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Sample records for emission channeling lattice

  1. Lattice QCD simulations of the Zc+ channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prelovsek, Sasa; Lang, C. B.; Leskovec, Luka; Mohler, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the lattice QCD simulations that search for the Zc+ with the unconventional quark content c ¯c d ¯u in the channel IG(JPC) = 1+(1+-). The major challenge is due to the two-meson states J /Ψ π , Ψ2 Sπ , Ψ1 Dπ , D D¯*, D *D¯*, ηcρ that are also inevitably present in this channel. The available lattice simulations find expected two-meson eigenstates, but no additional eigenstate as a candidate for Zc+ . This is in a striking contrast to the lattice results in the flavour non-exotic channels, where additional states are found in relation to most of the known resonances and bound states.

  2. Lattice Boltzmann method and channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stensholt, Sigvat; Mongstad Hope, Sigmund

    2016-07-01

    Lattice Boltzmann methods are presented at an introductory level with a focus on fairly simple simulations that can be used to test and illustrate the model’s capabilities. Two scenarios are presented. The first is a simple laminar flow in a straight channel driven by a pressure gradient (Poiseuille flow). The second is a more complex, including a wedge where Moffatt vortices may be induced if the wedge is deep enough. Simulations of the Poiseuille flow scenario accurately capture the theoretical velocity profile. The experiment shows the location of the fluid-wall boundary and the effects viscosity has on the velocity and convergence time. The numerical capabilities of the lattice Boltzmann model are tested further by simulating the more complex Moffatt vortex scenario. The method reproduces with high accuracy the theoretical predction that Moffat vortices will not form in a wedge if the vertex angle exceeds 146°. Practical issues limitations of the lattice Boltzmann method are discussed. In particular the accuracy of the bounce-back boundary condition is first order dependent on the grid resolution.

  3. 5. UPPER CHORD UNDERSIDE VIEW SHOWING CHANNEL IRON AND LATTICE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. UPPER CHORD UNDERSIDE VIEW SHOWING CHANNEL IRON AND LATTICE WORK CONSTRUCTION AND TENSION MEMBER CONNECTION. DECK VIEW LOOKING EAST. - Cunningham Lane Bridge, Spanning Pine River on Cunningham Lane near Highway 80, Rockbridge, Richland County, WI

  4. Influence of crystal mosaicity on axial channeling effects and lattice site determination of impurities

    SciTech Connect

    De Vries, B.; Vantomme, A.; Wahl, U.; Ruffenach, S.; Briot, O.

    2013-10-21

    Using the electron emission channeling and Rutherford backscattering/channeling techniques, the influence of the mosaicity of a thin film on the axial channeling of charged particles was investigated. It is found that crystal mosaicity leads to a broadening and a degradation of the experimental channeling effects. This phenomenon, which is shown to be of major importance when assessing the lattice site of impurities in a single crystal, can be modeled quantitatively by using the mosaic tilt and twist components derived from X-ray rocking curve scans. As a case study, we illustrate that our approach allows to accurately determine the lattice site of Er in AlN, despite the significant influence of mosaicity on the channeling measurements.

  5. Radiative cooling: lattice quantization and surface emissivity in thin coatings.

    PubMed

    Suryawanshi, Chetan N; Lin, Chhiu-Tsu

    2009-06-01

    Nanodiamond powder (NDP), multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT), and carbon black (CB) were dispersed in an acrylate (AC) emulsion to form composite materials. These materials were coated on aluminum panels (alloy 3003) to give thin coatings. The active phonons of the nanomaterials were designed to act as a cooling fan, termed "molecular fan (MF)". The order of lattice quantization, as investigated by Raman spectroscopy, is MWCNT > CB > NDP. The enhanced surface emissivity of the MF coating (as observed by IR imaging) is well-correlated to lattice quantization, resulting in a better cooling performance by the MWCNT-AC composite. MF coatings with different concentrations (0%, 0.4%, 0.7%, and 1%) of MWCNT were prepared. The equilibrium temperature lowering of the coated panel was observed with an increase in the loading of CNTs and was measured as 17 degrees C for 1% loading of MWCNT. This was attributed to an increased density of active phonons in the MF coating. PMID:20355930

  6. Study of the $Z_c^+$ channel using lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Prelovsek, Sasa; Lang, C. B.; Leskovec, Luka; Mohler, Daniel

    2015-01-15

    Recently experimentalists have discovered several charged charmoniumlike hadrons Zc+ with unconventional quark content c¯cd¯u. We perform a search for Zc+ with mass below 4.2 GeV in the channel IG(JPC)=1+(1+-) using lattice QCD. The major challenge is presented by the two-meson states J/ψπ, ψ2Sπ, ψ1D

  7. The Effect of Lattice Disorder on the Channeling Potential in fcc Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Assy, M. K.

    The axial and planar potential for α-particles in copper single crystal disordered by dumb-bell configuration (DBC) or body-centered interstitial (BCI) is calculated according to the continuum potential approximation by using Moliere potential and Biersack's universal potential and compared with the channeling potential of the normal lattice. The calculations showed that the axial potential for DBC or BCI are the same, but the planar potential has different estimations for each kind of lattice disorder. The point of minimum potential in the disordered lattice has been determined for both axial and planar channel.

  8. A versatile apparatus for on-line emission channeling experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, M. R.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.; Unidade de Física e Aceleradores, IST Amorim, L. M.; Pereira, L. M. C.

    2013-07-15

    The concept and functionality of an apparatus dedicated to emission channeling experiments using short-lived isotopes on-line at ISOLDE/CERN is described. The setup is assembled in two functional blocks – (a) base stand including beam collimation, implantation and measurement chamber, cryogenic extension, and vacuum control system and (b) Panmure goniometer extension including maneuvering cradle and sample heating furnace. This setup allows for in situ implantation and sample analysis in the as-implanted state and upon cooling down to 50 K and during annealing up to 1200 K. The functionality of the setup will be illustrated with the example of establishing the lattice location of {sup 56}Mn probes implanted into GaAs.

  9. Modeling the effects of emergent vegetation on open channel flow using a lattice model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A two-dimensional lattice model is developed to describe the influence of vegetation on the turbulent flow structure in an open channel. The model includes the influence of vegetation density on the frictional effect of the channel bed and walls. For the walls, a slip boundary condition is considere...

  10. Emission Channeling with Short-Lived Isotopes (EC-SLI) at CERN's ISOLDE Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.; Costa, A.; David-Bosne, E.; Pereira, L. M. C.; Amorim, L. M.; Augustyns, V.; Temst, K.; Vantomme, A.; da Silva, M. R.; Silva, D. J.; Araújo, J. P.; Miranda, P.; Bharuth-Ram, K.

    2015-11-01

    We give an overview on the historical development and current program for lattice location studies at CERN's ISOLDE facility, where the EC-SLI (Emission Channeling with Short-Lived Isotopes) collaboration maintains several setups for this type of experiments. We illustrate that the three most decisive factors for the success of the technique are access to facilities producing radioactive isotopes, position-sensitive detectors for the emitted decay particles, and reliable simulation codes which allow for quantitative analysis.

  11. A TWO-DIMENSIONAL LATTICE MODEL FOR DESCRIBING THE OPEN CHANNEL FLOW WITH VEGETATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 2D lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) is proposed for describing the turbulent shallow water flow in a vegetated channel. The flow turbulence is taken into account by means of the standard Smagorinsky subgrid-scale model. The drag stress exerted by the flow on the vegetation as well as the frictional e...

  12. Multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann simulations of turbulent channel and pipe flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opadrishta, Harish; Peng, Cheng; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2015-11-01

    The mesoscopic Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has become a reliable alternative for solving incompressible turbulent flows. However, the statistics of a simulated turbulent flow near a curved boundary may deviate from the physical rotational invariance (RI) of lattice coordinates. The main objective of this study is to compare the effects of different lattice models on the simulation results of turbulent flows, and explore ways to restore RI near a curved boundary. We will apply D3Q19 and D3Q27 multiple-relaxation-time LBM models to simulate turbulent pipe and channel flows. The statistics of the simulated flows are examined to quantify the nature of departures from RI. To help understand whether the departure is originated from the bounce-back scheme at the solid wall, we will perform simulations of a turbulent channel flow with walls orientated at an angle from the lattice grid, and test the use of an overset lattice grid near a pipe wall. The Chapman-Enskog analysis of these models will be performed to probe RI errors near a boundary. Our goal is to eventually perform an accurate direct numerical simulation of a turbulent pipe flow, and compare the results to previous simulations based on the Navier-Stokes equations.

  13. Further development of a facility for channeling studies: application to lattice location

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, D.R.

    1984-08-01

    Equipment modifications at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) Rutherford backscattering facility, including the addition of a high precision goniometer, have been made to enhance the performance of channeling experiments. The angular divergence of the alpha particle beam was also reduced to <0.05/sup 0/ by improving the collimation. To demonstrate improved channeling capability angular scans were performed about the (100), (110), and (111) axial channels of a 3400 A (100) silicon membrane. Both the minimum yield, chi/sub min/, and the critical angle, psi/sub 1/2/, were consistent with accepted values. A preliminary investigation of the lattice location of cobalt on the (100) silicon surface was undertaken. Approximately 4.5 x 10/sup 15/ Co atoms/cm/sup 2/ were electron beam deposited on a 3900 A, HF etched silicon membrane in a system using oilless pumps. Preliminary channeling data taken approximately one month later indicated a preferred site for approximately 16% of the cobalt atoms. Channeling data obtained six months later with the new goniometer showed no evidence for a preferred site. Room temperature oxidation between experiments was observed and is thought to have affected the location of the cobalt atoms. 33 references, 15 figures.

  14. Simulation of residual oil displacement in a sinusoidal channel with the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otomo, Hiroshi; Fan, Hongli; Hazlett, Randy; Li, Yong; Staroselsky, Ilya; Zhang, Raoyang; Chen, Hudong

    2015-10-01

    We simulate oil slug displacement in a sinusoidal channel in order to validate computational models and algorithms for multi-component flow. This case fits in the gap between fully realistic cases characterized by complicated geometry and academic cases with simplistic geometry. Our computational model is based on the lattice Boltzmann method and allows for variation of physical parameters such as wettability and viscosity. The effect of variation of model parameters is analyzed, in particular via comparison with analytical solutions. We discuss the requirements for accurate solution of the oil slug displacement problem.

  15. Channel flow of a tensorial shear-thinning Maxwell model: Lattice Boltzmann simulations.

    PubMed

    Papenkort, S; Voigtmann, Th

    2014-04-28

    We discuss pressure-driven channel flow for a model of shear-thinning glass-forming fluids, employing a modified lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulation scheme. The model is motivated by a recent microscopic approach to the nonlinear rheology of colloidal suspensions and captures a nonvanishing dynamical yield stress and the appearance of normal-stress differences and a flow-induced pressure contribution. The standard LB algorithm is extended to deal with tensorial, nonlinear constitutive equations of this class. The new LB scheme is tested in 2D pressure-driven channel flow and reproduces the analytical steady-state solution. The transient dynamics after startup and removal of the pressure gradient reproduce a finite stopping time for the cessation flow of yield-stress fluids in agreement with previous analytical estimates. PMID:24784287

  16. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of liquid crystal particulate flow in a channel with finite anchoring boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Roberts, Tyler; de Pablo, Juan; dePablo Team

    2014-11-01

    Liquid crystals (LC) posses anisotropic viscoelastic properties, and, as such, LC flow can be incredibly complicated. Here we employ a hybrid lattice Boltzmann method (pioneered by Deniston, Yeomans and Cates) to systematically study the hydrodynamics of nematic liquid crystals (LCs) with and without solid particles. This method evolves the velocity field through lattice Boltzmann and the LC-order parameter via a finite-difference solver of the Beris-Edwards equation. The evolution equation of the boundary points with finite anchoring is obtained through Poisson bracket formulation. Our method has been validated by matching the Ericksen-Leslie theory. We demonstrate two applications in the flow alignment regime. We first investigate a hybrid channel flow in which the top and bottom walls have different anchoring directions. By measuring the apparent shear viscosity in terms of Couette flow, we achieve a viscosity inhomogeneous system which may be applicable to nano particle processing. In the other example, we introduce a homeotropic spherical particle to the channel, and focus on the deformations of the defect ring due to anchorings and flow. The results are then compared to the molecular dynamics simulations of a colloid particle in an LC modeled by a Gay-Berne potential.

  17. Dual Lattice Boltzmann method for electrokinetic coupling : behavior at high and low salinities in rough channels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorentino, Eve-Agnès; Toussaint, Renaud; Jouniaux, Laurence

    2014-05-01

    We study the coupling between hydraulic and electric flows in a porous medium at small scale using the Lattice Boltzmann method. This method is a computational fluid dynamics technique that is used for advection and diffusion modeling. We implement a coupled Lattice Boltzmann algorithm that solves both the mass transport and the electric field arising from charges displacements. The streaming potential and electroosmosis phenomena occur in a variety of situations and derive from this coupling. We focus on the streaming potential which is described using the ratio between the created potential difference and the applied pressure gradient. The streaming potential is assumed to be a linear function of the fluid conductivity, but experimental results highlight anomalous behaviors at low and high salinity. We try to account for them by setting extreme conditions that are likely to generate non-linearities. Several pore radii are tested so as to determine what is the effect of a radius that is comparable to the Debye length, the screening length of the electric potential, due to the ions in the electrolyte. The volumetric integral of the electrical current is calculated for comparison with the 2D simulations. High values of zeta potential are tested to verify if the discrepancy regarding the theoretical result is concentration-dependent. We try to include a surface conductivity term in the coefficient formulation. Some tests including a rugosity on the channel walls are performed. All of these attempts show a normal behaviour of the streaming potential at high salinity. We observe a decrease of the ratio at low conductivity, showing that this ratio is modified when the pore radius becomes negligible compared with the Debye length, which is physically meaningful in little pores at low concentrations. References : S. Pride. Governing equations for the coupled electromagnetics and acoustics of porous media. Physical Review B, 50 : 15678-15696, 1994. D. A. Wolf

  18. Volume dependence of the long-range two-body potentials in various color channels by lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Y.; Toki, H.; Nakamura, A.; Saito, T.

    2008-02-01

    We study the color-dependent confining forces between two quarks by the quenched lattice simulations of Coulomb gauge QCD. The color-singlet and color-antitriplet instantaneous potentials yield attractive forces. The ratio of the string tensions obtained from them is approximately 2, and these tensions have little volume dependence. Meanwhile, the color-octet and color-sextet channels give a minor contribution to the two-quark system. We finally find that the infrared self-energy of the color-nonsinglet channels diverges in the infinite volume limit; however, the degree of the divergence on the finite lattice can be understood in terms of color factors.

  19. Effects of LatticeQCD EoS and Continuous Emission on Some Observables

    SciTech Connect

    Hama, Y.; Andrade, R.; Grassi, F.; Socolowski, O.; Kodama, T.; Tavares, B.; Padula, S. S.

    2006-04-11

    Effects of lattice-QCD-inspired equations of state and continuous emission on some observables are discussed, by solving a 3D hydrodynamics. The particle multiplicity as well {nu} 2 are found to increase in the mid-rapidity. We also discuss the effects of the initial-condition fluctuations.

  20. Electrical Conductivity, Thermal Stability, and Lattice Defect Evolution During Cyclic Channel Die Compression of OFHC Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satheesh Kumar, S. S.; Raghu, T.

    2015-02-01

    Oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper samples are severe plastically deformed by cyclic channel die compression (CCDC) technique at room temperature up to an effective plastic strain of 7.2. Effect of straining on variation in electrical conductivity, evolution of deformation stored energy, and recrystallization onset temperatures are studied. Deformation-induced lattice defects are quantified using three different methodologies including x-ray diffraction profile analysis employing Williamson-Hall technique, stored energy based method, and electrical resistivity-based techniques. Compared to other severe plastic deformation techniques, electrical conductivity degrades marginally from 100.6% to 96.6% IACS after three cycles of CCDC. Decrease in recrystallization onset and peak temperatures is noticed, whereas stored energy increases and saturates at around 0.95-1.1J/g after three cycles of CCDC. Although drop in recrystallization activation energy is observed with the increasing strain, superior thermal stability is revealed, which is attributed to CCDC process mechanics. Low activation energy observed in CCDC-processed OFHC copper is corroborated to synergistic influence of grain boundary characteristics and lattice defects distribution. Estimated defects concentration indicated continuous increase in dislocation density and vacancy with strain. Deformation-induced vacancy concentration is found to be significantly higher than equilibrium vacancy concentration ascribed to hydrostatic stress states experienced during CCDC.

  1. Lattice Boltzmann method simulations of Stokes number effects on particle motion in a channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lenan; Jebakumar, Anand Samuel; Abraham, John

    2016-06-01

    In a recent experimental study by Lau and Nathan ["Influence of Stokes number on the velocity and concentration distributions in particle-laden jets," J. Fluid Mech. 757, 432 (2014)], it was found that particles in a turbulent pipe flow tend to migrate preferentially toward the wall or the axis depending on their Stokes number (St). Particles with a higher St (>10) are concentrated near the axis while those with lower St (<1) move toward the walls. Jebakumar et al. ["Lattice Boltzmann method simulations of Stokes number effects on particle trajectories in a wall-bounded flow," Comput. Fluids 124, 208 (2016)] have carried out simulations of a particle in a laminar channel flow to investigate this behavior. In their work, they report a similar behavior where particles with low St migrate toward the wall and oscillate about a mean position near the wall while those with high St oscillate about the channel center plane. They have explained this behavior in terms of the Saffman lift, Magnus lift, and wall repulsion forces acting on the particle. The present work extends the previous work done by Jebakumar et al. and aims to study the behavior of particles at intermediate St ranging from 10 to 20. It is in this range where the equilibrium position of the particle changes from near the wall to the axis and the particle starts oscillating about the axis. The Lattice Boltzmann method is employed to carry out this study. It is shown that the change in mean equilibrium position is related to increasing oscillations of the particle with mean position near the wall which results in the particle moving past the center plane to the opposite side. The responsible mechanisms are explained in detail.

  2. Emission channeling studies on transition-metal doped GaN and ZnO: Cation versus anion substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, L. M. C.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.; Amorim, L. M.; Silva, D. J.; Decoster, S.; da Silva, M. R.; Temst, K.; Vantomme, A.

    2014-08-01

    The magnetic and electric properties of impurities in semiconductors are strongly dependent on the lattice sites which they occupy. While the majority site can often be predicted based on chemical similarities with the host elements and is usually simple to confirm experimentally, minority sites are far more complicated to predict, detect and identify. We have carried out extensive β- emission channeling studies on the lattice location of transition metal impurities in wide-gap dilute magnetic semiconductors, namely Co and Mn in GaN and ZnO, making use of radioactive 61Co and 56Mn implanted at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. In addition to the majority occupation of cation (Ga, Zn) sites, we located significant fractions (of the order of 20%) of the Co and Mn impurities in anion (N, O) sites, which are virtually unaffected by thermal annealing up to 900 °C. Here, we present the β- emission channeling experiments on 61Co-implanted GaN. We discuss these results in the context of our recent reports of minority anion substitution in Mn-implanted GaN Pereira et al. (2012) [19] and Mn/Co-implanted ZnO Pereira et al. (2011) [20], particularly in terms of the advantages of the emission channeling technique in such cases of multi-site occupancy.

  3. Velocity and density profiles of granular flow in channels using a lattice gas automaton

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, G.; Ohta, T.

    1997-06-01

    We have performed two-dimensional lattice-gas-automaton simulations of granular flow between two parallel planes. We find that the velocity profiles have nonparabolic distributions, while simultaneously the density profiles are nonuniform. Under nonslip boundary conditions, deviation of velocity profiles from the parabolic form of Newtonian fluids is found to be characterized solely by ratio of maximal velocity at the center to the average velocity, though the ratio depends on the model parameters in a complex manner. We also find that the maximal velocity (u{sub max}) at the center is a linear function of the driving force (g) as u{sub max}={alpha}g{minus}{delta} with nonzero {delta} in contrast with Newtonian fluids. Regarding density profiles, we observe that densities near the boundaries are higher than those in the center. The width of higher densities (above the average density) relative to the channel width is a decreasing function of a variable which scales with the driving force (g), energy dissipation parameter ({epsilon}), and the width of the system (L) as g{sup {mu}}L{sup {nu}}/{epsilon} with exponents {mu}=1.4{plus_minus}0.1 and {nu}=0.5{plus_minus}0.1. A phenomenological theory based on a scaling argument is presented to interpret these findings. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Two-dimensional lattice-Boltzmann simulation of size exclusion effects during colloidal transport in pore-scale flow channels

    SciTech Connect

    H. Basagaoglu; Meakin, P.; S. Succi; Redden, George D; T.R. Ginn

    2008-05-01

    Experimental investigations indicate that colloidal particles are transported more rapidly than soluble tracers through porous and fractured media. The prevailing in- terpretation is that colloids are confined to larger pores, larger channels or regions within channels where flow is more rapid. A lattice-Boltzmann modeling approach was used to analyze how size-dependent exclusion from low velocity fields in chan- nels can lead to accelerated transport of an inert non-Brownian colloidal particle in low-Reynolds number flows in two-dimensional smooth-walled and rough-walled channels. The simulations were based on pore-scale particle-fluid hydrodynamics without direct interactions between the particle surface and the channel surface. For the smooth-walled channel, the particle consistently drifted towards the center- line and traveled faster than the average fluid velocity. In rough-walled channels, differences between the velocity of the particle and the average velocity of the fluid displayed stronger variations than in the smooth-walled channel. Surface roughness increased the residence time of the particle in the flow channel and modified its trajectories differently in each flow regime. The final position (at the channel exit) and the average velocity of the particle in the rough-walled flow channel were sen- sitive to the release location of the particle, the flow strength, and the magnitude of the surface roughness in the channel. Under all flow conditions investigated, a large particle had a longer residence time in rough-walled flow channels, but drifted Preprint submitted to Elsevier Science 19 September 2006 toward the centerline more strongly than a smaller particle as it approached the channel walls.

  5. Lattice location of O18 in ion implanted Fe crystals by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, channeling and nuclear reaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vairavel, Mathayan; Sundaravel, Balakrishnan; Panigrahi, Binaykumar

    2016-09-01

    There are contradictory theoretical predictions of lattice location of oxygen interstitial atom at tetrahedral and octahedral interstices in bcc Fe. For validating these predictions, 300 keV O18 ions with fluence of 5 × 1015 ions/cm2 are implanted into bcc Fe single crystals at room temperature and annealed at 400 °C. The Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA)/channeling measurements are carried out with 850 keV protons. The lattice location of implanted O18 is analysed using the α-particles yield from O18(p,α)N15 nuclear reaction. The tilt angular scans of α-particle yield along <110> and <100> axial directions are performed at room temperature. Lattice location of O18 is found to be at tetrahedral interstitial site by comparing the experimental scan with simulated scans using FLUX7 software.

  6. Study on Free Surface and Channel Flow Induced by Low-Temperature Plasma via Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Gang; Jin, Yong; Li, Haiyuan; Li, Baoming

    2016-03-01

    Active boundary layer flow control and boundary layer manipulation in the channel flow that was based on low temperature plasma were studied by means of a lattice Boltzmann method. Two plasma actuators were placed in a row to obtain the influence rule of their separation distance on the velocity profile at three locations and maximum velocity in the flow field. Two plasma actuators were placed symmetrically inside a channel to examine the effect of channel height and voltage on the velocity profile and flow rate. It was found that the channel height controls the distribution of flow velocity, which affected the flow rate and its direction. Increasing plasma voltage had a negative effect on the flow rate due to the generation of a larger and stronger flow vortex.

  7. All-optical controllable channel-drop filters in two-dimensional square-lattice photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasihi, K.

    2016-05-01

    A novel all-optical controllable channel-drop filter in photonic crystals (PC) of square lattice is presented. We show that using a resonant-cavity-based add-drop filter with a wavelength-selective reflection feedback and a single-control switching module which is based on nonlinear PC microcavities, the dropped channel can be routed to the drop port or returned to the bus waveguide. Using the temporal coupled-mode theory and two-dimensional nonlinear finite-difference time-domain method, the performance of the proposed device is investigated and the simulation results show the validity of the proposed design.

  8. Scattering in the πN negative parity channel in lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, C. B.; Verduci, V.

    2013-03-01

    We study the coupled πN system (negative parity, isospin (1)/(2)) based on a lattice QCD simulation for nf=2 mass degenerate light quarks. Both standard 3-quark baryon operators as well as meson-baryon (4+1)-quark operators are included. This is an exploratory study for just one lattice size and lattice spacing and at a pion mass of 266 MeV. Using the distillation method and variational analysis we determine energy levels of the lowest eigenstates. Comparison with the results of simple 3-quark correlation studies exhibits drastic differences and a new level appears. A clearer picture of the negative parity nucleon spectrum emerges. For the parameters of the simulation we may assume elastic s-wave scattering and can derive values of the phase shift.

  9. Three-dimensional fluid flow simulation into a rectangular channel with partitions using the lattice-Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutra, Abdelkader; Ragui, Karim; Bennacer, Rachid; Benkahla, Youb K.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate numerically the 3D dimensional laminar flow of an incompressible Newtonian fluid into a rectangular channel, including several blocks mounted on the lower and upper walls. To do so, a numerical code based on the lattice Boltzmann method is utilized and it has been validated after comparison between the present results and those of the literature. The adiabatic partitions are arranged in three different manners: in the first one; and by using two blocks, these latter are mounted the one against the other. In the second, the bottom block is disposed next to the flow entry. Whereas, in the third; three parallel (or alternative) blocks are taking place the one close to the other at an equal distance. Regarding the Reynolds number and the partitions' distance effects on the fluid flow inside the channel, our phenomenon is widely analyzed throughout streamlines and velocity profiles, with special attention to the partitions' arrangement and the global drop pressure. It is to denote that the three dimensions D3Q19 model is adopted in this work, based on a cubic lattice, where each pattern of the latter is characterized by nineteen discrete speeds. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy Harvesting, Conversion and Storage (ICOME 2015) - Elected submissions", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  10. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of self-driven bubble transport in a micro-channel with a virtual check valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rou; Diao, Wei; Cheng, Yongguang; Zhu, Likun; Yu, Huidan (Whitney)

    2014-11-01

    An innovative self-circulation, self-regulation mechanism has recently been proposed to experimentally generate gaseous species from liquid reactants with little or zero parasitic power consumption. When a bubble grows at a location close to a virtual check valve, expansion of the left meniscus of the bubble is hindered due to its capability to provide a higher capillary pressure than the right meniscus does. We perform numerical simulation of bubble transport in a channel with a virtual check valve using lattice Boltzmann method to provide benchmarks for the experiments. A stable discretized lattice Boltzmann equation is employed to simulate incompressible bubble-liquid flows with density ratio above 1000. Polynomial wall free energy boundary condition is introduced and examined for static cases with a bubble sitting on solid surfaces for a triple contact among bubble, liquid, and solid surface. In this work, we focus on the effects of channel ratio between with and without check valve on the dynamics of bubble-driven liquid circulation. This work is supported by NSF Collabrotive Research (1264739).

  11. Numerical Simulation of Capillary Channels Growth in Heterogeneous Porous Anode in Aluminum Electrolysis Cells by Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diop, Mouhamadou; Wang, Moran

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents results obtained from three-dimensional numerical simulations of multiphase reactive flows in porous anode block in aluminum cells controlling a great extent of mass, heat and chemical balance in the anode-cathode region. A lattice Boltzmann method based on thermal reactive multiphase flows, is developed to simulate the spatial and temporal distribution of fluids, the effects of gas rate and capillary instabilities in the cryolite. A new model, which involves eighteen lattice particles for the first and second derivative, is proposed to achieve accurate simulations at high fluid density ratio. The effects of the dissolution of gas and the capillary number on the flow field induced by gas bubbles evolution are investigated. It is found that capillary channels in the limit of small Stefan, the radial transport of reactant out of the capillary channel decay exponentially with the height of penetration in the porous anode. Several examples are solved by the proposed method to demonstrate the accuracy and robustness of the method.

  12. Simulation of forced convection in a channel with nanofluid by the lattice Boltzmann method

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the thermal performance of fins mounted on the bottom wall of a horizontal channel and cooled with either pure water or an Al2O3-water nanofluid. The bottom wall of the channel is heated at a constant temperature and cooled by mixed convection of laminar flow at a relatively low temperature. The results of the numerical simulation indicate that the heat transfer rate of fins is significantly affected by the Reynolds number (Re) and the thermal conductivity of the fins. The influence of the solid volume fraction on the increase of heat transfer is more noticeable at higher values of the Re. PMID:23594696

  13. Lattice site investigations for Mg in LiNbO 3 by combined RBS-PIXE-NRA channeling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, A.; Kollewe, D.; Grabmaier, B. C.

    1992-02-01

    The lattice position of magnesium in lithium niobate has been investigated for single crystals doped with MgO (between 0 and 9 mol% in the congruent melt) using a combination of RBS, PIXE and NRA with channeling. Mg seems to be collinear with the niobium and lithium in the c-axis for the whole concentration range. Concentration dependent effects with a threshold of about 1 mol% MgO for other axes have been observed. For low concentrations experimental results and computer simulations performed with our recently developed program CASSIS indicate that magnesium occupies an octahedral site near lithium while for higher concentrations the regular lithium site and an octahedral position near niobium is found to be occupied.

  14. Retrieved Surface Emissivity Impact of New Cloud-Clearing Channel Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbein, Evan F.; Hook, Simon

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on a proposed new cloud clearing channel set to improve land products and validate surface emissivity is given. The topics include: 1) Methodology; 2) Channel Selection; 3) Temperature Statistics; 4) 850 hPa Temperature Variability; 5) Status of Surface Retrieval; 6) Emissivity at 9 micrometers; 7) Emissivity Spectra; 8) Ha Megev (Israel); 9) Egypt One; 10) Salonga National Park, Zaire; 11) HaGolan (Israel/Syria); 12) Emissivity at 3.75 micrometers; 13) Improving Surface Retrieval; 14) Work Needed for V5 Delivery; 15) Effects of MODIS Emissivity; 16) Channel Selection; 17) 500 hPa Temperature Variability; 18) 850 hPa Temperature Variability; and 19) 850 hPa Temperature Differences;

  15. Drawing the geometry of 3d transition metal-boron pairs in silicon from electron emission channeling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, D. J.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.; Augustyns, V.; Lima, T. A. L.; Costa, A.; Bosne, E.; da Silva, M. R.; Araújo, J. P.; Pereira, L. M. C.

    2016-03-01

    Although the formation of transition metal-boron pairs is currently well established in silicon processing, the geometry of these complexes is still not completely understood. We investigated the lattice location of the transition metals manganese, iron, cobalt and nickel in n- and p+ -type silicon by means of electron emission channeling. For manganese, iron and cobalt, we observed an increase of sites near the ideal tetrahedral interstitial position by changing the doping from n- to p+ -type Si. Such increase was not observed for Ni. We ascribe this increase to the formation of pairs with boron, driven by Coulomb interactions, since the majority of iron, manganese and cobalt is positively charged in p+ -type silicon while Ni is neutral. We propose that breathing mode relaxation around the boron ion within the pair causes the observed displacement from the ideal tetrahedral interstitial site. We discuss the application of the emission channeling technique in this system and, in particular, how it provides insight on the geometry of such pairs.

  16. Determination of crystal lattice defects by investigation of the channeling shoulder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellmer, H.; Aichinger, R.; Mäser, S.; Semrad, D.

    1999-09-01

    It is common practice to guard the development of beam damage of a crystal by looking at an increase of the minimum backscattering yield from the aligned crystal. Alternatively, we propose to observe the decrease of the channeling shoulders. The shoulders are found in an angular scan across a plane or axis on both sides of the channeling dip. They demonstrate the validity of Lindhard's rule of angular average [J. Lindhard, Dansk. Vid. Selsk, Mat. Fys. Medd. 34 (14) (1965)]. However, from this rule it would also follow that under beam bombardment both characteristics, dip and shoulder should disappear at about the same rate. By way of contrast, we find that at a charge of 300 μC deposited onto Te the shoulders have almost disappeared, whereas the dip is still clearly discernible. Investigations of the shoulder in a uni-directional double alignment geometry makes this method even more surface sensitive.

  17. Spin-Dependent Emission from Arrays of Planar Chiral Nanoantennas Due to Lattice and Localized Plasmon Resonances.

    PubMed

    Cotrufo, Michele; Osorio, Clara I; Koenderink, A Femius

    2016-03-22

    Chiral plasmonic nanoantennas manifest a strong asymmetric response to circularly polarized light. Particularly, the geometric handedness of a plasmonic structure can alter the circular polarization state of light emitted from nearby sources, leading to a spin-dependent emission direction. In past experiments, these effects have been attributed entirely to the localized plasmonic resonances of single antennas. In this work, we demonstrate that, when chiral nanoparticles are arranged in diffractive arrays, lattice resonances play a primary role in determining the spin-dependent emission of light. We fabricate 2D diffractive arrays of planar chiral metallic nanoparticles embedded in a light-emitting dye-doped slab. By measuring the polarized photoluminescence enhancement, we show that the geometric chirality of the array's unit cell induces a preferential circular polarization, and that both the localized surface plasmon resonance and the delocalized hybrid plasmonic-photonic mode contribute to this phenomenon. By further mapping the angle-resolved degree of circular polarization, we demonstrate that strong chiral dissymmetries are mainly localized at the narrow emission directions of the surface lattice resonances. We validate these results against a coupled dipole model calculation, which correctly reproduces the main features. Our findings demonstrate that, in diffractive arrays, lattice resonances play a primary role into the light spin-orbit effect, introducing a highly nontrivial behavior in the angular spectra. PMID:26854880

  18. Micromechanisms of brittle fracture: Acoustic emissions and electron channeling analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Gerberich, W.W.

    1990-06-01

    The objectives of this work are to: (i) Evaluate the initial stages of cleavage nucleation in single and polycrystalline samples; (ii) Determine the controlling event(s) which lead(s) to unstable cleavage (is it an unstable cluster'' of microcracks or a crack-tip opening displacement criterion for an array of ligaments surrounding these microcracks ); (iii) Determine how the process zone, which depends upon microstructure and processing history, affects the controlling event(s); (iv) Use selected area channeling patterns (SACP's) to assist in an independent measure of the cleavage fracture stress of grains cleaved at or just outside the elastic-plastic boundary; also, use it to evaluate static and dynamic strain distributions; and (v) Evaluate the effects of dislocation shielding and overload using combined methods of computational mechanics with discretized dislocation arrays and direct observations of dislocations using channeling, etch pit and birefringence methods. Accomplishments are discussed. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Surface growth for molten silicon infiltration into carbon millimeter-sized channels: Lattice-Boltzmann simulations, experiments and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergi, Danilo; Camarano, Antonio; Molina, José Miguel; Ortona, Alberto; Narciso, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The process of liquid silicon (Si) infiltration is investigated for channels with radii from 0.25[mm] to 0.75[mm] drilled in compact carbon (C) preforms. The advantage of this setup is that the study of the phenomenon results can be simplified. For comparison purposes, attempts are made in order to work out a framework for evaluating the accuracy of simulations. The approach relies on dimensionless numbers involving the properties of the surface reaction. It turns out that complex hydrodynamic behavior derived from second Newton law can be made consistent with Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulations. The experiments give clear evidence that the growth of silicon carbide (SiC) proceeds in two different stages and basic mechanisms are highlighted. LB simulations prove to be an effective tool for the description of the growing phase. Namely, essential experimental constraints can be implemented. As a result, the existing models are useful to gain more insight on the process of reactive infiltration into porous media in the first stage of penetration, i.e. up to pore closure because of surface growth. A way allowing one to implement the resistance from chemical reaction in Darcy law is also proposed.

  20. Spontaneous emission with a cascaded driving field in the same transition channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ronggang; Liu, Tong

    2015-11-01

    We study the spontaneous emission spectrum of a driven four-level atom in both Markovian reservoir and non-Markovian reservoir, in which the two driving fields are applied to the same transition channel. It is very interesting that the increase of the Rabi frequency of the first driving field leads to the emission spectrum enhancement in Markovian reservoir, but the increase of the second one can suppress the emission spectrum significantly. The phenomenon originates from the dressed states variation induced by the first driving field. For non-Markovian reservoir case, the rich spectrum behavior is due to a strong coupling between driving fields and modified reservoir.

  1. Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03693 Channel

    This channel is located south of Iani Chaos.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -10.9N, Longitude 345.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  2. Engineering lattice matching, doping level, and optical properties of KY(WO4)2:Gd, Lu, Yb layers for a cladding-side-pumped channel waveguide laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravazhi, Shanmugam; Geskus, Dimitri; van Dalfsen, Koop; Vázquez-Córdova, Sergio A.; Grivas, Christos; Griebner, Uwe; García-Blanco, Sonia M.; Pollnau, Markus

    2013-05-01

    Single-crystalline KY1- x-y-z GdxLuyYbz(WO4)2 layers are grown onto undoped KY(WO4)2 substrates by liquid-phase epitaxy. The purpose of co-doping the KY(WO4)2 layer with suitable fractions of Gd3+ and Lu3+ is to achieve lattice-matched layers that allow us to engineer a high refractive-index contrast between waveguiding layer and substrate for obtaining tight optical mode confinement and simultaneously accommodate a large range of Yb3+ doping concentrations by replacing Lu3+ ions of similar ionic radius for a variety of optical amplifier or laser applications. Crack-free layers, up to a maximum lattice mismatch of ~0.08 %, are grown with systematic variations of Y3+, Gd3+, Lu3+, and Yb3+ concentrations, their refractive indices are measured at several wavelengths, and Sellmeier dispersion curves are derived. The influence of co-doping on the spectroscopy of Yb3+ is investigated. As evidenced by the experimental results, the lattice constants, refractive indices, and transition cross-sections of Yb3+ in these co-doped layers can be approximated with good accuracy by weighted averages of data from the pure compounds. The obtained information is exploited to fabricate a twofold refractive-index-engineered sample consisting of a highly Yb3+-doped tapered channel waveguide embedded in a passive planar waveguide, and a cladding-side-pumped channel waveguide laser is demonstrated.

  3. Programmable eye-opener lattice filter for multi-channel dispersion compensation using an integrated compact low-loss silicon nitride platform.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Renan; Gundavarapu, Sarat; Blumenthal, Daniel J

    2016-07-25

    A tunable eye-opening lattice filter for dispersion compensation is demonstrated on an ultra low-loss waveguide platform based on a compact high-aspect ratio Si3N4 core. A programmable 10th order lattice filter is demonstrated by cascading a total of 21 Mach-Zehnder interferometers with programmable delay lines of lengths designed at the baseband data rate. The filter has a footprint of 2.23 cm2 with continuously tunable dispersion from -500 ps/nm to 500 ps/nm. The filter shows a periodic transfer function with a measured FSR of 100 GHz capable of compensating multiple WDM channels with a single device. PMID:27464127

  4. Emissivity and Anisothermality Studies at the Lunar Poles with Diviner's Far Infrared Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aye, K.; Paige, D. A.; Siegler, M. A.; Greenhagen, B. T.

    2013-12-01

    The Diviner Radiometer on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) is measuring surface temperatures in 7 different thermal channels, 4 of them in the wavelength area classically defined as far infrared, starting at 13 microns, and ending with the longest wavelength channel at 400 microns. The surface temperatures derived from these thermal infrared measurements at the lunar poles indicate some of the coldest temperatures measured in the solar system of around 20 K. This work aims to disprove the null hypothesis that other effects like wavelength and temperature dependent emissivities are responsible for a reduced radiant exitance and the subsequently low derived surface temperature. To address the wavelength dependency of emissivity we are comparing nighttime temperatures over time (cooling curves) in between the different far infrared channels at selected locations. The locations have to be selected for low rock abundance to minimize anisothermality effects influencing the cooling curves. For this we are applying the method of lunar surface rock abundance using Diviner data as described in Bandfield et al. (2011), that has not been done so far at latitudes poleward of 60°. To avoid the large influence of slopes on the surface temperatures, the main reason for the latitude restriction in Bandfield et al. (2011) we use recent LOLA altimeter data to resolve any slopes that could influence the cooling curve at a chosen location. Having selected a location relatively free of anisothermalities and taking their effect into account, general differences in the cooling curves of the different Diviner wavelengths are interpreted as wavelength-dependent emissivities. To address the potential temperature dependency of emissivity, we are studying how the parameters of a mid-temperature range exponential fit to the cooling curve fit from approx. 250 to 70K, where we do not expect a temperature dependence of emissivity, extends to highest and lowest temperatures at the poles

  5. [Study on Square Super-Lattice Pattern with Surface Discharge in Dielectric Barrier Discharge by Optical Emission Spectra].

    PubMed

    Niu, Xue-jiao; Dong, Li-fang; Liu, Ying; Wang, Qian; Feng, Jian-yu

    2016-02-01

    Square super-lattice pattern with surface discharge consisting of central spots and dim spots is firstly observed in the mixture of argon and air by using a dielectric barrier discharge device with water electrodes. By observing the image, it is found that the central spot is located at the centriod of its surrounding four dim spots. The short-exposure image recorded by a high speed video camera shows that the dim spot results from the surface discharges (SDs). The brightness of the central spot and is quite different from that of the dim spot, which indicates that the plasma states of the central spot and the dim spot may be differentiated. The optical emission spectrum method is used to further study the several plasma parameters of the central spot and the dim spot in different argon content. The emission spectra of the N₂ second positive band (C³IIu --> B³ IIg) are measured, from which the molecule vibration temperatures of the central spot and the dim spot are calculated respectively. The broadening of spectral line 696.57 nm (2P₂-->1S₅) is used to study the electron densities of the central spot and the dim spot. It is found that the molecule vibration temperature and electron density of the dim spot are higher than those of the central spot in the same argon content The molecule vibration temperature and electron density of the central spot and the dim spot increase with the argon content increasing from 90% to 99.9%. The surface discharge induced by the volume discharge (VD) has the determinative effect on the formation of the dim spot The experimental results above play an important role in studying the formation mechanism of surface discharg&of square super-lattice pattern with surface discharge. In addition, the studies exert an influence on the application of surface discharge and volume discharge in different fields. PMID:27209733

  6. Corona discharge radical emission spectroscopy: a multi-channel detector with nose-type function for discrimination analysis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yunfei; Wu, Peng; Wu, Xi; Jiang, Xiaoming; Xu, Kailai; Hou, Xiandeng

    2013-04-21

    A simple and economical multi-channel optical sensor using corona discharge radical emission spectroscopy is developed and explored as an optical nose for discrimination analysis of volatile organic compounds, wines, and even isomers. PMID:23471437

  7. Estimation of land surface directional emissivity in mid-infrared channel around 4.0 microm from MODIS data.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bo-Hui; Li, Zhao-Liang; Bi, Yuyun

    2009-03-01

    This work addressed the estimate of the directional emissivity in the mid-infrared (MIR) channel around 4.0 microm from MODIS data. A series of bidirectional reflectances in MODIS channel 22 (3.97 mum) were retrieved using the method developed by Tang and Li (Int. J. Remote Sens. 29, 4907, 2008) and then were used to estimate the directional emissivity in this channel with the aid of the BRDF model modified by Jiang and Li (Opt. Express 16, 19310, 2008). To validate the estimated directional emissivity, a cross-comparison of MODIS derived emissivities in channel 22 using the proposed method were performed with those provided by the MODIS land surface temperature/emissivity product MYD11B1 data. The results show that the proposed method for estimating the directional emissivity in MIR channel gives results comparable to those of MYD11B1 product with a Mean Error of -0.007 and a Root Mean Square Error of 0.024. PMID:19259154

  8. Calculation of friction coefficient and analysis of fluid flow in a stepped micro-channel for wide range of Knudsen number using Lattice Boltzmann (MRT) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhshan, Younes; Omidvar, Alireza

    2015-12-01

    Micro scale gas flows have attracted significant research interest in the last two decades. In this research, the fluid flow of gases in a stepped micro-channel has been conducted. Wide range of Knudsen number has been implemented using the Lattice Boltzmann (MRT) method in this study. A modified second-order slip boundary condition and a Bosanquet-type effective viscosity are used to consider the velocity slip at the boundaries and to cover the slip and transition regimes of flow to obtain an accurate simulation of rarefied gases. The flow specifications such as pressure loss, velocity profile, stream lines and friction coefficient at different conditions have been presented. The results show, good agreement with available experimental data. The calculation shows, that the friction coefficient decreases with increasing the Knudsen number and stepping the micro-channel has an inverse effect on the friction coefficient value. Furthermore, a new correlation is suggested for calculation of the friction coefficient in the stepped micro-channel flows as below;

  9. Attribution of atmospheric sulfur dioxide over the English Channel to dimethyl sulfide and changing ship emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mingxi; Bell, Thomas G.; Hopkins, Frances E.; Smyth, Timothy J.

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric sulfur dioxide (SO2) was measured continuously from the Penlee Point Atmospheric Observatory (PPAO) near Plymouth, United Kingdom, between May 2014 and November 2015. This coastal site is exposed to marine air across a wide wind sector. The predominant southwesterly winds carry relatively clean background Atlantic air. In contrast, air from the southeast is heavily influenced by exhaust plumes from ships in the English Channel as well as near Plymouth Sound. A new International Maritime Organization (IMO) regulation came into force in January 2015 to reduce the maximum allowed sulfur content in ships' fuel 10-fold in sulfur emission control areas such as the English Channel. Our observations suggest a 3-fold reduction in ship-emitted SO2 from 2014 to 2015. Apparent fuel sulfur content calculated from coincidental SO2 and carbon dioxide (CO2) peaks from local ship plumes show a high level of compliance to the IMO regulation (> 95 %) in both years (˜ 70 % of ships in 2014 were already emitting at levels below the 2015 cap). Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is an important source of atmospheric SO2 even in this semi-polluted region. The relative contribution of DMS oxidation to the SO2 burden over the English Channel increased from about one-third in 2014 to about one-half in 2015 due to the reduction in ship sulfur emissions. Our diel analysis suggests that SO2 is removed from the marine atmospheric boundary layer in about half a day, with dry deposition to the ocean accounting for a quarter of the total loss.

  10. Intercomparison of two BRDF models in the estimation of the directional emissivity in MIR channel from MSG1-SEVIRI data.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Geng-Ming; Li, Zhao-Liang

    2008-11-10

    This work intercompared two Bi-directional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) models, the modified Minnaert's model and the RossThick-LiSparse-R model, in the estimation of the directional emissivity in Middle Infra-Red (MIR) channel from the data acquired by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infra-Red Imager (SEVIRI) onboard the first Meteosat Second Generation (MSG1). The bi-directional reflectances in SEVIRI channel 4 (3.9 microm) were estimated from the combined MIR and Thermal Infra-Red (TIR) data and then were used to estimate the directional emissivity in this channel with aid of the BRDF models. The results show that: (1) Both models can relatively well describe the non-Lambertian reflective behavior of land surfaces in SEVIRI channel 4; (2) The RossThick-LiSparse-R model is better than the modified Minnaert's model in modeling the bi-directional reflectances, and the directional emissivities modeled by the modified Minnaert's model are always lower than the ones obtained by the RossThick-LiSparse-R model with averaged emissivity differences of approximately 0.01 and approximately 0.04 over the vegetated and bare areas, respectively. The use of the RossThick-LiSparse-R model in the estimation of the directional emissivity in MIR channel is recommended. PMID:19582025

  11. Gravitational wave emission from the single-degenerate channel of Type Ia supernovae.

    PubMed

    Falta, David; Fisher, Robert; Khanna, Gaurav

    2011-05-20

    The thermonuclear explosion of a C/O white dwarf as a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) generates a kinetic energy comparable to that released by a massive star during a SN II event. Current observations and theoretical models have established that SNe Ia are asymmetric, and therefore--like SNe II--potential sources of gravitational wave (GW) radiation. We perform the first detailed calculations of the GW emission for a SN Ia of any type within the single-degenerate channel. The gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) mechanism predicts a strongly polarized GW burst in the frequency band around 1 Hz. Third-generation spaceborne GW observatories currently in planning may be able to detect this predicted signal from SNe Ia at distances up to 1 Mpc. If observable, GWs may offer a direct probe into the first few seconds of the SNe Ia detonation. PMID:21668216

  12. An Application of Micro-channel Plate Photomultiplier Tube to Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H.; Chen, C.-T.; Frisch, H.; Tang, F.; Kao, C.-M.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing a Time-of-Flight Positron Emission Tomography detector using flat panel micro-channel plate photomultiplier tubes (MCP PMT). The high-speed waveform sampling data acquisition is adopted to exploit the fast time response of MCP PMT efficiently by using transmission-line readout scheme. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed detector, prototype detector modules were built using Photonis XP85022 MCP PMT, transmission-line board (TL), and high-speed waveform sampling electronics equipped with DRS4 chips. The MCP/TL module was coupled to single LYSO crystal, and experimental tests have been conducted in a coincidence setup to measure the responses to 511 keV annihilation photon. The details of the prototype module, experimental setup, and the preliminary results are presented and discussed. PMID:23227135

  13. An Application of Micro-channel Plate Photomultiplier Tube to Positron Emission Tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, H; Chen, C-T; Frisch, H; Tang, F; Kao, C-M

    2012-01-01

    We are developing a Time-of-Flight Positron Emission Tomography detector using flat panel micro-channel plate photomultiplier tubes (MCP PMT). The high-speed waveform sampling data acquisition is adopted to exploit the fast time response of MCP PMT efficiently by using transmission-line readout scheme. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed detector, prototype detector modules were built using Photonis XP85022 MCP PMT, transmission-line board (TL), and high-speed waveform sampling electronics equipped with DRS4 chips. The MCP/TL module was coupled to single LYSO crystal, and experimental tests have been conducted in a coincidence setup to measure the responses to 511 keV annihilation photon. The details of the prototype module, experimental setup, and the preliminary results are presented and discussed. PMID:23227135

  14. Genetic Interactions Found Between Calcium Channel Genes Modulate Amyloid Load Measured by Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Koran, Mary Ellen I.; Hohman, Timothy J.; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) is known to have a complex, oligogenic etiology, with considerable genetic heterogeneity. We investigated the influence of genetic interactions between genes in the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathway on amyloid-beta (Aβ) deposition as measured by PiB or AV-45 ligand positron emission tomography (PET) to aid in understanding LOAD’s genetic etiology. Subsets of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohorts were used for discovery and for two independent validation analyses. A significant interaction between RYR3 and CACNA1C was confirmed in all three of the independent ADNI datasets. Both genes encode calcium channels expressed in the brain. The results shown here support previous animal studies implicating interactions between these calcium channels in amyloidigenesis and suggest that the pathological cascade of this disease may be modified by interactions in the amyloid-calcium axis. Future work focusing on the mechanisms of such relationships may inform targets for clinical intervention. PMID:24026422

  15. Channeling, Volume Reection and Gamma Emission Using 14GeV Electrons in Bent Silicon Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Brandon

    2015-08-14

    High energy electrons can be deflected with very tight bending radius using a bent silicon crystal. This produces gamma radiation. As these crystals can be thin, a series of bent silicon crystals with alternating direction has the potential to produce coherent gamma radiation with reasonable energy of the driving electron beam. Such an electron crystal undulator offers the prospect for higher energy radiation at lower cost than current methods. Permanent magnetic undulators like LCLS at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are expensive and very large (about 100 m in case of the LCLS undulator). Silicon crystals are inexpensive and compact when compared to the large magnetic undulators. Additionally, such a high energy coherent light source could be used for probing through materials currently impenetrable by x-rays. In this work we present the experimental data and analysis of experiment T523 conducted at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We collected the spectrum of gamma ray emission from 14 GeV electrons on a bent silicon crystal counting single photons. We also investigated the dynamics of electron motion in the crystal i.e. processes of channeling and volume reflection at 14 GeV, extending and building off previous work. Our single photon spectrum for the amorphous crystal orientation is consistent with bremsstrahlung radiation and the volume reflection crystal orientation shows a trend consistent with synchrotron radiation at a critical energy of 740 MeV. We observe that in these two cases the data are consistent, but we make no further claims because of statistical limitations. We also extended the known energy range of electron crystal dechanneling length and channeling efficiency to 14 GeV.

