for Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Fecal incontinence (FI) is a multifactorial disorder that imposes considerable social and economic burdens. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of current and emerging treatment options for FI. A MEDLINE search was conducted for English-language articles related to FI prevalence, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment published from January 1, 1990 through June 1, 2013. The search was extended to unpublished trials on ClinicalTrials.gov and relevant publications cited in included articles. Conservative approaches, including dietary modifications, medications, muscle-strengthening exercises, and biofeedback, have been shown to provide short-term benefits. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation was considered ineffective in a randomized clinical trial. Unlike initial studies, sacral nerve stimulation has shown reasonable short-term effectiveness and some complications. Dynamic graciloplasty and artificial sphincter and bowel devices lack randomized controlled trials and have shown inconsistent results and high rates of explantation. Of injectable bulking agents, dextranomer microspheres in non-animal stabilized hyaluronic acid (NASHA Dx) has shown significant improvement in incontinence scores and frequency of incontinence episodes, with generally mild adverse effects. For the treatment of FI, conservative measures and biofeedback therapy are modestly effective. When conservative therapies are ineffective, invasive procedures, including sacral nerve stimulation, may be considered, but they are associated with complications and lack randomized, controlled trials. Bulking agents may be an appropriate alternative therapy to consider before more aggressive therapies in patients who fail conservative therapies. PMID:25014235

  15. Current and emerging strategies for treatment of childhood dystonia.

    PubMed

    Bertucco, Matteo; Sanger, Terence D

    2015-01-01

    Childhood dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by involuntary sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing twisting and repetitive movements, abnormal postures, or both (Sanger et al, 2003). Dystonia is a devastating neurological condition that prevents the acquisition of normal motor skills during critical periods of development in children. Moreover, it is particularly debilitating in children when dystonia affects the upper extremities such that learning and consolidation of common daily motor actions are impeded. Thus, the treatment and rehabilitation of dystonia is a challenge that continuously requires exploration of novel interventions. This review will initially describe the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms of the motor impairments found in childhood dystonia followed by the clinical measurement tools that are available to document the presence and severity of symptoms. Finally, we will discuss the state-of-the-art of therapeutic options for childhood dystonia, with particular emphasis on emergent and innovative strategies. PMID:25835254

  16. Assessing the New and Emerging Treatments for Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Friedlander, Sheila F; Simpson, Eric L; Irvine, Alan D

    2016-06-01

    The newer and emerging treatments for atopic dermatitis (AD) focus on blockade of inflammatory cytokines, especially those that derive from T helper cell type 2 (TH2) and are associated with a pathway of immunoglobulin E (IgE) sensitization. Among the proinflammatory cytokines that have been identified as promising therapeutic targets are chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells (CRTH2), IgE, thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), and several monoclonal antibodies that block key cytokine pathways in the innate immune response. Two agents that have been studied in phase III clinical trials are the boronbased phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE-4) inhibitor, crisaborole, and dupilumab, an antibody that inhibits the interleukin-4/ IL-13 receptor α chain. Semin Cutan Med Surg 35(supp5):S92-S96. PMID:27525671

  17. Current and emerging strategies for treatment of childhood dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Bertucco, Matteo; Sanger, Terence D.

    2014-01-01

    Childhood dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by involuntary sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing twisting and repetitive movements, abnormal postures, or both (Sanger et al. 2003). Dystonia is a devastating neurological condition that prevents the acquisition of normal motor skills during critical periods of development in children. Moreover, it is particularly debilitating in children when dystonia affects the upper extremities such that learning and consolidation of common daily motor actions are impeded. Thus, the treatment and rehabilitation of dystonia is a challenge that continuously requires exploration of novel interventions. This review will initially describe the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms of the motor impairments found in childhood dystonia followed by the clinical measurement tools that are available to document the presence and severity of symptoms. Finally, we will discuss the state-of-the-art of therapeutic options for childhood dystonia, with particular emphasis on emergent and innovative strategies. PMID:25835254

  18. Treatment-emergent mania/hypomania in unipolar patients

    PubMed Central

    Benvenuti, Antonella; Rucci, Paola; Miniati, Mario; Papasogli, Alessandra; Fagiolini, Andrea; Cassano, Giovanni B; Swartz, Holly; Frank, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of treatment-emergent mania/hypomania (TEMH) and to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with major depression experiencing this event during treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and/or interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT). Methods Following an algorithm-based protocol, 344 patients with major depression confirmed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV disorders were treated with an SSRI, interpersonal psychotherapy, or their combination for nine months. The emergence of mania/hypomania was carefully monitored throughout the study using the Young Mania Rating Scale and clinical assessment. Results Overall, eight patients experienced TEMH. The incidence of this event was 3.0% in patients treated with an SSRI and 0.9% in patients treated with IPT alone. Among patients treated with an SSRI, the difference between sites was higher than expected by chance alone (6.8% at Pisa and 0% at Pittsburgh, p = 0.002). Despite the adoption of an identical protocol at the two sites, some demographic and clinical characteristics of participants may account for this unexpected result. Alternatively, the greater number of episodes and earlier age of onset at the Pittsburgh site suggests that the unipolar course of illness was more clearly established prior to study entry. Conclusions TEMH is an infrequent event, occurring in 2.3% of patients treated for major depression. Nevertheless, its consequences are clinically relevant and require prompt and appropriate therapeutic interventions. For this reason, recognising those patients at risk for such an event is of paramount clinical significance. The observed difference in the incidence of TEMH between the two sites requires further investigation. PMID:18837867

  19. Emerging treatments for premature ejaculation: focus on dapoxetine

    PubMed Central

    Hellstrom, Wayne JG

    2009-01-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is a common problem in men worldwide. It has a significant impact on affected men and their partners in terms of self-esteem, dissatisfaction with their sexual relationships, personal distress, and interpersonal difficulty. Psychological therapies may achieve short-term improvements, but there are limited data on the long-term success of these methods. Oral therapy with long-acting selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) improves intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT), but these agents are designed to be administered daily and may be associated with unwanted sexual side effects and withdrawal symptoms upon abrupt discontinuation. Dapoxetine is a short-acting SSRI that can be taken as needed (prn) by men with PE. It has been studied in five separate multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials involving more than 6000 men with PE. In four studies that evaluated IELT as an endpoint (N = 4843), dapoxetine 30 and 60 mg prn achieved statistically significant increases in IELT versus placebo. Dapoxetine also showed statistically significant improvements in perceived control over ejaculation, PE-related personal distress, and other patient-reported outcomes in all five trials. Dapoxetine treatment is generally well-tolerated, with low incidences of discontinuation syndrome, sexual dysfunction, and treatment-emergent mood symptoms. The most common adverse events with dapoxetine included nausea, diarrhea, headache, dizziness, and somnolence. PMID:19557098

  20. Emergency Department Treatment of the Mechanically Ventilated Patient.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Rory; Mallemat, Haney

    2016-02-01

    Mechanical ventilation has a long and storied history, but until recently the process required little from the emergency physician. In the modern emergency department, critically ill patients spend a longer period under the care of the emergency physician, requiring a greater understanding of ventilator management. This article serves as an introduction to mechanical ventilation and a user-friendly bedside guide. PMID:26614242

  1. Emerging targets in neurodegeneration: new opportunities for Alzheimer's disease treatment?

    PubMed

    Rampa, Angela; Gobbi, Silvia; Belluti, Federica; Bisi, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder of the brain associated with memory impairment, progressive cognitive decline and changes in personality and behavior, with rising incidence among elderly people. Reflecting the world population ageing, the scenario is expected to worsen in the next decades if novel drugs or mechanisms that help to counteract neurodegeneration will not be identified. The complex neuropathology of AD is characterized by cholinergic loss, extracellular deposition of amyloid-β plaques, formation of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, chronic brain inflammation and oxidative damage. To date, there are no effective treatments that can slow or halt the disease, and currently approved drugs only seem to act as palliative by temporary ameliorating cognitive impairment. On the other hand, the role played by other biological systems in the pathogenetic process is now clearly growing and, as knowledge on how AD develops and triggers brain damage proceeds, drug discovery attempts to identify new potential therapeutic targets. This review will focus on these emerging strategies, some of which could open new therapeutic perspectives in Alzheimer's disease, adding new elements for the medicinal chemist to handle and combine for the design of novel multi-target-directed ligands able to simultaneously modulate 'old classic' and newly identified targets. PMID:23931436

  2. [Treatment of childhood injuries and violence in public emergency services].

    PubMed

    Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Mascarenhas, Márcio Denis Medeiros; Neves, Alice Cristina Medeiros das; Silva, Marta Alves da

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to analyze the profile of treatment for accidents and violence involving children under 10 years of age in Brazil in the year 2011. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study in 71 emergency services in the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS), located in the national capital and 24 state capitals. Data were obtained from the Ministry of Health's system of sentinel surveillance services for Violence and Accidents (VIVA Survey). The highest proportion of injuries (67.4%) occurred inside the child's home. Among unintentional injuries, falls were the most frequent (52.4%), followed by running into objects or persons (21.8%) and traffic injuries (10.9%), especially as passengers (bicycles were an important means of transportation involved in the injuries). The vast majority of unintentional injuries are avoidable, and educational measures should be adopted, especially with parents, teachers, the community, and health workers, calling attention to the risks and the adoption of safe behaviors in the home, at school, and in leisure-time activities. Cases of violence are subject to mandatory reporting, and prompt measures should be taken to protect victims. PMID:26083183

  3. Treatment of Pediatric Migraine in the Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, Amy A.; Goadsby, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is a relatively common reason for pediatric emergency room visits. Given the paucity of randomized trials involving pediatric migraineurs in the emergency department setting compared to adults, recommendations for managing these children are largely extrapolated from adult migraine emergency room studies and trials involving outpatient home pediatric migraine therapy. This paper reviews what is known about pediatric migraineurs who present to the emergency room and how they are currently managed, then goes on to summarize the best evidence currently available to guide clinical decision making. PMID:22964436

  4. Viruses and disease: emerging concepts for prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Herrington, C S; Coates, P J; Duprex, W P

    2015-01-01

    Viruses cause a wide range of human diseases, ranging from acute self-resolving conditions to acute fatal diseases. Effects that arise long after the primary infection can also increase the propensity for chronic conditions or lead to the development of cancer. Recent advances in the fields of virology and pathology have been fundamental in improving our understanding of viral pathogenesis, in providing improved vaccination strategies and in developing newer, more effective treatments for patients worldwide. The reviews assembled here focus on the interface between virology and pathology and encompass aspects of both the clinical pathology of viral disease and the underlying disease mechanisms. Articles on emerging diseases caused by Ebola virus, Marburg virus, coronaviruses such as SARS and MERS, Nipah virus and noroviruses are followed by reviews of enteroviruses, HIV infection, measles, mumps, human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and varicella zoster virus (VZV). The issue concludes with a series of articles reviewing the relationship between viruses and cancer, including the role played by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the pathogenesis of lymphoma and carcinoma; how human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are involved in the development of skin cancer; the involvement of hepatitis B virus infection in hepatocellular carcinoma; and the mechanisms by which Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) leads to Kaposi's sarcoma. We hope that this collection of articles will be of interest to a wide range of scientists and clinicians at a time when there is a renaissance in the appreciation of the power of pathology as virologists dissect the processes of disease. PMID:25366544

  5. Current and emerging pharmacological treatments for sarcoidosis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Beegle, Scott H; Barba, Kerry; Gobunsuy, Romel; Judson, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of sarcoidosis is not standardized. Because sarcoidosis may never cause significant symptoms or organ dysfunction, treatment is not mandatory. When treatment is indicated, oral corticosteroids are usually recommended because they are highly likely to be effective in a relative short period of time. However, because sarcoidosis is often a chronic condition, long-term treatment with corticosteroids may cause significant toxicity. Therefore, corticosteroid sparing agents are often indicated in patients requiring chronic therapy. This review outlines the indications for treatment, corticosteroid treatment, and corticosteroid sparing treatments for sarcoidosis. PMID:23596348

  6. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY: INNOVATIVE METHODS FOR BIOSLURRY TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The tests reported herein were conducted by IT Corporation (IT), Knoxville, TN, to investigate the feasibility of combined biological and chemical treatments to treat polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Bioslurry treatment of PAH-contaminated soils was demonstrated under the...

  7. Treatment of Sexual Offenders: Research, Best Practices, and Emerging Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Pamela M.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of sexual offenders has evolved substantially over the years; various theoretical and practice models of treatment been developed, modified, refined, and proposed over time. The predominant current recommended approach, supported by research, adheres to specific principles of effective correctional intervention, follows a…

  8. An Emerging Problem: Methamphetamine Abuse among Treatment Seeking Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Rachel; Ang, Alfonso; McCann, Michael J.; Rawson, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined correlates of methamphetamine (MA) and marijuana (MJ) use and treatment response among treatment-involved youth (N = 4,430) in Los Angeles County, California treated between 2000 and 2005. Of the sample, 912 (21%) were primary MA and 3,518 (79%) were primary MJ users. Correlates of increased MA use included being female, White,…

  9. Emerging Technologies in Autism Diagnosis, Therapy, Treatment, and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Angela C.

    2014-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder is the fastest growing developmental disability today. Autism is a syndrome with a diverse set of symptoms--rarely consistent across diagnosed individuals, and requiring a combination of therapies, educational approaches, and treatments. There is no known cure for autism. Instead treatment is left to educators and…

  10. Emergency Endovascular 'Bridge' Treatment for Iliac-Enteric Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Franchin, Marco; Tozzi, Matteo; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Castelli, Patrizio

    2011-10-15

    Aortic aneurysm has been reported to be the dominant cause of primary iliac-enteric fistula (IEF) in >70% of cases [1]; other less common causes of primary IEF include peptic ulcer, primary aortitis, pancreatic pseudocyst, or neoplastic erosion into an adjacent artery [2, 3]. We describe an unusual case of IEF managed with a staged approach using an endovascular stent-graft as a 'bridge' in the emergency setting to optimize the next elective definitive excision of the lesion.

  11. Emergency assessment and treatment planning for traumatic dental injuries.

    PubMed

    Moule, A; Cohenca, N

    2016-03-01

    Trauma involving the dentoalveolar region is a frequent occurrence which can result in the fracturing and displacement of teeth, crushing and/or fracturing of bone and soft tissue injuries including contusions, abrasions and lacerations. This review describes the assessment of patients with these injuries, not in a didactic sense by repeating excellent already published classifications and treatment options, but by addressing questions that arise during assessment. It covers trauma first aid, examination of the patient, factors that affect treatment planning decisions, and the importance of communicating treatment options and prognosis to traumatized patients. PMID:26923446

  12. SITE EMERGING TECHNOLOGY REPORT: INNOVATIVE METHODS FOR BIOSLURRY TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    IT Corporation (IT), Knoxville, Tennessee, in collaboration with U.S. Environmental protection Agency (EPA), investigated the feasibility of combined biological and chemical oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Bioslurry treatment of PAH-contaminated soils was dem...

  13. Integrating emerging treatment options in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kahl, Brad S; Fowler, Nathan H; Czuczman, Myron S

    2013-12-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma is an uncommon lymphoma subtype that is currently considered incurable and lacks a single standard of care. Choice of treatment is complicated by the disease’s clinical heterogeneity. The course of the disease may be indolent, moderately aggressive, or aggressive. A translocation between chromosomes 11 and 14 is observed in the majority of mantle cell lymphoma patients, and the diseased cells may develop a variety of other genetic aberrations. Although the disease tends to respond well to treatment, patients almost invariably relapse, with many becoming chemotherapy refractory over time. The development of new treatment strategies has improved the prognosis for these patients. Novel approaches include intensive chemotherapy, often in combination with stem cell transplantation; maintenance therapy with extended duration; and new targeted treatments such as ibrutinib, bendamustine, bortezomib, lenalidomide, and idelalisib. Many of these new agents have shown promising activity, both as single agents and in combination regimens. PMID:24893155

  14. Current and emerging options for the drug treatment of narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    De la Herrán-Arita, Alberto K; García-García, Fabio

    2013-11-01

    Narcolepsy/hypocretin deficiency (now called type 1 narcolepsy) is a lifelong neurologic disorder with well-established diagnostic criteria and etiology. Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and symptoms of dissociated rapid eye movement sleep such as cataplexy (sudden loss of muscle tone), hypnagogic hallucinations (sensory events that occur at the transition from wakefulness to sleep), sleep paralysis (inability to perform movements upon wakening or sleep onset), and nocturnal sleep disruption. As these symptoms are often disabling, most patients need life-long treatment. The treatment of narcolepsy is well defined, and, traditionally, amphetamine-like stimulants (i.e., dopaminergic release enhancers) have been used for clinical management to improve EDS and sleep attacks, whereas tricyclic antidepressants have been used as anticataplectics. However, treatments have evolved to better-tolerated compounds such as modafinil or armodafinil (for EDS) and adrenergic/serotonergic selective reuptake inhibitors (as anticataplectics). In addition, night-time administration of a short-acting sedative, c-hydroxybutyrate (sodium oxybate), has been used for the treatment for EDS and cataplexy. These therapies are almost always needed in combination with non-pharmacologic treatments (i.e., behavioral modification). A series of new drugs is currently being tested in animal models and in humans. These include a wide variety of hypocretin agonists, melanin- concentrating hormone receptor antagonists, antigenspecific immunopharmacology, and histamine H3 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists (e.g., pitolisant), which have been proposed for specific therapeutic applications, including the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, epilepsy, and more recently, narcolepsy. Even though current treatment is strictly symptomatic, based on the present state of knowledge of the pathophysiology of

  15. Age-related macular degeneration: experimental and emerging treatments

    PubMed Central

    Hubschman, Jean Pierre; Reddy, Shantan; Schwartz, Steven D

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This essay reviews the experimental treatments and new imaging modalities that are currently being explored by investigators to help treat patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design: Interpretative essay. Methods: Literature review and interpretation. Results: Experimental treatments to preserve vision in patients with exudative AMD include blocking vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), binding VEGF, and modulating the VEGF receptors. Investigators are also attempting to block signal transduction with receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Experimental treatments for non-exudative AMD include agents that target inflammation, oxidative stress, and implement immune-modulation. The effectiveness of these newer pharmacologic agents has the potential to grow exponentially when used in combination with new and improved imaging modalities that can help identify disease earlier and follow treatment response more precisely. Conclusion: With a better understanding, at the genetic and molecular level, of AMD and the development of superior imaging modalities, investigators are able to offer treatment options that may offer unprecedented visual gains while reducing the need for repetitive treatments. PMID:19668561

  16. Emerging treatment guidelines for mentally ill chemical abusers.

    PubMed

    Carey, K B

    1989-04-01

    Dr. Miller's Introduction: We are becoming more and more aware that many alcoholics and chemically dependent individuals also suffer from a psychiatric disorder. This reality emerges now after a period in which the possibility of coexisting mental and addictive disorders was often denied by the alcoholism and drug fields. Psychiatrists and other mental health professionals need to be alert to patients with these dual disorders so that relapses of both the dependency and the psychiatric disorder can be averted. This month's column presents useful guidelines to help professionals deal effectively with this difficult problem. PMID:2714747

  17. Willingness and Appropriateness of Peers Participating in Emerging Adults’ Substance Misuse Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Douglas C.; Cleeland, Leah; Middleton, Ashley; Godley, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of adapting empirically-supported family treatments for emerging adult peer dyads. Data were collected (n=84) from emerging adults and their peers. Peers completed measures of substance use, willingness to participate in their friends’ treatments, and an adapted version of the Significant Other Behavior Questionnaire (SBQ), which measures concerned significant others’ (CSO) responses to another’s use such a punishing, supporting, or withdrawing from the user. Peers were more likely to support sobriety or enable use, versus punishing use or withdrawing from their friends. Overall, peers were quite willing to assist in treatment, but heavily using peers were less enthusiastic. For some emerging adults, their current peers may represent untapped resources to integrate into treatment, and providing peer-enhanced treatments may expand the reach of services to non-treatment seeking populations. PMID:23462152

  18. Emergence of Transdiagnostic Treatments for PTSD and Posttraumatic Distress.

    PubMed

    Gutner, Cassidy A; Galovski, Tara; Bovin, Michelle J; Schnurr, Paula P

    2016-10-01

    Both theoretical and empirical findings have demonstrated similarities across diagnoses, leading to a growing interest in transdiagnostic interventions. Most of the evidence supporting transdiagnostic treatment has accumulated for depression, anxiety, and eating disorders, with minimal attention given to posttraumatic stress disorder and other reactions to traumatic stressors. Although single-diagnosis protocols are effective for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other trauma-related disorders, in principle, transdiagnostic approaches may have beneficial applications within a traumatized population. This paper defines different types of transdiagnostic treatments, reviews transdiagnostic approaches used in related disorders, and discusses their applicability to PTSD. Examples are drawn from existing transdiagnostic treatments in order to provide a framework for the application of such interventions to the field of traumatic stress. Implications for implementation and dissemination are also discussed. PMID:27604362

  19. Treatment of inflammatory myopathy: emerging therapies and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Moghadam-Kia, Siamak; Aggarwal, Rohit; Oddis, Chester V

    2016-01-01

    Despite the lack of placebo-controlled trials, glucocorticoids are considered the mainstay of initial treatment for idiopathic inflammatory myopathy and myositis-associated interstitial lung disease. Glucocorticoid-sparing agents are often given concomitantly with other immunosuppressive agents, particularly in patients with moderate or severe disease. First-line conventional immunosuppressive drugs include either methotrexate or azathioprine, and when they fail, more aggressive therapy includes mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus or cyclosporine, intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, or cyclophosphamide, used alone or in various combinations. Further investigations are required to assess the role of more novel therapies in the treatment of myositis and myositis-associated interstitial lung disease. PMID:26313852

  20. Hydrogels for brain repair after stroke: an emerging treatment option.

    PubMed

    Nih, Lina Ratiba; Carmichael, Stanley Thomas; Segura, Tatiana

    2016-08-01

    Stroke disability is the only major disease without an effective treatment. The substantial clinical burden of stroke in disabled survivors and the lack of a medical therapy that promotes recovery provide an opportunity to explore the use of biomaterials to promote brain repair after stroke. Hydrogels can be injected as a liquid and solidify in situ to form a gelatinous solid with similar mechanical properties to the brain. These biomaterials have been recently explored to generate pro-repair environments within the damaged organ. This review highlights the clinical problem of stroke treatment and discusses recent advances in using in situ forming hydrogels for brain repair. PMID:27162093

  1. Colonoscopy in the emergency treatment of colonic volvulus in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Arigbabu, A O; Badejo, O A; Akinola, D O

    1985-11-01

    The commonest cause of large-bowel obstruction in Nigeria is sigmoid volvulus. Patients usually present late, dehydrated, and in very poor condition. The mortality of emergency colonic surgery is undoubtedly high, more so in developing countries poorly equipped to cope with such a condition. To reduce the mortality rate and improve management of the patients, a four-year prospective study of detorsion followed by elective surgery after adequate resuscitation and bowel preparation was carried out between January 1979 and December 1982. Volvulus is classified into three groups: torsion, obstruction, and strangulation. Criteria for short colonoscopic detorsion of torsion and obstruction types are discussed, and the contraindication in the case of strangulation type mentioned. This article describes the management of 92 cases of sigmoid volvulus between 1979 and 1982. PMID:4053889

