Science.gov

Sample records for emerging disinfection by-products

  1. Emerging Disinfection By-Products and Other Emerging Environmental Contaminants: What’s New

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will cover new research and concerns regarding drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) and other emerging environmental contaminants, such as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), pharmaceuticals, perchlorate, benzotriazoles, fuel additives (e.g., ethylene dibro...

  2. NEW DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT ISSUES: EMERGING DBP'S AND ALTERNATIVE ROUTES OF EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses current issues with drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs), which include emerging (unregulated) DBPs that can be formed at greater levels with alternative disinfectants (as compared to chlorine) and routes of human exposure (which include inhalation ...

  3. The formation and control of emerging disinfection by-products of health concern.

    PubMed

    Krasner, Stuart W

    2009-10-13

    When drinking water treatment plants disinfect water, a wide range of disinfection by-products (DBPs) of health and regulatory concern are formed. Recent studies have identified emerging DBPs (e.g. iodinated trihalomethanes (THMs) and acids, haloacetonitriles, halonitromethanes (HNMs), haloacetaldehydes, nitrosamines) that may be more toxic than some of the regulated ones (e.g. chlorine- and bromine-containing THMs and haloacetic acids). Some of these emerging DBPs are associated with impaired drinking water supplies (e.g. impacted by treated wastewater, algae, iodide). In some cases, alternative primary or secondary disinfectants to chlorine (e.g. chloramines, chlorine dioxide, ozone, ultraviolet) that minimize the formation of some of the regulated DBPs may increase the formation of some of the emerging by-products. However, optimization of the various treatment processes and disinfection scenarios can allow plants to control to varying degrees the formation of regulated and emerging DBPs. For example, pre-disinfection with chlorine, chlorine dioxide or ozone can destroy precursors for N-nitrosodimethylamine, which is a chloramine by-product, whereas pre-oxidation with chlorine or ozone can oxidize iodide to iodate and minimize iodinated DBP formation during post-chloramination. Although pre-ozonation may increase the formation of trihaloacetaldehydes or selected HNMs during post-chlorination or chloramination, biofiltration may reduce the formation potential of these by-products. PMID:19736234

  4. Emerging Disinfection By-Products and Other Emerging Environmental Contaminants: What's New

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) have been associated with adverse human health effects, including bladder cancer, early term miscarriage, and birth defects. While it is vitally important to kill harmful pathogens in water, it is also important to minimize harmful ...

  5. EMERGING DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS OF TOXICOLOGICAL INTEREST: RESULTS OF A NATIONWIDE OCCURRENCE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Safe Drinking Water Act and Amendments requires that EPA address disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water. DBPs are formed when a disinfectant (such as chlorine) reacts with organic matter and/or bromide naturally present in source waters. Drinking water disinfecti...

  6. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS AND OTHER EMERGING CONTAMINANTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) have been studied for the last 30 years, significant, new concerns have arisen. These concerns include adverse reproductive and developmental effects recently observed in human populations, concerns that the types of cancer...

  7. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS OF EMERGING CONCERN: RESULTS OF A U.S. NATIONWIDE OCCURRENCE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are of concern because some epidemiologic studies have shown that some DBPs are associated with cancer or adverse reproductive/developmental effects in human populations and other studies have shown that certain DBPs cause similar he...

  8. OCCURRENCE, GENOTOXICITY, AND CARCINOGENICITY OF EMERGING DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER: A REVIEW AND ROADMAP FOR RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Occurrence, Genotoxicity, and Carcinogenicity of Emerging Disinfection By-products in Drinking Water: A Review and Roadmap for Research
    Summary of Paper
    What is study?
    This is the first review of the 30 year's research effort on the occurrence, genotoxicity,...

  9. OCCURRENCE, GENOTOXICITY, AND CARCINOGENICITY OF EMERGING DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER: A REVIEW AND ROADMAP FOR RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed when disinfectants (chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide, or chloramines) react with naturally occurring organic matter, anthropogenic contaminants, bromide, and iodide during the production of drinking water. Here we review 30 years of re...

  10. Roadmap for Interdisciplinary Research on Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    Slide presentation on interdisciplinary research on drinking water disinfection by-products which summarized important issues with drinking water disinfection by-products and focused on emerging, unregulated DBPs.

  11. Occurrence and exposures to disinfectants and disinfection by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Cumming, R.B.; Jolley, R.L.

    1992-12-31

    Disinfection by-products are associated with all chemical disinfectants. The concentration and toxic nature of the disinfection byproducts (DBPs) is a direct function of the chemical nature of the disinfectant itself and/or of the chemical reactions of the disinfectant with reaction substrates in the water, especially organic constituents. A principal advantage of biological and physical water treatment processes, such as filtration, is the lack of chemical reactions producing disinfectant-related DBPs. The use of the highest quality source water available is important for minimization of DBP formation. In lieu of such high quality water, improvement of water quality by removal of DBP precursors through filtration or other means before application of chemical disinfectants is important. Most, if not all, water treatment experts are aware of these simplistic axioms. In view of the increasing knowledge being developed concerning DBPs including the identification of ``new`` DBPs, prudence dictates minimization of DBP formation. Wholesome drinking water is perhaps the biggest economic bargain available to consumers. The cost-effectiveness of water quality improvement should be evaluated with that in mind.

  12. Occurrence and exposures to disinfectants and disinfection by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Cumming, R.B.; Jolley, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    Disinfection by-products are associated with all chemical disinfectants. The concentration and toxic nature of the disinfection byproducts (DBPs) is a direct function of the chemical nature of the disinfectant itself and/or of the chemical reactions of the disinfectant with reaction substrates in the water, especially organic constituents. A principal advantage of biological and physical water treatment processes, such as filtration, is the lack of chemical reactions producing disinfectant-related DBPs. The use of the highest quality source water available is important for minimization of DBP formation. In lieu of such high quality water, improvement of water quality by removal of DBP precursors through filtration or other means before application of chemical disinfectants is important. Most, if not all, water treatment experts are aware of these simplistic axioms. In view of the increasing knowledge being developed concerning DBPs including the identification of new'' DBPs, prudence dictates minimization of DBP formation. Wholesome drinking water is perhaps the biggest economic bargain available to consumers. The cost-effectiveness of water quality improvement should be evaluated with that in mind.

  13. Innovative method for prioritizing emerging disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water on the basis of their potential impact on public health.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Armelle; Forestier, Delphine; Lenes, Dorothée; Benanou, David; Jacob, Severine; Arfi, Catherine; Lambolez, Lucie; Levi, Yves

    2010-05-01

    Providing microbiologically safe drinking water is a major public health issue. However, chemical disinfection can produce unintended health hazards involving disinfection by-products (DBPs). In an attempt to clarify the potential public health concerns associated with emerging disinfection by-products (EDBPs), this study was intended to help to identify those suspected of posing potential related health effects. In view of the ever-growing list of EDBPs in drinking water and the lack of consensus about them, we have developed an innovative prioritization method that would allow us to address this issue. We first set up an exhaustive database including all the current published data relating to EDBPs in drinking water (toxicity, occurrence, epidemiology and international or local guidelines/regulations). We then developed a ranking method intended to prioritize the EDBPs. This method, which was based on a calculation matrix with different coefficients, was applied to the data regarding their potential contribution to the health risk assessment process. This procedure allowed us to identify and rank three different groups of EDBPs: Group I, consisting of the most critical EDBPs with regard to their potential health effects, has moderate occurrence but the highest toxicity. Group II has moderate to elevated occurrence and is associated with relevant toxicity, and Group III has very low occurrence and unknown or little toxicity. The EDBPs identified as posing the greatest potential risk using this method were as follows: NDMA and other nitrosamines, MX and other halofuranones, chlorate, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol, hydrazine, and two unregulated halomethanes, dichloromethane and tetrachloromethane. Our approach allowed us to define the EDBPs that it is most important to monitor in order to assess population exposure and related public health issues, and thus to improve drinking water treatment and distribution. It is also

  14. Studies on Disinfection By-Products and Drinking Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, Colleen E.

    2007-01-01

    Drinking water is disinfected with chemicals to remove pathogens, such as Giardia and Cryptosproridium, and prevent waterborne diseases such as cholera and typhoid. During disinfection, by-products are formed at trace concentrations. Because some of these by-products are suspected carcinogens, drinking water utilities must maintain the effectiveness of the disinfection process while minimizing the formation of by-products.

  15. Formation and Occurrence of Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed when disinfectants such as chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide, or chloramines react with naturally occurring organic matter, anthropogenic contaminants, bromide, and iodide during the production of drinking water. There is concern about D...

  16. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION BY ALTERNATIVE DISINFECTANTS AND REMOVAL BY GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of the use of the alternative disinfectants on the formation of halogenated disinfection by-products (DBPS) including total organic halide, trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacentonitriles, haloketones, chloral hydrate, and chloropicrin, were examined along with ...

  17. Status report on analytical methods to support the disinfectant/disinfection by-products regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The U.S. EPA is developng national regulations to control disinfectants and disinfection by-products in public drinking water supplies. Twelve disinfectants and disinfection by-products are identified for possible regulation under this rule. The document summarizes the analytical methods that EPA intends to propose as compliance monitoring methods. A discussion of surrogate measurements that are being considered for inclusion in the regulation is also provided.

  18. Genotoxicity of Disinfection By-products: Comparison to Carcinogenicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) can be formed when water is disinfected by various agents such as chlorine, ozone, or chloramines. Among the >600 DBPs identified in drinking water, 11 are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and another ~70 DBPs that occur at s...

  19. EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES OF DISINFECTANTS AND DISINFECTANT BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article provides a review of the epidemiologic evidence for human health effects that may be associated with the disinfection of drinking water. An epidemiologic study attempts to link human health effects with exposure to a specific agent (e.g., DBCM), agents (e.g., THMs or...

  20. CHARACTERIZING TOXICOLOGICALLY IMPORTANT DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concerns over trihalomethanes (THMs) and other halogenated by-products that can be formed during chlorination of drinking water, alternative disinfectants are being explored. Several drinking water treatment plants in the United States have altered their treatment methods...

  1. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concerns over trihalomethanes (THMs) and other halogenated by-products that can be formed during chlorination of drinking water, alternative disinfectants are being explored. Several drinking water treatment plants in the United States have altered their treatment methods...

  2. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfectants are being explored. Ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine are popular alternatives, as they produce low...

  3. Mutagenic activity of disinfection by-products.

    PubMed Central

    Cognet, L; Courtois, Y; Mallevialle, J

    1986-01-01

    Data on raw water quality, disinfection treatment practices, and the resulting mutagenic properties of the treated water were compiled from pilot- and full-scale treatment experiments to evaluate that parameter which might produce variability in the results of a mutagenic study. Analysis of the data and comparison of treatment practices indicated that the measured mutagenic activity is strongly related to the characteristics of the organic matter in the raw water, the methodology used to sample and detect mutagens, the scale of the study both in terms of treatment flow and period of study, and the point at which and the conditions under which oxidants are added during treatment. Conclusions regarding disinfection systems in full-scale water treatment plants include the following: When raw water is pretreated and high concentrations of organics are present in the raw water, both ozonation and chlorination increased mutagenic activity. However, no significant difference in mutagenicity was found between the two oxidants. Both in the case of a nitrified groundwater and a clarified surface water, the mutagenic activity of the water after ozonation was related to its mutagenic activity before ozonation. With ozonation, mutagenic activity decreased after granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Thus, when GAC filtration follows ozone disinfection, early addition of oxidants may not be deleterious to the finished water quality. When chlorine or chlorine dioxide is added after GAC filtration, chlorine dioxide was found to produce a less mutagenic water than chlorine. Although these conclusions suggest means of controlling mutagenic activity during treatment, it must be stressed that the measurement of mutagenicity is a presumptive index of contamination level. PMID:3816721

  4. CHLORINE DIOXIDE CHEMISTRY, REACTIONS, AND DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter contains two main sections-the first section describes the chemistry and reactions of chlorine dioxide, and the second describes the disinfection by-products (DBPs) of chlorine dioxide and their control. A short section on Research Needs completes this chapter. The...

  5. OCCURRENCE OF A NEW GENERATION OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A survey of disinfection by-product (DBP) occurrence in the United States was conducted at 12 drinking water treatment plants. In addition to currently regulated DBPs, more than 50 DBPs that rated a high priority for potential toxicity were studied. These priority DBPs included...

  6. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT CONTROL THROUGH BIOLOGICAL FILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection by-product (DBP) control through biofiltration is defined as the removal of DBP precursor mateterial (PM) by bacteria attached to the filte nedia. The PM consists of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and is utilized by the filter bacteria as a substrate for cell mainten...

  7. REDUCTION OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT PERCURSORS BY NANOFILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reduction of disinfection by-product (DBP) precursors by nanofiltration was investigated in Florida at both a groundwater site and a surface water site. eparate studies, involving pilot plant operations, were conducted for one year at each site. he principal research tasks at...

  8. Carcinogenicity of Disinfection By-products and Research Needs

    EPA Science Inventory

    A review by S.D. Richardson et al. (Mutat. Res. 636:178, 2007) presents the first analysis of the 30-year literature on the genotoxicity, carcinogenicity, and occurrence of 87 disinfection by-products (DBPs) identified in drinking water. Of these, 11 are regulated by the U.S. EP...

  9. REPRODUCTIVE EFFECTS OF ALTERNATE DISINFECTANTS AND THEIR BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a review article of the reproductive effects of alternate disinfectants and their by-products. The available literature is surveyed concerning studies of chlorine, chloramine, chlorine dioxide, chlorite, and chlorate. A more detailed discussion is given of reproductive st...

  10. THE UPTAKE OF WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS INTO FOODS DURING HOME PROCESSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of organic compounds in tap water are produced as a result of disinfection process. Use of chlorine-containing chemicals for disinfection produces many disinfection by-products (DBPs) including trihalomethanes, haloacetonitriles and haloacetic acid. Ozonation with secon...

  11. Disinfection by-product formation during seawater desalination: A review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daekyun; Amy, Gary L; Karanfil, Tanju

    2015-09-15

    Due to increased freshwater demand across the globe, seawater desalination has become the technology of choice in augmenting water supplies in many parts of the world. The use of chemical disinfection is necessary in desalination plants for pre-treatment to control both biofouling as well as the post-disinfection of desalinated water. Although chlorine is the most commonly used disinfectant in desalination plants, its reaction with organic matter produces various disinfection by-products (DBPs) (e.g., trihalomethanes [THMs], haloacetic acids [HAAs], and haloacetonitriles [HANs]), and some DBPs are regulated in many countries due to their potential risks to public health. To reduce the formation of chlorinated DBPs, alternative oxidants (disinfectants) such as chloramines, chlorine dioxide, and ozone can be considered, but they also produce other types of DBPs. In addition, due to high levels of bromide and iodide concentrations in seawater, highly cytotoxic and genotoxic DBP species (i.e., brominated and iodinated DBPs) may form in distribution systems, especially when desalinated water is blended with other source waters having higher levels of organic matter. This article reviews the knowledge accumulated in the last few decades on DBP formation during seawater desalination, and summarizes in detail, the occurrence of DBPs in various thermal and membrane plants involving different desalination processes. The review also identifies the current challenges and future research needs for controlling DBP formation in seawater desalination plants and to reduce the potential toxicity of desalinated water. PMID:26099832

  12. Drinking water and health: Disinfectants and disinfectant by-products. Volume 7

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    Studies of the toxicity of the by-products of disinfectants have focused on the trihalomethanes (THMs), which are formed during chlorination and for which considerable data on carcinogenicity have been developed. The level of total THMs in finished drinking water, currently regulated at 100 micrograms/L, should be reduced. Noting that chloroform is the principal THM produced by chlorination, the subcommittee found this level to be unsupportable on the basis of the risk values for chloroform developed in this review. Other, non-volatile by-products of chlorination may be important in contributing mutagenic properties to drinking water, especially when the natural water being treated contains high levels of organic matter. Short-term animal skin tests, although not conclusive, provide indications that organic concentrates from chlorinated water are tumorigenic under some experimental conditions. Unfortunately, many by-products of chlorination and other disinfection practices have not been identified. Consequently, the risks of ingesting cannot be quantified at present, but are potentially high enough to warrant continued efforts to analyze them. The use of alternative methods of drinking water disinfection is increasing, largely due to health and regulatory concerns about trihalomethanes. Thus, the nature and toxicity of the by-products of some other widely used water treatments (chloramination, ozonation, and chlorine dioxide) are also evaluated in the report to the extent allowed by available data. The subcommittee calculated quantitative risk assessment for disinfectants or their by-products when there was sufficient data.

  13. Detection of regulated disinfection by-products in cheeses.

    PubMed

    Cardador, Maria Jose; Gallego, Mercedes; Cabezas, Lourdes; Fernández-Salguero, Jose

    2016-08-01

    Cheese can contain regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs), mainly through contact with brine solutions prepared in disinfected water or sanitisers used to clean all contact surfaces, such as processing equipment and tanks. This study has focused on the possible presence of up to 10 trihalomethanes (THMs) and 13 haloacetic acids (HAAs) in a wide range of European cheeses. The study shows that 2 THMs, (in particular trichloromethane) and 3 HAAs (in particular dichloroacetic acid) can be found at μg/kg levels in the 56 cheeses analysed. Of the two types of DBPs, HAAs were generally present at higher concentrations, due to their hydrophilic and non-volatile nature. Despite their different nature (THMs are lipophilic), both of them have an affinity for fatty cheeses, increasing their concentrations as the percentage of water decreased because the DBPs were concentrated in the aqueous phase of the cheeses. PMID:26988506

  14. DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS: WHAT IS KNOWN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine are currently the major disinfectants being used to disinfect drinking water. Although the alternative disinfectants (ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine) are increasing in popularity in the United States, chlorine is still us...

  15. Minimization of the formation of disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Mohamed I; Gad-Allah, Tarek A; Ali, Mohamed E M; Yoon, Yeoman

    2012-09-01

    The drinking water industry is required to minimize DBPs levels while ensuring adequate disinfection. In this study, efficient and appropriate treatment scheme for the reduction of disinfection by-product (DBPs) formation in drinking water containing natural organic matter has been established. This was carried out by the investigation of different treatment schemes consisting of enhanced coagulation, sedimentation, disinfection by using chlorine dioxide/ozone, filtration by sand filter, or granular activated carbon (GAC). Bench scale treatment schemes were applied on actual samples from different selected sites to identify the best conditions for the treatment of water. Samples were collected from effluent of each step in the treatment train in order to analyze pH, UV absorbance at 254 nm (UVA(254)), specific UV absorbance at 254 nm (SUVA(254)), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), haloacetic acids (HAAs) and trihalomethanes (THMs). The obtained results indicated that using pre-ozonation/enhanced coagulation/activated carbon filtration treatment train appears to be the most effective method for reducing DBPs precursors in drinking water treatment. PMID:22591848

  16. Integrated Disinfection By-Products Mixtures Research: Concentration by Reverse Osmosis Membrane Techniques of Disinfection By-Products from Water Disinfected by Chlorination and Ozonation/Postchlorination

    EPA Science Inventory

    To conduct the health-effect studies described in subsequent articles in this series, concentrated aqueous mixtures of disinfection by-products were required for the two water treatment trains described in the preceding article (Miltner et al., 2008). To accomplish this, the fini...

  17. RESEARCH PLAN FOR MICROBIAL PATHOGENS AND DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research plan was developed to describe research needed to support EPAs development of drinking water regulations concerning disinfectants, disinfection by-products (DBPs) and microbial pathogens, focusing on key scientific and technical information needed. The research plan...

  18. ORD RESEARCH PLAN FOR MICROBIAL PATHOGENS AND DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research plan was developed to describe research needed to support EPAs development of drinking water regulations concerning disinfectants, disinfection by-products (DBPs) and microbial pathogens, focusing on key scientific and technical information needed. ...

  19. QUENCHING OF CHLORINATION DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION IN DRINKING WATER BY HYDROGEN PEROXIDE. (R825362)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactions between chlorine disinfectants, dissolved organic matter, and other chemicals in water form a series of disinfection by-products (DBPs), including trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs), that are toxic and subject to increasingly stringent regulations. Th...

  20. MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the identification of organic disinfection by-products (DBPs) at a pilot plant in Evansville, Indiana, that uses chlorine dioxide as a primary disinfectant. nconventional multispectral identification techniques (gas chromatography combined with high and low r...

  1. RESEARCH PLAN FOR MICROBIAL PATHOGENS AND DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research plan was developed to describe research needed to support EPA's development of drinking water regulations concerning disinfectants, disinfection by-products (DBPs) and microbial pathogens, focusing on key scientific and technical information needed. The research pl...

  2. IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND CHLORAMINE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Chlorine dioxide and chloramine are two popular alternative disinfectants, with...

  3. Chlorination Disinfection By-products and Pancreatic Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Do, Minh T.; Birkett, Nicholas J.; Johnson, Kenneth C.; Krewski, Daniel; Villeneuve, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Chlorination disinfection by-products (CDBPs) are produced during the treatment of water with chlorine to remove bacterial contamination. CDBPs have been associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer. There is also some evidence that they may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer. We report results from a population-based case–control study of 486 incident cases of pancreatic cancer and 3,596 age- and sex-matched controls. Exposure to chlorination by-products was estimated by linking lifetime residential histories to two different databases containing information on CDBP levels in municipal water supplies. Logistic regression analysis found no evidence of increased pancreatic cancer risk at higher CDBP concentrations (all odds ratios < 1.3). Null findings were also obtained assuming a latency period for pancreatic cancer induction of 3, 8, or 13 years. PMID:15811832

  4. An insight of disinfection by-product (DBP) formation by alternative disinfectants for swimming pool disinfection under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Linyan; Schmalz, Christina; Zhou, Jin; Zwiener, Christian; Chang, Victor W-C; Ge, Liya; Wan, Man Pun

    2016-09-15

    Sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) is the most commonly used disinfectant in pool treatment system. Outdoor pools usually suffer from the strong sunlight irradiation which degrades the free chlorine rapidly. In addition, more pools start to adopt the recirculation of swimming pool water, which intensifies the disinfection by-product (DBP) accumulation issue. Given these potential drawbacks of using NaClO in the tropical environment, two alternative organic-based disinfectants, trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCCA, C3Cl3N3O3) and bromochlorodimethylhydantoin (BCDMH, C5H6BrClN2O2), were investigated and compared to NaClO in terms of their self-degradation and the formation of DBPs, including trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs), under simulated tropical climate conditions. The result reveals that halogen stabilizer, TCCA, had the advantages of slower free chlorine degradation and lower DBP concentration compared to NaClO, which makes it a good alternative disinfectant. BCDMH was not recommended mainly due to the highly reactive disinfecting ingredient, hypobromous acid (HBrO), which fails to sustain the continuous disinfection requirement. Total disinfectant dosage was the main factor that affects residual chlorine/bromine and THM/HAA formation regardless of different disinfectant dosing methods, e.g. shock dosing (one-time spiking) in the beginning, and continuous dosing during the whole experimental period. Two-stage second-order-kinetic-based models demonstrate a good correlation between the measured and predicted data for chlorine decay (R(2) ≥ 0.95), THM (R(2) ≥ 0.99) and HAA (R(2) ≥ 0.83) formation. Higher temperature was found to enhance the DBP formation due to the temperature dependence of reaction rates. Thus, temperature control of pools, especially for those preferring higher temperatures (e.g. hydrotherapy and spa), should take both bather comfort and DBP formation potential into consideration. It is also observed that chlorine competition

  5. MAMMALIAN CELL CYTOTOXICITY AND GENOTOXICITY OF NEW DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water continues to protect the public health against acute disease. Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed by the reaction of a disinfectant with naturally occurring organic matter. Many DBPs are genotoxic and are implicated as huma...

  6. A Toxicological Perspective on Disinfection ByProducts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection of water is essential for reduction of microbes harmful to human health and chemical disinfection is considered one of the major public health triumphs of the 20th Century. An unintended consequence of disinfection with oxidizing chemicals is formation of disinfectio...

