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Sample records for emission sounder tes

  1. Evidence of Convective Redistribution of Carbon Monoxide in Aura Tropospheric Emission Sounder (TES) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manyin, Michael; Douglass, Anne; Schoeberl, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Vertical convective transport is a key element of the tropospheric circulation. Convection lofts air from the boundary layer into the free troposphere, allowing surface emissions to travel much further, and altering the rate of chemical processes such as ozone production. This study uses satellite observations to focus on the convective transport of CO from the boundary layer to the mid and upper troposphere. Our hypothesis is that strong convection associated with high rain rate regions leads to a correlation between mid level and upper level CO amounts. We first test this hypothesis using the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemistry and transport model. We find the correlation is robust and increases as the precipitation rate (the strength of convection) increases. We next examine three years of CO profiles from the Tropospheric Emission Sounder (TES) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instruments aboard EOS Aura. Rain rates are taken from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 3B-42 multi-satellite product. Again we find a correlation between mid-level and upper tropospheric CO, which increases with rain rate. Our result shows the critical importance of tropical convection in coupling vertical levels of the troposphere in the transport of trace gases. The effect is seen most clearly in strong convective regions such as the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone.

  2. Ammonia Measurements by the NASA Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the NPP Suomi Cross-Track Infrared Sounder (CrIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Shephard, M. W.; Henze, D. K.; Zhu, J.; Pinder, R. W.; Bash, J. O.; Walker, J. T.; Luo, M.

    2013-12-01

    Ammonia is highly reactive, with concurrent high spatial and temporal variability; it can play a key role in determining air quality through its part in the formation of PM2.5 particles. Deposition of NH3 also impacts water quality. With increased fertilizer use and rising temperatures ammonia concentrations are expected to increase significantly over India and China. Nevertheless in situ measurements are sparse, especially in areas beyond North America and Europe. The air quality community has a pressing need for global information on the diurnal and seasonal cycles as well as the distribution and strength of the ammonia sources. Measurements from satellites can provide this information. An advanced optimal estimation algorithm has been developed to retrieve NH3 from the TES instrument flying on the AURA satellite and ammonia is currently a standard TES operational product, available at http://avdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/index.php?site=635564035&id=10&go=list&path=/NH3. A similar retrieval is at the prototyping stage for the CrIS instrument. We will first provide a short summary of the characteristics of TES retrieved ammonia, discuss the distinct characteristics of point and satellite measurements and illustrate how information from the latter is related to the former. We will then present results from comparisons with in situ measurements. Specifically, we will compare TES NH3 with surface measurements in North Carolina and China, and examine the trend in NH3 over China; we will also compare TES NH3 with surface and aircraft measurements in the San Joaquin Valley in California, during both the CalNex and DISCOVER-AQ campaigns. We will present results from the application of inverse methods using TES ammonia to constrain model emissions, an area of research that has showcased the value provided by satellite data. Finally, we will demonstrate the potential of a sensor with TES characteristics on a geostationary platform to provide data with quality sufficient to evaluate

  3. Comparison of Methane Data Products from the TES and AIRS Infrared Sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, T. J.; Pagano, T. S.; Worden, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is the second most powerful greenhouse gas with a highly positive radiative forcing of 0.48 W/m2 (IPCC 2013). Global concentrations of methane have been steadily increasing since 2007 (Bruhwiler 2014), raising concerns about methane's impact on the future global climate. For about the last decade, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura spacecraft has been detecting several trace gas species in the troposphere including methane. The goal of this study is to compare TES methane retrievals to that of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua spacecraft so that scientific investigations may be transferred from TES to AIRS. The two instruments fly in the afternoon constellation (A-Train), providing numerous coincident measurements for comparison. In addition, they also have a similar spectral range, (3.3 to 15.4 µm) for TES (Beer, 2006) and (3.7 to 15.4 µm) for AIRS (Chahine, 2006), making both instruments sensitive to the mid and upper troposphere. This makes them ideal candidates to compare methane data products. However, because AIRS spectral resolution is lower than that of the TES, there may be a difference in vertical sensitivity. In addition, the retrieval techniques and error characteristics are different for the two data sets. The current state of validation for these data products will be presented. To identify conditions in which the data sets agree and dis agree, we present global maps of methane concentrations from monthly level 3 (L3) data products. We also investigate the temporal stability between the two datasets by comparing global zonal averages derived from L3 over the last decade. Finally, we compare L2 retrieval profiles from representative granules in the tropical, mid-latitude and northern latitudes.

  4. (abstract) Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard

    1994-01-01

    A descope of the EOS program now requires that all EOS platforms after AM1 be launched on DELTA-class vehicles, which results in much smaller platforms (and payloads) than previously envisaged. A major part of the TES hardware design effort has therefore been redirected towards meeting this challenge. The development of the TES concept continues on a schedule to permit flight on the EOS CHEM platform in 2002, where it is planned to be accompanied by HIRDLS and MLS.

  5. Emissivity spectra estimated with the MaxEnTES algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barducci, A.; Guzzi, D.; Lastri, C.; Nardino, V.; Pippi, I.; Raimondi, V.

    2014-10-01

    Temperature and Emissivity Separation (TES) applied to multispectral or hyperspectral Thermal Infrared (TIR) images of the Earth is a relevant issue for many remote sensing applications. The TIR spectral radiance can be modeled by means of the well-known Planck's law, as a function of the target temperature and emissivity. The estimation of these target's parameters (i.e. the Temperature Emissivity Separation, aka TES) is hindered by the circumstance that the number of measurements is less than the unknown number. Existing TES algorithms implement a temperature estimator in which the uncertainty is removed by adopting some a priori assumption that conditions the retrieved temperature and emissivity. Due to its mathematical structure, the Maximum Entropy formalism (MaxEnt) seems to be well suited for carrying out this complex TES operation. The main advantage of the MaxEnt statistical inference is the absence of any external hypothesis, which is instead characterizes most of the existing the TES algorithms. In this paper we describe the performance of the MaxEnTES (Maximum Entropy Temperature Emissivity Separation) algorithm as applied to ten TIR spectral channels of a MIVIS dataset collected over Italy. We compare the temperature and emissivity spectra estimated by this algorithm with independent estimations achieved with two previous TES methods (the Grey Body Emissivity (GBE), and the Model Emittance Calculation (MEC)). We show that MaxEnTES is a reliable algorithm in terms of its higher output Signal-to-Noise Ratio and the negligibility of systematic errors that bias the estimated temperature in other TES procedures.

  6. The Athena Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, P. R.; Mehall, G. L.; Gorelick, N.; Silverman, S.

    2000-07-01

    The Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) is a mature, high-performance infrared remote sensing instrument designed specifically for use on the martian surface. The major objectives of the Mini-TES portion of the Athena investigation are: (1) to map the mineralogy of rocks and soils from the near field to the horizon; (2) to determine the temperature profile and dust, water vapor and water ice abundance of the lower atmosphere; and (3) to determine the thermophysical properties (particle size, induration, and sub-surface layering) of the surrounding terrain. The instrument uses optical, electronic, and mechanical designs with high heritage from the Mars Global Surveyor TES instrument currently in orbit around Mars. The Mini-TES will provide infrared spectral image cubes of the full 360 deg scene around the rover from 50 deg below to 30 deg above the horizon at spatial resolutions of 8 and 20 mrad (8 and 20 cm at 10 m distance). Mini-TES covers the spectral range from 5 to 30 microns (2000 to 333/cm) with a spectral resolution of 10/cm . An elevation mirror capable of rotating more than 180 deg is mounted atop the mast between the two Pan-cam camera heads, reflecting radiation down through the mast and the azimuthal drive system, and into the Mini-TES telescope and interferometer. This system provides a full panoramic view of the surface, the atmosphere, and an internal, full-aperture calibration target. The spectrometer telescope is a 6.35-cm diameter reflecting Cassegrain that feeds a flat-plate Michelson interferometer. The instrument uses an uncooled deuterated triglycine sulfate (DTGS) pyroelectric detector that can operate from -40 to +40 C with no required cooling or heating.

  7. Pollution over Megacity Regions from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Payne, V.; Hegarty, J. D.; Luo, M.; Bowman, K. W.; Millet, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    The world's megacities, defined as urban areas with over 10 million people, are growing rapidly in population and increasing in number, as the migration from rural to urban areas continues. This rapid growth brings economic opportunities but also exacts costs, such as traffic congestion, inadequate sanitation and poor air quality. Monitoring air quality has become a priority for many regional governments, as they seek to understand the sources and distribution of the species contributing to the local pollution. Hyperspectral infrared instruments orbiting the Earth can measure many of these species simultaneously, and since they measure averages over their footprints, they are less sensitive to proximity to strong point sources than in situ measurements, and thus provide a more regional perspective. The JPL TES team has selected a number of megacities as Special Observation targets. These observations, or transects, are sets of 20 closely spaced (12 km apart) TES observations carried out every sixteen days. We will present the TES ozone (O3), peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), ammonia (NH3), formic acid (HCOOH) and methanol (CH3OH) data collected over Mexico City, Lagos (Nigeria) and Los Angeles from 2013 through 2015, and illustrate how the seasonality in the TES measurements is related to local emissions, biomass burning and regional circulation patterns, and we will reinforce our arguments with MODIS AOD and TES CO data. One of the transects over Mexico City in October demonstrates very nicely the synergy obtained from simultaneous measurements of multiple trace species. We will also discuss the spatial variability along the transects and how it is related to topography and land use.

  8. The Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES): Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hook, Simon; Johnson, William R.; Eng, Bjorn T.; Gunapala, Sarah D.; Lamborn, Andrew U.; Mouroulis, Pantazis, Z.; Mouroulis, Pantazis, Z.; Paine, Christopher G.; Soibel, Alexander; Wilson, Daniel W.

    2011-01-01

    The Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) is being developed as part of the risk reduction activities associated with the Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI). HyspIRI is one of the Tier 2 Decadal Survey Missions. HyTES will provide information on how to place the filters on the HyspIRI Thermal Infrared Instrument (TIR) as well as provide antecedent science data. The pushbroom design has 512 spatial pixels over a 50-degree field of view and 256 spectral channels between 7.5 micrometers to 12 micrometers. HyTES includes many key enabling state-of-the-art technologies including a high performance convex diffraction grating, a quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) focal plane array, and a compact Dyson-inspired optical design. The Dyson optical design allows for a very compact and optically fast system (F/1.6). It also minimizes cooling requirements due to the fact it has a single monolithic prism-like grating design which allows baffling for stray light suppression. The monolithic configuration eases mechanical tolerancing requirements which are a concern since the complete optical assembly is operated at cryogenic temperatures ((is) approximately 100K). The QWIP allows for optimum spatial and spectral uniformity and provides adequate responsivity or D-star to allow 200mK noise equivalent temperature difference (NEDT) operation across the LWIR passband. Assembly of the system is nearly complete. After completion, alignment results will be presented which show low keystone and smile distortion. This is required to minimize spatial-spectral mixing between adjacent spectral channels and spatial positions. Predictions show the system will have adequate signal to noise for laboratory calibration targets.

  9. Middle Atmosphere Sounder and Thermal Emission Radiometer - Master

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, M. G.; Scott, D. K.; Esplin, R. W.; Bailey, S. M.; Randall, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Sounder and Thermal Emission Radiometer (MASTER) instrument is an advanced infrared limb-scanning instrument designed to measure the thermal structure, chemical composition, and energy balance from the stratosphere to the lower thermosphere. MASTER builds on NASA's long and successful heritage of infrared limb scanners including the LIMS, HIRDLS, and SABER instruments. MASTER has exceptional radiometric sensitivity with a more efficient, compact, and lightweight design. An updated focal plane enables critical new science in the areas of the carbon budget closure, geomagnetically-driven ozone destruction, and auroral energy deposition, while virtually eliminating out of band contributions via dual filtering. MASTER will continue the SABER-TIMED and EOS-Aura records of temperature, lower stratospheric water vapor, ozone, methane, and thermospheric cooling by nitric oxide and carbon dioxide. MASTER's size and mass are specifically designed to allow flexibility in the choice of small satellite buses and low cost launch vehicles. The expanded focal plane enables a choice of channels applicable to science objectives in NASA's Earth Science and Heliophysics enterprises. Due to the long and successful heritage the MASTER instrument is at an exceptionally high technology readiness level. No new technologies are required to build the MASTER flight instrument.

  10. Temperature/emissivity separation of MTI data using the Terra/ASTER TES algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushkin, Amit; Balick, Lee K.; Gillespie, Alan R.

    2002-08-01

    Surface temperatures and emissivities can be estimated using multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) data, from various instruments. In this paper the temperature-emissivity separation algorithm (TES) is modified to recover surface temperatures and emissivities using Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) data from two mid infrared (MIR) and three TIR bands. As TES was originally designed for use with the five TIR bands from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection (ASTER) instrument, broadening its application to MIR wavelengths requires careful evaluation of possible atmospheric and reflected daytime solar illumination effects. Numerical simulations show that TES results for MTI data, assuming error-free atmospheric corrections, are statistically similar to TES results for ASTER data, with surface temperature recovery within +/- 1.5K and emissivity recovery within +/- 0.02. However, strong atmospheric absorption (as high as 61%), and expected daytime reflected solar illumination (as high as 50% of measured radiance) in the MIR bands suggest that TES results for MTI data are more sensitive to errors in atmospheric compensation. Furthermore, the relatively steep slope of Planck's radiation curve for typical terrestrial temperatures in the MIR wavelengths, suggests that inverting temperatures from measured MIR radiance using Planck's law will be more sensitive to error. Numerical simulations and preliminary image analysis suggest that the three TIR MTI bands are not sufficient to obtain the desired TES results. However, omitting one of the MIR bands and using a four-band configuration decreases sensitivity to atmospheric effects, while still maintaining acceptable theoretical TES performance.

  11. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) for the Earth Observing System (EOS) CHEM Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, R.; Glavich, T.; Rider, D.

    2000-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) is an imaging infrared Fourier transform spectrometer scheduled to be launched into polar sun-synchronous orbit on the Earth Observing System (EOS) CHEM satellite in December 2002.

  12. Separation of Atmospheric and Surface Spectral Features in Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Christensen, Philip R.

    2000-01-01

    We present two algorithms for the separation of spectral features caused by atmospheric and surface components in Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data. One algorithm uses radiative transfer and successive least squares fitting to find spectral shapes first for atmospheric dust, then for water-ice aerosols, and then, finally, for surface emissivity. A second independent algorithm uses a combination of factor analysis, target transformation, and deconvolution to simultaneously find dust, water ice, and surface emissivity spectral shapes. Both algorithms have been applied to TES spectra, and both find very similar atmospheric and surface spectral shapes. For TES spectra taken during aerobraking and science phasing periods in nadir-geometry these two algorithms give meaningful and usable surface emissivity spectra that can be used for mineralogical identification.

  13. Implementation of Cloud Retrievals for Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) Atmospheric Retrievals: Part 1. Description and Characterization of Errors on Trace Gas Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulawik, Susan S.; Worden, John; Eldering, Annmarie; Bowman, Kevin; Gunson, Michael; Osterman, Gregory B.; Zhang, Lin; Clough, Shepard A.; Shephard, Mark W.; Beer, Reinhard

    2006-01-01

    We develop an approach to estimate and characterize trace gas retrievals in the presence of clouds in high spectral measurements of upwelling radiance in the infrared spectral region (650-2260/cm). The radiance contribution of clouds is parameterized in terms of a set of frequency-dependent nonscattering optical depths and a cloud height. These cloud parameters are retrieved jointly with surface temperature, emissivity, atmospheric temperature, and trace gases such as ozone from spectral data. We demonstrate the application of this approach using data from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and test data simulated with a scattering radiative transfer model. We show the value of this approach in that it results in accurate estimates of errors for trace gas retrievals, and the retrieved values improve over the initial guess for a wide range of cloud conditions. Comparisons are made between TES retrievals of ozone, temperature, and water to model fields from the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO), temperature retrievals from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), tropospheric ozone columns from the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) GEOS-Chem, and ozone retrievals from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). In each of these cases, this cloud retrieval approach does not introduce observable biases into TES retrievals.

  14. Evaluating the Information from Minor Trace Gas Measurements by the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Shephard, M. W.; Henze, D. K.; Zhu, L.; Pinder, R. W.; Bash, J. O.; Walker, J. T.; Millet, D. B.; Wells, K. C.; Jeong, G.; Luo, M.; Chaliyakunnel, S.

    2012-12-01

    The high spectral resolution and good SNR provided by the TES instrument allow for the detection and retrieval of numerous trace species. Advanced optimal estimation algorithms have been developed to retrieve three of these, ammonia, methanol and formic acid, from TES radiances. Ammonia is currently a standard TES operational product, while methanol and formic acid will be standard products in the next TES software update (V006). Given the highly reactive nature of ammonia, with its concurrent high spatial and temporal variability, the large uncertainty in global emissions of methanol, and the large biases between measured and modeled formic acid, the air quality community has a pressing need for global information on these species; there is great interest in using these new satellite derived products, but there is often no clear idea on the information they provide. Here we will provide a short summary of the characteristics of the retrieved products, then present results from comparisons with in situ measurements. We will discuss the distinct characteristics of point and satellite measurements and illustrate how information from the latter is related to the former. We will compare global TES ammonia and methanol measurements with outcome from the GEOS-CHEM model. These comparisons have led us to examine a potential sampling bias driven by TES insensitivity in regions with low concentrations (less than 1 ppbv) or with low thermal contrast or thick clouds. We will present results from the application of inverse methods using TES ammonia and methanol to constrain model emissions, an area of research that has showcased the value provided by satellite data. Finally, we will demonstrate the potential of a sensor with TES characteristics on a geostationary platform to provide high quality data sufficient to evaluate models of the ammonia bi-directional exchange at the surface.

  15. MGS-TES Phase Effects and Thermal Infrared Directional Emissivity Field Measurements of Martian Analog Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitman, K. M.; Bandfield, J. L.; Wolff, M. J.

    2006-03-01

    We present a set of on- and off-nadir thermal IR field and laboratory emissivity spectra for three undisturbed Mars terrain analog sites and analyze them for presence or absence of directional emissivity effects. Comparisons to moderate and low albedo surface MGS-TES EPF sequences are discussed.

  16. Quantifying global terrestrial methanol emissions using observations from the TES satellite sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, K. C.; Millet, D. B.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Shephard, M. W.; Henze, D. K.; Bousserez, N.; Apel, E. C.; de Gouw, J.; Warneke, C.; Singh, H. B.

    2014-03-01

    We employ new global space-based measurements of atmospheric methanol from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) with the adjoint of the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to quantify terrestrial emissions of methanol to the atmosphere. Biogenic methanol emissions in the model are based on version 2.1 of the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGANv2.1), using leaf area data from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and GEOS-5 assimilated meteorological fields. We first carry out a pseudo observation test to validate the overall approach, and find that the TES sampling density is sufficient to accurately quantify regional- to continental-scale methanol emissions using this method. A global inversion of two years of TES data yields an optimized annual global surface flux of 122 Tg yr-1 (including biogenic, pyrogenic, and anthropogenic sources), an increase of 60% from the a priori global flux of 76 Tg yr-1. Global terrestrial methanol emissions are thus nearly 25% those of isoprene (~540 Tg yr-1), and are comparable to the combined emissions of all anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (~100-200 Tg yr-1). Our a posteriori terrestrial methanol source leads to a strong improvement of the simulation relative to an ensemble of airborne observations, and corroborates two other recent top-down estimates (114-120 Tg yr-1) derived using in situ and space-based measurements. Inversions testing the sensitivity of optimized fluxes to model errors in OH, dry deposition, and oceanic uptake of methanol, as well as to the assumed a priori constraint, lead to global fluxes ranging from 118 to 126 Tg yr-1. The TES data imply a relatively modest revision of model emissions over most of the tropics, but a significant upward revision in midlatitudes, particularly over Europe and North America. We interpret the inversion results in terms of specific source types using the methanol : CO correlations measured by TES, and find that

  17. Submillimeter limb-emission sounder JEM/SMILES aboard the Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inatani, Junji; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Satoh, Ryouta; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Ikeda, Naomi; Fujii, Yasunori; Nakajima, Takashi; Iida, Yukiei; Iida, Teruhito; Kikuchi, Ken'ichi; Miura, Takeshi; Masuko, Harunobu; Manabe, Takeshi; Ochiai, Satoshi; Seta, Masumichi; Irimajiri, Yoshihisa; Kasai, Yasuko; Suzuki, Makoto; Shirai, Tomoko; Tsujimaru, Sho; Shibasaki, Kazuo; Shiotani, Masato

    2000-12-01

    A submillimeter limb-emission sounder, that is to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM, dubbed as KIBO) at the International Space Station, has been designed. This payload, Superconducting Submillimeter-wave Limb-emission Sounder (SMILES), is aimed at global mappings of stratospheric trace gases by means of the most sensitive submillimeter receiver ever operated in space. Such sensitivity is ascribed to a Superconductor-Insulator- Superconductor (SIS) mixer, which is operated at 4.5 K in a dedicated cryostat combined with a mechanical cooler. SMILES will observe ozone-depletion-related molecules such as ClO, Hcl, HO2, HNO3, BrO and O3 in the frequency bands at 624.32-626.32 GHz and 649.12-650.32 GHz. A scanning antenna will cover tangent altitudes from 10 to 60 km in every 53 seconds, while tracing the latitudes form 38 S to 65 N along its orbit. This global coverage makes SMILES a useful tool of observing the low- and mid- latitudinal areas as well as the Arctic peripheral region. The molecular emissions will be detected by two units of acousto-optic spectrometers (AOS), each of which has coverage of 1.2 GHz with a resolution of 1.8 MHz. This high-resolution spectroscopy will allow us to detect weak emission lines attributing to less-abundant species.

  18. Validation of the TES algorithm for emissivity determination using field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmugge, T.; Ogawa, K.; French, A.; Ritchie, J.; Rango, A.

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge of the surface emissivity is important for determining the radiation balance at the land surface. This is especially true for arid regions with sparse vegetation, where the emissivity of the exposed soils and rocks is highly variable. The multispectral thermal infrared data obtained from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection (ASTER) radiometer on NASA's Terra satellite have been shown to be of good quality and provide a unique new tool for studying the emissivity of the land surface. ASTER has 5 channels in the 8 to 12 micrometer waveband with 90 m spatial resolution, when the data are combined with the Temperature Emissivity Separation (TES) algorithm the surface emissivity over this wavelength region can be determined along with surface temperature. To overcome the problem of having too many unknowns, i.e. 5 emissivities and the surface temperature, TES makes use of an empirical relation between the minimum emissivity and the range of values for the 5 ASTER channels. The TES algorithm was validated using measurements with a multispectral thermal infrared field radiometer (CIMEL 312) which has essentially the same 5 bands as ASTER. The measurements were made on several soils in the Jornada Experimental Range (JER) and the White Sands National Monument in southern New Mexico, USA. The JER is a long-term ecological reserve (LTER) site located at the northern end of the Chihuahuan desert. The site is typical of desert grassland where the main vegetation components are grass and shrubs. At the White Sands National Monument dunes of gypsum sand cover about 700 km2 (275 square miles). Since gypsum has a unique emissivity spectra with a pronounced minimum at the 8.6 micrometer wavelength it is a good target for satellite observations of emissivity. The observed emissivity spectra for these sites in New Mexico show good agreement ( <0.02) with values calculated from the laboratory spectra for the soil samples when the difference of physical

  19. The tropospheric emission spectrometer (TES) for the Earth Observing System (EOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beer, R.

    In recent years, increasing concern has been expressed about Global Change - the natural and anthropogenic alteration of the Earth's environment involving global greenhouse warming and the associated climate change, urban and regional atmospheric pollution, acid deposition, regional increases in tropospheric zone, and the decrease in stratospheric ozone. A common theme among these problems is that they all involve those tropospheric trace gases which are fundamental to the biosphere-troposphere interaction, the chemistry of the free troposphere itself, and troposphere-stratosphere exchange. The chemical species involved all have spectral signatures within the near and mid infrared that can now be measured by advanced techniques of remote-sensing infrared spectroradiometry. Such a system is the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), now in Phase B definition for the Earth Observing System (EOS) polar platforms. TES addresses these objectives by obtaining radiometrically calibrated, linewidth-limited spectral resolution, infrared spectra of the lower atmosphere using both natural thermal emission and reflected sunlight (where appropriate) in three different, but fully programmable, modes: a gobal mode, a pointed mode, and a limb-viewing mode. The goals of TES, its instrumentation, operational modes, sensitivity and data handling are discussed.

  20. The tropospheric emission spectrometer (TES) for the Earth Observing System (EOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, R.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, increasing concern has been expressed about Global Change - the natural and anthropogenic alteration of the Earth's environment involving global greenhouse warming and the associated climate change, urban and regional atmospheric pollution, acid deposition, regional increases in tropospheric zone, and the decrease in stratospheric ozone. A common theme among these problems is that they all involve those tropospheric trace gases which are fundamental to the biosphere-troposphere interaction, the chemistry of the free troposphere itself, and troposphere-stratosphere exchange. The chemical species involved all have spectral signatures within the near and mid infrared that can now be measured by advanced techniques of remote-sensing infrared spectroradiometry. Such a system is the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), now in Phase B definition for the Earth Observing System (EOS) polar platforms. TES addresses these objectives by obtaining radiometrically calibrated, linewidth-limited spectral resolution, infrared spectra of the lower atmosphere using both natural thermal emission and reflected sunlight (where appropriate) in three different, but fully programmable, modes: a gobal mode, a pointed mode, and a limb-viewing mode. The goals of TES, its instrumentation, operational modes, sensitivity and data handling are discussed.

  1. Comparison of improved Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) CO{sub 2} with HIPPO and SGP aircraft profile measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kulawik, S. S.; Worden, J. R.; Wofsy, S. C.; Biraud, S. C.; Nassar, R.; Jones, D. B.A.; Olsen, E. T.; Osterman, G. B.

    2012-02-01

    Comparisons are made between mid-tropospheric Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) satellite measurements and ocean profiles from three Hiaper Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) campaigns and land aircraft profiles from the United States Southern Great Plains (SGP) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site over a 4-yr period. These comparisons are used to characterize the bias in the TES CO{sub 2} estimates and to assess whether calculated and actual uncertainties and sensitivities are consistent. The HIPPO dataset is one of the few datasets spanning the altitude range where TES CO{sub 2} estimates are sensitive, which is especially important for characterization of biases. We find that TES CO{sub 2} estimates capture the seasonal and latitudinal gradients observed by HIPPO CO{sub 2} measurements; actual errors range from 0.8–1.2 ppm, depending on the campaign, and are approximately 1.4 times larger than the predicted errors. The bias of TES versus HIPPO is within 0.85 ppm for each of the 3 campaigns; however several of the sub-tropical TES CO{sub 2} estimates are lower than expected based on the calculated errors. Comparisons of aircraft flask profiles, which are measured from the surface to 5 km, to TES CO{sub 2} at the SGP ARM site show good agreement with an overall bias of 0.1 ppm and rms of 1.0 ppm. We also find that the predicted sensitivity of the TES CO{sub 2} estimates is too high, which results from using a multi-step retrieval for CO{sub 2} and temperature. We find that the averaging kernel in the TES product corrected by a pressure-dependent factor accurately reflects the sensitivity of the TES CO{sub 2} product.

  2. Overview and early results of the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Ken-Ichi; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Ochiai, Satoshi; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Irimajiri, Yoshihisa; Kasai, Yasuko; Koike, Makoto; Manabe, Takeshi; Mizukoshi, Kazuo; Murayama, Yasuhiro; Nagahama, Tomoo; Sano, Takuki; Sato, Ryota; Seta, Masumichi; Takahashi, Chikako; Takayanagi, Masahiro; Masuko, Harunobu; Inatani, Junji; Suzuki, Makoto; Shiotani, Masato

    2010-12-01

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) was successfully launched and attached to the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS) on 25 September 2009. It has been making atmospheric observations since 12 October 2009 with the aid of a 4 K mechanical cooler and superconducting mixers for submillimeter limb-emission sounding in the frequency bands of 624.32-626.32 GHz and 649.12-650.32 GHz . On the basis of the observed spectra, the data processing has been retrieving vertical profiles for the atmospheric minor constituents in the middle atmosphere, such as O3 with isotopes, HCl, ClO, HO2, BrO, and HNO3. Results from SMILES have demonstrated its high potential to observe atmospheric minor constituents in the middle atmosphere. Unfortunately, SMILES observations have been suspended since 21 April 2010 owing to the failure of a critical component.

  3. Effect of HF Emission of the topside sounder transmitter aboard the COSMOS-1809 satellite on the ionospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranets, N. V.; Gladyshev, V. A.; Afonin, V. V.