  2. Emerging antivirals for the treatment of hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Yan; Chen, Hong-Song

    2014-06-28

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) constitutes a major global public health threat, causing substantial disease burdens such as liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, thus representing high unmet medical needs. Currently available therapies are safe, well tolerated, and highly effective in decreasing viremia and improving measured clinical outcomes with low rates of antiviral resistance. However, long-term management remains a clinical challenge, mainly due to the slow kinetics of HBV surface antigen clearance. In this article, we review emerging antivirals directed at novel targets derived from mechanisms of viral cellular entry, viral replication, viral assembly, and the host immune response, leading to preclinical and clinical trials for possible future therapeutic intervention. The recent therapeutic advances in the development of all categories of HBV inhibitors may pave the way for regimens of finite duration that result in long-lasting control of chronic hepatitis B infection. PMID:24976708

  3. Current and emerging treatment options for Peyronie’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Ahmet; Wang, Julie C; Powers, Mary K; Hellstrom, Wayne JG

    2013-01-01

    Peyronie’s disease (PD) is a condition of the penis, characterized by the presence of localized fibrotic plaque in the tunica albuginea. PD is not an uncommon disorder, with recent epidemiologic studies documenting a prevalence of 3–9% of adult men affected. The actual prevalence of PD may be even higher. It is often associated with penile pain, anatomical deformities in the erect penis, and difficulty with intromission. As the definitive pathophysiology of PD has not been completely elucidated, further basic research is required to make progress in the understanding of this enigmatic condition. Similarly, research on effective therapies is limited. Currently, nonsurgical treatments are used for those men who are in the acute stage of PD, whereas surgical options are reserved for men with established PD who cannot successfully penetrate. Intralesional treatments are growing in clinical popularity as a minimally invasive approach in the initial treatment of PD. A surgical approach should be considered when men with PD do not respond to conservative, medical, or minimally invasive therapies for approximately 1 year and cannot have satisfactory sexual intercourse. As scientific breakthroughs in the understanding of the mechanisms of this disease process evolve, novel treatments for the many men suffering with PD are anticipated. PMID:24400231

  4. Glioblastoma multiforme: emerging treatments and stratification markers beyond new drugs.

    PubMed

    von Neubeck, C; Seidlitz, A; Kitzler, H H; Beuthien-Baumann, B; Krause, M

    2015-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumour in adults. The standard therapy for GBM is maximal surgical resection followed by radiotherapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ). In spite of the extensive treatment, the disease is associated with poor clinical outcome. Further intensification of the standard treatment is limited by the infiltrating growth of the GBM in normal brain areas, the expected neurological toxicities with radiation doses >60 Gy and the dose-limiting toxicities induced by systemic therapy. To improve the outcome of patients with GBM, alternative treatment modalities which add low or no additional toxicities to the standard treatment are needed. Many Phase II trials on new chemotherapeutics or targeted drugs have indicated potential efficacy but failed to improve the overall or progression-free survival in Phase III clinical trials. In this review, we will discuss contemporary issues related to recent technical developments and new metabolic strategies for patients with GBM including MR (spectroscopy) imaging, (amino acid) positron emission tomography (PET), amino acid PET, surgery, radiogenomics, particle therapy, radioimmunotherapy and diets. PMID:26159214

  5. Current and emerging treatments for uterine myoma – an update

    PubMed Central

    Duhan, Nirmala

    2011-01-01

    Uterine myomas, the most common benign, solid, pelvic tumors in women, occur in 20%–40% of women in their reproductive years and form the most common indication for hysterectomy. Various factors affect the choice of the best treatment modality for a given patient. Asymptomatic myomas may be managed by reassurance and careful follow up. Medical therapy should be tried as a first line of treatment for symptomatic myomas, while surgical treatment should be reserved only for appropriate indications. Hysterectomy has its place in myoma management in its definitiveness. However, myomectomy, rather than hysterectomy, should be performed when subsequent childbearing is a consideration. Preoperative gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog treatment before myomectomy decreases the size and vascularity of the myoma but may render the capsule more fibrous and difficult to resect. Uterine artery embolization is an effective standard alternative for women with large symptomatic myomas who are poor surgical risks or wish to avoid major surgery. Its effects on future fertility need further evaluation in larger studies. Serial follow-up without surgery for growth and/or development of symptoms is advisable for asymptomatic women, particularly those approaching menopause. The present article is incorporated with multiple clear clinical photographs and simplified elaboration of the available management options for these tumors of uterine smooth muscle to facilitate clear understanding. PMID:21892334

  6. Glioblastoma multiforme: emerging treatments and stratification markers beyond new drugs

    PubMed Central

    Seidlitz, A; Kitzler, H H; Beuthien-Baumann, B; Krause, M

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumour in adults. The standard therapy for GBM is maximal surgical resection followed by radiotherapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ). In spite of the extensive treatment, the disease is associated with poor clinical outcome. Further intensification of the standard treatment is limited by the infiltrating growth of the GBM in normal brain areas, the expected neurological toxicities with radiation doses >60 Gy and the dose-limiting toxicities induced by systemic therapy. To improve the outcome of patients with GBM, alternative treatment modalities which add low or no additional toxicities to the standard treatment are needed. Many Phase II trials on new chemotherapeutics or targeted drugs have indicated potential efficacy but failed to improve the overall or progression-free survival in Phase III clinical trials. In this review, we will discuss contemporary issues related to recent technical developments and new metabolic strategies for patients with GBM including MR (spectroscopy) imaging, (amino acid) positron emission tomography (PET), amino acid PET, surgery, radiogenomics, particle therapy, radioimmunotherapy and diets. PMID:26159214

  7. Emerging treatment options for myelofibrosis: focus on pacritinib

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Vivian; Weissman, Ashley; O’Connell, Casey Lee; Mehrvar, Azim; Akhtari, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Myelofibrosis (MF) is a myeloid malignancy associated with a heavy symptomatic burden that decreases quality of life and presents a risk for leukemic transformation. While there are limited curative treatments, the recent discovery of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway dysregulation has led to many clinical investigations for new treatment approaches. This review provides practical knowledge on the disease state, an overview of treatment options, and specifically focuses on the efficacy and safety of pacritinib in the management of MF. Pacritinib is a novel selective inhibitor of JAK2 and FMS-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) currently in Phase III trials for the treatment of MF. Thus far, studies have demonstrated clinical efficacy in reducing splenomegaly and constitutional symptoms. Common adverse events were gastrointestinal in nature, while hematologic toxicity was limited. However, it was announced that all ongoing clinical trials on pacritinib have been placed on hold by the US Food and Drug Administration in February 2016, due to concerns for increased intracranial hemorrhage and cardiac events. With comprehensive risk-benefit analysis of clinical trial data, the utility of pacritinib in the management of MF may be more clearly defined. PMID:27226728

  8. Odanacatib: an emerging novel treatment alternative for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Thomas C; Valenzano, Jonathan P; Verzella, Jessica L; Umland, Elena M

    2015-11-01

    Odanacatib represents a novel treatment option in the approach of postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women with osteoporosis experience a disturbance in bone remodeling wherein bone resorption exceeds bone formation. Cathepsin K is a lysosomal cysteine protease found primarily in osteoclasts that plays a major role in the breakdown of bone via its collagenase properties. Targeting a new area of pathophysiology, odanacatib inhibits cathepsin K to reduce bone resorption while preserving bone formation. Phase II and III trials have shown efficacy in increasing bone mineral density in the target treatment group. Overall, safety studies have found odanacatib to be well-tolerated and comparable to placebo; however, some imbalances in adverse events have been observed in the Phase III trials. Current and future studies will analyze the long-term ability of odanacatib in preventing bone fracture. PMID:26344800

  9. Current and emerging treatments for absence seizures in young patients

    PubMed Central

    Vrielynck, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we review the pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments of the different absence seizure types as recently recognized by the International League Against Epilepsy: typical absences, atypical absences, myoclonic absences, and eyelid myoclonia with absences. Overall, valproate and ethosuximide remain the principal anti-absence drugs. Typical absence seizures exhibit a specific electroclinical semiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacological response profile. A large-scale comparative study has recently confirmed the key role of ethosuximide in the treatment of childhood absence epilepsy, more than 50 years after its introduction. No new antiepileptic drug has proven major efficacy against typical absences. Of the medications under development, brivaracetam might be an efficacious anti-absence drug. Some experimental drugs also show efficacy in animal models of typical absence seizures. The treatment of other absence seizure types is not supported with a high level of evidence. Rufinamide appears to be the most promising new antiepileptic drug for atypical absences and possibly for myoclonic absences. The efficacy of vagal nerve stimulation should be further evaluated for atypical absences. Levetiracetam appears to display a particular efficacy in eyelid myoclonia with absences. Finally, it is important to remember that the majority of antiepileptic drugs, whether they be old or new, may aggravate typical and atypical absence seizures. PMID:23885176

  10. Current and emerging treatment options in the management of lupus.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Natasha; D'Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease with variable clinical manifestations. While the clearest guidelines for the treatment of SLE exist in the context of lupus nephritis, patients with other lupus manifestations such as neuropsychiatric, hematologic, musculoskeletal, and severe cutaneous lupus frequently require immunosuppression and/or biologic therapy. Conventional immunosuppressive agents such as mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide are widely used in the management of SLE with current more rationalized treatment regimens optimizing the use of these agents while minimizing potential toxicity. The advent of biologic therapies has advanced the treatment of SLE particularly in patients with refractory disease. The CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-BLyS agent belimumab are now widely in use in clinical practice. Several other biologic agents are in ongoing clinical trials. While immunosuppressive and biologic agents are the foundation of inflammatory disease control in SLE, the importance of managing comorbidities such as cardiovascular risk factors, bone health, and minimizing susceptibility to infection should not be neglected. PMID:27529058

  11. Emerging treatments for post-transplantation diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jenssen, Trond; Hartmann, Anders

    2015-08-01

    Post-transplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM), also known as new-onset diabetes mellitus (NODM), occurs in 10-15% of renal transplant recipients and is associated with cardiovascular disease and reduced lifespan. In the majority of cases, PTDM is characterized by β-cell dysfunction, as well as reduced insulin sensitivity in liver, muscle and adipose tissue. Glucose-lowering therapy must be compatible with immunosuppressant agents, reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and severe arteriosclerosis. Such therapy should not place the patient at risk by inducing hypoglycaemic episodes or exacerbating renal function owing to adverse gastrointestinal effects with hypovolaemia. First-generation and second-generation sulphonylureas are generally avoided, and caution is currently advocated for the use of metformin in patients with GFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2). DPP-4 inhibitors do not interact with immunosuppressant drugs and have demonstrated safety in small clinical trials. Other therapeutic options include glinides and glitazones. Evidence-based treatment regimens used in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus cannot be directly implemented in patients with PTDM. Studies investigating the latest drugs are required to direct the development of improved treatment strategies for patients with PTDM. This Review outlines the modern principles of glucose-lowering treatment in PTDM with specific reference to renal transplant recipients. PMID:25917553

  12. Emerging Treatment Options in Mild to Moderate Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, Gary R.; Hanauer, Stephen B.; Sandborn, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory condition associated with rectal bleeding and urgency, tenesmus, and diarrhea. Several medical therapies can be used in the treatment of UC. Aminosalicylates are widely used based on their efficacy in the induction and maintenance of remission. Although corticosteroids are effective in patients with more severe disease, systemic use is associated with significant safety concerns. The newer corticosteroid budesonide has lower systemic bioavailability and, consequently, a more favorable safety profile. A budesonide extended-release formulation allows once-daily dosing and delivers the agent locally throughout the colon. Biologic agents used for the treatment of moderate to severe UC include the tumor necrosis factor inhibitors infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab, and the integrin inhibitor vedolizumab. Rectally administered therapy can also be useful in the treatment of UC. In October 2014, the US Food and Drug Administration approved a budesonide foam formulation for inducing remission in patients with active mild to moderate distal UC extending up to 40 cm from the anal verge. Budesonide foam rapidly distributes to the sigmoid colon and the rectum and avoids some of the drawbacks of suppositories and enemas. PMID:26491415

  13. Current and emerging treatment options in the management of lupus

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Natasha; D’Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease with variable clinical manifestations. While the clearest guidelines for the treatment of SLE exist in the context of lupus nephritis, patients with other lupus manifestations such as neuropsychiatric, hematologic, musculoskeletal, and severe cutaneous lupus frequently require immunosuppression and/or biologic therapy. Conventional immunosuppressive agents such as mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide are widely used in the management of SLE with current more rationalized treatment regimens optimizing the use of these agents while minimizing potential toxicity. The advent of biologic therapies has advanced the treatment of SLE particularly in patients with refractory disease. The CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-BLyS agent belimumab are now widely in use in clinical practice. Several other biologic agents are in ongoing clinical trials. While immunosuppressive and biologic agents are the foundation of inflammatory disease control in SLE, the importance of managing comorbidities such as cardiovascular risk factors, bone health, and minimizing susceptibility to infection should not be neglected. PMID:27529058

  14. Current and emerging treatment options for hairy cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    López-Rubio, Montserrat; Garcia-Marco, Jose Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a lymphoproliferative B-cell disorder characterized by pancytopenia, splenomegaly, and characteristic cytoplasmic hairy projections. Precise diagnosis is essential in order to differentiate classic forms from HCL variants, such as the HCL-variant and VH4-34 molecular variant, which are more resistant to available treatments. The current standard of care is treatment with purine analogs (PAs), such as cladribine or pentostatin, which provide a high rate of long-lasting clinical remissions. Nevertheless, ~30%–40% of the patients relapse, and moreover, some of these are difficult-to-treat refractory cases. The use of the monoclonal antibody rituximab in combination with PA appears to produce even higher responses, and it is often employed to minimize or eliminate residual disease. Currently, research in the field of HCL is focused on identifying novel therapeutic targets and potential agents that are safe and can universally cure the disease. The discovery of the BRAF mutation and progress in understanding the biology of the disease has enabled the scientific community to explore new therapeutic targets. Ongoing clinical trials are assessing various treatment strategies such as the combination of PA and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies, recombinant immunotoxins targeting CD22, BRAF inhibitors, and B-cell receptor signal inhibitors. PMID:26316784

  15. Identification and assessment of site treatment plan implementation opportunities for emerging technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE), in response to the 1992 Federal Facility Compliance Act, has prepared Site Treatment Plans (STP) for the approximately 2,000 waste streams identified within its mixed waste inventory Concurrently, emerging mixed waste treatment technologies are in final development. This paper defines a three-phase process to identify and assess implementation opportunities for these emerging technologies within the STP. It highlights the first phase, functional matching of expected treatment capabilities with proposed treatment requirements. Matches are based on treatment type, regulated contaminant and waste matrix type, for both capabilities and requirements. Results identify specific waste streams and volumes that could be treated by each emerging technology. A study for Plasma Hearth Process, Delphi DETOX{sup sm}, Supercritical Water Oxidation and Vitrification shows that about 200,000 ml of DOE`s mixed waste inventory can potentially be treated by one or more of these emerging technologies. Actual implementations are small fractions of the treatable inventory. Differences between potential and actual implementations must be minimized to accrue optimum benefit from implementation of emerging or alternative treatment technologies. Functional matching is the first phase in identifying and quantifying benefits, addressing technology system and treatment issues, and providing, in part, the basis for STP implementation decisions. DOE, through EM`s Office of Technology Development, has funded this work.

  16. Emerging pharmacologic treatment options for fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Tori L; Davenport, Matthew H; Erickson, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common single gene cause of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder. Caused by a silenced fragile X mental retardation 1 gene and the subsequent deficiency in fragile X mental retardation protein, patients with FXS experience a range of physical, behavioral, and intellectual debilitations. The FXS field, as a whole, has recently met with some challenges, as several targeted clinical trials with high expectations of success have failed to elucidate significant improvements in a variety of symptom domains. As new clinical trials in FXS are planned, there has been much discussion about the use of the commonly used clinical outcome measures, as well as study design considerations, patient stratification, and optimal age range for treatment. The evidence that modification of these drug targets and use of these failed compounds would prove to be efficacious in human clinical study were rooted in years of basic and translational research. There are questions arising as to the use of the mouse models for studying FXS treatment development. This issue is twofold: many of the symptom domains and molecular and biochemical changes assessed and indicative of efficacy in mouse model study are not easily amenable to clinical trials in people with FXS because of the intolerability of the testing paradigm or a lack of noninvasive techniques (prepulse inhibition, sensory hypersensitivity, startle reactivity, or electrophysiologic, biochemical, or structural changes in the brain); and capturing subtle yet meaningful changes in symptom domains such as sociability, anxiety, and hyperactivity in human FXS clinical trials is challenging with the currently used measures (typically parent/caregiver rating scales). Clinicians, researchers, and the pharmaceutical industry have all had to take a step back and critically evaluate the way we think about how to best optimize future investigations into pharmacologic FXS treatments. As new clinical

  17. The Hartmann procedure for the treatment of colorectal emergencies.

    PubMed

    Hulkko, O A; Laitinen, S T; Haukipuro, K A; Ståhlberg, M J; Juvonen, T S; Kairaluoma, M I

    1986-01-01

    A total of 80 patients with colorectal emergencies were treated by the Hartmann procedure at the Oulu University Central Hospital during the years 1973-1984. The median age of the patients was 65 (18-81) years. The operative indications were: diverticular disease (n = 26), cancer (n = 21), stercoraceous perforation (n = 9), vascular accident (n = 5), radiation damage (n = 4) and miscellaneous (n = 11). 13 patients (16.3%) died after a median of 8 (1-33) days, mostly due to organ failure. 44 of the surviving 67 patients (65.7%) had postoperative complications. Intestinal continuity was restored in 34 patients (42.5%) after a median of 139 (65-794) days. Two patients (5.6%) died after the reconstruction. The permanency of the stoma in half of the surviving patients and the technical difficulties encountered in stoma closure are disadvantages attached to the Hartmann procedure which are sufficiently serious that alternative operative methods should always be considered. PMID:3788398

  18. Emerging desalination technologies for water treatment: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Subramani, Arun; Jacangelo, Joseph G

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, a review of emerging desalination technologies is presented. Several technologies for desalination of municipal and industrial wastewater have been proposed and evaluated, but only certain technologies have been commercialized or are close to commercialization. This review consists of membrane-based, thermal-based and alternative technologies. Membranes based on incorporation of nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes or graphene-based ones show promise as innovative desalination technologies with superior performance in terms of water permeability and salt rejection. However, only nanocomposite membranes have been commercialized while others are still under fundamental developmental stages. Among the thermal-based technologies, membrane distillation and adsorption desalination show the most promise for enhanced performance with the availability of a waste heat source. Several alternative technologies have also been developed recently; those based on capacitive deionization have shown considerable improvements in their salt removal capacity and feed water recovery. In the same category, microbial desalination cells have been shown to desalinate high salinity water without any external energy source, but to date, scale up of the process has not been methodically evaluated. In this paper, advantages and drawbacks of each technology is discussed along with a comparison of performance, water quality and energy consumption. PMID:25770440

  19. Update on New and Emerging Treatments for Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishna, Ganesh; Ithman, Muaid H; Lauriello, John

    2016-06-01

    Although there has been more than 50 years of development, there remains a great need for better antipsychotic medications. This article looks at the recent advances in treatment of schizophrenia. New hypotheses have been suggested that may replace or complement the dopamine hypotheses. The article explores the different novel drugs that impact some of the key neurotransmitter systems currently. Phosphodiesterase 10A inhibitors and α-7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulators constitute the majority. The marketing of these medications eventually may result in change about how schizophrenia is treated. PMID:27216901

  20. New and Emerging Treatment Options for Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Brian E; Chey, William D; Lembo, Anthony J

    2015-04-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder associated with abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, or a mix of symptoms. The pathophysiology of IBS is not completely understood but appears to involve genetics, the gut microbiome, immune activation, altered intestinal permeability, and brain-gut interactions. There is no gold standard for diagnosis. Several sets of symptom-based guidelines exist. Treatment strategies for IBS may include both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches. Lifestyle modifications that aim to improve exercise, sleep, diet, and stress may be warranted. Recent data suggest that a gluten-free diet and a diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs) may benefit some patients. For patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS, treatment options include the synthetic peripheral μ-opioid receptor agonist loperamide, antispasmodic agents, antidepressants, serotonin 5-HT3 antagonists, and the gut-specific antibiotic rifaximin. Ongoing research is evaluating the use of probiotics. For patients with constipation-predominant IBS, therapeutic strategies may include dietary fiber, laxatives, and the prosecretory agents lubiprostone and linaclotide. Research is continuing to optimize the use of available agents and evaluating new approaches to further improve the care of patients with IBS. PMID:26491416

  1. New and Emerging Treatment Options for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Brian E.; Chey, William D.; Lembo, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder associated with abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, or a mix of symptoms. The pathophysiology of IBS is not completely understood but appears to involve genetics, the gut microbiome, immune activation, altered intestinal permeability, and brain-gut interactions. There is no gold standard for diagnosis. Several sets of symptom-based guidelines exist. Treatment strategies for IBS may include both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches. Lifestyle modifications that aim to improve exercise, sleep, diet, and stress may be warranted. Recent data suggest that a gluten-free diet and a diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs) may benefit some patients. For patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS, treatment options include the synthetic peripheral μ-opioid receptor agonist loperamide, antispasmodic agents, antidepressants, serotonin 5-HT3 antagonists, and the gut-specific antibiotic rifaximin. Ongoing research is evaluating the use of probiotics. For patients with constipation-predominant IBS, therapeutic strategies may include dietary fiber, laxatives, and the prosecretory agents lubiprostone and linaclotide. Research is continuing to optimize the use of available agents and evaluating new approaches to further improve the care of patients with IBS. PMID:26491416

  2. Novel and emerging therapies for the treatment of polycythemia vera

    PubMed Central

    Verstovsek, Srdan; Komrokji, Rami S

    2016-01-01

    Polycythemia vera (PV) is a chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm defined by erythrocytosis and often accompanied by leukocytosis and thrombocytosis. Current treatment options, including IFN-α and hydroxyurea, effectively manage PV in many patients. However, some high-risk patients, particularly those who become hydroxyurea-intolerant/resistant, may benefit from IFN-α or new treatment options. A better understanding of PV pathophysiology, including the role of the JAK/STAT pathway, has inspired the development of new therapies. Several JAK inhibitors directly target JAK/STAT pathway activation and have been evaluated in Phase II/III trials with promising results. Pegylated variants of IFN-α, which reduce dosing frequency and toxicity associated with recombinant IFN-α, have yielded favorable efficacy results in Phase II trials. Finally, histone deacetylase inhibitors have been developed to manage PV at the level of chromatin-regulated gene expression. The earliest Phase III results from these next-generation therapies are expected in 2014. PMID:25353086

  3. Current management strategies and emerging treatments for functional dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2013-03-01

    Functional dyspepsia refers to painful and nonpainful symptoms that are perceived to arise in the upper digestive tract but are not secondary to organic, systemic or metabolic diseases. The symptoms of this syndrome often overlap with those of GERD and IBS, making its management far from simple. If Helicobacter pylori infection is diagnosed in patients with functional dyspepsia, it should be treated. In patients with mild or intermittent symptoms, reassurance and lifestyle advice might be sufficient; in patients not responding to these measures, or in those with more severe symptoms, drug therapy should be considered. Both PPIs and prokinetics can be used in initial empirical pharmacotherapy based on symptom patterns--a PPI is more likely to be effective in the presence of retrosternal or epigastric burning or epigastric pain, whereas a prokinetic is more effective in dyspepsia with early satiation or postprandial fullness. Although combinations of PPIs and prokinetics might have additive symptomatic effects, single-drug therapy is initially preferable. Antidepressants or referral to a psychiatrist or psychotherapist can be considered in nonresponders and in those whose symptoms have a marked effect on daily functioning. Despite extensive research, functional dyspepsia treatment often remains unsatisfactory. Better characterization of dyspeptic subgroups and understanding of underlying mechanisms will enable treatment advances to be made in the future. PMID:23381190

  4. Current and emerging therapies for the treatment of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Waalen, Jill

    2010-01-01

    Osteoporosis represents a weakening of bone tissue due to an imbalance in the dynamic processes of bone formation and bone resorption that are continually ongoing within bone tissue. Most currently available osteoporosis therapies are antiresorptive agents. Over the past decade, bisphosphonates, notably alendronate and risedronate, have become the dominant agents with newer bisphosphonates such as ibandronate and zoledronic acid following a trend of less frequent dosing regimens. Synthetic estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) continue to be developed as drugs that maintain the bone-protective effects of estrogen while avoiding its associated adverse side effects. Currently available agents of this class include raloxifene, the only SERM available in the United States (US), and lasofoxifene and bazedoxifene, available in Europe. Calcitonin, usually administered as a nasal spray, completes the list of currently approved antiresorptive agents, while parathyroid hormone analogs represent the only anabolic agents currently approved in both the US and Europe. Strontium ranelate is an additional agent available in Europe but not the US that has both anabolic and antiresorptive activity. New agents expected to further expand therapeutic options include denosumab, a monoclonal antibody inhibitor of the resorptive enzyme cathepsin K, which is in the final stages of Food and Drug Administration approval. Other agents in preclinical development include those targeting specific molecules of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway involved in stimulating bone formation by osteoblast cells. This review discusses the use of currently available agents as well as highlighting emerging agents expected to bring significant changes to the approach to osteoporosis therapy in the near future.