  7. THE TOXICOLOGY OF COMPLEX MIXTURES OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical disinfection of water is a major public health advance that has decreased dramatically water-borne disease. Chemical disinfectants react with naturally occurring organic and inorganic matter in water to produce a wide variety of disinfection byproducts (DBPs). DBP num...

  8. Influence of ultrasound enhancement on chlorine dioxide consumption and disinfection by-products formation for secondary effluents disinfection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoqin; Zhao, Junyuan; Li, Zifu; Lan, Juanru; Li, Yajie; Yang, Xin; Wang, Dongling

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) has been promoted as an alternative disinfectant because of its high disinfection efficiency and less formation of organic disinfection by-products (DBPs). However, particle-associated microorganisms could be protected during the disinfection process, which decreases the disinfection efficiency or increases the required dosage. Besides, the formation of inorganic disinfection by-products is a significant concern in environment health. Ultrasound (US)-combined disinfection methods are becoming increasingly attractive because they are efficient and environmentally friendly. In this study, US was introduced as an enhancement method to identify its influence on ClO2 demand reduction and to minimize the production of potential DBPs for secondary effluents disinfection. Fecal coliform was used as an indicator, and DBPs, including trichloromethane (TCM), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), chlorite (ClO2(-)), and chlorate (ClO3(-)), were analyzed to observe the potential DBPs formation. Results show that US pretreatment could reduce half of ClO2 dosage compared with ClO2 disinfection alone for the same disinfection efficiency, and that an input power density of 2.64 kJ/L pretreatment with the 1.5mg/L ClO2 was enough to meet the discharge requirement in China (i.e., fecal coliform below 1000 CFU/L for Class 1A) for secondary effluent disinfection, and the ClO2(-) concentration in the disinfection effluent was only 1.37 mg/L at the same time. Furthermore, the different effects of US on the two processes (US as pretreatment and simultaneous US/ClO2 disinfection) were also analyzed, including deagglomerating, cell damage, and synergistic disinfection as well as degasing/sonolysis. It was proved that the production of TCM, DCAA, and TCAA was insignificantly influenced with the introduction of US, but US pretreatment did reduce the production of ClO2(-) and ClO3(-) effectually. In general, US pretreatment could be a better option for

  9. A MULTIPLE-PURPOSE DESIGN APPROACH TO THE EVALUATION OF RISKS FROM COMPLEX MIXTURES OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water disinfection has effectively eliminated much of the morbidity and mortality associated with waterborne infectious diseases in the United States. Various disinfection processes, however, produce certain types and amounts of disinfection by-products (DBPs), including...

  10. DEVELOPMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF EXPOSURE TO DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN ANIMAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developmental consequences of exposure to disinfection by-products in animal models
    Sid Hunter, Michael Narotsky, James Andrews
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, 27711

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed by the reaction of disinf...

  11. Health impact of disinfection by-products in swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Cristina M; Font-Ribera, Laia

    2012-01-01

    This article is focused on the epidemiological evidence on the health impacts related to disinfection by-products (DBPs) in swimming pools, which is a chemical hazard generated as an undesired consequence to reduce the microbial pathogens. Specific DBPs are carcinogenic, fetotoxic and/or irritant to the airways according to experimental studies. Epidemiological evidence shows that swimming in pools during pregnancy is not associated with an increased risk of reproductive outcomes. An epidemiological study suggested an increased risk of bladder cancer with swimming pool attendance, although evidence is inconclusive. A higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms including asthma is found among swimming pool workers and elite swimmers, although the causality of this association is unclear. The body of evidence in children indicates that asthma is not increased by swimming pool attendance. Overall, the available knowledge suggests that the health benefits of swimming outweigh the potential health risks of chemical contamination. However, the positive effects of swimming should be enhanced by minimising potential risks. PMID:23247135

  12. Effect of capacitive deionization on disinfection by-product precursors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Danyang; Wang, Xiaomao; Xie, Yuefeng F; Tang, Hao L

    2016-10-15

    Formation of brominated disinfection by-products (DBPs) from bromide and natural organic matter upon chlorination imposes health risks to drinking water users. In this study, capacitive deionization (CDI) was evaluated as a potential process for DBP precursor removal. Synthetic humic acid and bromide containing saline water was used as model water prior to CDI treatment. Batch experiments were conducted at cell voltages of 0.6-, 0.9-, and 1.2V to study the influence of CDI on the ratio of bromide and dissolved organic carbon, bromine substitution factor, and DBP formation potential (FP). Results showed beneficial aspects of CDI on reducing the levels of these parameters. A maximum DBPFP removal from 1510 to 1160μg/L was observed at the cell voltage of 0.6V. For the removed DBPFP, electro-adsorption played a greater role than physical adsorption. However, it is also noted that there could be electrochemical oxidations that led to reduction of humic content and formation of new dichloroacetic acid precursors at high cell voltages. Because of the potential of CDI on reducing health risks from the formation of less brominated DBPs upon subsequent chlorination, it can be considered as a potential technology for DBP control in drinking water treatment. PMID:27285792

  13. IDENTIFICATION OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN SWIMMING POOL WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to kill harmful pathogens, swimming pool water is treated with a disinfectant, such as chlorine or ozone. One of the most commonly used disinfectants is stabilized chlorine (typically trichloro-S-triazinetrione). Trichloro-S-triazinetrione reacts in water to form one m...

  14. The Next Generation of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water has been rightly hailed as a public health triumph of the 20th century. Millions of people worldwide receive quality drinking water every day from their public water systems. However, chemical disinfection has also produced an unintended healt...

  15. The Next Generation of Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water has been rightly hailed as a public health triumph of the 20th century. Millions of people worldwide receive quality drinking water every day from their public water systems. However, chemical disinfection has also produced an unintended health ...

  16. Disinfection By-Products: Formation and Occurrence in Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water has been rightly hailed as a public health triumph of the twentieth century. Millions of people worldwide receive quality drinking water every day from their public water systems. However, chemical disinfection has also produced an unintended he...

  17. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION BY ALTERNATIVE DISINFECTANTS AND REMOVAL BY GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of the use of the alternative disinfectants on the formation of halogenated disinfection by–products (DBPs) including total organic halide, trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, haloketones, chloral hydrate, and chloropicrin, were examined along ...

  18. Emergency Disinfection of Drinking Water

    MedlinePlus

    ... menu Learn the Issues Air Chemicals and Toxics Climate Change Emergencies Greener Living Health and Safety Land and Cleanup Pesticides Waste Water Science & Technology Air Climate Change Ecosystems Health Land, Waste and Cleanup Pesticides Substances ...

  19. Overview of Disinfection By-products and Associated Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Cristina M; Cordier, Sylvaine; Font-Ribera, Laia; Salas, Lucas A; Levallois, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    The presence of chemical compounds formed as disinfection by-products (DBPs) is widespread in developed countries, and virtually whole populations are exposed to these chemicals through ingestion, inhalation, or dermal absorption from drinking water and swimming pools. Epidemiological evidence has shown a consistent association between long-term exposure to trihalomethanes and the risk of bladder cancer, although the causal nature of the association is not conclusive. Evidence concerning other cancer sites is insufficient or mixed. Numerous studies have evaluated reproductive implications, including sperm quality, time to pregnancy, menstrual cycle, and pregnancy outcomes such as fetal loss, fetal growth, preterm delivery, and congenital malformation. The body of evidence suggests only minor effects from high exposure during pregnancy on fetal growth indices such as small for gestational age (SGA) at birth. Populations highly exposed to swimming pools such as pool workers and professional swimmers show a higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms and asthma, respectively, although the direction of the association, and thus causality, is not clear among professional swimmers. The risk of asthma, wheezing, eczema, and other respiratory outcomes among children attending swimming pools has been the object of extensive research. Early studies suggested a positive association, while subsequent larger studies found no correlations or showed a protective association. Future research should develop methods to evaluate the effects of the DBP mixture and the interaction with personal characteristics (e.g., genetics, lifestyle), clarify the association between swimming pools and respiratory health, evaluate the occurrence of DBPs in low- and middle-income countries, and evaluate outcomes suggested by animal studies that have not been considered in epidemiological investigations. PMID:26231245

  20. CONTROL OF MICROBIAL CONTAMINANTS AND DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS (DBPS): COST AND PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA is in the process of developing a sophisticated regulatory strategy in an attempt to balance the complex trade-offs in risks associated with controlling disinfectants and disinfection by-products (D/DBPs) in drinking water. EPA first attempted to control DBPs in 1974, w...

  1. CONTROL OF MICROBIAL CONTAMINANTS AND DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER: COST AND PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) is in the process of developing a sophisticated regulatory strategy in an attempt to balance the risks associated with disinfectants and disinfection by-products (D/DBP) in drinking water. A major aspect of this strategy is the...

  2. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION AND CONTROL BY OZONATION AND BIOTREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is increasing interest in using ozone in water treatment because it is a strong disinfectant and is able to oxidize the precursors of some disinfection by-products (DBPs). However, ozonation itself produces DBPs, like aldehydes and ketones, and increases the concentration ...

  3. The Integrated Disinfection By-Product Mixtures Project (“4-Lab Study”): An Overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    The intended result of chemical disinfection of drinking water is reduction of microbial contamination and a concomitant decrease in waterborne disease. The formation of a myriad of disinfection by-products (DBPs) is an unintended consequence. DBPs are present in water as high...

  4. APPROACHING THE TOXICITY OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER AS A MIXTURE PROBLEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Assessment of human health risk from exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water is of concern because of the wide spread exposure of persons who use disinfected water. Taken as a body of literature, epidemiologic studies on chlorinated drinking ...

  5. OCCURRENCE AND TOXICITY OF IODINATED DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a recent Nationwide Disinfection By-Product (DBP) Occurrence Study, iodo-acids were identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid, bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo-prope...

  6. OCCURRENCE OF IODO-ACID AND IODO-THM DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a recent Nationwide Disinfection By-product (DBP) Occurrence Study, iodo-acids were identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid, bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo- prope...

  7. OCCURRENCE AND TOXICITY OF IODO-ACID DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a recent Nationwide Disinfection By-Product (DBP) Occurrence Study, iodo-acids were identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid (IAA), bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo...

  8. SPATIAL VARIATION OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT CONCENTRATIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR MINIMIZING EXPOSURE MISCLASSIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    PURPOSE: Many epidemiological studies of disinfection by-products (DBPs) rely on system average DBP concentrations as surrogates of personal exposures. Here we examine the potential effect of exposure misclassification from spatial variability on the association between mean bir...

  9. IDENTIFY THE OCCURRENCE OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concerns over trihalomethanes (THMs) and other halogenated by-products that can be formed during chlorination of drinking water, alternative disinfectants are being explored. Several drinking water treatment plants in the United States have altered their treatment methods...

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine are currently popular alternatives to ...

  11. IDENTIFICATION OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FORMED AT HIGH BROMIDE LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids, and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Chlorine dioxide is a popular alternative, with over 500 dri...

  12. Disinfection By-Products and Drinking Water Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water has been rightly hailed as a public health triumph of the 20th century. Before its widespread use, millions of people died from waterborne diseases. Now, people in developed nations receive quality drinking water every day from their public wa...

  13. Health effects of disinfection by-products in chlorinated swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Florentin, Arnaud; Hautemanière, Alexis; Hartemann, Philippe

    2011-11-01

    Increased attendance at swimming pools is correlated with higher input of organic and minerals pollutants introduced by swimmers in the swimming pool water. In most swimming pools, microbiological control is performed by disinfection with the addition of chlorine. Chlorine is now well-known to lead to the formation of many disinfection by-products (DBPs) including trihalomethanes and chloramines. The hypothesis of a link between the presence of eye and skin irritation syndromes in swimmers and contact with swimming pool water treated with chlorine was initially proposed by Mood (1953). During recent decades many epidemiological studies have described the importance of DBPs generated with natural or imported organic matter present in water. Many of these DBPs are suspected to be toxic or even carcinogenic. Trihalomethanes and haloacetic acid families are the most studied but others DBPs, like chloral hydrate, haloacetonitriles, N-nitrosodimethylamine and the bromate ion, are emerging compounds of interest. Epidemiological data about the risk of cancer are still controversial. However, numerous publications highlight a toxic risk especially the risk of allergy and respiratory symptoms for babies and elite swimmers. The few publications dedicated to risk assessment do not suggest increased risk, other than for elite swimmers. These publications are likely to underestimate the risk associated with DBPs because of the lack of data in the literature precludes the calculation of risk associated with certain compounds or certain pathways. Thus for regulations, the need to take into account the risks associated with disinfection by-products is now important without forgetting the need of the control of microbiological hazards in swimming pools. PMID:21885333

  14. Bioanalytical and chemical assessment of the disinfection by-product formation potential: role of organic matter.

    PubMed

    Farré, Maria José; Day, Sophie; Neale, Peta A; Stalter, Daniel; Tang, Janet Y M; Escher, Beate I

    2013-09-15

    Disinfection by-products (DBP) formed from natural organic matter and disinfectants like chlorine and chloramine may cause adverse health effects. Here, we evaluate how the quantity and quality of natural organic matter and other precursors influence the formation of DBPs during chlorination and chloramination using a comprehensive approach including chemical analysis of regulated and emerging DBPs, total organic halogen quantification, organic matter characterisation and bioanalytical tools. In vitro bioassays allow us to assess the hazard potential of DBPs early in the chain of cellular events, when the DBPs react with their molecular target(s) and activate stress response and defence mechanisms. Given the reactive properties of known DBPs, a suite of bioassays targeting reactive modes of toxic action including genotoxicity and sensitive early warning endpoints such as protein damage and oxidative stress were evaluated in addition to cytotoxicity. Coagulated surface water was collected from three different drinking water treatment plants, along with reverse osmosis permeate from a desalination plant, and DBP formation potential was assessed after chlorination and chloramination. While effects were low or below the limit of detection before disinfection, the observed effects and DBP levels increased after disinfection and were generally higher after chlorination than after chloramination, indicating that chlorination forms higher concentrations of DBPs or more potent DBPs in the studied waters. Bacterial cytotoxicity, assessed using the bioluminescence inhibition assay, and induction of the oxidative stress response were the most sensitive endpoints, followed by genotoxicity. Source waters with higher dissolved organic carbon levels induced increased DBP formation and caused greater effects in the endpoints related to DNA damage repair, glutathione conjugation/protein damage and the Nrf2 oxidative stress response pathway after disinfection. Fractionation studies

  15. Occurrence assessment for disinfectants and disinfection by-products (phase 6A) in public drinking water. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-03

    The EPA Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water is developing national primary drinking water regulations for disinfectant and disinfection by-product contaminants. Thirteen contaminants are being considered to be regulated under Phase 6. These contaminants, referred to as Phase 6a, are the subject of the report. The information is important for setting the Maximum Contaminant Level Goal for a contaminant. The exposure information also is used to estimate the baseline health impact assessment of current levels and for evaluation of the health benefits of the regulatory alternatives.

  16. Mammalian Cell Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of the Haloacetic Acids, A Major Class of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The haloacetic acids (HAAs) are disinfection by-products (DBPs) that are formed during the disinfection of drinking water, wastewaters and recreational pool waters. Currently, five HAAs [bromoacetic acid (BAA), dibromoacetic acid (DBAA), chloroacetic acid (CAA), dichloroacetic ac...

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FORMED IN THE PRESENCE OF BROMIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using a combination of mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy, disinfection by-products (DBPs) were identified in ozonated drinking water containing elevated bromide levels, and in ozonated water treated with secondary chlorine or chloramine. Only one brominated by-product-d...

  18. MUTAGENICITY AND DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN SURFACE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTED WITH PERACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aims of this research were to study the influence of peracetic acid (PAA) on the formation of mutagens in surface waters used for human consumption and to assess its potential application for the disinfection of drinking water. The results obtained using PAA were compared to ...

  19. DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF DICHLOROACETONITRILE: A BY-PRODUCT OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dichloracetonitrile (DCAN), a by-product of drinking water disinfection formed by reaction of chlorine with background organic materials, was evaluated for its developmental effects in pregnant Long-Evans rats. nimals were dosed by oral intubation on Gestation Days 6-18 (plug=0) ...

  20. Genotoxic Effects in Swimmers Exposed to Disinfection By-products in Indoor Swimming Pool

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water has been associated with cancer risk, and a recent study found an increased bladder cancer risk among subjects attending swimming pools. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate whether swimming in pools is associated with ...

  1. ORGANIC MATTER REACTIVITY SURROGATE FOR THE ESTIMATION OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FORMATION POTENTIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water must have a total organic carbon (TOC) method that can meet the monitoring requirements as originally proposed in the Stage 1, Disinfection By-Products (D/DBP) Rule, as stated in the Federal Register. Research under this task, th...

  2. HALONITROMETHANE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS: CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND MAMMALIAN CELL CYTOTOXICITY AND GENOTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Halonitromethanes are drinking water disinfection by-products that have recently received a high priority for health effects research from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Our purpose was to identify and synthesize where necessary the mixed halonitromethanes and to deter...

  3. ANIMAL MODELS FOR STUDYING MISCARRIAGE: ILLUSTRATION WITH STUDY OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Animal models for studying miscarriage: Illustration with study of drinking water disinfection by-products
    Authors & affiliations:
    Narotsky1, M.G. and S. Bielmeier Laffan2.
    1Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Tri...

  4. Assessing the Toxicities of Regulated and Unregulated Disinfection By-products in Normal Human Colon Cells.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence of over six hundred disinfection by-products (DBPs) and less than half of the total organic halides present in finished water has created a need for short-term in vitro assays to address toxicities that might be associated with human exposure. . We are using a normal...

  5. NEUROTOXICOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF TWO DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS, BROMODICHLOROMETHANE AND DIBROMOACETONITRILE, IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Safe Drinking Water Act requires that the U.S. EPA consider noncancer endpoints for the assessment of adverse human health effects of disinfection by-products (DBPs). As an extension of our studies in which we demonstrated neurotoxicity at relatively low levels of dibromo- an...

  6. SURVEY OF HALONITROMETHANES AND IODOMETHANES: DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project involves the study of two classes of chemicals, halonitromethanes and iodomethanes, which have been found to be drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs). Both have been predicted to have toxicity. In toxicity screening tests, bromonitromethanes have been shown ...

  7. INCREASED APOPTOSIS IN ORGANOGENESIS-STAGED MOUSE EMBRYOS INDUCED BY DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased apoptosis in organogenesis-staged mouse embryos induced by disinfection by-products. Sid Hunter1,2, Ellen Rogers1 and Keith Ward2, 1 Developmental Biology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, US EPA, RTP, NC; 2 Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC Chapel Hill, Cha...

  8. THE NEXT GENERATION OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS AND HEALTH ISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are of concern because some epidemiologic studies have shown that some DBPs are associated with cancer or adverse reproductive/developmental effects in human populations, and other studies have shown that certain DBPs cause similar h...

  9. METABOLIC FATE OF HALOGENATED DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN VIVO, AND RELATION TO BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Objectives/Hypotheses: Halogenated by-products of drinking water disinfection are of concern because of uncertainty over their health effects, particularly an increased risk of kidney and bladder cancer and widespread consumption. Due to their abundance relative to other h...

  10. THE EFFECTS OF COMBINED OZONATION AND FILTRATION ON DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION. (R830908)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of combined ozonation and membrane filtration on the removal of the natural organic matter (NOM) and the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) were investigated. Ozonation/filtration resulted in a reduction of up to 50% in the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) ...

  11. SOLID PHASE MICROEXTRACTION FOR TRACE LEVEL ANALYSIS OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation focuses on the development of a solid-phase microextraction (SPME)-gas chromatography (GC)/ion trap mass spectrometry (MS) method for the analysis of semivolatile disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water in the low ug/L range. These DBPs were selected ...

  12. Nanodetection of the disinfection by-products on GC-MS techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristoiu, Dumitru; Haydee, Melinda; Ristoiu, Tania

    2009-01-01

    Exposures to disinfection by-products (DBPs) in residential drinking water occur through multiple routes and vary across the population because of differences in the amount and ways people use water. Municipal water in the Romania is disinfected, with chlorine being the most common disinfectant agent. Disinfection of water, in additional to having the benefit of destroying microbes that can transmit diseases, has the drawback of producing a series of compounds known as disinfection by-products (DBPs). Chlorination produces many compounds containing chlorine and/or bromine, some of which have been shown to be carcinogenic, mutagenic, and/or teratogenic in animal studies. The most abundant class of DBPs that result from chlorination of drinking water are trihalomethanes (THMs) - chloroform (CHCl3), dichlorobromomethane (CHCl2Br), dibromochloromethane (CHBr2Cl) and bromoform (CHBr3). The most predominant THM species was CHCl3 and it highest concentration was 85•106 ng/m3. The others THMs compounds concentration were lower, between 65•104 ng/m3 and 12•106 ng/m3. THMs compounds were analyzed on gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS) and head space technique (HS) was used for all analysis.

  13. The role of phytoplankton as pre-cursors for disinfection by-product formation upon chlorination.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Adam; Drikas, Mary; Brookes, Justin D

    2016-10-01

    Water quality remains one of the greatest concerns with regards to human health. Advances in science and technology have resulted in highly efficient water treatment plants, significantly reducing diseases related to waterborne pathogenic microorganisms. While disinfection is critical to mitigate pathogen risk to humans, the reactions between the disinfectant and dissolved organic compounds can lead to the formation of chemical contaminants called disinfection by-products (DBPs). DBPs have been related to numerous health issues including birth defects and cancer. The formation of disinfection by-products occurs due to the reaction of oxidants and natural organic matter. DBP precursors are derived from anthropogenic sources including pharmaceuticals and chemical waste, the breakdown of vegetation from external catchment sources (allochthonous) and internally derived sources including phytoplankton (autochthonous). Current literature focuses on the contribution of allochthonous sources towards the formation of DBPs, however, the recalcitrant nature of hydrophilic phytoplankton derived organic matter indicates that autochthonous derived organic carbon can significantly contribute to total DBP concentrations. The contribution of phytoplankton to the formation of DBPs is also influenced by cellular exudation rates, chemical composition, environmental conditions and the physical and chemical conditions of the solution upon disinfection. Formation of DBPs is further influenced by the presence of cyanobacteria phyla due to their notoriety for forming dense blooms. Management of DBP formation can potentially be improved by reducing cyanobacteria as well as DBP precursors derived from other phytoplankton. PMID:27348195

  14. Modelling disinfection by-products formation in bromide-containing waters.

    PubMed

    Fabbricino, M; Korshin, G V

    2009-09-15

    A kinetic model capable of simulating by-products formation in bromide-containing waters during disinfection processes is presented in this paper. The model is based on two parallel sequences of incorporation and oxidation reactions induced by bromine or chlorine reacting with natural organic matter (NOM). Each sequence starts from a different type of NOM functionality that has its own set of specific reaction rate. Decay reactions of NOM and halogenated intermediates are assumed to follow a first order kinetic, while disinfection by-product (DBP) generation reactions are simulated introducing so-called splitting coefficients. This approach allows obtaining explicit expressions for DBP species. Model's results are compared with experimental data obtained for seawater samples. Comparison of the data confirms the model's ability to predict DBPs formation with high precision. PMID:19299084

  15. Use of biological assay systems to assess the relative carcinogenic hazards of disinfection by-products.

    PubMed Central

    Bull, R J; Robinson, M; Meier, J R; Stober, J

    1982-01-01

    Other workers have clearly shown that most, if not all, drinking water in the U.S. contains chemicals that possess mutagenic and/or carcinogenic activity by using bacterial and in vitro methods. In the present work, increased numbers of tumors were observed with samples of organic material isolated from 5 U.S. cities administered as tumor initiators in mouse skin initiation/promotion studies. Only in one case was the result significantly different from control. In studies designed to test whether disinfection practice contributes significantly to the tumor initiating activity found in drinking water mixed results have been obtained. In one experiment, water disinfected by chlorination, ozonation or combined chlorine resulted in a significantly greater number of papillomas when compared to nondisinfected water. In two subsequent experiments, where water was obtained from the Ohio River at different times of the year, no evidence of increased initiating activity was observed with any disinfectant. Analysis of water obtained at the comparable times of the year for total organic halogen, and trihalomethane formation revealed a substantial variation in the formation of these products. Considering the problems such variability poses for estimating risks associated with disinfection by-products, a model system which makes use of commercially obtained humic acid as a substrate for chlorination was investigated using the Ames test. Humic and fulvic acids obtained from two surface waters as well as the commercially obtained humic acid were without activity in TA 1535, TA 1537, TA 1538, TA 98 or TA 100 strains of S. typhimurium. Following treatment with a 0.8 molar ratio of chlorine (based on carbon) significant mutagenic activity was observed with all humic and fulvic acid samples. Comparisons of the specific mutagenic activity of the chlorinated products suggests that the commercial material might provide a useful model for studying health hazards associated with

  16. Formation of nitrogenous disinfection by-products in 10 chlorinated and chloraminated drinking water supply systems.

    PubMed

    Liew, Deborah; Linge, Kathryn L; Joll, Cynthia A

    2016-09-01

    The presence of nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) in drinking water supplies is a public health concern, particularly since some N-DBPs have been reported to be more toxic than the regulated trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids. In this paper, a comprehensive evaluation of the presence of N-DBPs in 10 drinking water supply systems in Western Australia is presented. A suite of 28 N-DBPs, including N-nitrosamines, haloacetonitriles (HANs), haloacetamides (HAAms) and halonitromethanes (HNMs), were measured and evaluated for relationships with bulk parameters in the waters before disinfection. A number of N-DBPs were frequently detected in disinfected waters, although at generally low concentrations (<10 ng/L for N-nitrosamines and <10 μg/L for other N-DBPs) and below health guideline values where they exist. While there were no clear relationships between N-DBP formation and organic nitrogen in the pre-disinfection water, N-DBP concentrations were significantly correlated with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and ammonia, and these, in addition to high bromide in one of the waters, led to elevated concentrations of brominated HANs (26.6 μg/L of dibromoacetonitrile). There were significant differences in the occurrence of all classes of N-DBPs between chlorinated and chloraminated waters, except for HNMs, which were detected at relatively low concentrations in both water types. Trends observed in one large distribution system suggest that N-DBPs can continue to form or degrade within distribution systems, and redosing of disinfectant may cause further by-product formation. PMID:27523603

  17. THE ROLE OF GC/MS AND LC/MS IN THE DISCOVERY OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has played a pivotal role in the discovery of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water. DBPs are formed when disinfectants, such as chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide, or chloramine, react with natural organic matter in the ...