  16. Channelling experiments on the lattice location of hydrogen in metals using the nuclear reaction 1H(11B, α)αα

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Eiichi

    1992-03-01

    In order to locate hydrogen dissolved in metals a nuclear reaction 1H(11B, α)αα was applied to a channelling method. As an example of this application the results of the following two experiments were briefly reported. (1) The lattice location of H in V was investigated under a <001> compressive stress of 7 kg/mm2 below the elastic limit. The configuration of hydrogen is extremely sensitive to compressive stress and changes from a tetrahedral (T) site to a diplaced-T or 4T configuration. On release of this stress the hydrogen atoms returned to T-sites. (2) To elucidate the mechanism of the enhancement of the terminal solubility for hydrogen (TSH) in Nb on alloying with undersized Mo atoms, the state of hydrogen was studied in Nb-based Nb-Mo dilute alloys. It was demonstrated that H atoms are trapped by Mo atoms and located at sites displaced from T-sites by about 0.6 Å. This result supports the trapping model for the enhancement of the TSH in the region of low Mo concentration.

  17. Industrial SO2 emissions monitoring using a portable multi-channel gas analyzer with an optimized retrieval algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. W.; Liu, C.; Xie, P. H.; Hartl, A.; Chan, K. L.; Tian, Y.; Wang, W.; Qin, M.; Liu, J. G.; Liu, W. Q.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate achieving accurate industrial SO2 emissions monitoring using a portable multi-channel gas analyzer with an optimized retrieval algorithm. The introduced analyzer features with large dynamic measurement range and correction of interferences from other co-existing infrared absorbers, e.g., NO, CO, CO2, NO2, CH4, HC, N2O and H2O. Both effects have been the major limitations of industrial SO2 emissions monitoring. The multi-channel gas analyzer measures 11 different wavelength channels simultaneously in order to achieve correction of several major problems of an infrared gas analyzer, including system drift, conflict of sensitivity, interferences among different infrared absorbers and limitation of measurement range. The optimized algorithm makes use of a 3rd polynomial rather than a constant factor to quantify gas-to-gas interference. The measurement results show good performance in both linear and nonlinear range, thereby solving the problem that the conventional interference correction is restricted by the linearity of both intended and interfering channels. The result implies that the measurement range of the developed multi-channel analyzer can be extended to the nonlinear absorption region. The measurement range and accuracy are evaluated by experimental laboratory calibration. An excellent agreement was achieved with a Pearson correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.99977 with measurement range from ~5 ppmv to 10 000 ppmv and measurement error <2 %. The instrument was also deployed for field measurement. Emissions from 3 different factories were measured. The emissions of these factories have been characterized with different co-existing infrared absorbers, covering a wide range of concentration levels. We compared our measurements with the commercial SO2 analyzers. The overall good agreements are achieved.

  18. A Multi-Channel Method for Retrieving Surface Temperature for High-Emissivity Surfaces from Hyperspectral Thermal Infrared Images.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xinke; Labed, Jelila; Zhou, Guoqing; Shao, Kun; Li, Zhao-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The surface temperature (ST) of high-emissivity surfaces is an important parameter in climate systems. The empirical methods for retrieving ST for high-emissivity surfaces from hyperspectral thermal infrared (HypTIR) images require spectrally continuous channel data. This paper aims to develop a multi-channel method for retrieving ST for high-emissivity surfaces from space-borne HypTIR data. With an assumption of land surface emissivity (LSE) of 1, ST is proposed as a function of 10 brightness temperatures measured at the top of atmosphere by a radiometer having a spectral interval of 800-1200 cm(-1) and a spectral sampling frequency of 0.25 cm(-1). We have analyzed the sensitivity of the proposed method to spectral sampling frequency and instrumental noise, and evaluated the proposed method using satellite data. The results indicated that the parameters in the developed function are dependent on the spectral sampling frequency and that ST of high-emissivity surfaces can be accurately retrieved by the proposed method if appropriate values are used for each spectral sampling frequency. The results also showed that the accuracy of the retrieved ST is of the order of magnitude of the instrumental noise and that the root mean square error (RMSE) of the ST retrieved from satellite data is 0.43 K in comparison with the AVHRR SST product. PMID:26061199

  19. A Multi-Channel Method for Retrieving Surface Temperature for High-Emissivity Surfaces from Hyperspectral Thermal Infrared Images

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xinke; Labed, Jelila; Zhou, Guoqing; Shao, Kun; Li, Zhao-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The surface temperature (ST) of high-emissivity surfaces is an important parameter in climate systems. The empirical methods for retrieving ST for high-emissivity surfaces from hyperspectral thermal infrared (HypTIR) images require spectrally continuous channel data. This paper aims to develop a multi-channel method for retrieving ST for high-emissivity surfaces from space-borne HypTIR data. With an assumption of land surface emissivity (LSE) of 1, ST is proposed as a function of 10 brightness temperatures measured at the top of atmosphere by a radiometer having a spectral interval of 800–1200 cm−1 and a spectral sampling frequency of 0.25 cm−1. We have analyzed the sensitivity of the proposed method to spectral sampling frequency and instrumental noise, and evaluated the proposed method using satellite data. The results indicated that the parameters in the developed function are dependent on the spectral sampling frequency and that ST of high-emissivity surfaces can be accurately retrieved by the proposed method if appropriate values are used for each spectral sampling frequency. The results also showed that the accuracy of the retrieved ST is of the order of magnitude of the instrumental noise and that the root mean square error (RMSE) of the ST retrieved from satellite data is 0.43 K in comparison with the AVHRR SST product. PMID:26061199

  20. Production of the doubly magic nucleus Sn100 in fusion and quasifission reactions via light particle and cluster emission channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalandarov, Sh. A.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Wieleczko, J. P.

    2014-08-01

    The possibilities of production of the doubly magic nucleus Sn100 in complete fusion and quasifission reactions with stable and radioactive ion beams are investigated within a dinuclear system model. The excitation functions for production of the exotic nuclei 100-103Sn and 112,114Ba via xn, pxn, αxn, and 12,14Cxn emission channels are predicted for future experiments.

  1. Hadronic Interactions from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinos Orginos

    2006-03-19

    In this talk I discuss a few recent results on lattice calculations of scattering lengths in hadronic processes. In particular, I present the scattering length of the pion-pion scattering in the I=2 channel and the nucleon-nucleon {sup 1}S{sub 0} channel and {sup 3}S{sub 1}-{sup 3}D{sub 1} coupled channels.

  2. Kalman filter physical retrieval of surface emissivity and temperature from SEVIRI infrared channels: a validation and intercomparison study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiello, G.; Serio, C.; Venafra, S.; Liuzzi, G.; Göttsche, F.; Trigo, I. F.; Watts, P.

    2015-07-01

    A Kalman filter-based approach for the physical retrieval of surface temperature and emissivity from SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager) infrared observations has been developed and validated against in situ and satellite observations. Validation for land has been provided based on in situ observations from the two permanent stations at Evora and Gobabeb operated by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) within the framework of EUMETSAT's Satellite Application Facility on Land Surface Analysis (LSA SAF). Sea surface retrievals have been intercompared on a broad spatial scale with equivalent satellite products (MODIS, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, and AVHRR, Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) and ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) analyses. For surface temperature, the Kalman filter yields a root mean square accuracy of ≍ ±1.5 °C for the two land sites considered and ≍ ±1.0 °C for the sea. Comparisons with polar satellite instruments over the sea surface show nearly zero temperature bias. Over the land surface the retrieved emissivity follows the seasonal vegetation cycle and permits identification of desert sand regions using the SEVIRI channel at 8.7 μm due to the strong quartz reststrahlen bands around 8-9 μm. Considering the two validation stations, we have found that emissivity retrieved in SEVIRI channel 10.8 μm over the gravel plains of the Namibian desert is in excellent agreement with in situ observations. Over Evora, the seasonal variation of emissivity with vegetation is successfully retrieved and yields emissivity values for green and dry vegetation that are in good agreement with spectral library data. The algorithm has been applied to the SEVIRI full disk, and emissivity maps on that global scale have been physically retrieved for the first time.

  3. Kalman filter physical retrieval of surface emissivity and temperature from SEVIRI infrared channels: a validation and inter-comparison study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiello, G.; Serio, C.; Venafra, S.; Liuzzi, G.; Göttsche, F.; Trigo, I. F.; Watts, P.

    2015-04-01

    A Kalman filter based approach for the physical retrieval of surface temperature and emissivity from SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager) infrared observations has been developed and validated against in situ and satellite observations. Validation for land has been provided based on in situ observations from the two permanent stations Evora and Gobabeb operated by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) within the framework of EUMETSAT's Satellite Application Facility on Land Surface Analysis (LSA-SAF). Sea surface retrievals have been intercompared on a broad spatial scale with equivalent satellite products (MODIS or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and AVHRR or Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) and ECMWF (European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts) analyses. Results show that for surface temperature the algorithm yields an accuracy of ≈ ± 1.5 °C in case of land and ≈ ± 1.0 °C in case of sea surface. Comparisons with polar satellite instruments over the sea surface show nearly zero temperature bias. Over the land surface the retrieved emissivity follows the seasonal vegetation cycle and allows to identify desert sand regions because of strong reststrahlen bands of Quartz in the SEVIRI channel at 8.7 μm. Considering the two validation stations, we have that emissivity retrieved in SEVIRI channel 10.8 μm over the gravel plains of the Namib desert is in excellent agreement with in situ observations. Over Evora, the seasonal variation of emissivity with vegetation is successfully retrieved and yields emissivity values for green and dry vegetation that are in good agreement with spectral library data. The algorithm has been applied to the SEVIRI full disk and emissivity maps on that global scale have been physically retrieved for the first time.

  4. A 31-Channel MR Brain Array Coil Compatible with Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Christin Y.; Keil, Boris; Chonde, Daniel B.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Catana, Ciprian; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Simultaneous acquisition of MR and PET images requires the placement of the MR detection coil inside the PET detector ring where it absorbs and scatters photons. This constraint is the principal barrier to achieving optimum sensitivity on each modality. Here, we present a 31-channel PET-compatible brain array coil with reduced attenuation but improved MR sensitivity. Methods A series of component tests were performed to identify tradeoffs between PET and MR performance. Aspects studied include the remote positioning of preamplifiers, coax size, coil trace size/material, and plastic housing. We then maximized PET performance at minimal cost to MR sensitivity. The coil was evaluated for MR performance (SNR, g-factor) and PET attenuation. Results The coil design showed an improvement in attenuation by 190% (average) compared to conventional 32-channel arrays, and no loss in MR SNR. Moreover, the 31-channel coil displayed an SNR improvement of 230% (cortical ROI) compared to a PET-optimized 8-channel array with similar attenuation properties. Implementing attenuation correction of the 31-channel array successfully removed PET artifacts, which were comparable to those of the 8-channel array. Conclusion The design of the 31-channel PET-compatible coil enables higher sensitivity for PET/MR imaging, paving the way for novel applications in this hybrid-imaging domain. PMID:25046699

  5. Spectrally resolved multi-channel contributions to the harmonic emission in N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diveki, Z.; Camper, A.; Haessler, S.; Auguste, T.; Ruchon, T.; Carré, B.; Salières, P.; Guichard, R.; Caillat, J.; Maquet, A.; Taïeb, R.

    2012-02-01

    When generated in molecules, high-order harmonics can be emitted through different ionization channels. The coherent and ultrafast electron dynamics occurring in the ion during the generation process is directly imprinted in the harmonic signal, i.e. in its amplitude and spectral phase. In aligned N2 molecules, we find evidence for a fast variation of this phase as a function of the harmonic order when varying the driving laser intensity. Basing our analysis on a three-step model, we find that this phase variation is a signature of transitions from a single- to a multi-channel regime. In particular, we show that significant nuclear dynamics may occur in the ionization channels on the attosecond timescale, affecting both the amplitude and the phase of the harmonic signal.

  6. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and emissivity of lunar regolith simulant using dual-channel millimeter-wave radiometry.

    PubMed

    McCloy, J S; Sundaram, S K; Matyas, J; Woskov, P P

    2011-05-01

    Millimeter wave (MMW) radiometry can be used for simultaneous measurement of emissivity and temperature of materials under extreme environments (high temperature, pressure, and corrosive environments). The state-of-the-art dual channel MMW passive radiometer with active interferometric capabilities at 137 GHz described here allows for radiometric measurements of sample temperature and emissivity up to at least 1600 °C with simultaneous measurement of sample surface dynamics. These capabilities have been used to demonstrate dynamic measurement of melting of powders of simulated lunar regolith and static measurement of emissivity of solid samples. The paper presents the theoretical background and basis for the dual-receiver system, describes the hardware in detail, and demonstrates the data analysis. Post-experiment analysis of emissivity versus temperature allows further extraction from the radiometric data of millimeter wave viewing beam coupling factors, which provide corroboratory evidence to the interferometric data of the process dynamics observed. These results show the promise of the MMW system for extracting quantitative and qualitative process parameters for industrial processes and access to real-time dynamics of materials behavior in extreme environments. PMID:21639528

  7. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and emissivity of lunar regolith simulant using dual-channel millimeter-wave radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, J. S.; Sundaram, S. K.; Matyas, J.; Woskov, P. P.

    2011-01-01

    Millimeter wave (MMW) radiometry can be used for simultaneous measurement of emissivity and temperature of materials under extreme environments (high temperature, pressure, and corrosive environments). The state-of-the-art dual channel MMW passive radiometer with active interferometric capabilities at 137 GHz described here allows for radiometric measurements of sample temperature and emissivity up to at least 1600 °C with simultaneous measurement of sample surface dynamics. These capabilities have been used to demonstrate dynamic measurement of melting of powders of simulated lunar regolith and static measurement of emissivity of solid samples. The paper presents the theoretical background and basis for the dual-receiver system, describes the hardware in detail, and demonstrates the data analysis. Post-experiment analysis of emissivity versus temperature allows further extraction from the radiometric data of millimeter wave viewing beam coupling factors, which provide corroboratory evidence to the interferometric data of the process dynamics observed. Finally, these results show the promise of the MMW system for extracting quantitative and qualitative process parameters for industrial processes and access to real-time dynamics of materials behavior in extreme environments.

  8. Effects of viscosity in a partially ionized channel flow with thermionic emission

    SciTech Connect

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2009-01-15

    The flow of the partially ionized gas inside thermionic hollow cathodes spans a diverse range of theoretical disciplines in plasma physics and fluid mechanics. Understanding and predicting the evolution of such flows has many practical implications because hollow cathodes are critical components of electric propulsion systems used onboard scientific and commercial spacecraft presently in space or in the mission planning stages. As space missions become more demanding of the propulsion system in terms of throughput, understanding and predicting failure mechanisms of the system becomes imperative. Two-dimensional numerical simulations of the partially ionized gas generated by a thermionic hollow cathode have been performed to quantify the effects of viscosity inside the cylindrical channel of the device. A comparison of the inviscid and fully viscous flow fields shows that viscosity has a significant impact on the atomic species and a lesser effect on the ions. The internal pressure is determined to be more than 40% higher compared to the inviscid solution and the Reynolds number for the flow of atoms is found to be less than 20 inside the channel. Although the Mach number is computed to be <0.1 for approximately 95% of the channel, the solution for the velocity flow field begins to deviate from the Poiseuille (parabolic) solution at about 50% of the channel due mainly to collisional drag with ions.

  9. [Study on Hexagonal Super-Lattice Pattern with Light Spot and Dim Spot in Dielectric Barrier Discharge by Optical Emission Spectra].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Dong, Li-fang; Niu, Xue-jiao; Zhang, Chao

    2016-02-01

    The hexagonal super-lattice pattern composed of the light spot and the dim spot is firstly observed and investigated in the discharge of gas mixture of air and argon by using the dielectric barrier discharge device with double water electrodes. It is found that the dim spot is located at the center of its surrounding three light spots by observing the discharge image. Obviously, the brightness of the light spot and the dim spot are different, which indicates that the plasma states of the light spot and the dim spot may be different. The optical emission spectrum method is used to further study the several plasma parameters of the light spot and the dim spot in different argon content. The emission spectra of the N₂ second positive band (C³IIu --> B³IIg) are measured, from which the molecule vibration temperatures of the light spot and the dim spot are calculated. Based on the relative intensity ratio of the line at 391.4 nm and the N₂ line at 394.1 nm, the average electron energies of the light spot and the dim spot are investigated. The broadening of spectral line 696.57 nm (2P₂-1S₅) is used to study the electron densities of the light spot and the dim spot. The experiment shows that the molecule vibration temperature, average electron energy and the electron density of the dim spot are higher than those of the light spot in the same argon content. The molecule vibration temperature and electron density of the light spot and dim spot increase with the argon content increasing from 70% to 95%, while average electron energies of the light spot and dim spot decrease gradually. The short-exposure image recorded by a high speed video camera shows that the dim spot results from the surface discharges (SDs). The surface discharge induced by the volume discharge (VD) has the decisive effect on the formation of the dim spot. The experiment above plays an important role in studying the formation mechanism of the hexagonal super-lattice pattern with light spot and

  10. Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bornyakov, V.G.

    2005-06-01

    Possibilities that are provided by a lattice regularization of QCD for studying nonperturbative properties of QCD are discussed. A review of some recent results obtained from computer calculations in lattice QCD is given. In particular, the results for the QCD vacuum structure, the hadron mass spectrum, and the strong coupling constant are considered.

  11. Design and characterization of a 32-channel heterodyne radiometer for electron cyclotron emission measurements on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Han, X.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. Li, E. Z.; Hu, L. Q.; Gao, X.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-07-15

    A 32-channel heterodyne radiometer has been developed for the measurement of electron cyclotron emission (ECE) on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). This system collects X-mode ECE radiation spanning a frequency range of 104–168 GHz, where the frequency coverage corresponds to a full radial coverage for the case with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.3 T. The frequency range is equally spaced every 2 GHz from 105.1 to 167.1 GHz with an RF bandwidth of ∼500 MHz and the video bandwidth can be switched among 50, 100, 200, and 400 kHz. Design objectives and characterization of the system are presented in this paper. Preliminary results for plasma operation are also presented.

  12. Design and characterization of a 32-channel heterodyne radiometer for electron cyclotron emission measurements on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak.

    PubMed

    Han, X; Liu, X; Liu, Y; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C; Li, E Z; Hu, L Q; Gao, X

    2014-07-01

    A 32-channel heterodyne radiometer has been developed for the measurement of electron cyclotron emission (ECE) on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). This system collects X-mode ECE radiation spanning a frequency range of 104-168 GHz, where the frequency coverage corresponds to a full radial coverage for the case with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.3 T. The frequency range is equally spaced every 2 GHz from 105.1 to 167.1 GHz with an RF bandwidth of ~500 MHz and the video bandwidth can be switched among 50, 100, 200, and 400 kHz. Design objectives and characterization of the system are presented in this paper. Preliminary results for plasma operation are also presented. PMID:25085139

  13. The optical potential on the lattice

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agadjanov, Dimitri; Doring, Michael; Mai, Maxim; MeiBner, Ulf -G.; Rusetsky, Akaki

    2016-06-08

    The extraction of hadron-hadron scattering parameters from lattice data by using the Luscher approach becomes increasingly complicated in the presence of inelastic channels. We propose a method for the direct extraction of the complex hadron-hadron optical potential on the lattice, which does not require the use of the multi-channel Luscher formalism. Furthermore, this method is applicable without modifications if some inelastic channels contain three or more particles.

  14. Denitrification capacity and greenhouse gas emissions of soils in channelized and restored reaches along an Alpine river corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Juna; Niklaus, Pascal; Samaritani, Emanuela; Frossard, Emmanuel; Tockner, Klement; Luster, Jörg

    2010-05-01

    In order to assess the effects of river restoration on water and air quality, the biogeochemical functions of channelized and restored river reaches have to be quantified. The objective of this study was to compare denitrification potential and greenhouse gas emissions of functional processing zones (FPZ) in a channelized and a recently restored reach of the alpine river Thur in north-eastern Switzerland. The study was part of the project cluster RECORD of the ETH domain, Switzerland, which was initiated to increase the mechanistic understanding of coupled hydrological and ecological processes in river corridors. The denitrification potential represents an important aspect of the soil filter function related to water quality. Besides, it also contributes to the emission of greenhouse gases. Extensively used pasture growing on a sandy loam is the characteristic FPZ of the channelized section. The restored section encompasses five FPZ: (i) bare gravel bars sparsely colonized by plants, (ii) gravel bars densely colonized by grass (mainly canary reed grass with up to 80 cm sandy deposits), (iii) mixed forest dominated by ash and maple, (iv) riparian forest dominated by willow (Salix alba), (v) older overbank sediments stabilized during restoration with young willows separating the forests from the river-gravel bar system (willow bush). The FPZ were sampled in January, April, August and October 2009. In addition, in June and July 2009 two flood events were monitored in the restored section with more frequent samplings. At each date, topsoil samples were collected in each FPZ (four replicates per samples) and analyzed for denitrifier enzyme activity (DEA). In addition, gas samples were taken in-situ using the closed chamber technique to measure soil respiration as well as N2O and CH4 fluxes. In all FPZ, the denitrification potential was mainly governed by soil moisture. It was highest in the willow forest exhibiting low spatial variability. The DEA in pasture, grass zone

  15. Lattice Cubes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parris, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Given a segment that joins two lattice points in R[superscript 3], when is it possible to form a lattice cube that uses this segment as one of its twelve edges? A necessary and sufficient condition is that the length of the segment be an integer. This paper presents an algorithm for finding such a cube when the prime factors of the length are…

  16. Theoretical calculation of performance enhancement in lattice-matched SiGeSn/GeSn p-channel tunneling field-effect transistor with type-II staggered tunneling junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongjuan; Han, Genquan; Wang, Yibo; Peng, Yue; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Chunfu; Zhang, Jincheng; Hu, Shengdong; Hao, Yue

    2016-04-01

    In this work, a lattice-matched SiGeSn/GeSn heterostructure p-channel tunneling field-effect transistor (hetero-PTFET) with a type-II staggered tunneling junction (TJ) is investigated theoretically. Lattice matching and type-II band alignment at the Γ-point is obtained at the SiGeSn/GeSn interface by tuning Sn and Si compositions. A steeper subthreshold swing (SS) and a higher on state current (I ON) are demonstrated in SiGeSn/GeSn hetero-PTFET than in GeSn homo-PTFET. Si0.31Ge0.49Sn0.20/Ge0.88Sn0.12 hetero-PTFET achieves a 2.3-fold higher I ON than Ge0.88Sn0.12 homo-PTFET at V DD of 0.3 V. Hetero-PTFET achieves a more abrupt hole profile and a higher carrier density near TJ than the homo-PTFET, which contributes to the significantly enhanced band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) rate and tunneling current in hetero-PTFET.

  17. Channeling, volume reflection and gamma emission using 14GeV electrons in bent silicon crystals - Oral presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Brandon

    2015-08-23

    High energy electrons can be deflected with very tight bending radius using a bent silicon crystal. This produces gamma radiation. As these crystals can be thin, a series of bent silicon crystals with alternating direction has the potential to produce coherent gamma radiation with reasonable energy of the driving electron beam. Such an electron crystal undulator offers the prospect for higher energy radiation at lower cost than current methods. Permanent magnetic undulators like LCLS at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are expensive and very large (about 100 m in case of the LCLS undulator). Silicon crystals are inexpensive and compact when compared to the large magnetic undulators. Additionally, such a high energy coherent light source could be used for probing through materials currently impenetrable by x-rays. In this work we present the experimental data and analysis of experiment T523 conducted at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We collected the spectrum of gamma ray emission from 14 GeV electrons on a bent silicon crystal counting single photons. We also investigated the dynamics of electron motion in the crystal i.e. processes of channeling and volume reflection at 14 GeV, extending and building off previous work. Our single photon spectrum for the amorphous crystal orientation is consistent with bremsstrahlung radiation and the volume reflection crystal orientation shows a trend consistent with synchrotron radiation at a critical energy of 740 MeV. We observe that in these two cases the data are consistent, but we make no further claims because of statistical limitations. We also extended the known energy range of electron crystal dechanneling length and channeling efficiency to 14 GeV.

  18. Two HCl-Elimination Channels and Two CO-Formation Channels Detected with Time-Resolved Infrared Emission upon Photolysis of Acryloyl Chloride [CH2CHC(O)Cl] at 193 nm.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pei-Wen; Scrape, Preston G; Butler, Laurie J; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2015-07-16

    Following photodissociation of gaseous acryloyl chloride, CH2CHC(O)Cl, at 193 nm, temporally resolved vibration-rotational emission spectra of HCl (v ≤ 7, J ≤ 35) in region 2350-3250 cm(-1) and of CO (v ≤ 4, J ≤ 67) in region 1865-2300 cm(-1) were recorded with a step-scan Fourier-transform spectrometer. The HCl emission shows a minor low-J component for v ≤ 4 with average rotational energy Erot = 9 ± 3 kJ mol(-1) and vibrational energy Evib = 28 ± 7 kJ mol(-1) and a major high-J component for v ≤ 7 with average rotational energy Erot = 36 ± 6 kJ mol(-1) and vibrational energy Evib = 49 ± 9 kJ mol(-1); the branching ratio of these two channels is ∼0.2:0.8. Using electronic structure calculations to characterize the transition states and each intrinsic reaction coordinate, we find that the minor pathway corresponds to the four-center HCl-elimination of CH2ClCHCO following a 1,3-Cl-shift of CH2CHC(O)Cl, whereas the major pathway corresponds to the direct four-center HCl-elimination of CH2CHC(O)Cl. Although several channels are expected for CO produced from the secondary dissociation of C2H3CO and H2C═C═C═O, each produced from two possible dissociation channels of CH2CHC(O)Cl, the CO emission shows a near-Boltzmann rotational distribution with average rotational energy Erot = 21 ± 4 kJ mol(-1) and average vibrational energy Evib = 10 ± 4 kJ mol(-1). Consideration of the branching fractions suggests that the CO observed with greater vibrational excitation might result from secondary decomposition of H2C═C═C═O that was produced via the minor low-J HCl-elimination channel, while the internal state distributions of CO produced from the other three channels are indistinguishable. We also introduce a method for choosing the correct point along the intrinsic reaction coordinate for a roaming HCl elimination channel to generate a Franck-Condon prediction for the HCl vibrational energy. PMID:25658197

  19. Atom location by electron channeling analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, S.J.

    1984-07-01

    For many years the orientation dependence of the characteristic x-ray emission close to a Bragg reflection has been regarded as a hindrance to accurate microanalysis, and a random incident beam direction has always been recommended for accurate composition analysis. However, this orientation dependence can be put to use to extract information on the lattice location of foreign atoms within the crystalline matrix. Here a generalization of the technique is described which is applicable to any crystal structure including monatomic crystals, and can quantitatively determine substitutional fractions of impurities. The technique was referred to as electron channeling analysis, by analogy with the closely related and widely used bulk technique of ion channeling analysis, and was developed for lattice location studies of dopants in semiconductors at high spatial resolution. Only two spectra are required for each channeling analysis, one in each of the channeling conditions described above. If the matrix and dopant x-ray yields vary identically between the two orientations then the dopant necessarily lies within the reflecting matrix planes. If the dopant x-ray yield does not vary the dopant atoms are randomly located with respect to the matrix planes. 10 references, 2 figures.

  20. Lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann computational physics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.

    1993-05-01

    Recent developments of the lattice gas automata method and its extension to the lattice Boltzmann method have provided new computational schemes for solving a variety of partial differential equations and modeling different physics systems. The lattice gas method, regarded as the simplest microscopic and kinetic approach which generates meaningful macroscopic dynamics, is fully parallel and can be easily programmed on parallel machines. In this talk, the author will review basic principles of the lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann method, its mathematical foundation and its numerical implementation. A detailed comparison of the lattice Boltzmann method with the lattice gas technique and other traditional numerical schemes, including the finite-difference scheme and the pseudo-spectral method, for solving the Navier-Stokes hydrodynamic fluid flows, will be discussed. Recent achievements of the lattice gas and the the lattice Boltzmann method and their applications in surface phenomena, spinodal decomposition and pattern formation in chemical reaction-diffusion systems will be presented.

  1. Synthesis, radiolabeling and evaluation of novel amine guanidine derivatives as potential positron emission tomography tracers for the ion channel of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor.

    PubMed

    Klein, Pieter J; Chomet, Marion; Metaxas, Athanasios; Christiaans, Johannes A M; Kooijman, Esther; Schuit, Robert C; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; van Berckel, Bart N M; Windhorst, Albert D

    2016-08-01

    The N-Methyl-d-Aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is involved in many neurological and psychiatric disorders including Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to develop a positron emission tomography (PET) ligand to assess the bio-availability of the NMDAR ion channel in vivo. A series of tri-N-substituted diarylguanidines was synthesized and their in vitro binding affinities for the NMDAR ion channel assessed in rat forebrain membrane fractions. Compounds 21, 23 and 26 were radiolabeled with either carbon-11 or fluorine-18 and ex vivo biodistribution and metabolite studies were performed in Wistar rats. Biodistribution studies showed high uptake especially in prefrontal cortex and lowest uptake in cerebellum. Pre-treatment with MK-801, however, did not decrease uptake of the radiolabeled ligands. In addition, all three ligands showed fast metabolism. PMID:27128179

  2. Transmission Electron Microscope Measures Lattice Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, William T.

    1996-01-01

    Convergent-beam microdiffraction (CBM) in thermionic-emission transmission electron microscope (TEM) is technique for measuring lattice parameters of nanometer-sized specimens of crystalline materials. Lattice parameters determined by use of CBM accurate to within few parts in thousand. Technique developed especially for use in quantifying lattice parameters, and thus strains, in epitaxial mismatched-crystal-lattice multilayer structures in multiple-quantum-well and other advanced semiconductor electronic devices. Ability to determine strains in indivdual layers contributes to understanding of novel electronic behaviors of devices.

  3. Area of Lattice Polygons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Paul

    2006-01-01

    A lattice is a (rectangular) grid of points, usually pictured as occurring at the intersections of two orthogonal sets of parallel, equally spaced lines. Polygons that have lattice points as vertices are called lattice polygons. It is clear that lattice polygons come in various shapes and sizes. A very small lattice triangle may cover just 3…

  4. Lattice kinetic simulation of nonisothermal magnetohydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Dipankar; Amiroudine, Sakir

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, a lattice kinetic algorithm is presented to simulate nonisothermal magnetohydrodynamics in the low-Mach number incompressible limit. The flow and thermal fields are described by two separate distribution functions through respective scalar kinetic equations and the magnetic field is governed by a vector distribution function through a vector kinetic equation. The distribution functions are only coupled via the macroscopic density, momentum, magnetic field, and temperature computed at the lattice points. The novelty of the work is the computation of the thermal field in conjunction with the hydromagnetic fields in the lattice Boltzmann framework. A 9-bit two-dimensional (2D) lattice scheme is used for the numerical computation of the hydrodynamic and thermal fields, whereas the magnetic field is simulated in a 5-bit 2D lattice. Simulation of Hartmann flow in a channel provides excellent agreement with corresponding analytical results. PMID:20866540

  5. Mid-infrared laser emission from Cr:ZnS channel waveguide fabricated by femtosecond laser helical writing.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ya-Pei; Zou, Xiao; Bai, Zhengyuan; Leng, Yuxin; Jiang, Benxue; Jiang, Xiongwei; Zhang, Long

    2015-01-01

    The operation of a mid-infrared laser at 2244 nm in a Cr:ZnS polycrystalline channel waveguide fabricated using direct femtosecond laser writing with a helical movement technique is demonstrated. A maximum power output of 78 mW and an optical-to-optical slope efficiency of 8.6% are achieved. The compact waveguide structure with 2 mm length was obtained through direct femtosecond laser writing, which was moved on a helical trajectory along the laser medium axis and parallel to the writing direction. PMID:26692268

  6. Mid-infrared laser emission from Cr:ZnS channel waveguide fabricated by femtosecond laser helical writing

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ya-Pei; Zou, Xiao; Bai, Zhengyuan; Leng, Yuxin; Jiang, Benxue; Jiang, Xiongwei; Zhang, Long

    2015-01-01

    The operation of a mid-infrared laser at 2244 nm in a Cr:ZnS polycrystalline channel waveguide fabricated using direct femtosecond laser writing with a helical movement technique is demonstrated. A maximum power output of 78 mW and an optical-to-optical slope efficiency of 8.6% are achieved. The compact waveguide structure with 2 mm length was obtained through direct femtosecond laser writing, which was moved on a helical trajectory along the laser medium axis and parallel to the writing direction. PMID:26692268

  7. Nuclear Force from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, N.; Aoki, S.; Hatsuda, T.

    2007-07-13

    The nucleon-nucleon (NN) potential is studied by lattice QCD simulations in the quenched approximation, using the plaquette gauge action and the Wilson quark action on a 32{sup 4} [{approx_equal}(4.4 fm){sup 4}] lattice. A NN potential V{sub NN}(r) is defined from the equal-time Bethe-Salpeter amplitude with a local interpolating operator for the nucleon. By studying the NN interaction in the {sup 1}S{sub 0} and {sup 3}S{sub 1} channels, we show that the central part of V{sub NN}(r) has a strong repulsive core of a few hundred MeV at short distances (r < or approx. 0.5 fm) surrounded by an attractive well at medium and long distances. These features are consistent with the known phenomenological features of the nuclear force.

  8. Nuclear force from lattice QCD.

    PubMed

    Ishii, N; Aoki, S; Hatsuda, T

    2007-07-13

    The nucleon-nucleon (NN) potential is studied by lattice QCD simulations in the quenched approximation, using the plaquette gauge action and the Wilson quark action on a 32(4) [approximately (4.4 fm)(4)] lattice. A NN potential V(NN)(r) is defined from the equal-time Bethe-Salpeter amplitude with a local interpolating operator for the nucleon. By studying the NN interaction in the (1)S(0) and (3)S(1) channels, we show that the central part of V(NN)(r) has a strong repulsive core of a few hundred MeV at short distances (r approximately < 0.5 fm) surrounded by an attractive well at medium and long distances. These features are consistent with the known phenomenological features of the nuclear force. PMID:17678213

  9. A multivariate CAR model for mismatched lattices.

    PubMed

    Porter, Aaron T; Oleson, Jacob J

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we develop a multivariate Gaussian conditional autoregressive model for use on mismatched lattices. Most current multivariate CAR models are designed for each multivariate outcome to utilize the same lattice structure. In many applications, a change of basis will allow different lattices to be utilized, but this is not always the case, because a change of basis is not always desirable or even possible. Our multivariate CAR model allows each outcome to have a different neighborhood structure which can utilize different lattices for each structure. The model is applied in two real data analysis. The first is a Bayesian learning example in mapping the 2006 Iowa Mumps epidemic, which demonstrates the importance of utilizing multiple channels of infection flow in mapping infectious diseases. The second is a multivariate analysis of poverty levels and educational attainment in the American Community Survey. PMID:25457598

  10. Exotic damping ring lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    This paper looks at, and compares three types of damping ring lattices: conventional, wiggler lattice with finite ..cap alpha.., wiggler lattice with ..cap alpha.. = 0, and observes the attainable equilibrium emittances for the three cases assuming a constraint on the attainable longitudinal impedance of 0.2 ohms. The emittance obtained are roughly in the ratio 4:2:1 for these cases.

  11. Spin-(3/2) pentaquark resonance signature in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lasscock, B.G.; Leinweber, D.B.; Melnitchouk, W.; Thomas, A.W.; Williams, A.G.; Young, R.D.; Zanotti, J.M.

    2005-10-01

    The possible discovery of the {theta}{sup +} pentaquark has motivated a number of studies of its nature using lattice QCD. While all the analyses thus far have focused on spin-(1/2) states, here we report the results of the first exploratory study in quenched lattice QCD of pentaquarks with spin (3/2). For the spin-(3/2) interpolating field we use a product of the standard N and K* operators. We do not find any evidence for the standard lattice resonance signature of attraction (i.e., binding at quark masses near the physical regime) in the J{sup P}=(3/2){sup -} channel. Some evidence of binding is inferred in the isoscalar (3/2){sup +} channel at several quark masses, in accord with the standard lattice resonance signature. This suggests that this is a good candidate for the further study of pentaquarks on the lattice.

  12. Lattice location of deuterium in plasma and gas charged Mg doped GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Wampler, W.R.; Barbour, J.C.; Seager, C.H.; Myers, S.M. Jr.; Wright, A.F.; Han, J.

    1999-12-02

    The authors have used ion channeling to examine the lattice configuration of deuterium in Mg doped GaN grown by MOCVD. The deuterium is introduced both by exposure to deuterium gas and to ECR plasmas. A density functional approach including lattice relaxation, was used to calculate total energies for various locations and charge states of hydrogen in the wurtzite Mg doped GaN lattice. Computer simulations of channeling yields were used to compare results of channeling measurements with calculated yields for various predicted deuterium lattice configurations.

  13. Lattice calculation of nonleptonic charm decays

    SciTech Connect

    Simone, J.N.

    1991-11-01

    The decays of charmed mesons into two body nonleptonic final states are investigated. Weak interaction amplitudes of interest in these decays are extracted from lattice four-point correlation functions using a effective weak Hamiltonian including effects to order G{sub f} in the weak interactions yet containing effects to all orders in the strong interactions. The lattice calculation allows a quantitative examination of non-spectator processes in charm decays helping to elucidate the role of effects such as color coherence, final state interactions and the importance of the so called weak annihilation process. For D {yields} K{pi}, we find that the non-spectator weak annihilation diagram is not small, and we interpret this as evidence for large final state interactions. Moreover, there is indications of a resonance in the isospin {1/2} channel to which the weak annihilation process contributes exclusively. Findings from the lattice calculation are compared to results from the continuum vacuum saturation approximation and amplitudes are examined within the framework of the 1/N expansion. Factorization and the vacuum saturation approximation are tested for lattice amplitudes by comparing amplitudes extracted from lattice four-point functions with the same amplitude extracted from products of two-point and three-point lattice correlation functions arising out of factorization and vacuum saturation.

  14. Lattice invariants for knots

    SciTech Connect

    Janse Van Rensburg, E.J.

    1996-12-31

    The geometry of polygonal knots in the cubic lattice may be used to define some knot invariants. One such invariant is the minimal edge number, which is the minimum number of edges necessary (and sufficient) to construct a lattice knot of given type. In addition, one may also define the minimal (unfolded) surface number, and the minimal (unfolded) boundary number; these are the minimum number of 2-cells necessary to construct an unfolded lattice Seifert surface of a given knot type in the lattice, and the minimum number of edges necessary in a lattice knot to guarantee the existence of an unfolded lattice Seifert surface. In addition, I derive some relations amongst these invariants. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Micro-channel plate detector

    DOEpatents

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Lee, Seon W.; Wang, Hsien -Hau; Pellin, Michael J.; Byrum, Karen; Frisch, Henry J.

    2015-09-22

    A method and system for providing a micro-channel plate detector. An anodized aluminum oxide membrane is provided and includes a plurality of nanopores which have an Al coating and a thin layer of an emissive oxide material responsive to incident radiation, thereby providing a plurality of radiation sensitive channels for the micro-channel plate detector.

  16. Accurate measurements of thermal radiation from a tungsten photonic lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Seager, C.H.; Sinclair, M.B.; Fleming, J.G.

    2005-06-13

    Recently, photonic lattice structures have become available that are fabricated from refractory materials such as tungsten and thus stable in vacuo at high temperatures. Such structures can be tailored to exhibit optical properties that are not achievable with ordinary optical materials. In particular, photonic lattices can be designed to suppress thermal emission in undesired spectral regions, and can thereby enhance the overall energy efficiency of emission at useful wavelengths. We report measurements of the thermal emission spectra of tungsten photonic lattices in the wavelength range 3 to 24 {mu}m. Suppression of thermal emission at wavelengths longer than the photonic bandedge ({approx}6 {mu}m) is observed, along with significant emission at shorter wavelengths. We show that from 404 to 546 K the spectral emissivity E({lambda}) is temperature independent and approaches [1-R({lambda})], where R({lambda}) is the measured specular reflectance spectrum. These results are in accord with Kirchhoff's law.

  17. Lattice location and thermal stability of implanted Fe in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Rita, E.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J.G.; Alves, E.; Soares, J.C.

    2004-11-22

    The emission channeling technique was applied to evaluate the lattice location of implanted {sup 59}Fe in single-crystalline ZnO. The angular distribution of {beta}{sup -} particles emitted by {sup 59}Fe was monitored with a position-sensitive electron detector, following 60 keV low dose (2.0x10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}) room-temperature implantation of the precursor isotope {sup 59}Mn. The emission patterns around the [0001], [1102],[1101], and [2113] directions revealed that following annealing at 800 deg. C, 95(8)% of the Fe atoms occupy ideal substitutional Zn sites with rms displacements of 0.06-0.09 A.

  18. Sensitivity of Satellite-Based Skin Temperature to Different Surface Emissivity and NWP Reanalysis Sources Demonstrated Using a Single-Channel, Viewing-Angle-Corrected Retrieval Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarino, B. R.; Minnis, P.; Yost, C. R.; Chee, T.; Palikonda, R.

    2015-12-01

    Single-channel algorithms for satellite thermal-infrared- (TIR-) derived land and sea surface skin temperature (LST and SST) are advantageous in that they can be easily applied to a variety of satellite sensors. They can also accommodate decade-spanning instrument series, particularly for periods when split-window capabilities are not available. However, the benefit of one unified retrieval methodology for all sensors comes at the cost of critical sensitivity to surface emissivity (ɛs) and atmospheric transmittance estimation. It has been demonstrated that as little as 0.01 variance in ɛs can amount to more than a 0.5-K adjustment in retrieved LST values. Atmospheric transmittance requires calculations that employ vertical profiles of temperature and humidity from numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. Selection of a given NWP model can significantly affect LST and SST agreement relative to their respective validation sources. Thus, it is necessary to understand the accuracies of the retrievals for various NWP models to ensure the best LST/SST retrievals. The sensitivities of the single-channel retrievals to surface emittance and NWP profiles are investigated using NASA Langley historic land and ocean clear-sky skin temperature (Ts) values derived from high-resolution 11-μm TIR brightness temperature measured from geostationary satellites (GEOSat) and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR). It is shown that mean GEOSat-derived, anisotropy-corrected LST can vary by up to ±0.8 K depending on whether CERES or MODIS ɛs sources are used. Furthermore, the use of either NOAA Global Forecast System (GFS) or NASA Goddard Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) for the radiative transfer model initial atmospheric state can account for more than 0.5-K variation in mean Ts. The results are compared to measurements from the Surface Radiation Budget Network (SURFRAD), an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program ground

  19. Exploring Three Nucleon Forces in Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Takumi

    2011-10-21

    We study the three nucleon force in N{sub f} = 2 dynamical clover fermion lattice QCD, utilizing the Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter wave function of the three nucleon system. Since parity-odd two nucleon potentials are not available in lattice QCD at this moment, we develop a new formulation to extract the genuine three nucleon force which requires only the information of parity-even two nucleon potentials. In order to handle the extremely expensive calculation cost, we consider a specific three-dimensional coordinate configuration for the three nucleons. We find that the linear setup is advantageous, where nucleons are aligned linearly with equal spacings. The lattice calculation is performed with 16{sup 3}x32 configurations at {beta} = 1.95, m{sub {pi}} = 1.13 GeV generated by CP-PACS Collaboration, and the result of the three nucleon force in triton channel is presented.

  20. Supersymmetry on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergner, Georg; Catterall, Simon

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the motivations, difficulties and progress in the study of supersymmetric lattice gauge theories focusing in particular on 𝒩 = 1 and 𝒩 = 4 super-Yang-Mills in four dimensions. Brief reviews of the corresponding lattice formalisms are given and current results are presented and discussed. We conclude with a summary of the main aspects of current work and prospects for the future.

  1. Flat Band Quastiperiodic Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodyfelt, Joshua; Flach, Sergej; Danieli, Carlo

    2014-03-01

    Translationally invariant lattices with flat bands (FB) in their band structure possess irreducible compact localized flat band states, which can be understood through local rotation to a Fano structure. We present extension of these quasi-1D FB structures under incommensurate lattices, reporting on the FB effects to the Metal-Insulator Transition.

  2. Laterally closed lattice homomorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toumi, Mohamed Ali; Toumi, Nedra

    2006-12-01

    Let A and B be two Archimedean vector lattices and let be a lattice homomorphism. We call that T is laterally closed if T(D) is a maximal orthogonal system in the band generated by T(A) in B, for each maximal orthogonal system D of A. In this paper we prove that any laterally closed lattice homomorphism T of an Archimedean vector lattice A with universal completion Au into a universally complete vector lattice B can be extended to a lattice homomorphism of Au into B, which is an improvement of a result of M. Duhoux and M. Meyer [M. Duhoux and M. Meyer, Extended orthomorphisms and lateral completion of Archimedean Riesz spaces, Ann. Soc. Sci. Bruxelles 98 (1984) 3-18], who established it for the order continuous lattice homomorphism case. Moreover, if in addition Au and B are with point separating order duals (Au)' and B' respectively, then the laterally closedness property becomes a necessary and sufficient condition for any lattice homomorphism to have a similar extension to the whole Au. As an application, we give a new representation theorem for laterally closed d-algebras from which we infer the existence of d-algebra multiplications on the universal completions of d-algebras.

  3. Continuous partition lattice

    PubMed Central

    Björner, Anders

    1987-01-01

    A continuous analogue to the partition lattices is presented. This is the metric completion of the direct limit of a system of embeddings of the finite partition lattices. The construction is analogous to von Neumann's construction of a continuous geometry over a field F from the finite-dimensional projective geometries over F. PMID:16593874

  4. Honeycomb lattices with defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Meryl A.; Ziff, Robert M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce a variant of the honeycomb lattice in which we create defects by randomly exchanging adjacent bonds, producing a random tiling with a distribution of polygon edges. We study the percolation properties on these lattices as a function of the number of exchanged bonds using an alternative computational method. We find the site and bond percolation thresholds are consistent with other three-coordinated lattices with the same standard deviation in the degree distribution of the dual; here we can produce a continuum of lattices with a range of standard deviations in the distribution. These lattices should be useful for modeling other properties of random systems as well as percolation.

  5. Scalar meson spectroscopy with lattice staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; DeTar, Carleton; Fu Ziwen; Prelovsek, Sasa

    2007-11-01

    With sufficiently light up and down quarks the isovector (a{sub 0}) and isosinglet (f{sub 0}) scalar meson propagators are dominated at large distance by two-meson states. In the staggered-fermion formulation of lattice quantum chromodynamics, taste-symmetry breaking causes a proliferation of two-meson states that further complicates the analysis of these channels. Many of them are unphysical artifacts of the lattice approximation. They are expected to disappear in the continuum limit. The staggered-fermion fourth-root procedure has its purported counterpart in rooted staggered chiral perturbation theory (rS{chi}PT). Fortunately, the rooted theory provides a strict framework that permits the analysis of scalar meson correlators in terms of only a small number of low-energy couplings. Thus the analysis of the point-to-point scalar meson correlators in this context gives a useful consistency check of the fourth-root procedure and its proposed chiral realization. Through numerical simulation we have measured correlators for both the a{sub 0} and f{sub 0} channels in the 'Asqtad' improved staggered-fermion formulation in a lattice ensemble with lattice spacing a=0.12 fm. We analyze those correlators in the context of rS{chi}PT and obtain values of the low-energy chiral couplings that are reasonably consistent with previous determinations.

  6. BB Potentials in Quenched Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold; Kostas Orginos; Martin J. Savage

    2007-12-01

    The potentials between two B-mesons are computed in the heavy-quark limit using quenched lattice QCD at $m_\\pi\\sim 400~{\\rm MeV}$. Non-zero central potentials are clearly evident in all four spin-isospin channels, (I,s_l) = (0,0) , (0,1) , (1,0) , (1,1), where s_l is the total spin of the light degrees of freedom. At short distance, we find repulsion in the $I\

  7. Lattice effect in solid state internal conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Kalman, Peter; Keszthelyi, Tamas

    2009-03-15

    The effect of the crystal lattice on nuclear fusion reactions p+d{yields}{sup 3}He taking place in internal conversion channels is studied. Fusionable particles solved in the investigated crystalline material form a sublattice. Fusion reaction is generated by a flux of incoming fusionable particles. The calculated cross sections are compared with those of an ordinary fusion reaction. The internal conversion coefficients are also calculated.

  8. Ultracold nonreactive molecules in an optical lattice: connecting chemistry to many-body physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Rick; Ewart, Kevin; Alam, Shah; Wall, Michael; Doçaj, Andris; Hazzard, Kaden

    2016-05-01

    We derive effective lattice models for ultracold bosonic or fermionic nonreactive molecules (NRMs) in an optical lattice. In stark contrast to the standard Hubbard model, which is commonly assumed to accurately describe NRMs, we find that the single on-site interaction parameter U is replaced by a multi-channel interaction. The complex, multi-channel collisional physics is unrelated to dipolar interactions, and so occurs even in the absence of an electric field or for homonuclear molecules. We find a crossover between coherent few-channel models and fully incoherent single-channel models as the lattice depth is increased. We devise ways to control the effective model parameters using external fields and lattice anisotropy. We show that these parameters can be determined in lattice modulation experiments, which measure molecular collision dynamics with a vastly sharper energy resolution than experiments in an ultracold gas. We will report our progress calculating this novel model's ground state phase diagram.

  9. A realistic lattice example

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Garren, A.A.

    1985-10-01

    A realistic, distributed interaction region (IR) lattice has been designed that includes new components discussed in the June 1985 lattice workshop. Unlike the test lattices, the lattice presented here includes utility straights and the mechanism for crossing the beams in the experimental straights. Moreover, both the phase trombones and the dispersion suppressors contain the same bending as the normal cells. Vertically separated beams and 6 Tesla, 1-in-1 magnets are assumed. Since the cells are 200 meters long, and have 60 degree phase advance, this lattice has been named RLD1, in analogy with the corresponding test lattice, TLD1. The quadrupole gradient is 136 tesla/meter in the cells, and has similar values in other quadrupoles except in those in the IR`s, where the maximum gradient is 245 tesla/meter. RLD1 has distributed IR`s; however, clustered realistic lattices can easily be assembled from the same components, as was recently done in a version that utilizes the same type of experimental and utility straights as those of RLD1.

  10. Influence of n{sup +} and p{sup +} doping on the lattice sites of implanted Fe in Si

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, D. J.; Araújo, J. P.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.

    2013-09-14

    We report on the lattice location of implanted {sup 59}Fe in n{sup +}- and p{sup +}-type Si by means of emission channeling. We found clear evidence that the preferred lattice location of Fe changes with the doping of the material. While in n{sup +}-type Si Fe prefers displaced bond-centered (BC) sites for annealing temperatures up to 600 °C, changing to ideal substitutional sites above 700 °C, in p{sup +}-type Si, Fe prefers to be in displaced tetrahedral interstitial positions after all annealing steps. The dominant lattice sites of Fe in n{sup +}-type Si therefore seem to be well characterized for all annealing temperatures by the incorporation of Fe into vacancy-related complexes, either into single vacancies which leads to Fe on ideal substitutional sites, or multiple vacancies, which leads to its incorporation near BC sites. In contrast, in p{sup +}-type Si, the major fraction of Fe is clearly interstitial (near-T or ideal T) for all annealing temperatures. The formation and possible lattice sites of Fe in FeB pairs in p{sup +}-Si are discussed. We also address the relevance of our findings for the understanding of the gettering effects caused by radiation damage or P-diffusion, the latter involving n{sup +}-doped regions.