  5. 42 CFR 483.372 - Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an emergency safety intervention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.372 Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an emergency safety intervention. (a... participation under the Medicaid program that reasonably ensure that— (1) A resident will be transferred...

  6. 42 CFR 483.372 - Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an emergency safety intervention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.372 Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an emergency safety intervention. (a... participation under the Medicaid program that reasonably ensure that— (1) A resident will be transferred...

  7. 42 CFR 483.372 - Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an emergency safety intervention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.372 Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an emergency safety intervention. (a... participation under the Medicaid program that reasonably ensure that— (1) A resident will be transferred...

  8. 42 CFR 483.372 - Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an emergency safety intervention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.372 Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an emergency safety intervention. (a... participation under the Medicaid program that reasonably ensure that— (1) A resident will be transferred...

  9. Emergency treatment options for pediatric traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Exo, J; Smith, C; Smith, R; Bell, MJ

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading killer of children and is a major public health problem around the world. Using general principles of neurocritical care, various treatment strategies have been developed to attempt to restore homeostasis to the brain and allow brain healing, including mechanical factors, cerebrospinal fluid diversion, hyperventilation, hyperosmolar therapies, barbiturates and hypothermia. Careful application of these therapies, normally in a step-wise fashion as intracranial injuries evolve, is necessary in order to attain maximal neurological outcome for these children. It is hopeful that new therapies, such as early hypothermia or others currently in preclinical trials, will ultimately improve outcome and quality of life for children after traumatic brain injury. PMID:20191093

  10. [EMERGENCY TREATMENT OF BLEEDING IN PATIENTS TAKING WARFARIN].

    PubMed

    Prasolov, N V; Shulutko, E M; Bulanov, A Yu; Yatskov, K V; Shcherbakov, O V

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulant therapy with vitamin K antagonists (AVK) is an effective treatment and prevention of thrombosis. One of the major disadvantages of the AVK is a risk for serious bleeding. Prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC), fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and vitamin K1 are available for control of these situations. The experience of special team ofthe Scientific Center for Hematology was the basis for presented retrospective study. Three regimens of warfarin-related bleeding were compared: PCC+ VK for several bleeding, FFP+ VK for different clinical situations and VKfor light bleeding. PCC showed himself as effective and safe hemostatic agent. Transfusions of FFP were sometimes not effective, sometimes led to TACO. Supplementation of vitamin K1 for patients of I and II groups provided more stable control of hemostasis. In III group VK vas effective to stop bleeding. Two impotent sings for conclusion: necessary of laboratory monitoring, TEG first of all; individual balance of hemostasis base of bleeding or thrombotic risks. PMID:26148369

  11. Emerging treatments for multiple myeloma: beyond immunomodulatory drugs and bortezomib.

    PubMed

    Mitsiades, Constantine S; Hideshima, Teru; Chauhan, Dharminder; McMillin, Douglas W; Klippel, Steffen; Laubach, Jacob P; Munshi, Nikhil C; Anderson, Kenneth C; Richardson, Paul G

    2009-04-01

    The successful clinical development of thalidomide, bortezomib, and lenalidomide not only transformed the therapeutic management of multiple myeloma (MM) but also catalyzed a renewed interest in the development of additional classes of novel agents for this disease. This review focuses on a series of new therapeutics that have shown promising preclinical results, as well as encouraging safety profiles and early evidence of anti-MM activity in clinical studies, either alone or in combination with other, conventional or novel, anti-MM treatments. These agents include second-generation proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory agents, as well as members of other therapeutic classes, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDAC), heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors, and the alkylphospholipid Akt inhibitor perifosine. PMID:19389500

  12. Emerging surgical therapies in the treatment of pediatric epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Karsy, Michael; Guan, Jian; Ducis, Katrina; Bollo, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    In the approximately 1% of children affected by epilepsy, pharmacoresistance and early age of seizure onset are strongly correlated with poor cognitive outcomes, depression, anxiety, developmental delay, and impaired activities of daily living. These children often require multiple surgical procedures, including invasive diagnostic procedures with intracranial electrodes to identify the seizure-onset zone. The recent development of minimally invasive surgical techniques, including stereotactic electroencephalography (SEEG) and MRI-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (MRgLITT), and new applications of neurostimulation, such as responsive neurostimulation (RNS), are quickly changing the landscape of the surgical management of pediatric epilepsy. In this review, the authors discuss these various technologies, their current applications, and limitations in the treatment of pediatric drug-resistant epilepsy, as well as areas for future research. The development of minimally invasive diagnostic and ablative surgical techniques together with new paradigms in neurostimulation hold vast potential to improve the efficacy and reduce the morbidity of the surgical management of children with drug-resistant epilepsy. PMID:27186523

  13. Emerging surgical therapies in the treatment of pediatric epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Karsy, Michael; Guan, Jian; Ducis, Katrina

    2016-01-01

    In the approximately 1% of children affected by epilepsy, pharmacoresistance and early age of seizure onset are strongly correlated with poor cognitive outcomes, depression, anxiety, developmental delay, and impaired activities of daily living. These children often require multiple surgical procedures, including invasive diagnostic procedures with intracranial electrodes to identify the seizure-onset zone. The recent development of minimally invasive surgical techniques, including stereotactic electroencephalography (SEEG) and MRI-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (MRgLITT), and new applications of neurostimulation, such as responsive neurostimulation (RNS), are quickly changing the landscape of the surgical management of pediatric epilepsy. In this review, the authors discuss these various technologies, their current applications, and limitations in the treatment of pediatric drug-resistant epilepsy, as well as areas for future research. The development of minimally invasive diagnostic and ablative surgical techniques together with new paradigms in neurostimulation hold vast potential to improve the efficacy and reduce the morbidity of the surgical management of children with drug-resistant epilepsy. PMID:27186523

  14. Emergency treatment of a snake bite: Pearls from literature

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Syed Moied; Ahmed, Mohib; Nadeem, Abu; Mahajan, Jyotsna; Choudhary, Adarash; Pal, Jyotishka

    2008-01-01

    Snake bite is a well-known occupational hazard amongst farmers, plantation workers, and other outdoor workers and results in much morbidity and mortality throughout the world. This occupational hazard is no more an issue restricted to a particular part of the world; it has become a global issue. Accurate statistics of the incidence of snakebite and its morbidity and mortality throughout the world does not exist; however, it is certain to be higher than what is reported. This is because even today most of the victims initially approach traditional healers for treatment and many are not even registered in the hospital. Hence, registering such patients is an important goal if we are to have accurate statistics and reduce the morbidity and mortality due to snakebite. World Health Organization/South East Asian Region Organisation (WHO/SEARO) has published guidelines, specific for the South East Asian region, for the clinical management of snakebites. The same guidelines may be applied for managing snakebite patients in other parts of the world also, since no other professional body has come up with any other evidence-based guidelines. In this article we highlight the incidence and clinical features of different types of snakebite and the management guidelines as per the WHO/SEARO recommendation. PMID:19561988

  15. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis: emerging targeted therapies to optimize treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Milic, Sandra; Mikolasevic, Ivana; Krznaric-Zrnic, Irena; Stanic, Marija; Poropat, Goran; Stimac, Davor; Vlahovic-Palcevski, Vera; Orlic, Lidija

    2015-01-01

    Diet and lifestyle changes have led to worldwide increases in the prevalences of obesity and metabolic syndrome, resulting in substantially greater incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and is related to diabetes, insulin resistance, central obesity, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is an entity that describes liver inflammation due to NAFLD. Growing evidence suggests that NAFLD is a multisystem disease with a clinical burden that is not only confined to liver-related morbidity and mortality, but that also affects several extra-hepatic organs and regulatory pathways. Thus, NAFLD is considered an important public health issue, but there is currently no effective therapy for all NAFLD patients in the general population. Studies seeking optimal therapy for NAFLD and NASH have not yet led to development of a universal protocol for treating this growing problem. Several pharmacological agents have been studied in an effort to improve insulin resistance and the proinflammatory mediators that may be responsible for NASH progression. Cardiovascular risk factors are highly prevalent among NASH patients, and the backbone of treatment regimens for these patients still comprises general lifestyle interventions, including dietary changes and increased physical activity. Vitamin E and thiazolidinedione derivatives are currently the most evidence-based therapeutic options, but only limited clinical evidence is available regarding their long-term efficacy and safety. Vitamin D and renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system blockers are promising drugs that are currently being intensively investigated for use in NAFLD/NASH patients. PMID:26316717

  16. Emerging Drugs for the Treatment of Diabetic Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Tecilazich, Francesco; Dinh, Thanh L.; Veves, Aristidis

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Diabetic ulcers are chronic non-healing ulcerations that despite the available medical tools still result in high amputation rates. Growing evidence suggests that alteration of the biochemical milieu of the chronic wound plays a significant role in diabetic wound healing impairment. Areas covered The basic pathophysiology and the conventional treatment strategy of diabetic foot ulcers have been reviewed in the first section. In the second part we describe the most up-to-date bench and translational research in the field. The third section focuses on the drugs currently under development and the ongoing clinical trials evaluating their safety and efficacy. Finally, we analyze the major drug development issues and the possible scientific approaches to overcome them. Expert opinion Significant strides in understanding the chronic wound development have led to the development of topical therapies to address aberrant expression of growth factors and overexpression of inflammatory cytokines. Current research in our lab suggests that in while decreased growth factor expression occurs at the local wound level, increased systemic serum levels of growth factors suggest growth factor resistance. PMID:23687931

  17. Pancreatic cancer: optimizing treatment options, new, and emerging targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Chiorean, Elena Gabriela; Coveler, Andrew L

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the US and is expected to become the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the next decade. Despite 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin with irinotecan and oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX) and gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel significantly improving outcomes for metastatic cancer, refractory disease still poses significant challenges. Difficulties with early detection and the inherent chemo- and radio-resistant nature of this malignancy led to attempts to define the sequential biology of pancreatic cancer in order to improve survival outcomes. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is characterized by several germline or acquired genetic mutations, the most common being KRAS (90%), CDK2NA (90%), TP53 (75%–90%), DPC4/SMAD4 (50%). In addition, the tumor microenvironment, chemoresistant cancer stem cells, and the desmoplastic stroma have been the target of some promising clinical investigations. Among the core pathways reproducibly shown to lead the development and progression of this disease, DNA repair, apoptosis, G1/S cell cycle transition, KRAS, Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, TGF-beta, and other cell invasion pathways, have been the target of “precision therapeutics”. No single molecularly targeted therapeutic though has been uniformly successful, probably due to the tumor heterogeneity, but biomarker research is evolving and it hopes to select more patients likely to benefit. Recent reports note activity with immunotherapies such as CD40 agonists, CCR2 inhibitors, cancer vaccines, and novel combinations against the immunosuppressive tumor milieu are ongoing. While many obstacles still exist, clearly we are making progress in deciphering the heterogeneity within pancreatic cancers. Integrating conventional and immunological targeting will be the key to effective treatment of this deadly disease. PMID:26185420

  18. Midostaurin: an emerging treatment for acute myeloid leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Gallogly, Molly Megan; Lazarus, Hillard M

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hematologic malignancy that carries a poor prognosis and has garnered few treatment advances in the last few decades. Mutation of the internal tandem duplication (ITD) region of fms-like tyrosine kinase (FLT3) is considered high risk for decreased response and overall survival. Midostaurin is a Type III receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor found to inhibit FLT3 and other receptor tyrosine kinases, including platelet-derived growth factor receptors, cyclin-dependent kinase 1, src, c-kit, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. In preclinical studies, midostaurin exhibited broad-spectrum antitumor activity toward a wide range of tumor xenografts, as well as an FLT3-ITD-driven mouse model of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Midostaurin is orally administered and generally well tolerated as a single agent; hematologic toxicity increases substantially when administered in combination with standard induction chemotherapy. Clinical trials primarily have focused on relapsed/refractory AML and MDS and included single- and combination-agent studies. Administration of midostaurin to relapsed/refractory MDS and AML patients confers a robust anti-blast response sufficient to bridge a minority of patients to transplant. In combination with histone deacetylase inhibitors, responses appear comparable to historic controls, while the addition of midostaurin to standard induction chemotherapy may prolong survival in FLT3-ITD mutant patients. The response of some wild-type (WT)-FLT3 patients to midostaurin therapy is consistent with midostaurin’s ability to inhibit WT-FLT3 in vitro, and also may reflect overexpression of WT-FLT3 in those patients and/or off-target effects such as inhibition of kinases other than FLT3. Midostaurin represents a well-tolerated, easily administered oral agent with the potential to bridge mutant and WT-FLT3 AML patients to transplant and possibly deepen response to induction chemotherapy. Ongoing studies are

  19. Emerging concepts about prenatal genesis, aberrant metabolism and treatment paradigms in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Witchel, Selma F; Recabarren, Sergio E; González, Frank; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Cheang, Kai I; Duleba, Antoni J; Legro, Richard S; Homburg, Roy; Pasquali, Renato; Lobo, Rogerio A; Zouboulis, Christos C; Kelestimur, Fahrettin; Fruzzetti, Franca; Futterweit, Walter; Norman, Robert J; Abbott, David H

    2012-12-01

    The interactive nature of the 8th Annual Meeting of the Androgen Excess and PCOS Society Annual Meeting in Munich, Germany (AEPCOS 2010) and subsequent exchanges between speakers led to emerging concepts in PCOS regarding its genesis, metabolic dysfunction, and clinical treatment of inflammation, metabolic dysfunction, anovulation and hirsutism. Transition of care in congenital adrenal hyperplasia from pediatric to adult providers emerged as a potential model for care transition involving PCOS adolescents. PMID:22661293

  20. Akt inhibition improves irinotecan treatment and prevents cell emergence by switching the senescence response to apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Vétillard, Alexandra; Jonchère, Barbara; Moreau, Marie; Toutain, Bertrand; Henry, Cécile; Fontanel, Simon; Bernard, Anne-Charlotte; Campone, Mario; Guette, Catherine; Coqueret, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Activated in response to chemotherapy, senescence is a tumor suppressive mechanism that induces a permanent loss of proliferation. However, in response to treatment, it is not really known how cells can escape senescence and how irreversible or incomplete this pathway is. We have recently described that cells that escape senescence are more transformed than non-treated parental cells, they resist anoikis and rely on Mcl-1. In this study, we further characterize this emergence in response to irinotecan, a first line treatment used in colorectal cancer. Our results indicate that Akt was activated as a feedback pathway during the early step of senescence. The inhibition of the kinase prevented cell emergence and improved treatment efficacy, both in vitro and in vivo. This improvement was correlated with senescence inhibition, p21waf1 downregulation and a concomitant activation of apoptosis due to Noxa upregulation and Mcl-1 inactivation. The inactivation of Noxa prevented apoptosis and increased the number of emergent cells. Using either RNA interference or p21waf1-deficient cells, we further confirmed that an intact p53-p21-senescence pathway favored cell emergence and that its downregulation improved treatment efficacy through apoptosis induction. Therefore, although senescence is an efficient suppressive mechanism, it also generates more aggressive cells as a consequence of apoptosis inhibition. We therefore propose that senescence-inducing therapies should be used sequentially with drugs favoring cell death such as Akt inhibitors. This should reduce cell emergence and tumor relapse through a combined induction of senescence and apoptosis. PMID:26485768

  1. Emerging from Depression: Treatment of Adolescent Depression Using the Major Treatment Models of Adult Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Kathleen M.

    Noting that adolescents who commit suicide are often clinically depressed, this paper examines various approaches in the treatment of depression. Major treatment models of adult depression, which can be directly applied to the treatment of the depressed adolescent, are described. Major treatment models and selected research studies are reviewed in…

  2. How Much are Emergency Medicine Specialists’ Decisions Reliable in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pediatric Fractures?

    PubMed Central

    Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen; Zohrevandi, Behzad; Saheb-Ekhtiari, Khashayar; Hashemi-Motlagh, Keyvan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Considering the importance of an early diagnosis and proper decision-making in regards to the treatment of pediatric distal radius and elbow fractures, this study examines emergency medicine specialists’ accuracy in the diagnosis and treatment of these patients. Methods: From 2012 and 2013, children less than 14 years old who were referred to an academic hospital emergency department with elbow or distal radius fractures were enrolled. Initially, patients were examined by an emergency medicine specialist and then they were referred to an orthopedic surgeon. Type of fracture and the proposed treatment of two specialists were compared. Results: In total, there were 108 patients (54 patients in each group) with a mean age of 8.1±3.3 years. Identical diagnosis in 48 cases (88.9%) of distal radius and 36 cases (66.7%) of elbow trauma were observed. We found a difference between diagnosis of the two specialists in diagnosing lateral condyle of the humerus fracture in the elbow group and growth plate fracture in the distal radius fracture group, but the differences were not significant. Among 108 patients, 70 patients (64.8%) received identical treatment. Conclusion: Although the emergency medicine specialists responded similarly to the orthopedic specialists in the diagnosis of pediatric distal radius and elbow fractures, diagnosis of more complicated fractures such as lateral condylar humoral fractures, distal radius growth plate and for choosing the proper treatment option, merits further education. PMID:26894221

  3. Antibody-drug conjugates—an emerging class of cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Diamantis, Nikolaos; Banerji, Udai

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are an emerging novel class of anticancer treatment agents that combines the selectivity of targeted treatment with the cytotoxic potency of chemotherapy drugs. New linker technology associated with novel highly potent cytotoxic payloads has permitted the development of more effective and safe ADCs. In recent years, two ADCs have been licensed, T-DM1 and brentuximab vedotin, and are already establishing their place in cancer treatment. A plethora of ADCs are being investigated in phases I and II trials, emerging data of which appears promising. As we deepen our understanding of what makes a successful ADC, an increasing number of ADCs will likely become viable treatment options as single agents or in combination with chemotherapy. This review will present the philosophy underlying ADCs, their main characteristics and current research developments with a focus on ADCs in solid tumours. PMID:26742008

  4. Emerging Standards of Care for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Panic Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beamish, Patrica M.; Granello, Darcy Haag; Granello, Paul F.; McSteen, Patricia B.; Stone, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Proposes eight emerging standards of care, based on a literature review, for the diagnosis and treatment of panic disorder without agoraphobia in adults. The diagnostic criteria were particularly analyzed in terms of comorbid psychological disorders, medical disorders, and substances that mimic panic symptoms. Defines minimal professional conduct.…

  5. 75 FR 80762 - Medicare Program; Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act: Applicability to Hospital and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... rule to address two policies related to the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA). Specifically, this document serves as a request for comments regarding our need to revisit the policies articulated in the September 9, 2003 Federal Register (68 FR 53243) and the August 19, 2008 Federal...

  6. The Emergence of Suicidal Ideation during the Post-Hospital Treatment of Depressed Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudiano, Brandon A.; Andover, Margaret S.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2008-01-01

    There is a paucity of research on the emergence of suicidal ideation in recently hospitalized patients undergoing treatment for depression. As part of a larger clinical trial, patients (N = 103) with major depression without suicidal ideation at hospital discharge were followed for up to 6 months while receiving study-related outpatient…

  7. Emergent treatments based on the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder: A selective review.

    PubMed

    Brady, Roscoe O; Keshavan, Matcheri

    2015-12-01

    Bipolar disorder is a chronic psychiatric disorder that is a cause of significant symptomatology even in the setting of optimal treatment. Most current treatments are developed from serendipity, and not based on known pathophysiology. In this review we examine a number of somatic and pharmacologic therapies that are poised to become part of the armamentarium of interventions to treat bipolar illness. As a group, these interventions are derived from a growing understanding of the biological underpinnings of bipolar disorders. We will look at emergent treatments based on our understanding of the molecular biology, neuroanatomy, and the genetics of bipolar disorder. PMID:26525885

  8. Emerging strategies for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis: promise and limitations?

    PubMed Central

    Yew, Wing Wai; Koh, Won-Jung

    2016-01-01

    A worsening scenario of drug-resistant tuberculosis has increased the need for new treatment strategies to tackle this worldwide emergency. There is a pressing need to simplify and shorten the current 6-month treatment regimen for drug-susceptible tuberculosis. Rifamycins and fluoroquinolones, as well as several new drugs, are potential candidates under evaluation. At the same time, treatment outcomes of patients with drug-resistant tuberculosis should be improved through optimizing the use of fluoroquinolones, repurposed agents and newly developed drugs. In this context, the safety and tolerance of new therapeutic approaches must be addressed. PMID:26767853

  9. Efficacy of Fifteen Emerging Interventions for the Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Olivia; Varker, Tracey; Forbes, David; Phelps, Andrea; Dell, Lisa; DiBattista, Ashley; Ralph, Naomi; O'Donnell, Meaghan

    2016-02-01

    Although there is an abundance of novel interventions for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), often their efficacy remains unknown. This systematic review assessed the evidence for 15 new or novel interventions for the treatment of PTSD. Studies that investigated changes to PTSD symptoms following the delivery of any 1 of the 15 interventions of interest were identified through systematic literature searches. There were 19 studies that met the inclusion criteria for this study. Eligible studies were assessed against methodological quality criteria and data were extracted. The majority of the 19 studies were of poor quality, hampered by methodological limitations, such as small sample sizes and lack of control group. There were 4 interventions, however, stemming from a mind-body philosophy (acupuncture, emotional freedom technique, mantra-based meditation, and yoga) that had moderate quality evidence from mostly small- to moderate-sized randomized controlled trials. The active components, however, of these promising emerging interventions and how they related to or were distinct from established treatments remain unclear. The majority of emerging interventions for the treatment of PTSD currently have an insufficient level of evidence supporting their efficacy, despite their increasing popularity. Further well-designed controlled trials of emerging interventions for PTSD are required. PMID:26749196

  10. CURVES: a mnemonic for determining medical decision-making capacity and providing emergency treatment in the acute setting.