  18. DOES MICRO LC/MS OFFER ADVANTAGES OVER CONVENTIONAL LC/MS IN IDENTIFYING DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lower maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) of disinfection by-products were set for drinking water municipalities by the Stage 1 DBP Rule in November, 1998. With these new regulations, additional water treatment plants are expected to choose alternative disinfectants to chlorine. Al...

  19. THE ROLE OF GC-MS AND LC-MS IN THE DISCOVERY OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has played a pivotal role in the discovery of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water. DBPs are formed when disinfectants, such as chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide or chloramine, react with natural organic matter in the wate...

  20. ORD'S FOUR LAB STUDY: TOXICOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL EVALUATION OF COMPLEX MIXTURES OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfectants used in the production of drinking water react with naturally occurring organic and inorganic material in the source water to produce disinfection by-products (DBPs). Humans are exposed daily to a complex mixture of DBPs via oral, dermal, and inhalation routes. To ...

  1. A NATIONWIDE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT OCCURRENCE STUDY - IDENTIFICATION OF NEW AND TOXICOLOGICALLY SIGNIFICANT COMPOUNDS WITH MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed when disinfectants, such as chlorine, react with natural organic matter and bromide present in the water. Chloroform was the first DBP identified in drinking water (in 1974), and was subsequently shown (along with other t...

  2. OCCURRENCE OF IODO-ACID AND IODO-THM DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a recent Nationwide Disinfection By-Product (DBP) Occurrence Study, iodo-acids were identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid, bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo-prope...

  3. Ongoing Meta-analysis on the Association between Disinfection By-product Exposure and Small for Gestational Age Births

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are potentially harmful chemicals formed in drinking water by the reaction of naturally occurring organic matter with disinfectants aimed to kill microbial pathogens. Though numerous DBP species exist, only a few species have been examined in toxic...

  4. Integrated Disinfection By-Products Mixtures Research: Disinfection of Drinking Waters by Chlorination and Ozonation/Postchlorination Treatment Scenarios

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article describes disinfection of the same source water by two commonly used disinfection treatment scenarios for purposes of subsequent concentration, chemical analysis, and toxicological evaluation. Accompanying articles in this issue of the Journal of Toxicology and Envir...

  5. Research issues underlying the four-lab study: integrated disinfection by-products mixtures research.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Jane Ellen; Richardson, Susan D; Teuschler, Linda K; Miltner, Richard J; Speth, Thomas F; Schenck, Kathleen M; Hunter, E Sidney; Rice, Glenn

    2008-01-01

    Chemical disinfection of drinking water is a major public health triumph of the 20th century, resulting in significant decreases in morbidity and mortality from waterborne diseases. Disinfection by-products (DBP) are chemicals formed by the reaction of oxidizing disinfectants with inorganic and organic materials in the source water. To address potential health concerns that cannot be answered directly by toxicological research on individual DBPs or defined DBP mixtures, scientists residing within the various organizations of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development (the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, the National Risk Management Research Laboratory, the National Exposure Research Laboratory, and the National Center for Environmental Assessment) engaged in joint investigation of environmentally realistic complex mixtures of DBP. Research on complex mixtures of DBP is motivated by three factors: (a) DBP exposure is ubiquitous to all segments of the population; (b) some positive epidemiologic studies are suggestive of potential developmental, reproductive, or carcinogenic health effects in humans exposed to DBP; and (c) significant amounts of the material that makes up the total organic halide portion of the DBP have not been identified. The goal of the Integrated Disinfection Byproducts Mixtures Research Project (the 4Lab Study) is provision of sound, defensible, experimental data on environmentally relevant mixtures of DBP and an improved estimation of the potential health risks associated with exposure to the mixtures of DBP formed during disinfection of drinking water. A phased research plan was developed and implemented. The present series of articles provides the results from the first series of experiments. PMID:18636387

  6. Effect of magnetic ion exchange and ozonation on disinfection by-product formation.

    PubMed

    Kingsbury, Ryan S; Singer, Philip C

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the performance of treatment with magnetic ion exchange (MIEX) resin followed by ozonation in achieving disinfection goals while controlling bromate and chlorinated disinfection by-product (DBP) formation. Three water samples were collected from raw water supplies impacted by the San Francisco Bay Delta to represent the varying levels of bromide and total organic carbon (TOC) that occur throughout the year. A fourth water was prepared by spiking bromide into a portion of one of the samples. Samples of each water were pre-treated with alum or virgin MIEX resin, and the raw and treated waters were subsequently ozonated under semi-batch conditions to assess the impact of treatment on ozone demand, ozone exposure for disinfection ("CT"), and bromate formation. Finally, aliquots of raw, coagulated, resin-treated, and ozonated waters were chlorinated in order to measure trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP). In the waters studied, MIEX resin removed 41-68% of raw water TOC, compared to 12-44% for alum. MIEX resin also reduced the bromide concentration by 20-50%. The removal of TOC by alum and MIEX resin significantly reduced the ozone demand of all waters studied, resulting in higher dissolved ozone concentrations and CT values for a given amount of ozone transferred into solution. For a given level of disinfection (CT), the amount of bromate produced by ozonation of MIEX-treated waters was similar to or slightly less than that of raw water and significantly less than that of alum-treated water. MIEX resin removed 39-85% of THMFP compared to 16-56% removal by alum. Ozonation reduced THMFP by 35-45% in all cases. This work indicates that in bromide-rich waters in which ozone disinfection is used, MIEX resin is a more appropriate treatment than alum for the removal of organic carbon, as it achieves superior TOC and THM precursor removal and decreases the production of bromate from ozone. PMID:23286989

  7. Gestational and lactational effects in rats of sodium, sulfate, and concentrated disinfection by-products in drinking water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological and animal toxicity studies have raised concerns regarding possible adverse health effects of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water (DW). Because many DBPs are unidentified, we sought to evaluate DW concentrates. In preparation for a multigenerational ...

  8. CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO DIBROMOACETIC ACID, A WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT, DIMINISHES PRIMORDIAL FOLLICLES IN THE RABBIT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to dibromoacetic acid (DBA), a commonly occurring water disinfection by-product, has detrimental effects on spermatogenesis and fertility in rats and rabbits. Despite indications of important reproductive consequences of DBA exposure in males, reproductive sequelae follo...

  9. THE FEASIBILITY OF PERFORMING CUMULATIVE RISK ASSESSMENTS FOR MIXTURES OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans are exposed daily to complex mixtures of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) via oral, dermal, and inhalation routes. Some positive epidemiological studies suggest reproductive and developmental effects and cancer are associated with consumption of chlorinated d...

  10. MUTAGENICITY IN SALMONELLA OF HALONITROMETHANES: A RECENTLY RECOGNIZED CLASS OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Halonitromethanes (HNMs) are a recently identified class of disinfection by-products in drinking water. They include chloronitromethane (CHN), dichloronitromethane (DCNM), trichloronitromethane (TCNM), bromonitromethane (BNM), dibromonitromethane (DBNM), tribromonitromethane (TBN...

  11. GESTATIONAL AND LACTATIONAL EFFECTS IN RATS OF SODIUM, SULFATE, AND CONCENTRATED DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological and animal toxicity studies have raised concerns regarding possible adverse health effects of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water (DW). Because many DBPs are unidentified, we sought to evaluate DW concentrates. In preparation for a multigenerational ...

  12. Evidence of arsenic release promoted by disinfection by-products within drinking-water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Andra, Syam S; Makris, Konstantinos C; Botsaris, George; Charisiadis, Pantelis; Kalyvas, Harris; Costa, Costas N

    2014-02-15

    Changes in disinfectant type could trigger a cascade of reactions releasing pipe-anchored metals/metalloids into finished water. However, the effect of pre-formed disinfection by-products on the release of sorbed contaminants (arsenic-As in particular) from drinking water distribution system pipe scales remains unexplored. A bench-scale study using a factorial experimental design was performed to evaluate the independent and interaction effects of trihalomethanes (TTHM) and haloacetic acids (HAA) on arsenic (As) release from either scales-only or scale-biofilm conglomerates (SBC) both anchored on asbestos/cement pipe coupons. A model biofilm (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) was allowed to grow on select pipe coupons prior experimentation. Either TTHM or HAA individual dosing did not promote As release from either scales only or SBC, detecting <6 μg AsL(-1) in finished water. In the case of scales-only coupons, the combination of the highest spike level of TTHM and HAA significantly (p<0.001) increased dissolved and total As concentrations to levels up to 16 and 95 μg L(-1), respectively. Similar treatments in the presence of biofilm (SBC) resulted in significant (p<0.001) increase in dissolved and total recoverable As up to 20 and 47 μg L(-1), respectively, exceeding the regulatory As limit. Whether or not, our laboratory-based results truly represent mechanisms operating in disinfected finished water in pipe networks remains to be investigated in the field. PMID:24365518

  13. Assessment of air and water contamination by disinfection by-products at 41 indoor swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Tardif, Robert; Catto, Cyril; Haddad, Sami; Simard, Sabrina; Rodriguez, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    This study was aimed at assessing the profiles (occurrence and speciation) of disinfection by-product (DBP) contamination in air and water of a group of 41 public indoor swimming pools in Québec (Canada). The contaminants measured in the water included the traditional DBPs [i.e., four trihalomethanes (THMs), six haloacetic acids (HAAs)] but also several emergent DBPs [i.e., halonitriles, halonitromethanes, haloketones and nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA)]. Those measured in the air comprised THMs and chloramines (CAMs). Overall, extremely variable DBP levels were found from one pool to another (both quantitatively and in terms of speciation). For instance, in water, among the four THMs, chloroform was usually the most abundant compound (37.9±25.7µg/L). Nevertheless, the sum of the three other brominated THMs represented more than 25% of total THMs at almost half the facilities visited (19 cases). In 13 of them, the levels of brominated THMs (66±24.2µg/L) even greatly outweighed the levels of chloroform (15.2±6.31µg/L). Much higher levels of HAAs (294.8±157.6µg/L) were observed, with a consistent preponderance of brominated HAAs in the swimming pools with more brominated THMs. NDMA levels which were measured in a subset of 8 pools ranged between 2.8ng/L and 105ng/L. With respect to air, chloroform was still the most abundant THM globally (119.4±74.2µg/m(3)) but significant levels of brominated THMs were also observed in various cases, particularly in the previously evoked group of 13 swimming pools with preponderant levels of brominated THMs in water. CAM levels (0.23±0.15mg/m(3)) varied highly, ranging from not detected to 0.56mg/m(3). Overall, the levels were generally relatively high compared to current guidelines or reference values from several countries, and they point to a relatively atypical presence of brominated compounds, and to significant levels of emergent DBPs for which health risk is less documented. PMID:27131795

  14. Study of Disinfection By-Products and Long Term Storage of Drinking Water.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, G.; White, D.; Garland, S.

    2002-12-01

    One of the challenges facing many of Alaska's communities is providing safe and reliable drinking water from sources containing high concentrations of natural organic material (NOM). These highly colored waters, locally referred to as "tundra tea," often result in the formation of disinfectant byproducts during treatment. Since surface water sources in the Arctic are often frozen for 6-9 months per year, communities are often forced to either store raw water for treatment during the winter or treat and store enough drinking water during the summer to last through the winter. Because long-term storage practices are somewhat unique to water treatment in the rural Northern communities, the practice has not been thoroughly studied and there is limited published information on how water quality is affected by extended storage. Anecdotal evidence and data collected by field engineers indicate that significant changes are occurring and that the quality of the treated water can be adversely impacted. The University of Alaska Small Drinking Water System Technical Assistance Center (ATTAC) is conducting fundamental and applied research to help Alaska's small communities provide safe and reliable drinking water. One research focus area is the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in small drinking water systems. Studies to characterize the NOM present in Alaskan surface waters and demonstrations of NOM removal technologies have been have been conducted over the past several years. The study presented here examined the formation of disinfection by-products during long-term storage of water from five small Alaskan water systems. Results from this research suggest that long-term storage has a significant impact on DBP formation. The results suggest that the NOM escaping treatment is likely to react in the storage tank resulting in DBP concentrations that are well above the estimated DBP formation potential.

  15. The removal of estrogenic activity with UV/chlorine technology and identification of novel estrogenic disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Xu, Bi; Liungai, Zhiqi; Hu, Hong-Ying; Chen, Chao; Qiao, Juan; Lu, Yun

    2016-04-15

    As a recently developed disinfection technology, ultraviolet (UV)/chlorine treatment has received much attention. Many studies have evaluated its effects on pathogen inactivation, contaminant removal, and formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs), but its potential for environmental estrogen removal and estrogenic DBP generation, which can also be a risk to both ecosystem and human health, have not been evaluated. In this study, UV/chlorine treatment resulted in a greater removal of estrogenic activity in synthetic effluent samples containing 17β-estradiol (E2) than did UV or chlorine treatment alone regardless of the water quality. For both the UV/chlorine and chlorine treatments, there was significant interference from NH3-N, although the UV/chlorine treatment was less affected. Estrogen receptor based affinity chromatography was used to isolate the specific estrogenic DBPs, and a novel product, with high estrogenic activity compared to E2, Δ9(11)-dehydro-estradiol, was identified. It was generated by all three treatments, and might be previously mistakenly recognized as estrone (E1). This study demonstrated that UV/chlorine is a better treatment for the removal of 17β-estradiol than chlorine and UV alone. The new identified estrogenic DBP, Δ9(11)-dehydro-estradiol, which can be isolated by affinity chromatography, could be an emerging concern in the future. PMID:26780699

  16. Disinfection by-products effect on swimmers oxidative stress and respiratory damage.

    PubMed

    Llana-Belloch, Salvador; Priego Quesada, Jose Ignacio; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro; Lucas-Cuevas, Ángel G; Salvador-Pascual, Andrea; Olaso-González, Gloria; Moliner-Martinez, Yolanda; Verdú-Andres, Jorge; Campins-Falco, Pilar; Gómez-Cabrera, M Carmen

    2016-08-01

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are generated through the reaction of chlorine with organic and inorganic matter in indoor swimming pools. Different DBPs are present in indoor swimming pools. This study evaluated the effects of different chlorinated formations in oxidative stress and lung damage in 20 swimmers after 40 min of aerobic swimming in 3 indoor pools with different characteristics. Biological samples were collected to measure lung damage (serum-surfactant-associated proteins A and B), oxidative stress parameters (plasma protein carbonylation and malondialdehyde, and whole-blood glutathione oxidation), and swimming exertion values (blood lactate) before and after exercise. Free chlorine and combined chlorine in water, and chlorine in air samples were determined in all the swimming pools. Chlorination as disinfection treatment led to the formation of chloramines in water samples, mainly mono- and dichloramine. However, free chlorine was the predominate species in ultraviolet-treated swimming pool. Levels of total chlorine increased as a function of the swimming activity in chlorinated swimming pools. The lower quality of the installation resulted in a higher content of total chlorine, especially in air samples, and therefore a higher exposure of the swimmer to DBPs. However, the concentration level of chlorinated DBPs did not result in significant variation in serum-surfactant-associated proteins A and oxidative stress parameters in swimmers. In conclusion, the quality of the installation affected the DBPs concentration; however, it did not lead to lung epithelial damage and oxidative stress parameters in swimmers. PMID:26364906

  17. Formation of disinfection by-products in the ultraviolet/chlorine advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ding; Bolton, James R; Andrews, Susan A; Hofmann, Ron

    2015-06-15

    Disinfection by-product (DBP) formation may be a concern when applying ultraviolet light and free chlorine (UV/chlorine) as an advanced oxidation process (AOP) for drinking water treatment, due to typically large chlorine doses (e.g. 5-10 mg L(-1) as free chlorine). A potential mitigating factor is the low chlorine contact times for this AOP treatment (e.g. seconds). Full-scale and pilot-scale test results showed minimal trihalomethane (THM) and haloacetic acid (HAA) formation during UV/chlorine treatment, while dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) and bromochloroacetonitrile (BCAN) were produced rapidly. Adsorbable organic halide (AOX) formation was significant when applying the UV/chlorine process in water that had not been previously chlorinated, while little additional formation was observed in prechlorinated water. Chlorine photolysis led to chlorate and bromate formation, equivalent to approximately 2-17% and 0.01-0.05% of the photolyzed chlorine, respectively. No perchlorate or chlorite formation was observed. During simulated secondary disinfection of AOP-treated water, DBP formation potential for THMs, HAAs, HANs, and AOX was observed to increase approximately to the same extent as was observed for pretreatment using the more common AOP of UV combined with hydrogen peroxide (UV/H2O2). PMID:25747363

  18. Reproductive and developmental effects of disinfection by-products in drinking water.

    PubMed Central

    Reif, J S; Hatch, M C; Bracken, M; Holmes, L B; Schwetz, B A; Singer, P C

    1996-01-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies have reported associations between the consumption of chlorinated drinking water and reproductive and developmental effects. Here we review the available epidemiologic data, assess the hazard potential posed by exposure to disinfection by-products, identify critical data gaps, and offer recommendations for further research. The epidemiologic evidence supporting associations between exposure to water disinfection by-products (DBPs) and adverse pregnancy outcomes is sparse, and positive findings should be interpreted cautiously. The methods used during the early stages of research in this area have been diverse. Variability in exposure assessment and endpoints makes it difficult to synthesize or combine the available data. Exposure misclassification and unmeasured confounding may have lead to bias in risk estimation. Future studies of reproductive outcome and exposure to chlorinated water should use improved methods for exposure assessment to 1) assure selection of appropriate exposure markers, 2) assess seasonal and annual fluctuations in DBPs, 3) assess variability within the distribution system, and 4) assess exposure through multiple routes such as bathing and showering, as well as consumption. Population-based studies should be conducted to evaluate male and female fertility, conception delay, growth retardation, and specific birth defects. The reproductive and developmental effects of exposure to DBPs could be efficiently explored in ongoing investigations by incorporating valid exposure markers and relevant questionnaire information. Future studies should make use of naturally occurring variability in the concentrations of DBPs and may incorporate biomarkers of exposure and effect in their design. Epidemiologic investigations should be conducted in parallel with laboratory-based and animal studies in a coordinated, multidisciplinary approach. PMID:8930546

  19. Disinfection by-products in ballast water treatment: an evaluation of regulatory data.

    PubMed

    Werschkun, Barbara; Sommer, Yasmin; Banerji, Sangeeta

    2012-10-15

    To reduce the global spread of invasive aquatic species, international regulations will soon require reductions of the number of organisms in ballast water discharged by ships. For this purpose, ballast water treatment systems were developed and approved by an international procedure. These systems rely on established water treatment principles which, to different degrees, have been proven to generate disinfection by-products with hazardous properties but have only scarcely been investigated in marine environments. Our study evaluates the publicly available documentation about approved ballast water treatment systems with regard to by-product formation. The most commonly employed methods are chlorination, ozonation, and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. Chlorination systems generate trihalomethanes, halogenated acetic acids, and bromate in substantially larger quantities than reported for other areas of application. Levels are highest in brackish water, and brominated species predominate, in particular bromoform and dibromoacetic acid. Ozonation, which is less frequently utilized, produces bromoform in lower concentrations but forms higher levels of bromate, both of which were effectively reduced by active carbon treatment. In systems based on UV radiation, medium pressure lamps are employed as well as UV-induced advanced oxidation. For all UV systems, by-product formation is reported only occasionally. The most notable observations were small increases in nitrite, hydrogen peroxide, halogenated methanes and acetic acids. The assessment of by-product formation during ballast water treatment is limited by the lacking completeness and quality of available information. This concerns the extent and statistical characterisation of chemical analysis as well as the documentation of the test water parameters. PMID:22818950

  20. Exposure estimates to disinfection by-products of chlorinated drinking water.

    PubMed Central

    Weisel, C P; Kim, H; Haltmeier, P; Klotz, J B

    1999-01-01

    Exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) of drinking water is multiroute and occurs in households serviced by municipal water treatment facilities that disinfect the water as a necessary step to halt the spread of waterborne infectious diseases. Biomarkers of the two most abundant groups of DBPs of chlorination, exhaled breath levels of trihalomethanes (THMs) and urinary levels of two haloacetic acids, were compared to exposure estimates calculated from in-home tap water concentrations and responses to a questionnaire related to water usage. Background THM breath concentrations were uniformly low. Strong relationships were identified between the THM breath concentrations collected after a shower and both the THM water concentration and the THM exposure from a shower, after adjusting for the postshower delay time in collecting the breath sample. Urinary haloacetic acid excretion rates were not correlated to water concentrations. Urinary trichloroacetic acid excretion rates were correlated with ingestion exposure, and that correlation was stronger in a subset of individuals who consumed beverages primarily within their home where the concentration measurements were made. No correlation was observed between an average 48-hr exposure estimate and the urinary dichloroacetic acid excretion rate, presumably because of its short biological half-life. Valid biomarkers were identified for DBP exposures, but the time between the exposure and sample collection should be considered to account for different metabolic rates among the DBPs. Further, using water concentration as an exposure estimate can introduce misclassification of exposure for DBPs whose primary route is ingestion due to the great variability in the amount of water ingested across a population. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9924004

  1. Photochemical and bacterial transformations of disinfection by-product precursors in water.

    PubMed

    Chow, Alex T; Díaz, Francisco J; Wong, Kin-Hang; O'Geen, Anthony T; Dahlgren, Randy A; Wong, Po-Keung

    2013-09-01

    In situ grab sampling from source waters and water extraction from source materials are common methods for determining disinfection by-product (DBP) formation potential (FP) of water samples or reactivity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in forming DBPs during chlorination. However, DOM, as the main DBP precursor, collected using these techniques may not represent the DOM reacting with disinfectants due to biogeochemical alterations during water conveyance to drinking water treatment facilities. In this study, we exposed leachates from fresh litter and associated decomposed duff to natural sunlight or K-12 for 14 d and evaluated the changes, if any, on the propensity to form trihalomethane (THM), haloacetonitrile (HAN), and chloral hydrate (CHD) during chlorination. Sunlight treatment did not significantly change dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration but caused a 24 to 43% decrease in the specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) at 254 nm, indicating that UV-active chromophores were transformed or degraded. There were significant increases ( < 0.05) in specific HAN formation potential (HAN-FP) and specific CHD formation potential (CHD-FP) (i.e., HAN and CHD formation potentials per unit carbon), but no change in specific THM formation potential (THM-FP) after sunlight exposure. In contrast, bacterial treatment did not show any significant effect on SUVA, specific chlorine demand, or any specific DBP-FPs, although bacterial colony counts suggested DOM in leachates was utilized for bacterial growth. Results of this study confirmed that the reactivity of DOM in forming DBPs could be different after biogeochemical processes compared with its source materials. For this study, photochemical reactions had a greater effect on DBP-FPs than did microbial degradation. PMID:24216437

  2. THE OCCURRENCE OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS OF HEALTH CONCERN IN DRINKING WATER: RESULTS OF A NATIONWIDE DBP OCCURRENCE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The motivation for this Nationwide Disinfection By-product (DBP) Occurrence Study was two-fold: First, more than 500 DBPs have been reported in the literature, yet there is almost no quantitative occurrence information for most. As a result, there is significant uncertainty ove...