    The experiment on investigation of effect of the HF emission (300 W) by the dipole antenna on the ionospheric plasma was carried out onboard the COSMOS-1809 satellite (1987). The sounder accelerated particles (SAP) at the electron cyclotron harmonics n x omegace and in the frequency region of antenna resonance were detected by the charged particle spectrometer.

  4. Observation capability of Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) from International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Yasuko; Tanaka, Takahiro; Dupuy, Eric; Kita, Kazuyuki; Baron, Philippe; Ochiai, Satoshi; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Kikuchi, Kenichi; Mendrok, Jana; Murtagh, Donal P.; Urban, Joachim; Smiles Mission Team

    A new generation of sub-millimeter-wave receivers employing sensitive SIS (Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor) detector technology will provide new opportunities for precise pas-sive remote sensing observation of minor constituents in atmosphere. Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) had been launched in September 11, 2009 and installed to the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS). SMILES is a collaboration project of National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). Mission objectives of SMILES are: 1. Space demonstration of super-sensitive SIS mixer and 4-K mechanical cooler technology 2. Super-sensitive global observation of atmospheric minor constituents with sub-millimeter-wave limb emission sounder JEM/SMILES will allow to observe the atmospheric species such as O3, H35Cl, H37Cl, ClO, HO2, BrO, HOCl, HOBr, HNO3, CH3CN, Ozone isotope species, H2O, and Ice Cloud with the precisions in a few to several tens percents. The altitude region of observation is from the upper troposphere to the mesopouse. We performed the early comparison/validation of ozone with 4 satellites measurements, AURA/MLS, Odin/SMR, ACE, and Odin/OSIRIS, and ozonesonde. SMILES ozone was in good agreement with these data. For example, difference between SMILES and MLS was less than 2 percent be-tween 20-50km. These results are consistent with the observation capabilities of JEM/SMILES with error analysis. This super technology may allow us to open new issues in atmospheric science.

  5. Correcting Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS-TES) High Altitude (40 - 65 km) Temperature Retrievals for Instrumental Correlated Noise and Biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnochie, T. H.; Smith, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS-TES) nadir-soundings have been used to derive atmospheric temperatures up to roughly 40 km [Conrath et al., JGR 105 2000, Smith et al., JGR 106, 2001], and MGS-TES limb soundings have been used to extend the atmospheric temperature data set to > 60 km in altitude [Smith et al., JGR 106, 2001]. The ~40 - ~65 km altitude range probed by the MGS-TES limb sounding is particularly important for capturing key dynamical features such as the warm winter polar mesosphere [e.g., Smith et al., JGR 106, 2001; McCleese et al., Nature Geoscience 1, 2008], and the response of thermal tides to dust opacity [e.g. Wilson and Hamilton, J. Atmos. Sci. 53, 1996]. Thus accurate and precise temperature profiles at these altitudes are particularly important for constraining global circulation models. They are also critical for interpreting observations of mesospheric condensate aerosols [e.g., Määttänen et al., Icarus 209, 2010; McConnochie et al., Icarus 210, 2010)]. We have indentified correlated noise components in the MGS-TES limb sounding radiances that propagate into very large uncertainties in the retrieved temperatures. We have also identified a slowly varying radiance bias in the limb sounding radiances. Note that the nadir-sounding-based MGS-TES atmospheric temperatures currently available from the Planetary Data System are not affected by either of these issues. These two issues affect the existing MGS-TES limb sounding temperature data set are as follows: Considering, for example, the 1.5 Pascal pressure level (which typically falls between 50 and 60 km altitude), correlated-noise induced standard errors for individual limb-sounding temperature retrievals were 3 - 5 K in Mars Year 24, rising to 5 - 15 K in Mars Year 25 and 10 - 15 K in Mars Year 26 and 27. The radiance bias, although consistent on ~10-sol time scales, is highly variable over the course of the MGS-TES mission. It results in temperatures (at the 1

  6. Interannual Variability of Dust and Ice in the Mars Atmosphere: Comparison of MRO Mars Climate Sounder Retrievals with MGS-TES Limb Sounding Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirley, J. H.; McConnochie, T. H.; Kleinbohl, A.; Schofield, J. T.; Kass, D.; Heavens, N. G.; Benson, J.; McCleese, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    Dust and ice play important roles in Martian atmospheric dynamics on all time scales. Dust loading in particular exerts an important control on atmospheric temperatures and thereby on the strength of the atmospheric circulation in any given year. We present the first comparisons of MGS-TES aerosol opacity profiles with MRO-MCS aerosol opacity profiles. While the differences in vertical resolution are significant (a factor of 2), we find good agreement at particular seasons between nightside zonal average dust opacity profiles from the two instruments. Derived water ice opacities are likewise similar but show greater variability.

  7. Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) Observations of Dust Opacity During Aerobraking and Science Phasing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Pearl, John C.; Conrath, Barney J.; Christensen, Philip R.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) arrived at Mars in September 1997 near Mars southern spring equinox and has now provided monitoring of conditions in the Mars atmosphere for more than half a Mars year. The large majority of the spectra taken by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) are in a nadir geometry (downward looking mode) where Mars is observed through the atmosphere. Most of these contain the distinct spectral signature of atmospheric dust. For these nadir-geometry spectra we retrieve column-integrated infrared aerosol (dust) opacities. TES observations during the aerobraking and science-phasing portions of the MGS mission cover the seasonal range L(sub s)=184 deg - 28 deg. Excellent spatial coverage was obtained in the southern hemisphere. Northern hemisphere coverage is generally limited to narrow strips taken during the periapsis pass but is still very valuable. At the beginning of the mission the 9-(micron)meter dust opacity at midsouthern latitudes was low (0.15-0.25). As the season advanced through southern spring and into summer, TES observed several regional dust storms (including the Noachis dust storm of November 1997) where peak 9-(micron)meter dust opacities approached or exceeded unity, as well as numerous smaller local storms. Both large and small dust storms exhibited significant changes in both spatial coverage and intensity over a timescale of a day. Throughout southern spring and summer the region at the edge of the retreating southern seasonal polar ice cap was observed to be consistently more dusty than other latitudes.

  8. Current Status of Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiotani, M.; Takayanagi, M.

    2009-12-01

    Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) was designed to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS) as a collaboration project of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). Mission Objectives are: i) Space demonstration of superconductive mixer and 4-K mechanical cooler for the submillimeter limb-emission sounding, and ii) global observations of atmospheric minor constituents in the stratosphere (O3, HCI, CIO, HO2, HOCI, BrO, O3 isotopes, HNO3, CH3CN, etc), contributing to the atmospheric sciences. The SMILES observation is characterized as aiming at variation and its impact of radical species in the stratosphere. Based on its high sensitivity in detecting atmospheric limb emission of the submillimeter wave range, JEM/SMILES will make measurements on several radical species crucial to the ozone chemistry. It will be launched with H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) by the latest version of H-II rocket (H-IIB) on September 10th from Tanegashima Space Center in Japan. In this presentaiton, the up-to-date information of SMILES operation as well as the preliminary result of observation data processing.

  9. Analysis of SO II point source emissions using NASA atmospheric infrared sounder data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Sylvia S.; Miller, David P.; Lewis, Paul E.

    2007-04-01

    Determining the extent to which large power plant emission sources interacting with atmospheric constituents affect the environment could play a significant role in future U.S. energy production policy. The effects on the environment caused by the interaction between power plant emissions and atmospheric constituents has not been investigated in depth due to the lack of calibrated spectral data on a suitable temporal and spatial scale. The availability of NASA's space-based Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) data makes it possible to explore, and begin the first steps toward establishing, a correlation between known emission sources and environmental indicators. An exploratory study was conducted in which a time series of 26 cloud-free AIRS data containing two coal-fired power plants in northern New Mexico were selected, acquired, and analyzed for SO II emissions. A generic forward modeling process was also developed to derive an estimate of the expected AIRS pixel radiance containing the SO II emissions from the two power plants based on published combustion analysis data for coal and available power plant documentation. Analysis of the AIRS NEΔR calculated in this study and subsequent comparison with the radiance values for SO II calculated from the forward model provided essential information regarding the suitability and risk in the use of a modified AIRS configuration for monitoring anthropogenic point source emissions. The results of this study along with its conclusions and recommendations in conjunction with additional research collaboration in several specific topics will provide guidance for the development of the next generation infrared spectrometer system that NASA is considering building for environmental monitoring.

  10. Detection and Spatial Mapping of Anthropogenic Methane Plumes with the Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulley, Glynn; Duren, Riley; Hook, Simon; Hopkins, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    Detection and Spatial Mapping of Anthropogenic Methane Plumes with the Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) Glynn Hulley, Simon Hook, Riley Duren, Francesca Hopkins Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA Currently large uncertainties exist associated with attribution and quantification of fugitive emissions of greenhouse gases such as methane across many regions and key economic sectors. A number of observational efforts are currently underway to better quantify and reduce uncertainties associated with these emissions, including agriculture and oil and gas production operations. One such effort led by JPL is the development of the Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) - a wide swath Thermal Infrared (TIR) airborne imager with high spectral (256 bands from 7.5 - 12 micron) and spatial resolution (~1.5 m at 1-km AGL altitude) that presents a major advance in airborne TIR remote sensing measurements. Using HyTES we have developed robust and reliable techniques for the detection and high resolution mapping of small scale plumes of anthropogenic (oil and gas fields, landfills, dairies) and non-anthropogenic (natural seeps) sources of methane in the state of California and Colorado. A background on the HyTES sensor, science objectives, gas detection methods, and examples of mapping fugitive methane plumes in California and Colorado will be discussed. These kind of observational efforts and studies will help address critical science questions related to methane budgets and management of future emissions in California and other regions.

  11. Overview and Early Results of the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiotani, Masato

    2010-05-01

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) was developed to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS) under the cooperation of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Information and Communication Technology (NICT). SMILES was successfully launched by the H-IIB rocket with the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) on September 11, 2009 and was attached to JEM on September 25. Mission objectives are: i) Space demonstration of 4-K mechanical cooler and super-conductive mixer for the submillimeter limb-emission sounding in the frequency bands of 624.32- 627.32 GHz and 649.12- 650.32 GHz, and ii) global observations of atmospheric minor constituents in the middle atmosphere (O3, HCl, ClO, HO2, HOCl, BrO, O3 isotopes, HNO3, CH3CN, etc), contributing to the atmospheric sciences. SMILES started atmospheric observations on October 12, 2009, and has been making very precise measurements on several radical species crucial to the ozone chemistry with its high-sensitivity. In this presentation, the overview of SMILES and the early results will be shown to demonstrate its high potential to observe the atmospheric minor constituents in the middle atmosphere.

  12. Current status of Superconductive Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiotani, Masato

    Superconductive Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) was designed to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS) as a collaboration project of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). Mission Objectives are: i) Space demonstration of superconductive mixer and 4-K mechanical cooler for the submillimeter limbemission sounding, and ii) global observations of atmospheric minor constituents in the stratosphere (O3, HCI, CIO, HO2, HOCI, BrO, O3 isotopes, HNO3, CH3CN, etc), contributing to the atmospheric sciences. The SMILES observation is characterized as aiming at variation and its impact of radical species in the stratosphere. Based on its high sensitivity in detecting atmospheric limb emission of the submillimeter wave range, JEM/SMILES will make measurements on several radical species crucial to the ozone chemistry (normal O3, isotope O3, ClO, HCl, HOCl, BrO, HO2, and H2O2). The SMILES will also try to observe isotopic composition of ozone. Fabrication of the proto-flight model (PFM) and functional test have been done, and it is aiming at the launch scheduled in 2009 by the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV).

  13. Overview and early results of the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiotani, Masato; Takayanagi, Masahiro; Murayama, Yasuhiro

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) was developed to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS) under the cooperation of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Information and Communication Technology (NICT). SMILES was successfully launched by the H-IIB rocket with the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) on September 11, 2009 and was attached to JEM on September 25. Mission objectives are: i) Space demonstration of 4-K mechanical cooler and super-conductive mixer for the submillimeter limb-emission sounding in the frequency bands of 624.32-627.32 GHz and 649.12-650.32 GHz, and ii) global observations of atmospheric minor constituents in the middle atmosphere (O3, HCl, ClO, HO2, HOCl, BrO, O3 isotopes, HNO3, CH3CN, etc), contributing to the atmospheric sciences. SMILES started atmospheric observations on October 12, 2009, and has been making very precise measurements on several radical species crucial to the ozone chemistry with its high-sensitivity. In this pre-sentation, the overview of SMILES and the preliminary results will be shown to demonstrate its high potential to observe the atmospheric minor constituents in the middle atmosphere.

  14. High-resolution inversion of methane emissions in North America using satellite observations (SCIAMACHY, TES, GOSAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wecht, K.; Jacob, D. J.; Payer, M.; Henze, D. K.; Worden, J.; Payne, V.; Frankenberg, C.; Bowman, K. W.; Boesch, H.

    2012-12-01

    Methane emissions from North America are poorly known and potentially subject to rapid anthropogenic and natural changes. Satellite retrievals of methane columns from SCIAMACHY, TES, and GOSAT offer a unique resource for constraining and monitoring methane emissions using adjoint inverse modeling. We validate these methane retrievals using INTEX-A, HIPPO and NOAA/GMD aircraft observations. We also evaluate the consistency between the different satellite instruments with respect to the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model (CTM) as an intercomparison platform. We derive fine-scale constraints on methane sources through a four-dimensional variational (4D-VAR) inversion using the adjoint of GEOS-Chem with 1/2o × 2/3o (~50 × 50 km2) horizontal resolution over North America. Boundary conditions over the oceans are optimized as part of the inversion, thus preventing any global model bias from impacting the North American GEOS-Chem domain. In situ observations from aircraft campaigns and ground-based networks are used to evaluate the inversion results. We find that current inventories overestimate emissions from natural wetlands and underestimate emissions from natural gas production and enteric fermentation. Our results provide guidance to the US EPA for improving its national emission inventories.

  15. High spatial resolution imaging of methane and other trace gases with the airborne Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulley, Glynn C.; Duren, Riley M.; Hopkins, Francesca M.; Hook, Simon J.; Vance, Nick; Guillevic, Pierre; Johnson, William R.; Eng, Bjorn T.; Mihaly, Jonathan M.; Jovanovic, Veljko M.; Chazanoff, Seth L.; Staniszewski, Zak K.; Kuai, Le; Worden, John; Frankenberg, Christian; Rivera, Gerardo; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Miller, Charles E.; Malakar, Nabin K.; Sánchez Tomás, Juan M.; Holmes, Kendall T.

    2016-06-01

    Currently large uncertainties exist associated with the attribution and quantification of fugitive emissions of criteria pollutants and greenhouse gases such as methane across large regions and key economic sectors. In this study, data from the airborne Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) have been used to develop robust and reliable techniques for the detection and wide-area mapping of emission plumes of methane and other atmospheric trace gas species over challenging and diverse environmental conditions with high spatial resolution that permits direct attribution to sources. HyTES is a pushbroom imaging spectrometer with high spectral resolution (256 bands from 7.5 to 12 µm), wide swath (1-2 km), and high spatial resolution (˜ 2 m at 1 km altitude) that incorporates new thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing technologies. In this study we introduce a hybrid clutter matched filter (CMF) and plume dilation algorithm applied to HyTES observations to efficiently detect and characterize the spatial structures of individual plumes of CH4, H2S, NH3, NO2, and SO2 emitters. The sensitivity and field of regard of HyTES allows rapid and frequent airborne surveys of large areas including facilities not readily accessible from the surface. The HyTES CMF algorithm produces plume intensity images of methane and other gases from strong emission sources. The combination of high spatial resolution and multi-species imaging capability provides source attribution in complex environments. The CMF-based detection of strong emission sources over large areas is a fast and powerful tool needed to focus on more computationally intensive retrieval algorithms to quantify emissions with error estimates, and is useful for expediting mitigation efforts and addressing critical science questions.

  16. Direct Top-down Estimates of Biomass Burning CO Emissions Using TES and MOPITT Versus Bottom-up GFED Inventory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pechony, Olga; Shindell, Drew T.; Faluvegi, Greg

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we utilize near-simultaneous observations from two sets of multiple satellite sensors to segregate Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) CO observations over active fire sources from those made over clear background. Hence, we obtain direct estimates of biomass burning CO emissions without invoking inverse modeling as in traditional top-down methods. We find considerable differences between Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED) versions 2.1 and 3.1 and satellite-based emission estimates in many regions. Both inventories appear to greatly underestimate South and Southeast Asia emissions, for example. On global scales, however, CO emissions in both inventories and in the MOPITT-based analysis agree reasonably well, with the largest bias (30%) found in the Northern Hemisphere spring. In the Southern Hemisphere, there is a one-month shift between the GFED and MOPITT-based fire emissions peak. Afternoon tropical fire emissions retrieved from TES are about two times higher than the morning MOPITT retrievals. This appears to be both a real difference due to the diurnal fire activity variations, and a bias due to the scarcity of TES data.

  17. Validation of ozone data from the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Koji; Manago, Naohiro; Mitsuda, Chihiro; Naito, Yoko; Nishimoto, Eriko; Sakazaki, Takatoshi; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Froidevaux, Lucien; Clarmann, Thomas; Stiller, Gabriele P.; Murtagh, Donal P.; Rong, Ping-Ping; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Walker, Kaley A.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Akiyoshi, Hideharu; Nakamura, Tetsu; Miyasaka, Takayuki; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Mizobuchi, Satoko; Kikuchi, Ken-Ichi; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Chikako; Hayashi, Hiroo; Sano, Takuki; Suzuki, Makoto; Takayanagi, Masahiro; Shiotani, Masato

    2013-06-01

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) onboard the International Space Station provided global measurements of ozone profiles in the middle atmosphere from 12 October 2009 to 21 April 2010. We present validation studies of the SMILES version 2.1 ozone product based on coincidence statistics with satellite observations and outputs of chemistry and transport models (CTMs). Comparisons of the stratospheric ozone with correlative data show agreements that are generally within 10%. In the mesosphere, the agreement is also good and better than 30% even at a high altitude of 73 km, and the SMILES measurements with their local time coverage also capture the diurnal variability very well. The recommended altitude range for scientific use is from 16 to 73 km. We note that the SMILES ozone values for altitude above 26 km are smaller than some of the correlative satellite datasets; conversely the SMILES values in the lower stratosphere tend to be larger than correlative data, particularly in the tropics, with less than 8% difference below ~24 km. The larger values in the lower stratosphere are probably due to departure of retrieval results between two detection bands at altitudes below 28 km; it is ~3% at 24 km and is increasing rapidly down below.

  18. Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) Observations: Atmospheric Temperatures During Aerobraking and Science Phasing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrath, Barney J.; Pearl, John C.; Smith, Michael D.; Maguire, William C.; Christensen, Philip R.; Dason, Shymala; Kaelberer, Monte S.

    1999-01-01

    Between September 1997, when the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft arrived at Mars, and September 1998 when the final aerobraking phase of the mission began, the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) has acquired an extensive data set spanning approximately half of a Martian year. Nadir-viewing spectral measurements from this data set within the 15-micrometers CO2 absorption band are inverted to obtain atmospheric temperature profiles from the surface up to about the 0.1 mbar level. The computational procedure used to retrieve the temperatures is presented. Mean meridional cross sections of thermal structure are calculated for periods of time near northern hemisphere fall equinox, winter solstice, and spring equinox, as well as for a time interval immediately following the onset of the Noachis Terra dust storm. Gradient thermal wind cross sections are calculated from the thermal structure. Regions of possible wave activity are identified using cross sections of rms temperature deviations from the mean. Results from both near-equinox periods show some hemispheric asymmetry with peak eastward thermal winds in the north about twice the magnitude of those in the south. The results near solstice show an intense circumpolar vortex at high northern latitudes and waves associated with the vortex jet core. Warming of the atmosphere aloft at mid-northern latitudes suggests the presence of a strong cross-equatorial Hadley circulation. Although the Noachis dust storm did not become global in scale, strong perturbations to the atmospheric structure are found, including an enhanced temperature maximum aloft at high northern latitudes resulting from intensification of the Hadley circulation. TES results for the various seasonal conditions are compared with published results from Mars general circulation models, and generally good qualitative agreement is found.

  19. A Balloon-borne Limb-Emission Sounder at 650-GHz band for Stratospheric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irimajiri, Yoshihisa; Ochiai, Satoshi

    We have developed a Balloon-borne Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (BSMILES) to observe stratospheric minor constituents like ozone, HCl etc. BSMILES carries a 300mm-diameter offset parabolic antenna, a 650-GHz heterodyne superconducting (SIS) low-noise receiver, and an acousto-optical spectrometer (AOS) with the bandwidth of 1GHz and the resolution of 1MHz. Gondola size is 1.35 m x 1.35 m x 1.26 m. Total weight is about 500 kg. Limb observations are made by scanning the antenna beam of about 0.12 degrees (FWHM) in vertical direction. A calibrated hot load (CHL) and elevation angle of 50 degrees are ob-served after each scan for calibration. The DSB system noise temperature of the SIS receiver is less than 460 K at 624-639 GHz with a best value of 330 K that is 11 times as large as the quantum limit. Data acquisition and antenna control are made by on-board PCs. Observed data are recorded to PC card with 2 GB capacity to collect after the observations from the sea, and HK data are transmitted to the ground. Gondola attitude is measured by three-axis fiber-optical gyroscope with accuracy less than 0.01 degrees, three-axis accelerometer, and a two-axis geoaspect sensor. Electric power is supplied by lithium batteries. Total power con-sumption is about 150W. Almost all systems are put in pressurized vessels for waterproofing, heat dissipation, and noise shield, etc. BSMILES was launched from Sanriku Balloon Center of Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), at the east coast of Japan, in the summer of 2003, 2004, and 2006. The gondola was carried to an altitude of 35 km by a balloon of 100,000 m3 in volume and the observations were made for 1.5 hours in 2004. All systems operated normally by keeping their temperature within the limit of operation by keeping gondola warm with styrene foam. After the observations, the gondola was dropped and splashed on the Pacific Ocean by a parachute and

  20. The EOS AURA Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES): Status of the Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation is a programmatic overview covering some of the highlights of the mission and serve as an introduction to the accompanying presentations at the workshop. It reviews the goals and the products of the TES experiment, a simplified chemistry of ozone in both the stratosphere and troposphere, a description of the instrument, and the TES operational modes. Included are graphs showing some of the results of TES analysis of the key constituents of the tropospheric chemistry and the inter-regional transport.

  1. Development of superconducting submillimeter-wave limb emission sounder (JEM/SMILES) aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Inatani, Junji; Satoh, Ryouta; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Ikeda, Naomi; Fujii, Yasunori; Nakajima, Takashi; Iida, Yukiei; Iida, Teruhito; Kikuchi, Ken'ichi; Miura, Takeshi; Masuko, Harunobu; Manabe, Takeshi; Ochiai, Satoshi; Seta, Masumichi; Irimajiri, Yoshihisa; Kasai, Yasuko; Suzuki, Makoto; Shirai, Tomoko; Tsujimaru, Sho; Shibasaki, Kazuo; Shiotani, Masato

    2001-12-01

    A submillimeter wave limb emission sounder, that is to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM, dubbed as 'KIBO') at the International Space Station, has been designed. This payload, Superconducting Submillimeter-wave Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES), is aimed at global mappings of stratospheric trace gasses by means of the most sensitive submillimeter receiver ever operated in space. Such sensitivity is ascribed to a Superconductor-Insulator- Superconductor (SIS) mixer, which is operated at 4.5 K in a dedicated cryostat combined with a mechanical cooler. SMILES will observe ozone-depletion-related molecules such as ClO, HCl, HO2, HNO3, BrO and O3 in the frequency bands at 624.32 - 626.32 GHz, and 649.12 - 650.32 GHz. A scanning antenna will cover tangent altitudes from 10 to 60 km in every 53 seconds, while tracing latitudes from 38S to 65N along its orbit. This global coverage makes SMILES a useful tool of observing the low- and mid-latitudinal areas as well as the Arctic peripheral region. The molecular emissions will be detected by two units of acousto-optic spectrometers (AOS), each of which has coverage of 1.2 GHz with a resolution of 1.8 MHz. This high-resolution spectroscopy will allow us to detect weal emission lines attributing to less-abundant species.

  2. Remote gas plume sensing and imaging with NASA's Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, William R.; Hulley, Glynn; Hook, Simon J.

    2014-05-01

    The hyperspectral thermal emission spectrometer was developed under NASA's instrument incubator program and has now completed three deployments. The scan head uses a state-of-the-art Dyson spectrometer cooled to 100K coupled to a quantum well infrared photodetector array held at 40K. The combination allows for 256 spectral channels between 7.5μm and 12μm with 512 cross track spatial pixels. Spectral features for many interesting gases fall within the instrument passband. We first review the pre-flight calibration and validation process for HyTES using a suite of instrumentation. This includes a smile measurement at two wavelengths (8.18μm and 10.6μm) as well as a concentration determination using large aperture gas cells. We then show positive gas plume detection at ranges >1000m for various cases: Ammonia gas detection from Salton Sea fumaroles, Methane detection from staged releases points in Wyoming as well as naturally occurring methane hot spots off the coast of Santa Barbara.

  3. Characterization of anthropogenic methane plumes with the Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES): a retrieval method and error analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuai, Le; Worden, John R.; Li, King-Fai; Hulley, Glynn C.; Hopkins, Francesca M.; Miller, Charles E.; Hook, Simon J.; Duren, Riley M.; Aubrey, Andrew D.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a retrieval algorithm to estimate lower tropospheric methane (CH4) concentrations from the surface to 1 km with uncertainty estimates using Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) airborne radiance measurements. After resampling, retrievals have a spatial resolution of 6 × 6 m2. The total error from a single retrieval is approximately 20 %, with the uncertainties determined primarily by noise and spectral interferences from air temperature, surface emissivity, and atmospheric water vapor. We demonstrate retrievals for a HyTES flight line over storage tanks near Kern River Oil Field (KROF), Kern County, California, and find an extended plume structure in the set of observations with elevated methane concentrations (3.0 ± 0.6 to 6.0 ± 1.2 ppm), well above mean concentrations (1.8 ± 0.4 ppm) observed for this scene. With typically a 20 % estimated uncertainty, plume enhancements with more than 1 ppm are distinguishable from the background values with its uncertainty. HyTES retrievals are consistent with simultaneous airborne and ground-based in situ CH4 mole fraction measurements within the reported accuracy of approximately 0.2 ppm (or ˜ 8 %), due to retrieval interferences related to air temperature, emissivity, and H2O.

  4. Validation of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) version 5 land surface emissivity product over the Namib and Kalahari deserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulley, Glynn C.; Hook, Simon J.; Manning, Evan; Lee, Sung-Yung; Fetzer, Eric

    2009-10-01

    Hyperspectral infrared sounders require accurate knowledge of the land surface emissivity (LSE) to retrieve important climate variables such as surface temperature, air temperature, and total water vapor from space. This study provides a method for validating and assessing the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) version 5 LSE product using high-spatial resolution data (90 m) from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) which has five bands in the thermal infrared region (8-12 μm, 1250-833 cm-1) and high-spectral resolution laboratory measurements of sand samples collected over the Namib and Kalahari deserts in southern Africa. Results indicate that the mean, absolute daytime LSE difference between AIRS and the laboratory results for six wavelengths in window regions between 3.9 and 11.4 μm (2564-877 cm-1) was 2.3% over the Namib and 0.70% over the Kalahari, while the mean difference with ASTER was 2.3% over the Namib and 2.26% over the Kalahari for four bands between 8 and 12 μm. Systematic modeling and surface dependent AIRS LSE retrieval errors such as large discrepancies between day and nighttime shortwave LSE (up to 15%), unphysical values (LSE >1), and large daytime temporal variations in the shortwave region (up to 30%) are further discussed.

  5. A comparison of minor trace gas retrievals from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Shephard, M. W.; Henze, D. K.; Millet, D. B.; Gombos, D.; Van Damme, M.; Clarisse, L.; Coheur, P. F.; Pommier, M.; Clerbaux, C.