    PubMed

    Chow, Grant V; Czarny, Matthew J; Hughes, Mark T; Carrese, Joseph A

    2010-02-01

    The evaluation of medical decision-making capacity and provision of emergency treatment in the acute care setting may present a significant challenge for both physicians-in-training and attending physicians. Although absolutely essential to the proper care of patients, recalling criteria for decision-making capacity may prove cumbersome during a medical emergency. Likewise, the requirements for providing emergency treatment must be fulfilled. This article presents a mnemonic (CURVES: Choose and Communicate, Understand, Reason, Value, Emergency, Surrogate) that addresses the abilities a patient must possess in order to have decision-making capacity, as well as the essentials of emergency treatment. It may be used in conjunction with, or in place of, lengthier capacity-assessment tools, particularly when time is of the essence. In addition, the proposed tool assists the practitioner in deciding whether emergency treatment may be administered, and in documenting medical decisions made during an acute event. PMID:20133288

  11. Benefits of Early Roflumilast Treatment After Hospital or Emergency Department Discharge for a COPD Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Qing; Mocarski, Michelle; Sun, Shawn X.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic lower respiratory disease, which includes chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), is the third leading cause of death in the United States. Roflumilast is an oral, once-daily, selective phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor approved for reducing the risk for COPD exacerbations in patients with severe COPD associated with chronic bronchitis and a history of exacerbations. Objectives To evaluate the effects of roflumilast treatment timing on COPD exacerbation rates (primary objective) and on resource utilization and healthcare costs (secondary objective) after hospital or emergency department discharge associated with a COPD exacerbation. Methods In this retrospective cohort study, claims data from March 2011 to March 2013 were extracted from Truven Health MarketScan combined commercial healthcare claims and Medicare supplemental claims databases and were analyzed to compare the exacerbation rates and the healthcare resource utilization and costs between the early roflumilast treatment (treatment initiation ≤30 days after hospital or emergency department discharge) and the delayed roflumilast treatment (treatment initiation 31–180 days after discharge) cohorts. Multivariate logistic regression and generalized linear models with log-link function and gamma distribution were adjusted for age, sex, insurance plan type, COPD disease complexity, and comorbidities. Results A total of 995 patients (N = 280 early roflumilast treatment, N = 715 delayed roflumilast treatment) were included. Compared with the delayed roflumilast treatment group, patients in the early roflumilast treatment group were 39% less likely to have an exacerbation after hospital discharge (P = .004). The patients receiving early roflumilast treatment also had 42% (P = .003) and 37% (P = .005) lower risks for COPD-related and all-cause rehospitalizations, respectively, than patients in the delayed roflumilast treatment group. Significantly fewer patients receiving early roflumilast

  12. Differentiating Types of Wide-Complex Tachycardia to Determine Appropriate Treatment in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    deSouza, Ian S; Peterson, Alanna C; Marill, Keith A

    2015-07-01

    Wide-complex tachycardia is a rare disease entity among patients presenting to the emergency department. However, due to its potential life-threatening nature, emergency clinicians must know how to assess and manage this condition. Wide-complex tachycardia encompasses a range of cardiac dysrhythmias, some of which can be difficult to distinguish and may require specific treatment approaches. This review summarizes the etiology and pathophysiology of wide-complex tachycardia, describes the differential diagnosis, and presents an evidence-based approach to identification of the different types of tachycardias through the use of a thorough history and physical examination, vagal maneuvers, electrocardiography, and adenosine. The treatment options and disposition for patients with various wide-complex tachycardias are also discussed, with attention to special circumstances and select controversial/contemporary topics. PMID:26308484

  13. Emerging Technology Summary. ACID EXTRACTION TREATMENT SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF METAL CONTAMINATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Acid Extraction Treatment System (AETS) is intended to reduce the concentrations and/or teachability of heavy metals in contaminated soils so the soil can be returned to the site from which it originated. The objective of the project was to determine the effectiveness and com...

  14. Current and emerging therapeutic options for the treatment of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Claudio A; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Chagas’ disease is an endemic disease in Latin America caused by a unicellular parasite (Trypanosoma cruzi) that affects almost 18 million people. This condition involves the heart, causing heart failure, arrhythmias, heart block, thromboembolism, stroke, and sudden death. In this article, we review the current and emerging treatment of Chagas’ cardiomyopathy focusing mostly on management of heart failure and arrhythmias. Heart failure therapeutical options including drugs, stem cells and heart transplantation are revised. Antiarrhythmic drugs, catheter ablation, and intracardiac devices are discussed as well. Finally, the evidence for a potential role of specific antiparasitic treatment for the prevention of cardiovascular disease is reviewed. PMID:20730015

  15. Wound emergencies: the importance of assessment, documentation, and early treatment using a wound electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Golinko, Michael S; Clark, Sunday; Rennert, Robert; Flattau, Anna; Boulton, Andrew J M; Brem, Harold

    2009-05-01

    Chronic wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers, venous ulcers, and pressure ulcers are a major source of morbidity and mortality. To describe wound characteristics associated with a wound emergency, the Wound Electronic Medical Records (WEMR) of 200 consecutive admissions (139 patients, average number of admissions 1.4) to a dedicated inpatient wound healing unit over a period of 5 months were retrospectively reviewed. Patient mean age was 62 +/- 16 years, 59% were men, 27% had a foot ulcer and diabetes mellitus, and 29% had venous ulcers. Presenting signs and symptoms included wound pain, cellulitis, nonpurulent drainage, and undermining, but few presented with classic local clinical signs of infection. Treatment consisted of sharp debridement with deep tissue culture and pathology from the wound base and/or systemic antibiotics. Twenty-percent (20%) of patients had pathology-confirmed and 38% had pathology- or radiology-confirmed osteomyelitis on admission, supporting that new or increasing wound pain, cellulitis, and/or nonpurulent drainage or presence of significant undermining may be indicative of an invasive infection and that patients presenting with these signs and symptoms require an immediate treatment plan and consideration of hospital admission. Use of an objective documentation system such as the WEMR may help alert clinicians to subtle wound changes that require aggressive treatment; thereby, avoiding emergency room visits and hospital admissions. Future research is needed utilizing the WEMR across multiple medical centers to further define criteria for a chronic wound emergency. PMID:19471049

  16. Treatment of schizophrenia with antipsychotics in Norwegian emergency wards, a cross-sectional national study

    PubMed Central

    Kroken, Rune A; Johnsen, Erik; Ruud, Torleif; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Jørgensen, Hugo A

    2009-01-01

    Background Surveys on prescription patterns for antipsychotics in the Scandinavian public health system are scarce despite the prevalent use of these drugs. The clinical differences between antipsychotic drugs are mainly in the areas of safety and tolerability, and international guidelines for the treatment of schizophrenia offer rational strategies to minimize the burden of side effects related to antipsychotic treatment. The implementation of treatment guidelines in clinical practice have proven difficult to achieve, as reflected by major variations in the prescription patterns of antipsychotics between different comparable regions and countries. The objective of this study was to evaluate the practice of treatment of schizophrenic patients with antipsychotics at discharge from acute inpatient settings at a national level. Methods Data from 486 discharges of patients from emergency inpatient treatment of schizophrenia were collected during a three-month period in 2005; the data were collected in a large national study that covered 75% of Norwegian hospitals receiving inpatients for acute treatment. Antipsychotic treatment, demographic variables, scores from the Global Assessment of Functioning and Health of the Nation Outcome Scales and information about comorbid conditions and prior treatment were analyzed to seek predictors for nonadherence to guidelines. Results In 7.6% of the discharges no antipsychotic treatment was given; of the remaining discharges, 35.6% were prescribed antipsychotic polypharmacy and 41.9% were prescribed at least one first-generation antipsychotic (FGA). The mean chlorpromazine equivalent dose was 450 (SD 347, range 25–2800). In the multivariate regression analyses, younger age, previous inpatient treatment in the previous 12 months before index hospitalization, and a comorbid diagnosis of personality disorder or mental retardation predicted antipsychotic polypharmacy, while previous inpatient treatment in the previous 12 months also

  17. Novel compounds for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: emerging therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Wilton, Steve D; Fletcher, Sue

    2011-01-01

    The identification of dystrophin and the causative role of mutations in this gene in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (D/BMD) was expected to lead to timely development of effective therapies. Despite over 20 years of research, corticosteroids remain the only available pharmacological treatment for DMD, although significant benefits and extended life have resulted from advances in the clinical care and management of DMD individuals. Effective treatment of DMD will require dystrophin restitution in skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscles and nonmuscle tissues; however, modulation of muscle loss and regeneration has the potential to play an important role in altering the natural history of DMD, particularly in combination with other treatments. Emerging biological, molecular, and small molecule therapeutics are showing promise in ameliorating this devastating disease, and it is anticipated that regulatory environments will need to display some flexibility in order to accommodate the new treatment paradigms. PMID:23776365

  18. Emerging treatments in Castleman disease – a critical appraisal of siltuximab

    PubMed Central

    Koff, Jean L; Lonial, Sagar

    2016-01-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is a rare, heterogeneous lymphoproliferative disorder for which no standard of care currently exists. Evidence that the pathophysiology of CD is fueled by excessive interleukin-6 (IL-6) has led to considerable interest in therapeutic targeting of this cytokine. Siltuximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody to IL-6, has thus emerged as a promising treatment option in a disease lacking efficacious therapy. Here, we review the findings of recent studies evaluating single-agent siltuximab treatment in CD, including the first-ever randomized clinical trial in this disease. Although much more work is needed to establish a standardized treatment approach, siltuximab appears to be a safe and effective treatment for patients with newly diagnosed and previously treated CD. PMID:26869762

  19. Treatment of patients with immune thrombocytopenia admitted to the emergency room.

    PubMed

    Bavunoğlu, Işıl; Eşkazan, Ahmet Emre; Ar, Muhlis Cem; Cengiz, Mahir; Yavuzer, Serap; Salihoğlu, Ayşe; Öngören, Şeniz; Tunçkale, Aydın; Soysal, Teoman

    2016-08-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is the most frequent cause of acquired thrombocytopenia. In adult ITP patients, corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) are used as first-line treatment. The aim of the present study was to investigate retrospectively the demographic and etiologic characteristics of patients with ITP admitted to the emergency room at our hospital. Seventy-five adult patients with ITP were included, and demographic data, bleeding characteristics, etiologic features and responses to treatments were evaluated retrospectively. Fifty-six patients (75 %) were female, and the median age was 43 years. Eighteen patients had a history of ITP, whereas in 57, thrombocytopenia was identified for the first time. During admission, the median platelet count was 5 × 10(9)/L. Cutaneous and/or mucosal bleeding was the most common clinical feature. High-dose dexamethasone was administered in 60 episodes, whereas IVIg and conventional-dose methylprednisolone were used in nine and six episodes, respectively. The overall response rate of the entire cohort following first-line treatments was 67 %, and complete remission was achieved in 31 patients, 19 patients achieved partial remission, and 25 patients were non-responders. In cases with life-threatening bleeding, concomitant infection, post-traumatic bleeding and need for emergency surgery, IVIg can be used as the first line of treatment option in addition to platelet transfusions. PMID:27129318

  20. Bringing the Hospital to the Patient: First Treatment of Stroke Patients at the Emergency Site

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Silke; Kostpopoulos, Panagiotis; Haass, Anton; Helwig, Stefan; Keller, Isabel; Licina, Tamara; Schlechtriemen, Thomas; Roth, Christian; Papanagiotou, Panagiotis; Zimmer, Anna; Vierra, Julio; Körner, Heiko; Schmidt, Kathrin; Romann, Marie-Sophie; Alexandrou, Maria; Yilmaz, Umut; Grunwald, Iris; Kubulus, Darius; Lesmeister, Martin; Ziegeler, Stephan; Pattar, Alexander; Golinski, Martin; Liu, Yang; Volk, Thomas; Bertsch, Thomas; Reith, Wolfgang; Fassbender, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Background Early treatment with rt-PA is critical for favorable outcome of acute stroke. However, only a very small proportion of stroke patients receive this treatment, as most arrive at hospital too late to be eligible for rt-PA therapy. Methods and Findings We developed a “Mobile Stroke Unit”, consisting of an ambulance equipped with computed tomography, a point-of-care laboratory system for complete stroke laboratory work-up, and telemedicine capabilities for contact with hospital experts, to achieve delivery of etiology-specific and guideline-adherent stroke treatment at the site of the emergency, well before arrival at the hospital. In a departure from current practice, stroke patients could be differentially treated according to their ischemic or hemorrhagic etiology even in the prehospital phase of stroke management. Immediate diagnosis of cerebral ischemia and exclusion of thrombolysis contraindications enabled us to perform prehospital rt-PA thrombolysis as bridging to later intra-arterial recanalization in one patient. In a complementary patient with cerebral hemorrhage, prehospital diagnosis allowed immediate initiation of hemorrhage-specific blood pressure management and telemedicine consultation regarding surgery. Call-to-therapy-decision times were 35 minutes. Conclusion This preliminary study proves the feasibility of guideline-adherent, etiology-specific and causal treatment of acute stroke directly at the emergency site. PMID:21060800

  1. The Basics of Alcohol Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Vaca, Federico E.; Winn, Diane

    2007-01-01

    Nearly eight million emergency department (ED) visits are attributed to alcohol every year in the United States. A substantial proportion is due to trauma. In 2005, 16,885 people were killed as a result of alcohol-related motor vehicle crashes. Patients with alcohol-use problems (AUPs) are not only more likely to drive after drinking but are also at greater risk for serious alcohol-related illness and injury. Emergency departments have an important and unique opportunity to identify these patients and intervene during the “teachable moment” of an ED visit. The American College of Emergency Physicians, Emergency Nurses Association, American College of Surgeons-Committee on Trauma, American Public Health Association, and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, have identified Alcohol Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) as a pivotal injury- and illness-prevention strategy to improve the health and well-being of ED patients. We provide a general overview of the basis and need for integrating SBIRT into EDs. Models of SBIRT, as well as benefits and challenges to its implementation, are also discussed. PMID:19561690

  2. Behavioral and emerging pharmacologic treatment options for cognitive impairment in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Sophia; Schulz, S Charles

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, the goal of treatment for individuals with schizophrenia has shifted from symptom control to functional recovery. For recovery to occur, the substantial cognitive impairments associated with this disorder must be addressed. Advances in neuroscience have paved the way for the development of more effective behavioral and pharmacologic treatments. Behavioral interventions such as cognitive training are tapping into the innate plasticity and adaptive qualities of the brain. Emerging pharmacologic treatments are targeting new neurotransmitters and systems, such as the glutamatergic system and the nicotinic-cholinergic system, which are involved in the cognitive and sensory deficits that lead to impairment. The best chances for recovery will most likely occur by combining behavioral and pharmacologic interventions. PMID:26919053

  3. Recent Patents and Emerging Therapeutics in the Treatment of Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Gyan P.; Tamboli, Viral; Jwala, Jwala; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2011-01-01

    Ocular allergy is an inflammatory response of the conjunctival mucosa that also affects the cornea and eyelids. Allergic conjunctivitis includes seasonal allergic conjunctivitis (SAC), perennial allergic conjunctivitis (PAC), vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC), atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC) and giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC). In general, allergic conditions involve mast cell degranulation that leads to release of inflammatory mediators and activation of enzymatic cascades generating pro-inflammatory mediators. In chronic ocular inflammatory disorders associated with mast cell activation such as VKC and AKC constant inflammatory response is observed due to predominance of inflammatory mediators such as eosinophils and Th2-generated cytokines. Antihistamines, mast-cell stabilizers, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, corticosteroids and immunomodulatory agents are commonly indicated for the treatment of acute and chronic allergic conjunctivitis. In recent years newer drug molecules have been introduced in the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis. This article reviews recent patents and emerging therapeutics in the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis. PMID:21171952

  4. A review of intranasal formulations for the treatment of seizure emergencies.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Mamta; Cloyd, James C; Siegel, Ronald A

    2016-09-10

    Epileptic seizure emergencies are life-threatening conditions, which in their most severe form, status epilepticus, have a high mortality rate if not quickly terminated. Treatment requires rapid delivery of anti-epileptics such as benzodiazepines to the brain. The nasal route is attractive due to its non-invasiveness, potential for direct nose to brain delivery, high vascularity, relatively large absorptive surface area, and avoidance of intestinal/liver metabolism. However, the limited volume of the nasal cavity and poor water solubility of anti-epileptics restrict absorption, leading to insufficient therapeutic brain levels. This review covers various formulation approaches adopted to improve nasal delivery of drugs, especially benzodiazepines, used to treat seizure emergencies. Other general topics such as nasal anatomy, challenges to nasal delivery, and drug/formulation considerations for nose to brain delivery are also discussed. PMID:27397490

  5. Continual evolution of type 2 diabetes: an update on pathophysiology and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Cornell, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a complex and progressive disease that has a major societal and economic impact. The most common form of diabetes, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), is a multifactorial disease, the pathophysiology of which involves not only the pancreas but also the liver, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, gastrointestinal tract, brain, and kidney. Novel therapies with mechanisms of action that are different from most existing drugs are emerging. One such class consists of compounds that inhibit renal sodium-glucose cotransporter 2, which is responsible for the bulk of glucose reabsorption by the kidneys. This new class of compounds improves glycemic control independently of insulin and promotes weight reduction, providing an additional tool to treat patients with T2DM. This review discusses the underlying pathophysiology of T2DM, clinical guidelines, and available and emerging treatment options, with particular emphasis on sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors. PMID:25931824

  6. Re-emergence of Babesia conradae and effective treatment of infected dogs with atovaquone and azithromycin.

    PubMed

    Di Cicco, Michael F; Downey, Megan E; Beeler, Emily; Marr, Henry; Cyrog, Peter; Kidd, Linda; Diniz, Pedro Paulo V P; Cohn, Leah A; Birkenheuer, Adam J

    2012-06-01

    Babesia conradae (B. conradae) causes hemolytic anemia in dogs. This organism has not been reported clinically since it was originally described in southern California in 1991. To date, no anti-protozoal therapies have been associated with clearance of B. conradae. This report describes the use of atovaquone and azithromycin for the treatment of dogs naturally infected with B. conradae and report the re-emergence of B. conradae in southern California. Twelve dogs naturally infected with B. conradae were identified by practicing veterinarians and public health officials in southern California. Treatments consisted of a 10 day course of atovaquone (13.3mg/kg PO q 8h) and azithromycin (10-12.5mg/kg PO q 24h). Four dogs were treated in a randomized blinded placebo-controlled fashion, four additional cases were treated in a non-random, non-blinded fashion and one dog received no treatment. All dogs were tested for B. conradae DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) initially and then once or 3 times post treatment (60-210 days). B. conradae infected dogs that received treatment did not have any detectable Babesia DNA by PCR after treatment. In contrast, dogs receiving placebo had detectable Babesia DNA by PCR throughout the study period. Combination therapy with atovaquone and azithromycin appears to be effective for acute and chronic babesiosis caused by B. conradae. PMID:22305297

  7. Emergency Dental Treatment of a Patient With Sturge-Weber Syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Maria Cecília Querido; Maia, Vanessa Nobre; Franco, Juliana Bertoldi; de Melo Peres, Maria Paula Siqueira

    2015-06-01

    The Sturge-Weber (SWS) syndrome is a rare condition with congenital capillary malformations. Hemorrhages may occur on dental treatment, which can have a dramatic effect on a patient's vital sign. The aim of the present brief clinical study was to briefly report a case of a female patient with SWS who underwent an endodontic treatment. A 25-year-old patient (C.O.B.S.) with SWS and vascular malformation in cervicofacial right region was admitted to the dental clinic with pulsatile pain in tooth 16. An emergency dental treatment with cavity preparation and access to root canals was performed with intraligamentary and intrapulpal anesthesia with 3% prilocain 3% with felypressin 0.03 UI/mL because the tooth was located in the region of the vascular malformation, and any surgical treatment could lead to hemorrhages. After 7 days, the patient was recalled with the absence of painful symptoms. The endodontic treatment in patients with SWS is feasible, and safety should be an alternative to surgical treatments. PMID:26080241

  8. Self-Medication: Initial Treatments Used by Patients Seen in an Ophthalmologic Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Regina Souza; Kara-José, Newton; Temporini, Edméa Rita; Kara-Junior, Newton; Noma-Campos, Regina

    2009-01-01

    OJECTIVE This study seeks to identify practices of self-medication in the treatment of ocular emergencies. We examine patients’ use of both homemade preparations and manufactured products before seeking specialized care. MATERIALS AND METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional analytic survey of consecutive patients seen in the ophthalmology emergency room of a teaching hospital. RESULTS The sample included 561 subjects, 51.3% males and 48.7% females, with a mean age of 39.8 years. Prior to seeking emergency care, 40.5% reported self-medicating; 29.4% used a homemade preparation (13.9% referred to an industrialized product like boric acid as a homemade preparation), and 11.1% used a manufactured product. The most frequently used products included a boric acid solution (53.3%), a normal saline solution (35.7%), herbal infusions (6.1%) and breast milk (4.8%). Viral conjunctivitis was the most frequent diagnosis (24.4%), followed by the presence of a corneal foreign body (7.4%). No significant differences were found in the self-treatment of ocular injuries according to gender (p = 0.95), level of education (p = 0.21) or age (p = 0.14). In addition, self-medication practices were not related to the medically judged severity of the condition. CONCLUSION Patients often attempt to treat conditions that require ophthalmologic emergency care by self-medicating with homemade or manufactured products. The most widely used products include boric acid, normal saline, leaf infusions and breast milk. This behavior occurs independently of educational level, gender, age or the nature of the ocular condition. Self-medication is a culturally driven practice that is used even in cases of acute ocular injuries. PMID:19690656

  9. [Bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with acute exacerbation: preclinical differential diagnostic and emergency treatment].