  3. Use of Normal Human Colon Cells to Assess Toxicities of Unregulated Disinfection By-products and Mixtures

    EPA Science Inventory

    The discovery of chlorination and chloramination by-products other than the regulated trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids has created a need for short-term in vitro assays to address toxicities that might be associated with human exposure. Approximately 600 disinfection by-produ...

  4. INVESTIGATIONS INTO THE GC/MS DECOMPOSITION OF TRIBROMONITROMETHANE IN DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tribromonitromethane (bromopicrin) has been found to be a disinfection by-product (DBP) in
    chlorinated1 and ozonated2 drinking water, and is structurally similar to dibromonitromethane,
    which has been indicated through structural analysis to be a possible carcinogen. Bromop...

  5. EPIDEMIOLOGIC EVALUATION OF THE POTENTIAL ASSOCIATION BETWEEN EXPOSURE TO DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS (DBP) AND SEMEN QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic Evaluation of the Potential Association between Exposure to Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products and Semen Quality
    *Morris, R; +Olshan, A; +Lansdell, L; *Jeffay, S; *Strader, L; *Klinefelter, G; *Perreault, S.

    * U.S. EPA/ORD/NHEERL/RTD/GEEBB, Research ...

  6. IDENTIFICATION OF PROTEINS INVOLVED IN TESTICULAR TOXICITY INDUCED BY HALOACID BY-PRODUCTS OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dibromoacetic acid (DBA), a prevalent disinfection by-product in drinking water, perturbs spermiogenesis in adult rats suggesting that Sertoli-germ cell communication is compromised. When isolated seminiferous tubules from rats exposed to DBA in vivo were cultured, quantitative a...

  7. Combining Mass Spectrometry and Toxicology for a Multi-Country European Epidemiologic Study on Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The HiWATE (Health Impacts of long-term exposure to disinfection by-products in drinking WATEr) project is the first systematic analysis that combines the epidemiology on adverse pregnancy outcomes with analytical chemistry and analytical biology in the European Union. This study...

  8. Combining Mass Spectrometry and Toxicology for a Multi-Country European Epidemiologic Study on Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The HiWATE (Health Impacts of long-term exposure to disinfection by-products in drinking WATEr) project is the first systematic analysis that combines the epidemiology on adverse pregnancy outcomes with analytical chemistry and analytical biology in the European Union. This study...

  9. APPLICATION OF SOLID PHASE MICROEXTRACTION GC/MS TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF HYDROPHILIC DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has given high priority to research aimed at developing methods to extract hydrophilic disinfection by-products (DBPs) from drinking water. Public water supplies are treated with a variety of chemicals aimed at reducing or eliminating inf...

  10. THE CARCINOGENIC RESPONSE TO A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS (DBP) WAS LESS THAN ADDITIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE CARCINOGENIC RESPONSE TO A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY -PRODUCTS (DBP) W AS LESS THAN ADDITIVE.

    Current default risk assessments for chemical mixtures assume additivity of carcinogenic effects but this may under or over represent the actual biological res...

  11. THE COMBINED CARCINOGENIC RISK FOR EXPOSURE TO MIXTURES OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS MAY BE LESS THAN ADDITIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Combined Carcinogenic Risk for Exposure to Mixtures of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products May be Less Than Additive

    Risk assessment methods for chemical mixtures in drinking water are not well defined. Current default risk assessments for chemical mixtures assume...

  12. Significance of pH on the Cytotoxic Potential of the Water Disinfection By-Product Iodoacetic Acid

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significance of pH on the Cytotoxic Potential of the Water Disinfection By-Product Iodoacetic Acid Vicki Richardson1, Susan D. Richardson2, Mary Moyer3, Jane Ellen Simmons1, and Anthony DeAngelo1, 1U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC, 2University of...

  13. Changes in Markers of Genotoxicity in Relation to Exposure to Disinfection By-Products in Swimming Pools

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) has been associated with cancer risk, but the mechanisms of action are poorly understood. A recent study found increased bladder cancer risk among subjects attending swimming pools, where uptake of DBPs, such as trihalomethanes (THMs) c...

  14. Cumulative toxicity of an environmentally relevant mixture of nine regulated disinfection by-products in a multigenerational rat reproductive bioassay

    EPA Science Inventory

    CUMULATIVE TOXICITY OF AN ENVIRONMENTALLY RELEVANT MIXTURE OF NINE REGULATED DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN A MULTIGENERATIONAL RAT REPRODUCTIVE BIOASSAY J E Simmons, GR. Klinefelter, JM Goldman, AB DeAngelo, DS Best, A McDonald, LF Strader, AS Murr, JD Suarez, MH George, ES Hunte...

  15. TOXICITY-BASED IDENTIFICATION OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS USING ESI-MS AND ESI-MS/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this research is to use a bio-assay directed approach to focus identification work on the most toxicologically important disinfection by-products. To this end, drinking water is being collected from full-scale treatment plants that use chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxi...

  16. TOXICITY-BASED IDENTIFICATION OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS USING LC/MS AND LC/MS/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this research is to use a bio-assay directed approach to focus identification work on the most toxicologically important disinfection by-products. To this end, drinking water is being collected from full-scale treatment plants that use chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxi...

  17. CONDUCTING A RISK ASSESSMENT OF MIXTURES OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS (DBPS) FOR DRINKING WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The risk assessment of disinfection by-product (DBP) mixtures in drinking water is an important issue in environmental health. To generate improved assessments of DBP mixture health risk, EPA scientists have explored a number of novel approaches to generating realistic, central ...

  18. Reproductive toxicity of a mixture of regulated drinking-water disinfection by-products in a multigenerational rat bioassay

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND:Trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloaretic acids (HAAs) are regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs); their joint reproductive toxicity in drinking water is unknown.OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate a drinking water mixture of the four regulated THMs and five regulated HAAs ...

  19. Developmental toxicity of mixtures: the water disinfection by-products dichloro-, dibromo- and bromochloro acetic acid in rat embryo culture

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chlorination of drinking water results in production of numerous disinfection by-products (DBPs). One of the important classes of DBPs is the haloacetic acids. We have previously shown that the haloacetic acids (HAs), dichloro (DCA), dibromo (DBA) and bromochloro (BCA) acetic...

  20. RENAL CARCINOGENICITY OF INDIVIDUAL AND A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS (DBP) IN EKER RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    RENAL CARCINOGENICITY OF INDIVIDUAL AND A MIXTURE OF DRINKING / WATER DISINFECTION BY -PRODUCTS (DBP) IN EKER RATS.

    Eker rats develop hereditary renal cell carcinoma secondary to a germline mutation in the tuberous sclerosis 2 tumor suppressor gene, and are highly suscepti...

  1. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS OF HEALTH CONCERN IN DRINKING WATER: RESULTS OF A U.S. NATIONWIDE OCCURRENCE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are of concern because some epidemiologic studies have shown that some DBPs are associated with cancer or adverse reproductive/developmental effects in human populations, and other studies have shown that certain DBPs cause similar h...

  2. The healthy men study: an evaluation of exposure to disinfection by-products in tap water and sperm quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Chlorination of drinking water generates disinfection by-products (DBPs), which have been shown to disrupt spermatogenesis in rodents at high doses, suggesting that DBPs could pose a reproductive risk to men. In this study we assessed DBP exposure and testicular toxic...

  3. OXIDATIVE DNA DAMAGE AND REPAIR IN RATS TREATED WITH POTASSIUM BROMATE AND A MIXTUE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidative DNA Damage and Repair in Rats Treated with Potassium Bromate and a Mixture of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    Public drinking water treated with chemical disint'ectants contains a complex mixture of disinfection by-products (D BPs). There is a need for m...

  4. OXIDATIVE DNA DAMAGE FROM POTASSIUM BROMATE EXPOSURE IN LONG-EVANS RATS IS NOT ENHANCED BY A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Public drinking water treated with chemical disinfectants contains a complex mixture of disinfection by-products (DBPs) for which the relative toxicity of the mixtures needs to be characterized to accurately assess risk. Potassium bromate (KBrO3) is a by-product from ozonation of...

  5. MUTAGENICITY IN SALMONELLA AND DNA DAMAGE IN THE CHO/COMET ASSAY INDUCED BY NITROHALOMETHANES, A NOVEL CLASS OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mutagenicity in Salmonella and DNA Damage in the CHO/Comet Assay Induced by Nitrohalomethanes, a Novel Class of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products.

    Halomethanes are a class of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) whose genotoxicity has been studied extensi...

  6. Assessment, modeling and optimization of parameters affecting the formation of disinfection by-products in water.

    PubMed

    Gougoutsa, Chrysa; Christophoridis, Christophoros; Zacharis, Constantinos K; Fytianos, Konstantinos

    2016-08-01

    This study focused on (a) the development of a screening methodology, in order to determine the main experimental variables affecting chlorinated and brominated disinfection by-product (DBP) formation in water during chlorination experiments and (b) the application of a central composite design (CCD) using response surface methodology (RSM) for the mathematical description and optimization of DBP formation. Chlorine dose and total organic carbon (TOC) were proven to be the main factors affecting the formation of total chlorinated DBPs, while chlorine dose and bromide concentration were the main parameters affecting the total brominated THMs. Longer contact time promoted a rise in chlorinated DBPs' concentration even in the presence of a minimal amount of organic matter. A maximum production of chlorinated DBPs was observed under a medium TOC value and it reduced at high TOC concentrations, possibly due to the competitive production of brominated THMs. The highest concentrations of chlorinated THMs were observed at chlorine dose 10 mg L(-1) and TOC 5.5 mg L(-1). The formation of brominated DBPs is possible even with a minimum amount of NaOCl in the presence of high concentration of bromide ions. Brominated DBPs were observed in maximum concentrations using 8 mg L(-1) of chlorine in the presence of 300 μg L(-1) bromides. PMID:27178297

  7. Removing of Disinfection By-Product Precursors from Surface Water by Using Magnetic Graphene Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongmou; Wang, Xianze; Luo, Zhen; Huo, Mingxin; Wu, Jinghui

    2015-01-01

    The magnetic graphene oxide (MGO) was successfully synthesised by the in situ chemical co-precipitation method with Fe3+, Fe2+ and graphene oxide (GO) in laboratory and, was used as an adsorbent for disinfection by-product (DBP) precursors removing from four natural surface water samples. The results indicate that various DBPs formation significantly decreased by 7–19% to 78–98% for the four samples after MGO treatment and, the treatment process was rapidly reached equilibrium within 20 minutes. The DBP precursors removal efficiency decreased with the increasing pH value from 4 to 10. Hydrophobic compounds (humic acid and fulvic acid) are more sensitive to MGO, whereas hydrophilic and nitrogenous compounds (aromatic proteins) are more insensitive. MGO could be regenerated by using 20% (v/v) ethanol and, the DBP precursors removal efficiency can stay stable after five cycles. These results indicate that MGO can be utilized as a promising adsorbent for the removal of DBP precursors from natural surface water. PMID:26623652

  8. Characterization of Disinfection By-Products from Chromatographically Isolated NOM through High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Harris, Bradley D; Brown, Taylor A; McGehee, Jimmie L; Houserova, Dominika; Jackson, Benjamin A; Buchel, Brandon C; Krajewski, Logan C; Whelton, Andrew J; Stenson, Alexandra C

    2015-12-15

    As levels of natural organic matter (NOM) in surface water rise, the minimization of potentially harmful disinfection by-products (DBPs) becomes increasingly critical. Here, we introduce the advantage that chromatographic prefractionation brings to investigating compositional changes to NOM caused by chlorination. Fractionation reduces complexity, making it easier to observe changes and attribute them to specific components. Under the conditions tested (0.1-0.4 g of Cl to g of C without further additives), the differences between highly and less oxidized NOM were striking. Highly oxidized NOM formed more diverse Cl-containing DPB, had a higher propensity to react with multiple Cl, and tended to transform so drastically as to no longer be amenable to electrospray-ionization mass spectral detection. Less-oxidized material tended to incorporate one Cl and retain its humiclike composition. N-containing, lipidlike, and condensed aromatic structure (CAS)-like NOM were selectively enriched in mass spectra, suggesting that such components do not react as extensively with NaOCl as their counterparts. Carbohydrate-like NOM, conversely, was selectively removed from spectra by chlorination. PMID:26554276

  9. Engineered biofiltration for the removal of disinfection by-product precursors and genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    McKie, Michael J; Taylor-Edmonds, Liz; Andrews, Susan A; Andrews, Robert C

    2015-09-15

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed when naturally occurring organic matter reacts with chlorine used in drinking water treatment, and DBPs formed in chlorinated drinking water samples have been shown to cause a genotoxic response. The objective of the current study was to further understand the principles of biofiltration and the resulting impacts on the formation of DBPs and genotoxicity. Pilot-scale systems were utilized to assess the performance of engineered biofilters enhanced with hydrogen peroxide, in-line coagulants, and nutrients when compared to passively operated biofilters and conventional treatment (coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation, non-biological filtration). Organic fractionation was completed using liquid chromatography-organic carbon detection (LC-OCD). Water samples were chlorinated after collection and examined for the removal of trihalomethane (THM), haloacetic acid (HAA), and adsorbable organic halide (AOX) precursors. Additionally, the formation potential of two halogenated furanones, 3-chloro-4(dichloromethyl)-2(5H)-furanone (MX) and mucochloric acid (MCA), and genotoxicity was determined. Biofiltration was shown to preferentially remove more DBP precursors than dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Formation potential of the unregulated DBPs, including MX and MCA, and genotoxic response was shown to be correlated to THM formation. These results infer that monitoring for THMs and HAAs provide insight to the formation of more mutagenic DBPs such as halogenated furanones, and that biofiltration may preferentially remove precursors to DBPs at a rate exceeding the removal of DOC. PMID:26065391

  10. Occurrence, profiling and prioritization of halogenated disinfection by-products in drinking water of China.

    PubMed

    Ding, Huanhuan; Meng, Liping; Zhang, Haifeng; Yu, Jianwei; An, Wei; Hu, Jianying; Yang, Min

    2013-07-01

    The occurrence of 28 disinfection by-products (DBPs), which were divided into 5 groups, in 70 drinking water treatment plants in 31 cities across China was investigated, and the toxic potency of each DBP group was calculated using mammalian cell toxicity data from previous studies for profiling. Of the 28 DBPs, 21 were detected with an average frequency of detection of 50%. Trihalomethanes (THM4) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) were the most predominant species, whose median concentration levels were at 10.53 and 10.95 μg L(-1), respectively. Two of four iodinated trihalomethanes (I-THMs) were detected, and the concentration of the I-THMs ranged from under the detection limit to 5.58 μg L(-1). The total concentration of haloacetonitriles (HANs) in different water samples ranged from under the limit of detection to 39.20 μg L(-1), with a median concentration of 1.11 μg L(-1). Two of four halonitromethanes (HNMs) were detected, and the maximum concentrations of chloronitromethane (CNM) and trichloronitromethane (TCNM) were 0.96 and 0.28 μg L(-1), respectively. HANs were found to be the most potent DBP group in terms of cytotoxicity, and HANs and HAAs had the same level of genotoxic potency. These results indicate that although at a low concentration level, the toxic potency of the unregulated HANs in drinking water may not be neglected. PMID:23743579

  11. Impact of groundwater surface storage on chlorination and disinfection by-product formation.

    PubMed

    Padhi, R K; Satpathy, K K; Subramanian, S

    2015-09-01

    The change in water quality arising from the open storage of groundwater (GW) and its impact on chlorination and chlorination by-product formation were investigated. Water quality descriptors, such as temperature, pH, chlorophyll, and dissolved oxygen contents of GW undergo substantial alteration when stored in a reservoir. Dissolved organic content (DOC) measured in the two water sources studied, i.e., GW and open reservoir water (RW), varied from 0.41 mg/L to 0.95 mg/L and 0.93 mg/L to 2.53 mg/L, respectively. Although DOC demonstrated wide variation, UV absorbance at 254 nm (UVA254) values for GW (0.022-0.067) and RW (0.037-0.077) did not display reciprocal variations. The chlorine demand (CD) of RW was always higher than that of GW for the corresponding sampling period. Average trihalomethane (THM) formation for RW was 50-80% higher compared to GW and thus poses an enhanced health risk. Appreciable amounts of bromide present in these water sources (0.15-0.26 mg/L in GW and 0.17-0.65 mg/L in RW) have resulted in the non-selective distribution of the four THM species. The formation of more toxic brominated THM due to chlorination of these near-coast drinking water sources must be regarded as a decisive factor for the choice of water disinfection regime. PMID:26322769

  12. Impacts of drinking water pretreatments on the formation of nitrogenous disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wenhai; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang; Templeton, Michael R; Yin, Daqiang

    2011-12-01

    The formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs), including both nitrogenous DBPs (N-DBPs) and carbonaceous DBPs (C-DBPs), was investigated by analyzing chlorinated water samples following the application of three pretreatment processes: (i) powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorption; (ii) KMnO(4) oxidation and (iii) biological contact oxidation (BCO), coupled with conventional water treatment processes. PAC adsorption can remove effectively the precursors of chloroform (42.7%), dichloroacetonitrile (28.6%), dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm) (27.2%) and trichloronitromethane (35.7%), which were higher than that pretreated by KMnO(4) oxidation and/or BCO process. The removal efficiency of dissolved organic carbon by BCO process (76.5%)--was superior to that by PAC adsorption (69.9%) and KMnO(4) oxidation (61.4%). However, BCO increased the dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentration which caused more N-DBPs to be formed during subsequent chlorination. Soluble microbial products including numerous DON compounds were produced in the BCO process and were observed to play an essential role in the formation of DCAcAm in particular. PMID:22014706

  13. Monohaloacetic acid drinking water disinfection by-products inhibit follicle growth and steroidogenesis in mouse ovarian antral follicles in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Clara H; Gao, Liying; Dettro, Tyler; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Ricke, William A; Plewa, Michael J; Flaws, Jodi A

    2016-07-01

    Water disinfection greatly reduced the incidence of waterborne diseases, but the reaction between disinfectants and natural organic matter in water leads to the formation of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs). DBPs have been shown to be toxic, but their effects on the ovary are not well defined. This study tested the hypothesis that monohalogenated DBPs (chloroacetic acid, CAA; bromoacetic acid, BAA; iodoacetic acid, IAA) inhibit antral follicle growth and steroidogenesis in mouse ovarian follicles. Antral follicles were isolated and cultured with either vehicle or DBPs (0.25-1.00mM of CAA; 2-15μM of BAA or IAA) for 48 and 96h. Follicle growth was measured every 24h and the media were analyzed for estradiol levels at 96h. Exposure to DBPs significantly inhibited antral follicle growth and reduced estradiol levels compared to controls. These data demonstrate that DBP exposure caused ovarian toxicity in vitro. PMID:27151372

  14. Genotoxicity analysis of two halonitromethanes, a novel group of disinfection by-products (DBPs), in human cells treated in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Liviac, Danae; Creus, Amadeu; Marcos, Ricard

    2009-04-15

    Halonitromethanes (HNMs) constitute an emerging class of disinfection by-products (DBPs) produced when chlorine and/or ozone are used for water treatment. The HNMs are structurally similar to halomethanes, but have a nitro-group in place of hydrogen bonded to the central carbon atom. Since little information exists on the genotoxic potential of HNMs, a study has been carried out with two HNM compounds, namely trichloronitromethane (TCNM) and bromonitromethane (BNM) by using human cells. Primary damage induction has been measured with the Comet assay, which is used to determine both the repair kinetics of the induced damage and the proportion of induced oxidative damage. In addition, the fixed DNA damage has been evaluated by using the micronucleus (MN) assay. The results obtained indicate that both compounds are genotoxic, inducing high levels of DNA breaks in the Comet assay, and that this DNA damage repairs well over time. In addition, oxidized bases constitute a high proportion of DNA-induced damage (50-75%). Contrarily, no positive effects were observed in the frequency of micronucleus, which measures both clastogenic and aneugenic effects, neither using TK6 cells nor peripheral blood lymphocytes. This lack of fixed genetic damage would minimize the potential mutagenic risk associated with HNMs exposure.

  15. Emerging nitrogenous disinfection byproducts: Transformation of the antidiabetic drug metformin during chlorine disinfection of water.

    PubMed

    Armbruster, Dominic; Happel, Oliver; Scheurer, Marco; Harms, Klaus; Schmidt, Torsten C; Brauch, Heinz-Jürgen

    2015-08-01

    As an environmental contaminant of anthropogenic origin metformin is present in the high ng/L- up to the low μg/L-range in most surface waters. Residues of metformin may lead to the formation of disinfection by-products during chlorine disinfection, when these waters are used for drinking water production. Investigations on the underlying chemical processes occurring during treatment of metformin with sodium hypochlorite in aqueous medium led to the discovery of two hitherto unknown transformation products. Both substances were isolated and characterized by HPLC-DAD, GC-MS, HPLC-ESI-TOF, (1)H-NMR and single-crystal X-ray structure determination. The immediate major chlorination product is a cyclic dehydro-1,2,4-triazole-derivate of intense yellow color (Y; C4H6ClN5). It is a solid chlorimine of limited stability. Rapid formation was observed between 10 °C and 30 °C, as well as between pH 3 and pH 11, in both ultrapure and tap water, even at trace quantities of reactants (ng/L-range for metformin, mg/L-range for free chlorine). While Y is degraded within a few hours to days in the presence of light, elevated temperature, organic solvents and matrix constituents within tap water, a secondary degradation product was discovered, which is stable and colorless (C; C4H6ClN3). This chloroorganic nitrile has a low photolysis rate in ambient day light, while being resistant to heat and not readily degraded in the presence of organic solvents or in the tap water matrix. In addition, the formation of ammonia, dimethylamine and N,N-dimethylguanidine was verified by cation exchange chromatography. PMID:25973582

  16. REPLICATION OF STUDY ON SPONTANEOUS ABORTION AND DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT (DBP) EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A limited number of epidemiological studies have evaluated the potential association between exposure to disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in drinking water and adverse reproductive outcomes. Reproductive effects that have been reported include spontaneous abortions, congenital defe...

  17. ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN FOODS AND BEVERAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The determination of exposure to drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) requires an understanding of how drinking waters come into contact with the human through multiple pathways. The most significant pathway is the ingestion of drinking water. However, ingestion can oc...