    2014-12-01

    The advent of hyperspectral infrared instruments orbiting the Earth has allowed for detecting and measuring numerous trace gas species that play important roles in atmospheric chemistry and impact air quality, but for which there is a dearth of information on their distribution and temporal variability. Here we will present global and regional comparisons of measurements from the NASA TES and the European MetOp IASI instruments of three of these gases: ammonia (NH3), formic acid (HCOOH) and methanol (CH3OH). Ammonia is highly reactive and thus very variable in space and time, while the sources and sinks of methanol and formic acid are poorly quantified: thus space-based measurements have the potential of significantly increasing our knowledge of the emissions and distributions of these gases. IASI and TES have many similarities but some significant differences. TES has significantly higher spectral resolution (0.06 cm-1), and its equator crossing times are ~1:30 am and 1:30 pm, local time, while IASI has lower resolution (0.5 cm-1) and an earlier equator crossing time (9:30 am and 9:30 pm), which leads to lower thermal contrast; however IASI provides much greater temporal and spatial coverage due to its cross-track scanning. Added to the instrumental differences are the differences in retrieval algorithms. The IASI team uses simple but efficient methods to estimate total column amounts of the species above, while the TES team performs full optimal estimation retrievals. We will compare IASI and TES total column measurements averaged on a 2.5x2.5 degree global grid for each month in 2009, and we will examine the seasonal cycle in some regions of interest, such as South America, eastern China, and the Midwest and the Central Valley in the US. In regions where both datasets are in agreement this analysis will provide confidence that the results are robust and reliable. In regions where there is disagreement we will look for the causes of the discrepancies, which will

  6. Simultaneous physical retrieval of surface emissivity spectrum and atmospheric parameters from infrared atmospheric sounder interferometer spectral radiances.

    PubMed

    Masiello, Guido; Serio, Carmine

    2013-04-10

    The problem of simultaneous physical retrieval of surface emissivity, skin temperature, and temperature, water-vapor, and ozone atmospheric profiles from high-spectral-resolution observations in the infrared is formulated according to an inverse problem with multiple regularization parameters. A methodology has been set up, which seeks an effective solution to the inverse problem in a generalized L-curve criterion framework. The a priori information for the surface emissivity is obtained on the basis of laboratory data alone, and that for the atmospheric parameters by climatology or weather forecasts. To ensure that we deal with a problem of fewer unknowns than observations, the dimensionality of the emissivity is reduced through expansion in Fourier series. The main objective of this study is to demonstrate the simultaneous retrieval of emissivity, skin temperature, and atmospheric parameters with a two-dimensional L-curve criterion. The procedure has been demonstrated with spectra observed from the infrared atmospheric sounder interferometer, flying onboard the European Meteorological Operational satellite. To check the quality and reliability of the methodology, we have used spectra recorded over regions characterized by known or stable emissivity. These include sea surface, for which effective emissivity models are known, and arid lands (Sahara and Namib Deserts) that are known to exhibit the characteristic spectral signature of quartz-rich sand. PMID:23670773

  7. Development of Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (JEM/SMILES) Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manabe, Takeshi

    2002-06-01

    In recent years, stratospheric ozone depletion is one of the most significant global environmental issues. it is well known that stratospheric trace gases, which include chlorine oxides and bromine oxides, play a crucial role in the process of stratospheric ozone destruction. Although the abundances of these trace gases are as low as in the order of parts par billion or less, they are quite efficient to destroy stratospheric ozone by catalytic reactions. In order to establish the techniques to monitor stratospheric Ozone and Ozone depleting molecules, CRL (Communications Research Laboratory and NASDA are collaborating to develop Superconducting Submillimeter-Limb Emission Sounder (JEM/SMILES) to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) of the International Space Station. In this paper, the outline of the JEM/SMILES project and the payload instrument is introduced.

  8. Terrestrial Analogue Field Thermal Emission Spectroscopy: Applications to the MER Mini-TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhagen, B. T.; Kirkland, L. E.; Herr, K. C.

    2002-12-01

    The 2003 Mars Exploration Rover science strategy is to identify promising targets using the visible/near-infrared imaging Pancam and the thermal infrared spectrometer Mini-TES. The rover would then traverse to those targets for more detailed examination. Team members will select sites using target morphology and color from Pancam, and interpretations of the mineralogy using Mini-TES. This strategy requires low ambiguity, near real-time interpretations of Mini-TES data. Field spectrometer measurements from a rover perspective differ significantly from both laboratory and airborne measurements. Thus field testing using instrumentation similar to the Mini-TES is required to develop and test methods. We will discuss our field testing research toward that end, with a focus on smooth rock coatings. Researchers desire to detect and characterize smooth rock coatings on Mars, if present. In July 2002, we measured field data of a varnished desert pavement, using equipment that measures very similarly to the Mini-TES. Desert varnish may provide information on the environmental conditions, and interests exobiologists because it may be biologically mediated. Downwelling radiance can affect the spectral character by imparting the spectral character of the downwelling radiance onto the measured target spectrum. The contribution differs from the airborne, laboratory, and field perspectives, and with the surface texture. Downwelling radiance is the thermal energy radiated onto a target by all objects in the hemisphere, including surrounding materials and atmospheric gases and aerosols. Smooth (specular) targets reflect light at the angle of incidence (line-sight), while diffuse targets reflect downwelling radiance integrated from the entire hemisphere. Because even smooth rock coatings are not entirely smooth, they have both diffuse and specular components. Typically the diffuse downwelling component is measured using a high reflectance, rough-surfaced target with a known spectral

  9. Observation of atmospheric composition by Superconducting SubMillimeter-wave Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES) onbord International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Y.; Philippe, B.; Mendrok, J.; Ochiai, S.; Urban, J.; Manabe, T.; Kikuchi, K.; Nishibori, T.; Sano, T.; Moller, J.; Murtagh, D. P.

    2009-12-01

    The Superconducting SubMillimeter-wave Limb Emission The Superconducting SubMillimeter-wave Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES) is the first application of superconductor--insulator--superconductor (SIS) heterodyne detector technology to the investigation of the Earth atmosphere from space. SMILES was designed to be onboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS), and is scheduled to be launched on 11 September 2009 by the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV). SMILES is a collaboration project of the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The performance of this state-of-the-art SIS receiver, with an estimated single side band (SSB) receiver noise temperature of 500 K at 625--650 GHz, provides a large improvement in sensitivity compared to the conventional submillimeter-wave Schottky-diode receivers used by the Sub-Millimetre Radiometer (SMR) onboard the Odin satellite (3000K, single side band, 485--580 GHz, cooled) and the Millimeter-wave Limb Sounder (MLS) onboard Aura (12000K, double side band at 625--650 GHz, uncooled). Since the integration time reduces with the square of the system noise temperature, this performance is roughly equivalent to reducing by a factor of up to 5-10 the integration time needed to reaching the same noise equivalent brightness temperatures. SMILES measurements thus have the potential to provide meaningful information on the global distribution of short-lived radical species, such as ozone, HCl, ClO, HO2, HOCl, CH3CN, BrO, H2O and ice cloud. NICT is operating the L2 research/L3 operational processing chain. In this paper, we introduce the status of SMILES data and its observation performance.

  10. TES Level 1 Algorithms: Interferogram Processing, Geolocation, Radiometric, and Spectral Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worden, Helen; Beer, Reinhard; Bowman, Kevin W.; Fisher, Brendan; Luo, Mingzhao; Rider, David; Sarkissian, Edwin; Tremblay, Denis; Zong, Jia

    2006-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura satellite measures the infrared radiance emitted by the Earth's surface and atmosphere using Fourier transform spectrometry. The measured interferograms are converted into geolocated, calibrated radiance spectra by the L1 (Level 1) processing, and are the inputs to L2 (Level 2) retrievals of atmospheric parameters, such as vertical profiles of trace gas abundance. We describe the algorithmic components of TES Level 1 processing, giving examples of the intermediate results and diagnostics that are necessary for creating TES L1 products. An assessment of noise-equivalent spectral radiance levels and current systematic errors is provided. As an initial validation of our spectral radiances, TES data are compared to the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) (on EOS Aqua), after accounting for spectral resolution differences by applying the AIRS spectral response function to the TES spectra. For the TES L1 nadir data products currently available, the agreement with AIRS is 1 K or better.

  11. Global Carbon Monoxide Products from Combined AIRS, TES and MLS Measurements on A-Train Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Juying X.; Yang, R.; Wei, Z.; Carminati, F.; Tangborn, A.; Sun, Z.; Lahoz, W.; Attie, J. L.; El Amraoui, L.; Duncan, B.

    2014-01-01

    This study tests a novel methodology to add value to satellite data sets. This methodology, data fusion, is similar to data assimilation, except that the background modelbased field is replaced by a satellite data set, in this case AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) carbon monoxide (CO) measurements. The observational information comes from CO measurements with lower spatial coverage than AIRS, namely, from TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) and MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder). We show that combining these data sets with data fusion uses the higher spectral resolution of TES to extend AIRS CO observational sensitivity to the lower troposphere, a region especially important for air quality studies. We also show that combined CO measurements from AIRS and MLS provide enhanced information in the UTLS (upper troposphere/lower stratosphere) region compared to each product individually. The combined AIRS-TES and AIRS-MLS CO products are validated against DACOM (differential absorption mid-IR diode laser spectrometer) in situ CO measurements from the INTEX-B (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment: MILAGRO and Pacific phases) field campaign and in situ data from HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) flights. The data fusion results show improved sensitivities in the lower and upper troposphere (20-30% and above 20%, respectively) as compared with AIRS-only version 5 CO retrievals, and improved daily coverage compared with TES and MLS CO data.

  12. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) satellite validations of ammonia, methanol, formic acid, and carbon monoxide over the Canadian oil sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shephard, M. W.; McLinden, C. A.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Luo, M.; Moussa, S. G.; Leithead, A.; Liggio, J.; Staebler, R. M.; Akingunola, A.; Makar, P.; Lehr, P.; Zhang, J.; Henze, D. K.; Millet, D. B.; Bash, J. O.; Zhu, L.; Wells, K. C.; Capps, S. L.; Chaliyakunnel, S.; Gordon, M.; Hayden, K.; Brook, J. R.; Wolde, M.; Li, S.-M.

    2015-09-01

    The wealth of air quality information provided by satellite infrared observations of ammonia (NH3), carbon monoxide (CO), formic acid (HCOOH), and methanol (CH3OH) is currently being explored and used for number of applications, especially at regional or global scales. These applications include air quality monitoring, trend analysis, emissions, and model evaluation. This study provides one of the first direct validations of Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) satellite retrieved profiles of NH3, CH3OH, and HCOOH through comparisons with coincident aircraft profiles. The comparisons are performed over the Canadian oil sands region during the intensive field campaign (August-September~2013) in support of the Joint Canada-Alberta Implementation Plan for the Oil Sands Monitoring (JOSM). The satellite/aircraft comparisons over this region during this period produced errors of: (i) + 0.08 ± 0.25 ppbv for NH3, (ii) + 7.5 ± 23 ppbv for CO, (iii) + 0.19 ± 0.46 ppbv for HCOOH, and (iv) -1.1 ± 0.39 ppbv for CH3OH. These values mostly agree with previously estimated retrieval errors; however, the relatively large negative bias in CH3OH and the significantly greater positive bias for larger HCOOH and CO values observed during this study warrant further investigation. Satellite and aircraft ammonia observations during the field campaign are also used in an initial effort to perform preliminary evaluations of Environment Canada's Global Environmental Multi-scale - Modelling Air quality and CHemistry (GEM-MACH) air quality modelling system at high-resolution (2.5 km × 2.5 km). These initial results indicate model under-prediction of ~ 0.6 ppbv (~ 60 %) for NH3, during the field campaign period. The TES-model CO comparison differences are ~ +20 ppbv (~ +20 %), but given that under these conditions the TES/aircraft comparisons also show a small positive TES CO bias indicates that the overall model under-prediction of CO is closer to ~ 10 % at 681 hPa (~ 3 km) during this

  13. Mars Aerosol Studies with the MGS TES Emission Phase Function Observations: Opacities, Particle Sizes, and Ice Cloud Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, M. J.; Clancy, R. T.; Pitman, K. M.; Christensen, P. R.; Whitney, B. A.

    2001-11-01

    A full Mars year (1999-2001) of emission phase function (EPF) observations from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) provide the most complete study of Mars dust and ice aerosol properties to date. TES visible (solar band average) and infrared spectral EPF sequences are analyzed self-consistently with detailed multiple scattering radiative transfer codes. As a consequence of the combined angular and wavelength coverage, we are able to define two distinct ice cloud types at 45\\arcdeg S-45\\arcdeg N latitudes on Mars. Type I ice clouds exhibit small particle sizes (1-2 \\micron\\ radii), as well as a broad, deep minimum in side-scattering that are potentially indicative of aligned ice grains. Type I ice aerosols are most prevalent in the southern hemisphere during Mars aphelion, but also appear more widely distributed in season and latitude as topographic and high altitude (>20 km) ice hazes. Type II ice clouds exhibit larger particle sizes (3-5 \\micron) and a much narrower side-scattering minimum, indicative of poorer grain alignment or a change in particle shape relative to the type I ice clouds. Type II ice clouds appear most prominently in the northern subtropical aphelion cloud belt, where relatively low altitudes water vapor saturation (10 km) coincide with strong advective transport. Retrieved dust particle radii of 1.5-1.8 \\micron\\ are consistent with Pathfinder and recent Viking/Mariner 9 reanalyses. Our analyses also find EPF-derived dust single scattering albedos (ssa) in agreement with those from Pathfinder. Spatial and seasonal changes in the dust ssa (0.92-0.95, solar band average) and phase functions suggest possible dust property variations, but may also be a consequence of variable high altitude ice hazes. The annual variations of both dust and ice clouds at 45S-45N latitudes are predominately orbital rather than seasonal in character and have shown remarkable repeatability during the portions of two Mars years observed

  14. TES FAQ

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-14

    ... TL1BSOL TES-Aura_L1B-SO-Low_FP fp _r run id -o orbit number_version id .h5 Special ... files contain measurements of a single molecular species or temperature. The Level 2 Ancillary Data Product contains information such as ...

  15. The Level 2 research product algorithms for the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, P.; Urban, J.; Sagawa, H.; Möller, J.; Murtagh, D. P.; Mendrok, J.; Dupuy, E.; Sato, T. O.; Ochiai, S.; Suzuki, K.; Manabe, T.; Nishibori, T.; Kikuchi, K.; Sato, R.; Takayanagi, M.; Murayama, Y.; Shiotani, M.; Kasai, Y.

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes the algorithms of the level-2 research (L2r) processing chain developed for the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES). The chain has been developed in parallel to the operational chain for conducting researches on calibration and retrieval algorithms. L2r chain products are available to the scientific community. The objective of version 2 is the retrieval of the vertical distribution of trace gases in the altitude range of 18-90 km. A theoretical error analysis is conducted to estimate the retrieval feasibility of key parameters of the processing: line-of-sight elevation tangent altitudes (or angles), temperature and ozone profiles. While pointing information is often retrieved from molecular oxygen lines, there is no oxygen line in the SMILES spectra, so the strong ozone line at 625.371 GHz has been chosen. The pointing parameters and the ozone profiles are retrieved from the line wings which are measured with high signal to noise ratio, whereas the temperature profile is retrieved from the optically thick line center. The main systematic component of the retrieval error was found to be the neglect of the non-linearity of the radiometric gain in the calibration procedure. This causes a temperature retrieval error of 5-10 K. Because of these large temperature errors, it is not possible to construct a reliable hydrostatic pressure profile. However, as a consequence of the retrieval of pointing parameters, pressure induced errors are significantly reduced if the retrieved trace gas profiles are represented on pressure levels instead of geometric altitude levels. Further, various setups of trace gas retrievals have been tested. The error analysis for the retrieved HOCl profile demonstrates that best results for inverting weak lines can be obtained by using narrow spectral windows.

  16. The Level 2 research product algorithms for the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, P.; Urban, J.; Sagawa, H.; Möller, J.; Murtagh, D. P.; Mendrok, J.; Dupuy, E.; Sato, T. O.; Ochiai, S.; Suzuki, K.; Manabe, T.; Nishibori, T.; Kikuchi, K.; Sato, R.; Takayanagi, M.; Murayama, Y.; Shiotani, M.; Kasai, Y.

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes the algorithms of the level-2 research (L2r) processing chain developed for the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES). The chain has been developed in parallel to the operational chain for conducting researches on calibration and retrieval algorithms. L2r chain products are available to the scientific community. The objective of version 2 is the retrieval of the vertical distribution of trace gases in the altitude range of 18-90 km. An theoretical error analysis is conducted to estimate the retrieval feasibility of key parameters of the processing: line-of-sight elevation tangent altitudes (or angles), temperature and O3 profiles. The line-of-sight tangent altitudes are retrieved between 20 and 50 km from the strong ozone (O3) line at 625.371 GHz, with low correlation with the O3 volume-mixing ratio and temperature retrieved profiles. Neglecting the non-linearity of the radiometric gain in the calibration procedure is the main systematic error. It is large for the retrieved temperature (between 5-10 K). Therefore, atmospheric pressure can not be derived from the retrieved temperature, and, then, in the altitude range where the line-of-sight tangent altitudes are retrieved, the retrieved trace gases profiles are found to be better represented on pressure levels than on altitude levels. The error analysis for the retrieved HOCl profile demonstrates that best results for inverting weak lines can be obtained by using narrow spectral windows. Future versions of the L2r algorithms will improve the temperature/pressure retrievals and also provide information in the upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric region (e.g., water vapor, ice content, O3) and on stratospheric and mesospheric line-of-sight winds.

  17. Comparison of ozone profiles between Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder and worldwide ozonesonde measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Koji; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Inai, Yoichi; Manago, Naohiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Sano, Takuki; Mitsuda, Chihiro; Naito, Yoko; Hasebe, Fumio; Koide, Takashi; Shiotani, Masato

    2013-11-01

    compared ozone profiles measured by the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) with those taken at worldwide ozonesonde stations. To assess the quality of the SMILES version 2.3 ozone data for 16-30 km, 601 ozonesonde profiles were compared with the coincident SMILES ozone profiles. The agreement between SMILES and ozonesonde measurements was generally good within 5%-7% for 18-30 km at middle and high latitudes but degraded below 18 km. At low latitudes, however, the SMILES ozone data showed larger values (~6%-15% for 20-26 km) than those at middle and high latitudes. To explain this bias, we explored some possible issues in the ozonesonde measurement system. One possibility is due to a pressure bias in radiosonde measurements with a pressure sensor, but it would be within a few percent. We also examined an issue of the ozonesonde's response time. The response time was estimated from ozonesonde measurements with ascending and descending profiles showing clear difference, by using the time lag correction method to minimize the difference between them. Our estimation shows 28 s on average which is a similar value derived by prelaunch preparation. By applying this correction to the original profiles, we found a negative bias of the ascending ozonesonde measurement more than 7% at 20 km in the equatorial latitude where the vertical gradient of ozone is steep. The corrected ozonesonde profiles showed better agreement with the SMILES data. We suggest that the response time of ozonesondes could create a negative bias, particularly in the lower stratosphere at equatorial latitudes.

  18. Advances in the Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) and Application to the Remote Sensing of Fires and Trace Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihaly, J. M.; Johnson, W. R.; Hulley, G. C.; Hook, S. J.; Eng, B. T.

    2014-12-01

    The Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) is an airborne imaging spectrometer developed by JPL and currently configured on the Twin Otter aircraft. The instrument utilizes 256 spectral channels between 7.5 and 12 micrometers in the Earth observing thermal infrared range of the electromagnetic spectrum and 512 spatial pixels cross-track. Given a 50 degree full angle field of view and the relatively low flight altitude of the Twin Otter aircraft, the instrument provides a wide swath with high spatial resolution (approximately 1.5 m at 1 km AGL). The available spatial and spectral resolution of HyTES represents a significant advance in airborne TIR remote sensing capability and considerable improvements to instrument performance have been made between the 2013 and 2014 science flights. The TIR wavelength range enables a wide range of remote sensing applications, including the detection of atmospheric trace gases (such as SO2, NH3, H2S, and N2O). The current performance, overall science objectives, and recent trace gas observations of the HyTES instrument will be presented. Results from a 2014 flight over a southern Utah wildfire will be discussed. Current work involving the miniaturization of the HyTES instrument for future deployment in the ER-2 high-altitude aircraft will also be presented.

  19. Connecting Surface Emissions, Convective Uplifting, and Long-Range Transport of Carbon Monoxide in the Upper Troposphere: New Observations from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Jonathan H.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Su, Hui; Neary, Lori; McConnell, John C.; Richards, Nigel A. D.

    2007-01-01

    Two years of observations of upper tropospheric (UT) carbon monoxide (CO) from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder are analyzed; in combination with the CO surface emission climatology and data from the NCEP analyses. It is shown that spatial distribution, temporal variation and long-range transport of UT CO are closely related to the surface emissions, deep-convection and horizontal winds. Over the Asian monsoon region, surface emission of CO peaks in boreal spring due to high biomass burning in addition to anthropogenic emission. However, the UT CO peaks in summer when convection is strongest and surface emission of CO is dominated by anthropogenic source. The long-range transport of CO from Southeast Asia across the Pacific to North America, which occurs most frequently during boreal summer, is thus a clear imprint of Asian anthropogenic pollution influencing global air quality.

  20. Comparison of Natural Narrow-banded Emissions and Sounder Stimulated Resonances In The Magnetospheres of Jupiter and The Earth (ulysses and Image Spacecraft)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osherovich, V. A.; Fainberg, J.; Benson, R. F.; MacDowall, R.

    The sounder stimulated resonances observed by Ulysses in JupiterSs Io torus re- vealed a spectrum of frequencies which has been interpreted in terms of Dn reso- nances together with electron plasma frequency fpe and Bernstein Qn resonances in order to determine the electron density and magnetic field strength (Osherovich et al. 1993; Benson et al. 1997). The presence of Dn resonances (cylindrical eigen- modes with frequencies proportional sqrtn, n = 1, 2, ...) has been predicted for the Io torus on the basis of the classification of the EarthSs Ionospheric sounder stim- ulated resonances (Osherovich 1987, 1989; Osherovich and Benson 1991; Benson and Osherovich 1992). The magnetic field strength measured by the Ulysses mag- netometer confirmed the values found from resonances to within a few percent. An alternative interpretation suggested that the Ulysses relaxation sounder did not excite Dn in JupiterSs magnetosphere( Le Sagre et al. 1998) and the topic has been subject to a recent debate (Canu 2001a; Benson et al. 2001; Canu 2001b) . We show that Dn resonances are present in both sounder stimulated spectra and in natural emissions ob- served by Ulysses during the inbound and outbound part of the trajectory inside the Io torus. The natural emissions (no sounding) have the same frequencies as their sounder stimulated counterparts. IMAGE/RPI observations, which confirm the specific rela- tion between Dn, fp and fce and for the subsidiary resonances Dn+ and Dn-, will also be presented. References: Benson, R.F. and V.A. Osherovich, Canu, J. Geophys. Res., 97, 19413, 1992. Benson, R.F. et al., Radio Sci., 32, 1127, 1997. Benson, R.F. et al., Radio Sci., 36, 1649, 2001. Canu, P., Radio Sci., 36, 171, 2001a. Canu, P., Radio Sci., 36, 1645, 2001b. Le Sagre, P. et al., J. Geophys. Res., 103, 26667, 1998. 1 Osherovich, V. A., J. Geophys. Res., 92, 316, 1987. Osherovich, V. A., J. Geophys. Res., 94, 5530, 1989. Osherovich, V. A. and R.F. Benson, ., J. Geophys. Res., 96

  1. Types, Sizes, Shapes and Distributions of Mars Ice and Dust Aerosols from the MGS TES Emission Phase Function Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, R. T.; Wolff, M. J.; Christensen, P. R.

    2001-12-01

    A full Mars year (1999-2001) of emission phase function (EPF observations from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) provide the most complete study of Mars dust and ice aerosol properties to date. TES visible (solar band average) and infrared spectral (6-30 micron, 10 invcm res) EPF sequences are analyzed self-consistently with detailed multiple scattering radiative transfer (RT) codes to obtain first-time seasonal/latitudinal distributions of aerosol visible optical depths, particle sizes, and single scattering phase functions. As a consequence of the combined angular and wavelength coverage, we are able to define two distinct ice cloud types at 45S-45N latitudes on Mars. Type 1 ice clouds exhibit small particle sizes (1-2 micron radii), as well as a broad, deep minimum in side scattering indicative of aligned ice grains (see Wolff et al., 2001). Type 1 ice aerosols are most prevalent in the southern hemisphere during Mars aphelion, but also appear more widely distributed in season and latitude as topographic and high altitude (above 20 km) ice hazes. Type 2 ice clouds exhibit larger particle sizes (2-4 microns) and a much narrower side-scattering minimum, indicative of poorer grain alignment or a change in particle shape relative to the type 1 ice clouds (see Wolff et al., 2001). Type 2 ice clouds appear most prominently in the northern subtropical aphelion cloud belt, where relatively low altitudes of water vapor saturation (10 km) coincide with strong advective transport (Clancy et al., 1996). Retrieved dust particle radii of 1.5-1.8 micron are consistent with Pathfinder (Tomasko et al., 1999) and recent Viking/Mariner 9 reanalyses (e.g., size distribution B of Clancy et al., 1995). Detailed spectral modeling of the solar passband also implies agreement of EPF-derived dust single scattering albedos (ssa) with the ssa results from Tomasko et al.(table 8 therein). Spatial and seasonal changes in the dust ssa (0.92-0.95, solar band

  2. TES overlayed on MOLA DEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This image is TES thermal data (Orbit 222) overlayed on the MOLA DEM. The color scale is TES T18-T25, which is a cold spot index. The grey scale is MOLA elevation in kilometers. Most cold spots can be attributed to surface spectral emissivity effects. Regions that are colored black-violet-blue have near unity emissivity and are coarse grained CO2. Regions that are yellow-red are fined grained CO2. The red-white spot located approximately 300W85N is our most likely candidate for a CO2 snow storm.

  3. Comparative analysis of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), and Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) longwave infrared (LWIR) hyperspectral data for geologic mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Fred A.

    2015-05-01

    Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and spatially coincident Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) data were used to map geology and alteration for a site in northern Death Valley, California and Nevada, USA. AVIRIS, with 224 bands at 10 nm spectral resolution over the range 0.4 - 2.5 μm at 3-meter spatial resolution were converted to reflectance using an atmospheric model. HyTES data with 256 bands at approximately 17 nm spectral resolution covering the 8 - 12 μm range at 4-meter spatial resolution were converted to emissivity using a longwave infrared (LWIR) radiative transfer atmospheric compensation model and a normalized temperature-emissivity separation approach. Key spectral endmembers were separately extracted for each wavelength region and identified, and the predominant material at each pixel was mapped for each range using Mixture-Tuned-Matched Filtering (MTMF), a partial unmixing approach. AVIRIS mapped iron oxides, clays, mica, and silicification (hydrothermal alteration); and the difference between calcite and dolomite. HyTES separated and mapped several igneous phases (not possible using AVIRIS), silicification, and validated separation of calcite from dolomite. Comparison of the material maps from the different modes, however, reveals complex overlap, indicating that multiple materials/processes exist in many areas. Combined and integrated analyses were performed to compare individual results and more completely characterize occurrences of multiple materials. Three approaches were used 1) integrated full-range analysis, 2) combined multimode classification, and 3) directed combined analysis in geologic context. Results illustrate that together, these two datasets provide an improved picture of the distribution of geologic units and subsequent alteration.

  4. Mars aerosol studies with the MGS TES emission phase function observations: Optical depths, particle sizes, and ice cloud types versus latitude and solar longitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, R. Todd; Wolff, Michael J.; Christensen, Philip R.

    2003-09-01

    Emission phase function (EPF) observations taken in 1999-2001 by Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS TES) support the broadest study of Martian aerosol properties to date. TES solar band and infrared (IR) spectral EPF sequences are analyzed to obtain first-time seasonal/latitudinal distributions of visible optical depths, particle sizes, and single scattering phase functions. This combined angular and wavelength coverage enables identification of two distinct ice cloud types over 45°S-45°N. Type 1 ice clouds exhibit small particle sizes (reff = 1-2 μm) and a distinctive backscattering increase. They are most prevalent in the southern hemisphere during aphelion, but also appear more widely distributed in season and latitude as topographic and high-altitude (>=20 km) ice hazes. Type 2 ice clouds exhibit larger particle sizes (reff = 3-4 μm), a distinct side-scattering minimum at 90-100° phase angles (characteristic of a change in particle shape relative to the type 1), and appear most prominently in the northern subtropical aphelion cloud belt. The majority of retrieved dust visible-to-IR optical depth ratios are indicative of reff = 1.5 +/- 0.1 μm, consistent with Pathfinder and Viking/Mariner 9 reanalyses. However, increased ratios (2.7 versus 1.7) appear frequently in the northern hemisphere over LS = 50-200°, indicating substantially smaller dust particles sizes (reff = 1.0 +/- 0.2 μm) at this time. In addition, larger (reff = 1.8-2.5 μm) dust particles were observed locally in the southern hemisphere during the peak of the 2001 global dust storm. Detailed spectral modeling of the TES visible band pass indicates agreement of EPF-derived dust single scattering albedos (0.92-0.94) with the spectrally resolved results from Pathfinder observations.