    PubMed

    Friege, B; Friege, L; Pelz, J; Weber, M; von Spiegel, T; Schröder, S

    2009-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and bronchial asthma are the most common causes of obstructive pulmonary diseases and acute dyspnoea. In the preclinical emergency situation a distinction between bronchial asthma and exacerbated COPD is difficult because symptoms are similar. Although the preclinical measures differ only marginally, a differential diagnosis from other causes of respiratory obstruction and acute dyspnoea, such as cardiac decompensation, anaphylaxis, aspiration of foreign bodies, tension pneumothorax and inhalation trauma is necessary because alternative treatment options are required. In the treatment of COPD and bronchial asthma inhalative bronchodilatory beta(2)-mimetics are the first choice especially for serious obstructive emergencies because there is an unfavorable relationship between effect and side-effects for the intravenous route. Dosable aerosols, nebulization and if necessary, continuous nebulization, are appropriate application forms even for serious obstructive crises with the need of a respirator. In these cases a minimal inspiratory flow in patients is not required. Theophylline only plays a minor role to beta(2)-mimetics and anticholinergics as a bronchodilator in asthma and COPD guidelines, even in serious obstructive diseases. For severe asthma attacks the administration of magnesium is a possible additional option. Systemic intravenous administration of steroids has an anti-inflammatory effect and for this reason is the second column of treatment for both diseases. Invasive ventilation remains a last resort to ensure respiratory function and indications for this are given in patients with clinical signs of impending exhaustion of breathing. PMID:19424670

  10. Travel medicine physician adherence to guidelines for the emergency self treatment of malaria.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Gerard T; Walden, Lucas M; Townend, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Few studies have examined emergency self treatment (EST) antimalarial prescribing patterns. 110 physician-members of the Travel Medicine Society of Ireland and British Global and Travel Health Association participated in this study. There was a trend towards the prescription of EST for travel to remote low-risk malaria areas; for long-term residents living in low-risk areas; and for frequent travellers to low-risk areas. This study provides insights into the use of EST in travellers' malaria. PMID:27279126

  11. Emergency treatment of exertional heatstroke and comparison of whole body cooling techniques.

    PubMed

    Costrini, A

    1990-02-01

    This manuscript compares the whole body cooling techniques in the emergency treatment of heatstroke. Historically, the use of cold water immersion with skin massage has been quite successful in rapidly lowering body temperature and in avoiding severe complications or death. Recent studies have suggested alternative therapies, including the use of a warm air spray, the use of helicopter downdraft, and pharmacological agents. While evidence exists to support these methods, they have not been shown to reduce fatalities as effectively as ice water immersion. Although several cooling methods may have clinical use, all techniques rely on the prompt recognition of symptoms and immediate action in the field. PMID:2406541

  12. Priority and emerging pollutants in sewage sludge and fate during sludge treatment.

    PubMed

    Mailler, R; Gasperi, J; Chebbo, G; Rocher, V

    2014-07-01

    This paper aims at characterizing the quality of different treated sludges from Paris conurbation in terms of micropollutants and assessing their fate during different sludge treatment processes (STP). To achieve this, a large panel of priority and emerging pollutants (n=117) have been monitored in different STPs from Parisian wastewater treatment plants including anaerobic digestion, thermal drying, centrifugation and a sludge cake production unit. Considering the quality of treated sludges, comparable micropollutant patterns are found for the different sludges investigated (in mg/kg DM - dry matter). 35 compounds were detected in treated sludges. Some compounds (metals, organotins, alkylphenols, DEHP) are found in every kinds of sludge while pesticides or VOCs are never detected. Sludge cake is the most contaminated sludge, resulting from concentration phenomenon during different treatments. As regards treatments, both centrifugation and thermal drying have broadly no important impact on sludge contamination for metals and organic compounds, even if a slight removal seems to be possible with thermal drying for several compounds by abiotic transfers. Three different behaviors can be highlighted in anaerobic digestion: (i) no removal (metals), (ii) removal following dry matter (DM) elimination (organotins and NP) and iii) removal higher than DM (alkylphenols - except NP - BDE 209 and DEHP). Thus, this process allows a clear removal of biodegradable micropollutants which could be potentially significantly improved by increasing DM removal through operational parameters modifications (retention time, temperature, pre-treatment, etc.). PMID:24797622

  13. Beyond TNF Inhibitors: New Pathways and Emerging Treatments for Psoriatic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lubrano, Ennio; Perrotta, Fabio Massimo

    2016-04-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by psoriasis, synovitis, enthesitis, spondylitis and association with other extra-articular manifestations. Chronic inflammation of involved tissues possibly leads to structural damage and to a reduction in function and quality of life. The treatment of PsA dramatically changed with the introduction of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α drugs, which have been shown to reduce the symptoms and signs of the disease, and slow radiographic progression. However, some patients do not respond to anti-TNFα or have a loss of response. Recently, the discovery of new pathogenic mechanisms have made possible the development of new drugs that target pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-12, IL-23 and IL-17, or interfere with cellular pathways involved in skin, joint and entheseal inflammation. New molecules, namely ustekinumab, secukinumab, and apremilast have shown efficacy and safety over the various components of the disease in randomized clinical trials. These drugs have been recently approved for the treatment of PsA and included in new treatment recommendations. Other molecules are currently being tested in phase III clinical trials and are potential new treatment options for PsA. The aim of this review is to update the new pathways involved in the development of the disease and the emerging treatments for PsA beyond TNFα inhibition. PMID:26957495

  14. Barriers to depression treatment among low-income, Latino emergency department patients.

    PubMed

    Wells, Anjanette; Lagomasino, Isabel T; Palinkas, Lawrence A; Green, Jennifer M; Gonzalez, Diana

    2013-08-01

    Low-income and Latinos use the emergency department (ED) as a primary source of care. Also, the depression prevalence in ED patients is high, making the ED a compelling venue for depression screening and intervention. This study examined barriers and facilitators to depression treatment among low-income, predominantly Latino ED patients. We conducted telephone interviews with 24 ED patients (18-62 years of age, 79 % female) who dropped out of a depression treatment intervention. Using grounded theory, we analyzed perceptions of depression and treatment, and barriers and facilitators to mental health treatment. Although most patients acknowledged signs of depression, there was a lack of readiness to seek help. Patients reported negative perceptions about anti-depressant medication, even if they had no previous use. Barriers to treatment included transportation concerns, employment/unemployment, patient-provider issues, and immigrant documentation. Identified facilitators included consistent provider advice and "talking." This study introduced new misunderstanding and miscommunication barriers. PMID:23054150

  15. Plant Alkaloids as an Emerging Therapeutic Alternative for the Treatment of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Perviz, Sadia; Khan, Haroon; Pervaiz, Aini

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a heterogeneous mood disorder that has been classified and treated in a variety of ways. Although, a number of synthetic drugs are being used as standard treatment for clinically depressed patients, but they have adverse effects that can compromise the therapeutic treatments and patient's compliance. Unlike, synthetic medications, herbal medicines are widely used across the globe due to their wide applicability and therapeutic efficacy associated with least side effects, which in turn has initiated the scientific research regarding the antidepressant activity. This review is mostly based on the literature of the last decade, aimed at exploring the preclinical profile of plant-based alkaloids (the abundant secondary metabolite) as an emerging therapy for depression. PMID:26913004

  16. Informing patients about emerging treatment options: creating "saviour siblings" for haemopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Strong, Kimberly A

    2009-05-01

    In June 2008, the ABC screened a television documentary involving a couple who decided to have an additional child in the hope of obtaining umbilical cord blood to treat their daughter who had leukaemia. The couple conceived naturally, meaning that there was a one in four chance that their child would be suitably matched. They seemed to be unaware of technologies that, if successful, could provide a near certainty that the next child would be a matched "saviour sibling". This story raises questions about whether clinicians have an obligation to discuss emerging and morally contentious treatment options. Ignorance of technology, assumptions about availability, and medical assessment of burdens and benefits may affect attitudes towards treatment options, but they do not justify non-disclosure of information. PMID:19413524

  17. High Feasibility of Empiric HIV Treatment for Patients With Suspected Acute HIV in an Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Kathleen R; Arora, Sanjay; Walsh, Kristin B; Lora, Meredith; Merjavy, Stephen; Livermore, Shanna; Menchine, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Earlier intervention in acute HIV infection limits HIV reservoirs and may decrease HIV transmission. We developed criteria for empiric antiretroviral therapy (ART) in an emergency department (ED) routine HIV screening program. We assessed the feasibility and willingness of patients with suspected acute HIV infection in the ED to begin ART. A suspected acute HIV infection was defined as a positive HIV antigen antibody combination immunoassay with pending HIV-antibody differentiation test results and HIV RNA viral load. During the study period, there were 16 confirmed cases of acute HIV infection: 11 met our criteria for empiric ART and agreed to treatment, 10 were prescribed ART, and 1 left the ED against medical advice without a prescription for ART. Eight patients completed at least one follow-up visit. Empiric HIV treatment in an ED is feasible, well received by patients, and offers a unique entry point into the HIV care continuum. PMID:27028498

  18. Relapse following emergency treatment for acute asthma: can it be predicted or prevented?

    PubMed

    Ducharme, F M; Kramer, M S

    1993-12-01

    We prospectively followed 314 children discharged from a children's hospital emergency department (ED) following an asthma attack, to identify risk, factors for relapse, i.e. a second ED visit for asthma within the next 10 days. Parents were surveyed concerning their child's past medical history, drugs received prior to the index visit, triggering factors, physician availability, parental anxiety, and sociodemographic variables. Data on severity of the attack, emergency treatment, response to treatment and drugs prescribed on discharge were extracted from the medical record. Ninety-six of the 314 children (31%) relapsed, most (68%) within 24 hours. Using multiple logistic regression, a predictive model was developed on 211 patients ("test sample"). The best model contained two variables: (1) the number of ED visits for acute asthma in the previous year (odds ratio [OR] = 2.4 for 4 or more vs fewer visits, 95% CI = 1.3-4.4) and (2) the intake of an oral short-acting theophylline preparation during the course of the acute treatment (OR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.2-0.7). The sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive values of this model for predicting relapse were 73, 53, and 40%, respectively. When applied to a second randomly selected "validation sample" of 103 children, sensitivity was 73%, specificity 50%, and PPV 41%, thus indicating the stability of the model. The model identifies the number of ED visits in the previous year as an important risk factor for relapse. It also suggests that oral short-acting theophylline may still have a role in the treatment of patients in whom the contribution of inflammation to airway obstruction is minimal. PMID:8263566

  19. [Anxiety and panic in emergency medicine--the right diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Berzewski, Horst

    2011-04-01

    Fearful patients are in emergency situation often inattentive, unable to concentrate, agitated or even aroused. They show reduced perception and restricted willingness to cooperate. In severe conditions these patients are strongly tending towards more hazardous behavior: refusal of necessary therapy, break out or even high suicidal risk. Within disaster situations (mass accidents, fires) fearful patients with their agitated and persuasive behavior can influence other victims and with that trigger a situation of mass panic that has to be avoided at any cost. Therefore these patients must be swiftly identified and separated from the event. A diligent diagnosis process including physical-neurological examination is necessary. The recommended treatment within the emergency situation consists of a close continuous personal contact through assuring and encouraging conversations. A sense of security should be created by explaining the planned therapeutic interventions in simple, easy-to-follow and understandable words. If this necessary psycho-therapeutic intervention can not be applied a short term psychopharmacological treatment is required preferably with Benzodiazepines. Still a longterm specific therapy is highly advised, since these disturbances, if left untreated, will lead to a chronic manifestation and with that to considerable psychosocial impairments. PMID:21484618

  20. Sedative Dosing of Propofol for Treatment of Migraine Headache in the Emergency Department: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, Jarrod; Roper, Grant; Hays, Daniel; Guisto, John

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Migraine headaches requiring an emergency department visit due to failed outpatient rescue therapy present a significant challenge in terms of length of stay (LOS) and financial costs. Propofol therapy may be effective at pain reduction and reduce that length of stay given its pharmacokinetic properties as a short acting intravenous sedative anesthetic and pharmacodynamics on GABA mediated chloride flux. Methods: Case series of 4 patients presenting to an urban academic medical center with migraine headache failing outpatient therapy. Each patient was given a sedation dose (1 mg/kg) of propofol under standard procedural sedation precautions. Results: Each of the 4 patients experienced dramatic reductions or complete resolution of headache severity. LOS for 3 of the 4 patients was 50% less than the average LOS for patients with similar chief complaints to our emergency department. 1 patient required further treatment with standard therapy but had a significant reduction in pain and a shorter LOS. There were no episodes of hypotension, hypoxia, or apnea during the sedations. Conclusion: In this small case series, sedation dose propofol appears to be effective and safe for the treatment of refractory migraines, and may result in a reduced LOS. PMID:24381692

  1. Do ethnic differences still exist in pain assessment and treatment in the emergency department?

    PubMed

    Ware, Laurie Jowers; Epps, Cynthia D; Clark, Julie; Chatterjee, Ayona

    2012-12-01

    Although the provision of timely and appropriate analgesia is a primary goal of Emergency Department (ED) staff, pain continues to be undertreated and some evidence supports the existence of pain treatment disparities. Despite strong incentives from accreditation organizations, pain management in the ED may still be inconsistent and problematic. The purpose of this research study was to conduct a retrospective chart review to investigate pain assessment and treatment for 200 adults (≥18 years old) admitted to the ED suffering from long-bone fractures. An additional purpose was to investigate demographic variables, including ethnicity, to determine if they influenced pain assessment, pain treatment, and wait times in the ED. Although assessment and treatment of pain is universally recognized as being important and necessary to provide optimal patient care, only 52% of patients in this study were assessed using a pain intensity scale, with 43% of those assessed reporting pain as ≥5 on a 0-10 pain intensity instrument. Pain medication was administered to 75% of the patients, but 25% of the patients received no medication. Only 24% of those receiving a pain medication were reassessed to determine pain relief. Compounding these problems were wait times for analgesia of >1 hour. Although the influence on pain management related to ethnicity was not a factor in this study, other findings revealed that undertreatment of pain, inadequate assessment, lack of documentation of pain, and lengthy wait times persist in the ED. PMID:23158701

  2. Improving adherence to acne treatment: the emerging role of application software

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chanhyun; Kim, Gilwan; Patel, Isha; Chang, Jongwha; Tan, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine recent studies on the effect of mobile and electronic (ME)-health technology on adherence to acne treatment. Background With emerging use of ME-health technology, there is a growing interest in evaluating the effectiveness of the tools on medication adherence. Examples of ME-health technology-based tools include text message-based pill reminders and Web-based patient education. Methods MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science were searched for articles on adherence to acne treatment published through November 2013. A combination of search terms such as “acne” and “adherence” or “compliance” were used. Results Adherence to oral acne medication was higher than for topical acne medication. The frequency of office visits was also an influencing factor for acne treatment adherence. The telephone-based reminders on a daily basis did not improve acne patients’ medication adherence, whereas the Web-based educational tools on a weekly basis had a positive effect on medication adherence in acne treatment. Conclusion In using ME-health interventions, factors such as medication dosage forms, frequency of intervention, and patients’ preferences should be taken into consideration. Developing disease-specific text message reminders may be helpful to increase adherence rates. In addition, a combination of text message reminders with another type of intervention may improve medication adherence. PMID:24600239

  3. Endovascular Treatment in Emergency Setting of Acute Arterial Injuries After Orthopedic Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Fontana, Federico Mangini, Monica Ierardi, Anna Maria Lagana, Domenico; Piacentino, Filippo Vizzari, Francesco Alberto Spano, Emanuela Fugazzola, Carlo

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of emergency endovascular treatment of acute arterial injuries after orthopedic surgery. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients (mean age 68.3 years) with acute arterial injuries after orthopedic surgery were observed, in particular, 5 patients with pseudoaneurysm, 9 patients with active bleeding, and 1 patient with arterial dissection. Transarterial embolization (TAE) and positioning of covered and noncovered stents were the treatments performed. Follow-up after stent implantation (mean 36 months) was performed with color Doppler US (CDU) at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Plain X-ray was performed to evidence dislodgment or fracture of the graft. A minimum of 12 months' follow-up is available after TAE. Results: Immediate technical success was obtained in all cases. No major complications occurred. Overall clinical success rate was 100%. During mean follow-up, stent-graft occlusions did not occurred. No recurrence and/or consequence of TAE was registered during a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Conclusions: Percutaneous treatment is a feasible and safe tool for treating arterial injuries because it can provide fast and definitive resolution of the damage. This low-invasiveness approach can be proposed as first-line treatment in patients with acute injuries after orthopedic surgery.

  4. Creativity and dementia: emerging diagnostic and treatment methods for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Jeffrey L; Miller, Bruce L; Christensen, Daniel D; Cherry, Debra

    2008-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease research is beginning to yield promising treatments and prevention strategies. Current Alzheimer's disease treatments benefit symptoms, but do not appreciably alter the basic disease process. The new generation of Alzheimer's disease medications, however, will likely include disease-modifying treatments, which will slow disease progression or stop it entirely. These new treatments pursue four points of intervention: increasing the clearance of amyloid-beta42 (Abeta42) proteins in the brain, blocking Abeta42 production, decreasing Abeta42 production, and decreasing Abeta42 aggregation. Neurogenerative therapies are being explored as well, suggesting future treatments may not only stop disease progression but also reverse it. Risk factors for developing Alzheimer's disease and factors associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer's disease have been identified. Future Alzheimer's disease management may come to resemble routine cardiovascular disease prevention and management, which involves the control of modifiable risk factors and the use of medications that decrease or stop underlying pathology. The hope is that such management will arrest the disease process before cognitive symptoms have begun. Like other neurologic illnesses, Alzheimer's disease has a profound impact on creativity. Alzheimer's disease attacks the right posterior part of the brain, which enables people to retrieve internal imagery and copy images. Alzheimer's disease patients may lose the ability to copy images entirely. However, people with Alzheimer's disease can continue to produce art by using their remaining strengths, such as color or composition instead of shapes or realism. Studying art and dementia is a model for identifying the strengths of psychiatric patients. Remarkably, art emerges in some patients even in the face of degenerative disease. In this expert roundtable supplement, Jeffrey L. Cummings, MD, offers an overview of recent advances in Alzheimer's disease

  5. [Clinical study of multiple traumas with severe facial injury undergoing emergency endovascular treatment: significance of emergency embolization of the external carotid artery].

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Naoto; Hirohata, Masaru; Miyagi, Tomoya; Fujimura, Naoko; Karukaya, Takashi; Tokutomi, Takashi; Shigemori, Minoru

    2005-07-01

    The outcome of multiple injures freqently depends on the priority of treatments, and the decision as to the procedures and timing of primary care is extremely important. We studied the patients with multiple trauma whounderwent emergency endovascular treatment for facial hemorrhage related to external carotid arterial injury. The subjects are 5 patients who underwent embolization of the external carotid artery by an endovascular approach among patients with multiple traumas who were brought to our hospital by ambulance. In these patients, the vital signs on arrival, interval between injury and intravascular surgery, type of brain injury, type and grade of concurrent injury and outcome were studied. Three patients showed hemorrhagic shock on arrival, and 1 patient showed hemorrhagic shock immediately after arrival. The mean interval between injury and endovascular surgery was 3.9 hours. All patients had skull base fracture, and abnormal intracranial lesions on initial CT including 4 focal injuries and 1 diffuse injury. Moderate to severe thoracic/abdominal injuries were noted in 3 patients. In the remaining 2 patients, there was no trauma in the thoracic or abdominal regions. Intraperitoneal hemorrhage with splenic injury was observed in 3 patients. In 3 of 4 patients died by hemorrhagic shock because of the delay of endvascular treatments. In trauma patients with persistent hemorrhage, emergency endovascular treatment should be considered as a primary survey for initial treatment without delay under intensive conservative treatment. PMID:16001808

  6. The emerging role of Clostridium histolyticum collagenase in the treatment of Dupuytren disease

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Alexis; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2010-01-01

    this emerging treatment option. PMID:21127696

  7. Emergency department treatment of adults with acute asthma exacerbations: effect on exhaled nitric oxide levels.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Jonathan I; Rodenas, Mario; Sinert, Richard; Joks, Rauno

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of exhaled nitric oxide levels (eNO) from asthmatic patients is a noninvasive marker of airway inflammation in both adults and children and has been used as an outpatient measure of asthma control. We examined eNO in acute asthma exacerbations and how it is affected by treatment in the emergency department (ED) setting. Both eNO and peak expiratory flow (PEF) rate were measured at arrival and before discharge for adult asthmatic subjects (n = 28) treated for acute exacerbations in the ED at Kings County Hospital Center during spring and fall pollen seasons. Total serum Immunoglobulin E (IgE), peripheral blood leukocyte numbers, and tobacco smoking history were determined. Routine ED treatment included oral prednisone at 60 mg and inhalation of nebulized albuterol and ipratropium. Both PEF (p = 0.0005) and eNO (p < 0.0001) increased after treatment of subjects. Initial eNO was associated with age (p = 0.0004), absolute eosinophil count (p = 0.003), Asthma Control Test (p = 0.004), and Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (p = 0.04). Change in pre- versus posttreatment eNO (ΔeNO) was associated with change in PEF (ΔPEF; p < 0.0001). Initial PEF was associated with oxygen saturation (p < 0.0001). ΔPEF was associated with serum IgE levels. ED visit duration was associated with initial PEF (p = 0.0004), ΔeNO (p = 0.004), and number of albuterol treatments (p = 0.001). These associations remained significant in multivariate models that controlled for demographic factors, asthma control, smoking, and measures of inflammation and ventilation. eNO levels increase after ED treatment of acute asthma exacerbations in adults. Improved ventilation may allow for more accurate measurement of NO produced in inflamed airways. PMID:23394510

  8. Twenty years after ACEIs and ARBs: emerging treatment strategies for diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Stacy A; Spurney, Robert F

    2015-11-15

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a serious complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The disease is now the most common cause of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) in developed countries, and both the incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing worldwide. Current treatments are directed at controlling hyperglycemia and hypertension, as well as blockade of the renin angiotensin system with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), and angiotensin receptor blockers. Despite these therapies, DN progresses to ESKD in many patients. As a result, much interest is focused on developing new therapies. It has been over two decades since ACEIs were shown to have beneficial effects in DN independent of their blood pressure-lowering actions. Since that time, our understanding of disease mechanisms in DN has evolved. In this review, we summarize major cell signaling pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic kidney disease, as well as emerging treatment strategies. The goal is to identify promising targets that might be translated into therapies for the treatment of patients with diabetic kidney disease. PMID:26336162

  9. Strategies to Circumvent Testosterone Surge and Disease Flare in Advanced Prostate Cancer: Emerging Treatment Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Pokuri, Venkata K; Nourkeyhani, Houman; Betsy, Bodie; Herbst, Laurie; Sikorski, Marcus; Spangenthal, Edward; Fabiano, Andrew; George, Saby

    2015-07-01

    The testosterone surge and disease flare is a feared complication from initiation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist treatment in advanced prostate adenocarcinoma. It is a common practice to start an average 7-day pretreatment regimen with an antiandrogen agent before initiating GnRH agonist therapy, to circumvent disease flare from testosterone surge. However, this might not be the best strategy and can be harmful, especially in patients at high risk of imminent organ damage from minimal testosterone surge. Surgical castration is a simple and cost-effective method that should be considered in these scenarios. But most patients refuse this procedure because of the permanent and psychologic impact of surgery. Novel GnRH antagonists, such as degarelix, and cytochrome P450 17 (CYP17) enzyme inhibitors, such as ketoconazole, achieve castrate-equivalent serum testosterone levels much faster than traditional GnRH agonists without the need for coadministration of antiandrogens. This article reports on 3 cases of impending oncologic emergencies in advanced prostate adenocarcinoma treated promptly with degarelix and ketoconazole without any disease flare related to testosterone surge. In the setting of symptomatic hormone-naïve metastatic prostate cancer, the authors suggest clinical trials using abiraterone, orteronel, and other newer agents that target the CYP17 axis (eg, ketoconazole) for fine-tuning the emergent medical castration methods and avoiding the dangers from the flare phenomenon. PMID:26150586

  10. Emerging treatments in management of prostate cancer: biomarker validation and endpoints for immunotherapy clinical trial design

    PubMed Central

    Slovin, Susan F

    2014-01-01

    The rapidly emerging field of immunotherapy and the development of novel immunologic agents that have been approved in melanoma and successfully studied in lung cancer, kidney cancer, and prostate cancer have mandated that there be uniformity in clinical trial analysis beyond conventional survival endpoints and imaging. This includes some measure of determining whether the immunologic target is hit and how the treatment has impacted on the immune system in toto. While melanoma is leading the field towards these ends, there is some doubt that not all of the recent successes with immune therapies, for example, checkpoint inhibitors, will be effective for every cancer, and that the toxicities may also be different depending on the malignancy. This review serves to elucidate the current issues facing clinical investigators who perform immunologic trials targeted at patients with prostate cancer and discusses the challenges in assessing the right immunologic endpoints to demonstrate biologic/immunologic targeting leading to clinical benefit.