  18. Chemistry, Toxicity and Health Risk Assessment of Drinking Water Disinfection ByProducts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are formed by the reaction of oxidizing chemicals (such as chlorine, ozone and chloramines) used to control waterborne pathogens with natural organic material and other substances in water. DBP mixture composition varies as a function of geographic ...

  19. HUMAN EXPOSURE TO WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS VIA FOODS AND BEVERAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ingestion of tap water is a major route of exposure to water disinfection byproducts (DBPs), including haloacetonitriles, haloketones, and haloacetic acids. A potentially significant alternate route of exposure is through the consumption of beverages prepared with tap water ...

  20. GC/MS IDENTIFICATION OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM MILWAUKEE'S NEW OZONATION PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Milwaukee Water Works recently added ozonation disinfection facilities to their municipal drinking water treatment. Coupling ozone treatment with biologically active filtration (BAF) was seen as a logical step to enhance multiple water quality objectives (an effective barrier...

  1. GENOTOXIC PROPERTIES OF HALOACETONITRILES: DRINKING WATER BY-PRODUCTS OF CHLORINE DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorinated and brominated haloacetonitriles (HAN), known drinking water contaminants which form during chlorine disinfection, were investigated for genotoxic activity. The HAN produced DNA strand breaks in cultured human lymphoblastic (CCRF-CEM) cells, bound to the nucleophilic ...

  2. IDENTIFICATION OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many drinking water treatment plants are currently using alternative disinfectants to treat drinking water, with ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine being the most popular. However, compared to chlorine, which has been much more widely studied, there is little information abo...

  3. Genotoxic Effects in Swimmers Exposed to Disinfection By-products in Indoor Swimming Pools

    PubMed Central

    Kogevinas, Manolis; Villanueva, Cristina M.; Font-Ribera, Laia; Liviac, Danae; Bustamante, Mariona; Espinoza, Felicidad; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.; Espinosa, Aina; Fernandez, Pilar; DeMarini, David M.; Grimalt, Joan O.; Grummt, Tamara; Marcos, Ricard

    2010-01-01

    Background Exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water has been associated with cancer risk. A recent study (Villanueva et al. 2007; Am J Epidemiol 165:148–156) found an increased bladder cancer risk among subjects attending swimming pools relative to those not attending. Objectives We evaluated adults who swam in chlorinated pools to determine whether exposure to DBPs in pool water is associated with biomarkers of genotoxicity. Methods We collected blood, urine, and exhaled air samples from 49 nonsmoking adult volunteers before and after they swam for 40 min in an indoor chlorinated pool. We estimated associations between the concentrations of four trihalomethanes (THMs) in exhaled breath and changes in micronuclei (MN) and DNA damage (comet assay) in peripheral blood lymphocytes before and 1 hr after swimming; urine mutagenicity (Ames assay) before and 2 hr after swimming; and MN in exfoliated urothelial cells before and 2 weeks after swimming. We also estimated associations and interactions with polymorphisms in genes related to DNA repair or to DBP metabolism. Results After swimming, the total concentration of the four THMs in exhaled breath was seven times higher than before swimming. The change in the frequency of micronucleated lymphocytes after swimming increased in association with higher exhaled concentrations of the brominated THMs (p = 0.03 for bromodichloromethane, p = 0.05 for chlorodibromomethane, p = 0.01 for bromoform) but not chloroform. Swimming was not associated with DNA damage detectable by the comet assay. Urine mutagenicity increased significantly after swimming, in association with the higher concentration of exhaled bromoform (p = 0.004). We found no significant associations with changes in micronucleated urothelial cells. Conclusions Our findings support potential genotoxic effects of exposure to DBPs from swimming pools. The positive health effects gained by swimming could be increased by reducing the potential health

  4. Fingerprinting the reactive toxicity pathways of 50 drinking water disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Stalter, Daniel; O'Malley, Elissa; von Gunten, Urs; Escher, Beate I

    2016-03-15

    A set of nine in vitro cellular bioassays indicative of different stages of the cellular toxicity pathway was applied to 50 disinfection by-products (DBPs) to obtain a better understanding of the commonalities and differences in the molecular mechanisms of reactive toxicity of DBPs. An Eschericia coli test battery revealed reactivity towards proteins/peptides for 64% of the compounds. 98% activated the NRf2-mediated oxidative stress response and 68% induced an adaptive stress response to genotoxic effects as indicated by the activation of the tumor suppressor protein p53. All DBPs reactive towards DNA in the E. coli assay and activating p53 also induced oxidative stress, confirming earlier studies that the latter could trigger DBP's carcinogenicity. The energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital ELUMO as reactivity descriptor was linearly correlated with oxidative stress induction for trihalomethanes (r(2)=0.98) and haloacetamides (r(2)=0.58), indicating that potency of these DBPs is connected to electrophilicity. However, the descriptive power was poor for haloacetic acids (HAAs) and haloacetonitriles (r(2) (<) 0.06). For HAAs, we additionally accounted for speciation by including the acidity constant with ELUMO in a two-parameter multiple linear regression model. This increased r(2) to >0.80, indicating that HAAs' potency is connected to both, electrophilicity and speciation. Based on the activation of oxidative stress response and the soft electrophilic character of most tested DBPs we hypothesize that indirect genotoxicity-e.g., through oxidative stress induction and/or enzyme inhibition-is more plausible than direct DNA damage for most investigated DBPs. The results provide not only a mechanistic understanding of the cellular effects of DBPs but the effect concentrations may also serve to evaluate mixture effects of DBPs in water samples. PMID:26773486

  5. Secondary formation of disinfection by-products by UV treatment of swimming pool water.

    PubMed

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Hansen, Kamilla M S; Andersen, Henrik R

    2015-07-01

    Formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during experimental UV treatment of pool water has previously been reported with little concurrence between laboratory studies, field studies and research groups. In the current study, changes in concentration of seven out of eleven investigated volatile DBPs were observed in experiments using medium pressure UV treatment, with and without chlorine and after post-UV chlorination. Results showed that post-UV chlorine consumption increased, dose-dependently, with UV treatment dose. A clear absence of trihalomethane formation by UV and UV with chlorine was observed, while small yet statistically significant increases in dichloroacetonitrile and dichloropropanone concentrations were detected. Results indicate that post-UV chlorination clearly induced secondary formation of several DBPs. However, the formation of total trihalomethanes was no greater than what could be replicated by performing the DBP formation assay with higher chlorine concentrations to simulate extended chlorination. Post-UV chlorination of water from a swimming pool that continuously uses UV treatment to control combined chlorine could not induce secondary formation for most DBPs. Concurrence for induction of trihalomethanes was identified between post-UV chlorination treatments and simulated extended chlorination time treatment. Trihalomethanes could not be induced by UV treatment of water from a continuously UV treated pool. This indicates that literature reports of experimentally induced trihalomethane formation by UV may be a result of kinetic increase in formation by UV. However, this does not imply that higher trihalomethane concentrations would occur in pools that apply continuous UV treatment. The bromine fraction of halogens in formed trihalomethanes increased with UV dose. This indicates that UV removes bromine atoms from larger molecules that participate in trihalomethane production during post-UV chlorination. Additionally, no significant

  6. Chlorine disinfection by-products in wastewater effluent: Bioassay-based assessment of toxicological impact.

    PubMed

    Watson, K; Shaw, G; Leusch, F D L; Knight, N L

    2012-11-15

    The potential ecological impact of disinfection by-products (DBPs) present in chlorinated wastewater effluents is not well understood. In this study, the chlorinated effluent of traditional wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and advanced water reclamation plants (AWRPs) supplying highly-treated recycled water were analyzed for nitrosamines and trihalomethanes (THMs), and a battery of bioassays conducted to assess effluent toxicity. An increase in general toxicity from DBPs was revealed for all wastewaters studied using an in vitro bioluminescence assay. Examples of androgenic activity and estrogenic activity arising from DBPs at specific sampling sites were also observed. The in vivo model (Artemia franciscana) was generally not adversely affected by exposure to DBPs from any of the chlorinated wastewaters studied. The observed toxicity could not be related to the concentrations of THMs and nitrosamines present, indicating that DBPs not monitored in this study were responsible for this. This work highlights the complexity of DBPs mixtures formed in chlorinated wastewaters, illustrating that toxicity of wastewater DBPs cannot be predicted by chemical monitoring of THMs and nitrosamines. The results suggest bioassays may be particularly useful monitoring tools in assessing toxicity arising from DBPs of these complex waters. The research concludes that DBPs formed in the chlorinated wastewaters studied can be toxic and may have a deleterious impact on aquatic organisms that are exposed to them, and therefore, that chlorination or chlorination/dechlorination may not be adequate treatment strategies for the protection of receiving waters. Chlorinated wastewater toxicity (from DBPs) is not well-understood in the Australian context, and this study serves to advise regulators on this issue. PMID:22981491

  7. What's in The Pool? A Comprehensive Identification Of Disinfection By-Products and Assessment of Mutagenicity of Chlorinated and Brominated Swimming Pool Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Swimming pool disinfectants and disinfection by-products (DBPs) have been linked to human health effects, including asthma and bladder cancer, but no studies have provided a comprehensive identification of DBPs in the water and related that to mutagenicity. We performed a compreh...

  8. What’s in the Pool? A Comprehensive Identification of Disinfection By-Products and Assessment of Mutagenicity of Chlorinated and Brominated Swimming Pool Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Swimming pool disinfectants and disinfection by-products (DBPs) have been linked to human health effects, including asthma and bladder cancer, but no studies have provided a comprehensive identification of DBPs in pool water and related those DBPs to the mutagenicity of pool wate...

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF A NOVEL METHOD FOR ANALYSIS OF TRANSCRIPTIONAL CHANGES IN TRANSITIONAL EPITHELIUM FROM URINARY BLADDERS OF RATS EXPOSED TO DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Development of a Novel Method for Analysis of Transcriptional Changes in Transitional Epithelium from Urinary Bladders of Rats Exposed to Drinking Water Disinfection By- products.

    Epidemiologic studies in human populations that drink chemically disinfected drinking wa...

  10. EFFECTS OF 20 WEEK EXPOSURES IN FEMALE SPRAGUE-DAWLEY (S-D) RATS TO THE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT DIBROMOACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of 20 week exposures in female Sprague-Dawley (S-D) rats to the drinking water disinfection by-product dibromoacetic acid. A S Murr and J M Goldman, Endocrinol. Br., RTD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, Res. Tri. Pk, NC. Sponsor: Audrey Cummings

    The drinking water disinfect...

  11. EFFECTS OF 20 WEEK EXPOSURES IN FEMALE SPRAGUE-DAWLEY (S-D) RATS TO DIBROMOACETIC ACID, A DRINKING WATER DISINFECTANT BY-PRODUCT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of 20 week exposures in female Sprague-Dawley (S-D) rats to the drinking water disinfection by-product dibromoacetic acid. A S Murr and J M Goldman, Endocrinol. Br., RTD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, Res. Tri. Pk, NC. Sponsor: Audrey Cummings

    The drinking water disinfect...

  12. IODO-ACID DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER: DOES LC/ESI-MS/MS OFFER AN ADVANTAGE OVER GC/NCI-MS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a recent Nationwide Disinfection By-Product (DBP) Occurrence Study, iodo-acids were identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid, bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo-prope...

  13. Disinfection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, J. P.; Haas, C. N.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastewater disinfection for 1978. This review covers areas such as: (1) mechanisms of inactivation of negative microorganisms by chlorine and ozone; and (2) the effects of various treatment on over-all water quality. A list of 61 references is also presented. (HM)

  14. DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary goal of the disinfection process in drinking water treatment is the inactivation of microbial pathogens. These pathogens comprise a diverse group of organisms which serve as the etiological agents of waterborne disease. Included in this group are bacterial, viral and ...

  15. Developmental Toxicity Evaluations of Whole Mixtures of Disinfection By-products using Concentrated Drinking Water in Rats: Gestational and Lactational Effects of Sulfate and Sodium*

    EPA Science Inventory

    A developmental toxicity bioassay was used in three experiments to evaluate drinking water concentrates for suitability in multigenerational studies. First, chlorinated water was concentrated 135 fold by reverse osmosis; select lost disinfection by-products were spiked back. Conc...

  16. Developmental Toxicity Evaluations of Whole Mixtures of Disinfection By-products using Concentrated Drinking Water in Rats: Gestational and Lactational Effects of Sulfate and Sodium

    EPA Science Inventory

    A developmental toxicity bioassay was used in three experiments to evaluate drinking water concentrates for suitability in multigenerational studies. First, chlorinated water was concentrated 135 fold by reverse osmosis; select lost disinfection by-products were spiked back. Co...

  17. TREATMENT OF LONG-EVANS RATS WITH A DEFINED MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IMPACTS INTESTINAL MICROBIAL METABOLISM.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water treatment results in the production of numerous halogenated disinfection by-products (DBPs), and has been associated with human colorectal cancer. Because the intestinal microbiota can bioactivate promutagens and procarcinogens, several studies have been done to examine the...

  18. INFLUENCE OF THE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT DIBROMOACETIC ACID ON RAT ESTROUS CYCLICITY AND OVARIAN FOLLICULAR STEROID RELEASE IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The drinking water disinfection by-product, dibromoacetic acid (DBA) has been reported to affect gonadal functions in the male rat. However, there is little information regarding its influence on female reproductive activity. Consequently, the present study investigated the eff...

  19. Mass Spectrometry Identification of Toxicologically Important Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection of drinking water has been rightly hailed as a public health triumph of the 20th century. Before its widespread use, millions of people died from waterborne diseases. Now, people in developed nations receive quality drinking water every day from their public wate...

  20. Formation of Toxic Iodinated Disinfection By-Products from Compounds Used in Medical Imaging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iodinated X-ray contrast media (ICM) were investigated as a source of iodine in the formation of iodo-trihalomethane (iodo-THM) and iodo-acid disinfection byproducts (DBPs), both of which are highly genotoxic and/or cytotoxic in mammalian cells. ICM are widely used at medical cen...

  1. REPRODUCTIVE AND DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY ASSOCIATED WITH DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS OF DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past decade many toxicologic studies have addressed the potential for disinfection byproducts of drinking water to elicit alterations on the reproductive system and fetal development.
    The types and designs of these studies vary considerably, but in general they can ...

  2. MEMBRANE EXTRACTION GC/MS FOR THE ANALYSIS OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    For many years, public water supplies in the U.S.have been treated with a variety of chemicals aimed at reducing or eliminating infectious diseases. Chlorine is the most common disinfectant used to combat waterborne microbial diseases; however, the use of ozone, chlorine dioxid...

  3. FATE OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT PRECURSORS DURING RIVERBANK FILTRATION AT THREE MIDWEST UTILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 3-year project is underway to evaluate riverbank filtration systems along three major US rivers. A principal aspects of the study involved monitoring a suite or organic, inorganic, and microbiological water quality parameters, with emphasis on disinfection byproduct formation p...

  4. ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN FOODS AND BEVERAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The determination of exposure to drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) requires an understanding of how drinking water comes in contact with humans through multiple pathways. In order to facilitate the investigation of human exposure to DBPs via foods and beverages, analy...

  5. Assessing regulatory violations of disinfection by-products in water distribution networks using a non-compliance potential index.

    PubMed

    Islam, Nilufar; Sadiq, Rehan; Rodriguez, Manuel J; Legay, Christelle

    2016-05-01

    Inactivating pathogens is essential to eradicate waterborne diseases. However, disinfection forms undesirable disinfection by-products (DBPs) in the presence of natural organic matter. Many regulations and guidelines exist to limit DBP exposure for eliminating possible health impacts such as bladder cancer, reproductive effects, and child development effects. In this paper, an index named non-compliance potential (NCP) index is proposed to evaluate regulatory violations by DBPs. The index can serve to evaluate water quality in distribution networks using the Bayesian Belief Network (BBN). BBN is a graphical model to represent contributing variables and their probabilistic relationships. Total trihalomethanes (TTHM), haloacetic acids (HAA5), and free residual chlorine (FRC) are selected as the variables to predict the NCP index. A methodology has been proposed to implement the index using either monitored data, empirical model results (e.g., multiple linear regression), and disinfectant kinetics through EPANET simulations. The index's usefulness is demonstrated through two case studies on municipal distribution systems using both full-scale monitoring and modeled data. The proposed approach can be implemented for data-sparse conditions, making it especially useful for smaller municipal drinking water systems. PMID:27102773

  6. The study of interrelationship between raw water quality parameters, chlorine demand and the formation of disinfection by-products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Md. Pauzi; Yee, Lim Fang; Ata, Sadia; Abdullah, Abass; Ishak, Basar; Abidin, Khairul Nidzham Zainal

    Disinfection is the most crucial process in the treatment of drinking water supply and is the final barrier against bacteriological impurities in drinking water. Chlorine is the primary disinfectant used in the drinking water treatment process throughout Malaysia. However, the occurrence of various disinfection by-products such as trihalomethanes (THM) and haloacetic acids created a major issue on the potential health hazards which may pose adverse health effects in both human and animals. To simulate real water treatment conditions and to represent the conditions inherent in a tropical country, this study was performed at an urbanized water treatment plant with a daily production of about 549,000 m 3 of treated water. The purpose of this work is to examine the relationship between the water quality parameters in the raw water with chlorine demand and the formation of disinfection by-products. This study also investigated the possibility of the statistical model applications for the prediction of chlorine demand and the THM formation. Two models were developed to estimate the chlorine demand and the THM formation. For the statistical evaluation, correlation and simple linear regression analysis were conducted using SPSS. The results of Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for the estimation of goodness-of-fit of the dependent variables of the models to the normal distribution showed that all the dependent variables followed the normal distribution at significance level of 0.05. Good linear correlations were observed between the independent parameters and formation of THM and the chlorine demand. This study also revealed that ammonia and the specific ultraviolet absorbent (SUVA) were the function of chlorine consumption in the treatment process. Chlorine dosage and SUVA increase the yield of THM. Chlorine demand and THM formation was moderately sensitive, but significant to the pH. The level of significance ( α) for the statistical tests and the inclusion of a variable in the

  7. Use of household bleach for emergency disinfection of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Elmaksoud, Sherif Abd; Patel, Nikita; Maxwell, Sherri L; Sifuentes, Laura Y; Gerba, Charles P

    2014-05-01

    Household bleach is typically used as a disinfectant for water in times of emergencies and by those engaging in recreational activities such as camping or rafting. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend a concentration of free chlorine of 1 mg/L for 30 minutes, or about 0.75 mL (1/8 teaspoon) of household bleach per gallon of water. The goal of the study described in this article was to assess two household bleach products to kill waterborne bacteria and viruses using the test procedures in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Guide Standard and Protocol for Testing Microbiological Purifiers. Bleach was found to meet these requirements in waters of low turbidity and organic matter. While the test bacterium was reduced by six logs in high turbid and organic-laden waters, the test viruses were reduced only by one-half to one log. In such waters greater chlorine doses or contact times are needed to achieve greater reduction of viruses. PMID:24909009

  8. Biological efficacy and toxic effect of emergency water disinfection process based on advanced oxidation technology.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yiping; Yuan, Xiaoli; Xu, Shujing; Li, Rihong; Zhou, Xinying; Zhang, Zhitao

    2015-12-01

    An innovative and removable water treatment system consisted of strong electric field discharge and hydrodynamic cavitation based on advanced oxidation technologies was developed for reactive free radicals producing and waterborne pathogens eliminating in the present study. The biological efficacy and toxic effects of this advanced oxidation system were evaluated during water disinfection treatments. Bench tests were carried out with synthetic microbial-contaminated water, as well as source water in rainy season from a reservoir of Dalian city (Liaoning Province, China). Results showed that high inactivation efficiency of Escherichia coli (>5 log) could be obtained for synthetic contaminated water at a low concentration (0.5-0.7 mg L(-1)) of total oxidants in 3-10 s. The numbers of wild total bacteria (108 × 10(3) CFU mL(-1)) and total coliforms (260 × 10(2) MPN 100 mL(-1)) in source water greatly reduced to 50 and 0 CFU mL(-1) respectively after treated by the advanced oxidation system, which meet the microbiological standards of drinking water, and especially that the inactivation efficiency of total coliforms could reach 100%. Meanwhile, source water qualities were greatly improved during the disinfection processes. The values of UV254 in particular were significantly reduced (60-80%) by reactive free radicals. Moreover, the concentrations of possible disinfection by-products (formaldehyde and bromide) in treated water were lower than detection limits, indicating that there was no harmful effect on water after the treatments. These investigations are helpful for the ecotoxicological studies of advanced oxidation system in the treatments of chemical polluted water or waste water. The findings of this work suggest that the developed water treatment system is ideal in the acute phases of emergencies, which also could offer additional advantages over a wide range of applications in water pollution control. PMID:26427371

  9. Mutagenic activity associated with by-products of drinking water disinfection by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone and UV-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zoeteman, B C; Hrubec, J; de Greef, E; Kool, H J

    1982-12-01

    A retrospective epidemiological study in The Netherlands showed a statistical association between chlorination by-products in drinking water and cancer of the esophagus and stomach for males. A pilot-plant study with alternative disinfectants was carried out with stored water of the Rivers Rhine and Meuse. It was demonstrated that the increase of direct acting mutagens after treatment with chlorine dioxide is similar to the effect of chlorination. Ozonation of Rhine water reduced the mutagenic activity for Salmonella typhimurium TA 98 both with and without metabolic activation. UV alone hardly affects the mutagenicity of the stored river water for S. typh. TA 98. In all studies, practically no mutagenic activity for S. typh. TA 100 was found. Although remarkable changes in the concentration of individual organic compounds are reported, the identity of the mutagens detected is yet unclear. Compounds of possible interest due to their removal by ozonation are 1,3,3-trimethyloxindole, dicyclopentadiene and several alkylquinolines. Compounds which might be responsible for the increased mutagenicity after chlorination are two brominated acetonitriles and tri(2-chlorethyl) phosphate. Furthermore, the concentration procedure with adsorption on XAD resin and the subsequent elution step may have affected the results. It is proposed to focus further research more on the less volatile by-products of disinfection than on the trihalomethanes. PMID:7151762

  10. Formation of halogenated disinfection by-products in cobalt-catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation processes in the presence of halides.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weiping; Dong, Wei; Kong, Deyang; Ji, Yuefei; Lu, Junhe; Yin, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    Sulfate radicals (SO4(-)) generated by activation of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) and persulfate (PS) are highly oxidative and applied to degrade various organic pollutants. This research was designed to investigate formation of halogenated by-products in Co(2+) activated PMS process in the presence of halides and natural organic matter (NOM). It was revealed that no halogenated by-products were detected in the presence of Cl(-) while 189 μg/L bromoform and 100.7 μg/L dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) were found after 120 h when 2 mg/L NOM, 0.1 mM Br(-), 1.0 mM PMS, and 5 μL Co(2+) were present initially. These products are known as disinfection by-products (DBPs) since they are formed in water disinfection processes. Formation of DBPs was even more significant in the absence of Co(2+). The data indicate that both PMS and SO4(-) can transform Br(-) to reactive bromine species which react with NOM to form halogenated by-products. Less DBP formation in Co(2+)-PMS systems was due to the further destruction of DBPs by SO4(-). More DBPs species including chlorinated ones were detected in the presence of both Cl(-) and Br(-). However, more brominated species produced than chlorinate ones generally. The total DBP yield decreased with the increase of Cl(-) content when total halides kept constant. This is one of the few studies that demonstrate the formation of halogenated DBPs in Co(2+)/PMS reaction systems, which should be taken into consideration in the application of SO4(-) based oxidation technologies. PMID:27093695

  11. Dissolved organic carbon and disinfection by-product precursor release from managed peat soils.

    PubMed

    Fleck, J A; Bossio, D A; Fujii, R

    2004-01-01

    A wetland restoration demonstration project examined the effects of a permanently flooded wetland on subsidence of peat soils. The project, started in 1997, was done on Twitchell Island, in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California. Conversion of agricultural land to a wetland has changed many of the biogeochemical processes controlling dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release from the peat soils, relative to the previous land use. Dissolved organic C in delta waters is a concern because it reacts with chlorine, added as a disinfectant in municipal drinking waters, to form carcinogenic disinfection byproducts (DBPs), including trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). This study explores the effects of peat soil biogeochemistry on DOC and DBP release under agricultural and wetland management. Results indicate that organic matter source, extent of soil organic matter decomposition, and decomposition pathways all are factors in THM formation. The results show that historical management practices dominate the release of DOC and THM precursors. However, within-site differences indicate that recent management decisions can contribute to changes in DOC quality and THM precursor formation. Not all aromatic forms of carbon are highly reactive and certain environmental conditions produce the specific carbon structures that form THMs. Both HAA and THM precursors are elevated in the DOC released under wetland conditions. The findings of this study emphasize the need to further investigate the roles of organic matter sources, microbial decomposition pathways, and decomposition status of soil organic matter in the release of DOC and DBP precursors from delta soils under varying land-use practices. PMID:15074797

  12. Dissolved Organic Carbon and Disinfection By-Product Precursor Release from Managed Peat Soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleck, J.A.; Bossio, D.A.; Fujii, R.