  5. Deriving Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Sizes from TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, M. J.; Clancy, R. T.; Smith, M. D.; McConnochie, T. H.; Flittner, D. E.; Fouchet, T.

    2011-12-01

    Vertical variations in aerosol particle sizes can have a dramatic effect in their net impact on the state and evolution of the Martian atmosphere. Recent analyses of data from the Spectroscopy for the Investigation of the Characteristics of the Atmosphere of Mars (SPICAM) and the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instruments offer some long overdue progress in constraining this aspect of aerosols. However, significantly more work remains to be done along these lines in order to better constrain and inform modern dynamical simulations of the Martian atmosphere. Thus, the primary goal of our work is to perform retrievals of particle size as a function of altitude for both dust and water ice aerosols. The choice of the TES dataset, with pole-to-pole coverage over a period of nearly three martian years, provides the crucial systematic temporal and spatial sampling. Additional leverage on the particle size will be obtained by using both solarband bolometry and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Our presentation will include: 1) A summary of our limb radiative transfer comparison/validation exercises which include Monte Carlo, Gauss-Seidel, and discrete-ordinate algorithms (including the plane-parallel source function approximation). 2) The initial results of the application of our particle size retrieval scheme to the TES observations of the 2001 planet encircling dust event. 3) A few test applications to the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) radiance profiles (enabled by the recent solarband radiometric calibration by Bandfield and collaborators). 4) Our plans for additional retrievals (aphelion cloud season, lower optical depth locations and seasons, etc.) and the distribution of the derived profiles.

  6. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) satellite observations of ammonia, methanol, formic acid, and carbon monoxide over the Canadian oil sands: validation and model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shephard, M. W.; McLinden, C. A.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Luo, M.; Moussa, S. G.; Leithead, A.; Liggio, J.; Staebler, R. M.; Akingunola, A.; Makar, P.; Lehr, P.; Zhang, J.; Henze, D. K.; Millet, D. B.; Bash, J. O.; Zhu, L.; Wells, K. C.; Capps, S. L.; Chaliyakunnel, S.; Gordon, M.; Hayden, K.; Brook, J. R.; Wolde, M.; Li, S.-M.

    2015-12-01

    The wealth of air quality information provided by satellite infrared observations of ammonia (NH3), carbon monoxide (CO), formic acid (HCOOH), and methanol (CH3OH) is currently being explored and used for a number of applications, especially at regional or global scales. These applications include air quality monitoring, trend analysis, emissions, and model evaluation. This study provides one of the first direct validations of Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) satellite-retrieved profiles of NH3, CH3OH, and HCOOH through comparisons with coincident aircraft profiles. The comparisons are performed over the Canadian oil sands region during the intensive field campaign (August-September, 2013) in support of the Joint Canada-Alberta Implementation Plan for Oil Sands Monitoring (JOSM). The satellite/aircraft comparisons over this region during this period produced errors of (i) +0.08 ± 0.25 ppbv for NH3, (ii) +7.5 ± 23 ppbv for CO, (iii) +0.19 ± 0.46 ppbv for HCOOH, and (iv) -1.1 ± 0.39 ppbv for CH3OH. These values mostly agree with previously estimated retrieval errors; however, the relatively large negative bias in CH3OH and the significantly greater positive bias for larger HCOOH and CO values observed during this study warrant further investigation. Satellite and aircraft ammonia observations during the field campaign are also used in an initial effort to perform preliminary evaluations of Environment Canada's Global Environmental Multi-scale - Modelling Air quality and CHemistry (GEM-MACH) air quality modelling system at high resolution (2.5 × 2.5 km2). These initial results indicate a model underprediction of ~ 0.6 ppbv (~ 60 %) for NH3, during the field campaign period. The TES/model CO comparison differences are ~ +20 ppbv (~ +20 %), but given that under these conditions the TES/aircraft comparisons also show a small positive TES CO bias indicates that the overall model underprediction of CO is closer to ~ 10 % at 681 hPa (~ 3 km) during this period.

  7. Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Particle Sizes using MGS/TES and MRO/MCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, M. J.; Clancy, R. T.; Smith, M. D.; Benson, J. L.; McConnochie, T. H.; Pankine, A.

    2012-12-01

    Vertical variations in aerosol particle sizes often have a dramatic impact on the state and evolution of the Martian atmosphere. Recent analyses of data from the Spectroscopy for the Investigation of the Characteristics of the Atmosphere of Mars (SPICAM), the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), and the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) instruments offer some long overdue progress in constraining this aspect of aerosols. However, significantly more work remains to be done along these lines in order to better constrain and inform modern dynamical simulations of the Martian atmosphere. Thus, the primary goal of our work is to perform retrievals of particle size as a function of altitude for both dust and water ice aerosols. The choice of the TES and MCS dataset, with pole-to-pole coverage over a period of nearly eight martian years, provides the crucial systematic temporal and spatial sampling. Our presentation will include: 1) A summary of our limb radiative transfer algorithms and retrieval schemes; 2) The initial results of the application of our particle size retrieval scheme to the 2001 TES and 2007 MCS observations of those planet encircling dust events; 3) Near-term plans for for additional retrievals (aphelion cloud season, lower optical depth locations and seasons, etc.); 4) Location of the archive to be used for the distribution of the derived profiles and associated retrieval metadata.

  8. TES Level 3

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-12-08

    ... Name Convention daily TES-Aura_L3-__.he5 8-day TES-Aura_L3--8D_.he5 monthly TES-Aura_L3--M_.he5 Notation ...

  9. TES Validation Reports

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-06-30

    ... Reports: TES Data Versions: TES Validation Report Version 6.0 (PDF) R13 processing version; F07_10 file versions TES Validation Report Version 5.0 (PDF) R12 processing version; F06_08, F06_09 file ...

  10. Tectonic and sedimentary controls on widespread gas emissions in the Sea of Marmara: Results from systematic, shipborne multibeam echo sounder water column imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupré, Stéphanie; Scalabrin, Carla; Grall, Céline; Augustin, Jean-Marie; Henry, Pierre; Şengör, A. M. Celal; Görür, Naci; ćaǧatay, M. Namık.; Géli, Louis

    2015-05-01

    Understanding of the evolution of fluid-fault interactions during earthquake cycles is a challenge that acoustic gas emission studies can contribute. A survey of the Sea of Marmara using a shipborne, multibeam echo sounder, with water column records, provided an accurate spatial distribution of offshore seeps. Gas emissions are spatially controlled by a combination of factors, including fault and fracture networks in connection to the Main Marmara Fault system and inherited faults, the nature and thickness of sediments (e.g., occurrence of impermeable or gas-bearing sediments and landslides), and the connectivity between the seafloor and gas sources, particularly in relation to the Eocene Thrace Basin. The relationship between seepage and fault activity is not linear, as active faults do not necessarily conduct gas, and scarps corresponding to deactivated fault strands may continue to channel fluids. Within sedimentary basins, gas is not expelled at the seafloor unless faulting, deformation, or erosional processes affect the sediments. On topographic highs, gas flares occur along the main fault scarps but are also associated with sediment deformation. The occurrence of gas emissions appears to be correlated with the distribution of microseismicity. The relative absence of earthquake-induced ground shaking along parts of the Istanbul-Silivri and Princes Islands segments is likely the primary factor responsible for the comparative lack of gas emissions along these fault segments. The spatiotemporal distribution of gas seeps may thus provide a complementary way to constrain earthquake geohazards by focusing the study on some key fault segments, e.g., the northern part of the locked Princes Islands segment.

  11. SAIL-Thermique: a model for land surface spectral emissivity in the thermal infrared. Evaluation and reassesment of the temperature - emissivity separation (TES) algorithm in presence of vegetation canopies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olioso, A.; Jacob, F.; Lesaignoux, A.

    2014-12-01

    The SAIL-Thermique model was developed to simulate thermal infrared (TIR) radiative transfers inside vegetation canopies and land surface emissivity. It is based on the SAIL model developed by Verhoef (1984) for simulating spectral reflectances in the solar domain. Due to the difficulty to measure land surface emissivity, no emissivity model was validated against ground measurements. In this study, several datasets extracted from the literature and from recent databases were used for evaluating emissivity simulations. Model simulations were performed from the knowledge of leaf area index, leaf inclination distribution, direction of viewing, and leaf and soil optical properties. As data on leaf inclination and leaf optical properties were usually not available, stochastic simulations were performed from a priori knowledges on their distribution (extracted from the literature and recent databases). Simulated 8-14 μm emissivities were favorably compared to measurements with a root mean square difference (RMSD) around 0.006 (0.004 when considering only herbaceous species). The model was then used for simulating emissivity spectra for providing information for the interpretation of TIR multispectral data from the ASTER sensor. We used the land surface emissivity simulations for re-assessing the TES algorithm used to separate emissivity and land surface temperature. We showed that the inclusion of vegetated land surfaces significantly modified the relationship between minimum emissivity and minimum maximum difference (ɛmin- MMD) which is at the heart of the TES algorithm. This relationship was originally established on the ASTER spectral library which did not include vegetated land surface (Schmugge et al. 1998). On a synthetic database, estimations of spectral emissivities and surface temperature were significantly improved when using the new ɛmin- MMD relationship in comparison to the classical one: RMSD dropped from ~0.012 to ~0.006 for spectral emissivity and from

  12. Diurnal ozone variations in the stratosphere revealed in observations from the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) on board the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakazaki, Takatoshi; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Mitsuda, Chihiro; Imai, Koji; Manago, Naohiro; Naito, Yoko; Nakamura, Tetsu; Akiyoshi, Hideharu; Kinnison, Douglas; Sano, Takuki; Suzuki, Makoto; Shiotani, Masato

    2013-04-01

    Considerable uncertainties remain in the global pattern of diurnal variation in stratospheric ozone, particularly lower to middle stratospheric ozone, which is the principal contributor to total column ozone. The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) attached to the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on board the International Space Station (ISS) was developed to gather high-quality global measurements of stratospheric ozone at various local times, with the aid of superconducting mixers cooled to 4K by a compact mechanical cooler. Using the SMILES dataset, as well as data from nudged chemistry-climate models (MIROC3.2-CTM and SD-WACCM), we show that the SMILES observational data have revealed the global pattern of diurnal ozone variations throughout the stratosphere. We also found that these variations can be explained by both photochemistry and dynamics. The peak-to-peak difference in the stratospheric ozone mixing ratio (total column ozone) reached 8% (1%) over the course of a day. This variation needs to be considered when merging ozone data from different satellite measurements and even from measurements made using one specific instrument at different local times.

  13. Diurnal ozone variations in the stratosphere revealed in observations from the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) onboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakazaki, Takatoshi; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Mitsuda, Chihiro; Imai, Koji; Manago, Naohiro; Naito, Yoko; Nakamura, Tetsu; Akiyoshi, Hideharu; Kinnison, Douglas; Sano, Takuki; Suzuki, Makoto; Shiotani, Masato

    2013-04-01

    Considerable uncertainties remain in the global pattern of diurnal variation in stratospheric ozone, particularly lower to middle stratospheric ozone, which is the principal contributor to total column ozone. The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) attached to the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on board the International Space Station (ISS), was developed to gather high-quality global measurements of stratospheric ozone at various local times, with the aid of superconducting mixers cooled to 4 K by a compact mechanical cooler. Using the SMILES dataset, as well as data from nudged chemistry-climate models (MIROC3.2-CTM and SD-WACCM), we show that the SMILES observational data have revealed the global pattern of diurnal ozone variations throughout the stratosphere. We also found that these variations can be explained by both photochemistry and dynamics. The peak-to-peak difference in the stratospheric ozone mixing ratio (total column ozone) reached 8% (1%) over the course of a day. This variation needs to be considered when merging ozone data from different satellite measurements and even from measurements made using one specific instrument at different local times.

  14. Topside sounders as mobile ionospheric heaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, R. F.

    2006-01-01

    There is evidence that satellite-borne RF sounders can act as mobile ionospheric heaters in addition to performing topside sounding. The main objective of topside sounding is to use sounder-generated electromagnetic (em) waves to obtain ionospheric topside vertical electron-density (N(sub e) profiles. These profiles are obtained from mathematical inversions of the frequency vs. delay-time ionospheric reflection traces. In addition to these em reflection traces, a number of narrowband intense signals are observed starting at zero delay times after the transmitted pulses. Some of these signals, termed plasma resonances, appear at characteristic frequencies of the ambient medium such as at the electron cyclotron frequency f(sub ce), the harmonics nf(sub ce), the electron plasma frequency f(sub pe) and the upper-hybrid frequency f(sub uh), where (f(sub uh))(exp 2) = (f(sub ce))(exp 2) + (f(sub pe))(exp 2) . These signals have been attributed to the oblique echoes of sounder-generated electrostatic (es) waves. These resonances provide accurate in situ f(sub pe) and f(sub ce) values which, in turn, lead to accurate N(sub e) and [B] values where B is the ambient magnetic field. Resonances are also observed between the nf(sub ce) harmonics both above and below f(sub uh). The former, known as the Qn plasma resonances, are mainly attributed to the matching of the wave group velocity of sounder-generated (Bernstein-mode) es waves to the satellite velocity. The frequency spectrum of these waves in the magnetosphere can be used to detect non-Maxwellian electron velocity-distributions. In addition, these resonances also exhibit components that appear to be the result of plasma emissions stimulated by the sounder pulses. The plasma resonances observed between the nf(sub ce) harmonics and below f(sub uh), known as the Dn plasma resonances, are entirely attributed to such sounder-stimulated plasma emissions. There are other sounder-stimulated plasma phenomena that also fall into

  15. X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy of uranium ore using a TES microcalorimeter mounted on a field-emission scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maehata, Keisuke; Idemitsu, Kazuya; Tanaka, Keiichi

    2011-08-01

    Energy dispersive spectroscopic measurements of uranium ore were conducted using a superconducting phase transition-edge-thermosensor (TES) microcalorimeter mounted on a field-emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) to demonstrate its potential for high-precision microanalysis. The effective solid angle for X-ray detection is found to be larger than 2 msr by precise adjustments in the X-ray polycapillary alignment. The observed detection signal pulses with decay time constant of 50 μs enable maximum count rates larger than 300 counts per second. The energy resolution was determined to be 14.6 eV FWHM at Al Kα X-ray energies of 1487 eV. Distinct peaks appear in the resulting X-ra y energy spectrum associated with U-Mα, U-Mβ and U-Mγ X-rays emitted by the uranium ore specimens. This spectrum includes weaker peaks corresponding to C-Kα, Fe-Lα, Cu-L and Sr L α1 X rays.

  16. Summer season variability of the north residual cap of Mars as observed by the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS-TES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvin, W. M.; Titus, T. N.

    2008-02-01

    Previous observations have noted the change in albedo in a number of North Pole bright outliers and in the distribution of bright ice deposits between Mariner 9, Viking, and Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) data sets. Changes over the summer season as well as between regions at the same season ( Ls) in different years have been observed. We used the bolometric albedo and brightness temperature channels of the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the MGS spacecraft to monitor north polar residual ice cap variations between Mars years and within the summer season for three northern Martian summers between July 1999 and April 2003. Large-scale brightness variations are observed in four general areas: (1) the patchy outlying frost deposits from 90 to 270°E, 75 to 80°N; (2) the large "tail" below the Chasma Boreale and its associated plateau from 315 to 45°E, 80 to 85°N, that we call the "Boreale Tongue" and in Hyperboreae Undae; (3) the troughed terrain in the region from 0 to 120°E longitude (the lower right on a polar stereographic projection) we have called "Shackleton's Grooves" and (4) the unit mapped as residual ice in Olympia Planitia. We also note two areas which seem to persist as cool and bright throughout the summer and between Mars years. One is at the "source" of Chasma Boreale (˜15°E, 85°N) dubbed "McMurdo", and the "Cool and Bright Anomaly (CABA)" noted by Kieffer and Titus 2001. TES Mapping of Mars' north seasonal cap. Icarus 154, 162-180] at ˜330°E, 87°N called here "Vostok". Overall defrosting occurs early in the summer as the temperatures rise and then after the peak temperatures are reached ( Ls˜110) higher elevations and outlier bright deposits cold trap and re-accumulate new frost. Persistent bright areas are associated with either higher elevations or higher background albedos suggesting complex feedback mechanisms including cold-trapping of frost due to albedo and elevation effects, as well as influence of mesoscale atmospheric dynamics.

  17. Processing TES Level-1B Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBaca, Richard C.; Sarkissian, Edwin; Madatyan, Mariyetta; Shepard, Douglas; Gluck, Scott; Apolinski, Mark; McDuffie, James; Tremblay, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    TES L1B Subsystem is a computer program that performs several functions for the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES). The term "L1B" (an abbreviation of "level 1B"), refers to data, specific to the TES, on radiometric calibrated spectral radiances and their corresponding noise equivalent spectral radiances (NESRs), plus ancillary geolocation, quality, and engineering data. The functions performed by TES L1B Subsystem include shear analysis, monitoring of signal levels, detection of ice build-up, and phase correction and radiometric and spectral calibration of TES target data. Also, the program computes NESRs for target spectra, writes scientific TES level-1B data to hierarchical- data-format (HDF) files for public distribution, computes brightness temperatures, and quantifies interpixel signal variability for the purpose of first-order cloud and heterogeneous land screening by the level-2 software summarized in the immediately following article. This program uses an in-house-developed algorithm, called "NUSRT," to correct instrument line-shape factors.

  18. Constraining U.S. ammonia emissions using TES remote sensing observations and the GEOS-Chem adjoint model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonia (NH(3)has significant impacts on biodiversity, eutrophication, and acidification. Widespread uncertainty in the magnitude and seasonality of NH3 emissions hinders efforts to address these issues. In this work, we constrain U.S. NH3 sources using obse...

  19. TES radiometric assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worden, H.; Sarkissian, E.; Bowman, K.; Fisher, B.; Rider, D.; Aumann, H. H.; Apolinski, M.; Debaca, R. C.; Gluck, S.; Madatyan, M.; McDuffie, J.; Tremblay, D.; Shephard, M.; Cady-Pereira, K.; Tobin, D.; Revercomb, H.

    2005-01-01

    TES is an infrared Fourier transform spectrometer on board the EOS-Aura spacecraft launched July 15, 2004. Improvements to the radiometric calibration and consequent assessment of radiometric accuracy have been on-going since launch.

  20. Sensitivity of Temperature Profiles Retrieved from Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS/TES) Observations to the GSFC Synthetic Mars Model Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maguire, William C.; Pearl, J. C.; Smith, M. D.; Thompson, R. F.; Conrath, B. J.; Dason, S.; Kaelberer, M. S.; Christensen, P. R.

    1999-01-01

    Part of the task of interpreting IR spectral features observed by MGS/TES due to surface minerals requires distinguishing those IR signatures from atmospheric signatures of gas and dust. Surface-atmosphere separation for MGS/TES depends on knowledge of the retrieved temperature profile. In turn, the temperature retrieval Erom the observed data depends on molecular parameters including 15 micron CO2 line shape or line intensities which contribute to defining the Mars synthetic radiative transfer model. Using a simple isothermal, homogeneous single layer model of Pinnock and Shine, we find the ratio of (the error in degrees Kelvin of the retrieved temperature profile) to (the percentage error in the absorption coefficient) (deg K/percent) to be 0.4 at 200K. This ratio at 150K and 250K is 0.2 and 0.6, respectively. A more refined model, incorporating observed MGS/TES retrieved temperature profiles, the TES instrumental resolution and the most recent molecular modelling, will yield an improved knowledge of this error sensitivity. We present results of such a sensitivity study to determine the dependence of temperature profiles inverted from MGS/TES on these and other molecular parameters. This work was supported in part by NASA's Mars Data Analysis Program.

  1. Apollo lunar sounder experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, R.J.; Adams, G.F.; Brown, W.E., Jr.; Eggleton, R.E.; Jackson, P.; Jordan, R.; Linlor, W.I.; Peeples, W.J.; Porcello, L.J.; Ryu, J.; Schaber, G.; Sill, W.R.; Thompson, T.W.; Ward, S.H.; Zelenka, J.S.

    1973-01-01

    The scientific objectives of the Apollo lunar sounder experiment (ALSE) are (1) mapping of subsurface electrical conductivity structure to infer geological structure, (2) surface profiling to determine lunar topographic variations, (3) surface imaging, and (4) measuring galactic electromagnetic radiation in the lunar environment. The ALSE was a three-frequency, wide-band, coherent radar system operated from lunar orbit during the Apollo 17 mission.

  2. Temperatures and aerosol opacities of the Mars atmosphere at aphelion: Validation and inter-comparison of limb sounding profiles from MRO/MCS and MGS/TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, James H.; McConnochie, Timothy H.; Kass, David M.; Kleinböhl, Armin; Schofield, John T.; Heavens, Nicholas G.; McCleese, Daniel J.; Benson, Jennifer; Hinson, David P.; Bandfield, Joshua L.

    2015-05-01

    We exploit the relative stability and repeatability of the Mars atmosphere at aphelion for an inter-comparison of Mars Global Surveyor/Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS/TES) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter/Mars Climate Sounder (MRO/MCS) nighttime temperature profiles and aerosol opacity profiles in Mars years 25, 26, 29, 30, and 31. Cross-calibration of these datasets is important, as they together provide an extended climatology for this planetary atmosphere. As a standard of comparison we employ temperature profiles obtained by radio occultation methods during the MGS mission in Mars years 24, 25, and 26. We first compare both zonal mean TES limb sounding profiles and zonal mean MCS limb sounding profiles with zonal means of radio occultation temperature profiles for the same season (Ls = 70-80°) and latitudes (55-70°N). We employ a statistical z test for quantifying the degree of agreement of temperature profiles by pressure level. For pressures less than 610 Pa (altitudes > 3 km), the ensemble mean temperature difference between the radio occultation and TES limb sounding profiles found in these comparisons was 1.7 ± 0.7 K. The ensemble mean temperature difference between radio occultation and MCS profiles was 1.4 ± 1.0 K. These differences fall within the formal error estimates for both TES and MCS, validating the accuracy of the instruments and their respective retrieval algorithms. In the second phase of our investigation, we compare aphelion season zonal mean TES limb sounding temperature, water ice opacity, and dust opacity profiles with those obtained at the same latitudes in different years by MCS. The ensemble mean temperature difference found for three comparisons between TES and MCS zonal mean temperature profiles was 2.8 ± 2.1 K. MCS and TES temperatures between 610 Pa and 5 Pa from 55 to 70°N are largely in agreement (with differences < 2 K) when water ice aerosol opacities are comparable. Temperature differences increase when the opacities

  3. SVD analysis of Aura TES spectral residuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard; Kulawik, Susan S.; Rodgers, Clive D.; Bowman, Kevin W.

    2005-01-01

    Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) analysis is both a powerful diagnostic tool and an effective method of noise filtering. We present the results of an SVD analysis of an ensemble of spectral residuals acquired in September 2004 from a 16-orbit Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) Global Survey and compare them to alternative methods such as zonal averages. In particular, the technique highlights issues such as the orbital variation of instrument response and incompletely modeled effects of surface emissivity and atmospheric composition.

  4. No widespread dust in the upper atmosphere of Mars from Mars Climate Sounder observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinboehl, Armin; Schofield, John T.; Kass, David M.; Abdou, Wedad A.; McCleese, Daniel J.

    2015-04-01

    The vertical distribution of dust in the Martian atmosphere has been a topic of discussion in the recent years. Measurements by limb sounding instruments like the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) and the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) indicate that atmospheric dust is not homogeneously distributed in the vertical but exhibits layering in the lower atmosphere. Recent retrievals from TES measurements also suggest a dust maximum higher in the atmosphere that predominantly occurs at 50-60 km altitude on the daytime hemisphere. We use new retrievals from MCS measurements to investigate this deduction. MCS is a mid- and far-infrared thermal emission radiometer on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. It measures radiances in limb and on-planet viewing geometries. From these radiance measurements, profiles of atmospheric temperature, dust and water ice are retrieved from the surface to ~80 km with a vertical resolution of ~5 km. Updates to the retrieval algorithm yield improved representations of aerosols above ~40 km altitude. With a few notable exceptions, retrieved dust extinctions in the upper atmosphere do not exceed 1e-5 km-1 at mid-infrared wavelengths, which is close to the limit of the MCS sensitivity. The sensitivity of an MCS limb measurement to aerosols at these altitudes is typically not limited by signal-to-noise but rather by the uncertainties in the representation of the instrument's vertical field-of-view, the far wings of which can provide radiance contributions from the lower atmosphere and the surface. Sensitivity studies suggest that low radiances measured at high altitudes are not caused by widespread dust but can be explained by these radiance contributions. Thus MCS measurements do not support the existence of widespread dust in the upper atmosphere of Mars.

  5. TES Limb-Geometry Observations of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.

    2003-01-01

    The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on-board Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) has a pointing mirror that allows observations in the plane of the orbit anywhere from directly nadir to far above either the forward or aft limbs for details about the TES instrument). Nadir-geometry observations are defined as those where the field-of-view contains the surface of Mars (even if the actual observation is at a high emission angle far from true nadir). Limb-geometry observations are defined as those where the line-of-sight of the observations does not intersect the surface. At a number of points along the MGS orbit (typically every 10 deg. or 20 deg. of latitude) a limb sequence is taken, which includes a stack of overlapping TES spectra from just below the limb to more than 120 km above the limb. A typical limb sequence has approx. 20 individual spectra, and the projected size of a TES pixel at the limb is 13 km.

  6. New generation topside sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Suman; Wickwar, Vincent; Goodman, John M.

    2001-09-01

    Having ionospheric electron density distributions as a function of height, latitude, longitude, and time under different conditions is essential for scientific, technical, and operational purposes. A satellite-based, swept-frequency, HF sounder can obtain electron density profiles on a global scale. We are developing a new generation HF sounder that employs recent developments in technology, electronics, and processing capabilities. It will provide global-scale electron density distributions, contours of fixed densities, maps of ƒoF2, hmax, etc. It will allow us to map irregularities, estimate anomalous propagation and conditions for ducting, determine angles of arrival, etc. It will also be able to perform various plasma diagnostics and, because of new flexibility, will be programmable from the ground to perform a variety of experiments in space. Need for such a system exists through the Department of Defense and several civilian agencies. Some of the novel features of the system include software-based design, direction of arrival estimation and synthetic aperture radar-type operation, onboard processing, and reconfigurable and flexible architecture with multimission capabilities.

  7. Spaceborne Infrared Atmospheric Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas; Macenka, Steven; Kampe, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    A report describes the development of the spaceborne infrared atmospheric sounder (SIRAS) - a spectral imaging instrument, suitable for observing the atmosphere of the Earth from a spacecraft, that utilizes four spectrometers to cover the wavelength range of 12 to 15.4 m with a spectral resolution that ranges between 1 part per 900 and 1 part per 1,200 in wavelength. The spectrometers are operated in low orders to minimize filtering requirements. Focal planes receive the dispersed energy and provide a spectrum of the scene. The design of the SIRAS combines advanced, wide-field refractive optics with high-dispersion gratings in a solid-state (no moving parts), diffraction-limited optical system that is the smallest such system that can be constructed for the specified wavelength range and resolution. The primary structure of the SIRAS has dimensions of 10 by 10 by 14 cm and has a mass of only 2.03 kg

  8. A Microwave Pressure Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. A.; Peckham, G. E.

    1978-01-01

    An instrument to measure atmospheric pressure at the earth's surface from an orbiting satellite would be a valuable addition to the expanding inventory of remote sensors. The subject of this report is such an instrument - the Microwave Pressure Sounder (MPS). It is shown that global-ocean coverage is attainable with sufficient accuracy, resolution and observational frequency for meteorological, oceanographic and climate research applications. Surface pressure can be deduced from a measurement of the absorption by an atmospheric column at a frequency in the wing of the oxygen band centered on 60 GHz. An active multifrequency instrument is needed to make this measurement with sufficient accuracy. The selection of optimum operating frequencies is based upon accepted models of surface reflection, oxygen, water vapor and cloud absorption. Numerical simulation using a range of real atmospheres defined by radiosonde observations were used to validate the frequency selection procedure. Analyses are presented of alternative system configurations that define the balance between accuracy and achievable resolution.