  11. Cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas in solid organ transplant recipients: emerging strategies for surveillance, staging, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Changhyun; Cheng, Joyce; Colegio, Oscar R

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in immunosuppressed solid organ transplant recipients (SOTRs) is 65- to 250-fold greater than in the general population. In addition, SCC in SOTRs is more aggressive than in the general population. SOTRs must undergo skin cancer screenings at intervals based on their risk stratification. The incidence of SCC in SOTRs varies with the type, intensity, and duration of the immunosuppressive regimen. Notably, patients on sirolimus have lower incidence of SCC compared to patients on calcineurin inhibitors. Revision of immunosuppressive regimen to include sirolimus may be a viable preventative measure against SCC in SOTRs who are high at risk for developing SCCs. Retinoids are also emerging as a means of chemoprophylaxis against development of new SCCs in high-risk patients. Treatments of SCC include electrodesiccation and curettage, surgical resection, cryosurgery, radiation, and systemic chemotherapy such as 5-fluorouracil and cetuximab. PMID:27178693

  12. Emerging strategies and therapies for treatment of Paget’s disease of bone

    PubMed Central

    Michou, Laëtitia; Brown, Jacques P

    2011-01-01

    Paget’s disease of bone (PDB) is a progressive monostotic or polyostotic metabolic bone disease characterized by focal abnormal bone remodeling, with increased bone resorption and excessive, disorganized, new bone formation. PDB rarely occurs before middle age, and it is the second most frequent metabolic bone disorder after osteoporosis, affecting up to 3% of adults over 55 years of age. One of the most striking and intriguing clinical features is the focal nature of the disorder, in that once the disease is established within a bone, there is only local spread within that bone and no systemic dissemination. Despite many years of intense research, the etiology of PDB has still to be conclusively determined. Based on a detailed review of genetic and viral factors incriminated in PDB, we propose a unifying hypothesis from which we can suggest emerging strategies and therapies. PDB results in weakened bone strength and abnormal bone architecture, leading to pain, deformity or, depending on the bone involved, fracture in the affected bone. The diagnostic assessment includes serum total alkaline phosphatase, total body bone scintigraphy, skull and enlarged view pelvis x-rays, and if needed, additional x-rays. The ideal therapeutic option would eliminate bone pain, normalize serum total alkaline phosphatase with prolonged remission, heal radiographic osteolytic lesions, restore normal lamellar bone, and prevent recurrence and complications. With the development of increasingly potent bisphosphonates, culminating in the introduction of a single intravenous infusion of zoledronic acid 5 mg, these goals of treatment are close to being achieved, together with long-term remission in almost all patients. Based on the recent pathophysiological findings, emerging strategies and therapies are reviewed: ie, pulse treatment with zoledronic acid; denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody directed against RANK ligand; tocilizumab, an interleukin-6 receptor inhibitor; odanacatib

  13. Effectiveness of Emergency Rehabilitation Treatments in Reducing Post-fire Erosion, Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rough, D. T.; MacDonald, L. H.

    2003-12-01

    Daniella T.M. Rough Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Watershed Stewardship, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO Lee H. MacDonald Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Watershed Stewardship, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO Burned area emergency rehabilitation (BAER) treatments are often applied to reduce post-fire flooding and erosion, but few studies have quantified their efficacy. The effectiveness of different BAER treatments in reducing post-fire erosion rates is being studied for three different wildfires in the Colorado Front Range. The treatments being monitored include seeding, contour felling, mulching, scarification with seeding, and a polyacrylamide (PAM). Sediment production rates are being measured at the hillslope scale using sediment fences installed immediately after the June 2000 Bobcat fire and the 2002 Hayman and Schoonover fires. Neither aerial- nor ground-based seeding significantly reduced erosion rates in the first three years after the Bobcat fire. In contrast, 4.5 t ha-1 of straw mulch consistently reduced sediment yields by more than 90%. Contour felling initially reduced erosion rates for small and moderate storms, but was less effective following the largest storms, presumably due to overwhelmed sediment storage capacity. A paired\\-swale design is being used for the 2002 Hayman and Schoonover fires, as this provides a more sensitive evaluation of BAER treatment effectiveness. The ground-based application of straw mulch and the aerial application of hydromulch each reduced sediment yields by more than 95% in both 2002 and 2003. However, the ground-based application of hydromulch in fall 2002 did not significantly reduce sediment yields in 2003. In 2002 the application of 11 kg ha-1 of PAM in an ammonium sulfate solution reduced sediment yields by 66%. In 2003 neither these sites nor three newly treated sites showed a significant reduction in sediment yields. A dry application of 5.6 kg ha-1 PAM had no detectable

  14. Emergency Department–Initiated Buprenorphine/Naloxone Treatment for Opioid Dependence

    PubMed Central

    D’Onofrio, Gail; O’Connor, Patrick G.; Pantalon, Michael V.; Chawarski, Marek C.; Busch, Susan H.; Owens, Patricia H.; Bernstein, Steven L.; Fiellin, David A.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Opioid-dependent patients often use the emergency department (ED) for medical care. OBJECTIVE To test the efficacy of 3 interventions for opioid dependence: (1) screening and referral to treatment (referral); (2) screening, brief intervention, and facilitated referral to community-based treatment services (brief intervention); and (3) screening, brief intervention, ED-initiated treatment with buprenorphine/naloxone, and referral to primary care for 10-week follow-up (buprenorphine). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A randomized clinical trial involving 329 opioid-dependent patients who were treated at an urban teaching hospital ED from April 7, 2009, through June 25, 2013. INTERVENTIONS After screening, 104 patients were randomized to the referral group, 111 to the brief intervention group, and 114 to the buprenorphine treatment group. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Enrollment in and receiving addiction treatment 30 days after randomization was the primary outcome. Self-reported days of illicit opioid use, urine testing for illicit opioids, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk, and use of addiction treatment services were the secondary outcomes. RESULTS Seventy-eight percent of patients in the buprenorphine group (89 of 114 [95% CI, 70%-85%]) vs 37% in the referral group (38 of 102 [95% CI, 28%-47%]) and 45% in the brief intervention group (50 of 111 [95% CI, 36%-54%]) were engaged in addiction treatment on the 30th day after randomization (P < .001). The buprenorphine group reduced the number of days of illicit opioid use per week from 5.4 days (95% CI, 5.1-5.7) to 0.9 days (95% CI, 0.5-1.3) vs a reduction from 5.4 days (95% CI, 5.1-5.7) to 2.3 days (95% CI, 1.7-3.0) in the referral group and from 5.6 days (95% CI, 5.3-5.9) to 2.4 days (95% CI, 1.8-3.0) in the brief intervention group (P < .001 for both time and intervention effects; P = .02 for the interaction effect). The rates of urine samples that tested negative for opioids did not differ

  15. Symptom-related emergency department visits and hospital admissions during ambulatory cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Siefert, Mary Lou; Blonquist, Traci M; Berry, Donna L; Hong, Fangxin

    2016-01-01

    Background People with cancer experience symptoms related to the disease and treatments. Symptom distress has a negative impact on quality of life (QoL). Attending to symptoms and side effects of treatment promotes safe and effective delivery of therapies and may prevent or reduce emergency department visits (EDVs) and unplanned hospital admissions (HAs). There is limited evidence examining symptom-related EDVs or HAs (sx-EDV/HAs) and interventions in ambulatory oncology patients. Objective To examine factors associated with sx-EDV/HAs in ambulatory oncology patients receiving chemotherapy and/or radiation. Methods This secondary analysis used data from a randomized controlled trial of ambulatory oncology patients (n = 663) who received the web-based Electronic Self-Report Assessment - Cancer intervention (symptom self-monitoring, tailored education, and communication coaching) or usual care with symptom self-monitoring alone. Group differences were described by summary statistics and compared by t test. Factors associated with the odds of at least 1 sx-EDV/HA were modeled using logistic regression. Results 98 patients had a total of 171 sx-EDV/HAs with no difference between groups. Higher odds of at least 1 sx-EDV/HA were associated with socioeconomic and clinical factors. The multivariable model indicated that work status, education level, treatment modality, and on-treatment Symptom Distress Scale-15 scores were significantly associated with having at least 1 sx-EDV/HA. Limitations This is a secondary analysis not sized to determine cause and effect. The results have limited generalizability. Conclusion Most patients did not experience an sx-EDV/HA. Demographic and clinical factors predicted an sx-EDV/HA. Funding National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, R01 NR008726; 2008–2011 PMID:27119127

  16. [Emergent treatment of source water contaminated by representative herbicide molinate and ametryn].

    PubMed

    Chen, Bei-bei; Gao, Nai-yun; Liu, Cheng; Yao, Juan-juan; Shang, Ya-bo; Qin, Zu-qun

    2008-09-01

    Emergent treatment of source water polluted by representative herbicide molinate and ametryn was researched. The results indicate that activated carbon adsorption and prechlorination could achieve high efficiencies to remove the herbicides. The pseudo second-order adsorption kinetic model and Freundlich adsorption isotherm model can be used to describe the adsorption process and the adsorption equilibrium of molinate and ametryn adsorbed by powdered activated carbon (PAC) in raw water respectively. Either molinate or ametryn of about 200 microg/L in water could be completely removed by 40 mg/L PAC. The best PAC adding point was 20 min before coagulation. The two herbicides were easily removed by granular activated carbon (GAC) column (20 cm high) which can be the available supplement of PAC treatment to strengthen safety. The Cl2 dosage of 2.5 mg/L could oxidize the two herbicides completely, but the chlorination products as well as their toxicity need further study. PAC adsorption combined with 1 mg/L KMnO4 preoxidation didn't improve the removal efficiencies of molinate and ametryn. The effect of PAC adsorption combined with 1.5 mg/L prechlorination depends on their adding sequence. When source water was simultaneously contaminated by the two herbicides both about 200 microg/L, the PAC and Cl2 dosage have to be increased to 50 mg/L and 3 mg/L respectively, then both herbicides can be removed or oxidized fully. PMID:19068632

  17. Evaluation of emerging contaminants in a drinking water treatment plant using electrodialysis reversal technology.

    PubMed

    Gabarrón, S; Gernjak, W; Valero, F; Barceló, A; Petrovic, M; Rodríguez-Roda, I

    2016-05-15

    Emerging contaminants (EC) have gained much attention with globally increasing consumption and detection in aquatic ecosystems during the last two decades from ng/L to lower ug/L. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence and removal of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs), endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and related compounds in a Drinking Water Treatment Plant (DWTP) treating raw water from the Mediterranean Llobregat River. The DWTP combined conventional treatment steps with the world's largest electrodialysis reversal (EDR) facility. 49 different PhACs, EDCs and related compounds were found above their limit of quantification in the influent of the DWTP, summing up to a total concentration of ECs between 1600-4200 ng/L. As expected, oxidation using chlorine dioxide and granular activated carbon filters were the most efficient technologies for EC removal. However, despite the low concentration detected in the influent of the EDR process, it was also possible to demonstrate that this process partially removed ionized compounds, thereby constituting an additional barrier against EC pollution in the product. In the product of the EDR system, only 18 out of 49 compounds were quantifiable in at least one of the four experimental campaigns, showing in all cases removals higher than 65% and often beyond 90% for the overall DWTP process. PMID:26894293

  18. Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections: the emerging threat and potential novel treatment options.

    PubMed

    Vergidis, Paschalis I; Falagas, Matthew E

    2008-02-01

    Gram-negative bacterial infections constitute an emerging threat because of the development of multidrug-resistant organisms. There is a relative shortage of new drugs in the antimicrobial development pipeline that have been tested in vitro and evaluated in clinical studies. Antibiotics that are in the pipeline for the treatment of serious Gram-negative bacterial infections include the cephalosporins, ceftobiprole, ceftarolin and FR-264205. Tigecycline is the first drug approved from a new class of antibiotics called glycylcyclines, and there has been renewed interest in this drug for the treatment of some multidrug-resistant Gram-negative organisms. Carbapenems in the pipeline include tomopenem, with the approved drugs doripenem and faropenem, an oral agent, under evaluation for activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections. Polymyxins are old antibiotics traditionally considered to be toxic, but which are being used because of their activity against resistant Gram-negative organisms. New pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data are available regarding the use of these agents. Finally, antimicrobial peptides and efflux pump inhibitors are two new classes of agents under development. This review of investigational antibiotics shows that several new agents will become available in the coming years, even though the pace of antimicrobial research is far from ideal. PMID:18246520

  19. Current and emerging antivirals for the treatment of cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis: an update on recent patents.

    PubMed

    Vadlapudi, Aswani D; Vadlapatla, Ramya K; Mitra, Ashim K

    2012-04-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis is the most common ocular opportunistic complication and a serious cause of vision loss in immunocompromised patients. Even though, a rise in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals seems to be a major factor responsible for the prevalence of CMV retinitis, the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) significantly reduced the incidence and severity of CMV retinitis. Thorough evaluation of the patient's immune status and an exact classification of the retinal lesions may provide better understanding of the disease etiology, which would be necessary for optimizing the treatment conditions. Current drugs such as ganciclovir, valganciclovir, cidofovir and foscarnet have been highly active against CMV, but prolonged therapy with these approved drugs is associated with dose-limiting toxicities thus limiting their utility. Moreover development of drug-resistant mutants has been observed particularly in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Continuous efforts by researchers in the industry and academia have led to the development of newer candidates with enhanced antiviral efficacy and apparently minimal side effects. These novel compounds can suppress viral replication and prevent reactivation in the target population. Though some of the novel therapeutics possess potent viral inhibitory activity, these compounds are still in stages of clinical development and yet to be approved. This review provides an overview of disease etiology, existing anti-CMV drugs, advances in emerging therapeutics in clinical development and related recent patents for the treatment of CMV retinitis. PMID:22044356

  20. Recent Patents on Emerging Therapeutics for the Treatment of Glaucoma, Age Related Macular Degeneration and Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2014-01-01

    Advancements in the field and rising interest among pharmaceutical researchers have led to the development of new molecules with enhanced therapeutic activity. Design of new drugs which can target a particular pathway and/or explore novel targets is of immense interest to ocular pharmacologists worldwide. Delivery of suitable pharmacologically active agents at proper dose (within the therapeutic window) to the target tissues without any toxicity to the healthy ocular tissues still remain an elusive task. Moreover, the presence of static and dynamic barriers to drug absorption including the corneal epithelium (lipophilic), corneal and scleral stroma (hydrophilic), conjunctival lymphatics, choroidal vasculature and the blood-ocular barriers also pose a significant challenge for achieving therapeutic drug concentrations at the target site. Although many agents are currently available, new compounds are being introduced for treating various ocular diseases. Deeper understanding of the etiology and complex mechanisms associated with the disease condition would aid in the development of potential therapeutic candidates. Novel small molecules as well as complex biotechnology derived macromolecules with superior efficacy, safety and tolerability are being developed. Therefore, this review article provides an overview of existing drugs, treatment options, advances in emerging therapeutics and related recent patents for the treatment of ocular disorders such as glaucoma, age related macular degeneration (AMD) and uveitis. PMID:25414810

  1. The future is today: emerging drugs for the treatment of erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Albersen, Maarten; Shindel, Alan; Mwamukonda, Kuwong; Lue, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Erectile Dysfunction (ED) is the most common male sexual dysfunction presented for treatment, and the most thoroughly studied sexual dysfunction in men. In the late 20th century, important discoveries were made regarding both the physiologic processes of penile erection and the pathophysiology of ED. These discoveries led to the commercial introduction of the phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5I), a class of medications which now accounts for the largest segment of the ED market. While these drugs are highly efficacious for many men, a relatively large subset of ED patients who do not respond to PDE5I has been identified. Recognition of this subset of the ED population and the ageing of the population has driven researchers to investigate novel treatment targets for ED. Increased research efforts have resulted in the development of several orally available compounds that combine high efficacy with low rates of adverse events. In this review we report on various compounds that regulate penile erection both centrally (Clavulanic acid, Dopamine and Melanocortin receptor agonists) and peripherally (novel PDE5I, soluble and particulate Guanylil Cyclase activators, Rho-kinase inhibitors and Maxi-K channel openers), and discuss the preclinical and clinical evidence supporting the development of these emerging drugs for ED. PMID:20415601

  2. Tuberous Sclerosis and Bilateral Renal Angiomyolipomas: A Case Report and Literature Review of Emerging Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    James, Leighton R.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is a rare multisystemic genetic disorder associated with the development of benign hamartomas. Angiomyolipomas are one such characteristic finding that may be seen in 55–80% of tuberous sclerosis complex patients. While being normally asymptomatic, they can also cause significant morbidity and mortality. We present the case of a patient with tuberous sclerosis complex and recently discovered bilateral renal angiomyolipomas, admitted for hematuria who underwent left renal artery embolization; however, worsening renal function necessitated subsequent nephrectomy. Despite still being mainstays of treatment, invasive interventions are now being recommended for specific patient populations as demonstrated in our case. Emerging strategies targeting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway have been shown to reduce the size of angiomyolipomas and are now used to treat asymptomatic cases >3 cm. Our review discusses these treatment options with the intention of increasing awareness of current recommendations and hopefully leading to increased application of these novel therapies that will reduce the need for invasive interventions. PMID:27525138

  3. Emerging Putative Biomarkers: The Role of Alpha 2 and 6 Integrins in Susceptibility, Treatment, and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Marthick, James R.; Dickinson, Joanne L.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic architecture underpinning prostate cancer is complex, polygenic and despite recent significant advances many questions remain. Advances in genetic technologies have greatly improved our ability to identify genetic variants associated with complex disease including prostate cancer. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) and microarray gene expression studies have identified genetic associations with prostate cancer susceptibility and tumour development. The integrins feature prominently in both studies examining the underlying genetic susceptibility and mechanisms driving prostate tumour development. Integrins are cell adhesion molecules involved in extracellular and intracellular signalling and are imperative for tumour development, migration, and angiogenesis. Although several integrins have been implicated in tumour development, the roles of integrin α2 and integrin α6 are the focus of this paper as evidence is now emerging that these integrins are implicit in prostate cancer susceptibility, cancer stem cell biology, angiogenesis, cell migration, and metastases to bone and represent potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. There currently exists an urgent need to develop tools that differentiate indolent from aggressive prostate cancers and predict how patients will respond to treatment. This paper outlines the evidence supporting the use of α2 and α6 integrins in clinical applications for tailored patient treatment. PMID:22900191

  4. Influence of hummocks and emergent vegetation on hydraulic performance in a surface flow wastewater treatment wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keefe, Steffanie H.; Daniels, Joan S.; Runkel, Robert L.; Wass, Roland D.; Stiles, Eric A.; Barber, Larry B.

    2010-01-01

    A series of tracer experiments were conducted biannually at the start and end of the vegetation growing season in a surface flow wastewater treatment wetland located near Phoenix, AZ. Tracer experiments were conducted prior to and following reconfiguration and replanting of a 1.2 ha treatment wetland from its original design of alternating shallow and deep zones to incorporate hummocks (shallow planting beds situated perpendicular to flow). Tracer test data were analyzed using analysis of moments and the one-dimensional transport with inflow and storage numerical model to evaluate the effects of the seasonal vegetation growth cycle and hummocks on solute transport. Following reconfiguration, vegetation coverage was relatively small, and minor changes in spatial distribution influenced wetland hydraulics. During start-up conditions, the wetland underwent an acclimation period characterized by small vegetation coverage and large transport cross-sectional areas. At the start of the growing season, new growth of emergent vegetation enhanced hydraulic performance. At the end of the growing season, senescing vegetation created short-circuiting. Wetland hydrodynamics were associated with high volumetric efficiencies and velocity heterogeneities. The hummock design resulted in breakthrough curves characterized by multiple secondary tracer peaks indicative of varied flow paths created by bottom topography.

  5. Influence of hummocks and emergent vegetation on hydraulic performance in a surface flow wastewater treatment wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keefe, Steffanie H.; Daniels, Joan S. (Thullen); Runkel, Robert L.; Wass, Roland D.; Stiles, Eric A.; Barber, Larry B.

    2010-11-01

    A series of tracer experiments were conducted biannually at the start and end of the vegetation growing season in a surface flow wastewater treatment wetland located near Phoenix, AZ. Tracer experiments were conducted prior to and following reconfiguration and replanting of a 1.2 ha treatment wetland from its original design of alternating shallow and deep zones to incorporate hummocks (shallow planting beds situated perpendicular to flow). Tracer test data were analyzed using analysis of moments and the one-dimensional transport with inflow and storage numerical model to evaluate the effects of the seasonal vegetation growth cycle and hummocks on solute transport. Following reconfiguration, vegetation coverage was relatively small, and minor changes in spatial distribution influenced wetland hydraulics. During start-up conditions, the wetland underwent an acclimation period characterized by small vegetation coverage and large transport cross-sectional areas. At the start of the growing season, new growth of emergent vegetation enhanced hydraulic performance. At the end of the growing season, senescing vegetation created short-circuiting. Wetland hydrodynamics were associated with high volumetric efficiencies and velocity heterogeneities. The hummock design resulted in breakthrough curves characterized by multiple secondary tracer peaks indicative of varied flow paths created by bottom topography.