    2004-01-01

    A wetland restoration demonstration project examined the effects of a permanently flooded wetland on subsidence of peat soils. The project, started in 1997, was done on Twitchell Island, in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California. Conversion of agricultural land to a wetland has changed many of the biogeochemical processes controlling dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release from the peat soils, relative to the previous land use. Dissolved organic C in delta waters is a concern because it reacts with chlorine, added as a disinfectant in municipal drinking waters, to form carcinogenic disinfection byproducts (DBPs), including trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). This study explores the effects of peat soil biogeochemistry on DOC and DBP release under agricultural and wetland management. Results indicate that organic matter source, extent of soil organic matter decomposition, and decomposition pathways all are factors in THM formation. The results show that historical management practices dominate the release of DOC and THM precursors. However, within-site differences indicate that recent management decisions can contribute to changes in DOC quality and THM precursor formation. Not all aromatic forms of carbon are highly reactive and certain environmental conditions produce the specific carbon structures that form THMs. Both HAA and THM precursors are elevated in the DOC released under wetland conditions. The findings of this study emphasize the need to further investigate the roles of organic matter sources, microbial decomposition pathways, and decomposition status of soil organic matter in the release of DOC and DBP precursors from delta soils under varying land-use practices.

  13. Evaluating Evidence for Association of Human Bladder Cancer with Drinking-Water Chlorination Disinfection By-Products

    PubMed Central

    Hrudey, Steve E.; Backer, Lorraine C.; Humpage, Andrew R.; Krasner, Stuart W.; Michaud, Dominique S.; Moore, Lee E.; Singer, Philip C.; Stanford, Benjamin D.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to chlorination disinfection by-products (CxDBPs) is prevalent in populations using chlorination-based methods to disinfect public water supplies. Multifaceted research has been directed for decades to identify, characterize, and understand the toxicology of these compounds, control and minimize their formation, and conduct epidemiologic studies related to exposure. Urinary bladder cancer has been the health risk most consistently associated with CxDBPs in epidemiologic studies. An international workshop was held to (1) discuss the qualitative strengths and limitations that inform the association between bladder cancer and CxDBPs in the context of possible causation, (2) identify knowledge gaps for this topic in relation to chlorine/chloramine-based disinfection practice(s) in the United States, and (3) assess the evidence for informing risk management. Epidemiological evidence linking exposures to CxDBPs in drinking water to human bladder cancer risk provides insight into causality. However, because of imprecise, inaccurate, or incomplete estimation of CxDBPs levels in epidemiologic studies, translation from hazard identification directly to risk management and regulatory policy for CxDBPs can be challenging. Quantitative risk estimates derived from toxicological risk assessment for CxDBPs currently cannot be reconciled with those from epidemiologic studies, notwithstanding the complexities involved, making regulatory interpretation difficult. Evidence presented here has both strengths and limitations that require additional studies to resolve and improve the understanding of exposure response relationships. Replication of epidemiologic findings in independent populations with further elaboration of exposure assessment is needed to strengthen the knowledge base needed to better inform effective regulatory approaches. PMID:26309063

  14. POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON FROM NORTH DAKOTA LIGNITE: AN OPTION FOR DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT CONTROL IN WATER TREATMENT PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel J. Stepan; Thomas A. Moe; Melanie D. Hetland; Margaret L. Laumb

    2001-06-01

    New federal drinking water regulations have been promulgated to restrict the levels of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in finished public water supplies. DBPs are suspected carcinogens and are formed when organic material is partially oxidized by disinfectants commonly used in the water treatment industry. Additional federal mandates are expected in the near future that will further affect public water suppliers with respect to DBPs. Powdered activated carbon (PAC) has traditionally been used by the water treatment industry for the removal of compounds contributing to taste and odor problems. PAC also has the potential to remove naturally occurring organic matter (NOM) from raw waters prior to disinfection, thus controlling the formation of regulated DBPs. Many small water systems are currently using PAC for taste and odor control and have the potential to use PAC for controlling DBPs. This project, a cooperative effort between the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), the Grand Forks Water Treatment Plant, and the University of North Dakota Department of Civil Engineering, consists of several interrelated tasks. The objective of the research was to evaluate a cost-effective PAC produced from North Dakota lignite for removing NOM from water and reducing trihalomethane formation potential. The research approach was to develop a statistically valid testing protocol that can be used to compare dose-response relationships between North Dakota lignite-derived PAC and commercially available PAC products. A statistical analysis was performed to determine whether significant correlations exist between operating conditions, water properties, PAC properties, and dose-response behavior. Pertinent physical and chemical properties were also measured for each of the waters and each of the PACs.

  15. Evaluating Evidence for Association of Human Bladder Cancer with Drinking-Water Chlorination Disinfection By-Products.

    PubMed

    Hrudey, Steve E; Backer, Lorraine C; Humpage, Andrew R; Krasner, Stuart W; Michaud, Dominique S; Moore, Lee E; Singer, Philip C; Stanford, Benjamin D

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to chlorination disinfection by-products (CxDBPs) is prevalent in populations using chlorination-based methods to disinfect public water supplies. Multifaceted research has been directed for decades to identify, characterize, and understand the toxicology of these compounds, control and minimize their formation, and conduct epidemiologic studies related to exposure. Urinary bladder cancer has been the health risk most consistently associated with CxDBPs in epidemiologic studies. An international workshop was held to (1) discuss the qualitative strengths and limitations that inform the association between bladder cancer and CxDBPs in the context of possible causation, (2) identify knowledge gaps for this topic in relation to chlorine/chloramine-based disinfection practice(s) in the United States, and (3) assess the evidence for informing risk management. Epidemiological evidence linking exposures to CxDBPs in drinking water to human bladder cancer risk provides insight into causality. However, because of imprecise, inaccurate, or incomplete estimation of CxDBPs levels in epidemiologic studies, translation from hazard identification directly to risk management and regulatory policy for CxDBPs can be challenging. Quantitative risk estimates derived from toxicological risk assessment for CxDBPs currently cannot be reconciled with those from epidemiologic studies, notwithstanding the complexities involved, making regulatory interpretation difficult. Evidence presented here has both strengths and limitations that require additional studies to resolve and improve the understanding of exposure response relationships. Replication of epidemiologic findings in independent populations with further elaboration of exposure assessment is needed to strengthen the knowledge base needed to better inform effective regulatory approaches. PMID:26309063

  16. Assessing exposure in epidemiologic studies to disinfection by-products in drinking water: report from an international workshop.

    PubMed Central

    Arbuckle, Tye E; Hrudey, Steve E; Krasner, Stuart W; Nuckols, Jay R; Richardson, Susan D; Singer, Philip; Mendola, Pauline; Dodds, Linda; Weisel, Clifford; Ashley, David L; Froese, Kenneth L; Pegram, Rex A; Schultz, Irvin R; Reif, John; Bachand, Annette M; Benoit, Frank M; Lynberg, Michele; Poole, Charles; Waller, Kirsten

    2002-01-01

    The inability to accurately assess exposure has been one of the major shortcomings of epidemiologic studies of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water. A number of contributing factors include a) limited information on the identity, occurrence, toxicity, and pharmacokinetics of the many DBPs that can be formed from chlorine, chloramine, ozone, and chlorine dioxide disinfection; b) the complex chemical interrelationships between DBPs and other parameters within a municipal water distribution system; and c) difficulties obtaining accurate and reliable information on personal activity and water consumption patterns. In May 2000, an international workshop was held to bring together various disciplines to develop better approaches for measuring DBP exposure for epidemiologic studies. The workshop reached consensus about the clear need to involve relevant disciplines (e.g., chemists, engineers, toxicologists, biostatisticians and epidemiologists) as partners in developing epidemiologic studies of DBPs in drinking water. The workshop concluded that greater collaboration of epidemiologists with water utilities and regulators should be encouraged in order to make regulatory monitoring data more useful for epidemiologic studies. Similarly, exposure classification categories in epidemiologic studies should be chosen to make results useful for regulatory or policy decision making. PMID:11834463

  17. Photodegradation kinetics of iopamidol by UV irradiation and enhanced formation of iodinated disinfection by-products in sequential oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fu-Xiang; Xu, Bin; Lin, Yi-Li; Hu, Chen-Yan; Zhang, Tian-Yang; Gao, Nai-Yun

    2014-07-01

    The photochemical degradation of iopamidol with low-pressure UV lamps and the formation of iodinated disinfection by-products (I-DBPs) during sequential oxidation processes including chlorine, monochloramine and chlorine dioxide were investigated in this study. Iopamidol can be effectively decomposed by UV irradiation with pseudo-first order reaction kinetics. The evaluated quantum yield was found to be 0.03318 mol einstein(-1). Results showed that iopamidol degradation rate was significantly increased by higher UV intensity and lower initial iopamidol concentration. However, the effect of solution pH was negligible. Degradation of iopamidol by UV photolysis was subjected to deiodination and hydroxylation mechanisms. The main degradation products including -OH substitutes and iodide were identified by UPLC-ESI-MS and UPLC-UV, respectively. Increasing the intensity of UV irradiation promoted the release of iodide. Destruction pathways of iopamidol photolysis were proposed. Enhanced formation of I-DBPs were observed after iopamidol photolysis followed by disinfection processes including chlorine, monochloramine and chlorine dioxide. With the increase of UV fluence, I-DBPs formation were significantly promoted. PMID:24762552

  18. Characterization of iodinated disinfection by-products in chlorinated and chloraminated waters using Orbitrap based gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Postigo, Cristina; Cojocariu, Cristian I; Richardson, Susan D; Silcock, Paul J; Barcelo, Damia

    2016-05-01

    Recent developments in gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS) have opened up the possibility to use the high resolution-accurate mass (HRAM) Orbitrap mass analyzer to further characterize the volatile and semivolatile fractions of environmental samples. This work describes the utilization of GC Orbitrap MS technology to characterize iodine-containing disinfection by-products (iodo-DBPs) in chlorinated and chloraminated DBP mixture concentrates. These DBP mixtures were generated in lab-scale disinfection reactions using Llobregat river water and solutions containing Nordic Lake natural organic matter (NOM). The DBPs generated were concentrated using XAD resins, and extracts obtained were analyzed in full scan mode with the GC Orbitrap MS. Integration of high resolution accurate mass information and fragment rationalization allowed the characterization of up to 11 different iodo-DBPs in the water extracts analyzed, including one new iodo-DBP reported for the first time. Overall, formation of iodo-DBPs was enhanced during chloramination reactions. As expected, NOM characteristics and iodide and bromide content of the tested waters affected the amount and type of iodo-DBPs generated. Graphical Abstract Characterization of iodo-DBPs in DBP mixtures based on high resolution accurate mass data obtained by means of GC Orbitrap MS analysis. PMID:27007731

  19. Formation of toxic iodinated disinfection by-products from compounds used in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Duirk, Stephen E; Lindell, Cristal; Cornelison, Christopher C; Kormos, Jennifer; Ternes, Thomas A; Attene-Ramos, Matias; Osiol, Jennifer; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J; Richardson, Susan D

    2011-08-15

    Iodinated X-ray contrast media (ICM) were investigated as a source of iodine in the formation of iodo-trihalomethane (iodo-THM) and iodo-acid disinfection byproducts (DBPs), both of which are highly genotoxic and/or cytotoxic in mammalian cells. ICM are widely used at medical centers to enable imaging of soft tissues (e.g., organs, veins, blood vessels) and are designed to be inert substances, with 95% eliminated in urine and feces unmetabolized within 24 h. ICM are not well removed in wastewater treatment plants, such that they have been found at elevated concentrations in rivers and streams (up to 100 μg/L). Naturally occurring iodide in source waters is believed to be a primary source of iodine in the formation of iodo-DBPs, but a previous 23-city iodo-DBP occurrence study also revealed appreciable levels of iodo-DBPs in some drinking waters that had very low or no detectable iodide in their source waters. When 10 of the original 23 cities' source waters were resampled, four ICM were found--iopamidol, iopromide, iohexol, and diatrizoate--with iopamidol most frequently detected, in 6 of the 10 plants sampled, with concentrations up to 2700 ng/L. Subsequent controlled laboratory reactions of iopamidol with aqueous chlorine and monochloramine in the absence of natural organic matter (NOM) produced only trace levels of iodo-DBPs; however, when reacted in real source waters (containing NOM), chlorine and monochloramine produced significant levels of iodo-THMs and iodo-acids, up to 212 nM for dichloroiodomethane and 3.0 nM for iodoacetic acid, respectively, for chlorination. The pH behavior was different for chlorine and monochloramine, such that iodo-DBP concentrations maximized at higher pH (8.5) for chlorine, but at lower pH (6.5) for monochloramine. Extracts from chloraminated source waters with and without iopamidol, as well as from chlorinated source waters with iopamidol, were the most cytotoxic samples in mammalian cells. Source waters with iopamidol but no

  20. Characterization and disinfection by-product formation potential of natural organic matter in surface and ground waters from Northern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Leenheer, J.A.; Katz, B.; Martin, B.S.; Noyes, T.I.

    2000-01-01

    Streamwaters in northern Florida have large concentrations of natural organic matter (NOM), and commonly flow directly into the ground water system through karst features, such as sinkholes. In this study NOM from northern Florida stream and ground waters was fractionated, the fractions characterized by infrared (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and then chlorinated to investigate their disinfection by-product (DBP) formation potential (FP). As the NOM character changed (as quantified by changes in NOM distribution in various fractions, such as hydrophilic acids or hydrophobic neutrals) due to migration through the aquifer, the total organic halide (TOX)-FP and trihalomethane (THM)-FP yield of each of these fractions varied also. In surface waters, the greatest DBP yields were produced by the colloid fraction. In ground waters, DBP yield of the hydrophobic acid fraction (the greatest in terms of mass) decreased during infiltration.

  1. Identification of disinfection by-products in freshwater and seawater swimming pools and evaluation of genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Manasfi, Tarek; De Méo, Michel; Coulomb, Bruno; Di Giorgio, Carole; Boudenne, Jean-Luc

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in swimming pools has been linked to adverse health effects. Numerous DBPs that occur in swimming pools are genotoxic and carcinogenic. This toxicity is of a greater concern in the case of brominated DBPs that have been shown to have substantially greater toxicities than their chlorinated analogs. In chlorinated seawater swimming pools, brominated DBPs are formed due to the high content of bromide. Nevertheless, very little data is reported about DBP occurrence and mutagenicity of water in these pools. In the present study, three seawater and one freshwater swimming pools located in Southeastern France were investigated to determine qualitatively and quantitatively their DBP contents. An evaluation of the genotoxic properties of water samples of the freshwater pool and a seawater pool was conducted through the Salmonella assay (Ames test). The predominant DBPs identified in the freshwater pool were chlorinated species and included trichloroacetic acid, chloral hydrate, dichloroacetonitrile, 1,1,1-trichloropropanone and chloroform. In the seawater pools, brominated DBPs were the predominant species and included dibromoacetic acid, bromoform and dibromoacetonitile. Bromal hydrate levels were also reported. In both types of pools, haloacetic acids were the most prevalent chemical class among the analyzed DBP classes. The distribution of other DBP classes varied depending on the type of pool. As to genotoxicity, the results of Ames test showed higher mutagenicity in the freshwater pool as a consequence of its considerably higher DBP contents in comparison to the tested seawater pool. PMID:26735347

  2. Comparison of formation of disinfection by-products by chlorination and ozonation of wastewater effluents and their toxicity to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Park, Keun-Young; Choi, Su-Young; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kweon, Ji-Hyang; Song, Ji-Hyeon

    2016-08-01

    This study compared the two most frequently used disinfectants (i.e., chlorine and ozone) to understand their efficiency in wastewater effluents and the ecotoxicity of disinfection by-products created during chlorination and ozonation. Four trihalomethanes (THMs) and nine haloacetic acids (HAAs) were measured from a chlorine-disinfected sample and two aldehydes (i.e., formaldehydes and acetaldehydes) were analyzed after ozonation. Chlorination was effective for total coliform removal with Ct value in the range of 30-60 mg-min/L. Over 1.6 mg/L of ozone dose and 0.5 min of the contact time presented sufficient disinfection efficiency. The concentration of THMs increased with longer contact time (24 h), but that of HAAs showed little change with contact time. The measured concentration of formaldehyde at the ozone dose of 1.6 mg/L and the contact time of 9 min showed the greatest value in this study, approximately 330 μg L(-1), from which the corresponding ecotoxicity was determined using an indicator species, Daphnia magna. The ecotoxicity results were consistent with the toxicological features judged by occurrence, genotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Both the disinfection efficiency as well as the DBP formation potential should therefore be considered to avoid harmful impacts on aquatic environments when a disinfection method is used for wastewater effluents. PMID:27213572

  3. Assessment of reproductive effects on complex mixtures of disinfection by-products in a multigenerational rat bioassay of drinking water concentrates

    EPA Science Inventory

    To address concerns raised by epidemiology studies, we conducted a multigenerational reproductive toxicity study in rats using a “whole” mixture of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs). Raw water was concentrated ~130 fold, chlorinated, and provided as drinking water to...

  4. Assessment of Reproductive Effects of Complex Mixtures of Disinfection By-Products in a Multi-Generational Rat Bioassay of Drinking Water Concentrates - Monterey

    EPA Science Inventory

    To address concerns raised by epidemiology studies, we conducted a multigenerational reproductive toxicity study in rats using a “whole” mixture of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs). Raw water was concentrated ~130 fold, chlorinated, and provided as drinking water to...

  5. PROBING REACTIVITY OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER FOR DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION USING XAD-8 RESIN ADSORPTION AND ULTRAFILTRATION FRACTIONATION. (R828045)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection by-product (DBP) reactivity (yield and speciation upon reaction with chlorine) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated from two surface waters was investigated. The source waters, each having significantly different specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA

  6. CARCINOGENICITY OF INDIVIDUAL AND A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN A RAT MODEL OF HEREDITARY RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carcinogenicity of Individual and a Mixture of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products in a Rat Model of Hereditary Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Eker rats develop hereditary renal cell carcinoma secondary to a germline mutation in the tuberous sclerosis 2 (Tsc2) gene and are ligh...

  7. CHLORINATED VS. CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER: TOXICITY-BASED IDENTIFICATION OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS USING ESI-MS AND ESI-MS/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are of concern because some epidemiologic studies have shown that some DBPs are associated with cancer or adverse reproductive/developmental effects in human populations, and other studies have shown that certain DBPs cause similar h...

  8. DISRUPTION IN RAT ESTROUS CYCLICITY BY THE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTANT BY-PRODUCT DIBROMOACETIC ACID: RELATIONSHIP TO A SUPPRESSION ON ESTRADIOL METABOLISM?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disruption in Rat Estrous Cyclicity by the Drinking Water Disinfectant By-Product Dibromoacetic Acid: Relationship to A Suppression on Estradiol Metabolism?

    Ashley S. Murr and Jerome M. Goldman, Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division National Health and En...

  9. DEVELOP METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION POTENTIAL (DBP-FP) AND INSTRUMENT DETECTION SYSTEM FOR MONITORING DBP-FP IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA requires drinking water utilities to monitor source water to determine the need for treatment to remove the precursors (natural organic matter {NOM}) of disinfection by-products (DBPs). Currently, drinking water utilities use total organic carbon (TOC), dissolved organic car...

  10. Meeting in Canada: Chlorinated vs. Chloraminated Drinking Water: Toxicity-Based Identification of Disinfection By-Products Using ESI-MS and ESI-MS/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are of concern because epidemiologic studies have shown that they are associated with bladder cancer and adverse reproductive/developmental effects in human populations. There is almost no information on high molecular weight DBPs (>...

  11. MODERATING INFLUENCE OF THE DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT DIBROMOACETIC ACID ON A DITHIOCARBAMATE-INDUCED SUPPRESSION OF THE LUTEINIZING HORMONE SURGE IN FEMALE RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disinfection by-product dibromoacetic acid (DBA) has been found in female rats to increase circulating concentrations of both estradiol (E2) and estrone (E1). This effect is apparently due, at least in part, to a suppression in hepatic catabolism. The present study investigat...

  12. MEETING IN CHINA: CHLORINATED VS. CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER: TOXICITY-BASED IDENTIFICATION OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS USING ESI-MS AND ESI-MS/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are of concern because epidemiologic studies have shown that they are associated with bladder cancer and adverse reproductive/developmental effects in human populations, and some cause cancer in laboratory animals. As a result, the U...

  13. Reproductive Toxicity of a Mixture of Regulated Drinking-Water Disinfection By-Products in a Multigenerational Rat Bioassay

    PubMed Central

    Klinefelter, Gary R.; Goldman, Jerome M.; DeAngelo, Anthony B.; Best, Deborah S.; McDonald, Anthony; Strader, Lillian F.; Murr, Ashley S.; Suarez, Juan D.; George, Michael H.; Hunter, E. Sidney; Simmons, Jane Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Background Trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) are regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs); their joint reproductive toxicity in drinking water is unknown. Objective We aimed to evaluate a drinking water mixture of the four regulated THMs and five regulated HAAs in a multigenerational reproductive toxicity bioassay. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed (parental, F1, and F2 generations) from gestation day 0 of the parental generation to postnatal day (PND) 6 of the F2 generation to a realistically proportioned mixture of THMs and HAAs at 0, 500×, 1,000×, or 2,000× of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Results Maternal water consumption was reduced at ≥ 1,000×; body weights were reduced at 2,000×. Prenatal and postnatal survival were unaffected. F1 pup weights were unaffected at birth but reduced at 2,000× on PND6 and at ≥ 1,000× on PND21. Postweaning F1 body weights were reduced at 2,000×, and water consumption was reduced at ≥ 500×. Males at 2,000× had a small but significantly increased incidence of retained nipples and compromised sperm motility. Onset of puberty was delayed at 1,000× and 2,000×. F1 estrous cycles and fertility were unaffected, and F2 litters showed no effects on pup weight or survival. Histologically, P0 (parental) dams had nephropathy and adrenal cortical pathology at 2,000×. Conclusions A mixture of regulated DBPs at up to 2,000× the MCLs had no adverse effects on fertility, pregnancy maintenance, prenatal survival, postnatal survival, or birth weights. Delayed puberty at ≥ 1,000× may have been secondary to reduced water consumption. Male nipple retention and compromised sperm motility at 2,000× may have been secondary to reduced body weights. Citation Narotsky MG, Klinefelter GR, Goldman JM, DeAngelo AB, Best DS, McDonald A, Strader LF, Murr AS, Suarez JD, George MH, Hunter ES III, Simmons JE. 2015. Reproductive toxicity of a mixture of regulated

  14. Drinking-Water Disinfection By-products and Semen Quality: A Cross-Sectional Study in China

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qiang; Wang, Yi-Xin; Xie, Shao-Hua; Xu, Liang; Chen, Yong-Zhe; Li, Min; Yue, Jing; Li, Yu-Feng; Liu, Ai-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) has been demonstrated to impair male reproductive health in animals, but human evidence is limited and inconsistent. Objective: We examined the association between exposure to drinking-water DBPs and semen quality in a Chinese population. Methods: We recruited 2,009 men seeking semen analysis from the Reproductive Center of Tongji Hospital in Wuhan, China, between April 2011 and May 2012. Each man provided a semen sample and a urine sample. Semen samples were analyzed for sperm concentration, sperm motility, and sperm count. As a biomarker of exposure to drinking-water DBPs, trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) was measured in the urine samples. Results: The mean (median) urinary TCAA concentration was 9.58 (7.97) μg/L (interquartile range, 6.01–10.96 μg/L). Compared with men with urine TCAA in the lowest quartile, increased adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were estimated for below-reference sperm concentration in men with TCAA in the second and fourth quartiles (OR = 1.79; 95% CI: 1.19, 2.69 and OR = 1.51; 95% CI: 0.98, 2.31, respectively), for below-reference sperm motility in men with TCAA in the second and third quartiles (OR = 1.46; 95% CI: 1.12, 1.90 and OR = 1.30; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.70, respectively), and for below-reference sperm count in men with TCAA in the second quartile (OR 1.62; 95% CI: 1.04, 2.55). Nonmonotonic associations with TCAA quartiles were also estimated for semen parameters modeled as continuous outcomes, although significant negative associations were estimated for all quartiles above the reference level for sperm motility. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that exposure to drinking-water DBPs may contribute to decreased semen quality in humans. Citation: Zeng Q, Wang YX, Xie SH, Xu L, Chen YZ, Li M, Yue J, Li YF, Liu AL, Lu WQ. 2014. Drinking-water disinfection by-products and semen quality: a cross-sectional study in China. Environ Health Perspect 122:741–746; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp

  15. Enhanced coagulation with powdered activated carbon or MIEX secondary treatment: a comparison of disinfection by-product formation and precursor removal.