  11. Architecture and Function of Mechanosensitive Membrane Protein Lattices

    PubMed Central

    Kahraman, Osman; Koch, Peter D.; Klug, William S.; Haselwandter, Christoph A.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments have revealed that membrane proteins can form two-dimensional clusters with regular translational and orientational protein arrangements, which may allow cells to modulate protein function. However, the physical mechanisms yielding supramolecular organization and collective function of membrane proteins remain largely unknown. Here we show that bilayer-mediated elastic interactions between membrane proteins can yield regular and distinctive lattice architectures of protein clusters, and may provide a link between lattice architecture and lattice function. Using the mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) as a model system, we obtain relations between the shape of MscL and the supramolecular architecture of MscL lattices. We predict that the tetrameric and pentameric MscL symmetries observed in previous structural studies yield distinct lattice architectures of MscL clusters and that, in turn, these distinct MscL lattice architectures yield distinct lattice activation barriers. Our results suggest general physical mechanisms linking protein symmetry, the lattice architecture of membrane protein clusters, and the collective function of membrane protein lattices. PMID:26771082

  12. Shaken lattice interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, Carrie; Yu, Hoon; Anderson, Dana

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we report on progress towards performing interferometry using atoms trapped in an optical lattice. That is, we start with atoms in the ground state of an optical lattice potential V(x) =V0cos [ 2 kx + ϕ(t) ] , and by a prescribed phase function ϕ(t) , transform from one atomic wavefunction to another. In this way, we implement the standard interferometric sequence of beam splitting, propagation, reflection, reverse propagation, and recombination. Through the use of optimal control techniques, we have computationally demonstrated a scalable accelerometer that provides information on the sign of the applied acceleration. Extension of this idea to a two-dimensional shaken-lattice-based gyroscope is discussed. In addition, we report on the experimental implementation of the shaken lattice system.

  13. SPIN ON THE LATTICE.

    SciTech Connect

    ORGINOS,K.

    2003-01-07

    I review the current status of hadronic structure computations on the lattice. I describe the basic lattice techniques and difficulties and present some of the latest lattice results; in particular recent results of the RBC group using domain wall fermions are also discussed. In conclusion, lattice computations can play an important role in understanding the hadronic structure and the fundamental properties of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). Although some difficulties still exist, several significant steps have been made. Advances in computer technology are expected to play a significant role in pushing these computations closer to the chiral limit and in including dynamical fermions. RBC has already begun preliminary dynamical domain wall fermion computations [49] which we expect to be pushed forward with the arrival of QCD0C. In the near future, we also expect to complete the non-perturbative renormalization of the relevant derivative operators in quenched QCD.

  14. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kantzos, P. T.; Krause, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Initial investigations of investment cast superalloy lattice block suggest that this technology will yield a low cost approach to utilize the high temperature strength and environmental resistance of superalloys in lightweight, damage tolerant structural configurations. Work to date has demonstrated that relatively large superalloy lattice block panels can be successfully investment cast from both IN-718 and Mar-M247. These castings exhibited mechanical properties consistent with the strength of the same superalloys measured from more conventional castings. The lattice block structure also accommodates significant deformation without failure, and is defect tolerant in fatigue. The potential of lattice block structures opens new opportunities for the use of superalloys in future generations of aircraft applications that demand strength and environmental resistance at elevated temperatures along with low weight.

  15. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  16. Legless locomotion in lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Perrin; Dai, Jin; Gong, Chaohui; Serrano, Miguel M.; Mendelson, Joseph R., III; Choset, Howie; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2015-03-01

    By propagating waves from head to tail, limbless organisms like snakes can traverse terrain composed of rocks, foliage, soil and sand. Previous research elucidated how rigid obstacles influence snake locomotion by studying a model terrain-symmetric lattices of pegs placed in hard ground. We want to understand how different substrate-body interaction modes affect performance in desert-adapted snakes during transit of substrates composed of both rigid obstacles and granular media (GM). We tested Chionactis occipitalis, the Mojave shovel-nosed snake, in two laboratory treatments: lattices of 0 . 64 cm diameter obstacles arrayed on both a hard, slick substrate and in a GM of ~ 0 . 3 mm diameter glass particles. For all lattice spacings, d, speed through the hard ground lattices was less than that in GM lattices. However, maximal undulation efficiencies ηu (number of body lengths advanced per undulation cycle) in both treatments were comparable when d was intermediate. For other d, ηu was lower than this maximum in hard ground lattices, while on GM, ηu was insensitive to d. To systematically explore such locomotion, we tested a physical robot model of the snake; performance depended sensitively on base substrate, d and body wave parameters.

  17. Hyperon-Nulceon Scattering from Fully-Dynamical Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Silas Beane; Paulo Bedaque; Thomas Luu; Konstantinos Orginos; Elizabetta Pallante; Assumpta Parreno; Martin Savage

    2007-10-01

    We present results of the first fully-dynamical lattice QCD determination of hyperon-nucleon scattering. One s-wave phase shift was determined for n{Lambda} scattering in both spin-channels at pion masses of 350, 490, and 590 MeV, and for n{Sigma}^- scattering in both spin channels at pion masses of 490, and 590 MeV. The calculations were performed with domain-wall valence quarks on dynamical, staggered gauge configurations with a lattice spacing of b ~0.125 fm.

  18. Realization of non-linear coherent states by photonic lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Dehdashti, Shahram Li, Rujiang; Chen, Hongsheng; Liu, Jiarui Yu, Faxin

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, first, by introducing Holstein-Primakoff representation of α-deformed algebra, we achieve the associated non-linear coherent states, including su(2) and su(1, 1) coherent states. Second, by using waveguide lattices with specific coupling coefficients between neighbouring channels, we generate these non-linear coherent states. In the case of positive values of α, we indicate that the Hilbert size space is finite; therefore, we construct this coherent state with finite channels of waveguide lattices. Finally, we study the field distribution behaviours of these coherent states, by using Mandel Q parameter.

  19. A lattice-Boltzmann scheme of the Navier-Stokes equations on a 3D cuboid lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Haoda; Peng, Cheng; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2015-11-01

    The standard lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) for fluid flow simulation is based on a square (in 2D) or cubic (in 3D) lattice grids. Recently, two new lattice Boltzmann schemes have been developed on a 2D rectangular grid using the MRT (multiple-relaxation-time) collision model, by adding a free parameter in the definition of moments or by extending the equilibrium moments. Here we developed a lattice Boltzmann model on 3D cuboid lattice, namely, a lattice grid with different grid lengths in different spatial directions. We designed our MRT-LBM model by matching the moment equations from the Chapman-Enskog expansion with the Navier-Stokes equations. The model guarantees correct hydrodynamics. A second-order term is added to the equilibrium moments in order to restore the isotropy of viscosity on a cuboid lattice. The form and the coefficients of the extended equilibrium moments are determined through an inverse design process. An additional benefit of the model is that the viscosity can be adjusted independent of the stress-moment relaxation parameter, thus improving the numerical stability of the model. The resulting cuboid MRT-LBM model is then validated through benchmark simulations using laminar channel flow, turbulent channel flow, and the 3D Taylor-Green vortex flow.

  20. RFI channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceliece, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A class of channel models is presented which exhibit varying burst error severity much like channels encountered in practice. An information-theoretic analysis of these channel models is made, and conclusions are drawn that may aid in the design of coded communication systems for realistic noisy channels.

  1. Dechanneling of Positrons in Disordered Lattices Effect of Anharmonic Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Assy, M. K.; El-Ashry, M. Y.; Mohamed, A. A.

    2005-01-01

    Dechanneling of positrons due to lattice disorder has been investigated for two stable configurations of the disordered face-centered cubic(fcc) lattices, Dumb-bell configuration (DBC) and Body-centered interstitial (BCI) for channeled positrons with incident energy (10 200) MeV in Cu single crystal in the planar direction (100). The effects of anharmonic terms in the channeling potential have been considered in the calculations. The calculations covered the transition-channeling probability, dechanneling probability, transmission and dechanneling coefficients. It has been found that the transition-channeling probability from the normal into the disordered region occurs only for the transitions n (normal) → n (disordered). Also the dependence of the transmission and dechanneling coefficients on the incident beam position has been studied by using a planar potential function based on shell structure model and compared with the results of a planar potential based on Lindhard's model.

  2. Taylor line swimming in microchannels and cubic lattices of obstacles.

    PubMed

    Münch, Jan L; Alizadehrad, Davod; Babu, Sujin B; Stark, Holger

    2016-09-21

    Microorganisms naturally move in microstructured fluids. Using the simulation method of multi-particle collision dynamics, we study in two dimensions an undulatory Taylor line swimming in a microchannel and in a cubic lattice of obstacles, which represent simple forms of a microstructured environment. In the microchannel the Taylor line swims at an acute angle along a channel wall with a clearly enhanced swimming speed due to hydrodynamic interactions with the bounding wall. While in a dilute obstacle lattice swimming speed is also enhanced, a dense obstacle lattice gives rise to geometric swimming. This new type of swimming is characterized by a drastically increased swimming speed. Since the Taylor line has to fit into the free space of the obstacle lattice, the swimming speed is close to the phase velocity of the bending wave traveling along the Taylor line. While adjusting its swimming motion within the lattice, the Taylor line chooses a specific swimming direction, which we classify by a lattice vector. When plotting the swimming velocity versus the magnitude of the lattice vector, all our data collapse on a single master curve. Finally, we also report more complex trajectories within the obstacle lattice. PMID:27510576

  3. Measuring on Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, Kevin H.

    2009-12-01

    Previous derivations of the sum and product rules of probability theory relied on the algebraic properties of Boolean logic. Here they are derived within a more general framework based on lattice theory. The result is a new foundation of probability theory that encompasses and generalizes both the Cox and Kolmogorov formulations. In this picture probability is a bi-valuation defined on a lattice of statements that quantifies the degree to which one statement implies another. The sum rule is a constraint equation that ensures that valuations are assigned so as to not violate associativity of the lattice join and meet. The product rule is much more interesting in that there are actually two product rules: one is a constraint equation arises from associativity of the direct products of lattices, and the other a constraint equation derived from associativity of changes of context. The generality of this formalism enables one to derive the traditionally assumed condition of additivity in measure theory, as well introduce a general notion of product. To illustrate the generic utility of this novel lattice-theoretic foundation of measure, the sum and product rules are applied to number theory. Further application of these concepts to understand the foundation of quantum mechanics is described in a joint paper in this proceedings.

  4. Lattice Boltzmann Stokesian dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ding, E J

    2015-11-01

    Lattice Boltzmann Stokesian dynamics (LBSD) is presented for simulation of particle suspension in Stokes flows. This method is developed from Stokesian dynamics (SD) with resistance and mobility matrices calculated using the time-independent lattice Boltzmann algorithm (TILBA). TILBA is distinguished from the traditional lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) in that a background matrix is generated prior to the calculation. The background matrix, once generated, can be reused for calculations for different scenarios, thus the computational cost for each such subsequent calculation is significantly reduced. The LBSD inherits the merits of the SD where both near- and far-field interactions are considered. It also inherits the merits of the LBM that the computational cost is almost independent of the particle shape. PMID:26651812

  5. Latticed pentamode acoustic cloak

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Liu, Xiaoning; Hu, Gengkai

    2015-01-01

    We report in this work a practical design of pentamode acoustic cloak with microstructure. The proposed cloak is assembled by pentamode lattice made of a single-phase solid material. The function of rerouting acoustic wave round an obstacle has been demonstrated numerically. It is also revealed that shear related resonance due to weak shear resistance in practical pentamode lattices punctures broadband feature predicted based on ideal pentamode cloak. As a consequence, the latticed pentamode cloak can only conceal the obstacle in segmented frequency ranges. We have also shown that the shear resonance can be largely reduced by introducing material damping, and an improved broadband performance can be achieved. These works pave the way for experimental demonstration of pentamode acoustic cloak. PMID:26503821

  6. Lattice Boltzmann Stokesian dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, E. J.

    2015-11-01

    Lattice Boltzmann Stokesian dynamics (LBSD) is presented for simulation of particle suspension in Stokes flows. This method is developed from Stokesian dynamics (SD) with resistance and mobility matrices calculated using the time-independent lattice Boltzmann algorithm (TILBA). TILBA is distinguished from the traditional lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) in that a background matrix is generated prior to the calculation. The background matrix, once generated, can be reused for calculations for different scenarios, thus the computational cost for each such subsequent calculation is significantly reduced. The LBSD inherits the merits of the SD where both near- and far-field interactions are considered. It also inherits the merits of the LBM that the computational cost is almost independent of the particle shape.

  7. Exact Lattice Supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Catterall, Simon; Kaplan, David B.; Unsal, Mithat

    2009-03-31

    We provide an introduction to recent lattice formulations of supersymmetric theories which are invariant under one or more real supersymmetries at nonzero lattice spacing. These include the especially interesting case of N = 4 SYM in four dimensions. We discuss approaches based both on twisted supersymmetry and orbifold-deconstruction techniques and show their equivalence in the case of gauge theories. The presence of an exact supersymmetry reduces and in some cases eliminates the need for fine tuning to achieve a continuum limit invariant under the full supersymmetry of the target theory. We discuss open problems.

  8. Precise lattice location of substitutional and interstitial Mg in AlN

    SciTech Connect

    Amorim, L. M.; Pereira, L. M. C.; Decoster, S.; Temst, K.; Vantomme, A.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.; Silva, D. J.; Silva, M. R. da; Gottberg, A.

    2013-12-23

    The lattice site location of radioactive {sup 27}Mg implanted in AlN was determined by means of emission channeling. The majority of the {sup 27}Mg was found to substitute for Al, yet significant fractions (up to 33%) were also identified close to the octahedral interstitial site. The activation energy for interstitial Mg diffusion is estimated to be between 1.1 eV and 1.7 eV. Substitutional Mg is shown to occupy ideal Al sites within a 0.1 Å experimental uncertainty. We discuss the absence of significant displacements from ideal Al sites, in the context of the current debate, on Mg doped nitride semiconductors.

  9. Low lattice thermal conductivity of stanene

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Bo; Zhang, Hao; Shao, Hezhu; Xu, Yuchen; Zhang, Xiangchao; Zhu, Heyuan

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental understanding of phonon transport in stanene is crucial to predict the thermal performance in potential stanene-based devices. By combining first-principle calculation and phonon Boltzmann transport equation, we obtain the lattice thermal conductivity of stanene. A much lower thermal conductivity (11.6 W/mK) is observed in stanene, which indicates higher thermoelectric efficiency over other 2D materials. The contributions of acoustic and optical phonons to the lattice thermal conductivity are evaluated. Detailed analysis of phase space for three-phonon processes shows that phonon scattering channels LA + LA/TA/ZA ↔ TA/ZA are restricted, leading to the dominant contributions of high-group-velocity LA phonons to the thermal conductivity. The size dependence of thermal conductivity is investigated as well for the purpose of the design of thermoelectric nanostructures. PMID:26838731

  10. Low lattice thermal conductivity of stanene.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Zhang, Hao; Shao, Hezhu; Xu, Yuchen; Zhang, Xiangchao; Zhu, Heyuan

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental understanding of phonon transport in stanene is crucial to predict the thermal performance in potential stanene-based devices. By combining first-principle calculation and phonon Boltzmann transport equation, we obtain the lattice thermal conductivity of stanene. A much lower thermal conductivity (11.6 W/mK) is observed in stanene, which indicates higher thermoelectric efficiency over other 2D materials. The contributions of acoustic and optical phonons to the lattice thermal conductivity are evaluated. Detailed analysis of phase space for three-phonon processes shows that phonon scattering channels LA + LA/TA/ZA ↔ TA/ZA are restricted, leading to the dominant contributions of high-group-velocity LA phonons to the thermal conductivity. The size dependence of thermal conductivity is investigated as well for the purpose of the design of thermoelectric nanostructures. PMID:26838731

  11. Fibonacci Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kevin; Geiger, Zachary; Senaratne, Ruwan; Rajagopal, Shankari; Fujiwara, Kurt; Weld, David; Weld Group Team

    2015-05-01

    Quasiperiodicity is intimately involved in quantum phenomena from localization to the quantum Hall effect. Recent experimental investigation of quasiperiodic quantum effects in photonic and electronic systems have revealed intriguing connections to topological phenomena. However, such experiments have been limited by the absence of techniques for creating tunable quasiperiodic structures. We propose a new type of quasiperiodic optical lattice, constructed by intersecting a Gaussian beam with a 2D square lattice at an angle with an irrational tangent. The resulting potential, a generalization of the Fibonacci lattice, is a physical realization of the mathematical ``cut-and-project'' construction which underlies all quasiperiodic structures. Calculation of the energies and wavefunctions of atoms loaded into the proposed quasiperiodic lattice demonstrate a fractal energy spectrum and the existence of edge states. We acknowledge support from the ONR (award N00014-14-1-0805), the ARO and the PECASE program (award W911NF-14-1-0154), the AFOSR (award FA9550-12-1-0305), and the Alfred P. Sloan foundation (grant BR2013-110).

  12. Progress in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2002-09-30

    After reviewing some of the mathematical foundations and numerical difficulties facing lattice QCD, I review the status of several calculations relevant to experimental high-energy physics. The topics considered are moments of structure functions, which may prove relevant to search for new phenomena at the LHC, and several aspects of flavor physics, which are relevant to understanding CP and flavor violation.

  13. Random lattice superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Haidong; Siegel, Warren

    2006-08-15

    We propose some new simplifying ingredients for Feynman diagrams that seem necessary for random lattice formulations of superstrings. In particular, half the fermionic variables appear only in particle loops (similarly to loop momenta), reducing the supersymmetry of the constituents of the type IIB superstring to N=1, as expected from their interpretation in the 1/N expansion as super Yang-Mills.

  14. Convex Lattice Polygons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Paul

    2006-01-01

    A "convex" polygon is one with no re-entrant angles. Alternatively one can use the standard convexity definition, asserting that for any two points of the convex polygon, the line segment joining them is contained completely within the polygon. In this article, the author provides a solution to a problem involving convex lattice polygons.

  15. Supersymmetry on the Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaich, David

    2016-03-01

    Lattice field theory provides a non-perturbative regularization of strongly interacting systems, which has proven crucial to the study of quantum chromodynamics among many other theories. Supersymmetry plays prominent roles in the study of physics beyond the standard model, both as an ingredient in model building and as a tool to improve our understanding of quantum field theory. Attempts to apply lattice techniques to supersymmetric field theories have a long history, but until recently these efforts have generally encountered insurmountable difficulties related to the interplay of supersymmetry with the lattice discretization of spacetime. In recent years these difficulties have been overcome for a class of theories that includes the particularly interesting case of maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills (N = 4 SYM) in four dimensions, which is a cornerstone of AdS/CFT duality. In combination with computational advances this progress enables practical numerical investigations of N = 4 SYM on the lattice, which can address questions that are difficult or impossible to handle through perturbation theory, AdS/CFT duality, or the conformal bootstrap program. I will briefly review some of the new ideas underlying this recent progress, and present some results from ongoing large-scale numerical calculations, including comparisons with analytic predictions.

  16. Shaken Lattice Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, Carrie; Yu, Hoon; Anderson, Dana

    2015-05-01

    This work introduces a method to perform interferometry using atoms trapped in an optical lattice. Starting at t = 0 with atoms in the ground state of a lattice potential V(x) =V0cos [ 2 kx + ϕ(t) ] , we show that it is possible to transform from one atomic wavefunction to another by a prescribed shaking of the lattice, i.e., by an appropriately tailored time-dependent phase shift ϕ(t) . In particular, the standard interferometer sequence of beam splitting, propagation, reflection, reverse propagation, and recombination can be achieved via a set of phase modulation operations {ϕj(t) } . Each ϕj(t) is determined using a learning algorithm, and the split-step method calculates the wavefunction dynamics. We have numerically demonstrated an interferometer in which the shaken wavefunctions match the target states to better than 1 % . We carried out learning using a genetic algorithm and optimal control techniques. The atoms remain trapped in the lattice throughout the full interferometer sequence. Thus, the approach may be suitable for use in an dynamic environment. In addition to the general principles, we discuss aspects of the experimental implementation. Supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and Northrop Grumman.

  17. Synthesis, structure activity relationship, radiolabeling and preclinical evaluation of high affinity ligands for the ion channel of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor as potential imaging probes for positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Klein, Pieter J; Christiaans, Johannes A M; Metaxas, Athanasios; Schuit, Robert C; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; van Berckel, Bart N M; Windhorst, Albert D

    2015-03-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) is involved in many neurological and psychiatric disorders including Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Currently, it is not possible to assess NMDAr availability in vivo. The purpose of this study was to develop a positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for the NMDAr ion channel. A series of di- and tri-N-substituted diarylguanidines was synthesized. In addition, in vitro binding affinity for the NMDAr ion channel in rat forebrain membrane fractions was assessed. Compounds 10, 11 and 32 were radiolabeled with either carbon-11 or fluorine-18. Ligands [(11)C]10 and [(18)F]32 were evaluated ex vivo in B6C3 mice. Biodistribution studies showed higher uptake of [(11)C]10 and [(18)F]32 in forebrain regions compared with cerebellum. In addition, for [(11)C]10 54% and for [(18)F]32 70% of activity in the brain at 60min was due to intact tracer. Pre-treatment with MK-801 (0.6mg·kg(-1), ip) slightly decreased uptake in NMDAr-specific regions for [(18)F]32, but not for [(11)C]10. As such [(18)F]32 has the best characteristics as a PET tracer for the ion channel of the NMDAr. PMID:25648682

  18. Glueball Spectrum and Matrix Elements on Anisotropic Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Chen; A. Alexandru; S.J. Dong; T. Draper; I. Horvath; F.X. Lee; K.F. Liu; N. Mathur; C. Morningstar; M. Peardon; S. Tamhankar; B.L. Young; J.B. Zhang

    2006-01-01

    The glueball-to-vacuum matrix elements of local gluonic operators in scalar, tensor, and pseudoscalar channels are investigated numerically on several anisotropic lattices with the spatial lattice spacing ranging from 0.1fm - 0.2fm. These matrix elements are needed to predict the glueball branching ratios in J/{psi} radiative decays which will help identify the glueball states in experiments. Two types of improved local gluonic operators are constructed for a self-consistent check and the finite volume effects are studied. We find that lattice spacing dependence of our results is very weak and the continuum limits are reliably extrapolated, as a result of improvement of the lattice gauge action and local operators. We also give updated glueball masses with various quantum numbers.

  19. TRP Channels

    PubMed Central

    Venkatachalam, Kartik; Montell, Craig

    2011-01-01

    The TRP (Transient Receptor Potential) superfamily of cation channels is remarkable in that it displays greater diversity in activation mechanisms and selectivities than any other group of ion channels. The domain organizations of some TRP proteins are also unusual, as they consist of linked channel and enzyme domains. A unifying theme in this group is that TRP proteins play critical roles in sensory physiology, which include contributions to vision, taste, olfaction, hearing, touch, and thermo- and osmosensation. In addition, TRP channels enable individual cells to sense changes in their local environment. Many TRP channels are activated by a variety of different stimuli and function as signal integrators. The TRP superfamily is divided into seven subfamilies: the five group 1 TRPs (TRPC, TRPV, TRPM, TRPN, and TRPA) and two group 2 subfamilies (TRPP and TRPML). TRP channels are important for human health as mutations in at least four TRP channels underlie disease. PMID:17579562

  20. Achromatic Cooling Channel with Li Lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Balbekov, V.

    2002-04-29

    A linear cooling channel with Li lenses, solenoids, and 201 MHz RF cavities is considered. A special lattice design is used to minimize chromatic aberrations by suppression of several betatron resonances. Transverse emittance of muon beam decreases from 2 mm to 0.5 mm at the channel of about 110 m length. Longitudinal heating is modest, therefore transmission of the channel is rather high: 96% without decay and 90% with decay. Minimal beam emittance achievable by similar channel estimated as about 0.25 mm at surface field of Li lenses 10 T.

  1. Channeled and microactiviation of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Maggiore, C.J.; Blacic, J.D.; Blondiaux, G.; Debrun, J.L.; Ali, M.H.; Mathez, E.; Misdaq, M.A.; Valladon, M.

    1988-01-01

    Charged particle activation analysis can be combined with channeling to determine lattice location of impurities at the trace level in single crystal samples. It can also be used with a nuclear microprobe to measure impurities at trace levels in small or spatially inhomogeneous samples. Examples of these extensions of activation analysis to realistic samples are carbon determination in organometallic vapor phase epitaxial layers of GaAlAs on GaAs and oxygen determination in diamonds. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Statistics of lattice animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping; Nadler, Walder; Grassberger, Peter

    2005-07-01

    The scaling behavior of randomly branched polymers in a good solvent is studied in two to nine dimensions, modeled by lattice animals on simple hypercubic lattices. For the simulations, we use a biased sequential sampling algorithm with re-sampling, similar to the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method (PERM) used extensively for linear polymers. We obtain high statistics of animals with up to several thousand sites in all dimension 2⩽d⩽9. The partition sum (number of different animals) and gyration radii are estimated. In all dimensions we verify the Parisi-Sourlas prediction, and we verify all exactly known critical exponents in dimensions 2, 3, 4, and ⩾8. In addition, we present the hitherto most precise estimates for growth constants in d⩾3. For clusters with one site attached to an attractive surface, we verify the superuniversality of the cross-over exponent at the adsorption transition predicted by Janssen and Lyssy.

  3. Lattice Boltzmann morphodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian Guo

    2014-08-01

    Morphological change due to sediment transport is a common natural phenomenon in real flows. It involves complex processes of erosion and deposition such as those along beaches and in river beds, imposing a strong strain on human beings. Studying and understanding morphodynamic evolution are essential to protect living environment. Although there are conventional numerical methods like finite difference method and finite volume method for forecast of morphological change by solving flow and morphodynamic equations, the methods are too complex/inefficient to be applied to a real large scale problem. To overcome this, a lattice Boltzmann method is developed to simulate morphological evolution under flows. It provides an alternative way of studying morphodynamics at the full advantages of the lattice Boltzmann methodology. The model is verified by applications to the evolution of one and two dimensional sand dunes under shallow water flows.

  4. Introduction to lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.

    1998-12-31

    The goal of the lectures on lattice QCD (LQCD) is to provide an overview of both the technical issues and the progress made so far in obtaining phenomenologically useful numbers. The lectures consist of three parts. The author`s charter is to provide an introduction to LQCD and outline the scope of LQCD calculations. In the second set of lectures, Guido Martinelli will discuss the progress they have made so far in obtaining results, and their impact on Standard Model phenomenology. Finally, Martin Luescher will discuss the topical subjects of chiral symmetry, improved formulation of lattice QCD, and the impact these improvements will have on the quality of results expected from the next generation of simulations.

  5. Predictions from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Kronfeld, A.S.; Allison, I.F.; Aubin, C.; Bernard, C.; Davies, C.T.H.; DeTar, C.; Di Pierro, M.; Freeland, E.D.; Gottlieb, Steven; Gray, A.; Gregor, E.; Heller, U.M.; Hetrick, J.E.; El-Khadra, Aida X.; Levkova, L.; Mackenzie, P.B.; Maresca, F.; Menscher, D.; Nobes, M.; Okamoto, M.; Oktay, M.B.; /Fermilab /Glasgow U. /Columbia U. /Washington U., St. Louis /Utah U. /DePaul U. /Art Inst. of Chicago /Indiana U. /Ohio State U. /Arizona U. /APS, New York /U. Pacific, Stockton /Illinois U., Urbana /Cornell U., LEPP /Simon Fraser U. /UC, Santa Barbara

    2005-09-01

    In the past year, we calculated with lattice QCD three quantities that were unknown or poorly known. They are the q{sup 2} dependence of the form factor in semileptonic D {yields} K/{nu} decay, the decay constant of the D meson, and the mass of the B{sub c} meson. In this talk, we summarize these calculations, with emphasis on their (subsequent) confirmation by experiments.

  6. Multipole plasmonic lattice solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Kou Yao; Ye Fangwei; Chen Xianfeng

    2011-09-15

    We theoretically demonstrate a variety of multipole plasmonic lattice solitons, including dipoles, quadrupoles, and necklaces, in two-dimensional metallic nanowire arrays with Kerr-type nonlinearities. Such solitons feature complex internal structures with an ultracompact mode size approaching or smaller than one wavelength. Their mode sizes and the stability characteristics are studied in detail within the framework of coupled mode theory. The conditions to form and stabilize these highly confined solitons are within the experimentally achievable range.

  7. Nucleon Structure from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    David Richards

    2007-09-05

    Recent advances in lattice field theory, in computer technology and in chiral perturbation theory have enabled lattice QCD to emerge as a powerful quantitative tool in understanding hadron structure. I describe recent progress in the computation of the nucleon form factors and moments of parton distribution functions, before proceeding to describe lattice studies of the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). In particular, I show how lattice studies of GPDs contribute to building a three-dimensional picture of the proton, I conclude by describing the prospects for studying the structure of resonances from lattice QCD.

  8. Crystallographic Lattice Boltzmann Method.

    PubMed

    Namburi, Manjusha; Krithivasan, Siddharth; Ansumali, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Current approaches to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) are computationally quite expensive for most realistic scientific and engineering applications of Fluid Dynamics such as automobiles or atmospheric flows. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), with its simplified kinetic descriptions, has emerged as an important tool for simulating hydrodynamics. In a heterogeneous computing environment, it is often preferred due to its flexibility and better parallel scaling. However, direct simulation of realistic applications, without the use of turbulence models, remains a distant dream even with highly efficient methods such as LBM. In LBM, a fictitious lattice with suitable isotropy in the velocity space is considered to recover Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics in macroscopic limit. The same lattice is mapped onto a cartesian grid for spatial discretization of the kinetic equation. In this paper, we present an inverted argument of the LBM, by making spatial discretization as the central theme. We argue that the optimal spatial discretization for LBM is a Body Centered Cubic (BCC) arrangement of grid points. We illustrate an order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency for LBM and thus a significant progress towards feasibility of DNS for realistic flows. PMID:27251098

  9. Crystallographic Lattice Boltzmann Method

    PubMed Central

    Namburi, Manjusha; Krithivasan, Siddharth; Ansumali, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Current approaches to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) are computationally quite expensive for most realistic scientific and engineering applications of Fluid Dynamics such as automobiles or atmospheric flows. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), with its simplified kinetic descriptions, has emerged as an important tool for simulating hydrodynamics. In a heterogeneous computing environment, it is often preferred due to its flexibility and better parallel scaling. However, direct simulation of realistic applications, without the use of turbulence models, remains a distant dream even with highly efficient methods such as LBM. In LBM, a fictitious lattice with suitable isotropy in the velocity space is considered to recover Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics in macroscopic limit. The same lattice is mapped onto a cartesian grid for spatial discretization of the kinetic equation. In this paper, we present an inverted argument of the LBM, by making spatial discretization as the central theme. We argue that the optimal spatial discretization for LBM is a Body Centered Cubic (BCC) arrangement of grid points. We illustrate an order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency for LBM and thus a significant progress towards feasibility of DNS for realistic flows. PMID:27251098

  10. Crystallographic Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namburi, Manjusha; Krithivasan, Siddharth; Ansumali, Santosh

    2016-06-01

    Current approaches to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) are computationally quite expensive for most realistic scientific and engineering applications of Fluid Dynamics such as automobiles or atmospheric flows. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), with its simplified kinetic descriptions, has emerged as an important tool for simulating hydrodynamics. In a heterogeneous computing environment, it is often preferred due to its flexibility and better parallel scaling. However, direct simulation of realistic applications, without the use of turbulence models, remains a distant dream even with highly efficient methods such as LBM. In LBM, a fictitious lattice with suitable isotropy in the velocity space is considered to recover Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics in macroscopic limit. The same lattice is mapped onto a cartesian grid for spatial discretization of the kinetic equation. In this paper, we present an inverted argument of the LBM, by making spatial discretization as the central theme. We argue that the optimal spatial discretization for LBM is a Body Centered Cubic (BCC) arrangement of grid points. We illustrate an order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency for LBM and thus a significant progress towards feasibility of DNS for realistic flows.

  11. Lattice QCD for parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quadling, Henley Sean

    Lattice QCD is an important tool in the investigation of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). This is particularly true at lower energies where traditional perturbative techniques fail, and where other non-perturbative theoretical efforts are not entirely satisfactory. Important features of QCD such as confinement and the masses of the low lying hadronic states have been demonstrated and calculated in lattice QCD simulations. In calculations such as these, non-lattice techniques in QCD have failed. However, despite the incredible advances in computer technology, a full solution of lattice QCD may still be in the too-distant future. Much effort is being expended in the search for ways to reduce the computational burden so that an adequate solution of lattice QCD is possible in the near future. There has been considerable progress in recent years, especially in the research of improved lattice actions. In this thesis, a new approach to lattice QCD algorithms is introduced, which results in very significant efficiency improvements. The new approach is explained in detail, evaluated and verified by comparing physics results with current lattice QCD simulations. The new sub-lattice layout methodology has been specifically designed for current and future hardware. Together with concurrent research into improved lattice actions and more efficient numerical algorithms, the very significant efficiency improvements demonstrated in this thesis can play an important role in allowing lattice QCD researchers access to much more realistic simulations. The techniques presented in this thesis also allow ambitious QCD simulations to be performed on cheap clusters of commodity computers.

  12. Toward lattice fractional vector calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2014-09-01

    An analog of fractional vector calculus for physical lattice models is suggested. We use an approach based on the models of three-dimensional lattices with long-range inter-particle interactions. The lattice analogs of fractional partial derivatives are represented by kernels of lattice long-range interactions, where the Fourier series transformations of these kernels have a power-law form with respect to wave vector components. In the continuum limit, these lattice partial derivatives give derivatives of non-integer order with respect to coordinates. In the three-dimensional description of the non-local continuum, the fractional differential operators have the form of fractional partial derivatives of the Riesz type. As examples of the applications of the suggested lattice fractional vector calculus, we give lattice models with long-range interactions for the fractional Maxwell equations of non-local continuous media and for the fractional generalization of the Mindlin and Aifantis continuum models of gradient elasticity.

  13. A Mechanical Lattice Aid for Crystallography Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amezcua-Lopez, J.; Cordero-Borboa, A. E.

    1988-01-01

    Introduces a 3-dimensional mechanical lattice with adjustable telescoping mechanisms. Discusses the crystalline state, the 14 Bravais lattices, operational principles of the mechanical lattice, construction methods, and demonstrations in classroom. Provides lattice diagrams, schemes of the lattice, and various pictures of the lattice. (YP)

  14. Multireflection boundary conditions for lattice Boltzmann models.

    PubMed

    Ginzburg, Irina; d'Humières, Dominique

    2003-12-01

    We present a general framework for several previously introduced boundary conditions for lattice Boltzmann models, such as the bounce-back rule and the linear and quadratic interpolations. The objectives are twofold: first to give theoretical tools to study the existing link-type boundary conditions and their corresponding accuracy; second to design boundary conditions for general flows which are third-order kinetic accurate. Using these new boundary conditions, Couette and Poiseuille flows are exact solutions of the lattice Boltzmann models for a Reynolds number Re=0 (Stokes limit) for arbitrary inclination with the lattice directions. Numerical comparisons are given for Stokes flows in periodic arrays of spheres and cylinders, linear periodic array of cylinders between moving plates, and for Navier-Stokes flows in periodic arrays of cylinders for Re<200. These results show a significant improvement of the overall accuracy when using the linear interpolations instead of the bounce-back reflection (up to an order of magnitude on the hydrodynamics fields). Further improvement is achieved with the new multireflection boundary conditions, reaching a level of accuracy close to the quasianalytical reference solutions, even for rather modest grid resolutions and few points in the narrowest channels. More important, the pressure and velocity fields in the vicinity of the obstacles are much smoother with multireflection than with the other boundary conditions. Finally the good stability of these schemes is highlighted by some simulations of moving obstacles: a cylinder between flat walls and a sphere in a cylinder. PMID:14754343

  15. Ultracold Nonreactive Molecules in an Optical Lattice: Connecting Chemistry to Many-Body Physics.

    PubMed

    Doçaj, Andris; Wall, Michael L; Mukherjee, Rick; Hazzard, Kaden R A

    2016-04-01

    We derive effective lattice models for ultracold bosonic or fermionic nonreactive molecules (NRMs) in an optical lattice, analogous to the Hubbard model that describes ultracold atoms in a lattice. In stark contrast to the Hubbard model, which is commonly assumed to accurately describe NRMs, we find that the single on-site interaction parameter U is replaced by a multichannel interaction, whose properties we elucidate. Because this arises from complex short-range collisional physics, it requires no dipolar interactions and thus occurs even in the absence of an electric field or for homonuclear molecules. We find a crossover between coherent few-channel models and fully incoherent single-channel models as the lattice depth is increased. We show that the effective model parameters can be determined in lattice modulation experiments, which, consequently, measure molecular collision dynamics with a vastly sharper energy resolution than experiments in a free-space ultracold gas. PMID:27081984

  16. Ultracold Nonreactive Molecules in an Optical Lattice: Connecting Chemistry to Many-Body Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doçaj, Andris; Wall, Michael L.; Mukherjee, Rick; Hazzard, Kaden R. A.

    2016-04-01

    We derive effective lattice models for ultracold bosonic or fermionic nonreactive molecules (NRMs) in an optical lattice, analogous to the Hubbard model that describes ultracold atoms in a lattice. In stark contrast to the Hubbard model, which is commonly assumed to accurately describe NRMs, we find that the single on-site interaction parameter U is replaced by a multichannel interaction, whose properties we elucidate. Because this arises from complex short-range collisional physics, it requires no dipolar interactions and thus occurs even in the absence of an electric field or for homonuclear molecules. We find a crossover between coherent few-channel models and fully incoherent single-channel models as the lattice depth is increased. We show that the effective model parameters can be determined in lattice modulation experiments, which, consequently, measure molecular collision dynamics with a vastly sharper energy resolution than experiments in a free-space ultracold gas.

  17. Searching for X (3872) using lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Song-Haeng; Detar, Carleton; MILC / Fermilab Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    For decades, many excited charmonium states have been discovered that cannot be explained within the conventional quark model. Among the those mesons, the narrow charmonium-like state X (3872) has been examined using various phenomenological models, however, the question for its constituent still remains open. One of the strong candidates is a DD* molecular state because its mass is within 1MeV of the DD* threshold, however, such a molecular state can't be directly studied by perturbative QCD in such a low energy regime where the interaction of the colored quarks and gluons is very strong. Numerical simulation with lattice QCD provides a nonperturbative, ab initio method for studying this mysterious meson state. In this talk, I present preliminary simulation results for this charmonium-like states with quantum numbers JPC =1++ in both the isospin 0 and 1 channels. We use interpolating operators including both the conventional excited P-wave charmonium state (χc 1) and the DD* open charm state for the isospin 0 channel, but only DD* for the isospin 1 channel. We extract large negative S-wave scattering length and find an X (3872) candidate 13 +/- 6 MeV below the DD* threshold in the isospin 0 channel.

  18. Lattice-induced nonadiabatic frequency shifts in optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Beloy, K.

    2010-09-15

    We consider the frequency shift in optical lattice clocks which arises from the coupling of the electronic motion to the atomic motion within the lattice. For the simplest of three-dimensional lattice geometries this coupling is shown to affect only clocks based on blue-detuned lattices. We have estimated the size of this shift for the prospective strontium lattice clock operating at the 390-nm blue-detuned magic wavelength. The resulting fractional frequency shift is found to be on the order of 10{sup -18} and is largely overshadowed by the electric quadrupole shift. For lattice clocks based on more complex geometries or other atomic systems, this shift could potentially be a limiting factor in clock accuracy.

  19. Impact of the crystallization of the high-k dielectric gate oxide on the positive bias temperature instability of the n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field emission transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Han Jin; Kim, Youngkuk; Sang Jeon, In; Yeo, Jaehyun; Im, Badro; Hong, Soojin; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Nam, Seok-Woo; Kang, Ho-kyu; Jung, E. S.

    2013-06-01

    The positive bias temperature instability (PBTI) characteristics of the n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field emission transistors which had different kinds of high-k dielectric gate oxides were studied with the different stress-relaxation times. The degradation in the threshold voltage followed a power-law on the stress times. In particular, we found that their PBTI behaviors were closely related to the structural phase of the high-k dielectric gate oxide. In an amorphous gate oxide, the negative charges were trapped into the stress-induced defects of which energy level was so deep that the trapped charges were de-trapped slowly. Meanwhile, in a crystalline gate oxide, the negative charges were trapped mostly in the pre-existing defects in the crystallized films during early stage of the stress time and de-trapped quickly due to the shallow energy level of the defects.

  20. Nucleon generalized parton distributions from full lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Haegler, Ph.; Musch, B.; Schroers, W.; Edwards, R. G.; Richards, D. G.; Engelhardt, M.; Fleming, G. T.; Orginos, K.; Renner, D. B.

    2008-05-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the lowest moments of nucleon generalized parton distributions in N{sub f}=2+1 lattice QCD using domain-wall valence quarks and improved staggered sea quarks. Our investigation includes helicity dependent and independent generalized parton distributions for pion masses as low as 350 MeV and volumes as large as (3.5 fm){sup 3}, for a lattice spacing of 0.124 fm. We use perturbative renormalization at one-loop level with an improvement based on the nonperturbative renormalization factor for the axial vector current, and only connected diagrams are included in the isosinglet channel.

  1. Single identities for lattice theory and for weakly associative lattices

    SciTech Connect

    McCune, W.; Padmanabhan, R.

    1995-03-13

    We present a single identity for the variety of all lattices that is much simpler than those previously known to us. We also show that the variety of weakly associative lattices is one-based, and we present a generalized one-based theorem for subvarieties of weakly associative lattices that can be defined with absorption laws. The automated theorem-proving program OTTER was used in substantial way to obtain the results.

  2. Ion channeling revisited.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Corona, Aldo; Nguyen, Anh

    2014-09-01

    A MS Excel program has been written that calculates accidental, or unintentional, ion channeling in cubic bcc, fcc and diamond lattice crystals or polycrystalline materials. This becomes an important issue when simulating the creation by energetic neutrons of point displacement damage and extended defects using beams of ions. All of the tables and graphs in the three Ion Beam Analysis Handbooks that previously had to be manually looked up and read from were programed into Excel in handy lookup tables, or parameterized, for the case of the graphs, using rather simple exponential functions with different powers of the argument. The program then offers an extremely convenient way to calculate axial and planar half-angles and minimum yield or dechanneling probabilities, effects on half-angles of amorphous overlayers, accidental channeling probabilities for randomly oriented crystals or crystallites, and finally a way to automatically generate stereographic projections of axial and planar channeling half-angles. The program can generate these projections and calculate these probabilities for axes and [hkl] planes up to (555).

  3. Thermodynamics of lattice OCD

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, H.

    1985-01-01

    The thermodynamic consequences of QCD are explored in the framework of lattice gauge theory. Attention is focused upon the nature of the chiral symmetry restoration transition at finite temperature and at finite baryon density, and possible strategies for identifying relevant thermodynamic phases are discussed. Some numerical results are presented on the chiral symmetry restoration in the SU(2) gauge theory at high baryon density. The results suggest that with T approx. = 110 MeV there is a second order restoration transition at the critical baryon density n/sub B//sup c/ approx. = 0.62 fm/sup -3/.

  4. Lattice polymer automata

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, S. |; Smith, J.R. |

    1995-05-01

    We present a new style of molecular dynamics and self-assembly simulation, the Lattice Polymer Automaton (LPA). In the LPA all interactions, including electromagnetic forces, are decomposed and communicated via propagating particles, {open_quotes}photons.{close_quotes} The monomer-monomer bondforces, the molecular excluded volume forces, the longer range intermolecular forces, and the polymer-solvent interactions may all be modeled with propagating particles. The LPA approach differs significantly from both of the standard approaches, Monte Carlo lattice methods and Molecular Dynamics simulations. On the one hand, the LPA provides more realism than Monte Carlo methods, because it produces a time series of configurations of a single molecule, rather than a set of causally unrelated samples from a distribution of configurations. The LPA can therefore be used directly to study dynamical properties; one can in fact watch polymers move in real time. On the other hand, the LPA is fully discrete, and therefore much simpler than traditional Molecular Dynamics models, which are continuous and operate on much shorter time scales. Due to this simplicity it is possible to simulate longer real time periods, which should enable the study of molecular self-organization on workstations supercomputers are not needed.

  5. Electron Density and Two-Channel Neutron Emission Measurements in Steady-State Spherical Inertial-Electrostatically Confined Plasmas, with Review of the One-Dimensional Kinetic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Chris C.; Hrbud, Ivana

    2004-01-01

    Electron density measurements have been made in steady-state plasmas in a spherical inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) discharge using microwave interferometry. Plasma cores interior to two cathodes, having diameters of 15 and 23 cm, respectively, were probed over a transverse range of 10 cm with a spatial resolution of about 1.4 cm for buffer gas pressures from 0.2 to 6 Pa in argon and deuterium. The transverse profiles are generally flat, in some cases with eccentric symmetric minima, and give mean densities of from approx. = 0.4 to 7 x 10(exp 10)/cu cm, the density generally increasing with the neutral gas pressure. Numerical solutions of the one-dimensional Poisson equation for IEC plasmas are reviewed and energy distribution functions are identified which give flat transverse profiles. These functions are used with the plasma approximation to obtain solutions which also give densities consistent with the measurements, and a double potential well solution is obtained which has minima qualitatively similar to those observed. Explicit consideration is given to the compatibility of the solutions interior and exterior to the cathode, and to grid transparency. Deuterium fusion neutron emission rates were also measured and found to be isotropic, to within the measurement error, over two simultaneous directions. Anisotropy was observed in residual emissions during operation with nonfusing hydrogen- 1. The deuterium rates are consistent with predictions from the model.

  6. Electron Density and Two-Channel Neutron Emission Measurements in Steady-State Spherical Inertial-Electrostatically Confined Plasmas, with Review of the 1-D Kinetic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Chris C.; Hrbud, Ivana

    2004-01-01

    Electron density measurements have been made in steady-state plasmas in a spherical inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) discharge using microwave interferometry. Plasma cores interior to two cathodes, having diameters of 15 and 23 cm, respectively, were probed over a transverse range of 10 cm with a spatial resolution of about 1.4 cm for buffer gas pressures from 0.2 to 6 Pa in argon and deuterium. The transverse profiles are generally flat, in some cases with eccentric symmetric minima, and give mean densities of from approx. = 0.4 to 7x 10(exp 10)/cu cm, the density generally increasing with the neutral gas pressure. Numerical solutions of the 1-D Poisson equation for EC plasmas are reviewed and energy distribution functions are identified which give flat transverse profiles. These functions are used with the plasma approximation to obtain solutions which also give densities consistent with the measurements, and a double potential well solution is obtained which has minima qualitatively similar to those observed. Explicit consideration is given to the compatibility of the solutions interior and exterior to the cathode, and to grid transparency. Deuterium fusion neutron emission rates were also measured and found to be isotropic, to within the measurement error, over two simultaneous directions. Anisotropy was observed in residual emissions during operation with non-fusing hydrogen-1. The deuterium rates are consistent with predictions from the model.

  7. Nuclear Physics and Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, Silas

    2003-11-01

    Impressive progress is currently being made in computing properties and interac- tions of the low-lying hadrons using lattice QCD. However, cost limitations will, for the foreseeable future, necessitate the use of quark masses, Mq, that are signif- icantly larger than those of nature, lattice spacings, a, that are not significantly smaller than the physical scale of interest, and lattice sizes, L, that are not sig- nificantly larger than the physical scale of interest. Extrapolations in the quark masses, lattice spacing and lattice volume are therefore required. The hierarchy of mass scales is: L 1 j Mq j â ºC j a 1 . The appropriate EFT for incorporating the light quark masses, the finite lattice spacing and the lattice size into hadronic observables is C-PT, which provides systematic expansions in the small parame- ters e m L, 1/ Lâ ºC, p/â ºC, Mq/â ºC and aâ ºC . The lattice introduces other unphysical scales as well. Lattice QCD quarks will increasingly be artificially separated

  8. Quantum Gases in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmettler, Peter; Kollath, Corinna

    2015-09-01

    The experimental realization of correlated quantum phases with ultracold gases in optical lattices and their theoretical understanding has witnessed remarkable progress during the last decade. In this review we introduce basic concepts and tools to describe the many-body physics of quantum gases in optical lattices. This includes the derivation of effective lattice Hamiltonians from first principles and an overview of the emerging quantum phases. Additionally, state-of-the-art numerical tools to quantitatively treat bosons or fermions on different lattices are introduced.

  9. Channeling through Bent Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, Stephanie; /Ottawa U. /SLAC

    2012-09-07

    Bent crystals have demonstrated potential for use in beam collimation. A process called channeling is when accelerated particle beams are trapped by the nuclear potentials in the atomic planes within a crystal lattice. If the crystal is bent then the particles can follow the bending angle of the crystal. There are several different effects that are observed when particles travel through a bent crystal including dechanneling, volume capture, volume reflection and channeling. With a crystal placed at the edge of a particle beam, part of the fringe of the beam can be deflected away towards a detector or beam dump, thus helping collimate the beam. There is currently FORTRAN code by Igor Yazynin that has been used to model the passage of particles through a bent crystal. Using this code, the effects mentioned were explored for beam energy that would be seen at the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at a range of crystal orientations with respect to the incoming beam. After propagating 5 meters in vacuum space past the crystal the channeled particles were observed to separate from most of the beam with some noise due to dechanneled particles. Progressively smaller bending radii, with corresponding shorter crystal lengths, were compared and it was seen that multiple scattering decreases with the length of the crystal therefore allowing for cleaner detection of the channeled particles. The input beam was then modified and only a portion of the beam sent through the crystal. With the majority of the beam not affected by the crystal, most particles were not deflected and after propagation the channeled particles were seen to be deflected approximately 5mm. After a portion of the beam travels through the crystal, the entire beam was then sent through a quadrupole magnet, which increased the separation of the channeled particles from the remainder of the beam to a distance of around 20mm. A different code, which was developed at SLAC, was used to

  10. Elimination of spurious lattice fermion solutions and noncompact lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.D.

    1997-09-22

    It is well known that the Dirac equation on a discrete hyper-cubic lattice in D dimension has 2{sup D} degenerate solutions. The usual method of removing these spurious solutions encounters difficulties with chiral symmetry when the lattice spacing l {ne} 0, as exemplified by the persistent problem of the pion mass. On the other hand, we recall that in any crystal in nature, all the electrons do move in a lattice and satisfy the Dirac equation; yet there is not a single physical result that has ever been entangled with a spurious fermion solution. Therefore it should not be difficult to eliminate these unphysical elements. On a discrete lattice, particle hop from point to point, whereas in a real crystal the lattice structure in embedded in a continuum and electrons move continuously from lattice cell to lattice cell. In a discrete system, the lattice functions are defined only on individual points (or links as in the case of gauge fields). However, in a crystal the electron state vector is represented by the Bloch wave functions which are continuous functions in {rvec {gamma}}, and herein lies one of the essential differences.

  11. Channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter provides a comprehensive overview of channel catfish aquaculture. Sections include fish biology; commercial culture; culture facilities; production practices; water quality management; nutrition, feeding and feed formulation; infectious diseases; harvesting and processing; and the...

  12. Physical symmetry and lattice symmetry in the lattice Boltzmann method

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, N.; Chen, S.; Jin, S.; Martinez, D.

    1997-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is regarded as a specific finite difference discretization for the kinetic equation of the discrete velocity distribution function. We argue that for finite sets of discrete velocity models, such as LBM, the physical symmetry is necessary for obtaining the correct macroscopic Navier-Stokes equations. In contrast, the lattice symmetry and the Lagrangian nature of the scheme, which is often used in the lattice gas automaton method and the existing lattice Boltzmann methods and directly associated with the property of particle dynamics, is not necessary for recovering the correct macroscopic dynamics. By relaxing the lattice symmetry constraint and introducing other numerical discretization, one can also obtain correct hydrodynamics. In addition, numerical simulations for applications, such as nonuniform meshes and thermohydrodynamics can be easily carried out and numerical stability can be ensured by the Courant-Friedricks-Lewey condition and using the semi-implicit collision scheme. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Methods of channeling simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, J.H.