  6. Floatable, macroporous structured alginate sphere supporting iron nanoparticles used for emergent Cr(VI) spill treatment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian-Fei; Li, Yong-Tao; Wu, Jin-Hua; Cao, Piao-Yang; Liu, Yong-Lin; Jiang, Gang-Biao

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) spill accident is a great challenge due to its high toxicity, sudden and extensiveness. In this study, we designed and fabricated a hierarchical, ordered and macroporous structured alginate sphere to support in-situ synthesized zero-valent iron nanoparticle (the alginate-nZVI sphere). Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) images showed well dispersion of nZVI on the composite. This alginate-nZVI sphere exhibited good separability in effective removal of Cr(VI). The result from Cr(VI) removal experiment demonstrated a Cr(VI) removal efficiency of 98.2% at equilibrium time, which can be ascribed to the well dispersion of the nZVI. In addition, the alginate-nZVI sphere was effective in Cr(VI) removal in a wide range of pH from 3.0 to 11.0, by the merit of alginate substrate. Hence, the alginate-nZVI sphere might be a promising agent for an emergent Cr(VI) spill treatment by enhancing the dispersion, stabilization and separation properties of nZVI. PMID:27112857

  7. Impact of regional pre-hospital emergency medical services in treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Sozener, Cemal B; Barsan, William G

    2012-09-01

    Stroke is a major public health concern afflicting an estimated 795,000 Americans annually. The associated morbidity and mortality is staggering. Early treatment with thrombolytics is beneficial. The window for treatment is narrow and minimization of the time from symptom onset to treatment is vital. The general population is not well informed as to the warning signs or symptoms of stroke, leading to substantial delays in emergency medical services (EMS) activation. Ambulance transport of stroke patients to the hospital has demonstrated improvements in key benchmarks such as door to physician evaluation, door to CT initiation, and increased thrombolytic treatment. Pre-hospital notification of the impending arrival of a stroke patient allows for vital preparation in the treating emergency department, and improving timely evaluation and treatment upon arrival of the stroke patient. EMS systems are a vital component of the management of stroke patients, and resources used to improve these systems are beneficial. PMID:22994221

  8. Diagnosis and Treatment of Acute Gout at a University Hospital Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Schlesinger, Naomi; Radvanski, Diane C; Young, Tina C; McCoy, Jonathan V; Eisenstein, Robert; Moore, Dirk F

    2015-01-01

    Background : Acute gout attacks account for a substantial number of visits to the emergency department (ED). Our aim was to evaluate acute gout diagnosis and treatment at a University Hospital ED. Methods : Our study was a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients with a diagnosis of acute gout seen in the ED 1/01/2004 - 12/31/2010. We documented: demographics, clinical characteristics, medications given, diagnostic tests, consultations and whether patients were hospitalized. Descriptive and summary statistics were performed on all variables. Results : We found 541 unique ED visit records of patients whose discharge diagnosis was acute gout over a 7 year period. 0.13% of ED visits were due to acute gout. The mean patient age was 54; 79% were men. For 118 (22%) this was their first attack. Attack duration was ≤ 3 days in 75%. Lower extremity joints were most commonly affected. Arthrocentesis was performed in 42 (8%) of acute gout ED visits. During 355 (66%) of ED visits, medications were given in the ED and/or prescribed. An anti-inflammatory drug was given during the ED visit during 239 (44%) visits. Medications given during the ED visit included: NSAIDs: 198 (56%): opiates 190 (54%); colchicine 32 (9%) and prednisone 32 (9%). During 154 (28%) visits an anti-inflammatory drug was prescribed. Thirty two (6%) were given no medications during the ED visit nor did they receive a prescription. Acute gout rarely (5%) led to hospitalizations. Conclusion : The diagnosis of acute gout in the ED is commonly clinical and not crystal proven. Anti-inflammatory drugs are the mainstay of treatment in acute gout; yet, during more than 50% of ED visits, anti-inflammatory drugs were not given during the visit. Thus, improvement in the diagnosis and treatment of acute gout in the ED may be required. PMID:26106456

  9. Multiple sclerosis: current and emerging disease-modifying therapies and treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Wingerchuk, Dean M; Carter, Jonathan L

    2014-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating central nervous system disease that typically strikes young adults, especially women. The pathobiology of MS includes inflammatory and neurodegenerative mechanisms that affect both white and gray matter. These mechanisms underlie the relapsing, and often eventually progressive, course of MS, which is heterogeneous; confident prediction of long-term individual prognosis is not yet possible. However, because revised MS diagnostic criteria that incorporate neuroimaging data facilitate early diagnosis, most patients are faced with making important long-term treatment decisions, most notably the use and selection of disease-modifying therapy (DMT). Currently, there are 10 approved MS DMTs with varying degrees of efficacy for reducing relapse risk and preserving neurological function, but their long-term benefits remain unclear. Moreover, available DMTs differ with respect to the route and frequency of administration, tolerability and likelihood of treatment adherence, common adverse effects, risk of major toxicity, and pregnancy-related risks. Thorough understanding of the benefit-risk profiles of these therapies is necessary to establish logical and safe treatment plans for individuals with MS. We review the available evidence supporting risk-benefit profiles for available and emerging DMTs. We also assess the place of individual DMTs within the context of several different MS management strategies, including those currently in use (sequential monotherapy, escalation therapy, and induction and maintenance therapy) and others that may soon become feasible (combination approaches and "personalized medicine"). We conducted this review using a comprehensive search of MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, from January 1, 1990, to August 31, 2013. The following search terms were used: multiple sclerosis, randomized controlled trials

  10. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Sac Rupture for Type IIIa Endoleak in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Previously Excluded with Endovascular Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Mangini, Monica Bracchi, Elena Recaldini, Chiara; Cocozza, Eugenio; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Pellegrino, Carlo Lagana, Domenico Fugazzola, Carlo

    2010-08-15

    Elective endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic pathology has been applied in a variety of conditions. The complications of thoracic aortic stenting are also well recognized. Endoleak after endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms is the most frequent complication; among them, type III is the least frequent. Endovascular treatment of type III endoleak is generally performed under elective conditions; less frequently, in emergency. We report a successful emergency endovascular management of post-thoracic endovascular repair for thoracic aortic aneurysm rupture due to type IIIa endoleak.

  11. Application of Ureteroscope in Emergency Treatment with Persistent Renal Colic Patients during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shilin; Liu, Guoqing; Duo, Yongfu; Wang, Jianfeng; Li, Jierong; Li, Chunjing

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the application of ureteroscopy in the treatment of ureteral calculi during pregnancy has been on the rise, for persistent renal colic patients without ultrasound-detected ureteral calculi, it may represent a clinical dilemma due to the potential risks for both mother and fetus. Objective The aim of the present study is to present our experience with the application of the ureteroscope in the emergency treatment of persistent renal colic patients during pregnancy. Methods From March 2009 to September 2014, a total of 117 pregnant women who received ureteroscopy for persistent renal colic were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided into three groups according to duration of the persistent renal colic: Group A (within 12 hours; 24 cases); Group B (12 to 24 hours; 76 cases); and Group C (more than 24 hours; 17 cases). The stone-free rate, complications, and other qualitative data were analyzed. Results Of the 117 patients, 31 patients who were found not to have renal or ureteral calculi received ureteroscopic double-J (DJ) stent insertion, whereas 86 patients who were found with ureteral calculi received ureteroscopic lithotripsy (URSL) and DJ stent insertion. Among them, 24 patients (27.9%) were found with ureteral calculi by ureteroscopy rather than ultrasound. In addition, 73 patients (84.9%) had complete fragmentation of calculi; 12 patients (10.3%) had a threatened abortion (the rates of threatened abortion in Groups A, B and C were 8.3% vs. 6.5% vs. 29.4%; Group C compared with Groups A and B, p<0.05), and one patient (1.2%) had urosepsis (in Group C). However, these complications were cured with conservative treatment, without postpartum infant and maternal complications. Conclusion For pregnant patients with persistent renal colic/ureteral calculi and hydronephrosis, ureteroscopic DJ stent insertion and URSL are effective and safe options when conservative treatment fails, even if no urinary calculi were found by ultrasound. At the

  12. Re-Emergence of Zika Virus: A Review on Pathogenesis, Clinical Manifestations, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Shuaib, Waqas; Stanazai, Hashim; Abazid, Ahmad G; Mattar, Ahmed A

    2016-08-01

    Zika virus (ZKV) is an arbovirus of the Flaviviridae family, which includes West Nile, dengue fever, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis virus. It is transmitted by the Aedes genus of mosquitoes. Before 2015, ZKV outbreaks occurred in areas of Africa, the Pacific Islands, and Southeast Asia. The current large outbreak, which began in Brazil, has also emerged throughout a large part of South/Central America, a number of islands in the Caribbean, including Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and Mexico. A sudden rise in the numbers of infants reported born with microcephaly in Brazil, and the detection of the single-stranded positive RNA virus in the amniotic fluid of affected newborns, has captured medical, mainstream media, and global political attention, causing considerable concern in a post-Ebola global community considerably more focused on the threat of internationally transmissible diseases. The goal of this article is to provide an overview of ZKV for clinicians, with the emphasis on pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment/preventive measures. PMID:26994509

  13. Emerging contaminant degradation and removal in algal wastewater treatment ponds: Identifying the research gaps.

    PubMed

    Norvill, Zane N; Shilton, Andy; Guieysse, Benoit

    2016-08-01

    Whereas the fate of emerging contaminants (ECs) during 'conventional' and 'advanced' wastewater treatment (WWT) has been intensively studied, little research has been conducted on the algal WWT ponds commonly used in provincial areas. The long retention times and large surface areas exposed to light potentially allow more opportunities for EC removal to occur, but experimental evidence is lacking to enable definite predictions about EC fate across different algal WWT systems. This study reviews the mechanisms of EC hydrolysis, sorption, biodegradation, and photodegradation, applying available knowledge to the case of algal WWT. From this basis the review identifies three main areas that need more research due to the unique environmental and ecological conditions occurring in algal WWT ponds: i) the effect of diurnally fluctuating pH and dissolved oxygen upon removal mechanisms; ii) the influence of algae and algal biomass on biodegradation and sorption under relevant conditions; and iii) the significance of EC photodegradation in the presence of dissolved and suspended materials. Because of the high concentration of dissolved organics typically found in algal WWT ponds, most EC photodegradation likely occurs via indirect mechanisms rather than direct photolysis in these systems. PMID:27135171

  14. The use of intravenous ketorolac for the treatment of renal colic in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Larsen, L S; Miller, A; Allegra, J R

    1993-05-01

    The objective of this study was to report the authors' experience using intravenous ketorolac (Syntex Laboratories, Palo Alto, CA) as an analgesic in the treatment of renal colic in a convenience sample at three suburban community hospital emergency departments. Twenty-five patients with renal colic were participants. Pregnant women, patients with a history of renal or hepatic impairment, bleeding diathesis, active peptic ulcer disease, or hypersensitivity to aspirin or nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID) were excluded. Ketorolac 30 mg administered intravenously during a 1-minute period, and the following parameters were monitored at times 0, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 60 minutes: pain on a scale of 0 to 10, pulse rate, blood pressure, and adverse side effects. A total of 25 patients were included in our series. Initially, they had a median pain score of 9 with an interquartile range of 1. Thereafter, the median pain scores and (interquartile ranges) were 8 (three) at 5 minutes, 5 (four) at 10 minutes, 2 (four) at 20 minutes, 1 (three) at 30 minutes, and 0 (one) at 60 minutes. There were no adverse side effects observed in any patients. Therefore, it can be concluded that intravenous ketorolac is an effective analgesic agent for the control of pain in patients with renal colic. PMID:8489656

  15. Engineering application of activated alumina adsorption dams for emergency treatment of arsenic-contaminated rivers.

    PubMed

    Dou, Junfeng; Qin, Wei; Ding, Aizhong; Xie, En; Zheng, Lei; Ding, Wencheng

    2015-01-01

    A batch of lab-based adsorption experiments were performed to investigate the arsenic (As) removal efficacy by activated alumina. Four factors including contact time, pH, initial As concentration and different coexisting ions were examined. The adsorbent made of activated alumina (AA) with particles of 2-4 mm diameter showed a high As removal efficiency and the As concentrations of the samples were below 0.05 mg/L when the hydraulic retention time (HRT) was operated above 5 min. The As concentrations of the samples could remain below 0.05 mg/L for 30 days. A series of AA adsorption dams coupled with several other supporting adsorption techniques were employed for As-contaminated river restoration. The engineering project functioned well, and the effluent As concentration was below 0.05 mg/L when the influent was between 0.2 and 0.7 mg/L, which met the discharge requirement of the Surface Water Quality Standards criteria III in China. The results demonstrated that AA adsorption dams could be applied for emergency treatments of small- or medium-sized rivers contaminated with As. PMID:25926343

  16. Recent progress in gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy: an emerging cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Both, Gerald W

    2009-08-01

    The principle of gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) has existed for many years but, while simple in concept, the effective practical application of this therapy has proven to be challenging. Improvements in the efficacy of GDEPT have been achieved principally through the choice and development of more effective vectors, by optimizing and controlling gene expression and by increasing the activity of the delivered enzyme through mutation. While innovation continues in this field, the pioneering GDEPT systems designed to treat glioma and prostate cancer have completed or are now entering late-stage clinical trials, respectively. As the pace of innovation in GDEPT technology far exceeds its clinical application, these initial products are anticipated to be replaced by next-generation biologicals. This review highlights recent progress in the strategies and development of GDEPT and summarizes the status of current clinical trials. With the first GDEPT product for treatment of resected gliomas poised to gain marketing approval, a new era in cancer gene medicine is emerging. PMID:19649987

  17. New developments in the treatment of hyperammonemia: emerging use of carglumic acid

    PubMed Central

    Daniotti, Marta; la Marca, Giancarlo; Fiorini, Patrizio; Filippi, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Hyperammonemia is a true neonatal emergency with high toxicity for the central nervous system and developmental delay. The causes of neonatal hyperammonemia are genetic defects of urea cycle enzymes, organic acidemias, lysinuric protein intolerance, hyperammonemia–hyperornithinemia– homocitrullinemia syndrome, transient hyperammonemia of the newborn, and congenital hyperinsulinism with hyperammonemia. In some of these conditions the high blood ammonia levels are due to the reduction of N-acetylglutamate, an essential cofactor necessary for the function of the urea cycle, or to the reduction of carbamoyl-phosphate synthase-I activity. In these cases, N-carbamylglutamate (carglumic acid) can be administered together with the conventional therapy. Carglumic acid is an analog of N-acetylglutamate that has a direct action on carbamoyl-phosphate synthase-I. Its effects are reactivation of the urea cycle and reduction of plasma ammonia levels. As a consequence it improves the traditional treatment, avoiding the need of hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. In this review we evaluate the possible field of application of carglumic acid and its effectiveness and safety. PMID:21403788

  18. 18 CFR 2.60 - Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures. 2.60 Section 2.60 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  19. Beyond land application: Emerging technologies for the treatment and reuse of anaerobically digested agricultural and food waste.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Johnathon P; Yang, Liangcheng; Ge, Xumeng; Wang, Zhiwu; Li, Yebo

    2015-10-01

    Effective treatment and reuse of the massive quantities of agricultural and food wastes generated daily has the potential to improve the sustainability of food production systems. Anaerobic digestion (AD) is used throughout the world as a waste treatment process to convert organic waste into two main products: biogas and nutrient-rich digestate, called AD effluent. Biogas can be used as a source of renewable energy or transportation fuels, while AD effluent is traditionally applied to land as a soil amendment. However, there are economic and environmental concerns that limit widespread land application, which may lead to underutilization of AD for the treatment of agricultural and food wastes. To combat these constraints, existing and novel methods have emerged to treat or reuse AD effluent. The objective of this review is to analyze several emerging methods used for efficient treatment and reuse of AD effluent. Overall, the application of emerging technologies is limited by AD effluent composition, especially the total solid content. Some technologies, such as composting, use the solid fraction of AD effluent, while most other technologies, such as algae culture and struvite crystallization, use the liquid fraction. Therefore, dewatering of AD effluent, reuse of the liquid and solid fractions, and land application could all be combined to sustainably manage the large quantities of AD effluent produced. Issues such as pathogen regrowth and prevalence of emerging organic micro-pollutants are also discussed. PMID:26235446

  20. 21 CFR 500.65 - Epinephrine injection 1:1,000 in 10-milliliter containers for emergency treatment of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... containers for emergency treatment of anaphylactoid shock in cattle, horses, sheep, and swine. 500.65 Section... cattle, horses, sheep, and swine. (a) Anaphylactoid reactions in cattle, horses, sheep, and swine occur... treating anaphylactoid shock. Usual Dosage: Cattle, horses, sheep, and swine—1 cubic centimeter per...

  1. 21 CFR 500.65 - Epinephrine injection 1:1,000 in 10-milliliter containers for emergency treatment of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... containers for emergency treatment of anaphylactoid shock in cattle, horses, sheep, and swine. 500.65 Section... cattle, horses, sheep, and swine. (a) Anaphylactoid reactions in cattle, horses, sheep, and swine occur... treating anaphylactoid shock. Usual Dosage: Cattle, horses, sheep, and swine—1 cubic centimeter per...

  2. 21 CFR 500.65 - Epinephrine injection 1:1,000 in 10-milliliter containers for emergency treatment of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... containers for emergency treatment of anaphylactoid shock in cattle, horses, sheep, and swine. 500.65 Section... cattle, horses, sheep, and swine. (a) Anaphylactoid reactions in cattle, horses, sheep, and swine occur... treating anaphylactoid shock. Usual Dosage: Cattle, horses, sheep, and swine—1 cubic centimeter per...

  3. 21 CFR 500.65 - Epinephrine injection 1:1,000 in 10-milliliter containers for emergency treatment of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... containers for emergency treatment of anaphylactoid shock in cattle, horses, sheep, and swine. 500.65 Section... cattle, horses, sheep, and swine. (a) Anaphylactoid reactions in cattle, horses, sheep, and swine occur... treating anaphylactoid shock. Usual Dosage: Cattle, horses, sheep, and swine—1 cubic centimeter per...

  4. 21 CFR 500.65 - Epinephrine injection 1:1,000 in 10-milliliter containers for emergency treatment of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... containers for emergency treatment of anaphylactoid shock in cattle, horses, sheep, and swine. 500.65 Section... cattle, horses, sheep, and swine. (a) Anaphylactoid reactions in cattle, horses, sheep, and swine occur... treating anaphylactoid shock. Usual Dosage: Cattle, horses, sheep, and swine—1 cubic centimeter per...

  5. Long-Term Follow-Up After Endovascular Treatment of Acute Aortic Emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Pitton, M. B. Herber, S.; Schmiedt, W.; Neufang, A.; Dorweiler, B.; Dueber, C.

    2008-01-15

    Purpose. To investigate the long-term outcome and efficacy of emergency treatment of acute aortic diseases with endovascular stent-grafts. Methods. From September 1995 to April 2007, 37 patients (21 men, 16 women; age 53.9 {+-} 19.2 years, range 18-85 years) with acute complications of diseases of the descending thoracic aorta were treated by endovascular stent-grafts: traumatic aortic ruptures (n = 9), aortobronchial fistulas due to penetrating ulcer or hematothorax (n = 6), acute type B dissections with aortic wall hematoma, penetration, or ischemia (n = 13), and symptomatic aneurysm of the thoracic aorta (n = 9) with pain, penetration, or rupture. Diagnosis was confirmed by contrast-enhanced CT. Multiplanar reformations were used for measurement of the landing zones of the stent-grafts. Stent-grafts were inserted via femoral or iliac cut-down. Two procedures required aortofemoral bypass grafting prior to stent-grafting due to extensive arteriosclerotic stenosis of the iliac arteries. In this case the bypass graft was used for introduction of the stent-graft. Results. A total of 46 stent-grafts were implanted: Vanguard/Stentor (n = 4), Talent (n = 31), and Valiant (n = 11). Stent-graft extension was necessary in 7 cases. In 3 cases primary graft extension was done during the initial procedure (in 1 case due to distal migration of the graft during stent release, in 2 cases due to the total length of the aortic aneurysm). In 4 cases secondary graft extensions were performed-for new aortic ulcers at the proximal stent struts (after 5 days) and distal to the graft (after 8 months) and recurrent aortobronchial fistulas 5 months and 9 years after the initial procedure-resulting in a total of 41 endovascular procedures. The 30-day mortality rate was 8% (3 of 37) and the overall follow-up was 29.9 {+-} 36.6 months (range 0-139 months). All patients with traumatic ruptures demonstrated an immediate sealing of bleeding. Patients with aortobronchial fistulas also

  6. A systematic review on prevalence and risk factors associated with treatment- emergent central sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Nigam, Gaurav; Pathak, Charu; Riaz, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Treatment-emergent central sleep apnea (TECSA) is the appearance of central apneas and hypopneas after significant resolution of the obstructive events has been attained using positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of TECSA and to understand what factors are associated with its development. METHODS: PubMed, MEDLINE, Scopus, Web of Science and Cochran Library databases were searched with Mesh headings to locate studies linking TECSA and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). RESULTS: Nine studies were identified that reported the prevalence of TECSA ranging from 5.0% to 20.3%. Prevalence of TECSA for studies using only full night titration was between 5.0% and 12.1% where as it was between 6.5% and 20.3% for studies using split-night polysomnogram. The mean effective continuous PAP (CPAP) setting varied between 7.5 cm and 15.2 cm of water for patients in TECSA group and between 7.4 cm and 13.6 cm of water for the group without TECSA. CONCLUSIONS: The aggregate point prevalence of TECSA is about 8% with the estimated range varying from 5% to 20% in patients with untreated OSA. The prevalence tends to be higher for split-night studies compared to full night titration studies. TECSA can occur at any CPAP setting although extremely high CPAP settings could increase the likelihood. Male gender, higher baseline apnea-hypopnea index, and central apnea index at the time of diagnostic study could be associated with the development of TECSA at a subsequent titration study. PMID:27512510

  7. Current and emerging treatments for irritable bowel syndrome with constipation and chronic idiopathic constipation: focus on prosecretory agents.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Rachel H; Luthin, David R

    2015-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C) and chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC) are two common functional gastrointestinal disorders that impair quality of life and pose a significant economic burden to the health care system. Current therapeutic options include lifestyle modifications, over-the-counter (OTC) agents, antispasmodics, serotonin agonists, and lubiprostone and linaclotide, two prosecretory prescription drugs approved for the treatment of IBS-C and CIC. This review discusses the efficacy and safety of current treatments and emerging therapies for the treatment of IBS-C and CIC, with a focus on the prosecretory agents. A search of the PubMed database (1966-November 2014) was performed to identify relevant articles; clinical trials on emerging agents were also identified by searching the ClinicalTrials.gov registry. OTC laxatives may relieve constipation but do not treat abdominal pain and discomfort. Antispasmodics may provide short-term relief in patients with IBS-C, but their utility is limited by anticholinergic adverse effects. Tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors have shown benefit in providing global symptom relief and in improving abdominal discomfort, but further research is needed. Phase III clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of lubiprostone and linaclotide relative to placebo for the short-term treatment of IBS-C and CIC, with improvements reported in stool frequency, perceived constipation severity, and abdominal pain and discomfort. Relatively small response rates, higher costs, and adverse effects associated with lubiprostone and linaclotide will likely render these agents suitable as second-line therapies in the treatment of IBS-C and CIC. Emerging potential treatment options include prucalopride, plecanatide, elobixibat, and tenapanor. Several of these emerging therapies have novel mechanisms of action and may show promise in patients

  8. An evidence-based approach to the evaluation and treatment of low back pain in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Borczuk, Pierre

    2013-07-01

    Low back pain is the most common musculoskeletal complaint that results in a visit to the emergency department, and it is 1 of the top 5 most common complaints in emergency medicine. Estimates of annual healthcare expenditures for low back pain in the United States exceed $90 billion annually, not even taking lost productivity and business costs into account. This review explores an evidence-based rationale for the evaluation of the patient with low back pain, and it provides guidance on risk stratification pertaining to laboratory assessment and radiologic imaging in the emergency department. Published guidelines from the American College of Physicians and American Pain Society are reviewed, with emphasis on best evidence for pharmacologic treatments, self-care interventions, and more invasive procedures and surgery in management of low back pain. Utilizing effective and proven strategies will avoid medical errors, provide better care for patients, and help manage healthcare resources and costs. PMID:24044786

  9. The depressed patient and suicidal patient in the emergency department: evidence-based management and treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bernard; Gitlin, David; Patel, Ronak

    2011-09-01

    There are approximately 12 million emergency department (ED) visits related to mental health/substance abuse annually. Approximately 650,000 patients are evaluated annually for suicide attempts. Evidence to guide the management and treatment of depression and suicidal ideation in the ED is limited. A large variation exists in the quality of care provided due to the lack of standardized guidelines aiding emergency clinicians. Depression ften manifests as unexplained somatic complaints, adding to the challenge of making this diagnosis in the ED. Recognition of depression by emergency clinicians has proved poor. Suicide is associated with multiple risk factors, of which a prior history of suicide attempts is the single strongest predictor. A systematic approach is required in the ED to identify patients with or at risk of having depression, and screening tools may offer utility to identify high-risk patients. PMID:22164363

  10. Can post-wildfire Burned Area Emergency Response treatments mitigate watershed degradation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neary, D.; Ffolliott, P.; Bautista, S.; Wittenberg, L.