    PubMed

    Watson, Kalinda; Farré, Maria José; Knight, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    The removal of both organic and inorganic disinfection by-product (DBP) precursors prior to disinfection is important in mitigating DBP formation, with halide removal being particularly important in salinity-impacted water sources. A matrix of waters of variable alkalinity, halide concentration and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration were treated with enhanced coagulation (EC) followed by anion exchange (MIEX resin) or powdered activated carbon (PAC) and the subsequent disinfection by-product formation potentials (DBP-FPs) assessed and compared to DBP-FPs for untreated samples. Halide and DOC removal were also monitored for both treatment processes. Bromide and iodide adsorption by MIEX treatment ranged from 0 to 53% and 4-78%, respectively. As expected, EC and PAC treatments did not remove halides. DOC removal by EC/PAC was 70 ± 10%, while EC/MIEX enabled a DOC removal of 66 ± 12%. Despite the halide removals achieved by MIEX, increases in brominated disinfection by-product (Br-DBP) formation were observed relative to untreated samples, when favourable Br:DOC ratios were created by the treatment. However, the increases in formation were less than what was observed for the EC/PAC treated waters, which caused large increases in Br-DBP formation when high Br-DBP-forming water quality conditions occurred. The formation potential of fully chlorinated DBPs decreased after treatment in all cases. PMID:25462752

  16. The Effect of Different Boiling and Filtering Devices on the Concentration of Disinfection By-Products in Tap Water

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco-Turigas, Glòria; Villanueva, Cristina M.; Goñi, Fernando; Rantakokko, Panu; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are ubiquitous contaminants in tap drinking water with the potential to produce adverse health effects. Filtering and boiling tap water can lead to changes in the DBP concentrations and modify the exposure through ingestion. Changes in the concentration of 4 individual trihalomethanes (THM4) (chloroform (TCM), bromodichloromethane (BDCM), dibromochloromethane (DBCM), and bromoform (TBM)), MX, and bromate were tested when boiling and filtering high bromine-containing tap water from Barcelona. For filtering, we used a pitcher-type filter and a household reverse osmosis filter; for boiling, an electric kettle, a saucepan, and a microwave were used. Samples were taken before and after each treatment to determine the change in the DBP concentration. pH, conductivity, and free/total chlorine were also measured. A large decrease of THM4 (from 48% to 97%) and MX concentrations was observed for all experiments. Bromine-containing trihalomethanes were mostly eliminated when filtering while chloroform when boiling. There was a large decrease in the concentration of bromate with reverse osmosis, but there was a little effect in the other experiments. These findings suggest that the exposure to THM4 and MX through ingestion is reduced when using these household appliances, while the decrease of bromate is device dependent. This needs to be considered in the exposure assessment of the epidemiological studies. PMID:23476675

  17. Monitoring of chlorination disinfection by-products and their associated health risks in drinking water of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Sidra; Hashmi, Imran; Rehman, Muhammad Saif Ur; Qazi, Ishtiaq A; Awan, Mohammad A; Nasir, Habib

    2015-03-01

    This study reports the baseline data of chlorination disinfection by-products such as trihalomethanes (THMs) and their associated health risks in the water distribution network of Islamabad and Rawalpindi, Pakistan. THM monitoring was carried out at 30 different sampling sites across the twin cities for 6 months. The average concentration of total trihalomethanes (TTHMs) and chloroform ranged between 575 and 595 μg/L which exceeded the permissible US (80 μg/L) and EU (100 μg/L) limits. Chloroform was one of the major contributors to the TTHMs concentration (>85%). The occurrence of THMs was found in the following order: chloroform, bromodichloromethane > dibromochloromethane > bromoform. Lifetime cancer risk assessment of THMs for both males and females was carried out using prediction models via different exposure routes (ingestion, inhalation, and dermal). Total lifetime cancer risk assessment for different exposure routes (ingestion, inhalation, and skin) was carried out. The highest cancer risk expected from THMs seems to be from the inhalation route followed by ingestion and dermal contacts. The average lifetime cancer risk for males and females was found to be 0.51 × 10⁻³ and 1.22 × 10⁻³, respectively. The expected number of cancer risks per year could reach two to three cases for each city. PMID:25719485

  18. The effect of different boiling and filtering devices on the concentration of disinfection by-products in tap water.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Turigas, Glòria; Villanueva, Cristina M; Goñi, Fernando; Rantakokko, Panu; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are ubiquitous contaminants in tap drinking water with the potential to produce adverse health effects. Filtering and boiling tap water can lead to changes in the DBP concentrations and modify the exposure through ingestion. Changes in the concentration of 4 individual trihalomethanes (THM4) (chloroform (TCM), bromodichloromethane (BDCM), dibromochloromethane (DBCM), and bromoform (TBM)), MX, and bromate were tested when boiling and filtering high bromine-containing tap water from Barcelona. For filtering, we used a pitcher-type filter and a household reverse osmosis filter; for boiling, an electric kettle, a saucepan, and a microwave were used. Samples were taken before and after each treatment to determine the change in the DBP concentration. pH, conductivity, and free/total chlorine were also measured. A large decrease of THM4 (from 48% to 97%) and MX concentrations was observed for all experiments. Bromine-containing trihalomethanes were mostly eliminated when filtering while chloroform when boiling. There was a large decrease in the concentration of bromate with reverse osmosis, but there was a little effect in the other experiments. These findings suggest that the exposure to THM4 and MX through ingestion is reduced when using these household appliances, while the decrease of bromate is device dependent. This needs to be considered in the exposure assessment of the epidemiological studies. PMID:23476675

  19. Disinfection by-product formation and mitigation strategies in point-of-use chlorination with sodium dichloroisocyanurate in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Lantagne, Daniele S; Cardinali, Fred; Blount, Ben C

    2010-07-01

    Almost a billion persons lack access to improved drinking water, and diarrheal diseases cause an estimated 1.87 million deaths per year. Sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) tablets are widely recommended for household water treatment to reduce diarrhea. Because NaDCC is directly added to untreated water sources, concerns have been raised about the potential health impact of disinfection by-products. This study investigated trihalomethane (THM) production in water from six sources used for drinking (0.6-888.5 nephelometric turbidity units) near Arusha, Tanzania. No sample collected at 1, 8, and 24 hours after NaDCC addition exceeded the World Health Organization guideline values for either individual or total THMs. Ceramic filtration, sand filtration, cloth filtration, and settling and decanting were not effective mitigation strategies to reduce THM formation. Chlorine residual and THM formation were not significantly different in NaDCC and sodium hypochlorite treatment. Household chlorination of turbid and non-turbid waters did not create THM concentrations that exceeded health risk guidelines. PMID:20595492

  20. Disinfection By-Product Formation and Mitigation Strategies in Point-of-Use Chlorination with Sodium Dichloroisocyanurate in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Lantagne, Daniele S.; Cardinali, Fred; Blount, Ben C.

    2010-01-01

    Almost a billion persons lack access to improved drinking water, and diarrheal diseases cause an estimated 1.87 million deaths per year. Sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) tablets are widely recommended for household water treatment to reduce diarrhea. Because NaDCC is directly added to untreated water sources, concerns have been raised about the potential health impact of disinfection by-products. This study investigated trihalomethane (THM) production in water from six sources used for drinking (0.6–888.5 nephelometric turbidity units) near Arusha, Tanzania. No sample collected at 1, 8, and 24 hours after NaDCC addition exceeded the World Health Organization guideline values for either individual or total THMs. Ceramic filtration, sand filtration, cloth filtration, and settling and decanting were not effective mitigation strategies to reduce THM formation. Chlorine residual and THM formation were not significantly different in NaDCC and sodium hypochlorite treatment. Household chlorination of turbid and non-turbid waters did not create THM concentrations that exceeded health risk guidelines. PMID:20595492

  1. Degradation of carbamazepine by UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process and formation of disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiqing; Xia, Ying; Li, Ting; Yao, Tian; Shi, Zhou; Zhu, Shumin; Gao, Naiyun

    2016-08-01

    Pharmaceuticals in water are commonly found and are not efficiently removed by current treatment processes. Degradation of antiepileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) by UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process was systematically investigated in this study. The results showed that the UV/chlorine process was more effective at degrading CBZ than either UV or chlorination alone. The CBZ degradation followed pseudo-first order reaction kinetics, and the degradation rate constants (kobs) were affected by the chlorine dose, solution pH, and natural organic matter concentration to different degrees. Degradation of CBZ greatly increased with increasing chlorine dose and decreasing solution pH during the UV/chlorine process. Additionally, the presence of natural organic matter in the solution inhibited the degradation of CBZ. UV photolysis, chlorination, and reactive species (hydroxyl radical •OH and chlorine atoms •Cl) were identified as responsible for CBZ degradation in the UV/chlorine process. Finally, a degradation pathway for CBZ in the UV/chlorine process was proposed and the formation potentials of carbonaceous and nitrogenous disinfection by-products were evaluated. Enhanced formation of trichloroacetic acid, dichloroacetonitrile, and trichloronitromethane precursors should be considered when applying UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process to drinking water. PMID:27164884

  2. The Power of Four (the 4-Lab Study): ORD’s Integrated Disinfection By-Products Mixtures Research Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical disinfection of water, a major public health triumph of the 20th century, has resulted in dramatic decreases in morbidity and mortality from water-borne disease. The intended result of chemical disinfection of drinking water is reduction of microbial contamination; the u...

  3. Development of Normal Human Colonocyte Cultures to Identify the Carcinogenic Potential of Priorty Disinfection By-products

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have linked the consumption of disinfected surface waters to an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Of the approximately >600 disinfection byproducts (DBPs) identified, the US EPA regulates 11 DBPs for an increased risk of cancer. An in-depth mechanism-...

  4. [Formation and Variation of Brominated Disinfection By-products in A Combined Ultrafiltration and Reverse Osmosis Process for Seawater Desalination].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhe; Sun, Ying-xue; Shi, Na; Hu, Hong-ying

    2015-10-01

    The characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and brominated disinfection by-products ( Br-DBPs ) during a seawater desalination ultrafiltration (UF) combined reverse osmosis (RO) process were studied. The seawater contained high level of bromide ion (45.6-50.9 mg x L(-1)) and aromatic compounds with specific ultraviolet absorbance ( SUVA) of 3.6-6.0 L x (mg x m)(-1). The tryptophan-like aromatic protein, fulvic acid-like and soluble microbial by-product-like were the main fluorescent DOM in the seawater. After pre-chlorination of the seawater, the concentrations of DBPs was significantly increased in the influent of UF, which was dominantly the Br-DBPs. Bromoform (CHBr3) accounted for 70.48% - 91.50% of total trihalomethanes (THMs), dibromoacetic acid (Br2CHCO2H) occupied 81.14% - 100% of total haloacetic acids (HAAs) and dibromoacetonitrile (C2HBr2N) occupied 83.77% - 87.45% of total haloacetonitriles ( HANs). The removal efficiency of THMs, HAAs and HANs by the UF membrane was 36.63% - 40.39%, 73.83% - 95.38% and 100%, respectively. The RO membrane could completely remove the HAAs, while a little of the THMs was penetrated. The antiestrogenic activity in the seawater was 0.35 - 0.44 mg x L(-1), which was increased 32% - 69% after the pre-chlorination. The DBPs and other bio-toxic organics which formed during the UF-RO process were finally concentrated in the UF concentrate and RO concentrate. PMID:26841602

  5. Assessing the human health impacts of exposure to disinfection by-products--a critical review of concepts and methods.

    PubMed

    Grellier, James; Rushton, Lesley; Briggs, David J; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the public health implications of chemical contamination of drinking water is important for societies and their decision-makers. The possible population health impacts associated with exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) are of particular interest due to their potential carcinogenicity and their widespread occurrence as a result of treatments employed to control waterborne infectious disease. We searched the literature for studies that have attempted quantitatively to assess population health impacts and health risks associated with exposure to DBPs in drinking water. We summarised and evaluated these assessments in terms of their objectives, methods, treatment of uncertainties, and interpretation and communication of results. In total we identified 40 studies matching our search criteria. The vast majority of studies presented estimates of generic cancer and non-cancer risks based on toxicological data and methods that were designed with regulatory, health-protective purposes in mind, and therefore presented imprecise and biased estimates of health impacts. Many studies insufficiently addressed the numerous challenges to DBP risk assessment, failing to evaluate the evidence for a causal relationship, not appropriately addressing the complex nature of DBP occurrence as a mixture of chemicals, not adequately characterising exposure in space and time, not defining specific health outcomes, not accounting for characteristics of target populations, and not balancing potential risks of DBPs against the health benefits related with drinking water disinfection. Uncertainties were often poorly explained or insufficiently accounted for, and important limitations of data and methods frequently not discussed. Grave conceptual and methodological limitations in study design, as well as erroneous use of available dose-response data, seriously impede the extent to which many of these assessments contribute to understanding the public health implications of

  6. HYDROGEN ABSTRACTION AND DECOMPOSITION OF BROMOPICRIN AND OTHER TRIHALOGENATED DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS BY GC/MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tribromonitromethane (bromopicrin), dibromochlorani-tromethane, bromodichloronitromethane, and trichloroni-tromethane (chloropicrin) have been identified as drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs). They are thermally unstable and decompose under commonly used injection port...

  7. Spatio-temporal variability of non-regulated disinfection by-products within a drinking water distribution network.

    PubMed

    Mercier Shanks, Catherine; Sérodes, Jean-Baptiste; Rodriguez, Manuel J

    2013-06-01

    The non-regulated disinfection by-products (NrDBP) targeted in this study include four haloacetonitriles (trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN); dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN); bromochloroacetonitrile (BCAN) and dibromoacetonitrile (DBAN)); one halonitromethane (trichloronitromethane, better known under the name chloropicrin (CPK)); and two haloketones (1,1-dichloro-2-propanone (11DCPone) and 1,1,1-trichloro-2-propanone (111TCPone)). This study provides a detailed picture of the spatial and temporal variability of these NrDBP concentrations throughout a drinking water distribution system located in a region with major seasonal climate variations. The results obtained show that the concentrations of the investigated NrDBPs varied significantly according to time and location. The average concentrations of TCAN, DCAN, CKP and 111TCPone were significantly higher in summer. Surprisingly, the average concentrations of 11DCPone were significantly higher in winter. For BCAN and DBAN, the average concentrations observed in winter were higher, but not in a statistically significant way. On the other hand, the four HANs, CPK and 111TCPone generally had spatial profiles involving an increase of the concentrations along the network according to increasing water residence times, whereas 11DCPone overall had a profile where concentrations increased at the beginning of the network, followed by a drop in the concentrations towards the ends of the network. In spite of certain disparities in the individual spatio-temporal variation profiles, strong correlations were generally observed between NrDBPs, and trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). Therefore, THMs and HAAs could be good statistical indicators of the presence of NrDBPs in the drinking water of the system under study. PMID:23582352

  8. Formation of iodinated disinfection by-products during oxidation of iodide-containing waters with chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tao; Xu, Bin; Lin, Yi-Li; Hu, Chen-Yan; Lin, Lin; Zhang, Tian-Yang; Gao, Nai-Yun

    2013-06-01

    This study was to explore the formation of iodinated disinfection by-products (I-DBPs), including iodoform (CHI3), iodoacetic acid (IAA) and triiodoacetic acid (TIAA), when iodide-containing artificial synthesized waters and raw waters are in contact with chlorine dioxide (ClO2). Among the investigated I-DBPs, CHI3 was the major species during ClO2 oxidation in artificial synthesized waters. Impact factors were evaluated, including the concentrations of ClO2, iodide (I(-)), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and pH. Formation of CHI3, IAA and TIAA followed an increasing and then decreasing pattern with increased ClO2 or DOC concentration. I-DBPs yield was significantly affected by solution pH. High concentrations of I-DBPs were generated under circumneutral conditions with the maximum formation at pH 8. The increase of I(-) concentration can increase I-DBPs yields, but the increment was suppressed when I(-) concentration was higher than 50 μM. When 100 μg/L I(-)and ClO2 (7.5-44.4 μM) were spiked to the raw water samples from Yangshupu and Minhang drinking water treatment plant, certain amounts of CHI3 and IAA were found under pH 7 and the concentrations were strongly correlated with ClO2 dosage and water qualities, however, no TIAA was detected. Finally, we investigated I-DBPs formation of 18 model compounds, including 4 carboxylic acids, 5 phenols and 8 amino acids, treating with ClO2 when I(-) was present. Results showed that most of these model compounds could form a considerable amount of I-DBPs, especially for propanoic acid, butanoic acid, resorcinol, hydroquinone, alanine, glutamic acid, phenylalanine and serine. PMID:23561492

  9. Use of urinary trichloroacetic acid as an exposure biomarker of disinfection by-products in cancer studies.

    PubMed

    Salas, Lucas A; Gracia-Lavedan, Esther; Goñi, Fernando; Moreno, Victor; Villanueva, Cristina M

    2014-11-01

    Urinary trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) has been proposed as a valid exposure biomarker for ingested disinfection by-products (DBP) for reproductive studies. However, it has never been used in epidemiologic studies on cancer. We investigate the performance of urinary TCAA as a biomarker of DBP exposure in the framework of an epidemiologic study on cancer. We conducted home visits to collect tap water, first morning void urine, and a 48h fluid intake diary among 120 controls from a case-control study of colorectal cancer in Barcelona, Spain. We measured urine TCAA and creatinine, and 9 haloacetic acids and 4 trihalomethanes (THM) in tap water. Lifetime THM exposure was estimated based on residential history since age 18 plus routine monitoring data. Robust linear regressions were used to estimate mean change in urinary TCAA adjusted by covariates. Among the studied group, mean age was 74 years (range 63-85) and 41 (34%) were females. Mean total tap water consumption was 2.2l/48h (standard error, 0.1l/48h). Geometric mean urine TCAA excretion rate was 17.3pmol/min [95%CI: 14.0-21.3], which increased 2% for a 10% increase in TCAA ingestion and decreased with total tap water consumption (-17%/l), water intake outside home (-32%), plasmatic volume (-64%/l), in smokers (-79%), and in users of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (-50%). Urinary TCAA levels were not associated with lifetime THM exposure. In conclusion, our findings support that urine TCAA is not a valid biomarker in case-control studies of adult cancer given that advanced age, comorbidites and medication use are prevalent and are determinants of urine TCAA levels, apart from ingested TCAA levels. In addition, low TCAA concentrations in drinking water limit the validity of urine TCAA as an exposure biomarker. PMID:25462676

  10. Seasonal evaluation of the presence of 46 disinfection by-products throughout a drinking water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Maria; Montesinos, Isabel; Cardador, M J; Silva, Manuel; Gallego, Mercedes

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we studied a total of 46 regulated and non-regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs) including 10 trihalomethanes (THMs), 13 haloacetic acids (HAAs), 6 halonitromethanes (HNMs), 6 haloacetonitriles (HANs) and 11 aldehydes at different points in a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) and its distribution network. Determining an increased number of compounds and using accurate, sensitive analytical methodologies for new DBPs can be useful to overcome some challenges encountered in the comprehensive assessment of the quality and safety of drinking water. This paper provides a detailed picture of the spatial and seasonal variability of DBP concentrations from raw water to distribution network. Samples were collected on a monthly basis at seven different points in the four seasons of a year to acquire robust data for DBPs and supplementary quality-related water parameters. Only 5 aldehydes and 2 HAAs were found in raw water. Chlorine dioxide caused the formation of 3 new aldehydes (benzaldehyde included), 5 HAAs and chloroform. The concentrations of DBPs present in raw water were up to 6 times higher in the warmer seasons (spring and summer). The sedimentation process further increased their concentrations and caused the formation of three new ones. Sand filtration substantially removed aldehydes and HAAs (15-50%), but increased the levels of THMs, HNMs and HANs by up to 70%. Chloramination raised the levels of 8 aldehydes and 7 HAAs; also, it caused the formation of monoiodoacetic acid, dibromochloromethane, dichloroiodomethane and bromochloroacetonitrile. Therefore, this treatment increases the levels of existing DBPs and leads to the formation of new ones to a greater extent than does chlorine dioxide. Except for 5 aldehydes, the 23 DBPs encountered at the DWTP exit were found at increased concentrations in the warmer seasons (HAAs by about 50% and THMs by 350%). PMID:25771439

  11. Prediction of the developmental toxicity hazard potential of halogenated drinking water disinfection by-products tested by the in vitro hydra assay

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, L.J.; Johnson, E.M.; Newman, L.M. )

    1990-06-01

    A series of seven randomly selected potential halogenated water disinfection by-products were evaluated in vitro by the hydra assay to determine their developmental toxicity hazard potential. For six of the chemicals tested by this assay (dibromoacetonitrile; trichloroacetonitrile; 2-chlorophenol; 2,4,6-trichlorophenol; trichloroacetic acid; dichloroacetone) it was predicted that they would be generally equally toxic to both adult and embryonic mammals when studied by means of standard developmental toxicity teratology tests. However, the potential water disinfection by-product chloroacetic acid (CA) was determined to be over eight times more toxic to the embryonic developmental portion of the assay than it was to the adults. Because of this potential selectivity, CA is a high-priority item for developmental toxicity tests in pregnant mammals to confirm or refute its apparent unique developmental hazard potential and/or to establish a NOAEL by the route of most likely human exposure.