  9. Space View Issues for Hyperspectral Sounders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Evan M.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Broberg, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    The expectation for climate quality measurements from hyperspectral sounders is absolute calibration accuracy at the 100 mK level and stability at the < 40 mK/decade level. The Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS)1, Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) hyperspectral sounders currently in orbit have been shown to agree well over most of their brightness temperature range. Some larger discrepancies are seen, however, at the coldest scene temperatures, such as those seen in Antarctic winter and deep convective clouds. A key limiting factor for the calibrated scene radiance accuracy for cold scenes is how well the effective radiance of the cold space view pertains to the scene views. The space view signal is composed of external sources and instrument thermal emission at about 270 K from the scan mirror, external baffles, etc. Any difference in any of these contributions between space views and scene views will impact the absolute calibration accuracy, and the impact can be critical for cold scenes. Any change over time in these will show up as an apparent trend in calibrated radiances. We use AIRS data to investigate the validity of the space view assumption in view of the 100 mK accuracy and 40 mK/decade trend expectations. We show that the space views used for the cold calibration point for AIRS v5 Level-1B products meet these standards except under special circumstances and that AIRS v6 Level-1B products will meet them under all circumstances. This analysis also shows the value of having multiple distinct space views to give operational redundancy and analytic data, and that reaching climate quality requires continuing monitoring of aging instruments and adjustment of calibration.

  10. Use of AIRS, OMI, MLS, and TES Data in Assessing Forest Ecosystem Exposure to Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spruce, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    Ground-level ozone at high levels poses health threats to exposed flora and fauna, including negative impacts to human health. While concern is common regarding depletion of ozone in the stratosphere, portions of the urban and rural United States periodically have high ambient levels of tropospheric ozone on the ground. Ozone pollution can cause a variety of impacts to susceptible vegetation (e.g., Ponderosa and Jeffrey pine species in the southwestern United States), such as stunted growth, alteration of growth form, needle or leaf chlorosis, and impaired ability to withstand drought-induced water stress. In addition, Southern Californian forests with high ozone exposures have been recently subject to multiyear droughts that have led to extensive forest overstory mortality from insect outbreaks and increased incidence of wildfires. Residual forests in these impacted areas may be more vulnerable to high ozone exposures and to other forest threats than ever before. NASA sensors collect a wealth of atmospheric data that have been used recently for mapping and monitoring regional tropospheric ozone levels. AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder), OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument), MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder), and TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) data could be used to assess forest ecosystem exposure to ozone. Such NASA data hold promise for providing better or at least complementary synoptic information on ground-level ozone levels that Federal agency partners can use to assess forest health trends and to mitigate the threats as needed in compliance with Federal laws and mandates. NASA data products on ozone concentrations may be able to aid applications of DSTs (decision support tools) adopted by the USDA FS (U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service) and by the NPS (National Park Service), such as the Ozone Calculator, in which ground ozone estimates are employed to assess ozone impacts to forested vegetation.

  11. Demonstration of superconducting sub-millimeter-wave limb emission sounder (SMILES) for observing trace gases in the middle atmosphere using the exposed facility of the Japanese experimental module (JEM) of the international space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuko, Harunobu; Manabe, Takeshi; Seta, Masumichi; Kasai, Yasuko; Ochiai, Satoshi; Irimajiri, Yoshihisa; Inatani, Junji; Ikeda, Naomi; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Iida, Yukiei; Fujii, Yasunori

    1999-01-01

    The sub-millimeter wavelength region is advantageous for high-precision observations of trace species in the stratosphere. A Superconducting Sub-Millimeter-wave Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES) is scheduled to demonstrate the measurements of extremely faint sub-millimeter-wave emissions of the atmospheric trace gases on the Exposed Facility (EF) of the Japanese Experimental Module (JEM) of the International Space Station in 2003. The applications of superconductivity and mechanical 4K-refrigerator in space will be demonstrated in the experiment. JEM/SMILES obtains the diurnal and seasonal variability in the global three-dimensional distributions of the stratospheric trace gases for quantitative understanding of the stratospheric ozone depletion and its effect on the climate change with respect to the relationships among chemical reaction processes and their relationships with atmospheric dynamics. JEM/SMILES utilizes the 640GHz band to measure the vertical profiles of trace gases involved in the stratospheric ozone depletion such as chlorine monoxide (CLO), bromine monoxide (BrO), etc., along with atmospheric temperature. JEM/SMILES employs Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor (SIS) mixers to improve measurement precision and spatial resolution, thereby enabling us to quantitatively understand the interactive processes between chemistry and dynamics.

  12. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer and Airborne Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, T.; Beer, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) is an instrument being developed for the NASA Earth Observing System Chemistry Platform. TES will measure the distribution of ozone and its precursors in the lower atmosphere. The Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES) is an aircraft precursor to TES. Applicable descriptions are given of instrument design, technology challenges, implementation and operations for both.

  13. First Atmospheric Science Results from the Mars Exploration Rovers Mini-TES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Wolff, Michael J.; Lemmon, Mark T.; Spanovich, Nicole; Banfield, Don; Budney, Charles J.; Clancy, R. Todd; Ghosh, Amitabha; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Smith, Peter; Whitney, Barbara; Christensen, Philip R.; Squyres, Steven W.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal infrared spectra of the martian atmosphere taken by the Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) were used to determine the atmospheric temperatures in the planetary boundary layer and the column-integrated optical depth of aerosols. Mini-TES observations show the diurnal variation of the martian boundary layer thermal structure, including a near-surface superadiabatic layer during the afternoon and an inversion layer at night. Upward-looking Mini-TES observations show warm and cool parcels of air moving through the Mini-TES field of view on a time scale of 30 seconds. The retrieved dust optical depth shows a downward trend at both sites.

  14. In-Flight Performance of the TES Loop Heat Pipe Rejection System: Seven Years in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Jose I.; Na-Nakornpanom, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) is an infrared, high spectral resolution Fourier transform spectrometer with a 3.3 to 15.4 micron wavelength coverage. TES is a scanning instrument intended for determining the chemical state of the Earth's lower atmosphere (troposphere) from the surface to 30+ km. TES produces vertical profiles of important pollutant and greenhouse gases such as carbon monoxide, ozone, methane, and water vapor on a global scale every other day. TES was launched into orbit onboard NASA's earth Observing System Aura spacecraft on July 15, 2004 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California.

  15. Spatially resolving methane emissions in California: constraints from the CalNex aircraft campaign and from present (GOSAT, TES) and future (TROPOMI, geostationary) satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wecht, K. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Sulprizio, M. P.; Santoni, G. W.; Wofsy, S. C.; Parker, R.; Bösch, H.; Worden, J.

    2014-02-01

    We apply a continental-scale inverse modeling system for North America based on the GEOS-Chem model to optimize California methane emissions at 1/2° × 2/3° horizontal resolution using atmospheric observations from the CalNex aircraft campaign (May-June 2010) and from satellites. Inversion of the CalNex data yields a best estimate for total California methane emissions of 2.86 ± 0.21 Tg yr-1, compared with 1.92 Tg yr-1 in the EDGAR v4.2 emission inventory used as a priori and 1.51 Tg yr-1 in the California Air Resources Board (CARB) inventory used for state regulations of greenhouse gas emissions. These results are consistent with a previous Lagrangian inversion of the CalNex data. Our inversion provides 12 independent pieces of information to constrain the geographical distribution of emissions within California. Attribution to individual source types indicates dominant contributions to emissions from landfills/wastewater (1.1 Tg yr-1), livestock (0.87 Tg yr-1), and gas/oil (0.64 Tg yr-1). EDGAR v4.2 underestimates emissions from livestock while CARB underestimates emissions from landfills/wastewater and gas/oil. Current satellite observations from GOSAT can constrain methane emissions in the Los Angeles Basin but are too sparse to constrain emissions quantitatively elsewhere in California (they can still be qualitatively useful to diagnose inventory biases). Los Angeles Basin emissions derived from CalNex and GOSAT inversions are 0.42 ± 0.08 and 0.31 ± 0.08, respectively. An observation system simulation experiment (OSSE) shows that the future TROPOMI satellite instrument (2015 launch) will be able to constrain California methane emissions at a detail comparable to the CalNex aircraft campaign. Geostationary satellite observations offer even greater potential for constraining methane emissions in the future.

  16. Spatially resolving methane emissions in California: constraints from the CalNex aircraft campaign and from present (GOSAT, TES) and future (TROPOMI, geostationary) satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wecht, K. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Sulprizio, M. P.; Santoni, G. W.; Wofsy, S. C.; Parker, R.; Bösch, H.; Worden, J.

    2014-08-01

    We apply a continental-scale inverse modeling system for North America based on the GEOS-Chem model to optimize California methane emissions at 1/2° × 2/3° horizontal resolution using atmospheric observations from the CalNex aircraft campaign (May-June 2010) and from satellites. Inversion of the CalNex data yields a best estimate for total California methane emissions of 2.86 ± 0.21 Tg a-1, compared with 1.92 Tg a-1 in the EDGAR v4.2 emission inventory used as a priori and 1.51 Tg a-1 in the California Air Resources Board (CARB) inventory used for state regulations of greenhouse gas emissions. These results are consistent with a previous Lagrangian inversion of the CalNex data. Our inversion provides 12 independent pieces of information to constrain the geographical distribution of emissions within California. Attribution to individual source types indicates dominant contributions to emissions from landfills/wastewater (1.1 Tg a-1), livestock (0.87 Tg a-1), and gas/oil (0.64 Tg a-1). EDGAR v4.2 underestimates emissions from livestock, while CARB underestimates emissions from landfills/wastewater and gas/oil. Current satellite observations from GOSAT can constrain methane emissions in the Los Angeles Basin but are too sparse to constrain emissions quantitatively elsewhere in California (they can still be qualitatively useful to diagnose inventory biases). Los Angeles Basin emissions derived from CalNex and GOSAT inversions are 0.42 ± 0.08 and 0.31 ± 0.08 Tg a-1 that the future TROPOMI satellite instrument (2015 launch) will be able to constrain California methane emissions at a detail comparable to the CalNex aircraft campaign. Geostationary satellite observations offer even greater potential for constraining methane emissions in the future.

  17. TES validation results from the Lake Tahoe special observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trembaly, D.; Sund Kulawik, S.; Rider, D.; Hook, S. J.

    2006-12-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) is a high-resolution infrared Fourier transform spectrometer on board the AURA spacecraft launched in 2004. As part of the science validation activities, four "Stare" special observations were acquired in August and September 2005 over Lake Tahoe located a the California-Nevada border in western US. Each "Stare" observation took 32 target observation scans each sharing almost the same footprint. The Tahoe site has several advantages for validation, namely it is at high altitude with negligible cloud cover, it has water as the surface with known spectral emissivity, and it has ground-based in-situ radiometric measurements. Statistics of the retrieved values of the target data set over water are compared with the observation error available in the TES product file. In most cases, the results show that the standard deviation of the volume mixing ratio (VMR 1 sigma) at a given pressure level is less that the observation error for H20, atmospheric temperature, and O3. VMR-sigma is higher than the observation error in the cases of H2O and atmospheric temperature for pressure levels very near the surface. The surface temperature retrieved by the TES algorithm agrees to less than 1K of the observed in-situ radiometeric measurements. This exercise has provided important validation of the TES reported errors and the TES on-board radiometric calibration source.

  18. Effects of Palagonitic Dust Coatings on Thermal Emission Spectra of Rocks and Minerals: Implications for Mineralogical Characterization of the Martian Surface by MGS-TES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, T. G.; Morris, R.; Christensen, P.

    2001-01-01

    Thermal emission measurements on dust-coated rocks and minerals show that a 300 5m thick layer is required to mask emission from the substrate and that non-linear effects are present. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Microwave limb sounder for stratospheric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, J. W.; Hardy, J. C.; Jarnot, R. F.; Pickett, H. M.; Zimmerman, P.

    1985-06-01

    The balloon-borne Microwave Limb Sounder (BMLS) measures atmospheric thermal emission from millimeter wavelength spectral lines to determine vertical profiles of stratospheric species. The instrument flown to data operates at 205 BHz to measure ClO, O3, and H2O2. A 63 GHz radiometer is added to test the technique for determining tangent point pressure from the MLS experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). Many additional species is also measured by the BLMS. A radiometer at 270 GHz would provide measurements of HO2, NO2, HNO3, N2O, 16O18O16O, and HCN. With this addition the BMLS can test the current theory of O3 heavy ozone photochemical balance in the upper stratosphere.

  20. HyTES: Thermal Imaging Spectrometer Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, William R.; Hook, Simon J.; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Wilson, Daniel W.; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Realmuto, Vincent; Lamborn, Andy; Paine, Chris; Mumolo, Jason M.; Eng, Bjorn T.

    2011-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed the Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES). It is an airborne pushbroom imaging spectrometer based on the Dyson optical configuration. First low altitude test flights are scheduled for later this year. HyTES uses a compact 7.5-12 micrometer m hyperspectral grating spectrometer in combination with a Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) and grating based spectrometer. The Dyson design allows for a very compact and optically fast system (F/1.6). Cooling requirements are minimized due to the single monolithic prism-like grating design. The configuration has the potential to be the optimal science-grade imaging spectroscopy solution for high altitude, lighter-than-air (HAA, LTA) vehicles and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) due to its small form factor and relatively low power requirements. The QWIP sensor allows for optimum spatial and spectral uniformity and provides adequate responsivity which allows for near 100mK noise equivalent temperature difference (NEDT) operation across the LWIR passband. The QWIP's repeatability and uniformity will be helpful for data integrity since currently an onboard calibrator is not planned. A calibration will be done before and after eight hour flights to gage any inconsistencies. This has been demonstrated with lab testing. Further test results show adequate NEDT, linearity as well as applicable earth science emissivity target results (Silicates, water) measured in direct sunlight.

  1. Global Summary MGS TES Data and Mars-Gram Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C.; Johnson, D.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2001) is an engineering-level Mars atmosphere model widely used for many Mars mission applications. From 0-80 km, it is based on NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM), while above 80 km it is based on University of Arizona Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model. Mars-GRAM 2001 and MGCM use surface topograph$ from Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter (MOLA). Validation studies are described comparing Mars-GRAM with a global summary data set of Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data. TES averages and standard deviations were assembled from binned TES data which covered surface to approx. 40 km, over more than a full Mars year (February, 1999 - June, 2001, just before start of a Mars global dust storm). TES data were binned in 10-by-10 degree latitude-longitude bins (i.e. 36 longitude bins by 19 latitude bins), 12 seasonal bins (based on 30 degree increments of Ls angle). Bin averages and standard deviations were assembled at 23 data levels (temperature at 21 pressure levels, plus surface temperature and surface pressure). Two time-of day bins were used: local time near 2 or 14 hours local time). Two dust optical depth bins wereused: infrared optical depth either less than or greater than 0.25 (which corresponds to visible optical depth either less than or greater than about 0.5). For interests in aerocapture and precision entry and landing, comparisons focused on atmospheric density. TES densities versus height were computed from TES temperature versus pressure, using assumptions of perfect gas law and hydrostatics. Mars-GRAM validation studies used density ratio (TES/Mars-GRAM) evaluated at data bin center points in space and time. Observed average TES/Mars-GRAM density ratios were generally 1+/-0.05, except at high altitudes (15-30 km, depending on season) and high latitudes (> 45 deg N), or at most altitudes in the southern hemisphere at Ls approx. 90 and 180deg

  2. Processing TES Level-2 Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poosti, Sassaneh; Akopyan, Sirvard; Sakurai, Regina; Yun, Hyejung; Saha, Pranjit; Strickland, Irina; Croft, Kevin; Smith, Weldon; Hoffman, Rodney; Koffend, John; Benenyan, Gerard; Nair, Hari; Sarkissian, Edwin; McDuffie, James; Monarrez, Ruth; Ho,David; Chan, Benny; Lampel, Michael

    2006-01-01

    TES Level 2 Subsystem is a set of computer programs that performs functions complementary to those of the program summarized in the immediately preceding article. TES Level-2 data pertain to retrieved species (or temperature) profiles, and errors thereof. Geolocation, quality, and other data (e.g., surface characteristics for nadir observations) are also included. The subsystem processes gridded meteorological information and extracts parameters that can be interpolated to the appropriate latitude, longitude, and pressure level based on the date and time. Radiances are simulated using the aforementioned meteorological information for initial guesses, and spectroscopic-parameter tables are generated. At each step of the retrieval, a nonlinear-least-squares- solving routine is run over multiple iterations, retrieving a subset of atmospheric constituents, and error analysis is performed. Scientific TES Level-2 data products are written in a format known as Hierarchical Data Format Earth Observing System 5 (HDF-EOS 5) for public distribution.

  3. Development of a superconducting submillimeter-wave limb emission sounder (SMILES) on the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Naomi; Inatani, Junji; Iida, Yukiei; Masuko, Harunobu; Manabe, Takeshi; Ochiai, Satoshi; Irimajiri, Yoshihisa; Seta, Masumichi; Shi, Sheng-Cai; Noguchi, Takashi

    1998-11-01

    NASDA and CRL are planning to develop a spaceborne SMILES, which is to be installed in the Exposed Facility (EF) on the JEM of the ISS. By observing gases such as ClO, HCl, NO, N2O, HO2 and BrO in the stratosphere, JEM/SMILES can trace the chemical reactions concerning the ozone depletion and climate change. Global distribution of those gases will be mapped with a height resolution of about 2 km. JEM/SMILES receives low-intensity signals from those gases with highly sensitive SIS (Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor) mixers at 640 GHz, which are cooled to 4.2 K by a space-qualified mechanical cooler. The mission target is to demonstrate the effectiveness of the submillimeter-wave limb emission sounding and to establish space applicability of the low-noise SIS mixers and a mechanical 4-K cooler. JEM/SMILES is expected to be launched in 2003, and the experiments will last a year or more.

  4. Non local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) atmospheric limb emission at 4.6 μm: 2. An analysis of the daytime wideband radiances as measured by UARS improved stratospheric and mesospheric sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Puertas, M.; Zaragoza, G.; López-Valverde, M. Á.; Taylor, F. W.

    1998-04-01

    An analysis of the measurements taken by the improved stratospheric and mesospheric sounder (ISAMS) in its carbon monoxide wideband channel around 4.6 μm at daytime is presented. The radiances show a good signal to noise ratio up to the lower thermosphere (about 120 km) and have been shown to be mainly due to emission from the weak CO2 4.3 μm isotopic and hot bands. They exhibit a very clear dependence with the solar illumination at tangent heights above about 60 km, where they have been found to be almost exclusively determined by the solar elevation. Below about 50 km they are dominated by the variations of the kinetic temperature. The measurements have been analyzed in the 50-100 km range by using a detailed non local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) model of the CO2 states emitting in the 4.3 μm spectral region and the GENLN2 line-by-line radiance code. A large number (up to 32) of CO2 isotopic and hot bands emit significantly in this spectral region. The N2O(ν3 = 1) and two O3(ν1 + ν3) bands also give contributions in the stratosphere and lower mesosphere. The CO(1→0) band is of relative importance only in the lower thermosphere. The absolute radiances as well as the solar zenith angle dependence are well reproduced by the model. The dependence on the solar zenith angle is due to the absorption of solar radiation in the CO2 near-infrared bands. A sensitivity study of the radiances was also conducted. The major conclusions are (1) the inclusion of the excitation of N2(1) from the electronic energy of O(1D) was required to explain the radiances in the lower mesosphere; (2) the value for the rate of the vibrational exchange between CO2(ν1,ν2,1) and N2(1) is very similar to the laboratory measurements and to that used in the analysis of the Spectral Infrared Rocket Experiment (SPIRE) 4.3 μm CO2 atmospheric limb radiances; and (3) the CO2 volume mixing ratio (vmr) in the 70-100 km region is significantly smaller than that measured in rocket experiments

  5. AIRS - the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambrigsten, Bjorn H.; Fetzer, Eric; Fishbein, Evan; Lee, Sung-Yung; Paganao, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) was launched in 2002, along with two companion microwave sounders. This AIRS sounding suite is the most advanced atmospheric sounding system to date, with measurement accuracies far surpassing those of current weather satellites. From its sun synchronous polar orbit, the AIRS system provides more than 90% of the globe every 24 hours. Much of the post-launch period has been devoted to optimizing the 'retrieval' system used to derive atmospheric and other parameters from the observations and to validate those parameters. The geophysical parameters have been produced since the beginning of 2003 - the first data were released to the public in mid-2003, and future improved versions will be released periodically. The ongoing calibration/validation effort has confirmed that the system is very accurate and stable. There are a number of applications for the AIRS products, ranging from numerical weather prediction - where positive impact on forecast accuracy has already been demonstrated, to atmospheric research - where the AIRS water vapor products near the surface and in the mid and upper troposphere as well as in the stratosphere promise to make it possible to characterize and model phenomena that are key for short-term atmospheric processes, from weather patterns to long-term processes, such as interannual variability and climate change.

  6. First Data from Mars Climate Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    ' atmosphere, hides the surface emission, and the thermal-infrared radiation comes only from the atmosphere.

    The visible-and-near-infrared image (left) is bright where surface ice and atmospheric hazes reflect sunlight back to space. The view is of the northern half of Mars, with the north polar cap visible as the bright semicircle at upper left. The night half of the planet (lower left) is dark. The 'terminator' boundary between the day side and night side of the planet cuts from lower left to upper right, through the polar area. During the science phase of the mission, after the spacecraft has shrunk its orbit to a nearly circular loop approximately 300 kilometers (186 miles) above the surface, these visible-and-near-infrared readings by the Mars Climate Sounder will track how the amount of solar energy reflected from Mars varies from place-to-place and season-to-season, particularly in the polar regions where absorbed sunlight vaporizes the seasonal carbon-dioxide ice.

    The 12-micron image (center) indicates that heat is being emitted from both the day side and the night side of the planet. The polar cap is dark in this image because it is cold (minus 190 degrees Fahrenheit) and emits less heat than surrounding areas. During the science phase of the mission, the thermal-infrared readings at this wavelength by Mars Climate Sounder will be used to track dust and clouds in the atmosphere. In the current season on Mars, the atmosphere is relatively clear except for an equatorial belt of thin water-ice clouds present in the visible-and-near-infrared image, and so the 12-micron image is dominated by the infrared radiation from the surface on the relatively hot dayside (upper right).

    The 15-micron image (right) indicates the temperatures of the atmosphere at an altitude of about 25 kilometers (15 miles), where there is not much temperature difference even between the night side and the day side of the planet. The polar atmosphere is colder, so it appears darker.

  7. TES Observations of Enhanced Ammonia & Methanol Over Northeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beer, R.; Bowman, K.; Clough, S. A.; Eldering, A.; Fisher, B.; Kulawik, S. S.; Kuo, M.; Osterman, G.; Sander, S. P.; Shephard, M.; Worden, J.

    2007-12-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the EOS Aura satellite makes global measurements of infrared radiances that are used to derive profiles of species such as O3, CO, H2O and CH4 as routine standard products. In addition, TES has a variety of special modes that provide denser spatial mapping at the expense of reduced coverage. One of these modes (called "transect") has now been used to detect additional molecules indicative of regional air pollution. On July 10 2007 at about 05:37 UTC (13:24 LMST) TES conducted such a transect observation over northeast Asia between latitudes +37.988 & +41.998, east longitudes 117.014 & 115.746 (some 460 km long). Examination of the spectral residuals (observed - calculated) following the retrieval of the TES standard products revealed surprisingly strong features attributable to enhanced concentrations of ammonia (NH3) and methanol (CH3OH), well above the normal background levels. This is the first time that these molecules have been detected in nadir viewing measurements that penetrate into the lower atmosphere. The paper will discuss the concentration and distribution of these species over this area and offer suggestions as to their origin. This work was carried out, in part, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  8. Characterization of Aura TES carbonyl sulfide retrievals over ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuai, L.; Worden, J.; Kulawik, S. S.; Montzka, S. A.; Liu, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a description of the NASA Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) carbonyl sulfide (OCS) retrieval algorithm for oceanic observations, along with evaluation of the biases and uncertainties using aircraft profiles from the HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) campaign and data from the NOAA Mauna Loa site. In general, the OCS retrievals (1) have less than 1.0 degree of freedom for signals (DOFs), (2) are sensitive in the mid-troposphere with a peak sensitivity typically between 300 and 500 hPa, (3) but have much smaller systematic errors from temperature, CO2 and H2O calibrations relative to random errors from measurement noise. We estimate the monthly means from TES measurements averaged over multiple years so that random errors are reduced and useful information about OCS seasonal and latitudinal variability can be derived. With this averaging, TES OCS data are found to be consistent (within the calculated uncertainties) with NOAA ground observations and HIPPO aircraft measurements. TES OCS data also captures the seasonal and latitudinal variations observed by these in situ data.

  9. PREMIER's imaging IR limb sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Stefan; Caron, Jerome; Bézy, Jean-Loup; Meynart, Roland; Langen, Jörg; Carnicero Dominguez, Bernardo; Bensi, Paolo; Silvestrin, Pierluigi

    2011-11-01

    The Imaging IR Limb Sounder (IRLS) is one of the two instruments planned on board of the candidate Earth Explorer Core Mission PREMIER. PREMIER stands for PRocess Exploration through Measurements of Infrared and Millimetrewave Emitted Radiation and is presently under feasibility study by ESA. Emerging from recent enhanced detector and processing technologies IRLS shall, next to a millimetre-wave limb sounder, explore the benefits of three-dimensional limb sounding with embedded cloud imaging capability. Such 3d imaging technology is expected to open a new era of limb sounding that will allow detailed studies of the link between atmospheric composition and climate, since it will map simultaneously fields of temperature and many trace gases in the mid/upper troposphere and stratosphere across a large vertical and horizontal field of view and with relatively high vertical and horizontal resolution. PREMIER shall fly in tandem formation looking backwards to METOP's swath and thereby explore the benefit of 3-dimensional information for meteorological/environmental analyses and climate forcing investigations. As currently planned and if implemented, IRLS will cover a total horizontal field of about 360 km and observe the limb at altitudes between 4 and 52 km. The vertical spatial sampling distance (SSD) will be well below 1 km. It will be run in two different exclusive modes to address scientific questions about atmospheric dynamics and chemistry at spectral samplings of ~1.2 cm-1 and ~0.2 cm-1, respectively. In such configuration IRLS will be composed of an imaging array with about 1800 macro pixels or sub-samples, thereby allowing cloud imaging and rejection at sufficient spatial resolution. We will present an overview of the instrument requirements as derived from the scientific requirements, the present status of the mission, and we will give an overview of the currently identified technology needs and instrument predevelopments.

  10. Role of the advanced IR sounder in land surface remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuteson, Robert O.

    2005-09-01

    A new era of Earth remote sensing began with the launch of the NASA EOS Aqua platform with the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) in May 2002. The EOS AIRS instrument is the first in a series of high spectral resolution infrared spectrometers that will allow improved characterization of the global atmospheric temperature and water vapor structure. Follow-on operational sensors with similar sounding capability include the Cross-track InfraRed Sounder (CrIS) on the NPP/NPOESS satellites and the Infrared Advanced Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the European METOP series. These so-called advanced infrared sounders will have a vital role to play in the remote sensing of land ecosystems. This paper describes how the use of Advanced IR Sounder data can be used to improve the accuracy of atmospheric corrections in the thermal IR and provide detailed information on the spectral dependence of the infrared land surface emissivity. Radiance observations from AIRS have been obtained over a large, uniform sandy desert region in the Libyan Desert suitable for evaluation of the 15-km footprints of the NASA AIRS advanced sounder. Analysis of this data indicates a spectral contrast of more than 30% between 12 mm and 9 mm in the surface infrared emissivity due to the presence of the mineral quartz with somewhat smaller contrast at 4 mm. Results of a method for separation of infrared surface emissivity and effective surface skin temperature are presented also.

  11. TES Observations of the South Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, T. N.; Kieffer, H. H.; Mullins, K. F.

    1998-09-01

    The recession of the south polar cap has been observed telescopically and from spacecraft in both the visible and thermal regions. Although a simple cap-edge versus time plot has commonly been used, without regard as to the longitude of measurement, Mariner 9, Viking, and HST observations clearly show that the retreating edge is irregular and asymmetric. The data used in this analysis is from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). Repeated TES coverage over the period L_s 185 through L_s 270 acquired much of the cap recession. During this period of time, TES was taking data in the array normal spin (ANS) mode, scanning acrossed the planet as the satellite made one complete roll every 100 minutes. Therefore, the data was irregularly sampled in both space and time. Also, because of the changes in the spacecraft orbit, the spatial resolution of the data is variable, ranging from 25 to 125 kilometers. We have constructed a map of the south polar region that contains the date when the last CO_2 sublimates, hereafter called the crocus date. The crocus date is based on sliding a representative temperature - versus - time curve along the observations for each location in the polar region and selecting the season of maximum temperature change. Recessions in the classic area ``Mountains of Mitchell'' are delayed significantly, disappearing approximately at L_s 260. High resolution (26 Km) brightness temperature data at L_s 244 confirms that solid CO_2 is the dominant cold component. One region (approx. 72-80 S, 180-250 W) within the annual polar cap became dark long before the temperatures begin to rise; in comparison with most areas that showed a gradual increase in brightness until a rapid darkening as the temperature rose well above CO_2 frost value. This dark region, here after called the Kidney Bean region, appears to be a major contributor to the asymmetric polar recession. The cause of the Kidney Bean region's unexpected behavior is

  12. New TES Search and Subset Application

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-08-06

    New TES Search and Subset Application Search & Subset Application Wednesday, September 19, 2012 The Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) at NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with the ...