    1989-06-01

    Many computer simulation programs have been used to interpret experiments almost since the first channeling measurements were made. Certain aspects of these programs are important in how accurately they simulate ions in crystals; among these are the manner in which the structure of the crystal is incorporated, how any quantity of interest is computed, what ion-atom potential is used, how deflections are computed from the potential, incorporation of thermal vibrations of the lattice atoms, correlations of thermal vibrations, and form of stopping power. Other aspects of the programs are included to improve the speed; among these are table lookup, importance sampling, and the multiparameter method. It is desirable for programs to facilitate incorporation of special features of interest in special situations; examples are relaxations and enhanced vibrations of surface atoms, easy substitution of an alternate potential for comparison, change of row directions from layer to layer in strained-layer lattices, and different vibration amplitudes for substitutional solute or impurity atoms. Ways of implementing all of these aspects and features and the consequences of them will be discussed. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Optical Abelian lattice gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Tagliacozzo, L.; Celi, A.; Zamora, A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2013-03-15

    We discuss a general framework for the realization of a family of Abelian lattice gauge theories, i.e., link models or gauge magnets, in optical lattices. We analyze the properties of these models that make them suitable for quantum simulations. Within this class, we study in detail the phases of a U(1)-invariant lattice gauge theory in 2+1 dimensions, originally proposed by P. Orland. By using exact diagonalization, we extract the low-energy states for small lattices, up to 4 Multiplication-Sign 4. We confirm that the model has two phases, with the confined entangled one characterized by strings wrapping around the whole lattice. We explain how to study larger lattices by using either tensor network techniques or digital quantum simulations with Rydberg atoms loaded in optical lattices, where we discuss in detail a protocol for the preparation of the ground-state. We propose two key experimental tests that can be used as smoking gun of the proper implementation of a gauge theory in optical lattices. These tests consist in verifying the absence of spontaneous (gauge) symmetry breaking of the ground-state and the presence of charge confinement. We also comment on the relation between standard compact U(1) lattice gauge theory and the model considered in this paper. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the quantum simulation of dynamical gauge theories in optical lattices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We focus on digital simulation of abelian lattice gauge theory. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We rediscover and discuss the puzzling phase diagram of gauge magnets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We detail the protocol for time evolution and ground-state preparation in any phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide two experimental tests to validate gauge theory quantum simulators.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann Equation On a 2D Rectangular Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouzidi, MHamed; DHumieres, Dominique; Lallemand, Pierre; Luo, Li-Shi; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We construct a multi-relaxation lattice Boltzmann model on a two-dimensional rectangular grid. The model is partly inspired by a previous work of Koelman to construct a lattice BGK model on a two-dimensional rectangular grid. The linearized dispersion equation is analyzed to obtain the constraints on the isotropy of the transport coefficients and Galilean invariance for various wave propagations in the model. The linear stability of the model is also studied. The model is numerically tested for three cases: (a) a vortex moving with a constant velocity on a mesh periodic boundary conditions; (b) Poiseuille flow with an arbitrasy inclined angle with respect to the lattice orientation: and (c) a cylinder &symmetrically placed in a channel. The numerical results of these tests are compared with either analytic solutions or the results obtained by other methods. Satisfactory results are obtained for the numerical simulations.

  16. Effect of AlN content on the lattice site location of terbium ions in Al x Ga1-x N compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialho, M.; Rodrigues, J.; Magalhães, S.; Correia, M. R.; Monteiro, T.; Lorenz, K.; Alves, E.

    2016-03-01

    Terbium lattice site location and optical emission in Tb implanted Al x Ga1-x N (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) samples grown by halide vapour phase epitaxy on (0001) sapphire substrates are investigated as a function of AlN content. The samples were implanted with a fluence of 5 × 1014 cm-2 of terbium ions and an energy of 150 keV. Lattice implantation damage is reduced using channelled ion implantation performed along the <0001> axis, normal to the sample surface. Afterwards, thermal annealing treatments at 1400 °C for GaN and 1200 °C for samples with x > 0 were performed to reduce the damage and to activate the optical emission of Tb3+ ions. The study of lattice site location is achieved measuring detailed angular ion channelling scans across the <0001>, < 10\\bar{1}1> and < \\bar{2}113> axial directions. The precise location of the implanted Tb ions is obtained by combining the information of these angular scans with simulations using the Monte Carlo code FLUX. In addition to a Ga/Al substitutional fraction and a random fraction, a fraction of Tb ions occupying a site displaced by 0.2 Å along c-axis from the Ga/Al substitutional site was considered, giving a good agreement between the experimental results and the simulation. Photoluminescence studies proved the optical activation of Tb3+ after thermal annealing and the enhancement of the 5D4 to 7F6 transition intensity with increasing AlN content.

  17. Excitonic surface lattice resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphrey, A. D.; Gentile, M. J.; Barnes, W. L.

    2016-08-01

    Electromagnetic resonances are important in controlling light at the nanoscale. The most studied such resonance is the surface plasmon resonance that is associated with metallic nanostructures. Here we explore an alternative resonance, the surface exciton-polariton resonance, one based on excitonic molecular materials. Our study is based on analytical and numerical modelling. We show that periodic arrays of suitable molecular nanoparticles may support surface lattice resonances that arise as a result of coherent interactions between the particles. Our results demonstrate that excitonic molecular materials are an interesting alternative to metals for nanophotonics; they offer the prospect of both fabrication based on supramolecular chemistry and optical functionality arising from the way the properties of such materials may be controlled with light.

  18. Characterization of projection lattices of Hilbert spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Szambien, H.H.

    1986-09-01

    The classical lattices of projections of Hilbert spaces over the real, the complex or the quaternion number field are characterized among the totality of irreducible, complete, orthomodular, atomic lattices satisfying the covering property. To this end, so-called paratopological lattices are introduced, i.e, lattices carrying a topology that renders the lattice operations restrictedly continuous.

  19. Coupled-channel scattering on a torus

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Peng; Dudek, Jozef Jon; Edwards, Robert G.; Szczepaniak, Adam Pawel

    2013-07-01

    Based on the Hamiltonian formalism approach, a generalized Luscher's formula for two particle scattering in both the elastic and coupled-channel cases in moving frames is derived from a relativistic Lippmann-Schwinger equation. Some strategies for extracting scattering amplitudes for a coupled-channel system from the discrete finite-volume spectrum are discussed and illustrated with a toy model of two-channel resonant scattering. This formalism will, in the near future, be used to extract information about hadron scattering from lattice QCD computations.

  20. A process for co-molding a visible-wavelength photonic crystal and microfluidic channel for biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srungarapu, Maurya; Snyder, Chloe E.; Kadiyala, Anand; Hamza, Bashar; Liu, Yuxin; Dawson, Jeremy M.

    2013-05-01

    Rapid DNA analysis systems show promise for reduced DNA analysis times and can be used by untrained operators in point-of-use applications. Throughput improvements can be gained by reducing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) cycle count, which is used in conventional DNA processing to amplify the DNA to an easily measurable amount. A Photonic Crystal (PhC) can be integrated within a microfluidic channel to enhance fluorescence emission, enabling a reduction in PCR cycling. Most PhCs are fabricated using serial top-down fabrication techniques, resulting in a structure that is challenging to integrate with microfluidic system components. Here, we present a co-integration process for fabricating a Silicon master mold consisting of a visible range PhC lattice and a microfluidic channel. This process can be used to co-fabricate microscale channel and nanoscale lattice structures in polymer or thermoplastic materials. Two dimensional visible range PhCs are fabricated by patterning electron beam resist via E-Beam Lithography (EBL). The patterned features (100-300nm features with 200-450nm pitch) are cured to a glass-like material that is used as a direct etch mask for Reactive Ion Etching. A 200μm wide and 25μm high ridge "strip" is fabricated around the PhC region using Photolithography and Deep RIE etching to form the completed channel and lattice mold. Results indicating the quality of nanoscale features resulting from the molding process in Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) will be discussed.

  1. Advances in lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Duke, D.W.; Owens, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on advances in lattice gauge theory. Topics covered include fermion Monte Carlo algorithms, portrait of a proton, critical behavior in QCD, the standard Higgs-model on the lattice, analytic calculation of mass gaps, and simulation of discrete Euclidean quantum gravity.

  2. Buckling modes in pantographic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgio, Ivan; Della Corte, Alessandro; dell'Isola, Francesco; Steigmann, David J.

    2016-07-01

    We study buckling patterns in pantographic sheets, regarded as two-dimensional continua consisting of lattices of continuously distributed fibers. The fibers are modeled as beams endowed with elastic resistance to stretching, shearing, bending and twist. Included in the theory is a non-standard elasticity due to geodesic bending of the fibers relative to the lattice surface. xml:lang="fr"

  3. Introduction to lattice gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R.

    The lattice formulation of Quantum Field Theory (QFT) can be exploited in many ways. We can derive the lattice Feynman rules and carry out weak coupling perturbation expansions. The lattice then serves as a manifestly gauge invariant regularization scheme, albeit one that is more complicated than standard continuum schemes. Strong coupling expansions: these give us useful qualitative information, but unfortunately no hard numbers. The lattice theory is amenable to numerical simulations by which one calculates the long distance properties of a strongly interacting theory from first principles. The observables are measured as a function of the bare coupling g and a gauge invariant cut-off approx. = 1/alpha, where alpha is the lattice spacing. The continuum (physical) behavior is recovered in the limit alpha yields 0, at which point the lattice artifacts go to zero. This is the more powerful use of lattice formulation, so in these lectures the author focuses on setting up the theory for the purpose of numerical simulations to get hard numbers. The numerical techniques used in Lattice Gauge Theories have their roots in statistical mechanics, so it is important to develop an intuition for the interconnection between quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics.

  4. The EMMA Main Ring Lattice.

    SciTech Connect

    Berg,J.S.

    2008-02-21

    I give a brief introduction to the purpose and goals of the EMMA experiment and describe how they will impact the design of the main EMMA ring. I then describe the mathematical model that is used to describe the EMMA lattice. Finally, I show how the different lattice configurations were obtained and list their parameters.

  5. Phase transition in finite density and temperature lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Chen, Ying; Gong, Ming; Liu, Chuan; Liu, Yu-Bin; Liu, Zhao-Feng; Ma, Jian-Ping; Meng, Xiang-Fei; Zhang, Jian-Bo

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the behavior of the chiral condensate in lattice QCD at finite temperature and finite chemical potential. The study was done using two flavors of light quarks and with a series of β and ma at the lattice size 24 × 122 × 6. The calculation was done in the Taylor expansion formalism. We are able to calculate the first and second order derivatives of ≤ft< {\\bar{\\psi} \\psi } \\right> in both isoscalar and isovector channels. With the first derivatives being small, we find that the second derivatives are sizable close to the phase transition and that the magnitude of \\bar{\\psi} \\psi decreases under the influence of finite chemical potential in both channels. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11335001, 11105153, 11405178), Projects of International Cooperation and Exchanges NSFC (11261130311)

  6. Anisotropic Lattice Deformation of InAs Self-Assembled Quantum Dots Embedded in GaNAs Strain Compensating Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, N.; Muto, S.; Ganapathy, S.; Suemune, I.; Numata, K.; Yabuta, K.

    2006-01-01

    Lattice deformations of InAs self-assembled quantum dots, which were grown on (001)GaAs substrates and embedded in GaNAs strain compensating layers (SCLs), were examined with an ion-channeling method in Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The channeling experiments demonstrated that the increase of the nitrogen concentrations in the GaNAs SCLs caused the indium lattice displacements along the [001] growth direction while those parallel to the (001) crystal plane were kept unchanged.

  7. Photodissociation of gaseous CH3COSH at 248 nm by time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy: Observation of three dissociation channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, En-Lan; Tsai, Po-Yu; Fan, He; Lin, King-Chuen

    2013-01-01

    Upon one-photon excitation at 248 nm, gaseous CH3C(O)SH is dissociated following three pathways with the products of (1) OCS + CH4, (2) CH3SH + CO, and (3) CH2CO + H2S that are detected using time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy. The excited state 1(nO, π*CO) has a radiative lifetime of 249 ± 11 ns long enough to allow for Ar collisions that induce internal conversion and enhance the fragment yields. The rate constant of collision-induced internal conversion is estimated to be 1.1 × 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. Among the primary dissociation products, a fraction of the CH2CO moiety may undergo further decomposition to CH2 + CO, of which CH2 is confirmed by reaction with O2 producing CO2, CO, OH, and H2CO. Such a secondary decomposition was not observed previously in the Ar matrix-isolated experiments. The high-resolution spectra of CO are analyzed to determine the ro-vibrational energy deposition of 8.7 ± 0.7 kcal/mol, while the remaining primary products with smaller rotational constants are recognized but cannot be spectrally resolved. The CO fragment detected is mainly ascribed to the primary production. A prior distribution method is applied to predict the vibrational distribution of CO that is consistent with the experimental findings.

  8. Lattice Boltzmann method on unstructured grids: further developments.

    PubMed

    Ubertini, S; Bella, G; Succi, S

    2003-07-01

    We discuss further developments of the finite-volume lattice Boltzmann formulation on unstructured grids. It is shown that the method tolerates significant grid distortions without showing any appreciable numerical viscosity effects at second order in the mesh size. A theoretical argument of plausibility for such a property is presented. In addition, a set of boundary conditions which permit to handle flows with open boundaries is also introduced and numerically demonstrated for the case of channel flows and driven cavity flows. PMID:12935281

  9. Excited and exotic charmonium spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L; Peardon, M J; Ryan, S M; Thomas, C; Vilaseca, P; Dudek, J; Edwards, R; Joo, B; Richards, D G

    2012-12-01

    We study the charmonium spectrum in full QCD on anisotropic lattices generated by Hadron Spectrum Collaboration. We adopt a large basis of interpolating operators to extract the excited charmonium states using the variational method. A detailed spectrum of excited charmonium mesons in many J{sup PC} channels is obtained. Some exotic hybrid states ( with J{sup PC} = 0{sup +-} , 1{sup -+} , 2{sup +-}) are also studied

  10. Nonlinear dust-lattice waves: a modified Toda lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, N. F.

    2008-09-07

    Charged dust grains in a plasma interact with a Coulomb potential, but also with an exponential component to the potential, due to Debye shielding in the background plasma. Here we investigate large-amplitude oscillations and waves in dust-lattices, employing techniques used in Toda lattice analysis. The lattice consists of a linear chain of particles, or a periodic ring as occurs in experimentally observed dust particle clusters. The particle motion has a triangular waveform, and chaotic motion for large amplitude motion of a grain.

  11. Charmed tetraquarks Tcc and Tcs from dynamical lattice QCD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Yoichi; Charron, Bruno; Aoki, Sinya; Doi, Takumi; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Inoue, Takashi; Ishii, Noriyoshi; Murano, Keiko; Nemura, Hidekatsu; Sasaki, Kenji

    2014-02-01

    Charmed tetraquarks Tcc=(ccubardbar) and Tcs=(csubardbar) are studied through the S-wave meson-meson interactions, D-D, Kbar-D, D-D* and Kbar-D*, on the basis of the (2+1)-flavor lattice QCD simulations with the pion mass mπ≃410, 570 and 700 MeV. For the charm quark, the relativistic heavy quark action is employed to treat its dynamics on the lattice. Using the HAL QCD method, we extract the S-wave potentials in lattice QCD simulations, from which the meson-meson scattering phase shifts are calculated. The phase shifts in the isospin triplet (I=1) channels indicate repulsive interactions, while those in the I=0 channels suggest attraction, growing as mπ decreases. This is particularly prominent in the Tcc (JP=1+,I=0) channel, though neither bound state nor resonance are found in the range mπ=410-700 MeV. We make a qualitative comparison of our results with the phenomenological diquark picture.

  12. Photodissociation of gaseous CH{sub 3}COSH at 248 nm by time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy: Observation of three dissociation channels

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, En-Lan; Tsai, Po-Yu; Fan, He; Lin, King-Chuen

    2013-01-07

    Upon one-photon excitation at 248 nm, gaseous CH{sub 3}C(O)SH is dissociated following three pathways with the products of (1) OCS + CH{sub 4}, (2) CH{sub 3}SH + CO, and (3) CH{sub 2}CO + H{sub 2}S that are detected using time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy. The excited state {sup 1}(n{sub O}, {pi}{sup *}{sub CO}) has a radiative lifetime of 249 {+-} 11 ns long enough to allow for Ar collisions that induce internal conversion and enhance the fragment yields. The rate constant of collision-induced internal conversion is estimated to be 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Among the primary dissociation products, a fraction of the CH{sub 2}CO moiety may undergo further decomposition to CH{sub 2}+ CO, of which CH{sub 2} is confirmed by reaction with O{sub 2} producing CO{sub 2}, CO, OH, and H{sub 2}CO. Such a secondary decomposition was not observed previously in the Ar matrix-isolated experiments. The high-resolution spectra of CO are analyzed to determine the ro-vibrational energy deposition of 8.7 {+-} 0.7 kcal/mol, while the remaining primary products with smaller rotational constants are recognized but cannot be spectrally resolved. The CO fragment detected is mainly ascribed to the primary production. A prior distribution method is applied to predict the vibrational distribution of CO that is consistent with the experimental findings.

  13. TRP channels.

    PubMed

    Benemei, Silvia; Patacchini, Riccardo; Trevisani, Marcello; Geppetti, Pierangelo

    2015-06-01

    Evidence is accumulating on the role of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, namely TRPV1, TRPA1, TRPV4 and TRPM8, expressed by C- and Aδ-fibres primary sensory neurons, in cough mechanism. Selective stimuli for these channels have been proven to provoke and, more rarely, to inhibit cough. More importantly, cough threshold to TRP agonists is increased by proinflammatory conditions, known to favour cough. Off-target effects of various drugs, such as tiotropium or desflurane, seem to produce their protective or detrimental actions on airway irritation and cough via TRPV1 and TRPA1, respectively. Thus, TRPs appear to encode the process that initiates or potentiates cough, activated by exogenous irritants and endogenous proinflammatory mediators. More research on TRP channels may result in innovative cough medicines. PMID:25725213

  14. Rho resonance parameters from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dehua; Alexandru, Andrei; Molina, Raquel; Döring, Michael

    2016-08-01

    We perform a high-precision calculation of the phase shifts for π -π scattering in the I =1 , J =1 channel in the elastic region using elongated lattices with two mass-degenerate quark flavors (Nf=2 ). We extract the ρ resonance parameters using a Breit-Wigner fit at two different quark masses, corresponding to mπ=226 MeV and mπ=315 MeV , and perform an extrapolation to the physical point. The extrapolation is based on a unitarized chiral perturbation theory model that describes well the phase shifts around the resonance for both quark masses. We find that the extrapolated value, mρ=720 (1 )(15 ) MeV , is significantly lower that the physical rho mass and we argue that this shift could be due to the absence of the strange quark in our calculation.

  15. Kenneth Wilson and Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukawa, Akira

    2015-09-01

    We discuss the physics and computation of lattice QCD, a space-time lattice formulation of quantum chromodynamics, and Kenneth Wilson's seminal role in its development. We start with the fundamental issue of confinement of quarks in the theory of the strong interactions, and discuss how lattice QCD provides a framework for understanding this phenomenon. A conceptual issue with lattice QCD is a conflict of space-time lattice with chiral symmetry of quarks. We discuss how this problem is resolved. Since lattice QCD is a non-linear quantum dynamical system with infinite degrees of freedom, quantities which are analytically calculable are limited. On the other hand, it provides an ideal case of massively parallel numerical computations. We review the long and distinguished history of parallel-architecture supercomputers designed and built for lattice QCD. We discuss algorithmic developments, in particular the difficulties posed by the fermionic nature of quarks, and their resolution. The triad of efforts toward better understanding of physics, better algorithms, and more powerful supercomputers have produced major breakthroughs in our understanding of the strong interactions. We review the salient results of this effort in understanding the hadron spectrum, the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements and CP violation, and quark-gluon plasma at high temperatures. We conclude with a brief summary and a future perspective.

  16. Legless locomotion in lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Perrin; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2014-11-01

    Little is known about interactions between an animal body and complex terrestrial terrain like sand and boulders during legless, undulatory travel (e.g. snake locomotion). We study the locomotor performance of Mojave shovel-nosed snakes (Chionactisoccipitalis , ~ 35 cm long) using a simplified model of heterogeneous terrain: symmetric lattices of obstacles. To quantify performance we measure mean forward speed and slip angle, βs, defined as the angle between the instantaneous velocity and tangent vectors at each point on the body. We find that below a critical peg density the presence of granular media results in high speed (~ 60 cm/s), low average slip (βs ~6°) snake performance as compared to movement in the same peg densities on hard ground (~ 25 cm/s and βs ~15°). Above this peg density, performance on granular and hard substrates converges. Speed on granular media decreases with increasing peg density to that of the speed on hard ground, while speed on hard ground remains constant. Conversely, βs on hard ground trends toward that on granular media as obstacle density increases.

  17. Localized structures in Kagome lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Avadh B; Bishop, Alan R; Law, K J H; Kevrekidis, P G

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the existence and stability of gap vortices and multi-pole gap solitons in a Kagome lattice with a defocusing nonlinearity both in a discrete case and in a continuum one with periodic external modulation. In particular, predictions are made based on expansion around a simple and analytically tractable anti-continuum (zero coupling) limit. These predictions are then confirmed for a continuum model of an optically-induced Kagome lattice in a photorefractive crystal obtained by a continuous transformation of a honeycomb lattice.

  18. Lattice QCD clusters at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Holmgren, D.; Mackenzie, Paul B.; Singh, Anitoj; Simone, Jim; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    As part of the DOE SciDAC ''National Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Computing'' project, Fermilab builds and operates production clusters for lattice QCD simulations. This paper will describe these clusters. The design of lattice QCD clusters requires careful attention to balancing memory bandwidth, floating point throughput, and network performance. We will discuss our investigations of various commodity processors, including Pentium 4E, Xeon, Opteron, and PPC970. We will also discuss our early experiences with the emerging Infiniband and PCI Express architectures. Finally, we will present our predictions and plans for future clusters.

  19. Quantum vortices in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Vignolo, P.; Fazio, R.; Tosi, M. P.

    2007-08-15

    A vortex in a superfluid gas inside an optical lattice can behave as a massive particle moving in a periodic potential and exhibiting quantum properties. In this paper we discuss these properties and show that the excitation of vortex dynamics in a two-dimensional lattice can lead to striking measurable changes in its dynamic response. It would be possible by means of Bragg spectroscopy to carry out the first direct measurement of the effective vortex mass. In addition, the experiments proposed here provide an alternative way to study the pinning to the underlying lattice and the dissipative damping.

  20. Reliability analysis of interdependent lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limiao, Zhang; Daqing, Li; Pengju, Qin; Bowen, Fu; Yinan, Jiang; Zio, Enrico; Rui, Kang

    2016-06-01

    Network reliability analysis has drawn much attention recently due to the risks of catastrophic damage in networked infrastructures. These infrastructures are dependent on each other as a result of various interactions. However, most of the reliability analyses of these interdependent networks do not consider spatial constraints, which are found important for robustness of infrastructures including power grid and transport systems. Here we study the reliability properties of interdependent lattices with different ranges of spatial constraints. Our study shows that interdependent lattices with strong spatial constraints are more resilient than interdependent Erdös-Rényi networks. There exists an intermediate range of spatial constraints, at which the interdependent lattices have minimal resilience.

  1. Lattice Location Determination of Ge in SiC by ALCHEMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kups, T.; Voelskow, M.; Skorupa, W.; Soueidan, M.; Ferro, G.; Pezoldt, J.

    The incorporation of Ge into cubic and hexagonal silicon carbide is compared for three different doping methods: ion-implantation, molecular beam epitaxy and liquid phase epitaxy. The lattice location of Ge was determined by the transmission electron microscopy based method ALCHEMI (atomic location by channelling enhanced microanalysis). Depending on the method used for incorporation, Ge is able to occupy different silicon carbide lattice locations.

  2. Heavy quarks and lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2003-11-05

    This paper is a review of heavy quarks in lattice gauge theory, focusing on methodology. It includes a status report on some of the calculations that are relevant to heavy-quark spectroscopy and to flavor physics.

  3. GMUGLE: A goal lattice constructor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintz, Kenneth J.

    2001-08-01

    Goal lattices are a method for ordering the goals of a system and associating with each goal the value of performing that goal in terms of how much it contributes to the accomplishment of the topmost goal of a system. This paper presents a progress report on the development of a web-based implementation of the George Mason University Goal Lattice Engine (GMUGLE). GMUGLE allows a user to interactively create goal lattices, add/delete goals, and specify their ordering relations through a web-based interface. The database portion automatically computes the GLB and LUB of pairs of goals which have been entered to form them into a lattice. Yet to be implemented is the code to input goal values, automatically apportion the values among included goals, and accrue value among the included goals.

  4. Lattice Tube Model of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banavar, Jayanth R.; Cieplak, Marek; Maritan, Amos

    2004-11-01

    We present a new lattice model for proteins that incorporates a tubelike anisotropy by introducing a preference for mutually parallel alignments in the conformations. The model is demonstrated to capture many aspects of real proteins.

  5. Freezing, accelerating, and slowing directed currents in real time with superimposed driven lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Aritra K.; Liebchen, Benno; Wulf, Thomas; Schmelcher, Peter

    2016-05-01

    We provide a generic scheme offering real-time control of directed particle transport using superimposed driven lattices. This scheme allows one to accelerate, slow, and freeze the transport on demand by switching one of the lattices subsequently on and off. The underlying physical mechanism hinges on a systematic opening and closing of channels between transporting and nontransporting phase space structures upon switching and exploits cantori structures which generate memory effects in the population of these structures. Our results should allow for real-time control of cold thermal atomic ensembles in optical lattices but might also be useful as a design principle for targeted delivery of molecules or colloids in optical devices.

  6. Lattice QCD in rotating frames.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Arata; Hirono, Yuji

    2013-08-23

    We formulate lattice QCD in rotating frames to study the physics of QCD matter under rotation. We construct the lattice QCD action with the rotational metric and apply it to the Monte Carlo simulation. As the first application, we calculate the angular momenta of gluons and quarks in the rotating QCD vacuum. This new framework is useful to analyze various rotation-related phenomena in QCD. PMID:24010426

  7. Energy of infinite vortex lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, L.J.; Doria, M.M.; Kadtke, J.B.

    1989-05-15

    An expression is derived for the energy density of a lattice of point vortices (or other logarithmic objects) having an arbitrary number of vortices of arbitrary strengths in an arbitrary unit cell. The result is expressed in the form of a rapidly convergent series well suited for numerical evaluation. The effects of separately changing the shape and dimensions of the unit cell are shown for simple cases, and the energy of the triangular lattice is calculated as a function of slip displacement.

  8. Emergent three-brane lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Mashile, Grant; Park, Nicholas

    2010-05-15

    In this article the anomalous dimension of a class of operators with a bare dimension of O(N) is studied. The operators considered are dual to excited states of a two giant graviton system. In the Yang-Mills theory they are described by restricted Schur polynomials, labeled with Young diagrams that have at most two columns. In a certain limit the dilatation operator looks like a lattice version of a second derivative, with the lattice emerging from the Young diagram itself.

  9. Fully relativistic lattice Boltzmann algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Romatschke, P.; Mendoza, M.; Succi, S.

    2011-09-15

    Starting from the Maxwell-Juettner equilibrium distribution, we develop a relativistic lattice Boltzmann (LB) algorithm capable of handling ultrarelativistic systems with flat, but expanding, spacetimes. The algorithm is validated through simulations of a quark-gluon plasma, yielding excellent agreement with hydrodynamic simulations. The present scheme opens the possibility of transferring the recognized computational advantages of lattice kinetic theory to the context of both weakly and ultrarelativistic systems.

  10. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtl, Adam C.; Bulava, John; Morningstar, Colin; Edwards, Robert; Mathur, Nilmani; Richards, David; Fleming, George; Juge, K. Jimmy; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2007-10-26

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  11. Transport in Sawtooth photonic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weimann, Steffen; Morales-Inostroza, Luis; Real, Bastián; Cantillano, Camilo; Szameit, Alexander; Vicencio, Rodrigo A.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate, theoretically and experimentally, a photonic realization of a Sawtooth lattice. This special lattice exhibits two spectral bands, with one of them experiencing a complete collapse to a highly degenerate flat band for a special set of inter-site coupling constants. We report the ob- servation of different transport regimes, including strong transport inhibition due to the appearance of the non-diffractive flat band. Moreover, we excite localized Shockley surfaces states, residing in the gap between the two linear bands.

  12. Berry Phase in Lattice QCD.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Arata

    2016-07-29

    We propose the lattice QCD calculation of the Berry phase, which is defined by the ground state of a single fermion. We perform the ground-state projection of a single-fermion propagator, construct the Berry link variable on a momentum-space lattice, and calculate the Berry phase. As the first application, the first Chern number of the (2+1)-dimensional Wilson fermion is calculated by the Monte Carlo simulation. PMID:27517766

  13. PC Clusters for Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmgren, D. J.

    2005-03-01

    In the last several years, tightly coupled PC clusters have become widely applied, cost effective resources for lattice gauge computations. This paper discusses the practice of building such clusters, in particular balanced design requirements. I review and quantify the improvements over time of key performance parameters and overall price to performance ratio. Applying these trends and technology forecasts given by computer equipment manufacturers, I predict the range of price to performance for lattice codes expected in the next several years.

  14. Lattice gauge theory for QCD

    SciTech Connect

    DeGrand, T.

    1997-06-01

    These lectures provide an introduction to lattice methods for nonperturbative studies of Quantum Chromodynamics. Lecture 1: Basic techniques for QCD and results for hadron spectroscopy using the simplest discretizations; lecture 2: Improved actions--what they are and how well they work; lecture 3: SLAC physics from the lattice-structure functions, the mass of the glueball, heavy quarks and {alpha}{sub s} (M{sub z}), and B-{anti B} mixing. 67 refs., 36 figs.

  15. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    John Bulava; Robert Edwards; George Fleming; K. Jimmy Juge; Adam C. Lichtl; Nilmani Mathur; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Stephen J. Wallace

    2007-06-16

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  16. Optimal lattice-structured materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Messner, Mark C.

    2016-07-09

    This paper describes a method for optimizing the mesostructure of lattice-structured materials. These materials are periodic arrays of slender members resembling efficient, lightweight macroscale structures like bridges and frame buildings. Current additive manufacturing technologies can assemble lattice structures with length scales ranging from nanometers to millimeters. Previous work demonstrates that lattice materials have excellent stiffness- and strength-to-weight scaling, outperforming natural materials. However, there are currently no methods for producing optimal mesostructures that consider the full space of possible 3D lattice topologies. The inverse homogenization approach for optimizing the periodic structure of lattice materials requires a parameterized, homogenized material model describingmore » the response of an arbitrary structure. This work develops such a model, starting with a method for describing the long-wavelength, macroscale deformation of an arbitrary lattice. The work combines the homogenized model with a parameterized description of the total design space to generate a parameterized model. Finally, the work describes an optimization method capable of producing optimal mesostructures. Several examples demonstrate the optimization method. One of these examples produces an elastically isotropic, maximally stiff structure, here called the isotruss, that arguably outperforms the anisotropic octet truss topology.« less

  17. Lattice study of (D¯ 1D*)± near-threshold scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ting; Chen, Ying; Gong, Ming; Lei, Yu-Hong; Li, Ning; Liu, Chuan; Liu, Yu-Bin; Liu, Zhao-Feng; Ma, Jian-Ping; Wang, Zhan-Lin; Zhang, Jian-Bo; Clqcd Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    In this exploratory lattice study, low-energy near threshold scattering of the (D¯1D*)± meson system is analyzed using lattice QCD with Nf=2 twisted mass fermion configurations. Both s-wave (JP=0-) and p-wave (JP=1+) channels are investigated. It is found that the interaction between the two charmed mesons is attractive near the threshold in both channels. This calculation provides some hints in the searching of resonances or bound states around the threshold of (D¯1D*)± system.

  18. The channels of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Victor R.

    1988-01-01

    The geomorphology of Mars is discussed, focusing on the Martian channels. The great flood channels of Mars, the processes of channel erosion, and dendritic channel networks, are examined. The topography of the Channeled Scabland region of the northwestern U.S. is described and compared to the Martian channels. The importance of water in the evolution of the channel systems is considered.

  19. Lattice Boltzmann Simulations of Peristaltic Particle Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connington, Kevin; Kang, Qinjun; Viswanathan, Hari; Chen, Shiyi; Abdel-Fattah, Amr

    2008-11-01

    A peristaltic flow occurs when a tube or channel with flexible walls transports the contained fluid by progressing a series of contraction or expansion waves along the length of those walls. It is a mechanism used to transport fluid and immersed solid particles when it is ineffective or impossible to impose a favorable pressure gradient or desirous to avoid contact between the transported mixture and mechanical moving parts. Peristaltic transport occurs in many physiological situations and has myriad industrial applications. We focus our study on the peristaltic transport of a macroscopic particle in a two dimensional channel using the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM). We systematically investigate the effect of variation of the relevant non-dimensional parameters of the system on the particle transport. We examine the particle behavior when the system exhibits the peculiar phenomenon of fluid ``trapping.'' Finally, we analyze how the particle presence affects stress, pressure, and dissipation in the fluid in hopes of determining preferred working conditions for peristaltic transport of shear-sensitive particles.

  20. Starburst Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    Translucent carbon dioxide ice covers the polar regions of Mars seasonally. It is warmed and sublimates (evaporates) from below, and escaping gas carves a numerous channel morphologies.

    In this example (figure 1) the channels form a 'starburst' pattern, radiating out into feathery extensions. The center of the pattern is being buried with dust and new darker dust fans ring the outer edges. This may be an example of an expanding morphology, where new channels are formed as the older ones fill and are no longer efficiently channeling the subliming gas out.

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003443_0980 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 21-Apr-2007. The complete image is centered at -81.8 degrees latitude, 76.2 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 247.1 km (154.4 miles). At this distance the image scale is 24.7 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects 74 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel. The image was taken at a local Mars time of 04:52 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 71 degrees, thus the sun was about 19 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 223.4 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  1. Tailoring the plasma channel generated by femtosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haitao; Fan, Chengyu; Zhang, Pengfei; Jia, Wei

    2015-02-01

    By investigating the spatial and temporal variations of the propagating pulses, we have shown for the first time that the lattice waveguides can induce nonlinear effects to tailor the plasma channel generated by a femtosecond laser pulse. Different types of the spatiotemporal localized nonlinear light bullet’s propagating configurations have been predicted. By adjusting the parameters of the modulation potential, longer continuum filaments and reshaped laser pulses can be obtained, due to the focusing nonlinearity of the lattice modulation index.

  2. Improved room-temperature luminescence of core-shell InGaAs/GaAs nanopillars via lattice-matched passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komolibus, Katarzyna; Scofield, Adam C.; Gradkowski, Kamil; Ochalski, Tomasz J.; Kim, Hyunseok; Huffaker, Diana L.; Huyet, Guillaume

    2016-02-01

    Optical properties of GaAs/InGaAs/GaAs nanopillars (NPs) grown on GaAs(111)B were investigated. Employment of a mask-etching technique allowed for an accurate control over the geometry of NP arrays in terms of both their diameter and separation. This work describes both the steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence of these structures as a function of the ensemble geometry, composition of the insert, and various shell compounds. The effects of the NP geometry on a parasitic radiative recombination channel, originating from an overgrown lateral sidewall layer, are discussed. Optical characterization reveals a profound influence of the core-shell lattice mismatch on the carrier lifetime and emission quenching at room temperature. When the lattice-matching conditions are satisfied, an efficient emission from the NP arrays at room temperature and below the band-gap of silicon is observed, clearly highlighting their potential application as emitters in optical interconnects integrated with silicon platforms.

  3. Tuning the Lattice Parameter of InxZnyP for Highly Luminescent Lattice-Matched Core/Shell Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Pietra, Francesca; De Trizio, Luca; Hoekstra, Anne W; Renaud, Nicolas; Prato, Mirko; Grozema, Ferdinand C; Baesjou, Patrick J; Koole, Rolf; Manna, Liberato; Houtepen, Arjan J

    2016-04-26

    Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) show great promise as LED phosphors due to their tunable narrow-band emission and ability to produce high-quality white light. Currently, the most suitable QDs for lighting applications are based on cadmium, which presents a toxicity problem for consumer applications. The most promising cadmium-free candidate QDs are based on InP, but their quality lags much behind that of cadmium based QDs. This is not only because the synthesis of InP QDs is more challenging than that of Cd-based QDs, but also because the large lattice parameter of InP makes it difficult to grow an epitaxial, defect-free shell on top of such material. Here, we propose a viable approach to overcome this problem by alloying InP nanocrystals with Zn(2+) ions, which enables the synthesis of InxZnyP alloy QDs having lattice constant that can be tuned from 5.93 Å (pure InP QDs) down to 5.39 Å by simply varying the concentration of the Zn precursor. This lattice engineering allows for subsequent strain-free, epitaxial growth of a ZnSezS1-z shell with lattice parameters matching that of the core. We demonstrate, for a wide range of core and shell compositions (i.e., varying x, y, and z), that the photoluminescence quantum yield is maximal (up to 60%) when lattice mismatch is minimal. PMID:27065247

  4. A search for good lattice rules based on the reciprocal lattice generator matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Lyness, J.N.; Newman, W.

    1989-01-01

    The search for cost-effective lattice rules is a time-consuming and difficult process. After a brief overview of some of the lattice theory relevant to these rules, a new approach to this search is suggested. This approach is based on a classification of lattice rules using the upper triangular lattice form'' of the reciprocal lattice generator matrix. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  5. The site occupation and valence of Mn ions in the crystal lattice of Sr{sub 4}Al{sub 14}O{sub 25} and its deep red emission for high color-rendering white light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lei; Xue, Shaochan; Chen, Xiuling; Bahader, Ali; Deng, Xiaorong; Zhao, Erlong; Jiang, Yang; Chen, Shifu; Chan, Ting-Shan; Zhao, Zhi; Zhang, Wenhua

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Different valences of Mn ions in Sr{sub 4}Al{sub 14}O{sub 25} were identified using XANES and EPR. • Red luminescence was attributed to Mn{sup 4+} occupying the center of AlO{sub 6} octahedron. • The Mn{sup 3+} incorporated in the center of AlO{sub 4} tetrahedron was non-luminescent. • The bond-valence theory was used to analyze the effective valences of cations. • A white LED device with CRI up to Ra 93.23 was packaged by using the red phosphor. - Abstract: The synthesis and component of red phosphor, Sr{sub 4}Al{sub 14}O{sub 25}: Mn, were optimized for application in white light-emitting diodes. The microstructure and morphology were investigated by the X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Different valences of Mn ions in Sr{sub 4}Al{sub 14}O{sub 25} were discriminated using the electron paramagnetic resonance and X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy techniques. The bond-valence theory was used to analyze the effective valences of Sr{sup 2+} and Al{sup 3+} in Sr{sub 4}Al{sub 14}O{sub 25}. As a result, the strong covalence of Al{sup 3+} in the AlO{sub 4} tetrahedron other than in the AlO{sub 6} octahedron is disclosed. The deep red emission is attributed to Mn{sup 4+} occupying the center of AlO{sub 6} octahedron. The mechanism of energy transfer is mainly through dipole–dipole interaction, revealed by the analyses of critical distance and concentration quench. A high color rendering white LED prototype with color-rendering index up to Ra 93.23 packaged by using the red phosphor demonstrates its applicability.

  6. Lattice location of diffused Zn atoms in GaAs and InP single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, L.Y.; Yu, K.M.; Ben-Tzur, M.; Haller, E.E.; Jaklevic, J.M.; Walukiewicz, W. ); Hanson, C.M. )

    1991-03-01

    We have investigated the saturation phenomenon of the free carrier concentration in {ital p}-type GaAs and InP single crystals doped by zinc diffusion. The free hole saturation occurs at 10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3} for GaAs, but the maximum concentration for InP appears at mid 10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}3}. The difference in the saturation hole concentrations for these materials is investigated by studying the incorporation and the lattice location of the impurity zinc, an acceptor when located on a group III atom site. Zinc is diffused into the III-V wafers in a sealed quartz ampoule. Particle-induced x-ray emission with ion-channeling techniques are employed to determine the exact lattice location of the zinc atoms. We have found that over 90% of all zinc atoms occupy Ga sites in the diffused GaAs samples, while for the InP case, the zinc substitutionality is dependent on the cooling rate of the sample after high-temperature diffusion. For the slowly cooled sample, a large fraction ({similar to}90%) of the zinc atoms form random precipitates of Zn{sub 3}P{sub 2} and elemental Zn. However, when rapidly cooled only 60% of the zinc forms such precipitates while the rest occupies specific sites in the InP. We analyze our results in terms of the amphoteric native defect model. We show that the difference in the electrical activity of the Zn atoms in GaAs and InP is a consequence of the different location of the Fermi level stabilization energy in these two materials.

  7. Heat conduction of symmetric lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Linru; Yu, Lilong; Zheng, Zhigang; Shu, Changzheng

    2013-06-01

    Heat conduction of symmetric Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) lattices with a coupling displacement was investigated. Through simplifying the model, we derived analytical expression of thermal current of the system in the overdamped case. By means of numerical calculations, the results indicate that: (i) As the coupling displacement d equals to zero, temperature oscillations of the heat baths linked with the lattices can control magnitude and direction of the thermal current; (ii) Whether there is a temperature bias or not, the thermal current oscillates periodically with d, whose amplitudes become greater and greater; (iii) As d is not equal to zero, the thermal current monotonically both increases and decreases with temperature oscillation amplitude of the heat baths, dependent on values of d; (iv) The coupling displacement also induces nonmonotonic behaviors of the thermal current vs spring constant of the lattice and coupling strength of the lattices; (v) These dynamical behaviors come from interaction of the coupling displacement with periodic potential of the FK lattices. Our results have the implication that the coupling displacement plays a crucial role in the control of heat current.

  8. Channel Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldo, Andrea; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio; Rigon, Riccardo

    This review proceeds from Luna Leopold's and Ronald Shreve's lasting accomplishments dealing with the study of random-walk and topologically random channel networks. According to the random perspective, which has had a profound influence on the interpretation of natural landforms, nature's resiliency in producing recurrent networks and landforms was interpreted to be the consequence of chance. In fact, central to models of topologically random networks is the assumption of equal likelihood of any tree-like configuration. However, a general framework of analysis exists that argues that all possible network configurations draining a fixed area are not necessarily equally likely. Rather, a probability P(s) is assigned to a particular spanning tree configuration, say s, which can be generally assumed to obey a Boltzmann distribution: P(s) % e^-H(s)/T, where T is a parameter and H(s) is a global property of the network configuration s related to energetic characters, i.e. its Hamiltonian. One extreme case is the random topology model where all trees are equally likely, i.e. the limit case for T6 4 . The other extreme case is T 6 0, and this corresponds to network configurations that tend to minimize their total energy dissipation to improve their likelihood. Networks obtained in this manner are termed optimal channel networks (OCNs). Observational evidence suggests that the characters of real river networks are reproduced extremely well by OCNs. Scaling properties of energy and entropy of OCNs suggest that large network development is likely to effectively occur at zero temperature (i.e. minimizing its Hamiltonian). We suggest a corollary of dynamic accessibility of a network configuration and speculate towards a thermodynamics of critical self-organization. We thus conclude that both chance and necessity are equally important ingredients for the dynamic origin of channel networks---and perhaps of the geometry of nature.

  9. Lattice Structure in Astrophysics: A reconsideration of White Dwarfs, Variables, and Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robitaille, Pierre-Marie

    2016-03-01

    Stars of the main sequence display a mass-luminosity relation which indicates that they share a common building block (hydrogen) and lattice structure (hexagonal planar) with the solar photosphere. White dwarfs however display very low luminosity in spite of their elevated color temperature. Rather than postulate that these stars represent degenerate matter, as Eddington and Chandrasekhar were forced to assume given their gaseous models, within the context of a Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Solar Model white dwarfs might simply be thought as possessing a different lattice structure (e.g. body centered cubic) and hence a lowered emissivity. They do not need to possess exceeding densities, reduced radii, and degeneracy in order to account for their lowered emissivity. Similarly, variable stars might well be oscillating between lattices types wherein the energy differences involved in the transformations are small. Other stars, such as Wolf-Rayet stars, which lack photospheric emission, might be too hot to enable a discrete lattice to form. Though condensed, the photosphere in that case would have a lattice which is so poorly organized that its emissivity is trivial. Nonetheless, the broad emission lines of Wolf-Rayet stars indicates that these objects are not breaking apart but rather, are important sites of condensation.

  10. Role of Lattice Coupling in Establishing Electronic and Magnetic Properties in Quasi-One-Dimensional Cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. S.; Johnston, S.; Moritz, B.; Lee, J.; Yi, M.; Zhou, K. J.; Schmitt, T.; Patthey, L.; Strocov, V.; Kudo, K.; Koike, Y.; van den Brink, J.; Devereaux, T. P.; Shen, Z. X.

    2013-06-01

    High resolution resonant inelastic x-ray scattering has been performed to reveal the role of lattice coupling in a family of quasi-1D insulating cuprates, Ca2+5xY2-5xCu5O10. Site-dependent low-energy excitations arising from progressive emissions of a 70 meV lattice vibrational mode are resolved for the first time, providing a direct measurement of electron-lattice coupling strength. We show that such electron-lattice coupling causes doping-dependent distortions of the Cu-O-Cu bond angle, which sets the intrachain spin exchange interactions. Our results indicate that the lattice degrees of freedom are fully integrated into the electronic behavior in low-dimensional systems.

  11. Plasmonic phase-gradient metasurface for spontaneous emission control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langguth, L.; Schokker, A. H.; Guo, K.; Koenderink, A. F.

    2015-11-01

    We combine the concept of phase-gradient metasurfaces with fluorescence directionality control of an ensemble of incoherent emitters. We design a periodic metasurface to control the scattering amplitude of the lattice in momentum space. The lattice is embedded in a waveguiding layer doped with organic fluorophores. In contrast to the usual symmetric directionality that plasmonic lattices impart on emission, we find that the phase gradient translates into asymmetric directional emission into the far field, determined by scattering on a subset of the reciprocal lattice vectors. The measured asymmetry is well explained by analytical modeling.

  12. Algebraic Lattices in QFT Renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borinsky, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The structure of overlapping subdivergences, which appear in the perturbative expansions of quantum field theory, is analyzed using algebraic lattice theory. It is shown that for specific QFTs the sets of subdivergences of Feynman diagrams form algebraic lattices. This class of QFTs includes the standard model. In kinematic renormalization schemes, in which tadpole diagrams vanish, these lattices are semimodular. This implies that the Hopf algebra of Feynman diagrams is graded by the coradical degree or equivalently that every maximal forest has the same length in the scope of BPHZ renormalization. As an application of this framework, a formula for the counter terms in zero-dimensional QFT is given together with some examples of the enumeration of primitive or skeleton diagrams.

  13. Madelung energy of Yukawa lattices.

    PubMed

    Pereira, P C N; Apolinario, S W S

    2012-10-01

    We propose a method to obtain an approximate closed form expression for the Madelung energy (ME) of Yukawa lattices. Such a method is applied for lattices of different topologies and dimensions. The obtained Madelung energies have a satisfactory accuracy for all ranges of the screening parameter κ of the Yukawa potential, and it becomes exact in the asymptotic limits κ→0 and κ→+∞. For instance, for the triangular lattice, the maximum relative error of the ME given by the method is about 0.0047. Also, satisfactory results are obtained for the one-component plasma limit. The Madelung constants of the two-dimensional hexagonal BN and square NaCl and the three-dimensional cubic NaCl crystals are estimated with a relative error of 0.004, 0.006, and 0.03, respectively. Finally, different ways to improve the method are presented and discussed. PMID:23214705

  14. Lattice QCD Beyond Ground States

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin; Saul D. Cohen

    2007-09-11

    In this work, we apply black box methods (methods not requiring input) to find excited-state energies. A variety of such methods for lattice QCD were introduced at the 3rd iteration of the numerical workshop series. We first review a selection of approaches that have been used in lattice calculations to determine multiple energy states: multiple correlator fits, the variational method and Bayesian fitting. In the second half, we will focus on a black box method, the multi-effective mass. We demonstrate the approach on a toy model, as well as on real lattice data, extracting multiple states from single correlators. Without complicated operator construction or specialized fitting programs, the black box method shows good consistency with the traditional approaches.

  15. Lattice Structures For Aerospace Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Olmo, E.; Grande, E.; Samartin, C. R.; Bezdenejnykh, M.; Torres, J.; Blanco, N.; Frovel, M.; Canas, J.

    2012-07-01

    The way of mass reduction improving performances in the aerospace structures is a constant and relevant challenge in the space business. The designs, materials and manufacturing processes are permanently in evolution to explore and get mass optimization solutions at low cost. In the framework of ICARO project, EADS CASA ESPACIO (ECE) has designed, manufactured and tested a technology demonstrator which shows that lattice type of grid structures is a promising weight saving solution for replacing some traditional metallic and composite structures for space applications. A virtual testing methodology was used in order to support the design of a high modulus CFRP cylindrical lattice technology demonstrator. The manufacturing process, based on composite Automatic Fiber Placement (AFP) technology developed by ECE, allows obtaining high quality low weight lattice structures potentially applicable to a wide range of aerospace structures. Launcher payload adaptors, satellite platforms, antenna towers or instrument supports are some promising candidates.

  16. Algebraic Lattices in QFT Renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borinsky, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The structure of overlapping subdivergences, which appear in the perturbative expansions of quantum field theory, is analyzed using algebraic lattice theory. It is shown that for specific QFTs the sets of subdivergences of Feynman diagrams form algebraic lattices. This class of QFTs includes the standard model. In kinematic renormalization schemes, in which tadpole diagrams vanish, these lattices are semimodular. This implies that the Hopf algebra of Feynman diagrams is graded by the coradical degree or equivalently that every maximal forest has the same length in the scope of BPHZ renormalization. As an application of this framework, a formula for the counter terms in zero-dimensional QFT is given together with some examples of the enumeration of primitive or skeleton diagrams.

  17. Studying and applying channeling at extremely high bunch charges

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, R.A.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    The potentially high plasma densities possible in solids might produce extremely high acceleration gradients. However solid-state plasmas could pose daunting challenges. Crystal channeling has been suggested as a mechanism to ameliorate these problems. A high-density plasma in a crystal lattice could quench the channeling process. There is no experimental or theoretical guidance on channeling for intense charged particle beams. An experiment has been carried out at the Fermilab A0 photoinjector to observe electron channeling radiation at high bunch charges. An electron beam with up to 8 nC per electron bunch was used to investigate the electron-crystal interaction. No evidence was found of quenching of channeling at charge densities two orders of magnitude larger than in earlier experiments. Possible new channeling experiments are discussed for the much higher bunch charge densities and shorter times required to probe channeling breakdown and plasma behavior.

  18. Nucleon Structure from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Haegler, Philipp

    2011-10-24

    Hadron structure calculations in lattice QCD have seen substantial progress during recent years. We illustrate the achievements that have been made by discussing latest lattice results for a limited number of important observables related to nucleon form factors and generalized parton distributions. A particular focus is placed on the decomposition of the nucleon spin 1/2 in terms of quark spin and orbital angular momentum contributions. Results and limitations of the necessary chiral extrapolations based on ChPT will be briefly discussed.

  19. Lattice QCD and Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinos Orginos

    2007-03-01

    A steady stream of developments in Lattice QCD have made it possible today to begin to address the question of how nuclear physics emerges from the underlying theory of strong interactions. Central role in this understanding play both the effective field theory description of nuclear forces and the ability to perform accurate non-perturbative calculations in lo w energy QCD. Here I present some recent results that attempt to extract important low energy constants of the effective field theory of nuclear forces from lattice QCD.