  12. Powdered activated carbon coupled with enhanced coagulation for natural organic matter removal and disinfection by-product control: application in a Western Australian water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Kristiana, Ina; Joll, Cynthia; Heitz, Anna

    2011-04-01

    The removal of organic precursors of disinfection by-products (DBPs), i.e. natural organic matter (NOM), prior to disinfection and distribution is considered as the most effective approach to minimise the formation of DBPs. This study investigated the impact of the addition of powdered activated carbon (PAC) to an enhanced coagulation treatment process at an existing water treatment plant on the efficiency of NOM removal, the disinfection behaviour of the treated water, and the water quality in the distribution system. This is the first comprehensive assessment of the efficacy of plant-scale application of PAC combined with enhanced coagulation on an Australian source water. As a result of the PAC addition, the removal of NOM improved by 70%, which led to a significant reduction (80-95%) in the formation of DBPs. The water quality in the distribution system also improved, indicated by lower concentrations of DBPs in the distribution system and better maintenance of disinfectant residual at the extremities of the distribution system. The efficacy of the PAC treatment for NOM removal was shown to be a function of the characteristics of the NOM and the quality of the source water, as well as the PAC dose. PAC treatment did not have the capacity to remove bromide ion, resulting in the formation of more brominated DBPs. Since brominated DBPs have been found to be more toxic than their chlorinated analogues, their preferential formation upon PAC addition must be considered, especially in source waters containing high concentrations of bromide. PMID:21353285

  13. Epidemiological approaches in the investigation of environmental causes of cancer: the case of dioxins and water disinfection by-products

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    I will refer in this paper to difficulties in research in environmental causes of cancer using as examples research on dioxins and on drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) that have created considerable controversy in the scientific and wider community. Dioxins are highly toxic chemicals that are animal carcinogens. For many years, evaluation of the carcinogenicity of dioxins in humans was based on case-control or registry based studies. The development of methods to measure dioxins in blood indicated that these studies suffered from extreme exposure misclassification. The conduct of large cohort studies of workers with widely contrasted exposures together with the use of biomarkers and models for exposure assessment, led to convincing evidence on the carcinogenicity of dioxins in humans. The high toxicity of a few dioxin congeners, the availability of a scheme to characterize the toxicity of a mixture of dioxins and related compounds and the long half-life of these compounds facilitated epidemiological research. Contrary to dioxins, trihalomethanes (THMs) and most of the hundreds of DBPs in drinking water are chemicals of low toxicity. For more than 15 years, the main evidence on the carcinogenicity of DBPs was through ecological or death certificate studies. More recent studies based on individual assessment confirmed increases in bladder cancer risk. However even those studies ignored the toxicological evidence on the importance of routes of exposure to DBPs other than ingestion and, probably, underestimated the risk. Persistence of weak study designs together with delays in advanced exposure assessment models led to delays in confirming early evidence on the carcinogenicity of DBPs. The evaluation of only a few chemicals when exposure is to a complex mixture remains a major problem in exposure assessment for DBPs. The success of epidemiological studies in identifying increased risks lies primarily on the wide contrast of exposure to DBPs in the general

  14. Epidemiological approaches in the investigation of environmental causes of cancer: the case of dioxins and water disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Kogevinas, Manolis

    2011-01-01

    I will refer in this paper to difficulties in research in environmental causes of cancer using as examples research on dioxins and on drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) that have created considerable controversy in the scientific and wider community. Dioxins are highly toxic chemicals that are animal carcinogens. For many years, evaluation of the carcinogenicity of dioxins in humans was based on case-control or registry based studies. The development of methods to measure dioxins in blood indicated that these studies suffered from extreme exposure misclassification. The conduct of large cohort studies of workers with widely contrasted exposures together with the use of biomarkers and models for exposure assessment, led to convincing evidence on the carcinogenicity of dioxins in humans. The high toxicity of a few dioxin congeners, the availability of a scheme to characterize the toxicity of a mixture of dioxins and related compounds and the long half-life of these compounds facilitated epidemiological research. Contrary to dioxins, trihalomethanes (THMs) and most of the hundreds of DBPs in drinking water are chemicals of low toxicity. For more than 15 years, the main evidence on the carcinogenicity of DBPs was through ecological or death certificate studies. More recent studies based on individual assessment confirmed increases in bladder cancer risk. However even those studies ignored the toxicological evidence on the importance of routes of exposure to DBPs other than ingestion and, probably, underestimated the risk. Persistence of weak study designs together with delays in advanced exposure assessment models led to delays in confirming early evidence on the carcinogenicity of DBPs. The evaluation of only a few chemicals when exposure is to a complex mixture remains a major problem in exposure assessment for DBPs. The success of epidemiological studies in identifying increased risks lies primarily on the wide contrast of exposure to DBPs in the general

  15. Prevalence of ocular, respiratory and cutaneous symptoms in indoor swimming pool workers and exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs).

    PubMed

    Fantuzzi, Guglielmina; Righi, Elena; Predieri, Guerrino; Giacobazzi, Pierluigi; Mastroianni, Katia; Aggazzotti, Gabriella

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of self-reported respiratory, ocular and cutaneous symptoms in subjects working at indoor swimming pools and to assess the relationship between frequency of declared symptoms and occupational exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs). Twenty indoor swimming pools in the Emilia Romagna region of Italy were included in the study. Information about the health status of 133 employees was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Subjects working at swimming pools claimed to frequently experience the following symptoms: cold (65.4%), sneezing (52.6%), red eyes (48.9%) and itchy eyes (44.4%). Only 7.5% claimed to suffer from asthma. Red eyes, runny nose, voice loss and cold symptoms were declared more frequently by pool attendants (lifeguards and trainers) when compared with employees working in other areas of the facility (office, cafe, etc.). Pool attendants experienced generally more verrucas, mycosis, eczema and rash than others workers; however, only the difference in the frequency of self-declared mycosis was statistically significant (p = 0.010). Exposure to DBPs was evaluated using both environmental and biological monitoring. Trihalomethanes (THMs), the main DBPs, were evaluated in alveolar air samples collected from subjects. Swimming pool workers experienced different THM exposure levels: lifeguards and trainers showed the highest mean values of THMs in alveolar air samples (28.5 +/- 20.2 microg/m(3)), while subjects working in cafe areas (17.6 +/- 12.1 microg/m(3)), offices (14.4 +/- 12.0 microg/m(3)) and engine rooms (13.6 +/- 4.4 microg/m(3)) showed lower exposure levels. Employees with THM alveolar air values higher than 21 microg/m(3) (median value) experienced higher risks for red eyes (OR 6.2; 95% CI 2.6-14.9), itchy eyes (OR 3.5; 95% CI 1.5-8.0), dyspnea/asthma (OR 5.1; 95% CI 1.0-27.2) and blocked nose (OR 2.2; 95% CI 1.0-4.7) than subjects with less exposure

  16. What’s in the Pool? A Comprehensive Identification of Disinfection By-products and Assessment of Mutagenicity of Chlorinated and Brominated Swimming Pool Water

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Susan D.; DeMarini, David M.; Kogevinas, Manolis; Fernandez, Pilar; Marco, Esther; Lourencetti, Carolina; Ballesté, Clara; Heederik, Dick; Meliefste, Kees; McKague, A. Bruce; Marcos, Ricard; Font-Ribera, Laia; Grimalt, Joan O.; Villanueva, Cristina M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Swimming pool disinfectants and disinfection by-products (DBPs) have been linked to human health effects, including asthma and bladder cancer, but no studies have provided a comprehensive identification of DBPs in the water and related that to mutagenicity. Objectives We performed a comprehensive identification of DBPs and disinfectant species in waters from public swimming pools in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain, that disinfect with either chlorine or bromine and we determined the mutagenicity of the waters to compare with the analytical results. Methods We used gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to measure trihalomethanes in water, GC with electron capture detection for air, low- and high-resolution GC/MS to comprehensively identify DBPs, photometry to measure disinfectant species (free chlorine, monochloroamine, dichloramine, and trichloramine) in the waters, and an ion chromatography method to measure trichloramine in air. We assessed mutagenicity with the Salmonella mutagenicity assay. Results We identified > 100 DBPs, including many nitrogen-containing DBPs that were likely formed from nitrogen-containing precursors from human inputs, such as urine, sweat, and skin cells. Many DBPs were new and have not been reported previously in either swimming pool or drinking waters. Bromoform levels were greater in brominated than in chlorinated pool waters, but we also identified many brominated DBPs in the chlorinated waters. The pool waters were mutagenic at levels similar to that of drinking water (~ 1,200 revertants/L-equivalents in strain TA100–S9 mix). Conclusions This study identified many new DBPs not identified previously in swimming pool or drinking water and found that swimming pool waters are as mutagenic as typical drinking waters. PMID:20833605

  17. OCCURRENCE OF IODO-ACID AND IODO-THM DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN CHLORAMINATED DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iodo-acids were recently identified for the first time as DBPs in drinking water disinfected with chloramines. The iodo-acids identified included iodoacetic acid (IAA), bromoiodoacetic acid, (E)-3-bromo-3-iodo-propenoic acid, (Z)-3-bromo-3-iodo-propenoic acid, and (E)-2-iodo-3...

  18. Reactivity of vinca alkaloids during water chlorination processes: Identification of their disinfection by-products by high-resolution quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Negreira, Noelia; Regueiro, Jorge; López de Alda, Miren; Barceló, Damià

    2016-02-15

    Concerns about the presence of anticancer drugs in the environment are rapidly increasing mainly due to their growing use in the developed countries and their known cytotoxic effects. Vinca alkaloids are widely used in cancer therapy; however, very scarce information is available on their occurrence, environmental fate and toxicological effects on aquatic organisms. Even less attention has been paid to their potential transformation products, which can exert higher toxicity than the parent compounds. Thus, in the present work, the reactivity of vincristine, vinblastine, vinorelbine and its metabolite 4-O-deacetyl vinorelbine during water chlorination processes has been investigated for the first time. Under the studied chlorination conditions, vincristine was fairly stable whereas vinblastine, vinorelbine and 4-O-deacetyl vinorelbine were quickly degraded. A total of sixty-five disinfection by-products were tentatively identified by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap tandem mass spectrometry. Among them, twenty by-products corresponded to mono-chlorinated compounds, eight to di-chlorinated compounds and two to tri-chlorinated compounds, which may be of major environmental concern. Other disinfection by-products involved hydroxylation and oxidation reactions. Although the structures of these by-products could not be positively confirmed due to lack of commercial standards, their chemical formulas and product ions can be added to databases, which will allow their screening in future monitoring studies. PMID:26674693

  19. The use of ozonation and catalytic ozonation combined with ultrafiltration for the control of natural organic matter (NOM) and disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnik, Bhavana Sushilkumar

    Commercially available titania membranes, with a molecular weight cut-off of 15, 5, 1 kD were used in a ozonation/membrane system that was fed with water from Lake Lansing. The effects of ozonation on permeate flux recovery and membrane fouling was investigated. In addition the effects of ozonation/membrane filtration hybrid process on the removal of the natural organic matter (NOM) and the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPS) were monitored. The commercial membrane (CeRAM Inside, Tami North America, St. Laurent, Quebec, Canada) was coated with iron oxide nanoparticles (4--6 nm in diameter) using a layer-by-layer technique and sintered in air for 30 minutes. Surface characterization was carried out using electron microscopy techniques and atomic force microscopy, to study the changes in structure and surface morphology of the membranes. The removal and survival of bacteria in the process was also evaluated using fluorescence microscopy and microbial assays. Finally the surface catalytic reaction was investigated to propose the mechanism responsible for the improved performance of the hybrid process. The permeate flux through a titania coated ceramic membrane was significantly affected by ozonation. A minimum threshold ozone concentration (2.5 g/m 3) could achieve complete recovery of permeate flux after fouling. Ozonation/filtration decreased the concentration of chlorinated disinfection by-products up to 80%. With catalyst coated membranes, the concentration of dissolved organic carbon was reduced by >85% and the concentrations of disinfection by-products decreased by up to 90%. Furthermore with the coated membrane, the concentrations of ozonation by-products in the permeate were reduced by >50% as compared to that obtained with the uncoated membranes, thus reducing the risk of potential regrowth of bacteria in the distribution system. Application of the hybrid process lead to greater than 7 log removal of bacteria. Surface characterization showed that

  20. Use of mechanism-based structure-activity relationships analysis in carcinogenic potential ranking for drinking water disinfection by-products.

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Yin-Tak; Lai, David; McLain, Jennifer L; Manibusan, Mary Ko; Dellarco, Vicki

    2002-01-01

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed when disinfectants such as chlorine, chloramine, and ozone react with organic and inorganic matter in water. The observations that some DBPs such as trihalomethanes (THMs), di-/trichloroacetic acids, and 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX) are carcinogenic in animal studies have raised public concern over the possible adverse health effects of DBPs. To date, several hundred DBPs have been identified. To prioritize research efforts, an in-depth, mechanism-based structure-activity relationship analysis, supplemented by extensive literature search for genotoxicity and other data, was conducted for ranking the carcinogenic potential of DBPs that met the following criteria: a) detected in actual drinking water samples, b) have insufficient cancer bioassay data for risk assessment, and c) have structural features/alerts or short-term predictive assays indicative of carcinogenic potential. A semiquantitative concern rating scale of low, marginal, low-moderate, moderate, high-moderate, and high was used along with delineation of scientific rationale. Of the 209 DBPs analyzed, 20 were of priority concern with a moderate or high-moderate rating. Of these, four were structural analogs of MX and five were haloalkanes that presumably will be controlled by existing and future THM regulations. The other eleven DBPs, which included halonitriles (6), haloketones (2), haloaldehyde (1), halonitroalkane (1), and dialdehyde (1), are suitable priority candidates for future carcinogenicity testing and/or mechanistic studies. PMID:11834465

  1. The removal process of 2,2-dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm), a new disinfection by-product, in drinking water treatment process and its toxicity on zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Zhou, Dongju; Yu, Shilin; Chen, Wei

    2016-09-01

    The removal process of 2,2-dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm), a new disinfection by-product (DBP) in conventional drinking water treatment plant (C-DWTP) and advanced DWTP (ADWTP) was studied with newly maximum formation potential (MFP) process. It was demonstrated that the advanced treatment displayed greater removal efficiency towards DCAcAm formation potential (MFP) than the conventional treatment. The hydrophilic natural organic matter and natural organic matter with molecular weight <1 kDa or >10 kDa leaded to more DCAcAm formation, and the aromatic protein was inferred as one part of DCAcAm precursor. DCAcAm was found to cause delayed development and malformation to zebrafish embryos at embryonic growth stage. Compared with heart toxicity, it caused a significant neuron toxicity. It also could cause the acute DNA damage to adult zebrafish, which should be extremely cautioned. PMID:27337431

  2. The impact of bromide on the formation of neutral and acidic disinfection by-products (DBPs) in Mediterranean chlorinated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Kampioti, Adamantia A; Stephanou, Euripides G

    2002-05-01

    By using the Grob closed loop stripping analysis technique a wide variety of disinfection by-products (DBPs) was determined, in finished drinking water of 15 important cities of Greece distributed in the southern, northern, west continental land and in the islands of Aegean and Ionian Seas. Trihalomethanes, haloacetonitriles, haloacetic acids, chloropicrin, halogenated ketons and chloral hydrate were the main DBPs determined. In chlorinated drinking water of coastal cities brominated DBPs were most abundant than their chlorinated homologues due to the higher bromide concentration in raw waters of these areas. Factor analysis with principal component extraction of the results demonstrated a clear differentiation between the examined drinking waters on the basis of their DBPs content and vicinity to the sea. PMID:12153027

  3. Do Iodine Contrast Media Compounds Used for Medical Imaging Contribute to the Formation of Iodinated Disinfection By-Products in Drinking Water?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iodinated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) have recently gained attention due to their cyto- and genotoxicity and increased formation in drinking water treated with chloramine, which has become an increasingly popular disinfectant in the United States. One of these—iodoacetic acid...

  4. Assessing exposure to disinfection by-products in women of reproductive age living in Corpus Christi, Texas, and Cobb county, Georgia: descriptive results and methods.

    PubMed Central

    Lynberg, M; Nuckols, J R; Langlois, P; Ashley, D; Singer, P; Mendola, P; Wilkes, C; Krapfl, H; Miles, E; Speight, V; Lin, B; Small, L; Miles, A; Bonin, M; Zeitz, P; Tadkod, A; Henry, J; Forrester, M B

    2001-01-01

    We conducted a field study in Corpus Christi, Texas, and Cobb County, Georgia, to evaluate exposure measures for disinfection by-products, with special emphasis on trihalomethanes (THMs). Participants were mothers living in either geographic area who had given birth to healthy infants from June 1998 through May 1999. We assessed exposure by sampling blood and water and obtaining information about water use habits and tap water characteristics. Two 10-mL whole blood samples were collected from each participant before and immediately after her shower. Levels of individual THM species (chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, and bromoform) were measured in whole blood [parts per trillion (pptr)] and in water samples (parts per billion). In the Corpus Christi water samples, brominated compounds accounted for 71% of the total THM concentration by weight; in Cobb County, chloroform accounted for 88%. Significant differences in blood THM levels were observed between study locations. For example, the median baseline blood level of bromoform was 0.3 pptr and 3.5 pptr for participants in Cobb County and Corpus Christi, respectively (p = 0.0001). Differences were most striking in blood obtained after showering. For bromoform, the median blood levels were 0.5 pptr and 17 pptr for participants in Cobb County and Corpus Christi, respectively (p = 0.0001). These results suggest that blood levels of THM species vary substantially across populations, depending on both water quality characteristics and water use activities. Such variation has important implications for epidemiologic studies of the potential health effects of disinfection by-products. PMID:11445514

  5. Use of three-dimensional excitation and emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy for predicting the disinfection by-product formation potential of reclaimed water.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ruixia; Ren, Huiqin; Li, Jianbing; Ma, Zhongzhi; Wan, Hongwen; Zheng, Xiaoying; Cheng, Shuiyuan

    2012-11-01

    This study was undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility of using three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (3DEEM) fluorescence spectroscopy for the determination of chlorination disinfection by-product (DBP) precursors and the disinfection by-product formation potential (DBPFP) of reclaimed water samples. Two major DBP precursors were examined in this study, including humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA). The 3DEEM fluorescence results obtained from various reclaimed water samples indicated that the reclaimed water samples were rich in fulvic acid-like substances that were associated with two main peaks (Ex/Em = 235-245/420-440 nm, and Ex/Em = 330-340/410-430 nm) in the fluorescence spectrum. The results also illustrated that the wavelength location of peak fluorescence intensity of a reclaimed water sample was independent of the influent water quality and the wastewater treatment process used in the reclamation plant. As a result, the peak fluorescence intensity and the wavelength location of the peak were used to identify the species of DBP precursors and their concentrations in the reclaimed water sample. Four regression models were then developed to relate the peak fluorescence intensity of the water sample to its DBPFP, including the formation potential of trihalomethane (THMFP) and the formation potential of haloacetic acid (HAAFP). The regression models were verified using the measured DBPFP results of a series of reclaimed water samples. It was found that the regression modeling results matched the measured DBPFP values well, with prediction errors below 10%. Therefore, the use of 3DEEM fluorescence spectroscopy together with the developed regression models in this study can provide a reliable and rapid tool for monitoring the quality of reclaimed water. Using this method, water quality could be monitored online, without utilizing the lengthy conventional DBPFP measurement. PMID:22925392

  6. The impact of alum coagulation on the character, biodegradability and disinfection by-product formation potential of reservoir natural organic matter (NOM) fractions.

    PubMed

    Soh, Yeow Chong; Roddick, Felicity; van Leeuwen, John

    2008-01-01

    Natural Organic Matter (NOM) from Myponga Reservoir, South Australia, was separated into four organic fractions based on their hydrophobic and hydrophilic properties using a sequence of non-ionic and ionic resins. NOM fractions were isolated for the purpose of determining the impact of alum coagulation on removal of these fractions in conventional water treatment, and their potential as precursors in the formation of disinfection by-products (DBP) and in supporting microbial growth. The NOM comprised VHA (very hydrophobic acids), SHA (slightly hydrophobic acids), CHA (charged hydrophilics) and NEU (neutral hydrophilics) fractions. These fractions were then jar tested with alum using low (50 mg/L), operational (100 mg/L) and very high (200 mg/L) doses to assess the removal capacities for these fractions in a conventional treatment plant. High-performance size exclusion chromatography-UV-DOC (HPSEC-UV-DOC) revealed that alum removed more of the hydrophobic and higher molecular weight components of NOM, but less of the NEU fraction and lower molecular weight components of NOM. Determination of biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) indicated that the NEU fraction had the highest biodegradability, followed by the CHA, SHA and VHA fractions. The VHA fraction had the highest total-trihalomethane formation potential (t-THMFP), followed by NEU, SHA and CHA. The NOM not removed by alum coagulation had the potential to support microbial growth (NEU fraction), and disinfection by-product (DBP) formation (VHA and NEU fractions). To obtain treated water with lower overall residual NOM, other treatment methods would need to be applied in addition to alum coagulation in order to reduce the concentration of the neutral fraction. PMID:18845853

  7. COMPONENT-BASED AND WHOLE-MIXTURE TECHNIQUES FOR ADDRESSING THE TOXICITY OF DRINKING-WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical disinfection of water is of direct public health benefit as it results in decreased waterborne illness. The chemicals used to disinfect water react with naturally occurring organic matter, bromide and iodide in the source water, resulting in the formation of disinfection...

  8. STRAIN COMPARISON IN PREGNANT RATS OF ENDOCRINE RESPONSE TO BROMODICHLOROMETHANE: A DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bromodichloromethane (BDCM), a trihalomethane, is a by-product of the chlorination of drinking water. In an epidemiological study, consumption of drinking water with high levels of BDCM was associated with an increased risk of spontaneous abortion in pregnant women (Waller et al....

  9. Efficacy of surface disinfectant cleaners against emerging highly resistant gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Worldwide, the emergence of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria is a clinical problem. Surface disinfectant cleaners (SDCs) that are effective against these bacteria are needed for use in high risk areas around patients and on multi-touch surfaces. We determined the efficacy of several SDCs against clinically relevant bacterial species with and without common types of multidrug resistance. Methods Bacteria species used were ATCC strains; clinical isolates classified as antibiotic-susceptible; and multi-resistant clinical isolates from Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Serratia marcescens (all OXA-48 and KPC-2); Acinetobacter baumannii (OXA-23); Pseudomonas aeruginosa (VIM-1); and Achromobacter xylosoxidans (ATCC strain). Experiments were carried out according to EN 13727:2012 in quadruplicate under dirty conditions. The five evaluated SDCs were based on alcohol and an amphoteric substance (AAS), an oxygen-releaser (OR), surface-active substances (SAS), or surface-active-substances plus aldehydes (SASA; two formulations). Bactericidal concentrations of SDCs were determined at two different contact times. Efficacy was defined as a log10 ≥ 5 reduction in bacterial cell count. Results SDCs based on AAS, OR, and SAS were effective against all six species irrespective of the degree of multi-resistance. The SASA formulations were effective against the bacteria irrespective of degree of multi-resistance except for one of the four P. aeruginosa isolates (VIM-1). We found no general correlation between SDC efficacy and degree of antibiotic resistance. Conclusions SDCs were generally effective against gram-negative bacteria with and without multidrug resistance. SDCs are therefore suitable for surface disinfection in the immediate proximity of patients. Single bacterial isolates, however, might have reduced susceptibility to selected biocidal agents. PMID:24885029

  10. Analysis of preneoplastic and neoplastic renal lesions in Tsc2 mutant Long-Evans (Eker) rats following exposure to a mixture of drinking water disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    McDorman, Kevin S; Hooth, Michelle J; Starr, Thomas B; Wolf, Douglas C

    2003-05-01

    Disinfection of surface water for human consumption results in the generation of a complex mixture of chemicals in potable water. Cancer risk assessment methodology assumes additivity of carcinogenic effects in the regulation of mixtures. A rodent model of hereditary renal cancer was used to investigate the carcinogenic response to a mixture of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs). Rats carrying a mutation in the Tsc2 tumor suppressor gene (Eker rats) readily develop renal preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions, and are highly susceptible to the effects of renal carcinogens. Male and female Eker rats were exposed via drinking water to individual or a mixture of DBPs for 4 or 10 months. Potassium bromate, 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX), chloroform, and bromodichloromethane were administered at low concentrations of 0.02, 0.005, 0.4 and 0.07 g/l, respectively, and high concentrations of 0.4, 0.07, 1.8 and 0.7 g/l, respectively. Low and high dose mixture solutions were comprised of all four chemicals at either low concentrations or high concentrations, respectively, Following necropsy, each kidney was examined microscopically for preneoplastic lesions (atypical tubules and hyperplasias) and tumors. While some of the mixture responses observed in male rats did fall within the range expected for an additive response, especially at the high dose, predominantly antagonistic effects on renal lesions were observed in response to the low dose mixture in male rats and the high dose mixture in female rats. These data suggest that current default risk assessments assuming additivity may overstate the cancer risk associated with exposure to mixtures of DBPs at low concentrations. PMID:12679048