  13. How Well Can Infrared Sounders Observe the Atmosphere and Surface Through Clouds?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.; Strow, L. Larrabee; Yang, Ping

    2010-01-01

    Infrared sounders, such as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and the Cross-track Infrared sounder (CrIS), have a cloud-impenetrable disadvantage in observing the atmosphere and surface under opaque cloudy conditions. However, recent studies indicate that hyperspectral, infrared sounders have the ability to detect cloud effective-optical and microphysical properties and to penetrate optically thin clouds in observing the atmosphere and surface to a certain degree. We have developed a retrieval scheme dealing with atmospheric conditions with cloud presence. This scheme can be used to analyze the retrieval accuracy of atmospheric and surface parameters under clear and cloudy conditions. In this paper, we present the surface emissivity results derived from IASI global measurements under both clear and cloudy conditions. The accuracy of surface emissivity derived under cloudy conditions is statistically estimated in comparison with those derived under clear sky conditions. The retrieval error caused by the clouds is shown as a function of cloud optical depth, which helps us to understand how well infrared sounders can observe the atmosphere and surface through clouds.

  14. MGS TES Measurements of Dust and Ice Aerosol Behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, R. T.; Wolff, M. J.; Christensen, P. R.

    2000-10-01

    The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES, Christensen et al., Science, v279, 1692-1697, 1998) on board the Mars Global Surveyor obtains simultaneous solar band and thermal IR spectral emission-phase-function (EPF) observations with global spatial coverage and continuous seasonal sampling. These measurements allow the first comprehensive study of the coupled visible scattering and thermal IR absorption properties of Mars atmospheric aerosols, a fundamental requirement towards defining opacities, particle sizes, and particle shapes for separable dust and water ice aerosol components. Furthermore, TES limb sounding at solar band and IR wavelengths may be analyzed in the context of these EPF column determinations to constrain the distinctive vertical profile behaviors of dust and ice clouds. We present initial radiative transfer analyses of TES visible and IR EPFs, which indicate surprisingly complex dust and ice aerosol behaviors over all latitudes and seasons. Distinctive backscattering peaks of variable intensity are observed for several types of water ice clouds, along with evidence for ice-coated dust aerosols. We will present a broad spatial and temporal sampling of solar band and spectral IR results for Mars atmospheric ice and dust aerosols observed over the 1998-2000 period. This research is supported by the MGS Participating Scientist and MED Science Data Analysis programs.

  15. Mars Aerocapture and Validation of Mars-GRAM with TES Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Duvall, Aleta; Keller, Vernon W.

    2005-01-01

    Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is a widely-used engineering- level Mars atmospheric model. Applications include systems design, performance analysis, and operations planning for aerobraking, entry descent and landing, and aerocapture. Typical Mars aerocapture periapsis altitudes (for systems with rigid-aeroshell heat shields) are about 50 km. This altitude is above the 0-40 km height range covered by Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) nadir observations. Recently, TES limb sounding data have been made available, spanning more than two Mars years (more than 200,000 data profiles) with altitude coverage up to about 60 km, well within the height range of interest for aerocapture. Results are presented comparing Mars-GRAM atmospheric density with densities from TES nadir and limb sounding observations. A new Mars-GRAM feature is described which allows individual TES nadir or limb profiles to be extracted from the large TES databases, and to be used as an optional replacement for standard Mars-GRAM background (climatology) conditions. For Monte-Carlo applications such as aerocapture guidance and control studies, Mars-GRAM perturbations are available using these TES profile background conditions.

  16. Multiorder etalon sounder (MOES) development and test for balloon experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Paul B.; Wnag, Jinxue; Wu, Jian

    1993-01-01

    The Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI), with its high throughput and high spectral resolution has been used in the remote-sensing measurements of the earth's atmospheric composition, winds, and temperatures. The most recent satellite instruments include the Fabry-Perot interferometer flown on the Dynamics Explorer-2 (DE-2), the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI), and the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) flown on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). These instruments measure the Doppler line profiles of the emission and absorption of certain atmospheric species (such as atomic oxygen) in the visible and infrared spectral region. The successful space flight of DE-FPI, HRDI, and CLAES on UARS demonstrated the extremely high spectral resolution and ruggedness of the etalon system for the remote sensing of earth and planetary atmospheres. Recently, an innovative FPI focal plane detection technique called the Circle-to-Line Interferometer Optical (CLIO) system was invented at the Space Physics Research Laboratory. The CLIO simplifies the FPI focal plane detection process by converting the circular rings or fringes into a linear pattern similar to that produced by a conventional spectrometer, while retaining the throughput advantage of the etalon interferometer. The combination of FPI and CLIO allows the development of more sensitive Fabry-Perot interferometers in the infrared for the remote sensing of the lower atmospheres of Earth and possibly other planets. The Multiorder Etalon Sounder (MOES), a combination of the rugged etalon and the CLIO, compares very favorably to other space-borne optical instruments in terms of performance versus complexity. The new instrument is expected to be rugged, compact, and very suitable for an operational temperature and moisture sounder. With this technique, the contamination of radiance measurements by emissions of other gases is also minimized. At the Space Physics Research Laboratory (SPRL), the MOES

  17. TES V006 L2 Ozone Product Reprocessing Complete

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-03-18

    TES V006 L2 Ozone Product Reprocessing Complete Wednesday, February 18, 2015 An improvement in the TES Level 2 ozone species retrieval quality flag algorithm was implemented to utilize the TES water and atmospheric temperature retrievals in the ozone quality determination.  Updates to the V006 TES Level 2 ozone standard ...

  18. TES (Thermal Energy Storage) Video News Release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    TES is an in-space technology experiment that flew on STS-62. Its intent is to investigate the behavior of two different thermal energy storage materials as they undergo repeated melting and freezing in the microgravity environment.

  19. Validation of TES ammonia observations at the single pixel scale in the San Joaquin Valley during DISCOVER-AQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kang; Cady-Pereira, Karen; Miller, David J.; Tao, Lei; Zondlo, Mark A.; Nowak, John B.; Neuman, J. A.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Müller, Markus; Wisthaler, Armin; Scarino, Amy J.; Hostetler, Chris A.

    2015-05-01

    Ammonia measurements from a vehicle-based, mobile open-path sensor and those from aircraft were compared with Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) NH3 columns at the pixel scale during the NASA Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality field experiment. Spatial and temporal mismatches were reduced by having the mobile laboratory sample in the same areas as the TES footprints. To examine how large heterogeneities in the NH3 surface mixing ratios may affect validation, a detailed spatial survey was performed within a single TES footprint around the overpass time. The TES total NH3 column above a single footprint showed excellent agreement with the in situ total column constructed from surface measurements with a difference of 2% (within the combined measurement uncertainties). The comparison was then extended to a TES transect of nine footprints where aircraft data (5-80 ppbv) were available in a narrow spatiotemporal window (<10 km, <1 h). The TES total NH3 columns above the nine footprints agreed to within 6% of the in situ total columns derived from the aircraft-based measurements. Finally, to examine how TES captures surface spatial gradients at the interpixel scale, ground-based, mobile measurements were performed directly underneath a TES transect, covering nine footprints within ±1.5 h of the overpass. The TES total columns were strongly correlated (R2 = 0.82) with the median NH3 mixing ratios measured at the surface. These results provide the first in situ validation of the TES total NH3 column product, and the methodology is applicable to other satellite observations of short-lived species at the pixel scale.

  20. Advanced Atmospheric Sounder and Imaging Radiometer (AASIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Design information for the Advanced Atmospheric Sounder and Imaging Radiometer is reported, which was developed to determine the configuration of a sensor for IR and visible imaging. The areas of technology reported include: systems design, optics, mechanics, electronics, detectors, radiative cooler, and radiometric calibration.

  1. Channel alignment and radiometry in hyperspectral atmospheric infrared sounders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Denis A.; Aumanna, H. H.; Pagano, Thomas S.; Overoye, Kenneth R.; Schindler, Rudolf A.

    2005-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a hyper-spectral infrared sounder which covers the 3.7 to 15,4 micron region with 2378 spectral channels. The AIRS instrument specification called for spatial co-registration of all channels to better than 2% of the field of view. Pre-launch testing confirmed that this requirement was met, since the standard deviations in the centroids was about 1% of the 13.5 km IFOV in scan and 3% in track. Detailed analysis of global AIRS data show that the typical scene gradient in 10 micron window channels is about I .3K/km rms. The way these gradients, which are predominantly caused by clouds, manifest themselves in the data depends on the details of the instrument design and the way the spectral channels are used in the data analysis, AIRS temperature and moisture retrievals use 328 of the 2378 channels from 17 independent arrays. As a result, the effect of the boresight misalignment averages to zero mean. Any increase in the effective noise is less than 0.2K. Also, there is no discernable performance degradation of products at the 45 km spatial resolution in the presence of partially cloudy scenes with up to 80% cloudiness. Single pixel radiometric differences between channels with boresight alignment differences can be appreciable and can affect scientific investigations on a single 15km footprint scale, particularly near coastlines, thunderstorms and surface emissivity inhomogeneities.

  2. Lessons Learned from Previous Space-Borne Sounders as a Guide to Future Sounder Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Deshpande, Manohar D.; Farrell,William M.; Fung, Shing F.; Osherovich, Vladimir A.; Pfaff, Rovert E.; Rowland, Douglas E.; Adrian, Mark L.

    2008-01-01

    Space-borne radio sounding is considered to be the gold standard for electron-density (N(sub e)) measurements compared to other techniques even under low-density conditions, such as N(sub e) < 1/cu cm, when other techniques are known to experience difficulties. These reliable measurements are not restricted to in-situ N(sub e) determinations since a spaceborne sounder can provide vertical N(sub e) profiles (N(sub e)(h)) from the spacecraft altitude to the altitude of maximum N(sub e). Near-conjunction studies involving the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) satellites in the topside ionosphere and Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) near the altitude of the F-region peak density have verified that, even at the greatest distance from the sounder, the ISIS-derived N(sub e)(h) profiles agree with the DE-2 Langmuir-probe measurements to within about 30% over a density range of more than two decades. Space-borne sounders can also provide N(sub e) profiles along the magnetic-field B, by inverting echoes that are ducted along field-aligned irregularities (FAI), and can provide information about the terrain beneath the satellite by examining surface reflections in the frequency range above the ionospheric penetration frequency. Many nations have launched rocket and satellite radio sounders in geospace over more than 4 decades and there have been sounders on space-probes and in orbit around other planets. Here we will summarize some of the lessons learned from these accomplishments by analyzing data from radio sounders on the Alouette and ISIS satellites and the OEDIPUS and other rockets in the terrestrial ionosphere, the IMAGE satellite in the terrestrial magnetosphere, the Ulysses space probe in Jupiter's 10 plasma torus and the MARSIS satellite in orbit around Mars. The emphasis will be on information deduced concerning (1) fundamental plasma processes and gradients in N, and B in the vicinity of the sounders from sounder-stimulated plasma resonances and

  3. Cross-validation of IASI/MetOp derived tropospheric δD with TES and ground-based FTIR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacour, J.-L.; Clarisse, L.; Worden, J.; Schneider, M.; Barthlott, S.; Hase, F.; Risi, C.; Clerbaux, C.; Hurtmans, D.; Coheur, P.-F.

    2014-11-01

    The Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) flying on-board MetOpA and MetOpB is able to capture fine isotopic variations of the HDO to H2O ratio (δD) in the troposphere. Such observations at the high spatio temporal resolution of the sounder are of great interest to improve our understanding of the mechanisms controlling humidity in the troposphere. In this study we aim to empirically assess the validity of our error estimation previously evaluated theoretically. To achieve this, we compare IASI δD retrieved profiles with other available profiles of δD, from the TES infrared sounder onboard AURA and from three ground-based FTIR stations produced within the MUSICA project: the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change) sites Kiruna and Izana, and the TCCON site Karlsruhe, which in addition to near-infrared TCCON spectra also records mid-infrared spectra. We describe the achievable level of agreement between the different retrievals and show that these theoretical errors are in good agreement with empirical differences. The comparisons are made at different locations from tropical to Arctic latitudes, above sea and above land. Generally IASI and TES are similarly sensitive to δD in the free troposphere which allows to compare their measurements directly. At tropical latitudes where IASI's sensitivity is lower than that of TES, we show that the agreement improves when taking into account the sensitivity of IASI in the TES retrieval. For the comparison IASI-FTIR only direct comparisons are performed because of similar sensitivities. We identify a quasi negligible bias in the free troposphere (-3‰) between IASI retrieved δD with the TES one, which are bias corrected, but an important with the ground-based FTIR reaching -47‰. We also suggest that model-satellite observations comparisons could be optimized with IASI thanks to its high spatial and temporal sampling.

  4. Industrial waste materials and by-products as thermal energy storage (TES) materials: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Andrea; Miró, Laia; Gil, Antoni; Rodríguez-Aseguinolaza, Javier; Barreneche, Camila; Calvet, Nicolas; Py, Xavier; Fernández, A. Inés; Grágeda, Mario; Ushak, Svetlana; Cabeza, Luisa F.

    2016-05-01

    A wide variety of potential materials for thermal energy storage (TES) have been identify depending on the implemented TES method, Sensible, latent or thermochemical. In order to improve the efficiency of TES systems more alternatives are continuously being sought. In this regard, this paper presents the review of low cost heat storage materials focused mainly in two objectives: on the one hand, the implementation of improved heat storage devices based on new appropriate materials and, on the other hand, the valorisation of waste industrial materials will have strong environmental, economic and societal benefits such as reducing the landfilled waste amounts, reducing the greenhouse emissions and others. Different industrial and municipal waste materials and by products have been considered as potential TES materials and have been characterized as such. Asbestos containing wastes, fly ashes, by-products from the salt industry and from the metal industry, wastes from recycling steel process and from copper refining process and dross from the aluminium industry, and municipal wastes (glass and nylon) have been considered. This work shows a great revalorization of wastes and by-product opportunity as TES materials, although more studies are needed to achieve industrial deployment of the idea.

  5. Mars Global Surveyor TES Results: Observations of Atmospheric Dust During Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Pearl, J. C.; Conrath, B. J.; Christensen, P. R.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor entered mapping orbit around Mars in March 1999. Infrared spectra returned by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) are very well suited for monitoring column-integrated infrared dust opacity. A global view of dust opacity is possible on a daily basis allowing the detailed study of the evolution of dust storms and the seasonal trend of the background dust opacity. Information about the vertical distribution of dust in the atmosphere can be obtained by examination of TES spectra taken in a limb-viewing geometry. We report here on 1) the observed horizontal distribution of dust aerosols and their evolution with time during the mapping phase of the Mars Global Surveyor mission so far (roughly covering northern hemisphere summer and early fall), and 2) the vertical distribution of dust aerosols as determined from TES spectra taken in the limb-viewing geometry.

  6. Determination of cloud parameters from infrared sounder data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H.-Y. M.

    1984-01-01

    The World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) plan is concerned with the need to develop a uniform global cloud climatology as part of a broad research program on climate processes. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) has been approved as the first project of the WCRP. The ISCCP has the basic objective to collect and analyze satellite radiance data to infer the global distribution of cloud radiative properties in order to improve the modeling of cloud effects on climate. Research is conducted to explore an algorithm for retrieving cloud properties by utilizing the available infrared sounder data from polar-orbiting satellites. A numerical method is developed for computing cloud top heights, amount, and emissivity on the basis of a parameterized infrared radiative transfer equation for cloudy atmospheres. Theoretical studies were carried out by considering a synthetic atmosphere.

  7. Radiometric consistency assessment of hyperspectral infrared sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Han, Y.; Jin, X.; Chen, Y.; Tremblay, D. A.

    2015-07-01

    The radiometric and spectral consistency among the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) is fundamental for the creation of long-term infrared (IR) hyperspectral radiance benchmark datasets for both inter-calibration and climate-related studies. In this study, the CrIS radiance measurements on Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite are directly compared with IASI on MetOp-A and -B at the finest spectral scale and with AIRS on Aqua in 25 selected spectral regions through one year of simultaneous nadir overpass (SNO) observations to evaluate radiometric consistency of these four hyperspectral IR sounders. The spectra from different sounders are paired together through strict spatial and temporal collocation. The uniform scenes are selected by examining the collocated Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) pixels. Their brightness temperature (BT) differences are then calculated by converting the spectra onto common spectral grids. The results indicate that CrIS agrees well with IASI on MetOp-A and IASI on MetOp-B at the longwave IR (LWIR) and middle-wave IR (MWIR) bands with 0.1-0.2 K differences. There are no apparent scene-dependent patterns for BT differences between CrIS and IASI for individual spectral channels. CrIS and AIRS are compared at the 25 spectral regions for both Polar and Tropical SNOs. The combined global SNO datasets indicate that, the CrIS-AIRS BT differences are less than or around 0.1 K among 21 of 25 comparison spectral regions and they range from 0.15 to 0.21 K in the remaining 4 spectral regions. CrIS-AIRS BT differences in some comparison spectral regions show weak scene-dependent features.

  8. Radiometric consistency assessment of hyperspectral infrared sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Han, Y.; Jin, X.; Chen, Y.; Tremblay, D. A.

    2015-11-01

    The radiometric and spectral consistency among the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) is fundamental for the creation of long-term infrared (IR) hyperspectral radiance benchmark data sets for both intercalibration and climate-related studies. In this study, the CrIS radiance measurements on Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite are directly compared with IASI on MetOp-A and MetOp-B at the finest spectral scale and with AIRS on Aqua in 25 selected spectral regions through simultaneous nadir overpass (SNO) observations in 2013, to evaluate radiometric consistency of these four hyperspectral IR sounders. The spectra from different sounders are paired together through strict spatial and temporal collocation. The uniform scenes are selected by examining the collocated Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) pixels. Their brightness temperature (BT) differences are then calculated by converting the spectra onto common spectral grids. The results indicate that CrIS agrees well with IASI on MetOp-A and IASI on MetOp-B at the long-wave IR (LWIR) and middle-wave IR (MWIR) bands with 0.1-0.2 K differences. There are no apparent scene-dependent patterns for BT differences between CrIS and IASI for individual spectral channels. CrIS and AIRS are compared at the 25 spectral regions for both polar and tropical SNOs. The combined global SNO data sets indicate that the CrIS-AIRS BT differences are less than or around 0.1 K among 21 of 25 spectral regions and they range from 0.15 to 0.21 K in the remaining four spectral regions. CrIS-AIRS BT differences in some comparison spectral regions show weak scene-dependent features.

  9. VAS demonstration: (VISSR Atmospheric Sounder) description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, H. E.; Uccellini, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    The VAS Demonstration (VISSR Atmospheric Sounder) is a project designed to evaluate the VAS instrument as a remote sensor of the Earth's atmosphere and surface. This report describes the instrument and ground processing system, the instrument performance, the valiation as a temperature and moisture profiler compared with ground truth and other satellites, and assesses its performance as a valuable meteorological tool. The report also addresses the availability of data for scientific research.

  10. Tropospheric Vertical Distribution of Tropical Atlantic Ozone Observed by TES during the Northern African Biomass Burning Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jourdain, L.; Worden, H. M.; Worden, J. R.; Bowman, K.; Li, Q.; Eldering, A.; Kulawik, S. S.; Osterman, G.; Boersma, K. F.; Fisher, B.; Rinsland, C. P.; Beer, R.; Gunson, M.

    2007-01-01

    We present vertical distributions of ozone from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) over the tropical Atlantic Ocean during January 2005. Between 10N and 20S, TES ozone retrievals have Degrees of Freedom for signal (DOF) around 0.7 - 0.8 each for tropospheric altitudes above and below 500 hPa. As a result, TES is able to capture for the first time from space a distribution characterized by two maxima: one in the lower troposphere north of the ITCZ and one in the middle and upper troposphere south of the ITCZ. We focus our analysis on the north tropical Atlantic Ocean, where most of previous satellite observations showed discrepancies with in-situ ozone observations and models. Trajectory analyses and a sensitivity study using the GEOS-Chem model confirm the influence of northern Africa biomass burning on the elevated ozone mixing ratios observed by TES over this region.

  11. Topside Ionospheric Sounder for CubeSats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, C.; Pratt, J.; Fish, C. S.; Winkler, C.; Pilinski, M.; Azeem, I.; Crowley, G.; Jeppesen, M.; Martineau, R.

    2014-12-01

    This presentation will outline the design of a Topside Ionospheric Sounder (TIS) for CubeSats. In the same way that an ionosonde measures the ionospheric profile from the ground, a Topside Sounder measures the ionospheric profile from a location above the F-region peak. The TIS will address the need for increased space situational awareness and environmental monitoring by estimating electron density profiles in the topside of the ionosphere. The TIS will measure topside electron density profiles for plasma frequencies ranging from 0.89 MHz to 28.4 MHz below the satellite altitude. The precision of the measurement will be 5% or 10,000 p/cm^3. The TIS average power consumption will be below 10 W and a mass of less than 10 kg, so it is appropriate for a 6U Cubesat (or multiple of that size). The sounder will operate via a transmitted frequency sweep across the desired plasma frequencies which, upon reception, can be differenced to determine range and density information of the topside ionosphere. The velocity of the spacecraft necessitates careful balancing of range resolution and frequency knowledge requirements as well as novel processing techniques to correctly associate the return signal with the correct plasma frequency. TIS is being designed to provide a low cost, low mass spacecraft that can provide accurate topside profiles of the ionospheric electron density in order to further understanding of ionospheric structure and dynamic processes in the ionosphere.

  12. Spectroscopic Measurement of L X-Rays Emitted by 241Am Source by TES Microcalorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, M.; Yamaguchi, K.; Maehata, K.; Iyomoto, N.; Ishibashi, K.; Takasaki, K.; Nakamura, K.; Tanaka, K.; Yamanaka, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Nondestructive plutonium monitoring during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel and in mixed-oxide-fuel fabrication facilities is expected to require spectroscopic measurements of L X-rays ranging from 10 to 20 keV. To this end, L X-ray emission intensities of transuranium elements will be important parameters in estimating the plutonium isotopic composition from L X-ray spectra. However, owing to fine structure within the L X-ray spectra, significant discrepancies exist among theoretical values, reference and experimental data concerning these emission intensities. To obtain better spectroscopic measurements, we used a TES microcalorimeter to get the energy spectrum of L X-rays emitted by 237Np resulting from α-decay of a 241Am source. Values for the L X-ray emission intensities were estimated by analyzing the spectral data and compared with previous data. We advocate for improvements in evaluation of emission intensities given the enhanced precision afforded by TES microcalorimetry.

  13. Successful Mars remote sensors, MO THEMIS and MER Mini-TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Steven; Christensen, Phil

    2003-11-01

    This paper describes results of the calibration of the Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) and the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) built by Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing (SBRS) under contract to Arizona State University (ASU). This paper also serves as an update to an earlier paper (Silverman, et al., 2003) for mission description and instrument designs (Schueler, et al., 2003). A major goal of the Mars Exploration Program is to help determine whether life ever existed on Mars via detailed in situ studies and surface sample return. It is essential to identify landing sites with the highest probability of containing samples indicative of early pre-biotic or biotic environments. Of particular interest are aqueous and/or hydrothermal environments in which life could have existed, or regions of current near-surface water or heat sources. The search requires detailed geologic mapping and accurate interpretations of site composition and history in a global context. THEMIS and Mini-TES were designed to do this and builds upon a wealth of data from previous experiments. Previous experiments include the Mariner 6/7 Mars Infrared Radiometer (MIR) and Infrared Spectrometer, the Mariner 9 Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer (IRIS), the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM), the Phobos Termoscan, and the continuing Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission using the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) and MGS Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). TES has collected hyperspectral images (up to 286 spectral bands from 6-50 μm) of the entire martian surface, providing an initial global reconnaissance of mineralogy and thermophysical properties. By covering the key 6.3 to 15.0 μm region in both TES and THEMIS, it is possible to combine TES fine spectral resolution with THEMIS fine spatial resolution to achieve a global mineralogic inventory at the spatial scales necessary for detailed geologic studies within the Odyssey data resources. Mini-TES is a single detector

  14. TES L2 Lite Standard Products

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-07-21

    ... and data/data comparisons. This product can be used for science analysis as each data product is fully characterized.   “NOTE: An update to the TES L2 Lite Products PGE corrected a date range issue in the ...

  15. Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) performance analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenyon, D.; Petheram, J.

    1991-01-01

    The science objectives of the NASA's Laser Atmospheric Sounder (LAWS) are discussed, and results of the performance analysis of the LAWS system are presented together with the instrument configuration used for these performance analyses. The results of analyses show that the science requirements for the wind-velocity accuracies of m/sec in the lower troposphere and 5 m/sec in the upper troposphere will be met by the present design of the LAWS system. The paper presents the performance estimates of the LAWS in terms of the global coverage, spatial resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, line-of-sight velocity error, and horizontal inversion accuracy.

  16. View to the south with the Two Sounder Antennas on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View to the south with the Two Sounder Antennas on the left - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Four Sounder Antennas, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  17. Topside sounder observations of equatorial bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, P. L.; Benson, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    Large scale regions of depleted equatorial ionospheric plasma, called equatorial bubbles, are investigated using topside sounder data. The sounder's unique remote measuring capability enables the magnetic field-aligned nature of the bubbles to be investigated. A search of all available Alouette 2 and ISIS 1 ionograms during nighttime perigee passes near the magnetic equator has revealed a variety of echo signatures associated with bubbles. In addition to a sudden drop in electron density, these signatures usually include in situ spread F and ducted traces. The ducted traces have been used to determine the electron density distribution and to infer changes in ion composition along the magnetic field line within the duct associated with the bubble. In some cases it can be determined that the bubble is asymmetric with respect to the magnetic equator. Even though such features require 3 dimensional models for their explanation, the great field-aligned extent of the bubbles (relative to their cross section) suggests that current theories, which ignore variations along the magnetic field, are still applicable.

  18. The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite microwave limb sounder instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barath, F. T.; Chavez, M. C.; Cofield, R. E.; Flower, D. A.; Frerking, M. A.; Gram, M. B.; Harris, W. M.; Holden, J. R.; Jarnot, R. F.; Kloezeman, W. G.

    1993-01-01

    The microwave limb sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) is the first satellite experiment using limb sounding techniques at microwave frequencies. Primary measurement objectives are stratospheric ClO, O3, H2O, temperature, and pressure. Measurements are of thermal emission: all are performed simultaneously and continuously and are not degraded by ice clouds or volcanic aerosols. The instrument has a 1.6-m mechanically scanning antenna system and contains heterodyne radiometers in spectral bands centred near 63, 183, and 205 GHz. The radiometers operate at ambient temperature and use Schottky-diode mixers with local oscillators derived from phase-locked Gunn oscillators. Frequency tripling by varactor multipliers generates the 183- and 205-GHz local oscillators, and quasi-optical techniques inject these into the mixers. Six 15-channel filter banks spectrally resolve stratospheric thermal emission lines and produce an output spectrum every 2 s. Thermal stability is sufficient for 'total power' measurements which do not require fast chopping. Radiometric calibration, consisting of measurements of cold space and an internal target, is performed every 65-s limb scan. Instrument in-orbit performance has been excellent, and all objectives are being met.