  20. Machines for lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, P.B.

    1989-05-01

    The most promising approach to the solution of the theory of strong interactions is large scale numerical simulation using the techniques of lattice gauge theory. At the present time, computing requirements for convincing calculations of the properties of hadrons exceed the capabilities of even the most powerful commercial supercomputers. This has led to the development of massively parallel computers dedicated to lattice gauge theory. This talk will discuss the computing requirements behind these machines, and general features of the components and architectures of the half dozen major projects now in existence. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  1. VARIABLE MOMENTUM COMPACTION LATTICE STUDIES.

    SciTech Connect

    KRAMER,S.; MURPHY,J.B.

    1999-03-29

    The VUV storage ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source was used to study the impact of changes in the momentum compaction factors over a large range from positive to negative values. Changes in bunch length and synchrotron tune were measured versus current and RF parameters for these different lattices. By controlling both the first and second-order momentum compaction factors, a lattice was developed in which a pair of alpha buckets was created within the energy aperture of the vacuum chamber and beam was stored simultaneously in both buckets.

  2. Nuclear Physics from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Silas Beane, Konstantinos Orginos, Martin Savage

    2011-01-01

    We review recent progress toward establishing lattice Quantum Chromodynamics as a predictive calculational framework for nuclear physics. A survey of the current techniques that are used to extract low-energy hadronic scattering amplitudes and interactions is followed by a review of recent two-body and few-body calculations by the NPLQCD collaboration and others. An outline of the nuclear physics that is expected to be accomplished with Lattice QCD in the next decade, along with estimates of the required computational resources, is presented.

  3. Spin-Lattice Coupling and Superconductivity in Fe Pnictides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Egami, T.; Fine, B. V.; Parshall, D.; Subedi, A.; Singh, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    We consider strong spin-lattice and spin-phonon coupling in iron pnictides and discuss its implications on superconductivity. Strong magneto-volume effect in iron compounds has long been known as the Invar effect. Fe pnictides also exhibit this effect, reflected in particular on the dependence of the magnetic moment on the atomic volume of Fe defined by the positions of the nearest neighbor atoms. Through the phenomenological Landau theory, developed on the basis of the calculations by the density functional theory (DFT) and the experimental results, we quantify the strength of the spin-lattice interaction as it relates to the Stoner criterion for themore » onset of magnetism. We suggest that the coupling between electrons and phonons through the spin channel may be sufficiently strong to be an important part of the superconductivity mechanism in Fe pnictides.« less

  4. Lattice Boltzmann method for the Saint-Venant equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haifei; Wang, Hongda; Liu, Shu; Hu, Changwei; Ding, Yu; Zhang, Jie

    2015-05-01

    The Saint-Venant equations represent the hydrodynamic principles of unsteady flows in open channel network through a set of non-linear partial differential equations. In this paper, a new lattice Boltzmann approach to solving the one-dimensional Saint-Venant equations (LABSVE) is developed, demonstrating the variation of discharge and sectional area with external forces, such as bed slope and bed friction. Our research recovers the Saint-Venant equations through deducing the Chapman-Enskog expansion on the lattice Boltzmann equation, which is a mesoscopic technique, bridging the molecular movement and macroscopic physical variables. It is also a fully explicit process, providing simplicity for programming. The model is verified by three benchmark tests: (i) a one-dimensional subcritical gradient flow; (ii) a dam-break wave flow; (iii) a flood event on the Yongding River. The results showed the accuracy of the proposed method and its good applicability in solving Saint-Venant problems.

  5. Lattice site of helium implanted in magnesium aluminate spinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alien, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    The lattice site of helium implanted at 60 keV in magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl 2O 4) has been investigated with channeling effect measurements that apply the ion-induced 3He(d, p) 4He nuclear reaction. Within the spinel crystal structure, numerous interstices characterized by octahedral anion coordination are intrinsically unfilled by cations. For implantation at 300 K, a typical helium atom locates centrally in one of these vacant octahedral interstices with a probability of approximately 95%. Significant occupation of other lattice sites of either high or low symmetry was rejected. In particular, helium neither clusters in defect complexes nor locates in tetrahedral interstices or substitutional sites.

  6. Toward the excited isoscalar meson spectrum from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Guo, Peng; Thomas, Christopher E.

    2013-11-18

    We report on the extraction of an excited spectrum of isoscalar mesons using lattice QCD. Calculations on several lattice volumes are performed with a range of light quark masses corresponding to pion masses down to about ~400 MeV. The distillation method enables us to evaluate the required disconnected contributions with high statistical precision for a large number of meson interpolating fields. We find relatively little mixing between light and strange in most JPC channels; one notable exception is the pseudoscalar sector where the approximate SU(3)F octet, singlet structure of the η, η' is reproduced. We extract exotic JPC states, identified as hybrid mesons in which an excited gluonic field is coupled to a color-octet qqbar pair, along with non-exotic hybrid mesons embedded in a qq¯-like spectrum.

  7. Toward the excited isoscalar meson spectrum from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Guo, Peng; Thomas, Christopher E.

    2013-11-18

    We report on the extraction of an excited spectrum of isoscalar mesons using lattice QCD. Calculations on several lattice volumes are performed with a range of light quark masses corresponding to pion masses down to about ~400 MeV. The distillation method enables us to evaluate the required disconnected contributions with high statistical precision for a large number of meson interpolating fields. We find relatively little mixing between light and strange in most JPC channels; one notable exception is the pseudoscalar sector where the approximate SU(3)F octet, singlet structure of the η, η' is reproduced. We extract exotic JPC states, identifiedmore » as hybrid mesons in which an excited gluonic field is coupled to a color-octet qqbar pair, along with non-exotic hybrid mesons embedded in a qq¯-like spectrum.« less

  8. Inherent secure communications using lattice based waveform design.

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, Matthew Owen

    2013-12-01

    The wireless communications channel is innately insecure due to the broadcast nature of the electromagnetic medium. Many techniques have been developed and implemented in order to combat insecurities and ensure the privacy of transmitted messages. Traditional methods include encrypting the data via cryptographic methods, hiding the data in the noise floor as in wideband communications, or nulling the signal in the spatial direction of the adversary using array processing techniques. This work analyzes the design of signaling constellations, i.e. modulation formats, to combat eavesdroppers from correctly decoding transmitted messages. It has been shown that in certain channel models the ability of an adversary to decode the transmitted messages can be degraded by a clever signaling constellation based on lattice theory. This work attempts to optimize certain lattice parameters in order to maximize the security of the data transmission. These techniques are of interest because they are orthogonal to, and can be used in conjunction with, traditional security techniques to create a more secure communication channel.

  9. Lattice site location and annealing behavior of implanted Ca and Sr in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vries, B.; Vantomme, A.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.; Araújo, J. P.; Lojkowski, W.; Kolesnikov, D.

    2006-07-01

    We report on the lattice location of ion-implanted Ca and Sr in thin films of single-crystalline wurtzite GaN. Using the emission channeling technique the angular distributions of β- particles emitted by the radioactive isotopes 45Ca (t1/2=163.8 d) and 89Sr (t1/2=50.53 d) were monitored with a position-sensitive detector following 60 keV room-temperature implantation. Our experiments give direct evidence that ˜90% of Ca and >60% of Sr atoms were occupying substitutional Ga sites with root mean square displacements of the order of 0.15-0.30 Å, i.e., larger than the expected thermal vibration amplitude of 0.074 Å. Annealing the Ca implanted samples at 1100-1350 °C in high-pressure N2 atmosphere resulted in a better incorporation into the substitutional Ga site. The Sr implanted sample showed a small decrease in rms displacements for vacuum annealing up to 900 °C, while the substitutional fraction remained nearly constant. The annealing behavior of the rms displacements can explain why annealing temperatures above 1100 °C are needed to achieve electrical and optical activations, despite the fact that the majority of the acceptors are already located on Ga sites immediately after ion implantation.

  10. Progress in lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1983-01-01

    These lectures first provide an overview of the current status of lattice gauge theory calculations. They then review some technical points on group integration, gauge fixing, and order parameters. Various Monte Carlo algorithms are discussed. Finally, alternatives to the Wilson action are considered in the context of universality for the continuum limit. 41 references.

  11. Triangles in a Lattice Parabola.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sastry, K. R. S.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed are properties possessed by polygons inscribed in the lattice parabola y=x, including the area of a triangle, triangles of minimum area, conditions for right triangles, triangles whose area is the cube of an integer, and implications of Pick's Theorem. Further directions to pursue are suggested. (MDH)

  12. Nonequilibrium model on Archimedean lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, F.

    2014-03-01

    On (4, 6, 12) and (4, 82) Archimedean lattices, the critical properties of the majority-vote model are considered and studied using the Glauber transition rate proposed by Kwak et al. [Kwak et al., Phys. Rev. E, 75, 061110 (2007)] rather than the traditional majority-vote with noise [Oliveira, J. Stat. Phys. 66, 273 (1992)]. We obtain T c and the critical exponents for this Glauber rate from extensive Monte Carlo studies and finite size scaling. The calculated values of the critical temperatures and Binder cumulant are T c = 0.651(3) and U 4* = 0.612(5), and T c = 0.667(2) and U 4* = 0.613(5), for (4, 6, 12) and (4, 82) lattices respectively, while the exponent (ratios) β/ν, γ/ν and 1/ν are respectively: 0.105(8), 1.48(11) and 1.16(5) for (4, 6, 12); and 0.113(2), 1.60(4) and 0.84(6) for (4, 82) lattices. The usual Ising model and the majority-vote model on previously studied regular lattices or complex networks differ from our new results.

  13. Nonequilibrium model on Archimedean lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, F. Welington S.

    2014-03-01

    On (4, 6, 12) and (4, 82) Archimedean lattices, the critical properties of the majority-vote model are considered and studied using the Glauber transition rate proposed by Kwak et al. [Kwak et al., Phys. Rev. E, 75, 061110 (2007)] rather than the traditional majority-vote with noise [Oliveira, J. Stat. Phys. 66, 273 (1992)]. We obtain T c and the critical exponents for this Glauber rate from extensive Monte Carlo studies and finite size scaling. The calculated values of the critical temperatures and Binder cumulant are T c = 0.651(3) and U {4/*} = 0.612(5), and T c = 0.667(2) and U {4/*} = 0.613(5), for (4, 6, 12) and (4, 82) lattices respectively, while the exponent (ratios) β/ν, γ/ν and 1/ ν are respectively: 0.105(8), 1.48(11) and 1.16(5) for (4, 6, 12); and 0.113(2), 1.60(4) and 0.84(6) for (4, 82) lattices. The usual Ising model and the majority-vote model on previously studied regular lattices or complex networks differ from our new results.

  14. Microparticle manipulation in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Weiqiang

    With the interference of several coherent beams, a periodical potential is produced for the particles trapped inside. The theoretical calculations show that the optical force applied on the particle in such optical lattice is in sinusoidal form. The force amplitudes vary greatly depending on the ratio of the particle size to the spacing of the optical lattice. A setup is constructed to demonstrate this dependence with two different methods: equipartition theorem and hydrodynamic-drag method. Based on this size dependence we develop an approach that allows tunable, size-dependent force selection of a subset of particles from an ensemble containing mixed particles. Combining a universal constant force with the sinusoidal optical force, a tilted washboard potential can be formed for the trapped particle. The diffusion of a particle over the barrier in this tilted washboard potential is briefly discussed. When the washboard potential oscillates, some interesting phenomena will happen: at high oscillation frequency, the particle's movement depends only on the oscillating amplitude; at low frequency, there are some combinations of the oscillation frequency and amplitude that induce the enhanced movement of the particle. This enhancement is first experimentally demonstrated with our setup. By implanting a single laser tweezers into the interferometric optical tweezers, we succeed in dynamically assembling designer colloidal lattices on the background of the interferometric optical tweezers. This new technique provides a flexible tool to design 2-d colloidal lattices.

  15. Lattice QCD in Background Fields

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Brian Tiburzi, Andre Walker-Loud

    2009-06-01

    Electromagnetic properties of hadrons can be computed by lattice simulations of QCD in background fields. We demonstrate new techniques for the investigation of charged hadron properties in electric fields. Our current calculations employ large electric fields, motivating us to analyze chiral dynamics in strong QED backgrounds, and subsequently uncover surprising non-perturbative effects present at finite volume.

  16. Experimenting with Langevin lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gavai, R.V.; Potvin, J.; Sanielevici, S.

    1987-05-01

    We report on the status of our investigations of the effects of systematic errors upon the practical merits of Langevin updating in full lattice QCD. We formulate some rules for the safe use of this updating procedure and some observations on problems which may be common to all approximate fermion algorithms.

  17. Simple theories of complex lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyrard, Michel

    1998-11-01

    While the theory of solitons has been very successful for continuous systems, very few nonlinear discrete lattices are amenable to an exact analytical treatment. In these “complex lattices” discreteness can be hostile to the solitons, preventing them to move due to the lack of translational invariance or even to exist as localized excitations. On the other hand, lattice discreteness can sometimes be very helpful. It can stabilize solutions that otherwise would split apart as in the discrete sine-Gordon lattice, or even allow the existence of localized oscillatory modes as exact solutions in systems where they would decay in the continuum limit. It is interesting that many of these phenomena can be understood qualitatively, and sometimes quantitatively, with very simple theories that rely on the usual concepts of linear wave propagation, resonances, linear stability of waves, for instance. There are, however, phenomena specific to discrete nonlinear lattices which allow the build up of large amplitude localized excitations, sometimes out of thermal fluctuations, which are more resistant to simple approaches and could deserve further interest because they may be relevant for various physical systems.

  18. CASSIS — A new Monte-Carlo computer program for channeling simulation of RBS, NRA and PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, A.

    1995-08-01

    The basic concepts of the Monte Carlo computer simulation program CASSIS (Channeling Adapted Simulation of Swift Ions in Solids) for channeling phenomena are presented and discussed. In contrast to common computer codes CASSIS is able to perform calculations for high foreign atom concentrations, complex noncubic crystal lattices and PIXE-channeling. The feasibility of the program is demonstrated for different materials.

  19. Orbital optical lattices with bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kock, T.; Hippler, C.; Ewerbeck, A.; Hemmerich, A.

    2016-02-01

    This article provides a synopsis of our recent experimental work exploring Bose-Einstein condensation in metastable higher Bloch bands of optical lattices. Bipartite lattice geometries have allowed us to implement appropriate band structures, which meet three basic requirements: the existence of metastable excited states sufficiently protected from collisional band relaxation, a mechanism to excite the atoms initially prepared in the lowest band with moderate entropy increase, and the possibility of cross-dimensional tunneling dynamics, necessary to establish coherence along all lattice axes. A variety of bands can be selectively populated and a subsequent thermalization process leads to the formation of a condensate in the lowest energy state of the chosen band. As examples the 2nd, 4th and 7th bands in a bipartite square lattice are discussed. The geometry of the 2nd and 7th bands can be tuned such that two inequivalent energetically degenerate energy minima arise at the X ±-points at the edge of the 1st Brillouin zone. In this case even a small interaction energy is sufficient to lock the phase between the two condensation points such that a complex-valued chiral superfluid order parameter can emerge, which breaks time reversal symmetry. In the 4th band a condensate can be formed at the Γ-point in the center of the 1st Brillouin zone, which can be used to explore topologically protected band touching points. The new techniques to access orbital degrees of freedom in higher bands greatly extend the class of many-body scenarios that can be explored with bosons in optical lattices.

  20. The B → K* form factors on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agadjanov, Andria; Bernard, Véronique; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Rusetsky, Akaki

    2016-09-01

    The extraction of the B →K* transition form factors from lattice data is studied, applying non-relativistic effective field theory in a finite volume. The possible mixing of πK and ηK states is taken into account. The two-channel analogue of the Lellouch-Lüscher formula is reproduced. Due to the resonance nature of the K*, an equation is derived, which allows to determine the form factors at the pole position in a process-independent manner. The infinitely-narrow width approximation of the results is discussed.

  1. Evidence for a bound H-dibaryon using lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Will Detmold

    2012-04-01

    The H-dibaryon, a J = 0 state with the valence quark content udsuds, has long been hypothesized to exist because of the attractive nature of color magnetic gluon exchange in the flavor- singlet channel. Using lattice QCD the NPLQCD collaboration have investigated this system and evidence is presented for the existence of a stable H-dibaryon, albeit at a quark mass somewhat larger than that in nature. This calculation is reviewed and combined with subsequent calculations by the HALQCD collaboration at the SU(3) flavor symmetric point to identify bounds on the H-dibaryon mass at the physical quark masses.

  2. Zero temperature string breaking in lattice quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Claude; DeGrand, Thomas; DeTar, Carleton; Lacock, Pierre; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, Urs M.; Hetrick, James; Orginos, Kostas; Toussaint, Doug; Sugar, Robert L.

    2001-10-01

    The separation of a heavy quark and antiquark pair leads to the formation of a tube of flux, or ''string,'' which should break in the presence of light quark-antiquark pairs. This expected zero-temperature phenomenon has proven elusive in simulations of lattice QCD. We study mixing between the string state and the two-meson decay channel in QCD with two flavors of dynamical sea quarks. We confirm that mixing is weak and find that it decreases at level crossing. While our study does not show direct effects of internal quark loops, our results, combined with unitarity, give a clear confirmation of string breaking.

  3. The structure of a moving vortex lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, D.W.; Crabtree, G.W.; Kaper, H.G.; Leaf, G.K.; Levine, D.M.; Vinokur, V.M.; Koshelev, A.E.

    1995-11-01

    Numerical solutions of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations show a new mechanism for plastic motion of a driven vortex lattice in a clean superconductor. The mechanism, which involves the creation of a defect superstructure, is intrinsic to the moving vortex lattice and is independent of bulk pinning. Other structural features found in the solutions include a reorientation of the vortex lattice and a gradual healing of lattice defects under the influence of a transport current.

  4. Lattice dynamics and lattice thermal conductivity of thorium dicarbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zongmeng; Huai, Ping; Qiu, Wujie; Ke, Xuezhi; Zhang, Wenqing; Zhu, Zhiyuan

    2014-11-01

    The elastic and thermodynamic properties of ThC2 with a monoclinic symmetry have been studied by means of density functional theory and direct force-constant method. The calculated properties including the thermal expansion, the heat capacity and the elastic constants are in a good agreement with experiment. Our results show that the vibrational property of the C2 dimer in ThC2 is similar to that of a free standing C2 dimer. This indicates that the C2 dimer in ThC2 is not strongly bonded to Th atoms. The lattice thermal conductivity for ThC2 was calculated by means of the Debye-Callaway model. As a comparison, the conductivity of ThC was also calculated. Our results show that the ThC and ThC2 contributions of the lattice thermal conductivity to the total conductivity are 29% and 17%, respectively.

  5. Charged and Neutral Particles Channeling Phenomena Channeling 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabagov, Sultan B.; Palumbo, Luigi

    2010-04-01

    regime by a buried oxide layer / V. Guidi, A. Mazzolari and V. V. Tikhomirov -- A positron source using channeling in crystals for linear colliders / X. Artru ... [et al.] -- Parametric channeling and collapse of charged particles beams in crystals / M. Vysotskyy and V. Vysotskii.The formation and usage of coherent correlated charged particles states in the physics of channeling in crystals / S. V. Adamenko, V. I. Vysotskii and M. V. Vysotskyy -- Surface channeling of magnetic-charged particles on multilayer surface / S. V. Adamenko and V. I. Vysotskii -- Coherent creation of anti-hydrogen atoms in a crystal by relativistic antiproton / Yu. P. Kunashenko -- Thermal equilibrium of light ions in heavy crystals / E. Tsyganov -- Photon emission of electrons in a crystalline undulator / H. Backe ... [et al.] -- Channeling radiation from relativistic electrons in a crystal target as complementary x-ray and gamma ray source at synchrotron light facilities / K. B. Korotchenko, Yu. L. Pivovarov and T. A. Tukhfatullin -- Diffracted channeling radiation and other compound radiation processes / H. Nitta -- Collective scattering on the atom planes under the condition of full transition / A. R. Mkrtchyan ... [et al.] -- The proposal of the experiment on the research of the diffracted channeling radiation / D. A. Baklanov ... [et al.] -- Positron channeling at the DaOne BTF Facility: the cup experiment / L. Quintieri ... [et al.] -- Radiation spectra of 200 MeV electrons in diamond and silicon crystals at axial and planar orientations / K. Fissum ... [et al.] -- Channeling experiments with electrons at the Mainz Microtron Mami / W. Lauth ... [et al.] -- Dechanneling of positrons by dislocations: effects of anharmonic interactions / J. George and A. P. Pathak -- Diffracted channeling radiation from axially channeled relativistic electrons / K. B. Korotchenko ... [et al.] -- Intensive quasi-monochromatic, directed x-ray radiation of planar channeled positron bunch / L. Gevorgian

  6. The CKM Matrix from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, Paul B.; /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    Lattice QCD plays an essential role in testing and determining the parameters of the CKM theory of flavor mixing and CP violation. Very high precisions are required for lattice calculations analyzing CKM data; I discuss the prospects for achieving them. Lattice calculations will also play a role in investigating flavor mixing and CP violation beyond the Standard Model.

  7. Lattice gaugefixing and other optics in lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Ken.

    1992-06-01

    We present results from four projects. In the first, quark and gluon propagators and effective masses and {Delta}I = 1/2 Rule operator matching coefficients are computed numerically in gaugefixed lattice QCD. In the second, the same quantities are evaluated analytically in the strong coupling, N {yields} {infinity} limit. In the third project, the Schwinger model is studied in covariant gauges, where we show that the effective electron mass varies with the gauge parameter and that longitudinal gaugefixing ambiguities affect operator product expansion coefficients (analogous to {Delta}I = 1/2 Rule matching coefficients) determined by matching gauge variant matrix elements. However, we find that matching coefficients even if shifted by the unphysical modes are {xi} invariant. In the fourth project, we show that the strong coupling parallelogram lattice Schwinger model as a different thermodynamic limit than the weak coupling continuum limit. As a function of lattice skewness angle these models span the {Delta} = {minus}1 critical line of 6-vertex models which, in turn, have been identified as c = 1 conformal field theories.

  8. Channel Wall Landslides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The multiple landslides in this VIS image occur along a steep channel wall. Note the large impact crater in the context image. The formation of the crater may have initially weakened that area of the surface prior to channel formation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.7, Longitude 324.8 East (35.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. Channels and Erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 20 June 2003

    The dissected and eroded channel observed in this THEMIS image taken of plains materials southwest of the volcano Elysium Mons shows typical erosional islands and depositional features. The interesting thing about this channel is that it appears to start out of nowhere. The MOLA context image shows that the channel originates from a fissure within the ground, whose origin is likely volcanic, but may also be related to volatile processes.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 19.5, Longitude 126.8 East (233.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of a viscoelastic shear-thinning fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papenkort, S.; Voigtmann, Th.

    2015-07-01

    We present a hybrid lattice Boltzmann algorithm for the simulation of flow glass-forming fluids, characterized by slow structural relaxation, at the level of the Navier-Stokes equation. The fluid is described in terms of a nonlinear integral constitutive equation, relating the stress tensor locally to the history of flow. As an application, we present results for an integral nonlinear Maxwell model that combines the effects of (linear) viscoelasticity and (nonlinear) shear thinning. We discuss the transient dynamics of velocities, shear stresses, and normal stress differences in planar pressure-driven channel flow, after switching on (startup) and off (cessation) of the driving pressure. This transient dynamics depends nontrivially on the channel width due to an interplay between hydrodynamic momentum diffusion and slow structural relaxation.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of a viscoelastic shear-thinning fluid.

    PubMed

    Papenkort, S; Voigtmann, Th

    2015-07-28

    We present a hybrid lattice Boltzmann algorithm for the simulation of flow glass-forming fluids, characterized by slow structural relaxation, at the level of the Navier-Stokes equation. The fluid is described in terms of a nonlinear integral constitutive equation, relating the stress tensor locally to the history of flow. As an application, we present results for an integral nonlinear Maxwell model that combines the effects of (linear) viscoelasticity and (nonlinear) shear thinning. We discuss the transient dynamics of velocities, shear stresses, and normal stress differences in planar pressure-driven channel flow, after switching on (startup) and off (cessation) of the driving pressure. This transient dynamics depends nontrivially on the channel width due to an interplay between hydrodynamic momentum diffusion and slow structural relaxation. PMID:26233150

  12. Form factors from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dru Renner

    2012-04-01

    Precision computation of hadronic physics with lattice QCD is becoming feasible. The last decade has seen precent-level calculations of many simple properties of mesons, and the last few years have seen calculations of baryon masses, including the nucleon mass, accurate to a few percent. As computational power increases and algorithms advance, the precise calculation of a variety of more demanding hadronic properties will become realistic. With this in mind, I discuss the current lattice QCD calculations of generalized parton distributions with an emphasis on the prospects for well-controlled calculations for these observables as well. I will do this by way of several examples: the pion and nucleon form factors and moments of the nucleon parton and generalized-parton distributions.

  13. Lattice Simulations and Infrared Conformality

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Appelquist, Thomas; Fleming, George T.; Lin, Meifeng; Neil, Ethan T.; Schaich, David A

    2011-09-01

    We examine several recent lattice-simulation data sets, asking whether they are consistent with infrared conformality. We observe, in particular, that for an SU(3) gauge theory with 12 Dirac fermions in the fundamental representation, recent simulation data can be described assuming infrared conformality. Lattice simulations include a fermion mass m which is then extrapolated to zero, and we note that this data can be fit by a small-m expansion, allowing a controlled extrapolation. We also note that the conformal hypothesis does not work well for two theories that are known or expected to be confining and chirally broken, and that itmore » does work well for another theory expected to be infrared conformal.« less

  14. Entropy favours open colloidal lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xiaoming; Chen, Qian; Granick, Steve

    2013-03-01

    Burgeoning experimental and simulation activity seeks to understand the existence of self-assembled colloidal structures that are not close-packed. Here we describe an analytical theory based on lattice dynamics and supported by experiments that reveals the fundamental role entropy can play in stabilizing open lattices. The entropy we consider is associated with the rotational and vibrational modes unique to colloids interacting through extended attractive patches. The theory makes predictions of the implied temperature, pressure and patch-size dependence of the phase diagram of open and close-packed structures. More generally, it provides guidance for the conditions at which targeted patchy colloidal assemblies in two and three dimensions are stable, thus overcoming the difficulty in exploring by experiment or simulation the full range of conceivable parameters.

  15. LATTICE QCD AT FINITE DENSITY.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHMIDT, C.

    2006-07-23

    I discuss different approaches to finite density lattice QCD. In particular, I focus on the structure of the phase diagram and discuss attempts to determine the location of the critical end-point. Recent results on the transition line as function of the chemical potential (T{sub c}({mu}{sub q})) are reviewed. Along the transition line, hadronic fluctuations have been calculated; which can be used to characterize properties of the Quark Gluon plasma and eventually can also help to identify the location of the critical end-point in the QCD phase diagram on the lattice and in heavy ion experiments. Furthermore, I comment on the structure of the phase diagram at large {mu}{sub q}.

  16. Lattice splitting under intermittent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schläpfer, Markus; Trantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2010-05-01

    We study the splitting of regular square lattices subject to stochastic intermittent flows. Various flow patterns are produced by different groupings of the nodes, based on their random alternation between two possible states. The resulting flows on the lattices decrease with the number of groups according to a power law. By Monte Carlo simulations we reveal how the time span until the occurrence of a splitting depends on the flow patterns. Increasing the flow fluctuation frequency shortens this time span, which reaches a minimum before rising again due to inertia effects incorporated in the model. The size of the largest connected component after the splitting is rather independent of the flow fluctuation frequency but slightly decreases with the link capacities. Our findings carry important implications for real-world networks, such as electric power grids with a large share of renewable intermittent energy sources.

  17. Lattice splitting under intermittent flows.

    PubMed

    Schläpfer, Markus; Trantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2010-05-01

    We study the splitting of regular square lattices subject to stochastic intermittent flows. Various flow patterns are produced by different groupings of the nodes, based on their random alternation between two possible states. The resulting flows on the lattices decrease with the number of groups according to a power law. By Monte Carlo simulations we reveal how the time span until the occurrence of a splitting depends on the flow patterns. Increasing the flow fluctuation frequency shortens this time span, which reaches a minimum before rising again due to inertia effects incorporated in the model. The size of the largest connected component after the splitting is rather independent of the flow fluctuation frequency but slightly decreases with the link capacities. Our findings carry important implications for real-world networks, such as electric power grids with a large share of renewable intermittent energy sources. PMID:20866296

  18. A transportable optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Stefan; Häfner, Sebastian; Grotti, Jacopo; Koller, Silvio; Al-Masoudi, Ali; Sterr, Uwe; Lisdat, Christian

    2016-06-01

    We present the experimental setup and first results of PTB's transportable 87Sr clock. It consists of a physics package, several compact laser breadboards, and a transportable high finesse cavity for the clock laser. A comparison of the transportable system with our stationary optical lattice clock yields an instability of 2.2 x 10-15 √s/τ for the transportable clock. The current fractional uncertainty of 1 × 10-15 is still limited by the not yet fully evaluated light shift from the free running optical lattice laser operated near the magic wavelength. We are currently improving our transportable system to reach an uncertainty at or below the 10-17 level, which will finaly be limited by the uncertainty in blackbody radiation shift correction.

  19. Limiting vibration in space lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Midturi, S.

    1997-12-01

    Using finite-element analysis and other methods, engineers are evaluating ways to control the vibrations and extend the use of flexible, deployable structures in space. The exploration of the universe by the United States has led to many technological innovations for space travel. Among them are lightweight lattice structures and booms, which have been used on the Voyager probes to the outer planets, the Hubble space telescope,m and many other missions. Typical applications of lattice structures in space include instrument booms, antennae, and solar-array deployers and supports. Booms are designed for automatic deployment to a controlled length and retraction into a very compact stowage volume. Deployable solar booms are often subjected to severe vibration while in orbit, and vibration must be limited or completely eliminated for safe and satisfactory performance.

  20. Innovations in Lattice QCD Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinos Orginos

    2006-06-25

    Lattice QCD calculations demand a substantial amount of computing power in order to achieve the high precision results needed to better understand the nature of strong interactions, assist experiment to discover new physics, and predict the behavior of a diverse set of physical systems ranging from the proton itself to astrophysical objects such as neutron stars. However, computer power alone is clearly not enough to tackle the calculations we need to be doing today. A steady stream of recent algorithmic developments has made an important impact on the kinds of calculations we can currently perform. In this talk I am reviewing these algorithms and their impact on the nature of lattice QCD calculations performed today.

  1. Topological defects on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasen, David; Mong, Roger; Fendley, Paul

    We construct defects in two-dimensional classical lattice models and one-dimensional quantum chains that are topologically invariant in the continuum limit. We show explicitly that these defect lines and their trivalent junctions commute with the transfer matrix/Hamiltonian. The resulting splitting and joining properties of the defect lines are exactly those of anyons in a topological phase. One useful consequence is an explicit definition of twisted boundary conditions that yield the precise shift in momentum quantization, and so provide a natural way of relating microscopic and macroscopic properties. Another is a generalization of Kramers-Wannier duality to a wide class of height models. Even more strikingly, we derive the modular transformation matrices explicitly and exactly from purely lattice considerations. We develop this construction for a variety of examples including the two-dimensional Ising model. Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, an NSF physics frontier center with support from the Moore Foundation. NSERC-PGSD.

  2. Heterogeneous, weakly coupled map lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotelo Herrera, M.a. Dolores; San Martín, Jesús; Porter, Mason A.

    2016-07-01

    Coupled map lattices (CMLs) are often used to study emergent phenomena in nature. It is typically assumed (unrealistically) that each component is described by the same map, and it is important to relax this assumption. In this paper, we characterize periodic orbits and the laminar regime of type-I intermittency in heterogeneous weakly coupled map lattices (HWCMLs). We show that the period of a cycle in an HWCML is preserved for arbitrarily small coupling strengths even when an associated uncoupled oscillator would experience a period-doubling cascade. Our results characterize periodic orbits both near and far from saddle-node bifurcations, and we thereby provide a key step for examining the bifurcation structure of heterogeneous CMLs.

  3. Scattering in Quantum Lattice Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, Andrew; Love, Peter

    2009-03-01

    Quantum Lattice Gas Automata (QLGA) are of interest for their use in simulating quantum mechanics on both classical and quantum computers. QLGAs are an extension of classical Lattice Gas Automata where the constraint of unitary evolution is added. In the late 1990s, David A. Meyer as well as Bruce Boghosian and Washington Taylor produced similar models of QLGAs. We start by presenting a unified version of these models and study them from the point of view of the physics of wave-packet scattering. We show that the Meyer and Boghosian-Taylor models are actually the same basic model with slightly different parameterizations and limits. We then implement these models computationally using the Python programming language and show that QLGAs are able to replicate the analytic results of quantum mechanics (for example reflected and transmitted amplitudes for step potentials and the Klein paradox).

  4. Lattice Simulations and Infrared Conformality

    SciTech Connect

    Appelquist, Thomas; Fleming, George T.; Lin, Meifeng; Neil, Ethan T.; Schaich, David A

    2011-09-01

    We examine several recent lattice-simulation data sets, asking whether they are consistent with infrared conformality. We observe, in particular, that for an SU(3) gauge theory with 12 Dirac fermions in the fundamental representation, recent simulation data can be described assuming infrared conformality. Lattice simulations include a fermion mass m which is then extrapolated to zero, and we note that this data can be fit by a small-m expansion, allowing a controlled extrapolation. We also note that the conformal hypothesis does not work well for two theories that are known or expected to be confining and chirally broken, and that it does work well for another theory expected to be infrared conformal.

  5. Apiary B Factory lattice design

    SciTech Connect

    Donald, M.H.R. ); Garren, A.A. )

    1991-04-01

    The Apiary B Factory is a proposed high-intensity electron-positron collider. This paper will present the lattice design for this facility, which envisions two rings with unequal energies in the PEP tunnel. The design has many interesting optical and geometrical features due to the needs to conform to the existing tunnel, and to achieve the necessary emittances, damping times and vacuum. Existing hardware is used to a maximum extent. 8 figs. 1 tab.

  6. Apiary B Factory Lattice Design

    SciTech Connect

    Donald, M.H.R.; Garren, A.A.

    1991-05-03

    The Apiary B Factory is a proposed high-intensity electron-positron collider. This paper presents the lattice design for this facility, which envisions two rings with unequal energies in the PEP tunnel. The design has many interesting optical and geometrical features due to the needs to conform to the existing tunnel, and to achieve the necessary emittances, damping times and vacuum. Existing hardware is used to a maximum extent.

  7. Scanning phononic lattices with ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Vines, R.E.; Wolfe, J.P.; Every, A.V.

    1999-11-01

    A method for probing the elastic properties of newly developed periodic structures using acoustic waves is introduced. Highly anisotropic transmission of surface acoustic waves is observed by continuously scanning the wave vector angle. Preliminary models of wave propagation through multilayers and two-dimensional lattices explain some of the experimental features, while other features can be attributed to the resonant excitation of interface waves. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Fuzzy lattice neurocomputing (FLN) models.

    PubMed

    Kaburlasos, V G; Petridis, V

    2000-12-01

    In this work it is shown how fuzzy lattice neurocomputing (FLN) emerges as a connectionist paradigm in the framework of fuzzy lattices (FL-framework) whose advantages include the capacity to deal rigorously with: disparate types of data such as numeric and linguistic data, intervals of values, 'missing' and 'don't care' data. A novel notation for the FL-framework is introduced here in order to simplify mathematical expressions without losing content. Two concrete FLN models are presented, namely 'sigma-FLN' for competitive clustering, and 'FLN with tightest fits (FLNtf)' for supervised clustering. Learning by the sigma-FLN, is rapid as it requires a single pass through the data, whereas learning by the FLNtf, is incremental, data order independent, polynomial theta(n3), and it guarantees maximization of the degree of inclusion of an input in a learned class as explained in the text. Convenient geometric interpretations are provided. The sigma-FLN is presented here as fuzzy-ART's extension in the FL-framework such that sigma-FLN widens fuzzy-ART's domain of application to (mathematical) lattices by augmenting the scope of both of fuzzy-ART's choice (Weber) and match functions, and by enhancing fuzzy-ART's complement coding technique. The FLNtf neural model is applied to four benchmark data sets of various sizes for pattern recognition and rule extraction. The benchmark data sets in question involve jointly numeric and nominal data with 'missing' and/or 'don't care' attribute values, whereas the lattices involved include the unit-hypercube, a probability space, and a Boolean algebra. The potential of the FL-framework in computing is also delineated. PMID:11156192

  9. Lithium lenses based muon cooling channel

    SciTech Connect

    Valeri I. Balbekov

    2003-05-28

    A linear ionization cooling channel for neutrino factory or muon collider is considered. It includes short Li lenses, matching solenoids, and 201 MHz RF cavities. The basic challenge is a suppression of chromatic effects in a wide energy range typical for muon beams. A special lattice is proposed to reach this, and methodic of an optimization is developed to minimize the chromatic aberrations by suppression of several betatron resonances. The most engineering constraint is a high field of matching solenoids. A channel with less of 10 T field is considered in detail. It is capable to cool transverse emittance of a beam from 2-3 mm to 0.5 mm at the channel length of about 130 m. Because there is no emittance exchange, longitudinal emittance increases in the process from 10 to 20 mm at transmission of about 90%.

  10. Mechanics of advanced fiber reinforced lattice composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Hua-Lin; Zeng, Tao; Fang, Dai-Ning; Yang, Wei

    2010-12-01

    Fiber reinforced lattice composites are light-weight attractive due to their high specific strength and specific stiffness. In the past 10 years, researchers developed three-dimensional (3D) lattice trusses and two-dimensional (2D) lattice grids by various methods including interlacing, weaving, interlocking, filament winding and molding hot-press. The lattice composites have been applied in the fields of radar cross-section reduction, explosive absorption and heat-resistance. In this paper, topologies of the lattice composites, their manufacturing routes, as well as their mechanical and multifunctional applications, were surveyed.

  11. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-01-13

    In this study, one of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculations of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.

  12. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-01-13

    In this study, one of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculationsmore » of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.« less

  13. Quantised vortices in polariton lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berloff, Natalia

    2015-11-01

    The first comprehensive treatment of quantised vorticity in the light of research on vortices in modern fluid mechanics appeared in Russell Donnelly seminal research papers and summarized in his 1991 book ``Quantized Vortices in Helium II''. Recently quantized vortices have been studied in polariton condensates. Polaritons are the mixed light-matter quasi-particles that are formed in the strong exciton-photon coupling regime. Under non-resonant optical excitation rapid relaxation of carriers and bosonic stimulation result in the formation of a non-equilibrium polariton condensate characterized by a single many-body wave-function, therefore, naturally possessing quantized vortices. Polariton condensates can be imprinted into any two-dimensional lattice by spatial modulation of the pumping laser and form vortices via interacting outfows from the pumping sites. Optically pumped polariton condensates can be injected in lattice configurations with arbitrary density profiles offering the possibility to control the kinetics of the condensate and therefore the number and location of vortices. I will present some new developments in theoretical and experimental studies of quantized vortices in polariton condensates and discuss possible practical implementations of polariton lattices.

  14. Ectopic A-lattice seams destabilize microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Katsuki, Miho; Drummond, Douglas R.; Cross, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Natural microtubules typically include one A-lattice seam within an otherwise helically symmetric B-lattice tube. It is currently unclear how A-lattice seams influence microtubule dynamic instability. Here we find that including extra A-lattice seams in GMPCPP microtubules, structural analogues of the GTP caps of dynamic microtubules, destabilizes them, enhancing their median shrinkage rate by >20-fold. Dynamic microtubules nucleated by seeds containing extra A-lattice seams have growth rates similar to microtubules nucleated by B-lattice seeds, yet have increased catastrophe frequencies at both ends. Furthermore, binding B-lattice GDP microtubules to a rigor kinesin surface stabilizes them against shrinkage, whereas microtubules with extra A-lattice seams are stabilized only slightly. Our data suggest that introducing extra A-lattice seams into dynamic microtubules destabilizes them by destabilizing their GTP caps. On this basis, we propose that the single A-lattice seam of natural B-lattice MTs may act as a trigger point, and potentially a regulation point, for catastrophe. PMID:24463734

  15. Lattice Green's functions in all dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttmann, Anthony J.

    2010-07-01

    We give a systematic treatment of lattice Green's functions (LGF) on the d-dimensional diamond, simple cubic, body-centred cubic and face-centred cubic lattices for arbitrary dimensionality d >= 2 for the first three lattices, and for 2 <= d <= 5 for the hyper-fcc lattice. We show that there is a close connection between the LGF of the d-dimensional hyper-cubic lattice and that of the (d - 1)-dimensional diamond lattice. We give constant-term formulations of LGFs for each of these lattices in all dimensions. Through a still under-developed connection with Mahler measures, we point out an unexpected connection between the coefficients of the sc, bcc and diamond LGFs and some Ramanujan-type formulae for 1/π.

  16. Lattice Truss Structural Response Using Energy Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenner, Winfred Scottson

    1996-01-01

    A deterministic methodology is presented for developing closed-form deflection equations for two-dimensional and three-dimensional lattice structures. Four types of lattice structures are studied: beams, plates, shells and soft lattices. Castigliano's second theorem, which entails the total strain energy of a structure, is utilized to generate highly accurate results. Derived deflection equations provide new insight into the bending and shear behavior of the four types of lattices, in contrast to classic solutions of similar structures. Lattice derivations utilizing kinetic energy are also presented, and used to examine the free vibration response of simple lattice structures. Derivations utilizing finite element theory for unique lattice behavior are also presented and validated using the finite element analysis code EAL.

  17. Investigation on the lattice site location of the excess arsenic atoms in GaAs layers grown by low temperature molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Kin Man; Liliental-Weber, Z.

    1991-11-01

    We have measured the excess As atoms present in gaze layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy at low substrate temperatures using particle induced x-ray emission technique. The amount of excess As atoms in layers grown by MBE at 200{degrees}C were found to be {approximately} 4 {times} 10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}2}. Subsequent annealing of the layers under As overpressure at 600{degrees}C did not result in any substantial As loss. However, transmission electron microscopy revealed that As precipitates (2-5nm in diameter) were present in the annealed layers. The lattice location of the excess As atoms in the as grown layers was investigated by ion channeling methods. Angular scans were performed in the <110> axis of the crystal. Our results strongly suggest that a large fraction of these excess As atoms are located in an interstitial position close to an As row. These As intersitials'' are located at a site slightly displaced from the tetrahedral site in a diamond cubic lattice. No interstitial As signal is observed in the annealed layers.

  18. Investigation on the lattice site location of the excess arsenic atoms in GaAs layers grown by low temperature molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Kin Man; Liliental-Weber, Z.

    1991-11-01

    We have measured the excess As atoms present in gaze layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy at low substrate temperatures using particle induced x-ray emission technique. The amount of excess As atoms in layers grown by MBE at 200{degrees}C were found to be {approximately} 4 {times} 10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}2}. Subsequent annealing of the layers under As overpressure at 600{degrees}C did not result in any substantial As loss. However, transmission electron microscopy revealed that As precipitates (2-5nm in diameter) were present in the annealed layers. The lattice location of the excess As atoms in the as grown layers was investigated by ion channeling methods. Angular scans were performed in the <110> axis of the crystal. Our results strongly suggest that a large fraction of these excess As atoms are located in an interstitial position close to an As row. These As ``intersitials`` are located at a site slightly displaced from the tetrahedral site in a diamond cubic lattice. No interstitial As signal is observed in the annealed layers.

  19. Defect luminescence and lattice strain in Mn2+ doped ZnGa2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somasundaram, K.; Abhilash, K. P.; Sudarsan, V.; Christopher Selvin, P.; Kadam, R. M.

    2016-06-01

    Undoped and Mn2+ doped ZnGa2O4 phosphors were prepared by solution combustion method and characterized by XRD, SEM, luminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques. Based on XRD results, it is inferred that, strain in ZnGa2O4 host lattice increases with incorporation of Mn2+ ions in the lattice. Mn2+ doping at concentration levels investigated, lead to significant reduction in the defect emission and this has been attributed to the formation of higher oxidation states of Mn ions in the lattice. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance studies confirmed that majority of Mn ions exist as Mn2+ species and they occupy tetrahedral Zn2+ site in ZnGa2O4 lattice with an average hyperfine coupling constant, Aiso∼82 G.

  20. Dicke superradiance as nondestructive probe for the state of atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Brinke, Nicolai; Schützhold, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    We present a proposal for a probing scheme utilizing Dicke superradiance to obtain information about ultracold atoms in optical lattices. A probe photon is absorbed collectively by an ensemble of lattice atoms generating a Dicke state. The lattice dynamics (e.g., tunneling) affects the coherence properties of that Dicke state and thus alters the superradiant emission characteristics - which in turn provides insight into the lattice (dynamics). Comparing the Bose-Hubbard and the Fermi-Hubbard model, we find similar superradiance in the strongly interacting Mott insulator regime, but crucial differences in the weakly interacting (superfluid or metallic) phase. Furthermore, we study the possibility to detect whether a quantum phase transition between the two regimes can be considered adiabatic or a quantum quench.

  1. Dicke superradiance as nondestructive probe for the state of atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinke, Nicolai ten; Schützhold, Ralf

    2016-05-01

    We present a proposal for a probing scheme utilizing Dicke superradiance to obtain information about ultracold atoms in optical lattices. A probe photon is absorbed collectively by an ensemble of lattice atoms generating a Dicke state. The lattice dynamics (e.g., tunneling) affects the coherence properties of that Dicke state and thus alters the superradiant emission characteristics - which in turn provides insight into the lattice (dynamics). Comparing the Bose-Hubbard and the Fermi-Hubbard model, we find similar superradiance in the strongly interacting Mott insulator regime, but crucial differences in the weakly interacting (superfluid or metallic) phase. Furthermore, we study the possibility to detect whether a quantum phase transition between the two regimes can be considered adiabatic or a quantum quench.

  2. Unbiased sampling of lattice Hamilton path ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Marc L.

    2006-10-01

    Hamilton paths, or Hamiltonian paths, are walks on a lattice which visit each site exactly once. They have been proposed as models of globular proteins and of compact polymers. A previously published algorithm [Mansfield, Macromolecules 27, 5924 (1994)] for sampling Hamilton paths on simple square and simple cubic lattices is tested for bias and for efficiency. Because the algorithm is a Metropolis Monte Carlo technique obviously satisfying detailed balance, we need only demonstrate ergodicity to ensure unbiased sampling. Two different tests for ergodicity (exact enumeration on small lattices, nonexhaustive enumeration on larger lattices) demonstrate ergodicity unequivocally for small lattices and provide strong support for ergodicity on larger lattices. Two other sampling algorithms [Ramakrishnan et al., J. Chem. Phys. 103, 7592 (1995); Lua et al., Polymer 45, 717 (2004)] are both known to produce biases on both 2×2×2 and 3×3×3 lattices, but it is shown here that the current algorithm gives unbiased sampling on these same lattices. Successive Hamilton paths are strongly correlated, so that many iterations are required between statistically independent samples. Rules for estimating the number of iterations needed to dissipate these correlations are given. However, the iteration time is so fast that the efficiency is still very good except on extremely large lattices. For example, even on lattices of total size 10×10×10 we are able to generate tens of thousands of uncorrelated Hamilton paths per hour of CPU time.

  3. Cross-stream migration of compliant particles in microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilimnik, Alex; Nur, Soojung Claire; di Carlo, Dino; Alexeev, Alexander

    2010-11-01

    Using a 3D hybrid lattice Boltzmann and lattice spring computational method, the motion of rigid and soft particles in a pressure-driven microfluidic flow was examined. The particles were modeled as neutrally buoyant fluid-filled elastic shells. The equilibrium positions of these particles were obtained in a low-Reynolds-number flow while accounting for non-linear inertial effects. Microchannels of different width were examined and it was found that the equilibrium position of the rigid particles moves away from the channel walls as the ratio between particle diameter and channel width increases. Furthermore, it was found that capsule deformability enhances the particle migration toward the channel centerline. The simulation results were compared with experimental data obtained with varying size and viscosity oil droplets suspended in water indicating favorable agreement. These findings could aid in the design of devices to sort particles based on their mechanical stiffness.

  4. Refurbishment of the CASSIS code for channeling simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, A.

    2012-02-01

    Channeling is a powerful method for the investigation of the properties of crystalline materials (e.g. lattice site location, defect structures, etc.). More than a decade ago the program code CASSIS has been developed to extend the possible simulation of channeling phenomena to non-cubic crystal lattices, high foreign atom concentrations and PIXE-channeling. Due to the rapid progress in computer technology it is necessary to review and refurbish the existing code by substituting calculation procedures by more sophisticated and more precise ones. Another topic addressed during this refurbishment was the lack of user-friendliness of the old code. The introduction of a simplified input scheme and automatic procedures for the calculation of necessary secondary inputs resolved this situation. As an example and demonstration of possible applications a detailed large-dimension 2-D scan of silicon is presented and discussed.

  5. Collisional Losses, Decoherence, and Frequency Shifts in Optical Lattice Clocks with Bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Lisdat, Ch.; Winfred, J. S. R. Vellore; Middelmann, T.; Riehle, F.; Sterr, U.

    2009-08-28

    We have quantified collisional losses, decoherence and the collision shift in a one-dimensional optical lattice clock on the highly forbidden transition {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} at 698 nm with bosonic {sup 88}Sr. We were able to distinguish two loss channels: inelastic collisions between atoms in the upper and lower clock state and atoms in the upper clock state only. Based on the measured coefficients, we determine the operation parameters at which a 1D-lattice clock with {sup 88}Sr shows no degradation due to collisions on the fractional uncertainty level of 10{sup -16}.

  6. Effects of Cu Dopant on Lattice and Optical Properties of ZnS Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Shuhua, Lu; Aiji, Wang; Tingfang, Chen; Yinshu, Wang

    2016-04-01

    Doped and undoped ZnS colloidal nanocrystals have drawn much attention due to their versatile applications in the fields of optoelectronics and biotechnology. In this paper, Cu doped ZnS quantum dots were synthesized via the simple thermolysis of ethylxanthate salts. The lattice and optical properties of the nanocrystals were then studied in detail. The quantum dot lattice contracted linearly between Cu concentrations of 0.2-2%, while it continued to contract more gradually as Cu concentrations were further increased from 4 to 6%, due in part to the Cu ions located on the surface of the ZnS lattice. Cu incorporation induces a long tail in absorption at long wavelengths. The PL spectrum shows a red shift at first, and then a blue shift with increases in Cu concentration. Cu doped at low concentrations (0.2-1%) enhanced the emission, while high Cu concentrations (2-6%) quenched emissions. PMID:27451716

  7. Positron emission tomography wrist detector

    DOEpatents

    Schlyer, David J.; O'Connor, Paul; Woody, Craig; Junnarkar, Sachin Shrirang; Radeka, Veljko; Vaska, Paul; Pratte, Jean-Francois

    2006-08-15

    A method of serially transferring annihilation information in a compact positron emission tomography (PET) scanner includes generating a time signal representing a time-of-occurrence of an annihilation event, generating an address signal representing a channel detecting the annihilation event, and generating a channel signal including the time and address signals. The method also includes generating a composite signal including the channel signal and another similarly generated channel signal concerning another annihilation event. An apparatus that serially transfers annihilation information includes a time signal generator, address signal generator, channel signal generator, and composite signal generator. The time signal is asynchronous and the address signal is synchronous to a clock signal. A PET scanner includes a scintillation array, detection array, front-end array, and a serial encoder. The serial encoders include the time signal generator, address signal generator, channel signal generator, and composite signal generator.

  8. Colliding-beam-accelerator lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, J.; Cornacchia, M.; Courant, E.D.; Parzen, G.

    1983-01-01

    We describe the lattice of the Colliding Beam Accelerator, a 400 x 400 GeV pp facility proposed for construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The structure adopted is very versatile, in part in consequence of its desirable behavior as function of momentum deviation and as function of the betatron tunes. Each of the six insertions can be arranged to meet specific requirements at the crossing points as illustrated by a discussion of the tuneable low-beta insertions. The luminosity in these low-beta insertions (2 x 10/sup 33/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/) would be an order of magnitude larger than the standard insertions.