    2009-04-01

    Wildfire is a natural phenomenon that began with the development of terrestrial vegetation in a lightning-filled atmosphere 350 million years ago. As human populations developed in the Pleistocene and Holocene epochs, mankind transformed fire into one of its oldest tools. A negative impact of prime concern in the 21st Century is desertification. This term refers to land degradation, not the immediate creation of classical deserts. It is about the loss of the land's proper hydrologic function and biological productivity as a result of human activities and climate change. It affects 33% of the earth's surface and over a billion people. Fire-related desertification has a number of environmental, social, and economic consequences. The two key environmental consequences are soil erosion and exotic plant invasions. Wildfires typically have exotic plant species abundances ten times that of undisturbed forests (Neary et al. 2003). Seeding has been used for many years in the USA as a prime Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) treatment. Until recently, this seeding contributed to exotic plant invasions since fast-growing, but non native plants seeds were used. The use of native plant seeds and sterile hybrids has reduced this problem somewhat. Erosion after wildfires documented in the USA can be in the range of <1 to 370 Mg/ha, depending on fire severity, degree of water repellency, slope, and post-fire rainfall events. Soil losses in the high end of that range definitely exceed soil loss tolerances and contribute to desertification. Soil disturbance and degradation after wildfires is a function of fire severity, and the impacts can range from the minimal to catastrophic and long-lasting. The most obvious impact is the loss of organic matter from combustion of the forest floor. Changes in soil physical and chemical properties with high-severity wildfire can produce water repellency, aggravating rainfall runoff and erosion. Since soils take long times to form (50 to 75

  11. Recurrent Challenges for Clinicians: Emergence of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Vancomycin Resistance, and Current Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Tarai, Bansidhar; Das, Poonam; Kumar, Dilip

    2013-07-01

    Gram-positive pathogens mainly, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, are developing increasing resistance to glycopeptides that pose a problem in treating infections caused by these pathogens. Vancomycin is the treatment of choice in treating methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Community-acquired MRSA is associated with infections in patients without recent history of hospital admission and without the classical risk factors for MRSA carriage (including healthcare personnel). MRSA poses new threats and challenges beyond the hospital with the emergence of community-acquired MRSA. Indiscriminate use of vancomycin leads to the emergence and spread of vancomycin resistance in multidrug resistant strains is of growing concern in the recent years. Minimum Inhibitory concentration (MIC) remains an important determinant in choosing the right antibiotics. Infections caused by MRSA strains with vancomycin MIC > 4 μg/mL leads to the vancomycin treatment failure. The Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute had also lowered the cut-off susceptibility and resistance breakpoints for vancomycin. Despite the availability of newer antimicrobial agents (Linezolid, Daptomycin, Tigecycline) for drug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens, clinicians and patients still need options for treatment of MRSA infection. There is a need to reduce the global burden of infections caused by Gram-positive pathogens and its resistant strains (mainly MRSA). Continuous efforts should be made to prevent the spread and the emergence of glycopeptide resistance by early detection of the resistant strains and using the proper infection control measures in the hospital setting. PMID:24701097

  12. Emergencies in Orthodontics. Part 2: Management of Removable Appliances, Functional Appliances and other Adjuncts to Orthodontic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Dowsing, Paul; Murray, Alison; Sandler, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    In the second of two papers, management of orthodontic emergencies involving appliances other than Fixed appliances will be detailed. Problems relating to removable appliances, as well as other orthodontic adjuncts, will be discussed. Unfortunately, orthodontic appliance breakage does occur, despite the clinicians giving clear and concise instructions to the patients and their parents at fitting. If general dental practitioners have a practical knowledge of how to diagnose problems and to provide appropriate advice or timely 'emergency' treatment, this will significantly reduce the inconvenience for all parties concerned. It should also ensure that treatment progresses in the most efficient and comfortable manner for their patients. In specific situations the early, accurate identification of the problem and instigation of its appropriate management can avoid more serious consequences. Clinical Relevance: Appropriate handling of an orthodontic 'emergency' by the dentist can, on many occasions, provide immediate relief to the patient. This will, in turn, allow treatment to continue in the right direction, thus allowing more efficient and effective use of valuable resources. PMID:26076540

  13. Outcome and patients' satisfaction after functional treatment of acute lateral ankle injuries at emergency departments versus family doctor offices

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Patrik R; Benneker, Lorin M; Eggli, Stefan; Zimmermann, Heinz; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K

    2008-01-01

    Background In some Western countries, more and more patients seek initial treatment even for minor injuries at emergency units of hospitals. The initial evaluation and treatment as well as aftercare of these patients require large amounts of personnel and logistical resources, which are limited and costly, especially if compared to treatment by a general practitioner. In this study, we investigated whether outsourcing from our level 1 trauma center to a general practitioner has an influence on patient satisfaction and compliance. Methods This prospective, randomized study, included n = 100 patients who suffered from a lateral ankle ligament injury grade I-II (16, 17). After radiological exclusion of osseous lesions, the patients received early functional treatment and were shown physical therapy exercises to be done at home, without immobilization or the use of stabilizing ortheses. The patients were randomly assigned into two groups of 50 patients each: Group A (ER): Follow-up and final examination in the hospital's emergency unit. Group B (GP): Follow-up by general practitioner, final examination at hospital's emergency unit. The patients were surveyed regarding their satisfaction with the treatment and outcome of the treatment. Results Female and male patients were equally represented in both groups. The age of the patients ranged from 16 – 64 years, with a mean age of 34 years (ER) and 35 years (GP). 98% (n = 98) of all patients were satisfied with their treatment, and 93% (n = 93) were satisfied with the outcome. For these parameters no significant difference between the two groups could be noted (p = 0.7406 and 0.7631 respectively). 39% of all patients acquired stabilizing ortheses like ankle braces (Aircast, Malleoloc etc.) on their own initiative. There was a not significant tendency for more self-acquired ortheses in the group treated by general practicioners (p = 0,2669). Conclusion Patients who first present at the ER with a lateral ankle ligament

  14. Orders to limit emergency treatment for an ambulance service in a large metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Miles, S H; Crimmins, T J

    1985-07-26

    We describe a policy allowing paramedics and emergency physicians to honor orders from nursing home records not to perform resuscitation or endotracheal intubation. The policy was adopted by the regional body coordinating emergency medical care and endorsed by the county medical society. The policy establishes community-wide definitions for "do not resuscitate" and "do not intubate" orders. It requires physicians to write such directives in patient's medical records and to update them every two years. It urges long-term care facilities to adopt policies to help ensure good decision-making practices in the formulation of these directives. The policy intends to partially address the unnecessary loss of patient autonomy that occurs when emergency care is administered according to routine orders. PMID:4009881

  15. Emergency drinking water treatment during source water pollution accidents in China: origin analysis, framework and technologies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Jian; Chen, Chao; Lin, Peng-Fei; Hou, Ai-Xin; Niu, Zhang-Bin; Wang, Jun

    2011-01-01

    China has suffered frequent source water contamination accidents in the past decade, which has resulted in severe consequences to the water supply of millions of residents. The origins of typical cases of contamination are discussed in this paper as well as the emergency response to these accidents. In general, excessive pursuit of rapid industrialization and the unreasonable location of factories are responsible for the increasing frequency of accidental pollution events. Moreover, insufficient attention to environmental protection and rudimentary emergency response capability has exacerbated the consequences of such accidents. These environmental accidents triggered or accelerated the promulgation of stricter environmental protection policy and the shift from economic development mode to a more sustainable direction, which should be regarded as the turning point of environmental protection in China. To guarantee water security, China is trying to establish a rapid and effective emergency response framework, build up the capability of early accident detection, and develop efficient technologies to remove contaminants from water. PMID:21133359

  16. Predictors of Treatment Response for Suicidal Youth Referred for Emergency Psychiatric Hospitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huey, Jr., Stanley J.; Henggeler, Scott W.; Rowland, Melisa D.; Halliday-Boykins, Colleen A.; Cunningham, Phillippe B.; Pickrel, Susan G.

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated factors that predicted poor treatment response for 70 suicidal youth (ages 10 to 17 years; 67% African American) who received either multisystemic therapy (MST) or inpatient psychiatric hospitalization. Following treatment, suicidal youth were classified as either treatment responders or nonresponders based on caregiver or…

  17. National Analysis of Differences among Substance Abuse Treatment Outcomes: College Student and Nonstudent Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahker, Ethan; Acion, Laura; Arndt, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To discover differences between student and nonstudent substance abuse treatment demographics, treatment characteristics, and outcomes. Participants: Conducted February 2014, clients without prior treatment admissions, aged 18-24, not in methadone maintenance therapy, and in nonintensive and ambulatory intensive outpatient treatment…

  18. Hypnosis in the treatment of acute pain in the emergency department setting.

    PubMed Central

    Deltito, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Emergency ward physicians are presented daily with patients in pain. Provisions of safe, quick pain control remains one of their major duties. Hypnosis can be used as an effective adjunct or substitute for analgesic medications when these drugs prove to be ineffective or contraindicated. Four such illustrative cases of attempted pain control are presented. The psychological foundations of pain and its assessment are discussed. The emergency ward physician can obtain facility in hypnotic techniques with only modest training. Hypnosis may then become a valuable tool in helping him provide safe and effective pain management. PMID:6728748

  19. Chloroquine could be used for the treatment of filoviral infections and other viral infections that emerge or emerged from viruses requiring an acidic pH for infectivity.

    PubMed

    Akpovwa, Hephzibah

    2016-06-01

    Viruses from the Filoviridae family, as many other virus families, require an acidic pH for successful infection and are therefore susceptible to the actions of 4-aminoquinolines, such as chloroquine. Although the mechanisms of action of chloroquine clearly indicate that it might inhibit filoviral infections, several clinical trials that attempted to use chloroquine in the treatment of other acute viral infections - including dengue and influenza A and B - caused by low pH-dependent viruses, have reported that chloroquine had no clinical efficacy, and these results demoted chloroquine from the potential treatments for other virus families requiring low pH for infectivity. The present review is aimed at investigating whether chloroquine could combat the present Ebola virus epidemic, and also at exploring the main reasons for the reported lack of efficacy. Literature was sourced from PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, reference list of articles and textbooks - Fields Virology (Volumes 1and 2), the cytokine handbook, Pharmacology in Medicine: Principles and Practice, and hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine retinopathy. The present analysis concludes that (1) chloroquine might find a place in the treatment of Ebola, either as a monotherapy or in combination therapies; (2) the ineffectiveness of chloroquine, or its analogue, hydroxychloroquine, at treating infections from low pH-dependent viruses is a result of the failure to attain and sustain a steady state concentration sufficient to increase and keep the pH of the acidic organelles to approximately neutral levels; (3) to successfully treat filoviral infections - or other viral infections that emerge or emerged from low pH-dependent viruses - a steady state chloroquine plasma concentration of at least 1 µg/mL(~3.125 μM/L) or a whole blood concentration of 16 μM/L must be achieved and be sustained until the patients' viraemia becomes undetectable. These concentrations, however, do not rule out the efficacy of

  20. Outpatient Care of Young People after Emergency Treatment of Deliberate Self-Harm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridge, Jeffrey A.; Marcus, Steven C.; Olfson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about the mental health care received by young people after an episode of deliberate self-harm. This study examined predictors of emergency department (ED) discharge, mental health assessments in the ED, and follow-up outpatient mental health care for Medicaid-covered youth with deliberate self-harm. Method: A…

  1. Ability of newly emerged adult Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes to exit belowground stormwater treatment systems via lateral conveyance pipes.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Marco E; Harbison, Justin E; Burns, Joseph E; Hu, Renjie

    2012-03-01

    Culex quinquefasciatus Say mosquitoes flourish in belowground stormwater systems in the southern United States. Recent evidence suggests that oviposition-site-seeking females may have difficulties locating, entering, and ovipositing inside permanent water chambers when surface entry through pickholes in manhole covers are sealed. It remains unknown, however, if newly emerged adults are able to detect cues necessary to exit these partly sealed systems via lateral conveyance pipes or if they perish belowground. Fourth instar Cx. quinquefasciatus were placed within proprietary belowground stormwater treatment systems to determine the percentage of newly emerged adults able to escape treatment chambers via a single lateral conveyance pipe. Overall, 56% of deployed mosquitoes were captured in adult exit traps with an 1:1 male:female ratio. The percentage of adults captured varied significantly among chambers, but was not associated with structural site characteristics such as the chamber depth or the length and course of conveyance pipe to the exit trap. Empirical observations suggested that longbodied cellar spiders, Pholcus phalangioides (Fuesslin), ubiquitous in these structures, may have reduced adult trap capture. Findings demonstrate that newly emerged Cx. quinquefasciatus can exit subterranean chambers under potentially difficult structural conditions but suggest that a portion may perish in the absence of surface exit points in manhole shafts. PMID:22493853

  2. Managing multiple myeloma: the emerging role of novel therapies and adapting combination treatment for higher risk settings.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Paul G; Laubach, Jacob; Mitsiades, Constantine S; Schlossman, Robert; Hideshima, Teru; Redman, Katherine; Chauhan, Dharminder; Ghobrial, Irene M; Munshi, Nikhil; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2011-09-01

    Novel therapies have transformed the treatment paradigm for multiple myeloma with significant improvements in survival now seen in both younger and older patients. Nonetheless, the disease is heterogeneous and high-risk patients in particular continue to have poor outcome. Moreover, the disease remains incurable. Efforts to refine risk stratification and disease characteristics continue with the use of cytogenetics, enhanced imaging techniques and other new technologies, such as genomics. The integration of novel therapies into induction therapy, consolidation and maintenance continues to evolve, and the appropriate use of combination strategies including proteasome inhibition and immunomodulatory treatment is emerging as a platform with application across the disease spectrum. Despite these advances, resistance to novel agents occurs and so the identification of new targets and the recognition of clonal heterogeneity are especially important as improvements to current treatment strategies are developed, with the goal of further improving patient outcome. PMID:21732930

  3. Antisense treatment of caliciviridae: an emerging disease agent of animals and humans.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alvin W; Matson, David O; Stein, David A; Skilling, Douglas E; Kroeker, Andrew D; Berke, Tamas; Iversen, Patrick L

    2002-04-01

    The Earth's oceans are the primary reservoir for an emerging family of RNA viruses, the Caliciviridae, which can cause a spectrum of diseases in marine animals, wildlife, farm animals, pets and humans. Certain members of this family have unusually broad host ranges, and some are zoonotic (transmissible from animals to humans). The RNA virus replicative processes lack effective genetic repair mechanisms, and, therefore, virtually every calicivirus replicate is a mutant. Hence, traditional therapeutics dependent on specific nucleic acid sequences or protein epitopes lack the required diversity of sequence or conformational specificity that would be required to reliably detect, prevent or treat infections from these mutant clusters (quasi-species) of RNA viruses, including the Caliciviridae. Antisense technology using phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers shows promise in overcoming these current diagnostic and therapeutic problems inherent with newly emerging viral diseases. PMID:12044040

  4. Evaluation of Drug Utilization Patterns during Initial Treatment in the Emergency Room: A Retroprospective Pharmacoepidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Cheekavolu, Chakrapani; Pathapati, Rama Mohan; Babasaheb Laxmansingh, Kudagi; Saginela, Satish Kumar; Makineedi, Veera Prasad; Siddalingappa; Kumar, Amitabh

    2011-01-01

    Background. We assessed the prescribing trends, average number of drugs per prescription, and cost per prescription during the initial contact of the patient with the physician in emergency room. Methods. This retro-prospective study was conducted over a period of six months. Medical records of two hundred patients were reviewed for prescribing patterns. Results. 52 different types of drugs (996 drugs) were prescribed in total 200 prescriptions during the mean time spent in emergency room of 2.8 ± 1.4 hours. The average number of drugs per prescription was 4.2 ± 1.2. 95% of drugs were prescribed by trade name. Average drugs cost per prescription was 784 ± 134 rupees (17USD). Conclusion. Polypharmacy remains the main form of irrational prescribing. Prescribing patterns of drugs were knowledge based rather than WHO criteria for rational use of drugs. PMID:22242208

  5. Computer-Based Script Training for Aphasia: Emerging Themes from Post-Treatment Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherney, Leora R.; Halper, Anita S.; Kaye, Rosalind C.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents results of post-treatment interviews following computer-based script training for persons with chronic aphasia. Each of the 23 participants received 9 weeks of AphasiaScripts training. Post-treatment interviews were conducted with the person with aphasia and/or a significant other person. The 23 interviews yielded 584 coded…

  6. Nosocomial poisoning associated with emergency department treatment of organophosphate toxicity--Georgia, 2000.

    PubMed

    Geller, R J; Singleton, K L; Tarantino, M L; Drenzek, C L; Toomey, K E

    2001-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) staff caring for patients contaminated with toxic chemicals are at risk for developing toxicity from secondary contamination. This report describes three cases of occupational illnesses associated with organophosphate toxicity caused by exposure to a contaminated patient and underscores the importance of using personal protection equipment (PPE) and establishing and following decontamination procedures in EDs and other areas of acute care hospitals. PMID:11327219

  7. Nosocomial poisoning associated with emergency department treatment of organophosphate toxicity--Georgia, 2000.

    PubMed

    2001-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) staff caring for patients contaminated with toxic chemicals are at risk for developing toxicity from secondary contamination. This report describes three cases of occupational illnesses associated with organophosphate toxicity caused by exposure to a contaminated patient and underscores the importance of using personal protection equipment (PPE) and establishing and following decontamination procedures in EDs and other areas of acute care hospitals. PMID:11198947

  8. DESIGN OF NIDA CTN PROTOCOL 0047: SCREENING, MOTIVATIONAL ASSESSMENT, REFERRAL, AND TREATMENT IN EMERGENCY DEPARTMENTS (SMART-ED)

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Dennis M.; Adinoff, Bryon; Crandall, Cameron; Forcehimes, Alyssa A.; Lindblad, Robert; Mandler, Raul N.; Oden, Neal; Perl, Harold I.; Walker, Robrina

    2011-01-01

    Background Medical settings such as emergency departments (EDs) present an opportunity to identify and provide services for individuals with substance use problems who might otherwise never receive any form of assessment, referral, or intervention. Although Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) models have been extensively studied and are considered effective for individuals with alcohol problems presenting in emergency departments and other medical settings, the efficacy of such interventions has not been established for drug users presenting in EDs. Objectives This paper describes the design of a NIDA Clinical Trials Network protocol testing the efficacy of an SBIRT model in medical EDs, highlighting considerations that that are pertinent to the design of other studies targeting substance use behaviors in medical treatment settings. Methods The protocol is described, and critical design decisions are discussed. Results Design challenges included defining treatment conditions, study population, and site characteristics; developing the screening process; choosing the primary outcome; balancing brevity and comprehensiveness of assessment; and selecting the strategy for statistical analysis. Conclusion Many of the issues arising in the design of this study will be relevant to future studies of interventions for addictions in medical settings. Scientific Significance Optimal trial design is critical to determining how best to integrate substance abuse interventions into medical care. PMID:21854285

  9. Phytotoxicity and naphthenic acid dissipation from oil sands fine tailings treatments planted with the emergent macrophyte Phragmites australis.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Sarah A; Headley, John V; Peru, Kerry M; Mikula, Randy J; Germida, James J

    2010-01-01

    During reclamation the water associated with the runoff or groundwater flushing from dry stackable tailings technologies may become available to the reclaimed environment within an oil sands lease. Here we evaluate the performance of the emergent macrophyte, common reed (Phragmites australis), grown in chemically amended mature fine tailings (MFT) and simulated runoff/seepage water from different MFT drying treatments. The present study also investigated the phytotoxicity of the concentration of oil sands naphthenic acids (NAs) in different MFT drying chemical treatments, in both planted and unplanted systems. We demonstrate that although growth was reduced, the emergent macrophyte common reed was capable of growing in diluted unamended MFT runoff, as well as in diluted runoff from MFT amended with either 0.25% lime and gypsum or 0.5% gypsum. Common reed can thus assist in the dewatering process of oil sands MFT. However, simulated runoff or seepage waters from chemically amended and dried MFT were phytotoxic, due to combined levels of salts, naphthenic acids and pH. Phytoremediation of runoff water/ground water seepage from dry-land applied MFT will thus require pre-treatment in order to make conditions more favorable for plant growth. PMID:20486009

  10. New and emerging targeted treatments in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Fred R; Suda, Kenichi; Wiens, Jacinta; Bunn, Paul A

    2016-09-01

    Targeted therapies are substantially changing the management of lung cancers. These treatments include drugs that target driver mutations, those that target presumed important molecules in cancer cell proliferation and survival, and those that inhibit immune checkpoint molecules. This area of research progresses day by day, with novel target discoveries, novel drug development, and use of novel combination treatments. Researchers and clinicians have also extensively investigated the predictive biomarkers and the molecular mechanisms underlying inherent or acquired resistance to these targeted therapies. We review recent progress in the development of targeted treatments for patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, especially focusing on data from published clinical trials. PMID:27598681