  19. ISM-TES Joint Analysis of Pyroxene on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, C. D.; Mustard, J. F.

    2002-12-01

    Observations made by the ISM instrument on the Phobos II spacecraft provided evidence for martian crustal rock compositions similar to basaltic SNC meteorites. These meteorites contain both ortho- and clino-pyroxene. Analyses of 1 and 2 μm spectral bands showed varying proportions of these two minerals over the low albedo regions observed by ISM. Pyroxene is also observed in TES data using mineral deconvolution models of the thermal emission spectra. Different models disagree on whether there are one or two pyroxenes present in surface materials. The disconnect between ISM and TES observations may result from several issues including differences in interactions of radiation with the surface in the two wavelength ranges, incomplete mineral modeling of TES data due to spectral library limitations, or differences in the surface due to the ten year separation between the missions. An important concern is how visible and near-infrared radiation interact with the surface compared to the way thermal energy is emitted. Thin coatings on the rocks in Syrtis Major were suspected based on spectral slope variability in the ISM data. It is possible that these coatings respond differently in the thermal infrared and affect the interpretation of mineral composition. We address these issues by comparing ISM and TES spectral data directly. The two data sets were gridded and coregistered to a 0.5° resolution. The spectra were then merged to make an extended spectral set covering both wavelength ranges. By comparing the spectral parameters from the near-infrared (ISM) with the mineral deconvolutions, surface-type deconvolutions, and spectral shapes from the thermal infrared (TES), we can learn more about the nature of the surface materials. This work in particular looks at the relationship between the 1 and 2 μm bands and mineral deconvolution-derived pyroxene content. As expected, these quantities are correlated. However, variations in the pyroxene to plagioclase ratio do not

  20. Mineralogy at Meridiani Planum from the Mini-TES experiment on the opportunity rover

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, P.R.; Wyatt, M.B.; Glotch, T.D.; Rogers, A.D.; Anwar, S.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bandfield, J.L.; Blaney, D.L.; Budney, C.; Calvin, W.M.; Fallacaro, A.; Fergason, R.L.; Gorelick, N.; Graff, T.G.; Hamilton, V.E.; Hayes, A.G.; Johnson, J. R.; Knudson, A.T.; McSween, H.Y., Jr.; Mehall, G.L.; Mehall, L.K.; Moersch, J.E.; Morris, R.V.; Smith, M.D.; Squyres, S. W.; Ruff, S.W.; Wolff, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    The Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) on Opportunity investigated the mineral abundances and compositions of outcrops, rocks, and soils at Meridiani Planum. Coarse crystalline hematite and olivine-rich basaltic sands were observed as predicted from orbital TES spectroscopy. Outcrops of aqueous origin are composed of 15 to 35% by volume magnesium and calcium sulfates [a high-silica component modeled as a combination of glass, feldspar, and sheet silicates (???20 to 30%)], and hematite; only minor jarosite is identified in Mini-TES spectra. Mini-TES spectra show only a hematite signature in the millimeter-sized spherules. Basaltic materials have more plagioclase than pyroxene, contain olivine, and are similar in inferred mineral composition to basalt mapped from orbit. Bounce rock is dominated by clinopyroxene and is close in inferred mineral composition to the basaltic martian meteorites. Bright wind streak material matches global dust. Waterlain rocks covered by unaltered basaltic sands suggest a change from an aqueous environment to one dominated by physical weathering.

  1. A joint data record of tropospheric ozone from Aura-TES and MetOp-IASI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oetjen, Hilke; Payne, Vivienne H.; Neu, Jessica L.; Kulawik, Susan S.; Edwards, David P.; Eldering, Annmarie; Worden, Helen M.; Worden, John R.

    2016-08-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on Aura and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on MetOp-A together provide a time series of 10 years of free-tropospheric ozone with an overlap of 3 years. We characterise the differences between TES and IASI ozone measurements and find that IASI's coarser vertical sensitivity leads to a small (< 5 ppb) low bias relative to TES for the free troposphere. The TES-IASI differences are not dependent on season or any other factor and hence the measurements from the two instruments can be merged, after correcting for the offset, in order to study decadal-scale changes in tropospheric ozone. We calculate time series of regional monthly mean ozone in the free troposphere over eastern Asia, the western United States (US), and Europe, carefully accounting for differences in spatial sampling between the instruments. We show that free-tropospheric ozone over Europe and the western US has remained relatively constant over the past decade but that, contrary to expectations, ozone over Asia in recent years does not continue the rapid rate of increase observed from 2004 to 2010.

  2. High-altitude dust layers on Mars: Observations with the Thermal Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzewich, Scott D.; Talaat, Elsayed R.; Toigo, Anthony D.; Waugh, Darryn W.; McConnochie, Timothy H.

    2013-06-01

    Limb-scanning observations of Martian atmospheric dust with the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) over 3 Mars years indicate two distinct altitude layers with persistent maxima in the dust mixing ratio vertical profile. The first, lower maximum in the dust distribution profile is the "high-altitude tropical dust maximum" (HATDM) centered at 20-30 km, previously detected by the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS). Through the observation period, the HATDM followed a repeatable seasonal cycle with a brief absence in early northern spring and reached its highest altitudes and largest amplitude during the dust storm season in southern spring and summer. The HATDM is likely maintained during the day by a combination of convective and topographic updrafts and then degraded at night by scavenging from water ice clouds. The second, upper maximum in the dust distribution profile, which we refer, for convenience, to as the upper dust maximum (UDM), is centered at 45-65 km and is only detected in daytime observations. We see additional evidence of its presence in the limited number of MCS aerosol opacity retrievals available at these altitudes. Comparable dust mixing ratios are nearly absent from this altitude range at night. This upper maximum is generally a northern hemisphere phenomenon, peaking in amplitude in northern summer and nearly absent from the TES observational domain during the dust storm season. We suggest topographic updrafts over Martian volcanoes, small particle size, diurnal transport associated with thermal tides, and scavenging by water ice as probable key factors in the creation of the UDM.

  3. EOS Laser Atmosphere Wind Sounder (LAWS) investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In this final report, the set of tasks that evolved from the Laser Atmosphere Wind Sounder (LAWS) Science Team are reviewed, the major accomplishments are summarized, and a complete set of resulting references provided. The tasks included preparation of a plan for the LAWS Algorithm Development and Evolution Laboratory (LADEL); participation in the preparation of a joint CNES/NASA proposal to build a space-based DWL; involvement in the Global Backscatter Experiments (GLOBE); evaluation of several DWL concepts including 'Quick-LAWS', SPNDL and several direct detection technologies; and an extensive series of system trade studies and Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSE's). In this report, some of the key accomplishments are briefly summarized with reference to interim reports, special reports, conference/workshop presentations, and publications.

  4. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Project Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the status of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). These instruments are on board the EOS Aqua Spacecraft that was launched May 4, 2002. The instruments are working normally. The objectives of the mission were to improve weather forecasting, assist in climate studies, and provide information as to the composition of Earth's atmosphere. The Aqua spacecraft is operating normally, the the primary life-limiting resource is fuel for maneuvers. The presentation also contains charts indicating who are using the data. There is information on the type of data available, and the propsal process. Also there is a few views of some of the planned instruments that were made possible in part due to the success of AIRS.

  5. Climate Change and Sounder Radiometric Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Manning, Evan

    2009-01-01

    Satellite instrument radiometric stability is critical for climate studies. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiances are of sufficient stability and accuracy to serve as a climate data record as evidenced by comparisons with the global network of buoys. In this paper we examine the sensitivity of derived geophysical products to potential instrument radiometric stability issues due to diurnal, orbital and seasonal variations. Our method is to perturb the AIRS radiances and examine the impact to retrieved parameters. Results show that instability in retrieved temperature products will be on the same order of the brightness temperature error in the radiances and follow the same time dependences. AIRS excellent stability makes it ideal for examining impacts of instabilities of future systems on geophysical parameter performance.

  6. RAWS: The spaceborne radar wind sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Richard K.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of the Radar Wind Sounder (RAWS) is discussed. The goals of the RAWS is to estimate the following three qualities: the echo power, to determine rain rate and surface wind velocity; the mean Doppler frequency, to determine the wind velocity in hydrometers; and the spread of the Doppler frequency, to determine the turbulent spread of the wind velocity. Researchers made significant progress during the first year. The feasibility of the concept seems certain. Studies indicate that a reasonably sized system can measure in the presence of ice clouds and dense water clouds. No sensitivity problems exist in rainy environments. More research is needed on the application of the radar to the measurement of rain rates and winds at the sea surface.

  7. RAWS: The spaceborne radar wind sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Richard K.

    1991-09-01

    The concept of the Radar Wind Sounder (RAWS) is discussed. The goals of the RAWS is to estimate the following three qualities: the echo power, to determine rain rate and surface wind velocity; the mean Doppler frequency, to determine the wind velocity in hydrometers; and the spread of the Doppler frequency, to determine the turbulent spread of the wind velocity. Researchers made significant progress during the first year. The feasibility of the concept seems certain. Studies indicate that a reasonably sized system can measure in the presence of ice clouds and dense water clouds. No sensitivity problems exist in rainy environments. More research is needed on the application of the radar to the measurement of rain rates and winds at the sea surface.

  8. Assimilation of the Microwave Limb Sounder Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wargan, K.; Read, W.; Livesey, N.; Wagner, P.; Nguyen. H.; Pawson, S.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that the assimilation of limb-sounder data can significantly improve the representation of ozone in NASA's GEOS Data Assimilation Systems (GEOS-DAS), particularly in the stratosphere. The studies conducted so far utilized retrieved data from the MIPAS, POAM, ILAS and EOS Microwave Limb Sounder (EOS MLS) instruments. Direct assimilation of the radiance data can be seen as the natural next step to those studies. The motivation behind working with radiances is twofold. First, retrieval algorithms use a priori data which are either climatological or are obtained from previous analyses. This introduces additional uncertainty and, in some cases, may lead to "self-contamination"- when the a priori is taken from the same assimilation system in which subsequently ingests the retrieved observations. Second, radiances can be available in near real time thus providing an opportunity for operational assimilation, which could help improve the use of infrared radiance instruments from operational satellite instruments. In this presentation we summarize our ongoing work on an implementation of the assimilation of EOS MLS radiances into the GEOS-5 DAS. This work focuses on assimilation of band 7 brightness temperatures which are sensitive to ozone. Our implementation uses the MLS Callable Forward Model developed by the MLS team at NASA JPL as the observation operator. We will describe our approach and recent results which are not yet final. In particular, we will demonstrate that this approach has a potential to improve the vertical structure of ozone in the lower tropical stratosphere as compared with the retrieved MLS product. We will discuss the computational efficiency of this implementation.

  9. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder on the Earth Observing System

    SciTech Connect

    Aumann, H.H.; Pagano, R.J. . Jet Propulsion Lab.)

    1994-03-01

    Recent breakthroughs in IR detector array and cryocooler technology have made it possible to convert the concepts of optimum, passive, IR sounding to a practical satellite-borne instrument: the Atmospheric infrared Sounder (AIRS), a grating array IR spectrometer temperature sounder. AIRS, together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit and the Microwave Humidity Sounder, will form a complementary sounding system for the Earth Observing System to be launched in the year 2000. The three instruments are expected to become the new operational sounding system for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

  10. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder ClO Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, J. W.; Read, W. G.; Froidevaux, L.; Lungu, T. A.; Perun, V. S.; Stachnik, R. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Fishbein, E. F.; Flower, D. A.; Burke, J. R.; Hardy, J. C.; Nakamura, L. L.; Ridenoure, B. P.; Shippony, Z.; Thurstans, R. P.; Thurstans, R. P.; Avallone, L. M.; Toohey, D. W.; deZafra, R. L.; Shindell, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    Validation of stratospheric ClO measurements by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) is described. Credibility of the measurements is established by (1) the consistency of the measured ClO spectral emission line with the retrieved ClO profiles and (2) comparisons of ClO from MLS with that from correlative measurements by balloon-based, ground-based, and aircraft-based instruments. Values of "noise" (random), "scaling" (multiplicative), and "bias" (additive) uncertainties are determined for the Version 3 data, in the first version public release of the known artifacts in these data are identified. Comparisons with correlative measurements indicate agreement to within the combined uncertainties expected for MLS and the other measurements being compared. It is concluded that MLS Version 3 ClO data, with proper consideration of the uncertainties and "quality" parameters produced with these data, can be used for scientific analyses at retrieval surfaces between 46 and 1 hPa (approximately 20-50 km in height). Future work is planned to correct known problems in the data and improve their quality.

  11. Reflectance and Thermal Infrared Spectroscopy of Mars: Relationship Between ISM and TES for Compositional Determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Joseph (Technical Monitor); Mustard, John

    2004-01-01

    Reflectance spectroscopy has demonstrated that high albedo surfaces on Mars contain heavily altered materials with some component of hematite, poorly crystalline ferric oxides, and an undefined silicate matrix. The spectral properties of many low albedo regions indicate crystalline basalts containing both low and high calcium pyroxene, a mineralogy consistent with the basaltic SNC meteorites. The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) experiment on the Mars Geochemical Surveyor has acquired critical new data relevant to surface composition and mineralogy, but in a wavelength region that is complementary to reflectance spectroscopy. The essence of the completed research was to analyze TES data in the context of reflectance data obtained by the French ISM imaging spectrometer experiment in 1989. This approach increased our understanding of the complementary nature of these wavelength regions for mineralogic determinations using actual observations of the martian surface. The research effort focused on three regions of scientific importance: Syrtis Major-Isidis Basin, Oxia Palus-Arabia, and Valles Marineris. In each region distinct spatial variations related to reflectance, and in derived mineralogic information and interpreted compositional units were analyzed. In addition, specific science questions related to the composition of volcanics and crustal evolution, soil compositions and pedogenic processes, and the relationship between pristine lithologies and weathering provided an overall science-driven framework for the work. The detailed work plan involved colocation of TES and ISM data, extraction of reflectance and emissivity spectra from areas of known reflectance variability, and quantitative analysis using factor analysis and statistical techniques to determine the degree of correspondence between these different wavelength regions. Identified coherent variations in TES spectroscopy were assessed against known atmospheric effects to validate that the variations

  12. Validation of the Radiometric Stability of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, H. H.; Elliott, D.; Strow, L. L.

    2012-01-01

    It has been widely accepted that an infrared sounder in low polar orbit is capable of producing climate quality data, if the spectral brightness temperatures have instrumental trends of less than 10 mK/yr. Achieving measurement stability at this level is not only very demanding of the design of the instrument, it is also pushes the state of art of measuring on orbit what stability is actually achieved. We discuss this using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) L1B data collected between 2002 and 2011. We compare the L1B brightness temperature observed in cloud filtered night tropical ocean spectra (obs) to the brightness temperature calculated based on the known surface emissivity, temperature and water vapor profiles from the ECMWF ReAnalysis (ERA) and the growth rates of CO2, N2O and Ozone. The trend in (obs-calc) is a powerful tool for the evaluation of the stability of the 2378 AIRS channels. We divided the channels into seven classes: All channels which sound in the stratosphere (at pressure levels below 150 hPa), 14 micron CO2 sounding, 4 micron CO2 P-branch sounding, 4 micron CO2 R-branch sounding, water vapor sounding, shortwave surface sounding and longwave surface sounding. The peak in the weighting function at 1050 hPa separates sounding and surface channels. The boundary between shortwave and longwave is 5 microns. Except for the stratosphere sounding channels, the remaining six groups have (obs-calc) trends of less than 20 mK/yr. The longwave surface channels have trends of 2 mK/yr, significantly less than the 8 mK/yr trend seem in the shortwave window channels. Based on the design of the instrument, trends within a group of channels should be the same. While the longwave and shortwave trends are less than the canonical 10 mK/yr, the larger trend in the shortwave channels could be an artifact of using the pre-launch determined calibration coefficients. This is currently under evaluation. The trend in (obs-calc) for the non-surface sounding channels, in

  13. Validation of the radiometric stability of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumann, H. H.; Elliott, D.; Strow, L. L.

    2012-09-01

    It has been widely accepted that an infrared sounder in low polar orbit is capable of producing climate quality data, if the spectral brightness temperatures have instrumental trends of less than 10 mK/yr. Achieving measurement stability at this level is not only very demanding of the design of the instrument, it is also pushes the state of art of measuring on orbit what stability is actually achieved. We discuss this using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) L1B data collected between 2002 and 2011. We compare the L1B brightness temperature observed in cloud filtered night tropical ocean spectra (obs) to the brightness temperature calculated based on the known surface emissivity, temperature and water vapor profiles from the ECMWF ReAnalysis (ERA) and the growth rates of CO2 , N2O and Ozone. The trend in (obscalc) is a powerful tool for the evaluation of the stability of the 2378 AIRS channels. We divided the channels into seven classes: All channels which sound in the stratosphere (at pressure levels below 150 hPa), 14 um CO2 sounding, 4 um CO2 P-branch sounding, 4um CO2 R-branch sounding, water vapor sounding, shortwave surface sounding and longwave surface sounding. The peak in the weighting function at 1050 hPa separates sounding and surface channels. The boundary between shortwave and longwave is 5 μm. Except for the stratosphere sounding channels, the remaining six groups have (obs-calc) trends of less than 20 mK/yr. The longwave surface channels have trends of 2 mK/yr, significantly less than the 8 mK/yr trend seem in the shortwave window channels. Based on the design of the instrument, trends within a group of channels should be the same. While the longwave and shortwave trends are less than the canonical 10 mK/yr, the larger trend in the shortwave channels could be an artifact of using the pre-launch determined calibration coefficients. This is currently under evaluation. The trend in (obs-calc) for the non-surface sounding channels, in particular for

  14. Reconciling the MOLA, TES, and Neutron Observations of the North Polar CO2 Mass Budget on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, Robert M.; Mattingly, B.; Titus, T. N.

    2003-01-01

    There are now three independent observations of the CO2 polar cap mass budget of Mars' north polar cap. The first is based elevation changes detected by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). The second is based on MGS Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) broadband observations of the solar and infrared radiation fields at the top of the atmosphere. The third is based on neutron counts measured by the neutron spectrometer (NS) on Odyssey. If one assumes a cap density of 910 kg/cu m, then the peak mass loading poleward of 85 N inferred from the MOLA data is approx. 1090 kg/sq m, which compares to approx. 1150 kg/sq m inferred from TES for the same region, and 700 kg/sq m from the NS data. TES and MOLA are in good agreement, but are about 60% higher than the NS data. Is there a way to reconcile these discrepancies?

  15. TES observations of the interannual variability of PAN over Northern Eurasia and the relationship to springtime fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Liye; Fischer, Emily V.; Payne, Vivienne H.; Worden, John R.; Jiang, Zhe

    2015-09-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry through its impact on remote oxidant and nitrogen budgets. PAN is formed rapidly in boreal fire plumes through the oxidation of short-lived volatile organic compounds in the presence of nitrogen oxide radicals. Here we present new satellite observations of PAN from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) over northern Eurasia for April 2006-2010. We observe large interannual variability in TES PAN observations, and we show that fires are one source of this variability using (1) Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Mean Fire Radiative Power observations and (2) Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory backward trajectories. We also show that cold springtime temperatures and enhanced vertical mixing in the lower free troposphere over northeastern Eurasia likely played a role in the detection of PAN from TES in April 2006 in this region.

  16. Development and evaluation of a sensitive and specific assay for diagnosis of human toxocariasis by use of three recombinant antigens (TES-26, TES-30USM, and TES-120).

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Suharni; Azmi, Norhaida Che; Noordin, Rahmah

    2009-06-01

    Diagnosis of human toxocariasis currently relies on serologic tests that use Toxocara excretory-secretory (TES) antigen to detect immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to the larvae. In general, however, these assays do not have adequate specificity for use in countries in which other soil-transmitted helminths are endemic. The use of recombinant antigens in these assays, however, is promising for improving the specificity of the diagnosis of toxocariasis. Toward this goal, we developed an IgG4 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) involving three recombinant antigens: rTES-30USM (previously produced), rTES-26, and rTES-120. The latter two antigens were produced by reverse transcription-PCR cloning; subcloned into glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged and His-tagged prokaryotic expression vectors, respectively; and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant proteins were subsequently purified by affinity chromatography using GST and His-Trap resins. The diagnostic potential of each purified recombinant antigen was tested with various immunoglobulin classes (IgG, IgM, and IgE) and IgG subclasses. The IgG4 ELISA was determined to have the highest specificity and was further evaluated using a panel of serum samples. The rTES-26 IgG4 ELISA showed 80.0% (24/30 samples positive) sensitivity, and both the rTES-30USM IgG4 ELISA and rTES-120 IgG4 ELISA had 93.0% (28/30) sensitivity. Combined use of rTES-120 and rTES-30 IgG4 ELISA for the diagnosis of toxocariasis provided 100% sensitivity. The specificities of rTES-26, rTES-30USM, and rTES-120 antigens were 96.2%, 93.9%, and 92.0%, respectively. These results indicate that the development of a diagnostic test using the three recombinant antigens will allow for more-accurate detection of toxocariasis. PMID:19369434

  17. Cross-track infrared sounder FPAA performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterjohn, Stacy A.; D'Souza, Arvind I.; Dawson, Larry C.; Dolan, Peter N.; Jefferson, Genae; Stapelbroek, Maryn G.; Willis, Richard W.; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal S.; Boehmer, Ellen; Ehlert, John C.; Andrews, James E.

    2005-01-01

    The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), an interferometric sounder, is one of the instruments within the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) suite. CrIS measures earth radiances at high spectral resolution providing accurate and high-resolution pressure, temperature and moisture profiles of the atmosphere. These profiles are used in weather prediction models to track storms, predict levels of precipitation etc. Each CrIS instrument contains three Focal Plane Array Assemblies (FPAAs): SWIR [λc(98 K) ~ 5 mm], MWIR [λc(98 K) ~ 9 mm], and LWIR [λc(81 K) ~ 16 mm]. Each FPAA consists of nine large (850-mm-diameter) photovoltaic detectors arranged in a 3 x 3 pattern, with each detector having an accompanying cold preamplifier. This paper describes the selection methodology of the detectors that constitute the FPAAs and the performance of the CrIS SWIR, MWIR and LWIR proto-flight FPAAs. The appropriate bandgap n-type Hg1-xCdxTe was grown on lattice-matched CdZnTe. 850-mm-diameter photodiodes were manufactured using a Lateral Collection Diode (LCD) architecture. Custom pre-amplifiers were designed and built to interface with these large photodiodes. The LWIR, MWIR and SWIR detectors are operated at 81 K, 98 K and 98 K respectively. These relatively high operating temperatures permit the use of passive radiators on the instrument to cool the detectors. Performance goals are D* = 5.0 x 1010 cm-Hz1/2/W at 14.0 mm, 9.3 x 1010 cm-Hz1/2/W at 8.0 mm and 3.0 x 1011 cm-Hz1/2/W at 4.64 mm. Measured mean values for the nine photodiodes in each of the LWIR, MWIR and SWIR FPAAs are D* = 5.3 x 1010 cm-Hz1/2/W at 14.0 mm, 1.0 x 1011 cm-Hz1/2/W at 8.0 mm and 3.1 x 1011 cm-Hz1/2/W at 4.64 mm. These compare favorably with the following BLIP D* values calculated at the nominal flux condition: D* = 8.36 x 1010 cm Hz1/2/W at 14.0 mm, 1.4 x 1011 cm-Hz1/2/W at 8.0 mm and 4.1 x 1011 cm-Hz1/2/W at 4.64 mm.

  18. Work of PZT ceramics sounder for sound source artificial larynx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugio, Yuuichi; Kanetake, Ryota; Tanaka, Akimitsu; Ooe, Katsutoshi

    2007-04-01

    We aim to develop the easy-to-use artificial larynx with high tone quality. We focus on using a PZT ceramics sounder as its sound source, because it is small size, low power consumption, and harmless to humans. But conventional PZT ceramics sounder have the problem that it cannot generate an enough sound in the low frequency range, thus they cannot be used for artificial larynx. Then, we aim to develop the PZT ceramics sounder which can generate enough volume in the low frequency range. If we can lower the resonance frequency of the sounder, it can generate low pitch sound easily. Therefore I created the new diaphragm with low resonance frequency. In addition, we could obtain the high amplitude by changing method of driving. This time, we report on the characteristic comparison of this new PZT ceramics sounder and conventional one. Furthermore, for this new one, we analyzed the best alignment of PZT ceramics and the shape of the diaphragm to obtain low resonance frequency and big amplitude. In fact we analyzed the optimization of the structure. The analysis is done by computer simulation of ANSYS and Laser Doppler Vibrometer. In the future, we will add intonation to the generated sound by input wave form which is developed concurrently, and implant the sounder inside of the body by the method of fixing metal to biomolecule which is done too. And so high tone quality and convenient artificial larynx will be completed.

  19. Development of Laboratory Experimental System to Clarify Solar Wind Charge Exchange Mechanism with TES Microcalorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enoki, T.; Ishisaki, Y.; Akamatsu, H.; Ezoe, Y.; Ohashi, T.; Kanda, T.; Ishida, T.; Tanuma, H.; Ohashi, H.; Shinozaki, K.; Mitsuda, K.

    2012-06-01

    Significant fraction of the cosmic diffuse soft X-ray emission (0.1-1 keV) is caused by the Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX) process between the solar wind ion (C q+, N q+, O q+ etc.) and the interplanetary neutral matter. It is difficult to identify spectral features of SWCX with the spectral resolution of existing X-ray astronomy satellites. We are developing a laboratory experimental system with transition edge sensor (TES) X-ray microcalorimeters, in order to clarify the SWCX mechanism. This experiment is designed to measure Charge eXchange (CX) X-rays using Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) that generates multi-charged ions. Emission lines (OVIII: 2p→1s; 654 eV) by CX between O8+ and neutral He atom is aimed to be measured with energy resolution better than 10 eV. The TES microcalorimeter is cooled by a double-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (DADR), however, our TES microcalorimeter are not working potentially due to magnetic field contamination. This paper reports our experimental system, present results, and future prospects.

  20. Constraints on Asian ozone using Aura TES, OMI and Terra MOPITT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z.; Worden, J. R.; Jones, D. B. A.; Lin, J.-T.; Verstraeten, W. W.; Henze, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid industrialization in Asia in the last two decades has resulted in a significant increase in Asian ozone (O3) precursor emissions with likely a corresponding increase in the export of O3 and its precursors. However, the relationship between this increasing O3, the chemical environment, O3 production efficiency, and the partitioning between anthropogenic and natural precursors is unclear. In this work, we use satellite measurements of O3, CO and NO2 from TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer), MOPITT (Measurement of Pollution In The Troposphere) and OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) to quantify O3 precursor emissions for 2006 and their impact on free tropospheric O3 over northeastern Asia, where pollution is typically exported globally due to strong westerlies. Using the GEOS-Chem (Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry) global chemical transport model, we test the modeled seasonal and interannual variation of O3 based on prior and updated O3 precursor emissions where the updated emissions of CO and NOx are based on satellite measurements of CO and NO2. We show that the observed TES O3 variability and amount are consistent with the model for these updated emissions. However, there is little difference in the modeled ozone between the updated and prior emissions. For example, for the 2006 June time period, the prior and posterior NOx emissions were 14% different over China but the modeled ozone in the free troposphere was only 2.5% different. Using the adjoint of GEOS-Chem we partition the relative contributions of natural and anthropogenic sources to free troposphere O3 in this region. We find that the influence of lightning NOx in the summer is comparable to the contribution from surface emissions but smaller for other seasons. China is the primary contributor of anthropogenic CO, emissions and their export during the summer. While the posterior CO emissions improved the comparison between model and TES by 32%, on average, this change also had only a small

  1. An Overview of TES Polar Observations to Date

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieffer, H. H.; Titus, T.; Mullins, K.; Christensen, P. R.

    2000-08-01

    The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) has made observations of the Martian polar regions over the last three years. These observations are a combination of low resolutions scans (aerobraking observations of the south pole) and high resolution "noodles" (aerobraking observations of the north pole and all mapping phase observations). This review summarizes important results to date, which include: (1) Both polar caps are mostly dark ice (not frost) prior to exposure to solar insolation, (2) The asymmetric recession of the south polar cap is dominated by albedo variations, especially the Cryptic region, which remains a dark slab Of CO2 throughout its sublimation, (3) Seasonal cap appearance is largely determined by frost grain size. The geographic patterns repeat each year, (4) Cold spots observed during the northern winter are a spectral- emissivity effect mainly due to surface accumulation of fine-grained frost or snow; their kinetic temperatures are not exceptional, (5) Cold spots are concentrated near topographic features, e.g. craters, chasma, and slopes of the perennial cap, and (6) Mapping data has constrained the characteristic time scales of cold spot formation and dissipation during the polar night; both are a few days.