  9. Solitary waves on tensegrity lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraternali, F.; Senatore, L.; Daraio, C.

    2012-06-01

    We study the dynamics of lattices formed by masses connected through tensegrity prisms. By employing analytic and numerical arguments, we show that such structures support two limit dynamic regimes controlled by the prisms' properties: (i) in the low-energy (sonic) regime the system supports the formation and propagation of solitary waves which exhibit sech2 shape and (ii) in the high-energy (ultrasonic) regime the system supports atomic-scale localization. Such peculiar features found in periodic arrays of tensegrity structures suggest their use for the creation of new composite materials (here called "tensegrity materials") of potential interest for applications in impact absorption, energy localization and in new acoustic devices.

  10. Lattice models of biological growth

    SciTech Connect

    Young, D.A.; Corey, E.M. )

    1990-06-15

    We show that very simple iterative rules for the growth of cells on a two-dimensional lattice can simulate biological-growth phenomena realistically. We discuss random cellular automata models for the growth of fern gametophytes, branching fungi, and leaves, and for shape transformations useful in the study of biological variation and evolution. Although there are interesting analogies between biological and physical growth processes, we stress the uniqueness of biological automata behavior. The computer growth algorithms that successfully mimic observed growth behavior may be helpful in determining the underlying biochemical mechanisms of growth regulation.

  11. Multi-stable cylindrical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirrera, Alberto; Lachenal, Xavier; Daynes, Stephen; Weaver, Paul M.; Chenchiah, Isaac V.

    2013-11-01

    We present a cylindrical lattice structure that mimics the behaviour of the virus bacteriophage T4 in having two (or more) stable states which differ in their radii and length. While the virus achieves bistability through molecular mechanisms we use composite materials to exploit the interplay between pre-stress, material properties and structural geometry. We demonstrate (computationally) that multi-stability is a robust phenomenon. We also show (analytically) that it is possible to choose the design variables so that the energy is independent of the radius, thus resulting in every state of the structure being stable.

  12. Dipolar molecules in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Sowiński, Tomasz; Dutta, Omjyoti; Hauke, Philipp; Tagliacozzo, Luca; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2012-03-16

    We study the extended Bose-Hubbard model describing an ultracold gas of dipolar molecules in an optical lattice, taking into account all on-site and nearest-neighbor interactions, including occupation-dependent tunneling and pair tunneling terms. Using exact diagonalization and the multiscale entanglement renormalization ansatz, we show that these terms can destroy insulating phases and lead to novel quantum phases. These considerable changes of the phase diagram have to be taken into account in upcoming experiments with dipolar molecules. PMID:22540482

  13. Detecting monopoles on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Bonati, Claudio; Di Giacomo, Adriano; D'Elia, Massimo

    2010-11-01

    We address the issue why the number and the location of magnetic monopoles detected on lattice configurations are gauge dependent, in contrast with the physical expectation that monopoles have a gauge-invariant status. By use of the non-Abelian Bianchi identities we show that monopoles are gauge-invariant, but the efficiency of the technique usually adopted to detect them depends on the choice of the gauge in a well understood way. In particular we have studied a class of gauges which interpolate between the Maximal Abelian gauge, where all monopoles are observed, and the Landau gauge, where all monopoles escape detection.

  14. GLAD: A Generic LAttice Debugger

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.J.

    1991-11-01

    Today, numerous simulation and analysis codes exist for the design, commission, and operation of accelerator beam lines. There is a need to develop a common user interface and database link to run these codes interactively. This paper will describe a proposed system, GLAD (Generic LAttice Debugger), to fulfill this need. Specifically, GLAD can be used to find errors in beam lines during commissioning, control beam parameters during operation, and design beam line optics and error correction systems for the next generation of linear accelerators and storage rings.

  15. An Isochronous Lattice for PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, W.J.; Donald, M.H.R.; Garren, A.A.

    1991-04-01

    With e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings operating in a quasi-isochronous mode, it might be possible to produce short bunches with length {sigma}{sub z} < 1 cm. The unique characteristics of the short bunches could then be utilized for synchrotron radiation applications or colliders with mm-scale {beta}*. In principle, the design of a quasi-isochronous storage ring is relatively straight-forward, but experimental studies with electron storage rings in this configuration have not been carried out. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that an isochronous lattice design is compatible with PEP given a minimum of hardware modifications.

  16. Lattice Boltzmann methods in Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Christian; Parmigiani, Andrea; Su, Yanqing

    2014-05-01

    Numerical models often offer the only possible approach to study the complex non-linear dynamics of geodynamical processes that are difficult or impossible to scale for laboratory experiments. The development of improved computer resources has allowed the emergence of large-scale parallel computations in Earth Sciences. These resources have lead to an increasing complexity in models where a greater number of adjustable parameters arise. Although the increasing number of free parameters offers a greater flexibility to fit satisfyingly the set of available constraints (e.g. geochemical, structural) it also provides new challenges in terms of the size of the parameter space and non-uniqueness of model solutions. Another significant challenge associated with state-of-the-art models is that their complexity is in general associated with the addition of parameterizations of the unresolved (small) scale processes. This trend calls for the development of complementary high-performance models to constrain the physics at small-scales where mass, momentum and energy exchanges at interfaces between different phases control the dynamics in heterogeneous media. We argue that more attention should be devoted to the development of multiphase numerical modeling at the granular (pore) scale to investigate the dynamical behavior of heterogeneous media and the emergence of feedbacks that influence the response of these media at much greater scales. The lattice Boltzmann method is a paradigm that emerged almost three decades ago. It is based on kinetic theory and follows a bottom-up approach that contrast the top-down strategy of standard methods such as Finite Volumes, FEM and Finite Differences. Lattice Boltzmann is ideally suited to handle the complex dynamics of multiphase systems at small spatial scales and is very efficient for parallel programing. In this presentation, we discuss the development of different lattice Boltzmann models developed in our group over the last years

  17. Fractal lattice of gelatin nanoglobules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, D. V.; Krasovskii, A. N.

    2012-11-01

    The globular structure of polymer coatings on a glass, which were obtained from micellar solutions of gelatin in the isooctane-water-sodium (bis-2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate system, has been studied using electron microscopy. It has been shown that an increase in the average globule size is accompanied by the formation of a fractal lattice of nanoglobules and a periodic physical network of macromolecules in the coating. The stability of such system of the "liquid-in-a-solid" type is limited by the destruction of globules and the formation of a homogeneous network structure of the coating.

  18. Equalization in redundant channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulpule, Bhalchandra R. (Inventor); Collins, Robert E. (Inventor); Cominelli, Donald F. (Inventor); O'Neill, Richard D. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A miscomparison between a channel's configuration data base and a voted system configuration data base in a redundant channel system having identically operating, frame synchronous channels triggers autoequalization of the channel's historical signal data bases in a hierarchical, chronological manner with that of a correctly operating channel. After equalization, symmetrization of the channel's configuration data base with that of the system permits upgrading of the previously degraded channel to full redundancy. An externally provided equalization command, e.g., manually actuated, can also trigger equalization.

  19. Localization of Waves in Merged Lattices.

    PubMed

    Alagappan, G; Png, C E

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a new two-dimensional physical topology-merged lattice, that allows dense number of wave localization states. Merged lattices are obtained as a result of merging two lattices of scatters of the same space group, but with slightly different spatial resonances. Such merging creates two-dimensional scattering "beats" which are perfectly periodic on the longer spatial scale. On the shorter spatial scale, the systematic breakage of the translational symmetry leads to strong wave scattering, and this causes the occurrences of wave localization states. Merged Lattices promises variety of localization states including tightly confined, and ring type annular modes. The longer scale perfect periodicity of the merged lattice, enables complete prediction and full control over the density of the localization states and its' quality factors. In addition, the longer scale periodicity, also allows design of integrated slow wave components. Merged lattices, thus, can be engineered easily to create technologically beneficial applications. PMID:27535096

  20. Working Group Report: Lattice Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, T.; et al.,

    2013-10-22

    This is the report of the Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory prepared for the proceedings of the 2013 Community Summer Study ("Snowmass"). We present the future computing needs and plans of the U.S. lattice gauge theory community and argue that continued support of the U.S. (and worldwide) lattice-QCD effort is essential to fully capitalize on the enormous investment in the high-energy physics experimental program. We first summarize the dramatic progress of numerical lattice-QCD simulations in the past decade, with some emphasis on calculations carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Lattice-QCD Collaboration, and describe a broad program of lattice-QCD calculations that will be relevant for future experiments at the intensity and energy frontiers. We then present details of the computational hardware and software resources needed to undertake these calculations.

  1. Localization of Waves in Merged Lattices

    PubMed Central

    Alagappan, G.; Png, C. E.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a new two–dimensional physical topology–merged lattice, that allows dense number of wave localization states. Merged lattices are obtained as a result of merging two lattices of scatters of the same space group, but with slightly different spatial resonances. Such merging creates two–dimensional scattering “beats” which are perfectly periodic on the longer spatial scale. On the shorter spatial scale, the systematic breakage of the translational symmetry leads to strong wave scattering, and this causes the occurrences of wave localization states. Merged Lattices promises variety of localization states including tightly confined, and ring type annular modes. The longer scale perfect periodicity of the merged lattice, enables complete prediction and full control over the density of the localization states and its’ quality factors. In addition, the longer scale periodicity, also allows design of integrated slow wave components. Merged lattices, thus, can be engineered easily to create technologically beneficial applications. PMID:27535096

  2. Channel nut tool

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Marvin

    2016-01-12

    A method, system, and apparatus for installing channel nuts includes a shank, a handle formed on a first end of a shank, and an end piece with a threaded shaft configured to receive a channel nut formed on the second end of the shaft. The tool can be used to insert or remove a channel nut in a channel framing system and then removed from the channel nut.

  3. Observing dynamical SUSY breaking with lattice simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamori, Issaku

    2008-11-23

    On the basis of the recently developed lattice formulation of supersymmetric theories which keeps a part of the supersymmetry, we propose a method of observing dynamical SUSY breaking with lattice simulation. We use Hamiltonian as an order parameter and measure the ground state energy as a zero temperature limit of the finite temperature simulation. Our method provides a way of obtaining a physical result from the lattice simulation for supersymmetric theories.

  4. Trapping Rydberg Atoms in an Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Sarah E.

    2012-06-01

    Optical lattice traps for Rydberg atoms are of interest in advanced science and in practical applications. After a brief discussion of these areas of interest, I will review some basics of optical Rydberg-atom trapping. The trapping potential experienced by a Rydberg atom in an optical lattice is given by the spatial average of the free-electron ponderomotive energy weighted by the Rydberg electron's probability distribution. I will then present experimental results on the trapping of ^85Rb Rydberg atoms in a one-dimensional ponderomotive optical lattice (wavelength 1064 nm). The principal methods employed to study the lattice performance are microwave spectroscopy, which is used to measure the lattice's trapping efficiency, and photo-ionization, which is used to measure the dwell time of the atoms in the lattice. I have achieved a 90% trapping efficiency for ^85Rb 50S atoms by inverting the lattice immediately after laser excitation of ground-state atoms into Rydberg states. I have characterized the dwell time of the atoms in the lattice using photo-ionization of 50D5/2 atoms. In continued work, I have explored the dependence of the Rydberg-atom trapping potential on the angular portion of the atomic wavefunction. Distinct angular states exhibit different trapping behavior in the optical lattice, depending on how their wavefunctions are oriented relative to the lattice planes. Specifically, I have measured the lattice potential depth of sublevels of ^85Rb nD atoms (50<=n<=65) in a one-dimensional optical lattice with a transverse DC electric field. The trapping behavior varies substantially for the various angular sublevels, in agreement with theory. The talk will conclude with an outlook into planned experiments.

  5. Experimental generation of optical coherence lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yahong; Ponomarenko, Sergey A.; Cai, Yangjian

    2016-08-01

    We report experimental generation and measurement of recently introduced optical coherence lattices. The presented optical coherence lattice realization technique hinges on a superposition of mutually uncorrelated partially coherent Schell-model beams with tailored coherence properties. We show theoretically that information can be encoded into and, in principle, recovered from the lattice degree of coherence. Our results can find applications to image transmission and optical encryption.

  6. Computational study of lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zujev, Aleksander

    This dissertation is composed of the descriptions of a few projects undertook to complete my doctorate at the University of California, Davis. Different as they are, the common feature of them is that they all deal with simulations of lattice models, and physics which results from interparticle interactions. As an example, both the Feynman-Kikuchi model (Chapter 3) and Bose-Fermi mixture (Chapter 4) deal with the conditions under which superfluid transitions occur. The dissertation is divided into two parts. Part I (Chapters 1-2) is theoretical. It describes the systems we study - superfluidity and particularly superfluid helium, and optical lattices. The numerical methods of working with them are described. The use of Monte Carlo methods is another unifying theme of the different projects in this thesis. Part II (Chapters 3-6) deals with applications. It consists of 4 chapters describing different projects. Two of them, Feynman-Kikuchi model, and Bose-Fermi mixture are finished and published. The work done on t - J model, described in Chapter 5, is more preliminary, and the project is far from complete. A preliminary report on it was given on 2009 APS March meeting. The Isentropic project, described in the last chapter, is finished. A report on it was given on 2010 APS March meeting, and a paper is in preparation. The quantum simulation program used for Bose-Fermi mixture project was written by our collaborators Valery Rousseau and Peter Denteneer. I had written my own code for the other projects.

  7. SUPER-B LATTICE STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, M.E.; Raimondi, P.; Piminov, P.; Sinyatkin, S.; Nosochkov, Y.; Wittmer, W.; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    The SuperB asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider is designed for 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} luminosity and beam energies of 6.7 and 4.18 GeV for e{sup +} and e{sup -} respectively. The High and Low Energy Rings (HER and LER) have one Interaction Point (IP) with 66 mrad crossing angle. The 1258 m rings fit to the INFN-LNF site at Frascati. The ring emittance is minimized for the high luminosity. The Final Focus (FF) chromaticity correction is optimized for maximum transverse acceptance and energy bandwidth. Included Crab Waist sextupoles suppress betatron resonances induced in the collisions with a large Piwinski angle. The LER Spin Rotator sections provide longitudinally polarized electron beam at the IP. The lattice is flexible for tuning the machine parameters and compatible with reusing the PEP-II magnets, RF cavities and other components. Details of the lattice design are presented.

  8. The Fermilab lattice information repository

    SciTech Connect

    Ostiguy, J.-F.; Michelotti, L.; McCusker-Whiting, M.; Kriss, M.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    Over the years, it has become increasingly obvious that a centralized lattice and machine information repository with the capability of keeping track of revision information could be of great value. This is especially true in the context of a large accelerator laboratory like Fermilab with six rings and sixteen beamlines operating in various modes and configurations, constantly subject to modifications, improvements and even major redesign. While there exist a handful of potentially suitable revision systems--both freely available and commercial--our experience has shown that expecting beam physicists to become fully conversant with complex revision system software used on an occasional basis is neither realistic nor practical. In this paper, we discuss technical aspects of the FNAL lattice repository, whose fully web-based interface hides the complexity of Subversion, a comprehensive open source revision system. The FNAL repository has been operational since September 2004; the unique architecture of ''Subversion'' has been a key ingredient of the technical success of its implementation.

  9. Collapsing lattice animals and lattice trees in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping; Grassberger, Peter

    2005-06-01

    We present high statistics simulations of weighted lattice bond animals and lattice trees on the square lattice, with fugacities for each non-bonded contact and for each bond between two neighbouring monomers. The simulations are performed using a newly developed sequential sampling method with resampling, very similar to the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method (PERM) used for linear chain polymers. We determine with high precision the line of second-order transitions from an extended to a collapsed phase in the resulting two-dimensional phase diagram. This line includes critical bond percolation as a multicritical point, and we verify that this point divides the line into different universality classes. One of them corresponds to the collapse driven by contacts and includes the collapse of (weakly embeddable) trees. There is some evidence that the other is subdivided again into two parts with different universality classes. One of these (at the far side from collapsing trees) is bond driven and is represented by the Derrida-Herrmann model of animals having bonds only (no contacts). Between the critical percolation point and this bond-driven collapse seems to be an intermediate regime, whose other end point is a multicritical point P* where a transition line between two collapsed phases (one bond driven and the other contact driven) sparks off. This point P* seems to be attractive (in the renormalization group sense) from the side of the intermediate regime, so there are four universality classes on the transition line (collapsing trees, critical percolation, intermediate regime, and Derrida-Herrmann). We obtain very precise estimates for all critical exponents for collapsing trees. It is already harder to estimate the critical exponents for the intermediate regime. Finally, it is very difficult to obtain with our method good estimates of the critical parameters of the Derrida-Herrmann universality class. As regards the bond-driven to contact-driven transition in the

  10. Electron channeling radiation experiments at very high electron bunch charges

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, R.A. Jr.; Freudenberger, J.; Fritzler, S.; Genz, H.; Richter, A.; Ushakov, A.; Zilges, A.; Sellschop, J.P.F.

    2003-12-01

    Plasmas offer the possibility of high acceleration gradients. An intriguing suggestion is to use the higher plasma densities possible in solids to get extremely high gradients. Although solid-state plasmas might produce high gradients they would pose daunting problems. Crystal channeling has been suggested as one mechanism to address these challenges. There is no experimental or theoretical guidance on channeling for intense electron beams. A high-density plasma in a crystal lattice could quench the channeling process. An experiment has been carried out at the Fermilab NICADD Photoinjector Laboratory to observe electron channeling radiation at high bunch charges. An electron beam with up to 8 nC per electron bunch was used to investigate the electron-crystal interaction. No evidence was found of quenching of channeling at charge densities two orders of magnitude larger than that in earlier experiments.

  11. Trade-off capacities of the quantum Hadamard channels

    SciTech Connect

    Bradler, Kamil; Hayden, Patrick; Touchette, Dave; Wilde, Mark M.

    2010-06-15

    Coding theorems in quantum Shannon theory express the ultimate rates at which a sender can transmit information over a noisy quantum channel. More often than not, the known formulas expressing these transmission rates are intractable, requiring an optimization over an infinite number of uses of the channel. Researchers have rarely found quantum channels with a tractable classical or quantum capacity, but when such a finding occurs, it demonstrates a complete understanding of that channel's capabilities for transmitting classical or quantum information. Here we show that the three-dimensional capacity region for entanglement-assisted transmission of classical and quantum information is tractable for the Hadamard class of channels. Examples of Hadamard channels include generalized dephasing channels, cloning channels, and the Unruh channel. The generalized dephasing channels and the cloning channels are natural processes that occur in quantum systems through the loss of quantum coherence or stimulated emission, respectively. The Unruh channel is a noisy process that occurs in relativistic quantum information theory as a result of the Unruh effect and bears a strong relationship to the cloning channels. We give exact formulas for the entanglement-assisted classical and quantum communication capacity regions of these channels. The coding strategy for each of these examples is superior to a naieve time-sharing strategy, and we introduce a measure to determine this improvement.

  12. Subwavelength Lattice Optics by Evolutionary Design

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new class of structured optical materials—lattice opto-materials—that can manipulate the flow of visible light into a wide range of three-dimensional profiles using evolutionary design principles. Lattice opto-materials are based on the discretization of a surface into a two-dimensional (2D) subwavelength lattice whose individual lattice sites can be controlled to achieve a programmed optical response. To access a desired optical property, we designed a lattice evolutionary algorithm that includes and optimizes contributions from every element in the lattice. Lattice opto-materials can exhibit simple properties, such as on- and off-axis focusing, and can also concentrate light into multiple, discrete spots. We expanded the unit cell shapes of the lattice to achieve distinct, polarization-dependent optical responses from the same 2D patterned substrate. Finally, these lattice opto-materials can also be combined into architectures that resemble a new type of compound flat lens. PMID:25380062

  13. Fractionalized topological defects in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xing-Hai; Fan, Wen-Jun; Shi, Jin-Wei; Kou, Su-Peng

    2015-10-01

    Topological objects are interesting topics in various fields of physics ranging from condensed matter physics to the grand unified and superstring theories. Among those, ultracold atoms provide a playground to study the complex topological objects. In this paper we present a proposal to realize an optical lattice with stable fractionalized topological objects. In particular, we generate the fractionalized topological fluxes and fractionalized skyrmions on two-dimensional optical lattices and fractionalized monopoles on three-dimensional optical lattices. These results offer a new approach to study the quantum many-body systems on optical lattices of ultracold quantum gases with controllable topological defects, including dislocations, topological fluxes and monopoles.

  14. Bosonic edge states in gapped honeycomb lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Huaiming; Niu, Yuekun; Chen, Shu; Feng, Shiping

    2016-03-01

    By quantum Monte Carlo simulations of bosons in gapped honeycomb lattices, we show the existence of bosonic edge states. For a single layer honeycomb lattice, bosonic edge states can be controlled to appear, cross the gap, and merge into bulk states by an on-site potential applied on the outermost sites of the boundary. On a bilayer honeycomb lattice, A bosonic edge state traversing the gap at half filling is demonstrated. The topological origin of the bosonic edge states is discussed with pseudo Berry curvature. The results will simulate experimental studies of these exotic bosonic edge states with ultracold bosons trapped in honeycomb optical lattices.

  15. Vortex lattice of surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzedolik, Igor V.; Lapayeva, Svetlana; Pereskokov, Vladislav

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the formation of a plasmon polariton vortex lattice on a metal surface following the interference of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). The plasmon polariton vortex lattice is formed by the interference of the SPP transverse-magnetic mode (TM-mode) and electric mode (E-mode) in the presence of the inhomogeneity with a curvilinear boundary on the surface of the metal layer. The SPP vortex lattice can be controlled by changing the configuration of the boundary. Weak nonlinearity of the metal permittivity does not change the interference pattern, but it increases the propagation length of the SPPs and, therefore, the area of the vortex lattice too.

  16. Modeling dynamical geometry with lattice gas automata

    SciTech Connect

    Hasslacher, B.; Meyer, D.A.

    1998-06-27

    Conventional lattice gas automata consist of particles moving discretely on a fixed lattice. While such models have been quite successful for a variety of fluid flow problems, there are other systems, e.g., flow in a flexible membrane or chemical self-assembly, in which the geometry is dynamical and coupled to the particle flow. Systems of this type seem to call for lattice gas models with dynamical geometry. The authors construct such a model on one dimensional (periodic) lattices and describe some simulations illustrating its nonequilibrium dynamics.

  17. Subwavelength lattice optics by evolutionary design.

    PubMed

    Huntington, Mark D; Lauhon, Lincoln J; Odom, Teri W

    2014-12-10

    This paper describes a new class of structured optical materials--lattice opto-materials--that can manipulate the flow of visible light into a wide range of three-dimensional profiles using evolutionary design principles. Lattice opto-materials are based on the discretization of a surface into a two-dimensional (2D) subwavelength lattice whose individual lattice sites can be controlled to achieve a programmed optical response. To access a desired optical property, we designed a lattice evolutionary algorithm that includes and optimizes contributions from every element in the lattice. Lattice opto-materials can exhibit simple properties, such as on- and off-axis focusing, and can also concentrate light into multiple, discrete spots. We expanded the unit cell shapes of the lattice to achieve distinct, polarization-dependent optical responses from the same 2D patterned substrate. Finally, these lattice opto-materials can also be combined into architectures that resemble a new type of compound flat lens. PMID:25380062

  18. Trace maps of general Padovan lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Peiqing

    2000-07-01

    The two kinds of seven-dimensional trace maps of a new class of three-component quasiperiodic lattices, which are constructed based on the general Padovan sequences Sl+1 ={ Sl-1 m, Sl-2 n}, are derived for arbitrary integer value of m and n. It is shown that these lattices can be grouped into two distinct class. The lattices in class I correspond to n=1 and arbitrary m. They are shown to have volume-preserving second kind maps. The results are compared with those of other three-component quasiperiodic lattices.

  19. Elastic lattice in an incommensurate background

    SciTech Connect

    Dickman, R.; Chudnovsky, E.M. )

    1995-01-01

    We study a harmonic triangular lattice, which relaxes in the presence of an incommensurate short-wavelength potential. Monte Carlo simulations reveal that the elastic lattice exhibits only short-ranged translational correlations, despite the absence of defects in either lattice. Extended orientational order, however, persists in the presence of the background. Translational correlation lengths exhibit approximate power-law dependence upon cooling rate and background strength. Our results may be relevant to Wigner crystals, atomic monolayers on crystals surfaces, and flux-line and magnetic bubble lattices.

  20. The Earliest Ion Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohorille, A.; Wilson, M. A.; Wei, C.

    2009-12-01

    Supplying protocells with ions required assistance from channels spanning their membrane walls. The earliest channels were most likely short proteins that formed transmembrane helical bundles surrounding a water-filled pore. These simple aggregates were capable of transporting ions with efficiencies comparable to those of complex, contemporary ion channels. Channels with wide pores exhibited little ion selectivity but also imposed only modest constraints on amino acid sequences of channel-forming proteins. Channels with small pores could have been selective but also might have required a more precisely defined sequence of amino acids. In contrast to modern channels, their protocellular ancestors had only limited capabilities to regulate ion flux. It is postulated that subsequent evolution of ion channels progressed primarily to acquire precise regulation, and not high efficiency or selectivity. It is further proposed that channels and the surrounding membranes co-evolved.

  1. Microfluidic channel fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Don W.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Cardinale, Gregory F.

    2001-01-01

    A new channel structure for microfluidic systems and process for fabricating this structure. In contrast to the conventional practice of fabricating fluid channels as trenches or grooves in a substrate, fluid channels are fabricated as thin walled raised structures on a substrate. Microfluidic devices produced in accordance with the invention are a hybrid assembly generally consisting of three layers: 1) a substrate that can or cannot be an electrical insulator; 2) a middle layer, that is an electrically conducting material and preferably silicon, forms the channel walls whose height defines the channel height, joined to and extending from the substrate; and 3) a top layer, joined to the top of the channels, that forms a cover for the channels. The channels can be defined by photolithographic techniques and are produced by etching away the material around the channel walls.

  2. Precipitation patterns during channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamtveit, B.; Hawkins, C.; Benning, L. G.; Meier, D.; Hammer, O.; Angheluta, L.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral precipitation during channelized fluid flow is widespread in a wide variety of geological systems. It is also a common and costly phenomenon in many industrial processes that involve fluid flow in pipelines. It is often referred to as scale formation and encountered in a large number of industries, including paper production, chemical manufacturing, cement operations, food processing, as well as non-renewable (i.e. oil and gas) and renewable (i.e. geothermal) energy production. We have studied the incipient stages of growth of amorphous silica on steel plates emplaced into the central areas of the ca. 1 meter in diameter sized pipelines used at the hydrothermal power plant at Hellisheidi, Iceland (with a capacity of ca 300 MW electricity and 100 MW hot water). Silica precipitation takes place over a period of ca. 2 months at approximately 120°C and a flow rate around 1 m/s. The growth produces asymmetric ca. 1mm high dendritic structures ';leaning' towards the incoming fluid flow. A novel phase-field model combined with the lattice Boltzmann method is introduced to study how the growth morphologies vary under different hydrodynamic conditions, including non-laminar systems with turbulent mixing. The model accurately predicts the observed morphologies and is directly relevant for understanding the more general problem of precipitation influenced by turbulent mixing during flow in channels with rough walls and even for porous flow. Reference: Hawkins, C., Angheluta, L., Hammer, Ø., and Jamtveit, B., Precipitation dendrites in channel flow. Europhysics Letters, 102, 54001

  3. Gramicidin Channels: Versatile Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Olaf S.; Koeppe, Roger E., II; Roux, Benoît

    Gramicidin channels are miniproteins in which two tryptophan-rich subunits associate by means of transbilayer dimerization to form the conducting channels. That is, in contrast to other ion channels, gramicidin channels do not open and close; they appear and disappear. Each subunit in the bilayer-spanning channel is tied to the bilayer/solution interface through hydrogen bonds that involve the indole NH groups as donors andwater or the phospholipid backbone as acceptors. The channel's permeability characteristics are well-defined: gramicidin channels are selective for monovalent cations, with no measurable permeability to anions or polyvalent cations; ions and water move through a pore whose wall is formed by the peptide backbone; and the single-channel conductance and cation selectivity vary when the amino acid sequence is varied, even though the permeating ions make no contact with the amino acid side chains. Given the plethora of available experimental information—for not only the wild-type channels but also for channels formed by amino acid-substituted gramicidin analogues—gramicidin channels continue to provide important insights into the microphysics of ion permeation through bilayer-spanning channels. For similar reasons, gramicidin channels constitute a system of choice for evaluating computational strategies for obtaining mechanistic insights into ion permeation through the more complex channels formed by integral membrane proteins.

  4. Evaluation of the adequacy of using few-group lattice-homogenized properties for the diffusion analysis of the super critical water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, W.

    2012-07-01

    Two issues may affect the accuracy of computed core reactivities and flux/power distributions for the Super Critical Water Reactor (SCWR) core with traditional core-analysis code RFSP: one is the two-energy-group neutron-diffusion theory; the other is the generation of lattice-homogenized properties with the lattice code based on the single-lattice-cell model without considering the effects of the environment. These two issues are not SCWR specific; however their effect may be more significant for SCWR. It has been illustrated that the lattice-homogenized properties calculated with the single-lattice-cell model is not sufficiently accurate for heterogeneous core configurations such as ACR-1000 checkerboard-voiding and core-reflector interface when adjacent channels experience significant spectrum interaction. To evaluate the adequacy of using two-group neutron-diffusion theory with single-lattice-based lattice properties for the analysis of the SCWR core, a 2-D SCWR benchmark problem was setup with the reference solution provided by the continuous-energy Monte-Carlo code SERPENT. The assessment shows that the traditional two-group neutron-diffusion theory with the single-lattice-cell- based lattice properties is not sufficient to capture either the spectral change or the environment effect for the SCWR core. The solution of the eight-group neutron-diffusion equation with the multicell- based lattice properties is considered appropriate for the analysis of the d SCWR core. (authors)

  5. Cold atoms in a rotating optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foot, Christopher J.

    2009-05-01

    We have demonstrated a novel experimental arrangement which can rotate a two-dimensional optical lattice at frequencies up to several kilohertz. Our arrangement also allows the periodicity of the optical lattice to be varied dynamically, producing a 2D ``accordion lattice'' [1]. The angles of the laser beams are controlled by acousto-optic deflectors and this allows smooth changes with little heating of the trapped cold (rubidium) atoms. We have loaded a BEC into lattices with periodicities ranging from 1.8μm to 18μm, observing the collapse and revival of the diffraction orders of the condensate over a large range of lattice parameters as recently reported by a group in NIST [2]. We have also imaged atoms in situ in a 2D lattice over a range of lattice periodicities. Ultracold atoms in a rotating lattice can be used for the direct quantum simulation of strongly correlated systems under large effective magnetic fields, i.e. the Hamiltonian of the atoms in the rotating frame resembles that of a charged particle in a strong magnetic field. In the future, we plan to use this to investigate a range of phenomena such as the analogue of the fractional quantum Hall effect. [4pt] [1] R. A. Williams, J. D. Pillet, S. Al-Assam, B. Fletcher, M. Shotter, and C. J. Foot, ``Dynamic optical lattices: two-dimensional rotating and accordion lattices for ultracold atoms,'' Opt. Express 16, 16977-16983 (2008) [0pt] [2] J. H. Huckans, I. B. Spielman, B. Laburthe Tolra, W. D. Phillips, and J. V. Porto, Quantum and Classical Dynamics of a BEC in a Large-Period Optical Lattice, arXiv:0901.1386v1

  6. Quark eigenmodes and lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guofeng

    In this thesis, we study a number of topics in lattice QCD through the low-lying quark eigenmodes in the domain wall fermion (DWF) formulation in the quenched approximation. Specifically, we present results for the chiral condensate measured from these eigenmodes; we investigate the QCD vacuum structure by looking at the correlation between the magnitude of the chirality density, |psi†(x)gamma5psi( x)|, and the normal density, psi†( x)psi(x), for these states; we study the behavior of DWF formulation at large quark masses by investigating the mass dependence of the eigenvalues of the physical four dimensional-states as well as the bulk, five-dimensional states.

  7. Gluonic transversity from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detmold, W.; Shanahan, P. E.

    2016-07-01

    We present an exploratory study of the gluonic structure of the ϕ meson using lattice QCD (LQCD). This includes the first investigation of gluonic transversity via the leading moment of the twist-2 double-helicity-flip gluonic structure function Δ (x ,Q2). This structure function only exists for targets of spin J ≥1 and does not mix with quark distributions at leading twist, thereby providing a particularly clean probe of gluonic degrees of freedom. We also explore the gluonic analogue of the Soffer bound which relates the helicity flip and nonflip gluonic distributions, finding it to be saturated at the level of 80%. This work sets the stage for more complex LQCD studies of gluonic structure in the nucleon and in light nuclei where Δ (x ,Q2) is an "exotic glue" observable probing gluons in a nucleus not associated with individual nucleons.

  8. Defect solitons in photonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianke; Chen, Zhigang

    2006-02-01

    Nonlinear defect modes (defect solitons) and their stability in one-dimensional photonic lattices with focusing saturable nonlinearity are investigated. It is shown that defect solitons bifurcate out from every infinitesimal linear defect mode. Low-power defect solitons are linearly stable in lower bandgaps but unstable in higher bandgaps. At higher powers, defect solitons become unstable in attractive defects, but can remain stable in repulsive defects. Furthermore, for high-power solitons in attractive defects, we found a type of Vakhitov-Kolokolov (VK) instability which is different from the usual VK instability based on the sign of the slope in the power curve. Lastly, we demonstrate that in each bandgap, in addition to defect solitons which bifurcate from linear defect modes, there is also an infinite family of other defect solitons which can be stable in certain parameter regimes. PMID:16605473

  9. Entropy of unimodular lattice triangulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauf, Johannes F.; Krüger, Benedikt; Mecke, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Triangulations are important objects of study in combinatorics, finite element simulations and quantum gravity, where their entropy is crucial for many physical properties. Due to their inherent complex topological structure even the number of possible triangulations is unknown for large systems. We present a novel algorithm for an approximate enumeration which is based on calculations of the density of states using the Wang-Landau flat histogram sampling. For triangulations on two-dimensional integer lattices we achieve excellent agreement with known exact numbers of small triangulations as well as an improvement of analytical calculated asymptotics. The entropy density is C=2.196(3) consistent with rigorous upper and lower bounds. The presented numerical scheme can easily be applied to other counting and optimization problems.

  10. Multigroup Reactor Lattice Cell Calculation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1990-03-01

    The Winfrith Improved Multigroup Scheme (WIMS), is a general code for reactor lattice cell calculations on a wide range of reactor systems. In particular, the code will accept rod or plate fuel geometries in either regular arrays or in clusters, and the energy group structure has been chosen primarily for thermal calculations. The basic library has been compiled with 14 fast groups, 13 resonance groups and 42 thermal groups, but the user is offered themore » choice of accurate solutions in many groups or rapid calculations in few groups. Temperature dependent thermal scattering matrices for a variety of scattering laws are available in the library for the principal moderators which include hydrogen, deuterium, graphite, beryllium and oxygen. WIMSD5 is a succesor version of WIMS-D/4.« less

  11. Simple lattice model of macroevolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Wojciech

    2009-04-01

    In future astrobiology, like in modern astrophysics, the numerical simulations can be a very important tool for proving theories. In this paper, I propose a simple lattice model of a multi-species ecosystem suitable for the study of emergent properties of macroevolution. Unlike the majority of ecological models, the number of species is not fixed - they emerge by "mutation" of existing species, then survive or go extinct depending on the balance between local ecological interactions. The Monte-Carlo numerical simulations show that this model is able to qualitatively reproduce phenomena that have been empirically observed, like the dependence between size of the isolated area and the number of species inhabiting there, primary production and species-diversity. The model allows also studying the causes of mass extinctions and more generally, repeatability, and the role of pure chance in macroevolution.

  12. Optical lattices with micromechanical mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerer, K.; Stannigel, K.; Genes, C.; Zoller, P.; Treutlein, P.; Camerer, S.; Hunger, D.; Haensch, T. W.

    2010-08-15

    We investigate a setup where a cloud of atoms is trapped in an optical lattice potential of a standing-wave laser field which is created by retroreflection on a micromembrane. The membrane vibrations itself realize a quantum mechanical degree of freedom. We show that the center-of-mass mode of atoms can be coupled to the vibrational mode of the membrane in free space. Via laser cooling of atoms a significant sympathetic cooling effect on the membrane vibrations can be achieved. Switching off laser cooling brings the system close to a regime of strong coherent coupling. This setup provides a controllable segregation between the cooling and coherent dynamics regimes, and allows one to keep the membrane in a cryogenic environment and atoms at a distance in a vacuum chamber.

  13. On lattice chiral gauge theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiani, L.; Rossi, G. C.; Testa, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Smit-Swift-Aoki formulation of a lattice chiral gauge theory is presented. In this formulation the Wilson and other non invariant terms in the action are made gauge invariant by the coupling with a nonlinear auxilary scalar field, omega. It is shown that omega decouples from the physical states only if appropriate parameters are tuned so as to satisfy a set of BRST identities. In addition, explicit ghost fields are necessary to ensure decoupling. These theories can give rise to the correct continuum limit. Similar considerations apply to schemes with mirror fermions. Simpler cases with a global chiral symmetry are discussed and it is shown that the theory becomes free at decoupling. Recent numerical simulations agree with those considerations.

  14. B B interactions with static bottom quarks from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicudo, Pedro; Cichy, Krzysztof; Peters, Antje; Wagner, Marc

    2016-02-01

    The isospin, spin and parity dependent potential of a pair of B mesons is computed using Wilson twisted mass lattice QCD with two flavors of degenerate dynamical quarks. The B meson is addressed in the static-light approximation, i.e. the b quarks are infinitely heavy. From the results of the B B meson-meson potentials, a simple rule can be deduced stating which isospin, spin and parity combinations correspond to attractive and which to repulsive forces. We provide fits to the ground state potentials in the attractive channels and discuss the potentials in the repulsive and excited channels. The attractive channels are the most important since they can possibly lead to a bound four-quark state, i.e. a b ¯b ¯u d tetraquark. Using these attractive potentials in the Schrödinger equation, we find an indication for such a tetraquark state of two static bottom antiquarks and two light u /d quarks with mass extrapolated down to the physical value.

  15. Fading channel simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, P.E.; Fitzgerald, T.J.

    1991-12-31

    This invention relates to high frequency (HF) radio signal propagation through fading channels and, more particularly, to simulation of fading channels in order to characterize HF radio system performance in transmitting and receiving signals through such fading channels. Fading channel effects on a transmitted communication signal are simulated with both frequency and time variations using a channel scattering function to affect the transmitted signal. A conventional channel scattering function is converted to a series of channel realizations by multiplying the square root of the channel scattering function by a complex number of which the real and imaginary parts are each independent variables. The two-dimensional inverse-FFT of this complex-valued channel realization yields a matrix of channel coefficients that provide a complete frequency-time description of the channel. The transmitted radio signal is segmented to provide a series of transmitted signal and each segment is subject to FFT to generate a series of signal coefficient matrices. The channel coefficient matrices and signal coefficient matrices are then multiplied and subjected to inverse-FFT to output a signal representing the received affected radio signal. A variety of channel scattering functions can be used to characterize the response of a transmitter-receiver system to such atmospheric effects.

  16. Dimers on the 33 .42 lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuli; Yan, Weigen

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we obtain explicit expression of the number of close-packed dimers (perfect matchings) of the 33 .42 lattice with cylindrical boundary condition. Particularly, we show that the entropy of 33 .42 lattice is the same for cylindrical and toroidal boundary conditions.

  17. Results and Frontiers in Lattice Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    John Bulava; Robert Edwards; George Fleming; K.Jimmy Juge; Adam C. Lichtl; Nilmani Mathur; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Stephen J. Wallace

    2007-06-16

    The Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration (LHPC) baryon spectroscopy effort is reviewed. To date the LHPC has performed exploratory Lattice QCD calculations of the low-lying spectrum of Nucleon and Delta baryons. These calculations demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by obtaining the masses of an unprecedented number of excited states with definite quantum numbers. Future work of the project is outlined.

  18. Results and Frontiers in Lattice Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bulava, John; Morningstar, Colin; Edwards, Robert; Richards, David; Fleming, George; Juge, K. Jimmy; Lichtl, Adam C.; Mathur, Nilmani; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2007-10-26

    The Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration (LHPC) baryon spectroscopy effort is reviewed. To date the LHPC has performed exploratory Lattice QCD calculations of the low-lying spectrum of Nucleon and Delta baryons. These calculations demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by obtaining the masses of an unprecedented number of excited states with definite quantum numbers. Future work of the project is outlined.

  19. LHC Phenomenology and Lattice Strong Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, G. T.

    2013-03-01

    While the LHC experimentalists work to find evidence of physics beyond the standard model, lattice gauge theorists are working as well to characterize the range of possible phenomena in strongly-coupled models of electroweak symmetry breaking. I will summarize the current progress of the Lattice Strong Dynamics (LSD) collaboration on the flavor dependence of SU(3) gauge theories.

  20. Ultracold quantum gases in triangular optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, C.; Soltan-Panahi, P.; Kronjäger, J.; Dörscher, S.; Bongs, K.; Sengstock, K.

    2010-06-01

    Over recent years, exciting developments in the field of ultracold atoms confined in optical lattices have led to numerous theoretical proposals devoted to the quantum simulation of problems e.g. known from condensed matter physics. Many of those ideas demand experimental environments with non-cubic lattice geometries. In this paper, we report on the implementation of a versatile three-beam lattice allowing for the generation of triangular as well as hexagonal optical lattices. As an important step, the superfluid-Mott insulator (SF-MI) quantum phase transition has been observed and investigated in detail in this lattice geometry for the first time. In addition to this, we study the physics of spinor Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) in the presence of the triangular optical lattice potential, especially spin changing dynamics across the SF-MI transition. Our results suggest that, below the SF-MI phase transition, a well-established mean-field model describes the observed data when renormalizing the spin-dependent interaction. Interestingly, this opens up new perspectives for a lattice-driven tuning of a spin dynamics resonance occurring through the interplay of the quadratic Zeeman effect and spin-dependent interaction. Finally, we discuss further lattice configurations that can be realized with our setup.

  1. Quantum nonlinear Schrodinger equation on a lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Bogolyubov, N.M.; Korepin, V.E.

    1986-09-01

    A local Hamiltonian is constructed for the nonlinear Schrodinger equation on a lattice in both the classical and the quantum variants. This Hamiltonian is an explicit elementary function of the local Bose fields. The lattice model possesses the same structure of the action-angle variables as the continuous model.

  2. The Chroma Software System for Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Edwards; Balint Joo

    2004-06-01

    We describe aspects of the Chroma software system for lattice QCD calculations. Chroma is an open source C++ based software system developed using the software infrastructure of the US SciDAC initiative. Chroma interfaces with output from the BAGEL assembly generator for optimized lattice fermion kernels on some architectures. It can be run on workstations, clusters and the QCDOC supercomputer.

  3. A lattice formulation of chiral gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Bodwin, G.T.

    1996-08-01

    We present a method for implementing gauge theories of chiral fermions on the lattice. Discussed topics include: the lattice as a UV regulator, a chiral QED model, modification of the fermion determinant, large gauge-field momenta, and a non-perturbative problem.

  4. Lattice Boltzmann equation for relativistic quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Succi, Sauro

    2002-03-15

    Relativistic versions of the quantum lattice Boltzmann equation are discussed. It is shown that the inclusion of nonlinear interactions requires the standard collision operator to be replaced by a pair of dynamic fields coupling to the relativistic wave function in a way which can be described by a multicomponent complex lattice Boltzmann equation. PMID:16210189

  5. Wave propagation on a random lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Sahlmann, Hanno

    2010-09-15

    Motivated by phenomenological questions in quantum gravity, we consider the propagation of a scalar field on a random lattice. We describe a procedure to calculate the dispersion relation for the field by taking a limit of a periodic lattice. We use this to calculate the lowest order coefficients of the dispersion relation for a specific one-dimensional model.

  6. Recent advances in lattice Boltzmann methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Doolen, G.D.; He, X.; Nie, X.; Zhang, R.

    1998-12-31

    In this paper, the authors briefly present the basic principles of lattice Boltzmann method and summarize recent advances of the method, including the application of the lattice Boltzmann method for fluid flows in MEMS and simulation of the multiphase mixing and turbulence.

  7. A mathematical model of collagen lattice contraction

    PubMed Central

    Dallon, J. C.; Evans, E. J.; Ehrlich, H. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Two mathematical models for fibroblast–collagen interaction are proposed which reproduce qualitative features of fibroblast-populated collagen lattice contraction. Both models are force based and model the cells as individual entities with discrete attachment sites; however, the collagen lattice is modelled differently in each model. In the collagen lattice model, the lattice is more interconnected and formed by triangulating nodes to form the fibrous structure. In the collagen fibre model, the nodes are not triangulated, are less interconnected, and the collagen fibres are modelled as a string of nodes. Both models suggest that the overall increase in stress of the lattice as it contracts is not the cause of the reduced rate of contraction, but that the reduced rate of contraction is due to inactivation of the fibroblasts. PMID:25142520

  8. Synthetic magnetic fluxes on the honeycomb lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Gorecka, Agnieszka; Gremaud, Benoit; Miniatura, Christian

    2011-08-15

    We devise experimental schemes that are able to mimic uniform and staggered magnetic fluxes acting on ultracold two-electron atoms, such as ytterbium atoms, propagating in a honeycomb lattice. The atoms are first trapped into two independent state-selective triangular lattices and then further exposed to a suitable configuration of resonant Raman laser beams. These beams induce hops between the two triangular lattices and make atoms move in a honeycomb lattice. Atoms traveling around each unit cell of this honeycomb lattice pick up a nonzero phase. In the uniform case, the artificial magnetic flux sustained by each cell can reach about two flux quanta, thereby realizing a cold-atom analog of the Harper model with its notorious Hofstadter's butterfly structure. Different condensed-matter phenomena such as the relativistic integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, as observed in graphene samples, could be targeted with this scheme.

  9. Status of the ATF2 Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, E.; Tomas, R.; Bambade, P.; Okugi, T.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Seryi, A.; White, G.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2011-12-09

    The current status for the ATF2 Nominal and Ultra-low {beta}* lattices are presented in this paper. New lattice designs have been obtained in order to minimise the impact of the last interpretation of multipole measurements that have been included into the model. However, the new ATF2 Ultra-low design is not able to recover the expected vertical beam size at the IP with the current magnet distribution. Therefore, different quadrupole sorting have been studied. A significant gain is evident for the ATF2 Ultra-low lattice when sorting the magnets according to the skew-sextupolar components. The ATF2 Nominal lattice is also expected to benefit from the new sorting. Tuning results of the new ATF2 Ultra-low lattice under realistic imperfections are also reported.

  10. Ising antiferromagnet on the Archimedean lattices.

    PubMed

    Yu, Unjong

    2015-06-01

    Geometric frustration effects were studied systematically with the Ising antiferromagnet on the 11 Archimedean lattices using the Monte Carlo methods. The Wang-Landau algorithm for static properties (specific heat and residual entropy) and the Metropolis algorithm for a freezing order parameter were adopted. The exact residual entropy was also found. Based on the degree of frustration and dynamic properties, ground states of them were determined. The Shastry-Sutherland lattice and the trellis lattice are weakly frustrated and have two- and one-dimensional long-range-ordered ground states, respectively. The bounce, maple-leaf, and star lattices have the spin ice phase. The spin liquid phase appears in the triangular and kagome lattices. PMID:26172675

  11. Quantum transport in d-dimensional lattices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Manzano, Daniel; Chuang, Chern; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-04-28

    We show that both fermionic and bosonic uniform d-dimensional lattices can be reduced to a set of independent one-dimensional chains. This reduction leads to the expression for ballistic energy fluxes in uniform fermionic and bosonic lattices. By the use of the Jordan–Wigner transformation we can extend our analysis to spin lattices, proving the coexistence of both ballistic and non-ballistic subspaces in any dimension and for any system size. Lastly, we then relate the nature of transport to the number of excitations in the homogeneous spin lattice, indicating that a single excitation always propagates ballistically and that the non-ballistic behaviour ofmore » uniform spin lattices is a consequence of the interaction between different excitations.« less

  12. Counting lattice animals in high dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, Sebastian; Mertens, Stephan

    2011-09-01

    We present an implementation of Redelemeier's algorithm for the enumeration of lattice animals in high-dimensional lattices. The implementation is lean and fast enough to allow us to extend the existing tables of animal counts, perimeter polynomials and series expansion coefficients in d-dimensional hypercubic lattices for 3 <= d <= 10. From the data we compute formulae for perimeter polynomials for lattice animals of size n <= 11 in arbitrary dimension d. When amended by combinatorial arguments, the new data suffice to yield explicit formulae for the number of lattice animals of size n <= 14 and arbitrary d. We also use the enumeration data to compute numerical estimates for growth rates and exponents in high dimensions that agree very well with Monte Carlo simulations and recent predictions from field theory.

  13. Quantum transport in d-dimensional lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzano, Daniel; Chuang, Chern; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-04-01

    We show that both fermionic and bosonic uniform d-dimensional lattices can be reduced to a set of independent one-dimensional chains. This reduction leads to the expression for ballistic energy fluxes in uniform fermionic and bosonic lattices. By the use of the Jordan–Wigner transformation we can extend our analysis to spin lattices, proving the coexistence of both ballistic and non-ballistic subspaces in any dimension and for any system size. We then relate the nature of transport to the number of excitations in the homogeneous spin lattice, indicating that a single excitation always propagates ballistically and that the non-ballistic behaviour of uniform spin lattices is a consequence of the interaction between different excitations.

  14. Ising antiferromagnet on the Archimedean lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Unjong

    2015-06-01

    Geometric frustration effects were studied systematically with the Ising antiferromagnet on the 11 Archimedean lattices using the Monte Carlo methods. The Wang-Landau algorithm for static properties (specific heat and residual entropy) and the Metropolis algorithm for a freezing order parameter were adopted. The exact residual entropy was also found. Based on the degree of frustration and dynamic properties, ground states of them were determined. The Shastry-Sutherland lattice and the trellis lattice are weakly frustrated and have two- and one-dimensional long-range-ordered ground states, respectively. The bounce, maple-leaf, and star lattices have the spin ice phase. The spin liquid phase appears in the triangular and kagome lattices.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of phonon transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yangyu; Wang, Moran

    2016-06-01

    A novel lattice Boltzmann scheme is proposed for phonon transport based on the phonon Boltzmann equation. Through the Chapman-Enskog expansion, the phonon lattice Boltzmann equation under the gray relaxation time approximation recovers the classical Fourier's law in the diffusive limit. The numerical parameters in the lattice Boltzmann model are therefore rigorously correlated to the bulk material properties. The new scheme does not only eliminate the fictitious phonon speed in the diagonal direction of a square lattice system in the previous lattice Boltzmann models, but also displays very robust performances in predicting both temperature and heat flux distributions consistent with analytical solutions for diverse numerical cases, including steady-state and transient, macroscale and microscale, one-dimensional and multi-dimensional phonon heat transport. This method may provide a powerful numerical tool for deep studies of nonlinear and nonlocal heat transports in nanosystems.

  16. A lattice approach to spinorial quantum gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renteln, Paul; Smolin, Lee

    1989-01-01

    A new lattice regularization of quantum general relativity based on Ashtekar's reformulation of Hamiltonian general relativity is presented. In this form, quantum states of the gravitational field are represented within the physical Hilbert space of a Kogut-Susskind lattice gauge theory. The gauge field of the theory is a complexified SU(2) connection which is the gravitational connection for left-handed spinor fields. The physical states of the gravitational field are those which are annihilated by additional constraints which correspond to the four constraints of general relativity. Lattice versions of these constraints are constructed. Those corresponding to the three-dimensional diffeomorphism generators move states associated with Wilson loops around on the lattice. The lattice Hamiltonian constraint has a simple form, and a correspondingly simple interpretation: it is an operator which cuts and joins Wilson loops at points of intersection.

  17. Trapping Rydberg Atoms in an Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S. E.; Younge, K. C.; Raithel, G.

    2011-12-23

    Rubidium Rydberg atoms are laser excited and subsequently trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice (wavelength 1064 nm). Efficient trapping is achieved by a lattice inversion immediately after laser excitation using an electro-optic technique. The trapping efficiency is probed via analysis of the trap-induced shift of the two-photon microwave transition 50S{yields}51S. The inversion technique allows us to reach a trapping efficiency of 90%. The dependence of the efficiency on the timing of the lattice inversion and on the trap laser power is studied. The dwell time of 50D{sub 5/2} Rydberg atoms in the lattice is analyzed using lattice-induced photoionization.

  18. Fast Lattice Monte Carlo Simulations of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Pengfei

    2014-03-01

    The recently proposed fast lattice Monte Carlo (FLMC) simulations (with multiple occupancy of lattice sites (MOLS) and Kronecker δ-function interactions) give much faster/better sampling of configuration space than both off-lattice molecular simulations (with pair-potential calculations) and conventional lattice Monte Carlo simulations (with self- and mutual-avoiding walk and nearest-neighbor interactions) of polymers.[1] Quantitative coarse-graining of polymeric systems can also be performed using lattice models with MOLS.[2] Here we use several model systems, including polymer melts, solutions, blends, as well as confined and/or grafted polymers, to demonstrate the great advantages of FLMC simulations in the study of equilibrium properties of polymers.

  19. Lattice QCD studies of s-wave meson-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Yoichi

    2011-10-21

    We study the s-wave KN interactions in the isospin I = 0, 1 channels and associated exotic state {Theta}{sup +} from 2+1 flavor full lattice QCD simulation for relatively heavy quark mass corresponding to m{sub {pi}} = 871 MeV. The s-wave KN potentials are obtained from the Bethe-Salpeter amplitudes. Potentials in both channels reveal short range repulsions: Strength of the repulsion is stronger in the I = 1 potential. The I = 0 potential is found to have attractive well at mid range. The KN scattering phase shifts are calculated and compared with the experimental data.

  20. Porous Substrate Effects on Thermal Flows Through a Rev-Scale Finite Volume Lattice Boltzmann Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarghami, Ahad; Francesco, Silvia Di; Biscarini, Chiara

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, fluid flows with enhanced heat transfer in porous channels are investigated through a stable finite volume (FV) formulation of the thermal lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). Temperature field is tracked through a double distribution function (DDF) model, while the porous media is modeled using Brinkman-Forchheimer assumptions. The method is tested against flows in channels partially filled with porous media and parametric studies are conducted to evaluate the effects of various parameters, highlighting their influence on the thermo-hydrodynamic behavior.

  1. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002580.htm Calcium channel blocker overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Calcium channel blockers are a type of medicine used ...

  2. Manifesting pseudo-spin polarization of graphene with field emission image

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jingkun; Li, Zhibing Wang, Weiliang

    2014-02-07

    Coherent emission of electron from graphene in both electric and magnetic fields is studied. We obtain the emission wave function analytically. The emission current density is calculated. The structure of Landau levels is recognizable in the emission image. The emission pattern depends on the phase difference of two sub-lattices. We find that the pattern changes obviously with the gate voltage on the edge. It provides a way to manipulate the emission pattern.

  3. Fluorescence imaging of lattice re-distribution on step-index direct laser written Nd:YAG waveguide lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez de Mendívil, Jon; Pérez Delgado, Alberto; Lifante, Ginés; Jaque, Daniel; Ródenas, Airán; Benayas, Antonio; Aguiló, Magdalena; Diaz, Francesc; Kar, Ajoy K.

    2015-01-14

    The laser performance and crystalline micro-structural properties of near-infrared step-index channel waveguides fabricated inside Neodymium doped YAG laser ceramics by means of three-dimensional sub-picosecond pulse laser direct writing are reported. Fluorescence micro-mapping of the waveguide cross-sections reveals that an essential crystal lattice re-distribution has been induced after short pulse irradiation. Such lattice re-distribution is evidenced at the waveguide core corresponding to the laser written refractive index increased volume. The waveguides core surroundings also present diverse changes including slight lattice disorder and bi-axial strain fields. The step-index waveguide laser performance is compared with previous laser fabricated waveguides with a stress-optic guiding mechanism in absence of laser induced lattice re-distribution.

  4. Optimal channels for channelized quadratic estimators.

    PubMed

    Kupinski, Meredith K; Clarkson, Eric

    2016-06-01

    We present a new method for computing optimized channels for estimation tasks that is feasible for high-dimensional image data. Maximum-likelihood (ML) parameter estimates are challenging to compute from high-dimensional likelihoods. The dimensionality reduction from M measurements to L channels is a critical advantage of channelized quadratic estimators (CQEs), since estimating likelihood moments from channelized data requires smaller sample sizes and inverting a smaller covariance matrix is easier. The channelized likelihood is then used to form ML estimates of the parameter(s). In this work we choose an imaging example in which the second-order statistics of the image data depend upon the parameter of interest: the correlation length. Correlation lengths are used to approximate background textures in many imaging applications, and in these cases an estimate of the correlation length is useful for pre-whitening. In a simulation study we compare the estimation performance, as measured by the root-mean-squared error (RMSE), of correlation length estimates from CQE and power spectral density (PSD) distribution fitting. To abide by the assumptions of the PSD method we simulate an ergodic, isotropic, stationary, and zero-mean random process. These assumptions are not part of the CQE formalism. The CQE method assumes a Gaussian channelized likelihood that can be a valid for non-Gaussian image data, since the channel outputs are formed from weighted sums of the image elements. We have shown that, for three or more channels, the RMSE of CQE estimates of correlation length is lower than conventional PSD estimates. We also show that computing CQE by using a standard nonlinear optimization method produces channels that yield RMSE within 2% of the analytic optimum. CQE estimates of anisotropic correlation length estimation are reported to demonstrate this technique on a two-parameter estimation problem. PMID:27409452

  5. Channel catfish pond fertilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most successful aquaculture enterprise in the U.S. is channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus production. In the U.S., 257 million kg of channel catfish were sold in 2007 at a value of $455 million. Large-scale commercial channel catfish culture began in the late 1950s and expanded rapidly from 1978...

  6. Toward a realistic low-field SSC lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Heifets, S.

    1985-10-01

    Three six-fold lattices for 3 T superferric SSC have been generated at TAC. The program based on the first order canonical transformation was used to compare lattices. On this basis the realistic race-track lattices were generated.

  7. Infrared photoelectron emission from Scandate dispenser cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Kevin L.; Feldman, Donald W.; Virgo, Matt; O'Shea, Patrick G.

    2003-08-01

    Nonlinear photoelectric emission from Scandate dispenser cathodes using 1.064-μm radiation in nanosecond-scale pulses has been observed. Unlike single-photon emission, the photocurrent is a strong function of both the initial lattice temperature and the applied electric field as well as laser intensity. The parametric data is compared to a theoretical model for the process, and the data is shown to be explicable in terms of laser heating of the electron gas and subsequent photoemission.

  8. Channel blocking of MspA revisited.

    PubMed

    Perera, Ayomi S; Wang, Hongwang; Basel, Matthew T; Pokhrel, Megh Raj; Gamage, Pubudu Siyambalagoda; Kalita, Mausam; Wendel, Sebastian; Sears, Bryan; Welideniya, Dhanushi; Liu, Yao; Turro, Claudia; Troyer, Deryl L; Bossmann, Stefan H

    2013-01-01

    Porin A from Mycobacterium smegmatis (MspA) is a highly stable, octameric channel protein, which acts as the main transporter of electrolytes across the cell membrane. MspA features a narrow, negatively charged constriction zone, allowing stable binding of various analytes thereby blocking the channel. Investigation of channel blocking of mycobacterial porins is of significance in developing alternate treatment methods for tuberculosis. The concept that ruthenium(II)quaterpyridinium complexes have the capability to act as efficient channel blockers for MspA and related porins, emerged after very high binding constants were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography and steady-state luminescence studies. Consequently, the interactions between the ruthenium(II) complex RuC2 molecules and MspA, leading to RuC2@MspA assemblies, have been studied utilizing time-resolved absorption/emission, atomic force microscopy, dynamic light scattering, ζ potential measurements, and isothermal titration calorimetry. The results obtained provide evidence for the formation of clusters/large aggregates of RuC2 and MspA. The results are of interest with respect to utilizing prospective channel blockers in porins. The combination of results from conceptually different techniques shed some light onto the chemical nature of MspA-channel blocker interactions thus contributing to the development of a paradigm for channel blocking. PMID:23214433

  9. Some physical and chemical indices of the Union Jack lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuli; Yan, Weigen; Tian, Tao

    2015-02-01

    The Union Jack lattice is the dual lattice of the 4.8.8 lattice. The quantum spin model with frustration and the Ising model on the Union Jack lattice have been studied extensively by physicists. In this paper, we derive the spectrum and Laplacian spectrum of the Union Jack lattice with toroidal boundary condition. As applications, we obtain the formulae of the number of spanning trees, the energy, and the Kirchhoff index of the Union Jack lattice with toroidal boundary condition.

  10. The I=2 ππ S-wave Scattering Phase Shift from Lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Beane, S. R.; Chang, E.; Detmold, W.; Lin, H. W.; Luu, T. C.; Orginos, K.; Parreno, A.; Savage, M. J.; Torok, A.; Walker-Loud, A.

    2012-02-16

    The π+π+ s-wave scattering phase-shift is determined below the inelastic threshold using Lattice QCD. Calculations were performed at a pion mass of mπ ≈ 390 MeV with an anisotropic nf = 2+1 clover fermion discretization in four lattice volumes, with spatial extent L ≈ 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 and 3.9 fm, and with a lattice spacing of bs ≈ 0.123 fm in the spatial direction and bt bs/3.5 in the time direction. The phase-shift is determined from the energy-eigenvalues of π+π+ systems with both zero and non-zero total momentum in the lattice volume using Luscher's method. Our calculations are precise enoughmore » to allow for a determination of the threshold scattering parameters, the scattering length a, the effective range r, and the shape-parameter P, in this channel and to examine the prediction of two-flavor chiral perturbation theory: mπ2 a r = 3+O(mπ2/Λχ2). Chiral perturbation theory is used, with the Lattice QCD results as input, to predict the scattering phase-shift (and threshold parameters) at the physical pion mass. Our results are consistent with determinations from the Roy equations and with the existing experimental phase shift data.« less

  11. Two relaxation time lattice Boltzmann model for rarefied gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahani, Javad Abolfazli; Norouzi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) with two relaxation times (TRT) is implemented in order to study gaseous flow through a long micro/nano-channel. A new relation is introduced for the reflection factor in the bounce-back/specular reflection (BSR) boundary condition based on the analytical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. The focus of the present study is on comparing TRT with the other LBE models called multiple relaxation times (MRT) and single relaxation time (SRT) in simulation of rarefied gas flows. After a stability analysis for the TRT and SRT models, the numerical results are presented and validated by the analytical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations with slip boundary condition, direct simulation of Monte Carlo (DSMC) and information preservation (IP) method. The effect of various gases on flow behavior is also investigated by using the variable hard sphere (VHS) model through the symmetrical relaxation time.

  12. Lattice Boltzmann method for mixtures at variable Schmidt number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteferrante, Michele; Melchionna, Simone; Marconi, Umberto Marini Bettolo

    2014-07-01

    When simulating multicomponent mixtures via the Lattice Boltzmann Method, it is desirable to control the mutual diffusivity between species while maintaining the viscosity of the solution fixed. This goal is herein achieved by a modification of the multicomponent Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook evolution equations by introducing two different timescales for mass and momentum diffusion. Diffusivity is thus controlled by an effective drag force acting between species. Numerical simulations confirm the accuracy of the method for neutral binary and charged ternary mixtures in bulk conditions. The simulation of a charged mixture in a charged slit channel show that the conductivity and electro-osmotic mobility exhibit a departure from the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski prediction at high diffusivity.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann method for mixtures at variable Schmidt number.

    PubMed

    Monteferrante, Michele; Melchionna, Simone; Marconi, Umberto Marini Bettolo

    2014-07-01

    When simulating multicomponent mixtures via the Lattice Boltzmann Method, it is desirable to control the mutual diffusivity between species while maintaining the viscosity of the solution fixed. This goal is herein achieved by a modification of the multicomponent Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook evolution equations by introducing two different timescales for mass and momentum diffusion. Diffusivity is thus controlled by an effective drag force acting between species. Numerical simulations confirm the accuracy of the method for neutral binary and charged ternary mixtures in bulk conditions. The simulation of a charged mixture in a charged slit channel show that the conductivity and electro-osmotic mobility exhibit a departure from the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski prediction at high diffusivity. PMID:25005272

  14. Spin-3/2 baryons in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Zanotti; S. Choe; D.B. Leinweber; W. Melnitchouk; A.G. Williams; J.B. Zhang

    2002-06-01

    We present first results for masses of spin-3/2 baryons in lattice QCD, using a novel fat-link clover fermion action in which only the irrelevant operators are constructed using fat links. In the isospin-1/2 sector, we observe, after appropriate spin and parity projection, a strong signal for the J{sup P} = 3/2{sup -} state, and find good agreement between the 1/2{sup +} mass and earlier nucleon mass simulations with a spin-1/2 interpolating field. For the isospin-3/2 Delta states, clear mass splittings are observed between the various 1/2{sup +/-} and the 3/2{sup +/-} channels, with the calculated level orderings in good agreement with those observed empirically.

  15. Resonance Parameters of the Rho-Meson from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Feng, Karl Jansen, Dru Renner

    2011-05-01

    We perform a non-perturbative lattice calculation of the P-wave pion-pion scattering phase in the rho-meson decay channel using two flavors of maximally twisted mass fermions at pion masses ranging from 480 MeV to 290 MeV. Making use of finite-size methods, we evaluate the pion-pion scattering phase in the center-of-mass frame and two moving frames. Applying an effective range formula, we find a good description of our results for the scattering phase as a function of the energy covering the resonance region. This allows us to extract the rho-meson mass and decay width and to study their quark mass dependence.

  16. Resonance parameters of the {rho} meson from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xu; Jansen, Karl; Renner, Dru B.

    2011-05-01

    We perform a nonperturbative lattice calculation of the P-wave pion-pion scattering phase in the {rho}-meson decay channel using two flavors of maximally twisted mass fermions at pion masses ranging from 480 to 290 MeV. Making use of finite-size methods, we evaluate the pion-pion scattering phase in the center-of-mass frame and two moving frames. Applying an effective range formula, we find a good description of our results for the scattering phase as a function of the energy covering the resonance region. This allows us to extract the {rho}-meson mass and decay width and to study their quark mass dependence.

  17. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of chemical dissolution in porous media.

    PubMed

    Kang, Qinjun; Zhang, Dongxiao; Chen, Shiyi; He, Xiaoyi

    2002-03-01

    In this paper, we develop a lattice Boltzmann model for simulating the transport and reaction of fluids in porous media. To simulate such a system, we account for the interaction of forced convection, molecular diffusion, and surface reaction. The problem is complicated by the evolution of the porous media geometry due to chemical reactions, which may significantly and continuously modify the hydrologic properties of the media. The particular application that motivates the present study is acid stimulation, a common technique used to increase production from petroleum reservoirs. This technique involves the injection of acid (e.g., hydrochloric acid, HCl, acetic acid, HAc) into the formation to dissolve minerals comprising the rock. As acid is injected, highly conductive channels or "wormholes" may be formed. The dissolution of carbonate rocks in 0.5M HCl and 0.5M HAc is simulated with the lattice Boltzmann model developed in this study. The dependence of dissolution process and the geometry of the final wormhole pattern on the acid type and the injection rate is studied. The results agree qualitatively with the experimental and theoretical analyses of others and substantiate the previous finding that there exists an optimal injection rate at which the wormhole is formed as well as the number of pore volumes of the injected fluid to break through is minimized. This study also confirms the experimentally observed phenomenon that the optimal injection rate decreases and the corresponding minimized number of pore volumes to break through increases as the acid is changed from HCl to HAc. Simulations suggest that the proposed lattice Boltzmann model may serve as an alternative reliable quantitative approach to study chemical dissolution in porous media. PMID:11909255

  18. Accuracy of non-Newtonian Lattice Boltzmann simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Daniel; Schneider, Andreas; Böhle, Martin

    2015-11-01

    This work deals with the accuracy of non-Newtonian Lattice Boltzmann simulations. Previous work for Newtonian fluids indicate that, depending on the numerical value of the dimensionless collision frequency Ω, additional artificial viscosity is introduced, which negatively influences the accuracy. Since the non-Newtonian fluid behavior is incorporated through appropriate modeling of the dimensionless collision frequency, a Ω dependent error EΩ is introduced and its influence on the overall error is investigated. Here, simulations with the SRT and the MRT model are carried out for power-law fluids in order to numerically investigate the accuracy of non-Newtonian Lattice Boltzmann simulations. A goal of this accuracy analysis is to derive a recommendation for an optimal choice of the time step size and the simulation Mach number, respectively. For the non-Newtonian case, an error estimate for EΩ in the form of a functional is derived on the basis of a series expansion of the Lattice Boltzmann equation. This functional can be solved analytically for the case of the Hagen-Poiseuille channel flow of non-Newtonian fluids. With the help of the error functional, the prediction of the global error minimum of the velocity field is excellent in regions where the EΩ error is the dominant source of error. With an optimal simulation Mach number, the simulation is about one order of magnitude more accurate. Additionally, for both collision models a detailed study of the convergence behavior of the method in the non-Newtonian case is conducted. The results show that the simulation Mach number has a major impact on the convergence rate and second order accuracy is not preserved for every choice of the simulation Mach number.

  19. New faces of the familiar clathrin lattice.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, Jeremy D; Hwang, Peter K; Brodsky, Frances M

    2005-04-01

    The clathrin triskelion self-assembles into a lattice that coats transport vesicles participating in several key membrane traffic pathways. A new model of a clathrin lattice at approximately 8 angstrom resolution, generated by Fotin et al. (Nature 2004;432:573) confirmed the basic structural features of clathrin that were defined over many years of biochemical and structural analysis. In addition, new structural features of the clathrin trimerization domain were modelled for the first time, and the predictions correlated well with previous biochemical studies. A second model, placing auxilin within the lattice suggested a possible lattice contact targeted during lattice disassembly (Fotin et al. Nature 2004;432:649). This contact predicts interactions of the newly modelled trimerization domain with a newly defined extension of the clathrin triskelion, the ankle domain. These aspects of the new models were emphasized in the published reports describing them and in recent commentary (Brodsky, Nature 2004;432:568). Also emerging from the new models is a better picture of how the clathrin structure is distributed throughout the lattice, allowing the first predictions of interacting molecular interfaces contributing to contacts in the assembled lattice. The focus of this interchange is to emphasize these additional features revealed by the recently published models from Fotin and colleagues. PMID:15752139

  20. Dynamic Behavior of Engineered Lattice Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawreliak, J. A.; Lind, J.; Maddox, B.; Barham, M.; Messner, M.; Barton, N.; Jensen, B. J.; Kumar, M.

    2016-06-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is enabling the fabrication of materials with engineered lattice structures at the micron scale. These mesoscopic structures fall between the length scale associated with the organization of atoms and the scale at which macroscopic structures are constructed. Dynamic compression experiments were performed to study the emergence of behavior owing to the lattice periodicity in AM materials on length scales that approach a single unit cell. For the lattice structures, both bend and stretch dominated, elastic deflection of the structure was observed ahead of the compaction of the lattice, while no elastic deformation was observed to precede the compaction in a stochastic, random structure. The material showed lattice characteristics in the elastic response of the material, while the compaction was consistent with a model for compression of porous media. The experimental observations made on arrays of 4 × 4 × 6 lattice unit cells show excellent agreement with elastic wave velocity calculations for an infinite periodic lattice, as determined by Bloch wave analysis, and finite element simulations.

  1. Duality analysis on random planar lattices.

    PubMed

    Ohzeki, Masayuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2012-11-01

    The conventional duality analysis is employed to identify a location of a critical point on a uniform lattice without any disorder in its structure. In the present study, we deal with the random planar lattice, which consists of the randomized structure based on the square lattice. We introduce the uniformly random modification by the bond dilution and contraction on a part of the unit square. The random planar lattice includes the triangular and hexagonal lattices in extreme cases of a parameter to control the structure. A modern duality analysis fashion with real-space renormalization is found to be available for estimating the location of the critical points with a wide range of the randomness parameter. As a simple test bed, we demonstrate that our method indeed gives several critical points for the cases of the Ising and Potts models and the bond-percolation thresholds on the random planar lattice. Our method leads to not only such an extension of the duality analyses on the classical statistical mechanics but also a fascinating result associated with optimal error thresholds for a class of quantum error correction code, the surface code on the random planar lattice, which is known as a skillful technique to protect the quantum state. PMID:23214752

  2. Dynamic Behavior of Engineered Lattice Materials

    PubMed Central

    Hawreliak, J. A.; Lind, J.; Maddox, B.; Barham, M.; Messner, M.; Barton, N.; Jensen, B. J.; Kumar, M.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is enabling the fabrication of materials with engineered lattice structures at the micron scale. These mesoscopic structures fall between the length scale associated with the organization of atoms and the scale at which macroscopic structures are constructed. Dynamic compression experiments were performed to study the emergence of behavior owing to the lattice periodicity in AM materials on length scales that approach a single unit cell. For the lattice structures, both bend and stretch dominated, elastic deflection of the structure was observed ahead of the compaction of the lattice, while no elastic deformation was observed to precede the compaction in a stochastic, random structure. The material showed lattice characteristics in the elastic response of the material, while the compaction was consistent with a model for compression of porous media. The experimental observations made on arrays of 4 × 4 × 6 lattice unit cells show excellent agreement with elastic wave velocity calculations for an infinite periodic lattice, as determined by Bloch wave analysis, and finite element simulations. PMID:27321697

  3. Dynamic Behavior of Engineered Lattice Materials.

    PubMed

    Hawreliak, J A; Lind, J; Maddox, B; Barham, M; Messner, M; Barton, N; Jensen, B J; Kumar, M

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is enabling the fabrication of materials with engineered lattice structures at the micron scale. These mesoscopic structures fall between the length scale associated with the organization of atoms and the scale at which macroscopic structures are constructed. Dynamic compression experiments were performed to study the emergence of behavior owing to the lattice periodicity in AM materials on length scales that approach a single unit cell. For the lattice structures, both bend and stretch dominated, elastic deflection of the structure was observed ahead of the compaction of the lattice, while no elastic deformation was observed to precede the compaction in a stochastic, random structure. The material showed lattice characteristics in the elastic response of the material, while the compaction was consistent with a model for compression of porous media. The experimental observations made on arrays of 4 × 4 × 6 lattice unit cells show excellent agreement with elastic wave velocity calculations for an infinite periodic lattice, as determined by Bloch wave analysis, and finite element simulations. PMID:27321697

  4. Duality analysis on random planar lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohzeki, Masayuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2012-11-01

    The conventional duality analysis is employed to identify a location of a critical point on a uniform lattice without any disorder in its structure. In the present study, we deal with the random planar lattice, which consists of the randomized structure based on the square lattice. We introduce the uniformly random modification by the bond dilution and contraction on a part of the unit square. The random planar lattice includes the triangular and hexagonal lattices in extreme cases of a parameter to control the structure. A modern duality analysis fashion with real-space renormalization is found to be available for estimating the location of the critical points with a wide range of the randomness parameter. As a simple test bed, we demonstrate that our method indeed gives several critical points for the cases of the Ising and Potts models and the bond-percolation thresholds on the random planar lattice. Our method leads to not only such an extension of the duality analyses on the classical statistical mechanics but also a fascinating result associated with optimal error thresholds for a class of quantum error correction code, the surface code on the random planar lattice, which is known as a skillful technique to protect the quantum state.

  5. Modeling shocks in periodic lattice materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messner, Mark; Barham, Matthew; Barton, Nathan

    2015-06-01

    Periodic lattice materials have an excellent density-to-stiffness ratio, with the elastic stiffness of stretch dominated lattices scaling linearly with relative density. Recent developments in additive manufacturing techniques enable the use of lattice materials in situations where the response of the material to shock loading may become significant. Current continuum models do not describe the response of such lattice materials subject to shocks. This presentation details the development of continuum models suitable for representing shock propagation in periodic lattice materials, particularly focusing on the transition between elastic and plastic response. In the elastic regime, the material retains its periodic structure and equivalent continuum models of infinite, periodic truss structures accurately reproduce characteristics of stretch-dominated lattices. At higher velocities, the material tends to lose its initial lattice structure and begins to resemble a foam or a solid with dispersed voids. Capturing the transition between these regimes can be computationally challenging. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Scaling of Hamiltonian walks on fractal lattices.

    PubMed

    Elezović-Hadzić, Suncica; Marcetić, Dusanka; Maletić, Slobodan

    2007-07-01

    We investigate asymptotical behavior of numbers of long Hamiltonian walks (HWs), i.e., self-avoiding random walks that visit every site of a lattice, on various fractal lattices. By applying an exact recursive technique we obtain scaling forms for open HWs on three-simplex lattice, Sierpinski gasket, and their generalizations: Given-Mandelbrot (GM), modified Sierpinski gasket (MSG), and n -simplex fractal families. For GM, MSG and n -simplex lattices with odd values of n , the number of open HWs Z(N), for the lattice with N>1 sites, varies as omega(N)}N(gamma). We explicitly calculate the exponent gamma for several members of GM and MSG families, as well as for n-simplices with n=3, 5, and 7. For n-simplex fractals with even n we find different scaling form: Z(N) approximately omega(N)mu(N1/d(f), where d(f) is the fractal dimension of the lattice, which also differs from the formula expected for homogeneous lattices. We discuss possible implications of our results on studies of real compact polymers. PMID:17677410

  7. Channel Floor Yardangs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 19 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    The yardangs in this image are forming in channel floor deposits. The channel itself is funneling the wind to cause the erosion.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 4.5, Longitude 229.7 East (133.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are

  8. Channels on Bakhuysen Crater Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Portion of channels on the wall of Bakhuysen crater (MOC 10605). These channels (22.1oS, 344.9oW) are the best examples of integrated drainage reminiscent of terrestrial systems. The pattern is topographically controlled; the relationships emphasized by light-colored sediments viewed in this low incidence angle (11.2o), nadir viewing (emission angle = 1.5o) image. The crater rim is marked by the escarpment running diagonally in the middle left to upper right of the image (downtrack scale = 8.4 m/pixel, crosstrack = 5.8 m/pixel). No channels outside the crater rim. This suggests that the source of the fluid was confined within the crater.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  9. Vector and scalar charmonium resonances with lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lang, C. B.; Leskovec, Luka; Mohler, Daniel; Prelovsek, Sasa

    2015-09-15

    We perform an exploratory lattice QCD simulation of DD¯ scattering, aimed at determining the masses as well as the decay widths of charmonium resonances above open charm threshold. Neglecting coupling to other channels, the resulting phase shift for DD¯scattering in p-wave yields the well-known vector resonance ψ(3770). For m π = 156 MeV, the extracted resonance mass and the decay width agree with experiment within large statistical uncertainty. The scalar charmonium resonances present a puzzle, since only the ground state χ c0(1P ) is well understood, while there is no commonly accepted candidate for its first excitation. We then simulatemore » DD¯scattering in s-wave in order to shed light on this puzzle. The resulting phase shift supports the existence of a yet-unobserved narrow resonance with a mass slightly below 4 GeV. A scenario with this narrow resonance and a pole at χ c0(1P), we found, agrees with the energy-dependence of our phase shift. Further lattice QCD simulations and experimental efforts are needed to resolve the puzzle of the excited scalar charmonia.« less

  10. Towards a lattice based neutral magnesium optical frequency standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelkar, Hrishikesh; Riedmann, Matthias; Wuebbena, Temmo; Kulosa, Andre; Friebe, Jan; Pape, Andre; Amairi, Sana; Malobabic, Sina; Zipfel, Klaus; Ruehmann, Steffen; -Maria Rasel, Ernst; Ertmer, Wolfgang

    2010-03-01

    Magnesium is a promising candidate for a high performance neutral atom optical frequency standard. It offers a low sensitivity to frequency shifts of the ^1S0-^3P0 clock transition by room temperature blackbody radiation and has several isotopes of suitable abundance (two bosonic, one fermionic) to realize an optical clock. We report on recent progress towards creating a lattice clock of magnesium. ^24Mg atoms are pre-cooled in two stages. The singlet Magneto Optical Trap (MOT) captures and cools atoms from an atomic beam which are then loaded into a triplet MOT. The triplet MOT has a decay channel to the dark ^3P0 state which is used to load atoms into a 1064 nm dipole trap. The cooling stages are on simultaneously and atoms are continuously loaded in the dipole trap. We capture upto 9 10^4 atoms at a temperature below 100 μK. We are exploring different avenues for further cooling which will enable reaching the Lamb-Dicke regime in a magic wavelength lattice.

  11. Vector and scalar charmonium resonances with lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C. B.; Leskovec, Luka; Mohler, Daniel; Prelovsek, Sasa

    2015-09-15

    We perform an exploratory lattice QCD simulation of DD¯ scattering, aimed at determining the masses as well as the decay widths of charmonium resonances above open charm threshold. Neglecting coupling to other channels, the resulting phase shift for DD¯scattering in p-wave yields the well-known vector resonance ψ(3770). For m π = 156 MeV, the extracted resonance mass and the decay width agree with experiment within large statistical uncertainty. The scalar charmonium resonances present a puzzle, since only the ground state χ c0(1P ) is well understood, while there is no commonly accepted candidate for its first excitation. We then simulate DD¯scattering in s-wave in order to shed light on this puzzle. The resulting phase shift supports the existence of a yet-unobserved narrow resonance with a mass slightly below 4 GeV. A scenario with this narrow resonance and a pole at χ c0(1P), we found, agrees with the energy-dependence of our phase shift. Further lattice QCD simulations and experimental efforts are needed to resolve the puzzle of the excited scalar charmonia.

  12. Relaxation Dynamics Of Bose-Fermi Doublons In Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safavi-Naini, Arghavan; Gärttner, Martin; Schachenmayer, Johannes; Wall, Michael L.; Covey, Jacob P.; Moses, Steven A.; Miecnikowski, Matthew T.; Fu, Zhengkun; Rey, Ana Maria; Jin, Deborah S.; Ye, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment at JILA we investigate the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of a dilute Fermi-Bose mixture, starting from a well-defined initial state, where each lattice site is either empty or occupied by a Bose-Fermi doublon. Utilizing analytical techniques and numerical simulations using the t-DRMG method, we identify the leading relaxation mechanisms of the doublons. At short times strong interactions tend to hold the doublons together, as previously reported in similar type of experiments made with identical bosons or two component fermions. Since the fermions feel a much shallower lattice than the bosons, the bosons can be visualized as random localization centers for the fermions. However, at longer times the boson tunneling cannot be ignored and additional decay channels unique to Bose-Fermi mixtures become relevant. While cluster expansion allows us to characterize the short time dynamics for dilute arrays, the long time relaxation dynamics at higher densities is strongly correlated. In this regime exact numerical techniques are employed. JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844, NSF-PIF-1211914, ARO, AFOSR, AFOSR-MURI.

  13. Study of decuplet baryon resonances from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrou, C.; Negele, J. W.; Petschlies, M.; Pochinsky, A. V.; Syritsyn, S. N.

    2016-06-01

    A lattice QCD study of the strong decay width and coupling constant of decuplet baryons to an octet baryon-pion state is presented. The transfer matrix method is used to obtain the overlap of lattice states with decuplet baryon quantum numbers on the one hand and octet baryon-pion quantum numbers on the other as an approximation of the matrix element of the corresponding transition. By making use of leading-order effective field theory, the coupling constants as well as the widths for the various decay channels are determined. The transitions studied are Δ →π N , Σ*→Λ π , Σ*→Σ π and Ξ*→Ξ π . We obtain results for two ensembles of Nf=2 +1 dynamical fermion configurations: one using domain wall valence quarks on a staggered sea at a pion mass of 350 MeV and a box size of 3.4 fm and a second one using domain wall sea and valence quarks at pion mass 180 MeV and box size 4.5 fm.

  14. A Review of Nucleon Spin Calculations in Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin

    2009-08-01

    We review recent progress on lattice calculations of nucleon spin structure, including the parton distribution functions, form factors, generalization parton distributions, and recent developments in lattice techniques.

  15. Bacterial Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Compton, Emma L R; Mindell, Joseph A

    2010-09-01

    Bacterial ion channels were known, but only in special cases, such as outer membrane porins in Escherichia coli and bacterial toxins that form pores in their target (bacterial or mammalian) membranes. The exhaustive coverage provided by a decade of bacterial genome sequencing has revealed that ion channels are actually widespread in bacteria, with homologs of a broad range of mammalian channel proteins coded throughout the bacterial and archaeal kingdoms. This review discusses four groups of bacterial channels: porins, mechano-sensitive (MS) channels, channel-forming toxins, and bacterial homologs of mammalian channels. The outer membrane (OM) of gram-negative bacteria blocks access of essential nutrients; to survive, the cell needs to provide a mechanism for nutrients to penetrate the OM. Porin channels provide this access by forming large, nonspecific aqueous pores in the OM that allow ions and vital nutrients to cross it and enter the periplasm. MS channels act as emergency release valves, allowing solutes to rapidly exit the cytoplasm and to dissipate the large osmotic disparity between the internal and external environments. MS channels are remarkable in that they do this by responding to forces exerted by the membrane itself. Some bacteria produce toxic proteins that form pores in trans, attacking and killing other organisms by virtue of their pore formation. The review focuses on those bacterial toxins that kill other bacteria, specifically the class of proteins called colicins. Colicins reveal the dangers of channel formation in the plasma membrane, since they kill their targets with exactly that approach. PMID:26443789

  16. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Ranade, Sanjeev S; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-09-23

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is essential for various physiological processes such as the conscious sensations of touch and hearing, and the unconscious sensation of blood flow. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels. PMID:26402601

  17. C. elegans TRP channels

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Rui; Xu, X.Z. Shawn

    2010-01-01

    TRP (transient receptor potential) channels represent a superfamily of cation channels found in all eukaryotes. The C. elegans genome encodes seventeen TRP channels covering all of the seven TRP subfamilies. Genetic analyses in C. elegans have implicated TRP channels in a wide spectrum of behavioral and physiological processes, ranging from sensory transduction (e.g. chemosensation, touch sensation, proprioception and osmosensation) to fertilization, drug dependence, organelle biogenesis, apoptosis, gene expression, and neurotransmitter/hormone release. Many C. elegans TRP channels share similar activation and regulatory mechanisms with their vertebrate counterparts. Studies in C. elegans have also revealed some previously unrecognized functions and regulatory mechanisms of TRP channels. C. elegans represents an excellent genetic model organism for the study of function and regulation of TRP channels in vivo. PMID:21290304

  18. Anyonic braiding in optical lattices

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chuanwei; Scarola, V. W.; Tewari, Sumanta; Das Sarma, S.

    2007-01-01

    Topological quantum states of matter, both Abelian and non-Abelian, are characterized by excitations whose wavefunctions undergo nontrivial statistical transformations as one excitation is moved (braided) around another. Topological quantum computation proposes to use the topological protection and the braiding statistics of a non-Abelian topological state to perform quantum computation. The enormous technological prospect of topological quantum computation provides new motivation for experimentally observing a topological state. Here, we explicitly work out a realistic experimental scheme to create and braid the Abelian topological excitations in the Kitaev model built on a tunable robust system, a cold atom optical lattice. We also demonstrate how to detect the key feature of these excitations: their braiding statistics. Observation of this statistics would directly establish the existence of anyons, quantum particles that are neither fermions nor bosons. In addition to establishing topological matter, the experimental scheme we develop here can also be adapted to a non-Abelian topological state, supported by the same Kitaev model but in a different parameter regime, to eventually build topologically protected quantum gates. PMID:18000038

  19. The AGS-Booster lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Barton, D.S.; Claus, J.; Cottingham, J.G.; Courant, E.D.; Danby, G.T.; Dell, G.F.; Forsyth, E.B.; Gupta, R.C.; Kats, J.

    1987-01-01

    The AGS Booster has three objectives. They are to increase the space charge limit of the AGS, to increase the intensity of the polarized proton beam by accumulating many linac pulses (since the intensity is limited by the polarized ion source), and to reaccelerate heavy ions from the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff before injection into the AGS. The machine is capable of accelerating protons at 7.5 Hertz from 200 MeV to 1.5 GeV or to lower final energies at faster repetition rates. The machine will also be able to accelerate heavy ions from as low as 1 MeV/nucleon to a magnetic rigidity as high as 17.6 Tesla-meters with a one second repetition rate. As an accumulator for polarized protons, the Booster should be able to store the protons at 200 MeV for several seconds. We expect that the Booster will increase the AGS proton intensity by a factor of four, polarized proton intensity by a factor of twenty to thirty, and will also enable the AGS to accelerate all species of heavy ions (at present the AGS heavy ion program is limited to the elements lighter than sulfur because it can only accelerate fully stripped ions). The construction project started in FY 1985 and is expected to be completed in 1989. The purpose of this paper is to provide a future reference for the AGS Booster lattice.

  20. Performance comparisons of low emittance lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Delahaye, J.P.; Zisman, M.S.

    1987-05-01

    In this paper, the results of a performance analysis of several low emittance electron storage ring lattices provided by various members of the Lattice Working Group are presented. Altogether, four lattices were investigated. There are two different functions being considered for the low beam emittance rings discussed here. The first is to serve as a Damping Ring (DR), i.e., to provide the emittance damping required for a high energy linear collider. The second is to provide beams for a short wavelength Free Electron Laser (FEL), which is envisioned to operate in the wavelength region near 40 A.

  1. Charmonium excited state spectrum in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; Nilmani Mathur; David Richards

    2008-02-01

    Working with a large basis of covariant derivative-based meson interpolating fields we demonstrate the feasibility of reliably extracting multiple excited states using a variational method. The study is performed on quenched anisotropic lattices with clover quarks at the charm mass. We demonstrate how a knowledge of the continuum limit of a lattice interpolating field can give additional spin-assignment information, even at a single lattice spacing, via the overlap factors of interpolating field and state. Excited state masses are systematically high with respect to quark potential model predictions and, where they exist, experimental states. We conclude that this is most likely a result of the quenched approximation.

  2. Reactive Orthotropic Lattice Diffuser for Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An orthotropic lattice structure interconnects porous surfaces of the flap with internal lattice-structured perforations to equalize the steady pressure field on the flap surfaces adjacent to the end and to reduce the amplitude of the fluctuations in the flow field near the flap end. The global communication that exists within all of the perforations provides the mechanism to lessen the pressure gradients experienced by the end portion of the flap. In addition to having diffusive effects (diffusing the incoming flow), the three-dimensional orthogonal lattice structure is also reactive (acoustic wave phase distortion) due to the interconnection of the perforations.

  3. Thermometry via Light Shifts in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M.; McGuyer, B. H.; Iwata, G. Z.; Zelevinsky, T.

    2015-01-01

    For atoms or molecules in optical lattices, conventional thermometry methods are often unsuitable due to low particle numbers or a lack of cycling transitions. However, a differential spectroscopic light shift can map temperature onto the line shape with a low sensitivity to trap anharmonicity. We study narrow molecular transitions to demonstrate precise frequency-based lattice thermometry, as well as carrier cooling. This approach should be applicable down to nanokelvin temperatures. We also discuss how the thermal light shift can affect the accuracy of optical lattice clocks.

  4. Tracking results using a standard cell lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfand, N.M.

    1987-10-01

    This is a summary of results obtained by tracking a single particle through a lattice composed of a r.f. cavity and standard FODO cells. The lattice also includes two families of sextupoles for controlling the chromaticity. The parameters of the cells, i.e. their length and phase advance, closely resemble those of the Fermilab Main Ring or the Tevatron. We therefore have a model lattice which is similar to that of those accelerators but without the straight sections present in the actual machines. It is hoped that the simplified model used will exhibit the salient features of the actual accelerator but will be simpler to understand. 8 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Entropic lattice Boltzmann model for compressible flows.

    PubMed

    Frapolli, N; Chikatamarla, S S; Karlin, I V

    2015-12-01

    We present a lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) that covers the entire range of fluid flows, from low Mach weakly compressible to transonic and supersonic flows. One of the most restrictive limitations of the lattice Boltzmann method, the low Mach number limit, is overcome here by three fundamental changes to the LBM scheme: use of an appropriately chosen multispeed lattice, accurate evaluation of the equilibrium, and the entropic relaxation for the collision. The range of applications is demonstrated through the simulation of a bow shock in front of an airfoil and the simulation of decaying compressible turbulence with shocklets. PMID:26764625

  6. Continuum methods in lattice perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, Thomas G

    2002-11-15

    We show how methods of continuum perturbation theory can be used to simplify perturbative lattice calculations. We use the technique of asymptotic expansions to expand lattice loop integrals around the continuum limit. After the expansion, all nontrivial dependence on momenta and masses is encoded in continuum loop integrals and the only genuine lattice integrals left are tadpole integrals. Using integration-by-parts relations all of these can be expressed in terms of a small number of master integrals. Four master integrals are needed for bosonic one loop integrals, sixteen in QCD with Wilson or staggered fermions.

  7. A lattice model for data display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, William L.; Dyer, Charles R.; Paul, Brian E.

    1994-01-01

    In order to develop a foundation for visualization, we develop lattice models for data objects and displays that focus on the fact that data objects are approximations to mathematical objects and real displays are approximations to ideal displays. These lattice models give us a way to quantize the information content of data and displays and to define conditions on the visualization mappings from data to displays. Mappings satisfy these conditions if and only if they are lattice isomorphisms. We show how to apply this result to scientific data and display models, and discuss how it might be applied to recursively defined data types appropriate for complex information processing.

  8. Entropic lattice Boltzmann model for compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frapolli, N.; Chikatamarla, S. S.; Karlin, I. V.

    2015-12-01

    We present a lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) that covers the entire range of fluid flows, from low Mach weakly compressible to transonic and supersonic flows. One of the most restrictive limitations of the lattice Boltzmann method, the low Mach number limit, is overcome here by three fundamental changes to the LBM scheme: use of an appropriately chosen multispeed lattice, accurate evaluation of the equilibrium, and the entropic relaxation for the collision. The range of applications is demonstrated through the simulation of a bow shock in front of an airfoil and the simulation of decaying compressible turbulence with shocklets.

  9. Application of model search to lattice theory.

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, M.; Wilkinson, K.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2001-08-01

    We have used the first-order model-searching programs MACE and SEM to study various problems in lattice theory. First, we present a case study in which the two programs are used to examine the differences between the stages along the way from lattice theory to Boolean algebra. Second, we answer several questions posed by Norman Megill and Mladen Pavicic on ortholattices and orthomodular lattices. The questions from Megill and Pavicic arose in their study of quantum logics, which are being investigated in connection with proposed computing devices based on quantum mechanics. Previous questions of a similar nature were answered by McCune and MACE in [2].

  10. XXIVth International Symposium on Lattice Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-12-01

    Lattice 2006, the XXIV International Symposium on Lattice Field Theory, was held from July 23-28, 2006 at the Starr Pass Hotel near Tucson, Arizona, USA, hosted by the University of Arizona Physics Department. The scientific program contained 25 plenary session talks and 193 parallel session contributions (talks and posters). Topics in lattice QCD included: hadron spectroscopy; hadronic interactions and structure; algorithms, machines, and networks; chiral symmetry; QCD confinement and topology; quark masses, gauge couplings, and renormalization; electroweak decays and mixing; high temperature and density; and theoretical developments. Topics beyond QCD included large Nc, Higgs, SUSY, gravity, and strings.

  11. Charged and Neutral Particles Channeling Phenomena Channeling 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabagov, Sultan B.; Palumbo, Luigi

    2010-04-01

    regime by a buried oxide layer / V. Guidi, A. Mazzolari and V. V. Tikhomirov -- A positron source using channeling in crystals for linear colliders / X. Artru ... [et al.] -- Parametric channeling and collapse of charged particles beams in crystals / M. Vysotskyy and V. Vysotskii.The formation and usage of coherent correlated charged particles states in the physics of channeling in crystals / S. V. Adamenko, V. I. Vysotskii and M. V. Vysotskyy -- Surface channeling of magnetic-charged particles on multilayer surface / S. V. Adamenko and V. I. Vysotskii -- Coherent creation of anti-hydrogen atoms in a crystal by relativistic antiproton / Yu. P. Kunashenko -- Thermal equilibrium of light ions in heavy crystals / E. Tsyganov -- Photon emission of electrons in a crystalline undulator / H. Backe ... [et al.] -- Channeling radiation from relativistic electrons in a crystal target as complementary x-ray and gamma ray source at synchrotron light facilities / K. B. Korotchenko, Yu. L. Pivovarov and T. A. Tukhfatullin -- Diffracted channeling radiation and other compound radiation processes / H. Nitta -- Collective scattering on the atom planes under the condition of full transition / A. R. Mkrtchyan ... [et al.] -- The proposal of the experiment on the research of the diffracted channeling radiation / D. A. Baklanov ... [et al.] -- Positron channeling at the DaOne BTF Facility: the cup experiment / L. Quintieri ... [et al.] -- Radiation spectra of 200 MeV electrons in diamond and silicon crystals at axial and planar orientations / K. Fissum ... [et al.] -- Channeling experiments with electrons at the Mainz Microtron Mami / W. Lauth ... [et al.] -- Dechanneling of positrons by dislocations: effects of anharmonic interactions / J. George and A. P. Pathak -- Diffracted channeling radiation from axially channeled relativistic electrons / K. B. Korotchenko ... [et al.] -- Intensive quasi-monochromatic, directed x-ray radiation of planar channeled positron bunch / L. Gevorgian

  12. Determination of channeling perspectives for complex crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, W.R.

    1993-03-01

    Specification of the atomic arrangement for axes and planes of high symmetry is essential for crystal alignment using Rutherford backscattering and for studies of the lattice location of impurities in single crystals. By rotation of an inscribed orthogonal coordinate system, a visual image for a given perspective of a crystal structure can be specified. Knowledge of the atomic arrangement permits qualitative channeling perspectives to be visualized and calculation of continuum potentials for channeling. Channeling angular-yield profiles can then be analytically modeled and, subsequently, shadowing by host atoms of positions within the unit cell predicted. Software to calculate transformed atom positions for a channeling perspective in a single crystal are described and illustrated for the spinel crystal structure.

  13. Expected number of quantum channels in quantum networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Wang, He-Ming; Ji, Dan-Tong; Mu, Liang-Zhu; Fan, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication between nodes in quantum networks plays an important role in quantum information processing. Here, we proposed the use of the expected number of quantum channels as a measure of the efficiency of quantum communication for quantum networks. This measure quantified the amount of quantum information that can be teleported between nodes in a quantum network, which differs from classical case in that the quantum channels will be consumed if teleportation is performed. We further demonstrated that the expected number of quantum channels represents local correlations depicted by effective circles. Significantly, capacity of quantum communication of quantum networks quantified by ENQC is independent of distance for the communicating nodes, if the effective circles of communication nodes are not overlapped. The expected number of quantum channels can be enhanced through transformations of the lattice configurations of quantum networks via entanglement swapping. Our results can shed lights on the study of quantum communication in quantum networks. PMID:26173556

  14. Expected number of quantum channels in quantum networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Wang, He-Ming; Ji, Dan-Tong; Mu, Liang-Zhu; Fan, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication between nodes in quantum networks plays an important role in quantum information processing. Here, we proposed the use of the expected number of quantum channels as a measure of the efficiency of quantum communication for quantum networks. This measure quantified the amount of quantum information that can be teleported between nodes in a quantum network, which differs from classical case in that the quantum channels will be consumed if teleportation is performed. We further demonstrated that the expected number of quantum channels represents local correlations depicted by effective circles. Significantly, capacity of quantum communication of quantum networks quantified by ENQC is independent of distance for the communicating nodes, if the effective circles of communication nodes are not overlapped. The expected number of quantum channels can be enhanced through transformations of the lattice configurations of quantum networks via entanglement swapping. Our results can shed lights on the study of quantum communication in quantum networks. PMID:26173556

  15. Coupled ππ, KK¯ scattering in P-wave and the ρ resonance from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wilson, David J.; Briceño, Raúl A.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Thomas, Christopher E.

    2015-11-02

    In this study, we determine elastic and coupled-channel amplitudes for isospin-1 meson-meson scattering inmore » $P$-wave, by calculating correlation functions using lattice QCD with light quark masses such that $$m_\\pi = 236$$ MeV in a cubic volume of $$\\sim (4 \\,\\mathrm{fm})^3$$. Variational analyses of large matrices of correlation functions computed using operator constructions resembling $$\\pi\\pi$$, $$K\\overline{K}$$ and $$q\\bar{q}$$, in several moving frames and several lattice irreducible representations, leads to discrete energy spectra from which scattering amplitudes are extracted. In the elastic $$\\pi\\pi$$ scattering region we obtain a detailed energy-dependence for the phase-shift, corresponding to a $$\\rho$$ resonance, and we extend the analysis into the coupled-channel $$K\\overline{K}$$ region for the first time, finding a small coupling between the channels.« less

  16. Effect of compression on water transport in gas diffusion layer of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell using lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Dong Hyup; Kim, Hansang

    2015-10-01

    The effect of the compression ratio on the dynamic behavior of liquid water transport in a gas diffusion layer (GDL) is studied both experimentally and numerically. We experimentally study the emergence and growth of liquid droplets in a channel at various compression ratios by adopting a direct visualization device. The results of the experiment show that water breakthrough occurs at the channel for a low compression ratio, whereas it is observed at the channel/rib interface for a high compression ratio. To determine the mechanism of water transport in the GDL, a multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is developed for a simplified porous structure of the GDL. The observation of lattice Boltzmann (LB) simulation shows that the compression ratio significantly affects the water transport in the GDL. The results indicate that the lower compression ratio reduces the water saturation in the GDL. The simulation and experimental result are similar.

  17. A Compact and High Performance Muon Capture Channel for Muon Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, D.; Gallardo, J.; Palmer, R.B.

    2011-03-28

    It is widely believed that a neutrino factory would deliver unparallel performance in studying neutrino mixing and would provide tremendous sensitivity to new physics in the neutrino sector. Here we will describe and simulate the front-end of the neutrino factory system, which plays critical role in determining the number of muons that can be accepted by the downstream accelerators. In this system, a proton bunch on a target creates secondaries that drift into a capture transport channel. A sequence of rf cavities forms the resulting muon beams into strings of bunches of differing energies, aligns the bunches to nearly equal central energies, and initiates ionization cooling. For this, the muon beams are transported through sections containing high-gradient cavities and strong focusing solenoids. In this paper we present results of optimization and variation studies toward obtaining the maximum number of muons for a neutrino factory by using a compact transport channel. It has been suggested computationally and experimentally that the maximum achievable gradient is enhanced by introducing an external magnetic field at right angles to the rf electric field since it suppresses field-emission processes. Here, we have discussed a possible scheme for extending the concept of magnetic insulation to capture, transport, and cool muons in a neutrino factory. We incorporated this idea into a new lattice design where the rf cavities are shaped so that their walls were tangential to the magnetic-field lines. We showed that, with magnetic insulation, the field-emitted electrons impact the cavity surface with energies four orders-of-magnitude less than in conventional pillbox cavities; consequently, damage from field-emission is suppressed significantly. While demanding in terms of power requirements, this neutrino factory lattice showed satisfactory performance in both cooling and collecting the accepted muons within the requirements for the IDSNF. Optimizations were also made

  18. Measurement of the nuclear energy loss under channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, H.; Mertens, A.

    2001-07-01

    Neutral Ne atoms with keV energies are scattered under channeling conditions, i.e. at a glancing angle of incidence, from a LiF(001) surface. By means of a time-of-flight method with a pulsed neutral beam we record energy distributions for scattered projectiles. For this specific system the small energy transferred to the crystal lattice ("nuclear energy loss") during channeling via binary collisions with large impact parameters dominates the dissipation of projectile energy. All other excitations of the solid can be brought to a negligible level.

  19. Observation of the two-dimensional reciprocal lattice by use of lattice grating sheets and a laser pointer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutaoka, Takanori; Tokunaga, Tomohito; Umeda, Takashi; Maehara, Toshinobu

    2014-09-01

    Demonstration of the diffraction patterns from the two-dimensional Bravais lattice has been studied by use of the two single line lattice grating sheets and a laser pointer. A variable two-dimensional lattice grating was prepared using two grating sheets which are closely attached to each other. The five types of two-dimensional Bravais lattices can be produced by adjusting the relative angle between two single line lattices. The light diffraction patterns from the two-dimensional Bravais lattices indicate the reciprocal lattices of these basic two-dimensional lattice structures.

  20. Angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of square antidot lattices studied by Brillouin light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gubbiotti, G.; Tacchi, S.; Madami, M.; Carlotti, G.; Ding, J.; Adeyeye, A. O.

    2015-06-29

    The Brillouin light scattering technique has been exploited to study the angle-resolved spin wave band diagrams of squared Permalloy antidot lattice. Frequency dispersion of spin waves has been measured for a set of fixed wave vector magnitudes, while varying the wave vector in-plane orientation with respect to the applied magnetic field. The magnonic band gap between the two most dispersive modes exhibits a minimum value at an angular position, which exclusively depends on the product between the selected wave vector magnitude and the lattice constant of the array. The experimental data are in very good agreement with predictions obtained by dynamical matrix method calculations. The presented results are relevant for magnonic devices where the antidot lattice, acting as a diffraction grating, is exploited to achieve multidirectional spin wave emission.

  1. Fading channel simulator

    DOEpatents

    Argo, Paul E.; Fitzgerald, T. Joseph

    1993-01-01

    Fading channel effects on a transmitted communication signal are simulated with both frequency and time variations using a channel scattering function to affect the transmitted signal. A conventional channel scattering function is converted to a series of channel realizations by multiplying the square root of the channel scattering function by a complex number of which the real and imaginary parts are each independent variables. The two-dimensional inverse-FFT of this complex-valued channel realization yields a matrix of channel coefficients that provide a complete frequency-time description of the channel. The transmitted radio signal is segmented to provide a series of transmitted signal and each segment is subject to FFT to generate a series of signal coefficient matrices. The channel coefficient matrices and signal coefficient matrices are then multiplied and subjected to inverse-FFT to output a signal representing the received affected radio signal. A variety of channel scattering functions can be used to characterize the response of a transmitter-receiver system to such atmospheric effects.

  2. NBS LATTICE: A program to analyze lattice relationships, version of summer, 1985

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himes, V. L.; Mighell, A. D.

    1985-12-01

    A FORTRAN program to analyze lattice relationships has been written and is available for distribution by the NBS Crystal Data Center. The present version of NBS *LATTICE performs several functions including: (1) the characterization and identification of unknown materials using lattice-formula matching techniques; (2) the calculation of the reduced cell of the lattice, and the calculation and reduction of specified derivative supercells and/or subcells (i.e., this program function calculates the standard cells which are useful in the determination of metric lattice symmetry in finding a matrix relating two unit cells, etc.); (3) unit cell transformations; and (4) matrix inversions. It is planned to incorporate additional functions in forthcoming versions of this program. Among others, these functions will include a matrix method to determine metric lattice symmetry and a technique to find a transformation matrix relating any two unit cells.

  3. Coupled-cluster method: A lattice-path-based subsystem approximation scheme for quantum lattice models

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, R. F.; Li, P. H. Y.

    2011-04-15

    An approximation hierarchy, called the lattice-path-based subsystem (LPSUBm) approximation scheme, is described for the coupled-cluster method (CCM). It is applicable to systems defined on a regular spatial lattice. We then apply it to two well-studied prototypical (spin-(1/2) Heisenberg antiferromagnetic) spin-lattice models, namely, the XXZ and the XY models on the square lattice in two dimensions. Results are obtained in each case for the ground-state energy, the ground-state sublattice magnetization, and the quantum critical point. They are all in good agreement with those from such alternative methods as spin-wave theory, series expansions, quantum Monte Carlo methods, and the CCM using the alternative lattice-animal-based subsystem (LSUBm) and the distance-based subsystem (DSUBm) schemes. Each of the three CCM schemes (LSUBm, DSUBm, and LPSUBm) for use with systems defined on a regular spatial lattice is shown to have its own advantages in particular applications.

  4. Coupled-cluster method: A lattice-path-based subsystem approximation scheme for quantum lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, R. F.; Li, P. H. Y.

    2011-04-01

    An approximation hierarchy, called the lattice-path-based subsystem (LPSUBm) approximation scheme, is described for the coupled-cluster method (CCM). It is applicable to systems defined on a regular spatial lattice. We then apply it to two well-studied prototypical (spin-(1)/(2) Heisenberg antiferromagnetic) spin-lattice models, namely, the XXZ and the XY models on the square lattice in two dimensions. Results are obtained in each case for the ground-state energy, the ground-state sublattice magnetization, and the quantum critical point. They are all in good agreement with those from such alternative methods as spin-wave theory, series expansions, quantum Monte Carlo methods, and the CCM using the alternative lattice-animal-based subsystem (LSUBm) and the distance-based subsystem (DSUBm) schemes. Each of the three CCM schemes (LSUBm, DSUBm, and LPSUBm) for use with systems defined on a regular spatial lattice is shown to have its own advantages in particular applications.

  5. Analysis of quantum spin models on hyperbolic lattices and Bethe lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniška, Michal; Gendiar, Andrej

    2016-04-01

    The quantum XY, Heisenberg, and transverse field Ising models on hyperbolic lattices are studied by means of the tensor product variational formulation algorithm. The lattices are constructed by tessellation of congruent polygons with coordination number equal to four. The calculated ground-state energies of the XY and Heisenberg models and the phase transition magnetic field of the Ising model on the series of lattices are used to estimate the corresponding quantities of the respective models on the Bethe lattice. The hyperbolic lattice geometry induces mean-field-like behavior of the models. The ambition to obtain results on the non-Euclidean lattice geometries has been motivated by theoretical studies of the anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory correspondence.

  6. Lattice Waves, Spin Waves, and Neutron Scattering

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Brockhouse, Bertram N.

    1962-03-01

    Use of neutron inelastic scattering to study the forces between atoms in solids is treated. One-phonon processes and lattice vibrations are discussed, and experiments that verified the existence of the quantum of lattice vibrations, the phonon, are reviewed. Dispersion curves, phonon frequencies and absorption, and models for dispersion calculations are discussed. Experiments on the crystal dynamics of metals are examined. Dispersion curves are presented and analyzed; theory of lattice dynamics is considered; effects of Fermi surfaces on dispersion curves; electron-phonon interactions, electronic structure influence on lattice vibrations, and phonon lifetimes are explored. The dispersion relation of spin waves in crystals and experiments in which dispersion curves for spin waves in Co-Fe alloy and magnons in magnetite were obtained and the reality of the magnon was demonstrated are discussed. (D.C.W)

  7. Parton distributions from lattice QCD: an update

    SciTech Connect

    Detmold, W; Melnitchouk, W; Thomas, A W

    2004-04-01

    We review the extraction of parton distributions from their moments calculated in lattice QCD, focusing in particular on their extrapolation to the physical region. As examples, we consider both the unpolarized and polarized isovector parton distributions of the nucleon.

  8. Optical vortex array in spatially varying lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, Amit; Kumar, Manish; Senthilkumaran, P.; Joseph, Joby

    2016-04-01

    We present an experimental method based on a modified multiple beam interference approach to generate an optical vortex array arranged in a spatially varying lattice. This method involves two steps which are: numerical synthesis of a consistent phase mask by using two-dimensional integrated phase gradient calculations and experimental implementation of produced phase mask by utilizing a phase only spatial light modulator in an optical 4f Fourier filtering setup. This method enables an independent variation of the orientation and period of the vortex lattice. As working examples, we provide the experimental demonstration of various spatially variant optical vortex lattices. We further confirm the existence of optical vortices by formation of fork fringes. Such lattices may find applications in size dependent trapping, sorting, manipulation and photonic crystals.

  9. Colloquium: Physics of optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Derevianko, Andrei; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2011-04-01

    Recently invented and demonstrated optical lattice clocks hold great promise for improving the precision of modern time keeping. These clocks aim at the 10{sup -18} fractional accuracy, which translates into a clock that would neither lose nor gain a fraction of a second over an estimated age of the Universe. In these clocks, millions of atoms are trapped and interrogated simultaneously, dramatically improving clock stability. Here the principles of operation of these clocks are discussed and, in particular, a novel concept of magic trapping of atoms in optical lattices. Recently proposed microwave lattice clocks are also highlights and several applications that employ the optical lattice clocks as a platform for precision measurements and quantum information processing.

  10. Ballistic Transport in Graphene Antidot Lattices.

    PubMed

    Sandner, Andreas; Preis, Tobias; Schell, Christian; Giudici, Paula; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Weiss, Dieter; Eroms, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    The bulk carrier mobility in graphene was shown to be enhanced in graphene-boron nitride heterostructures. However, nanopatterning graphene can add extra damage and drastically degrade the intrinsic properties by edge disorder. Here we show that graphene embedded into a heterostructure with hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) on both sides is protected during a nanopatterning step. In this way, we can prepare graphene-based antidot lattices where the high mobility is preserved. We report magnetotransport experiments in those antidot lattices with lattice periods down to 50 nm. We observe pronounced commensurability features stemming from ballistic orbits around one or several antidots. Due to the short lattice period in our samples, we can also explore the boundary between the classical and the quantum transport regime, as the Fermi wavelength of the electrons approaches the smallest length scale of the artificial potential. PMID:26598218

  11. Nondestructive imaging of an ultracold lattice gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Y. S.; Chakram, S.; Aycock, L. M.; Vengalattore, M.

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate the nondestructive imaging of a lattice gas of ultracold bosons. Atomic fluorescence is induced in the simultaneous presence of degenerate Raman sideband cooling. The combined influence of these processes controllably cycles an atom between a dark state and a fluorescing state while eliminating heating and loss. Through spatially resolved sideband spectroscopy following the imaging sequence, we demonstrate the efficacy of this imaging technique in various regimes of lattice depth and fluorescence acquisition rate. Our work provides an important extension of quantum gas imaging to the nondestructive detection, control, and manipulation of atoms in optical lattices. In addition, our technique can also be extended to atomic species that are less amenable to molasses-based lattice imaging.

  12. Lattice engineering through nanoparticle-DNA frameworks.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Zhang, Yugang; Wang, Tong; Xin, Huolin L; Li, Huilin; Gang, Oleg

    2016-06-01

    Advances in self-assembly over the past decade have demonstrated that nano- and microscale particles can be organized into a large diversity of ordered three-dimensional (3D) lattices. However, the ability to generate different desired lattice types from the same set of particles remains challenging. Here, we show that nanoparticles can be assembled into crystalline and open 3D frameworks by connecting them through designed DNA-based polyhedral frames. The geometrical shapes of the frames, combined with the DNA-assisted binding properties of their vertices, facilitate the well-defined topological connections between particles in accordance with frame geometry. With this strategy, different crystallographic lattices using the same particles can be assembled by introduction of the corresponding DNA polyhedral frames. This approach should facilitate the rational assembly of nanoscale lattices through the design of the unit cell. PMID:26901516

  13. Random sequential adsorption on imprecise lattice.

    PubMed

    Privman, Vladimir; Yan, Han

    2016-06-28

    We report a surprising result, established by numerical simulations and analytical arguments for a one-dimensional lattice model of random sequential adsorption, that even an arbitrarily small imprecision in the lattice-site localization changes the convergence to jamming from fast, exponential, to slow, power-law, with, for some parameter values, a discontinuous jump in the jamming coverage value. This finding has implications for irreversible deposition on patterned substrates with pre-made landing sites for particle attachment. We also consider a general problem of the particle (depositing object) size not an exact multiple of the lattice spacing, and the lattice sites themselves imprecise, broadened into allowed-deposition intervals. Regions of exponential vs. power-law convergence to jamming are identified, and certain conclusions regarding the jamming coverage are argued for analytically and confirmed numerically. PMID:27369530

  14. Anyonization of lattice Chern-Simons theory

    SciTech Connect

    Eliezer, D.; Semenoff, G.W. )

    1992-07-01

    The authors formulate Hamiltonian lattice Chern-Simons theory which has the property that the Chern-Simons gauge fields of the theory can be eliminated by making matter fields multivalued operators with anyonic statistics. They prove that, when the statistics parameter is an odd integer so that the anyons are bosons, the ground state, which consists of a condensate of bound pairs of flux tubes and fermions, breaks phase invariance. The ensuing long-range order implies that the system is an unconventional superfluid. They formulate a condition which may be useful as a numerical signal for symmetry breaking in the ground state for any statistics parameter. They also discuss an exotic lattice Chern-Simons theory, which makes explicit the relation of anyons to framed knot invariants. They discuss various lattice representations of the Chern-Simons term and find the unique local lattice Chern-Simon term with the appropriate naive continuum limit, which permits anyonization.

  15. Camera placement in integer lattices (extended abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocchiola, Michel; Kranakis, Evangelos

    1990-09-01

    Techniques for studying an art gallery problem (the camera placement problem) in the infinite lattice (L sup d) of d tuples of integers are considered. A lattice point A is visible from a camera C positioned at a vertex of (L sup d) if A does not equal C and if the line segment joining A and C crosses no other lattice vertex. By using a combination of probabilistic, combinatorial optimization and algorithmic techniques the position they must occupy in the lattice (L sup d) in the order to maximize their visibility can be determined in polynomial time, for any given number s less than or equal to (5 sup d) of cameras. This improves previous results for s less than or equal to (3 sup d).

  16. Strange Baryon Physics in Full Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin

    2007-11-01

    Strange baryon spectra and form factors are key probes to study excited nuclear matter. The use of lattice QCD allows us to test the strength of the Standard Model by calculating strange baryon quantities from first principles.

  17. Recent lattice QCD results on nucleon structure

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinos Orginos

    2006-07-01

    I review recent developments in lattice calculations of nucleon structure. In particular, I cover the calculations of nucleon matrix elements related to generalized parton distribution functions, structure functions and form factors.

  18. Regge calculus models of closed lattice universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rex G.; Williams, Ruth M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the behavior of closed "lattice universes" wherein masses are distributed in a regular lattice on the Cauchy surfaces of closed vacuum universes. Such universes are approximated using a form of Regge calculus originally developed by Collins and Williams to model closed Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universes. We consider two types of lattice universes, one where all masses are identical to each other and another where one mass gets perturbed in magnitude. In the unperturbed universe, we consider the possible arrangements of the masses in the Regge Cauchy surfaces and demonstrate that the model will only be stable if each mass lies within some spherical region of convergence. We also briefly discuss the existence of Regge models that are dual to the ones we have considered. We then model a perturbed lattice universe and demonstrate that the model's evolution is well behaved, with the expansion increasing in magnitude as the perturbation is increased.

  19. Visualization of 3D optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hoseong; Clemens, James

    2016-05-01

    We describe the visualization of 3D optical lattices based on Sisyphus cooling implemented with open source software. We plot the adiabatic light shift potentials found by diagonalizing the effective Hamiltonian for the light shift operator. Our program incorporates a variety of atomic ground state configurations with total angular momentum ranging from j = 1 / 2 to j = 4 and a variety of laser beam configurations including the two-beam lin ⊥ lin configuration, the four-beam umbrella configuration, and four beams propagating in two orthogonal planes. In addition to visualizing the lattice the program also evaluates lattice parameters such as the oscillation frequency for atoms trapped deep in the wells. The program is intended to help guide experimental implementations of optical lattices.

  20. Persistent superconductor currents in holographic lattices.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Norihiro; Ishibashi, Akihiro; Maeda, Kengo

    2014-07-01

    We consider a persistent superconductor current along the direction with no translational symmetry in a holographic gravity model. Incorporating a lattice structure into the model, we numerically construct novel solutions of hairy charged stationary black branes with momentum or rotation along the latticed direction. The lattice structure prevents the horizon from rotating, and the total momentum is only carried by matter fields outside the black brane horizon. This is consistent with the black hole rigidity theorem, and it suggests that in dual field theory with lattices, superconductor currents are made up of "composite" fields, rather than "fractionalized" degrees of freedom. We also show that our solutions are consistent with the superfluid hydrodynamics. PMID:25032917

  1. Lattice engineering through nanoparticle-DNA frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Zhang, Yugang; Wang, Tong; Xin, Huolin L.; Li, Huilin; Gang, Oleg

    2016-06-01

    Advances in self-assembly over the past decade have demonstrated that nano- and microscale particles can be organized into a large diversity of ordered three-dimensional (3D) lattices. However, the ability to generate different desired lattice types from the same set of particles remains challenging. Here, we show that nanoparticles can be assembled into crystalline and open 3D frameworks by connecting them through designed DNA-based polyhedral frames. The geometrical shapes of the frames, combined with the DNA-assisted binding properties of their vertices, facilitate the well-defined topological connections between particles in accordance with frame geometry. With this strategy, different crystallographic lattices using the same particles can be assembled by introduction of the corresponding DNA polyhedral frames. This approach should facilitate the rational assembly of nanoscale lattices through the design of the unit cell.

  2. Thermal Emission from Structured Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Ian Andrew

    spectroscopy. The photonic crystal is placed in a Michelson interferometer, and the normal direction thermal emission across as broad range of the THz spectrum is measured. The positions of these measured emission peaks are shown to be consistent with prediction when the physical sizes of the constituent components are included in the simulation. The focus of this document then shifts to the mid-IR in Chapter 4. The mid-IR study is done entirely in simulation. The thermal emission from a plane of plasmonic coated spheres is simulated and the effects of the lattice geometry and spacing on the spectrum as well as on the direction of emission are studied. The lattice constants modeled range from much smaller than a wavelength, designated the effective medium regime, to on the order of the wavelength of light, designated the photonic crystal regime. The thermal emission exhibits significantly different spatial and spectral dependencies on the lattice spacing and geometry in these two regimes. Finally more complex situations are studied. A second layer of spheres is added, and the effects on the emission are explored. A single layer of spheres embedded in a generic plastic bonding matrix is also simulated, and the modifications to the thermal emission caused by this bonding matrix are briefly discussed.

  3. Stability analysis of lattice Boltzmann methods

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, J.D.; Chen, Shiyi

    1996-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann equation describes the evolution of the velocity distribution function on a lattice in a manner that macroscopic fluid dynamical behavior is recovered. Although the equation is a derivative of lattice gas automata, it may be interpreted as a Lagrangian finite-difference method for the numerical simulation of the discrete-velocity Boltzmann equation that makes use of a BGK collision operator. As a result, it is not surprising that numericaI instability of lattice Boltzmann methods have been frequently encountered by researchers. We present an analysis of the stability of perturbations of the particle populations linearized about equilibrium values corresponding to a constant-density uniform mean flow. The linear stability depends on the following parameters: the distribution of the mass at a site between the different discrete speeds, the BGK relaxation time, the mean velocity, and the wave-number of the perturbations. This parameter space is too large to compute the complete stability characteristics. We report some stability results for a subset of the parameter space for a 7-velocity hexagonal lattice, a 9-velocity square lattice, and a 15-velocity cubic lattice. Results common to all three lattices are (1) the BGK relaxation time {tau} must be greater than 1/2 corresponding to positive shear viscosity, (2) there exists a maximum stable mean velocity for fixed values of theother parameters, and (3) as {tau} is increased from 1/2 the maximum stable velocity increases monotonically until some fixed velocity is reached which does not change for larger {tau}.

  4. Lattice and Phase Diagram in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, Maria Paola

    2008-10-13

    Model calculations have produced a number of very interesting expectations for the QCD Phase Diagram, and the task of a lattice calculations is to put these studies on a quantitative grounds. I will give an overview of the current status of the lattice analysis of the QCD phase diagram, from the quantitative results of mature calculations at zero and small baryochemical potential, to the exploratory studies of the colder, denser phase.

  5. Building the RHIC tracking lattice model

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Tepikian, S.

    2010-01-27

    In this note we outline the procedure to build a realistic lattice model for the RHIC beam-beam tracking simulation. We will install multipole field errors in the arc main dipoles, arc main quadrupols and interaction region magnets (DX, D0, and triplets) and introduce a residual closed orbit, tune ripples, and physical apertures in the tracking lattice model. Nonlinearities such as local IR multipoles, second order chromaticies and third order resonance driving terms are also corrected before tracking.

  6. Generalized Parton Distributions from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Orginos, Konstantinos

    2007-10-01

    I review recent results on moments of Generalized Parton Distribution functions (GPDs) from Lattice QCD. In particular, I discuss the methodology of lattice calculations, and how various systematic errors arising in these calculations are controlled. I conclude with an overview of the roadmap towards precision non-perturbative determination of moments of GPDs, and discuss the potential impact to the extraction of GPDs form experiment.

  7. Lattice vibrations in lead bromide and chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabatos-Nédelec, C.; Bréhat, F.; Wyncke, B.

    Lead bromide and lead chloride lattice dynamics studies by polarized IR reflectivity and Raman scattering are reported at room temperature and at 10 K. Reflectivity spectra from 20 to 300 cm -1 have been fitted with a model of the factorized form of the dielectric function. The lattice modes frequencies, damping factors and oscillators strengths are given, as well as the effective charges of the polar modes. The study concludes the ionic character of the compounds.

  8. Current and lattice matched tandem solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.

    1987-01-01

    A multijunction (cascade) tandem photovoltaic solar cell device is fabricated of a Ga.sub.x In.sub.1-x P (0.505.ltoreq.X.ltoreq.0.515) top cell semiconductor lattice matched to a GaAs bottom cell semiconductor at a low-resistance heterojunction, preferably a p+/n+ heterojunction between the cells. The top and bottom cells are both lattice matched and current matched for high efficiency solar radiation conversion to electrical energy.

  9. Vague Congruences and Quotient Lattice Implication Algebras

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xiaoyan; Xu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to further develop the congruence theory on lattice implication algebras. Firstly, we introduce the notions of vague similarity relations based on vague relations and vague congruence relations. Secondly, the equivalent characterizations of vague congruence relations are investigated. Thirdly, the relation between the set of vague filters and the set of vague congruences is studied. Finally, we construct a new lattice implication algebra induced by a vague congruence, and the homomorphism theorem is given. PMID:25133207

  10. Plasmonic lattice solitons in metallic nanowire materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swami, O. P.; Kumar, Vijendra; Nagar, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate theoretically that the plasmonic lattice solitons (PLSs) are formed in array of metallic nanowires embedded in Kerr-type material. The strong nonlinearity at metal surface, combined with the tight confinement of the guiding modes of the metallic nanowires, provide the main physical mechanism for balancing the creation of plasmonic lattice solitons and wave diffraction. We show that the PLSs are satisfied in a verity of plasmonic systems, which have important applications in nanophotonics and subwavelength optics.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann approach for complex nonequilibrium flows.

    PubMed

    Montessori, A; Prestininzi, P; La Rocca, M; Succi, S

    2015-10-01

    We present a lattice Boltzmann realization of Grad's extended hydrodynamic approach to nonequilibrium flows. This is achieved by using higher-order isotropic lattices coupled with a higher-order regularization procedure. The method is assessed for flow across parallel plates and three-dimensional flows in porous media, showing excellent agreement of the mass flow with analytical and numerical solutions of the Boltzmann equation across the full range of Knudsen numbers, from the hydrodynamic regime to ballistic motion. PMID:26565365

  12. New directions for quantum lattice gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Quantum Lattice Gas Automata are an extension of classical Lattice Gas Automata with the added constraints of linearity and unitary evolution. They were defined in the late 1990s by Meyer, and Boghosian and Taylor. We present a unified version of these models and study them from the point of view of the quantum simulation of problems of quantum dynamics of practical interest including chemical reactive scattering.

  13. Lattice QCD and the Jefferson Laboratory Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek, Robert Edwards, David Richards, Konstantinos Orginos

    2011-06-01

    Lattice gauge theory provides our only means of performing \\textit{ab initio} calculations in the non-perturbative regime. It has thus become an increasing important component of the Jefferson Laboratory physics program. In this paper, we describe the contributions of lattice QCD to our understanding of hadronic and nuclear physics, focusing on the structure of hadrons, the calculation of the spectrum and properties of resonances, and finally on deriving an understanding of the QCD origin of nuclear forces.

  14. Topological phases: An expedition off lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Michael H.; Gamper, Lukas; Gils, Charlotte; Isakov, Sergei V.; Trebst, Simon; Troyer, Matthias

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Models of topological phases where the lattice topology is a dynamical variable. > We discuss off-lattice hazards that destroy topological protection. > The Cheeger constant yields upper bound to the energy of excited states. > Baby universes meet condensed matter physics. > We study the graph Laplacian of loop gases and string nets on fluctuating lattices. - Abstract: Motivated by the goal to give the simplest possible microscopic foundation for a broad class of topological phases, we study quantum mechanical lattice models where the topology of the lattice is one of the dynamical variables. However, a fluctuating geometry can remove the separation between the system size and the range of local interactions, which is important for topological protection and ultimately the stability of a topological phase. In particular, it can open the door to a pathology, which has been studied in the context of quantum gravity and goes by the name of 'baby universe', here we discuss three distinct approaches to suppressing these pathological fluctuations. We complement this discussion by applying Cheeger's theory relating the geometry of manifolds to their vibrational modes to study the spectra of Hamiltonians. In particular, we present a detailed study of the statistical properties of loop gas and string net models on fluctuating lattices, both analytically and numerically.

  15. Excitations of quantum gases in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesilada, Emek

    This thesis describes experiments that studied the excitations of an ultra-cold atomic Rb gas in an optical lattice using Bragg spectroscopy. A Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of 87Rb was formed in a cloverleaf trap. An optical lattice of cubic symmetry, formed by the interference of six laser beams, was superimposed on the Rb BEC and turned on adiabatically. Such a system is well described by the Bose-Hubbard model, which predicts a quantum phase transition from a superfluid to a Mott insulator state at a critical lattice depth. In the first experiment, we studied the superfluid regime. The superfluid admits sound waves as phonon excitations. In two photon Bragg spectroscopy two laser beams intersecting at angle on the condensate create such excitations. The excitation spectrum of BEC was measured in a three dimensional optical lattice as a function of lattice strength. In the second experiment we studied the excitation spectrum of the Mott insulator. The lowest energy excitations in such a system are particle-hole excitations. These correspond to the hopping of atoms from one lattice site to another. The insulating phase is characterized by a gap in the excitation spectrum and we measured this particle-hole gap by Bragg spectroscopy. The precise nature of our measurement allowed us to study the opening of the excitation gap that has previously eluded experimental verification.

  16. Some Poisson structures and Lax equations associated with the Toeplitz lattice and the Schur lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemarie, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The Toeplitz lattice is a Hamiltonian system whose Poisson structure is known. In this paper, we unveil the origins of this Poisson structure and derive from it the associated Lax equations for this lattice. We first construct a Poisson subvariety H n of GL n (C), which we view as a real or complex Poisson-Lie group whose Poisson structure comes from a quadratic R-bracket on gl n (C) for a fixed R-matrix. The existence of Hamiltonians, associated to the Toeplitz lattice for the Poisson structure on H n , combined with the properties of the quadratic R-bracket allow us to give explicit formulas for the Lax equation. Then we derive from it the integrability in the sense of Liouville of the Toeplitz lattice. When we view the lattice as being defined over R, we can construct a Poisson subvariety H n τ of U n which is itself a Poisson-Dirac subvariety of GL n R (C). We then construct a Hamiltonian for the Poisson structure induced on H n τ , corresponding to another system which derives from the Toeplitz lattice the modified Schur lattice. Thanks to the properties of Poisson-Dirac subvarieties, we give an explicit Lax equation for the new system and derive from it a Lax equation for the Schur lattice. We also deduce the integrability in the sense of Liouville of the modified Schur lattice.

  17. Theory of the lattice Boltzmann method: From the Boltzmann equation to the lattice Boltzmann equation

    SciTech Connect

    He, Xiaoyi; Lou, Li-Shi Lou, Li-Shi

    1997-12-01

    In this paper, the lattice Boltzmann equation is directly derived from the Boltzmann equation. It is shown that the lattice Boltzmann equation is a special discretized form of the Boltzmann equation. Various approximations for the discretization of the Boltzmann equation in both time and phase space are discussed in detail. A general procedure to derive the lattice Boltzmann model from the continuous Boltzmann equation is demonstrated explicitly. The lattice Boltzmann models derived include the two-dimensional 6-bit, 7-bit, and 9-bit, and three-dimensional 27-bit models. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Spin-Lattice-Coupled Order in Heisenberg Antiferromagnets on the Pyrochlore Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Kazushi; Kawamura, Hikaru

    2016-06-01

    Effects of local lattice distortions on the spin ordering are investigated for the antiferromagnetic classical Heisenberg model on the pyrochlore lattice. It is found by Monte Carlo simulations that the spin-lattice coupling (SLC) originating from site phonons induces a first-order transition into two different types of collinear magnetic ordered states. The state realized at the stronger SLC is cubic symmetric characterized by the magnetic (1/2 ,1/2 ,1/2 ) Bragg peaks, while that at the weaker SLC is tetragonal symmetric characterized by the (1,1,0) ones, each accompanied by the commensurate local lattice distortions. Experimental implications to chromium spinels are discussed.

  19. Analysis of quantum error-correcting codes: Symplectic lattice codes and toric codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, James William

    Quantum information theory is concerned with identifying how quantum mechanical resources (such as entangled quantum states) can be utilized for a number of information processing tasks, including data storage, computation, communication, and cryptography. Efficient quantum algorithms and protocols have been developed for performing some tasks (e.g. , factoring large numbers, securely communicating over a public channel, and simulating quantum mechanical systems) that appear to be very difficult with just classical resources. In addition to identifying the separation between classical and quantum computational power, much of the theoretical focus in this field over the last decade has been concerned with finding novel ways of encoding quantum information that are robust against errors, which is an important step toward building practical quantum information processing devices. In this thesis I present some results on the quantum error-correcting properties of oscillator codes (also described as symplectic lattice codes) and toric codes. Any harmonic oscillator system (such as a mode of light) can be encoded with quantum information via symplectic lattice codes that are robust against shifts in the system's continuous quantum variables. I show the existence of lattice codes whose achievable rates match the one-shot coherent information over the Gaussian quantum channel. Also, I construct a family of symplectic self-dual lattices and search for optimal encodings of quantum information distributed between several oscillators. Toric codes provide encodings of quantum information into two-dimensional spin lattices that are robust against local clusters of errors and which require only local quantum operations for error correction. Numerical simulations of this system under various error models provide a calculation of the accuracy threshold for quantum memory using toric codes, which can be related to phase transitions in certain condensed matter models. I also present

  20. Jamming in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; Steel, Fiona

    2011-03-01

    We study jamming of low aspect-ratio cylindrical Delrin grains in a vertical channel. Grain heights are less than their diameter so the grains resemble antacid tablets, coins, or poker chips. These grains are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section where the channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. Grains are sometimes observed to form jams, stable structures supported by the channel walls with no support beneath them. The probability of jam occurrence and the strength or robustness of a jam is effected by grain and channel sizes. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability and jam strength in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories. Supported by an Undergraduate Research Grant from Penn State Erie, The Behrend College.

  1. Dimensional Behavior of Fuel Channels - Recent Experience and Consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Blavius, Dirk; Muench, Claus-Juergen; Garner, Norman L.

    2007-07-01

    Fuel channels in boiling-water reactors (BWR) undergo distortions like bow, bulge, and twist due to their operating conditions. These distortions may adversely impact planned operating strategy, and therefore need to be adequately addressed during various stages of fuel channel design and manufacturing, core design and operation monitoring. Fuel channel distortion may lead to interference between the fuel channel and adjacent control blade. If severe, such interference can impair both positioning of control blades during normal operations and rapid control blade insertion during a reactor scram. During the last five years, unexpectedly high fuel channel distortions leading to problems in control blade operations have been observed in some C- and S-lattice BWR plants in the U.S. operating on 18 - 24 month cycles. As a result, U.S. operators have implemented costly surveillance programs to detect the onset of high distortions and have declared control blades inoperable when unacceptable control blade operation occurs. This unusual fuel channel distortion has not been observed with AREVA NP fuel supplied in Europe in this scale. Nevertheless fuel channel distortion-related problems were recently observed in reactors outside the U.S. with early control blade operation. The mechanisms causing this unexpected fuel-channel distortion and the influencing factors are not completely understood worldwide for the time being. Therefore, a prediction of channels which will exhibit high bow is very challenging. A status is given from the AREVA NP perspective on: - The existing fuel channel distortion database, - The understanding of the phenomenon, - Measures to gather further information and improve existing tools, materials, and designs, and - Customer actions to reduce potential high channel bow and associated control blade issues. (authors)

  2. Symmetrization for redundant channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulplue, Bhalchandra R. (Inventor); Collins, Robert E. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A plurality of redundant channels in a system each contain a global image of all the configuration data bases in each of the channels in the system. Each global image is updated periodically from each of the other channels via cross channel data links. The global images of the local configuration data bases in each channel are separately symmetrized using a voting process to generate a system signal configuration data base which is not written into by any other routine and is available for indicating the status of the system within each channel. Equalization may be imposed on a suspect signal and a number of chances for that signal to heal itself are provided before excluding it from future votes. Reconfiguration is accomplished upon detecting a channel which is deemed invalid. A reset function is provided which permits an externally generated reset signal to permit a previously excluded channel to be reincluded within the system. The updating of global images and/or the symmetrization process may be accomplished at substantially the same time within a synchronized time frame common to all channels.

  3. Phosphoinositides regulate ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Hille, Bertil; Dickson, Eamonn J.; Kruse, Martin; Vivas, Oscar; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoinositides serve as signature motifs for different cellular membranes and often are required for the function of membrane proteins. Here, we summarize clear evidence supporting the concept that many ion channels are regulated by membrane phosphoinositides. We describe tools used to test their dependence on phosphoinositides, especially phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and consider mechanisms and biological meanings of phosphoinositide regulation of ion channels. This lipid regulation can underlie changes of channel activity and electrical excitability in response to receptors. Since different intracellular membranes have different lipid compositions, the activity of ion channels still in transit towards their final destination membrane may be suppressed until they reach an optimal lipid environment. PMID:25241941

  4. Force Evaluation in the Lattice Boltzmann Method Involving Curved Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Renwei; Yu, Dazhi; Shyy, Wei; Luo, Li-Shi; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The present work investigates two approaches for force evaluation in the lattice Boltzmann equation: the momentum- exchange method and the stress-integration method on the surface of a body. The boundary condition for the particle distribution functions on curved geometries is handled with second order accuracy based on our recent works. The stress-integration method is computationally laborious for two-dimensional flows and in general difficult to implement for three-dimensional flows, while the momentum-exchange method is reliable, accurate, and easy to implement for both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows. Several test cases are selected to evaluate the present methods, including: (i) two-dimensional pressure-driven channel flow; (ii) two-dimensional uniform flow past a column of cylinders; (iii) two-dimensional flow past a cylinder asymmetrically placed in a channel (with vortex shedding); (iv) three-dimensional pressure-driven flow in a circular pipe; and (v) three-dimensional flow past a sphere. The drag evaluated by using the momentum-exchange method agrees well with the exact or other published results.

  5. Force evaluation in the lattice Boltzmann method involving curved geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Renwei; Yu, Dazhi; Shyy, Wei; Luo, Li-Shi

    2002-04-01

    The present work investigates two approaches for force evaluation in the lattice Boltzmann equation: the momentum-exchange method and the stress-integration method on the surface of a body. The boundary condition for the particle distribution functions on curved geometries is handled with second-order accuracy based on our recent works [Mei et al., J. Comput. Phys. 155, 307 (1999); ibid. 161, 680 (2000)]. The stress-integration method is computationally laborious for two-dimensional flows and in general difficult to implement for three-dimensional flows, while the momentum-exchange method is reliable, accurate, and easy to implement for both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows. Several test cases are selected to evaluate the present methods, including: (i) two-dimensional pressure-driven channel flow; (ii) two-dimensional uniform flow past a column of cylinders; (iii) two-dimensional flow past a cylinder asymmetrically placed in a channel (with vortex shedding); (iv) three-dimensional pressure-driven flow in a circular pipe; and (v) three-dimensional flow past a sphere. The drag evaluated by using the momentum-exchange method agrees well with the exact or other published results.

  6. Strong dynamics and lattice gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaich, David

    In this dissertation I use lattice gauge theory to study models of electroweak symmetry breaking that involve new strong dynamics. Electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) is the process by which elementary particles acquire mass. First proposed in the 1960s, this process has been clearly established by experiments, and can now be considered a law of nature. However, the physics underlying EWSB is still unknown, and understanding it remains a central challenge in particle physics today. A natural possibility is that EWSB is driven by the dynamics of some new, strongly-interacting force. Strong interactions invalidate the standard analytical approach of perturbation theory, making these models difficult to study. Lattice gauge theory is the premier method for obtaining quantitatively-reliable, nonperturbative predictions from strongly-interacting theories. In this approach, we replace spacetime by a regular, finite grid of discrete sites connected by links. The fields and interactions described by the theory are likewise discretized, and defined on the lattice so that we recover the original theory in continuous spacetime on an infinitely large lattice with sites infinitesimally close together. The finite number of degrees of freedom in the discretized system lets us simulate the lattice theory using high-performance computing. Lattice gauge theory has long been applied to quantum chromodynamics, the theory of strong nuclear interactions. Using lattice gauge theory to study dynamical EWSB, as I do in this dissertation, is a new and exciting application of these methods. Of particular interest is non-perturbative lattice calculation of the electroweak S parameter. Experimentally S ≈ -0.15(10), which tightly constrains dynamical EWSB. On the lattice, I extract S from the momentum-dependence of vector and axial-vector current correlators. I created and applied computer programs to calculate these correlators and analyze them to determine S. I also calculated the masses

  7. Titanium-silicon carbide composite lattice structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moongkhamklang, Pimsiree

    Sandwich panel structures with stiff, strong face sheets and lightweight cellular cores are widely used for weight sensitive, bending dominated loading applications. The flexural stiffness and strength of a sandwich panel is determined by the stiffness, strength, thickness, and separation of the face sheets, and by the compressive and shear stiffness and strength of the cellular core. Panel performance can be therefore optimized using cores with high specific stiffness and strength. The specific stiffness and strength of all cellular materials depends upon the specific elastic modulus and strength of the material used to make the structure. The stiffest and strongest cores for ambient temperature applications utilize carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) honeycombs and lattice structures. Few options exist for lightweight sandwich panels intended for high temperature uses. High temperature alloys such as Ti-6A1-4V can be applied to SiC monofilaments to create very high specific modulus and strength fibers. These are interesting candidates for the cores of elevated temperature sandwich structures such as the skins of hypersonic vehicles. This dissertation explores the potential of sandwich panel concepts that utilize millimeter scale titanium matrix composite (TMC) lattice structures. A method has been developed for fabricating millimeter cell size cellular lattice structures with the square or diamond collinear truss topologies from 240 mum diameter Ti-6A1-4V coated SiC monofilaments (TMC monofilaments). Lattices with relative densities in the range 10% to 20% were manufactured and tested in compression and shear. Given the very high compressive strength of the TMC monofilaments, the compressive strengths of both the square and diamond lattices were dominated by elastic buckling of the constituent struts. However, under shear loading, some of the constituent struts of the lattices are subjected to tensile stresses and failure is then set by tensile failure of the

  8. Dynamic tuning of lattice plasmon lasers with long coherence characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Thang; Yang, Ankun; Schatz, George; Odom, Teri; Mikkelsen, Maiken

    Here, we experimentally demonstrate dynamic tuning of an optically-pumped lattice plasmon laser based on arrays of gold nanoparticles and liquid gain materials [A. Yang, T.B. Hoang et al., Nature Communications 6, 6939 (2015)]. The structure consists of an array of 120 nm diameter gold disks with a height of 50 nm and 600 nm spacing. A liquid gain material composed of IR-140 dye molecules dissolved in a variety of organic solvents is placed on top of the disks and held in place by a thin glass coverslip. At a lasing wavelength of 860 nm, time-resolved measurements show a dramatic reduction of the decay time from 1 ns to less than 20 ps when the optical excitation power density increases from below to above the lasing threshold, indicating the transition from spontaneous to stimulated emission. By changing the dielectric environment surrounding the gold disks in real time, the lasing wavelength can be dynamically tuned over a 55 nm range. Finally, we will discuss recent experiments where we probe both the temporal and spatial coherence properties of the lattice plasmon laser. This advance of tunable plasmon lasers offer prospects to enhance and detect weak physical and chemical processes on the nanoscale in real time.

  9. Quantum magnetism on kagome lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Zhihao

    The spin 1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on kagome (a planar lattice of corner sharing triangles) is one of the most celebrated models of a strongly correlated system. Despite intensive studies, the physics of its ground state and excitations remains unsettled. Recently, researchers successfully synthesized and characterized several new materials described by this model. It is hoped that the longstanding problem can be finally resolved through combined efforts of experimentalists, material scientists and theorists. In this thesis, we present a physical picture of the low energy physics of kagome. We demonstrate that there are N/3 fermionic particles on a kagome of N sites. The motion of these particles is strongly constrained. They are bound into small bosonic states by strong pair-wise attractions. The "antiparticle" also exists and a particle-antiparticle pair can be created at energy cost 0.218J. Low energy spin 1 excitations correspond to breaking a bound state into two free particles at energy cost 0.06J. This is the physical mechanism of the kagome spin gap. Our physical picture finds several applications. The dynamical structure factor of pair-breaking processes on kagome is computed. We assume the bound states are independent thanks to their small sizes. The result agrees well with the recent inelastic neutron scattering measurement conducted on herbertsmithite, a kagome antiferromagnet. In the second application, we study the effect of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction. DM interaction is important for low energy physics on kagome since the ground state of the dominate exchange interaction is highly degenerated. Through analytical and numerical arguments, it is determined that the vacuum become unstable to creation of particle-antiparticle pairs at critical strength D of DM interaction on the sawtooth chain, a chain of corner sharing triangles. We speculate that the mechanism is behind the numerically observed quantum phase transition at finite D on

  10. The Spectrum and Laplacian Spectrum of the Dice Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuli; Yan, Weigen; Tian, Tao

    2016-05-01

    The dice lattice is the dual lattice of kagomé lattice. Many physical properties on the dice lattice have been studied by physicists, such as Ising model, Glassy dynamics of Josephson arrays, and Lattice Green's function. In this paper, we derive the spectrum and Laplacian spectrum of the dice lattice with toroidal boundary condition. In addition, we apply our results to obtain the formulae of the number of spanning trees, the Kirchhoff index, and the energy of the dice lattice with toroidal boundary condition.

  11. The Spectrum and Laplacian Spectrum of the Dice Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuli; Yan, Weigen; Tian, Tao

    2016-07-01

    The dice lattice is the dual lattice of kagomé lattice. Many physical properties on the dice lattice have been studied by physicists, such as Ising model, Glassy dynamics of Josephson arrays, and Lattice Green's function. In this paper, we derive the spectrum and Laplacian spectrum of the dice lattice with toroidal boundary condition. In addition, we apply our results to obtain the formulae of the number of spanning trees, the Kirchhoff index, and the energy of the dice lattice with toroidal boundary condition.

  12. Lattice-matched and strained InGaAs solar cells for thermophotovoltaic use

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, R.K.; Wilt, D.M.; Jain, R.; Landis, G.A.; Flood, D.J.

    1996-02-01

    Lattice-matched and strained indium gallium arsenide solar cells can be used effectively and efficiently for thermophotovoltaic applications. A 0.75 eV bandgap InGaAs solar cell is well matched to a 2000 K blackbody source with a emission peak around 1.5 {mu}m. A 0.60 eV bandgap InGaAs cell is well suited to a Ho-YAG selective emitter and a blackbody at 1500 K which have emission peak around 2.0 {mu}m. Modeling results predict that the cell efficiencies in excess of 30{percent} are possible for the 1500 K Ho-YAG selective emitter (with strained InGaAs) and for the 2000 K blackbody (with lattice-matched InGaAs) sources. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Gain modulation by graphene plasmons in aperiodic lattice lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, S.; Marshall, O. P.; Folland, T. G.; Kim, Y.-J.; Grigorenko, A. N.; Novoselov, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional graphene plasmon-based technologies will enable the development of fast, compact, and inexpensive active photonic elements because, unlike plasmons in other materials, graphene plasmons can be tuned via the doping level. Such tuning is harnessed within terahertz quantum cascade lasers to reversibly alter their emission. This is achieved in two key steps: first, by exciting graphene plasmons within an aperiodic lattice laser and, second, by engineering photon lifetimes, linking graphene’s Fermi energy with the round-trip gain. Modal gain and hence laser spectra are highly sensitive to the doping of an integrated, electrically controllable, graphene layer. Demonstration of the integrated graphene plasmon laser principle lays the foundation for a new generation of active, programmable plasmonic metamaterials with major implications across photonics, material sciences, and nanotechnology.

  14. Basaltic Lava Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, K. V.; Griffiths, R. W.; Kerr, R. C.

    2004-12-01

    In Hawaii, the mode of lava transport - through open channels or through insulating lava tubes - determines the thermal, rheological, and emplacement history of a lava flow. Most Hawaiian lavas are erupted at near-liquidus temperatures and are therefore crystal-poor; lava transport through open channels allows rapid cooling and consequent rapid increases in lava crystallinity. Solidified aa flows resulting from channelized flow are typically fine-grained throughout their thickness, indicating cooling of the entire flow thickness during transport. In contrast, transport of lava through insulating tubes permits flow over long distances with little cooling. Flows emerging from such tubes typically have pahoehoe flow surfaces with glassy crusts. Groundmass textures that coarsen from the flow rind to the interior reflect rates of post-emplacement, rather than syn-emplacement, cooling. To distinguish eruption conditions that result in lava channels from those that allow formation of lava tubes, we have performed a series of laboratory experiments involving injection of PEG 600 (a wax with a Newtonian rheology and freezing temperature of 19ºC) into cold water through both uniform and non-uniform sloping channels. In uniform channels, tube formation can be distinguished from open channel flow using a dimensionless parameter based on a solidification time scale, an advection time scale, and a Rayleigh number that describes convection by heat loss from crust-free shear zones. Theoretical analysis predicts that in the open channel regime, the width of the crust (dc) will vary with the channel width (W) as dc = W5/3. Crustal coverage of non-uniform channels in both laboratory experiments and field examples from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, is consistent with this prediction. However, experiments in non-uniform channels illustrate additional controls on the surface coverage of lava channels. Most important is crustal extension resulting from flow acceleration through constrictions

  15. Holographic Fermi liquids in a spontaneously generated lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsup, James; Papantonopoulos, Eleftherios; Siopsis, George; Yeter, Kubra

    2016-05-01

    We discuss fermions in a spontaneously generated holographic lattice background. The lattice structure at the boundary is generated by introducing a higher-derivative interaction term between a U (1 ) gauge field and a scalar field. We solve the equations of motion below the critical temperature at which the lattice forms and analyze the change in the Fermi surface due to the lattice. The fermion band structure is found to exhibit a gap due to lattice effects.

  16. Peristaltic particle transport using the Lattice Boltzmann method

    SciTech Connect

    Connington, Kevin William; Kang, Qinjun; Viswanathan, Hari S; Abdel-fattah, Amr; Chen, Shiyi

    2009-01-01

    Peristaltic transport refers to a class of internal fluid flows where the periodic deformation of flexible containing walls elicits a non-negligible fluid motion. It is a mechanism used to transport fluid and immersed solid particles in a tube or channel when it is ineffective or impossible to impose a favorable pressure gradient or desirous to avoid contact between the transported mixture and mechanical moving parts. Peristaltic transport occurs in many physiological situations and has myriad industrial applications. We focus our study on the peristaltic transport of a macroscopic particle in a two-dimensional channel using the lattice Boltzmann method. We systematically investigate the effect of variation of the relevant dimensionless parameters of the system on the particle transport. We find, among other results, a case where an increase in Reynolds number can actually lead to a slight increase in particle transport, and a case where, as the wall deformation increases, the motion of the particle becomes non-negative only. We examine the particle behavior when the system exhibits the peculiar phenomenon of fluid trapping. Under these circumstances, the particle may itself become trapped where it is subsequently transported at the wave speed, which is the maximum possible transport in the absence of a favorable pressure gradient. Finally, we analyze how the particle presence affects stress, pressure, and dissipation in the fluid in hopes of determining preferred working conditions for peristaltic transport of shear-sensitive particles. We find that the levels of shear stress are most hazardous near the throat of the channel. We advise that shear-sensitive particles should be transported under conditions where trapping occurs as the particle is typically situated in a region of innocuous shear stress levels.

  17. Ion channels in microbes

    PubMed Central

    Martinac, Boris; Saimi, Yoshiro; Kung, Ching

    2008-01-01

    Summary Studies of ion channels have for long been dominated by the animalcentric, if not anthropocentric view of physiology. The structures and activities of ion channels had, however, evolved long before the appearance of complex multicellular organisms on Earth. The diversity of ion channels existing in cellular membranes of prokaryotes is a good example. Though at first it may appear as a paradox that most of what we know about the structure of eukaryotic ion channels is based on the structure of bacterial channels, this should not be surprising given the evolutionary relatedness of all living organisms and suitability of microbial cells for structural studies of biological macromolecules in a laboratory environment. Genome sequences of the human as well as various microbial, plant and animal organisms unambiguously established the evolutionary links, whereas crystallographic studies of the structures of major types of ion channels published over the last decade clearly demonstrated the advantage of using microbes as experimental organisms. The purpose of this review is not only to provide an account of acquired knowledge on microbial ion channels but also to show that the study of microbes and their ion channels may also hold a key to solving unresolved molecular mysteries in the future. PMID:18923187

  18. RFI channels, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceliece, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The cutoff parameters for a class of channel models exhibiting burst noise behavior were calculated and the performance of interleaved coding strategies was evaluated. It is concluded that, provided the channel memory is large enough and is properly exploited, interleaved coding is nearly optimal.

  19. Venus - Sinuous Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This full resolution radar mosaic from Magellan at 49 degrees south latitude, 273 degrees east longitude of an area with dimensions of 130 by 190 kilometers (81 by 118 miles), shows a 200 kilometer (124 mile) segment of a sinuous channel on Venus. The channel is approximately 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) wide. These channel-like features are common on the plains of Venus. In some places they appear to have been formed by lava which may have melted or thermally eroded a path over the plains' surface. Most are 1 to 3 kilometers (0.6 to 2 miles) wide. They resemble terrestrial rivers in some respects, with meanders, cutoff oxbows, and abandoned channel segments. However, Venus channels are not as tightly sinuous as terrestrial rivers. Most are partly buried by younger lava plains, making their sources difficult to identify. A few have vast radar-dark plains units associated with them, suggesting large flow volumes. These channels appear to be older than other channel types on Venus, as they are crossed by fractures and wrinkle ridges, and are often buried by other volcanic materials. In addition, they appear to run both upslope and downslope, suggesting that the plains were warped by regional tectonism after channel formation. Resolution of the Magellan data is about 120 meters (400 feet).

  20. Common Misconceptions about the Dynamical Theory of Crystal Lattices: Cauchy Relations, Lattice Potentials and Infinite Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elcoro, Luis; Etxebarria, Jesus

    2011-01-01

    The requirement of rotational invariance for lattice potential energies is investigated. Starting from this condition, it is shown that the Cauchy relations for the elastic constants are fulfilled if the lattice potential is built from pair interactions or when the first-neighbour approximation is adopted. This is seldom recognized in widely used…