  2. Submillimeter Planetary Atmospheric Chemistry Exploration Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlecht, Erich T.; Allen, Mark A.; Gill, John J.; Choonsup, Lee; Lin, Robert H.; Sin, Seth; Mehdi, Imran; Siegel, Peter H.; Maestrini, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Planetary Atmospheric Chemistry Exploration Sounder (SPACES), a high-sensitivity laboratory breadboard for a spectrometer targeted at orbital planetary atmospheric analysis. The frequency range is 520 to 590 GHz, with a target noise temperature sensitivity of 2,500 K for detecting water, sulfur compounds, carbon compounds, and other atmospheric constituents. SPACES is a prototype for a powerful tool for the exploration of the chemistry and dynamics of any planetary atmosphere. It is fundamentally a single-pixel receiver for spectral signals emitted by the relevant constituents, intended to be fed by a fixed or movable telescope/antenna. Its front-end sensor translates the received signal down to the 100-MHz range where it can be digitized and the data transferred to a spectrum analyzer for processing, spectrum generation, and accumulation. The individual microwave and submillimeter wave components (mixers, LO high-powered amplifiers, and multipliers) of SPACES were developed in cooperation with other programs, although with this type of instrument in mind. Compared to previous planetary and Earth science instruments, its broad bandwidth (approx. =.13%) and rapid tunability (approx. =.10 ms) are new developments only made possible recently by the advancement in submillimeter circuit design and processing at JPL.

  3. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder- An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larnbrigtsen, Bjorn; Fetzer, Eric; Lee, Sung-Yung; Irion, Fredrick; Hearty, Thomas; Gaiser, Steve; Pagano, Thomas; Aumann, Hartmut; Chahine, Moustafa

    2004-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) was launched in May 2002. Along with two companion microwave sensors, it forms the AIRS Sounding Suite. This system is the most advanced atmospheric sounding system to date, with measurement accuracies far surpassing those available on current weather satellites. The data products are calibrated radiances from all three sensors and a number of derived geophysical parameters, including vertical temperature and humidity profiles, surface temperature, cloud fraction, cIoud top pressure, and profiles of ozone. These products are generated under cloudy as well as clear conditions. An ongoing calibration validation effort has confirmed that the system is very accurate and stable, and many of the geophysical parameters have been validated. AIRS is in some cases more accurate than any other source and can therefore be difficult to validate, but this offers interesting new research opportunities. The applications for the AIRS products range from numerical weather prediction to atmospheric research - where the AIRS water vapor products near the surface and in the mid to upper troposphere will make it possible to characterize and model phenomena that are key for short-term atmospheric processes, such as weather patterns, to long-term processes, such as interannual cycles (e.g., El Nino) and climate change.

  4. Planetary protection for Europa radar sounder antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaron, Kim M.; Moussessian, Alina; Newlin, Laura E.; Willis, Paul B.; Chen, Fei; Harcke, Leif J.; Chapin, Elaine; Jun, Insoo; Gim, Yonggyu; McEachen, Michael; Allen, Scotty; Kirchner, Donald; Blankenship, Donald

    2016-05-01

    The potential for habitability puts stringent requirements on planetary protection for a mission to Europa. A long-wavelength radar sounder with a large antenna is one of the proposed instruments for a future Europa mission. The size and construction of radar sounding antennas make the usual methods of meeting planetary protection requirements challenging. This paper discusses a viable planetary protection scheme for an antenna optimized for Europa radar sounding. The preferred methodology for this antenna is exposure to 100 kGy (10 Mrad) in water of gamma radiation using a Cobalt-60 source for both bulk and surface sterilization and exposure to vapor hydrogen peroxide for surface treatment for possible recontamination due to subsequent handling. For the boom-supported antenna design, selected tests were performed to confirm the suitability of these treatment methods. A portion of a coilable boom residual from an earlier mission was irradiated and its deployment repeatability confirmed with no degradation. Elasticity was measured of several fiberglass samples using a four-point bending test to confirm that there was no degradation due to radiation exposure. Vapor hydrogen peroxide treatment was applied to the silver-coated braid used as the antenna radiating element as it was the material most likely to be susceptible to oxidative attack under the treatment conditions. There was no discernable effect. These tests confirm that the radar sounding antenna for a Europa mission should be able tolerate the proposed sterilization methods.

  5. DUst Sounder and Temperature Imager Experiment (DUSTIE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHugh, M. J.; Fish, C. S.; Taylor, M. J.; Gordley, L. L.; Hervig, M. E.; Summers, M. E.; Siskind, D. E.

    2009-12-01

    The Dust Sounder and Temperature Imager Experiment (DUSTIE) is a proposed CubeSat mission to determine the global distribution of cosmic smoke in the atmosphere. The Earth is under continual bombardment by comets and meteoroids. Over the last 5 billion years they have brought water and the basics of life to our planet. Today they are vaporized during atmospheric entry and deposited as microscopic smoke particles in the upper atmosphere. These cosmic particles are known to be important in a host of atmospheric processes, including nucleation of ice particles, ion chemistry in the thermosphere and heterogeneous chemistry in the mesosphere. Despite this, our current understanding is based on scant observations and theory. The successful deployment of DUSTIE will offer a major advance in this important emerging area of research. DUSTIE will use a digital camera to image the Sun at 0.420 µm during spacecraft sunrise and sunset. This will provide measurements to characterize the smoke distribution over the altitude range of ~40 to 90 km. A high-inclination orbit will provide near-global coverage monthly. Simultaneous refraction measurements will yield atmospheric density profiles up to 75 km. Measured smoke extinctions will be used to derive smoke particle volume and surface area densities. DUSTIE will utilize a 3U form factor CubeSat and rely heavily upon commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components and proven technologies.

  6. Pioneer Venus Sounder Probe Solar Flux Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomasko, M. G.; Doose, L. R.; Palmer, J. M.; Holmes, A.; Wolfe, W. L.; Debell, A. G.; Brod, L. G.; Sholes, R. R.

    1980-01-01

    The Solar Flux Radiometer aboard the Pioneer Venus Sounder Probe operated successfully during its descent through the atmosphere of Venus. The instrument measured atmospheric radiance over the spectral range from 400 to 1800 nm as a function of altitude. Elevation and azimuthal measurements on the radiation field were made with five optical channels. Twelve filtered Si and Ge photovoltaic detectors were maintained near 30 C with a phase-change material. The detector output currents were processed with logarithmic transimpedance converters and digitized with an 11-bit A/D converter. Atmospheric sampling in both elevation and azimuth was done according to a Gaussian integration scheme. The serial output data averaged 20 bits/sec, including housekeeping (sync, spin period, sample timing and mode). The data were used to determine the deposition of solar energy in the atmosphere of Venus between 67 km and the surface along with upward and downward fluxes and radiances with an altitude resolution of several hundred meters. The results allow for more accurate modeling of the radiation balance of the atmosphere than previously possible.

  7. GRIPS - The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, Ryan; Dickerson, Russell; Schoeberl, Mark; Bloom, Hal; Gordley, Larry; McHugh, Martin; Thompson, Anne; Burrows, John; Zeng, Ning; Marshall, Tom; Fish, Chad; Kim, Jhoon; Park, Rokjin; Warner, Juying; Bhartia, Pawan; Kollonige, Debra

    2013-04-01

    Climate change and air quality are the most pressing environmental issues of the 21st century for America and for the world as a whole. Despite decades of research, the sources and sinks of key greenhouse gases and other pollutants remain highly uncertain making atmospheric composition predictions difficult. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS) will measure carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and methane (CH4). By using measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O) and the O2 A-band to help correct for clouds and aerosols, GRIPS will achieve unprecedented precision. Together these gases account for about 85% of all climate forcing and they impact atmospheric ozone (O3). GRIPS, employing gas-filter correlation radiometry, uses the target gases themselves in place of dispersive elements to achieve outstanding throughput, sensitivity, and specificity. Because it uses a combination of reflected and thermal IR, GRIPS will detect trace gas concentrations right down to the Earth's surface. When flown in parallel to a UV/VIS sensor such as GEMS on GEO-KOMPSAT-2B over East Asia or the Sentinel 4 on MTG over Europe/Africa, the combination offers powerful finger-printing capabilities to distinguish and quantify diverse pollution sources such as electricity generation, biomass burning, and motor vehicles. From geostationary orbit, GRIPS will be able to focus on important targets to quantify sources, net flux, diurnal cycles, and long-range transport of these key components in the Earth's radiative balance and air quality.

  8. GRIPS - The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, R. R.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Gordley, L. L.; McHugh, M. J.; Thompson, A. M.; Burrows, J. P.; Zeng, N.; Marshall, B. T.; Fish, C. S.; Spackman, J. R.; Kim, J.; Park, R.; Warner, J. X.; Bhartia, P. K.; Kollonige, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change and air quality are the most pressing environmental issues of the 21st century - for America and for the world as a whole. Despite decades of research, the sources and sinks of key greenhouse gases and other pollutants remain highly uncertain making atmospheric composition predictions difficult. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS) will measure carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and methane (CH4). By using measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O) and the O2 A-band to help correct for clouds and aerosols, GRIPS will achieve unprecedented precision. Together these gases account for about 85% of all climate forcing and they impact atmospheric ozone (O3). GRIPS, employing gas-filter correlation radiometry, uses the target gases themselves in place of dispersive elements to achieve outstanding throughput, sensitivity, and specificity. Because it uses a combination of reflected and thermal IR, GRIPS will detect trace gas concentrations right down to the Earth's surface. When flown in parallel to a UV/VIS sensor such as GEMS on GEO-KOMPSAT-2B over East Asia or the Sentinel 4 on MTG over Europe/Africa, the combination offers powerful finger-printing capabilities to distinguish and quantify diverse pollution sources such as electricity generation, biomass burning, and motor vehicles. From geostationary orbit, GRIPS will be able to focus on important targets to quantify sources, net flux, diurnal cycles, and long-range transport of these key components in the Earth's radiative balance and air quality.

  9. Cross-validation of IASI/MetOp derived tropospheric δD with TES and ground-based FTIR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacour, J.-L.; Clarisse, L.; Worden, J.; Schneider, M.; Barthlott, S.; Hase, F.; Risi, C.; Clerbaux, C.; Hurtmans, D.; Coheur, P.-F.

    2015-03-01

    The Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) flying onboard MetOpA and MetOpB is able to capture fine isotopic variations of the HDO to H2O ratio (δD) in the troposphere. Such observations at the high spatio-temporal resolution of the sounder are of great interest to improve our understanding of the mechanisms controlling humidity in the troposphere. In this study we aim to empirically assess the validity of our error estimation previously evaluated theoretically. To achieve this, we compare IASI δD retrieved profiles with other available profiles of δD, from the TES infrared sounder onboard AURA and from three ground-based FTIR stations produced within the MUSICA project: the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change) sites Kiruna and Izaña, and the TCCON site Karlsruhe, which in addition to near-infrared TCCON spectra also records mid-infrared spectra. We describe the achievable level of agreement between the different retrievals and show that these theoretical errors are in good agreement with empirical differences. The comparisons are made at different locations from tropical to Arctic latitudes, above sea and above land. Generally IASI and TES are similarly sensitive to δD in the free troposphere which allows one to compare their measurements directly. At tropical latitudes where IASI's sensitivity is lower than that of TES, we show that the agreement improves when taking into account the sensitivity of IASI in the TES retrieval. For the comparison IASI-FTIR only direct comparisons are performed because the sensitivity profiles of the two observing systems do not allow to take into account their differences of sensitivity. We identify a quasi negligible bias in the free troposphere (-3‰) between IASI retrieved δD with the TES, which are bias corrected, but important with the ground-based FTIR reaching -47‰. We also suggest that model-satellite observation comparisons could be optimized with IASI thanks to its high

  10. Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer: Engineering Flight Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, William R.; Hook, Simon J.; Shoen, Steven S.; Eng, Bjorn T.

    2013-01-01

    The Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) successfully completed its first set of engineering test flights. HyTES was developed in support of the Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI). HyspIRI is one of the Tier II Decadal Survey missions. HyTES currently provides both high spectral resolution (17 nm) and high spatial resolution (2-5m) data in the thermal infrared (7.5-12 micron) part of the electromagnetic spectrum. HyTES data will be used to help determine the optimum band positions for the HyspIRI Thermal Infrared (TIR) sensor and provide antecedent data for HyspIRI related studies.

  11. Successful Mars remote sensors, MO THEMIS and MER Mini-TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Steven; Christensen, Phil

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes results of the calibration of the miniature thermal emission spectrometer (Mini-TES) and the thermal emission imaging system (THEMIS) built by Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing (SBRS) under contract to Arizona State University (ASU). This paper also serves as an update to an earlier paper (Silverman et al., 2003) for mission description and instrument designs (Schueler et al., 2003). A major goal of the Mars exploration program is to help determine whether life ever existed on Mars via detailed in situ studies and surface sample return. It is essential to identify landing sites with the highest probability of containing samples indicative of early pre-biotic or biotic environments. Of particular interest are aqueous and/or hydrothermal environments in which life could have existed, or regions of current near-surface water or heat sources [Exobiology_Working_Group, 1995, An Exobiological Strategy for Mars Exploration, NASA Headquarters]. The search requires detailed geologic mapping and accurate interpretations of site composition and history in a global context. THEMIS and Mini-TES were designed to do this and builds upon a wealth of data from previous experiments. Previous experiments include the Mariner 6/7 Mars infrared radiometer (MIR) and infrared spectrometer [G.C. Pimentel, P.B. Forney, K.C. Herr, Evidence about hydrate and solid water in the martian surface from the 1969 Mariner infrared spectrometer, Journal of Geophysical Research 79(11) (1974) 1623 1634], the Mariner 9 infrared interferometer spectrometer (IRIS) [B. Conrath, R. Curran, R. Hanel, V. Kunde, W. Maguire, J. Pearl, J. Pirraglia, J. Walker, Atmospheric and surface properties of Mars obtained by infrared spectroscopy on Mariner 9, Journal of Geophysical Research 78 (1973) 4267 4278], the Viking infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) [H.H. Kieffer, T.Z. Martin, A.R. Peterfreund, B.M. Jakosky, E.D. Miner, F.D. Palluconi, Thermal and albedo mapping of Mars during the Viking

  12. Steroid degradation gene cluster of Comamonas testosteroni consisting of 18 putative genes from meta-cleavage enzyme gene tesB to regulator gene tesR.

    PubMed

    Horinouchi, Masae; Kurita, Tomokazu; Yamamoto, Takako; Hatori, Emi; Hayashi, Toshiaki; Kudo, Toshiaki

    2004-11-12

    Steroid degradation genes of Comamonas testosteroni TA441 are encoded in at least two gene clusters: one containing the meta-cleavage enzyme gene tesB and ORF1, 2, 3; and another consisting of ORF18, 17, tesI, H, A2, and tesA1, D, E, F, G (tesA2 to ORF18 and tesA1 to tesG are encoded in opposite directions). Analysis of transposon mutants with low steroid degradation revealed 13 ORFs and a gene (ORF4, 5, 21, 22, 23, 25, 26, 27, 28, 30, 31, 32, 33, and tesR) involved in steroid degradation in the downstream region of ORF3. TesR, which is almost identical to that of TeiR, a positive regulator of Delta1-dehydrogenase (corresponds to TesH in TA441) and 3alpha-dehydrogenase (currently not identified in TA441), in C. testosteroni ATCC11996 (Pruneda-Paz, 2004), was shown to be necessary for induction of the steroid degradation gene clusters identified in TA441, tesB to tesR, tesA1 to tesG, and tesA2 to ORF18. At least some of the ORFs from ORF3 to ORF33 were suggested to be involved in 9,17-dioxo-1,2,3,4,10,19-hexanorandrostan-5-oic acid degradation. PMID:15474469

  13. Cross-track infrared sounder FPAA performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterjohn, Stacy A.; D'Souza, Arvind I.; Dawson, Larry C.; Dolan, Peter N.; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal S.; Ehlert, John C.

    2003-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) is one of many instruments that comprise the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). The CrIS instrument is a Michelson interferometer-based sensor that is sensitive to wavelengths between 3.5 and 16 microns. Three separate Focal Plane Array Assemblies (FPAAs) referred to as the Short Wave Infrared Assembly, the Mid Wave Infrared assembly, and the Long Wave Infrared assembly are used to span the spectral range. The CrIS instrument measures the earth radiance at high spectral resolution using the data to provide pressure, temperature and moisture profiles of the atmosphere. The CrIS instrument will help improve both global and regional predictions of weather patterns, storm tracks, and precipitation. The CrIS program selected photovoltaic (PV) detectors for use in all three spectral bands. PV technology outperforms photoconductive detectors in terms of high sensitivity and linearity. Each FPAA consists of a 3×3 detector-matrix that are used to form 9 fields of view (FOV). Each detector has a 1,000 mm active area diameter and has its own cold preamplifier, warm post amplifier and independent high pass filter. This paper describes the performance for all three assemblies that together form the basis of the CrIS Engineering Development Unit 2 (EDU2) Detector Preamp Module (DPM). Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) is used to grow the appropriate bandgap n-type Hg1-xCdxTe on lattice matched CdZnTe. SWIR, MWIR and LWIR 1000 mm diameter detectors have been manufactured using the Lateral Collection Diode (LCD) architecture. Custom pre-amplifiers have been designed to interface with the large SWIR, MWIR and LWIR detectors. The operating temperature is above 78 K, permitting the use of passive radiators in spacecraft to cool the detectors. Recently, all three FPAAs were completed and tested. The tests performed on each assembly are listed.

  14. The Exomars Climate Sounder (EMCS) Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forget, F.; Schofield, J. T.; Kass, D. M.; Kleinböhl, A.; McCleese, D. J.; Allen, M. A.; Foote, M. C.; Millour, E.; Spiga, A.; Talagrand, O.; Calcutt, S. B.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Read, P. L.; Lewis, S. R.; Fouchet, T.; Lefèvre, F.; Määttänen, A.; Barnes, J. R.; Bougher, S. W.; Haberle, R. M.; Jeganathan, M.; Bowles, N.

    2011-10-01

    The ExoMars Climate Sounder (EMCS) investigation is developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (Principal Investigator J. T. Schofield) in collaboration with an international scientific team from France, the United Kingdom and the USA. EMCS plans to map daily, global, pole-to-pole profiles of temperature, dust, water and CO2 ices, and water vapor from the proposed 2016 ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (EMTGO). These profiles are to be assimilated into Mars General Circulation Models (MGCMs) to generate global, interpolated fields of measured and derived parameters such as wind. Sciences objectives of EMCS are to: Enhance understanding of Mars photochemistry by providing daily, global, high vertical resolution fields of atmospheric state, aerosol distribution, and water vapor concentration. EMCS atmospheric state measurements, combined with data assimilation, characterize the transport, sources and sinks of trace gases measured by the proposed EMTGO. The aerosol measurements reveal the heterogeneous photochemical pathways of trace gases. EMCS plans to map water vapor, the key source gas for odd hydrogen, known to be important in Martian photochemistry. Extend the MRO/MCS climatology of high vertical resolution measurements of the lower and middle atmosphere of Mars, with the improved coverage of local time provided by the proposed EMTGO. EMCS will determine the diurnal, seasonal & long-term variability of temperature and aerosol, and its impact on photochemistry. EMCS climatology, combined with earlier data, would relate EMTGO observations to earlier trace gas measurements. Support future Mars missions with measured climatology and near real-time density profile retrievals for landing and aerocapture, in the same way that MRO/MCS supported the Phoenix landing and is supporting the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) landing. EMCS could be the only instrument in orbit able to support Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) for the proposed ExoMars 2018 Rover Mission.

  15. On-Orbit performance of the TES pulse tube cryocooler system and the instrument - Six years in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Jose Israel; Na-Nakornpanom, Arthur

    2012-06-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument pulse tube cryocoolers began operation 36 days after launch of the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura spacecraft on July 15, 2004. TES is designed with four infrared Mercury Cadmium Telluride focal plane arrays in two separate housings cooled by a pair of Northrup Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) single-stage pulse tube cryocoolers. The instrument also makes use of a two-stage passive cooler to cool the optical bench. The instrument is a high-resolution infrared imaging Fourier transform spectrometer with 3.3-15.4 micron spectral coverage. After four weeks of outgassing, the instrument optical bench and focal planes were cooled to their operating temperatures to begin science operations. During the early months of the mission, ice contamination of the cryogenic surfaces including the focal planes led to increased cryocooler loads and the need for periodic decontamination cycles. After a highly successful 5 years of continuous in-space operations, TES was granted a 2 year extension. This paper reports on the TES cryogenic system performance including the two-stage passive cooler. After a brief overview of the cryogenic design, the paper presents detailed data on the highly successful space operation of the pulse tube cryocoolers and instrument thermal design over the past six years since the original turn-on in 2004. The data shows the cryogenic contamination decreased substantially to where decontamination cycles are now performed every six months. The cooler stroke required for constant-temperature operation has not increased indicating nearconstant cooler efficiency and the instrument's thermal design has also provided a nearly constant heat rejection sink. At this time TES continues to operate in space providing important Earth science data. KEYWORDS: TES, EOS, Aura, cryocooler

  16. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer Product File Readers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Brendan M.

    2010-01-01

    TES Product File Reader software extracts data from publicly available Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) HDF (Hierarchical Data Format) product data files using publicly available format specifications for scientific analysis in IDL (interactive data language). In this innovation, the software returns data fields as simple arrays for a given file. A file name is provided, and the contents are returned as simple IDL variables.

  17. Latest developments of geostationary microwave sounder technologies for NOAA's mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajpai, Shyam; Madden, Michael; Chu, Donald; Yapur, Martin

    2006-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have been flying microwave sounders since 1975 on Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). Microwave observations have made significant contributions to the understanding of the atmosphere and earth surface. This has helped in improving weather and storm tracking forecasts. However, NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) have microwave requirements that can not be met due to the unavailability of proven technologies. Several studies of a Geostationary Microwave Sounder (GMS) have been conducted. Among those, are the Geostationary Microwave Sounder (GEM) that uses a mechanically steered solid dish antenna and the Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer (GeoSTAR) that utilizes a sparse aperture array. Both designs take advantage of the latest developments in sensor technology. NASA/Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) has recently successfully built and tested a prototype ground-based GeoSTAR at 50 GHz frequency with promising test results. Current GOES IR Sounders are limited to cloud top observations. Therefore, a sounding suite of IR and Microwave should be able to provide observations under clear as well as cloudy conditions all the time. This paper presents the results of the Geostationary Microwave Sounder studies, user requirements, frequencies, technologies, limitations, and implementation strategies.

  18. Using MGS-TES Observations for Investigating Diabatic Circulation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, M. A.; Murphy, J. R.

    2003-12-01

    The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on board the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) provides atmospheric column dust opacities and atmospheric vertical temperature profiles. Santee and Crisp (1995) used Mariner 9 IRIS temperature and opacity data to diagnose the mean-meridional diabatic circulation in the Martian atmosphere during late northern winter. In this presentation we employ time-and-zonal mean temperature profiles and column dust opacities from TES in a 1-dimensional radiative transfer model to derive total (solar + IR) radiative heating rates. These heating rates and TES temperature profiles are then used in Santee and Crisp's (1995) diagnostic stream function model to quantify the diabatic circulation for several distinct seasonal periods of the first Martian year of MGS' mapping mission. The importance of this circulation information is that it can be used in conjunction with atmospheric dust column abundances to quantify the flux of dust into and out of the polar regions, possibly offering clues about the time scales upon which polar layered terrains are formed or eroded. This research is funded by NASA's Mars Data Analysis Program (Grant #: NASA/NAG5-11164) and the New Mexico Space Grant Consortium. Reference: Santee, M. L. and Crisp, D., (1995) `Diagnostic calculations of the circulation in the Martian atmosphere', JGR, 100, 5465-5484.

  19. Global dust infrared aerosol properties retrieved using hyperspectral sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelle, Virginie; Chédin, alain; Pondrom, Marc; Pierangelo, Clémence; Armante, Raymond; Crevoisier, Cyril; Crépeau, Laurent; Scott, Noëlle

    2015-04-01

    Observations from infrared hyperspectral sounders, here IASI and AIRS, are interpreted in terms of dust aerosol properties (AOD and mean altitude). The method is based on a "Look-Up-Table" (LUT) approach, where all radiative transfer computation is performed once for all and "off-line", for a large selection of atmospheric situations, of observing conditions, of surface characteristics (in particular the surface emissivity and temperature), and different aerosol refractive index models. The inversion scheme follows two main steps: first, determination of the observed atmospheric thermodynamic situation, second, simultaneous retrieval of the 10µm coarse-mode AOD and of the mean altitude. The method is here applied over sea and over land, at daily scale daytime and nighttime, and at the satellite pixel resolution (12 km at nadir). The geographical study area studied includes the northern tropics from west Atlantic to the Arabian peninsula and Indian ocean, and the Mediterranean basin, all of them characterized by strong, regular dust events. A special focus is given to the hourly variation of aerosol properties within a day. In this context, both IASI overpasses are processed, providing two measurements at 9:30AM and 9:30PM (equator local time) each day. First results obtained from AIRS observations, made at 1:30 AM and PM, open the way to the analysis of the aerosol diurnal cycle. For the AOD, comparisons are made with AERONET ground-based data , when available, in order to 1) evaluate our results, and 2) show the importance of a better knowledge of the aerosol diurnal cycle, especially close to the sources. Mean aerosol layer altitude obtained from IASI is compared at local scale with the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP/CALIPSO) aerosol altitude.

  20. The UARS and EOS Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, J. W.; Read, W. G.; Froidevaux, L.; Jarnot, R. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Flower, D. A.; Lau, G. K.; Pickett, H. M.; Santee, M. L.; Wu, D. L.; Boyles, M. A.; Burke, J. R.; Lay, R. R.; Loo, M. S.; Livesey, N. J.; Lungu, T. A.; Manney, G. L.; Nakamura, L. L.;  Perun, V. S.;  Ridenoure, B. P.;  Shippony, Z.;  Siegel, P. H.;  Thurstans, R. P.;  Harwood, R. S.;  Pumphrey, H. C.;  Filipiak, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) experiments obtain measurements of atmospheric composition, temperature, and pressure by observations of millimeter- and submillimeter-wavelength thermal emission as the instrument field of view is scanned through the atmospheric limb. Features of the measurement technique include the ability to measure many atmospheric gases as well as temperature and pressure, to obtain measurements even in the presence of dense aerosol and cirrus, and to provide near-global coverage on a daily basis at all times of day and night from an orbiting platform. The composition measurements are relatively insensitive to uncertainties in atmospheric temperature. An accurate spectroscopic database is available, and the instrument calibration is also very accurate and stable. The first MLS experiment in space, launched on the (NASA) Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) in September 1991, was designed primarily to measure stratospheric profiles of ClO, O3, H2O, and atmospheric pressure as a vertical reference. Global measurement of ClO, the predominant radical in chlorine destruction of ozone, was an especially important objective of UARS MLS. All objectives of UARS MLS have been accomplished and additional geophysical products beyond those for which the experiment was designed have been obtained, including measurement of upper-tropospheric water vapor, which is important for climate change studies. A follow-on MLS experiment is being developed for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) and is scheduled to be launched on the EOS CHEMISTRY platform in late 2002. EOS MLS is designed for many stratospheric measurements, including HOx radicals, which could not be measured by UARS because adequate technology was not available, and better and more extensive upper-tropospheric and lower-stratospheric measurements.

  1. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder Ozone Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, L.; Read, W. G.; Lungu, T. A.; Cofield, R. E.; Fishbein, E. F.; Flower, D. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Ridenoure, B. P.; Shippony, Z.; Waters, J. W.; Margitan, J. J.; McDermid, I. S.; Stachnik, R. A.; Peckham, G. E.; Braathen, G.; Deshler, T.; Fishman, J.; Hofmann, D. J.; Oltmans, S. J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the validation of ozone data from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). The MLS ozone retrievals are obtained from the calibrated microwave radiances (emission spectra) in two separate bands, at frequencies near 205 and 183 GHz. Analyses described here focus on the MLS Version 3 data (the first set of files made publicly available). We describe results of simulations performed to assess the quality of the retrieval algorithms, in terms of both mixing ratio and radiance closure. From actual MLS observations, the 205-GHz ozone retrievals give better closure (smaller radiance residuals) than that from the 183-GHz measurements and should be considered more accurate from the calibration aspects. However, the 183-GHz data are less noise limited in the mesosphere and can provide the most useful scientific results in that region. We compare the retrieved 205-GHz ozone profiles in the middle-to lower stratosphere to ozonesonde measurements at a wide range of latitudes and seasons. Ground-based lidar data from Table Mountain, California, provide a good reference for comparisons at higher altitudes. Based on these analyses, comparisons with balloon-borne measurements and others, as well as a detailed budget of estimated uncertainties, MLS results appear to be generally of high quality, with some biases worth mentioning. Results for the lowermost stratosphere (approx. 50 to 100 bPa) are still in need of improvement. A set of estimated precision and accuracy values is derived for the MLS ozone data sets. We also comment on recent updates in the retrieval algorithms and their impact on ozone values.

  2. TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Nadir (TL2H2ON)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Nadir (TL2H2ON) News:  TES News ... Title:  TES Discipline:  Tropospheric Chemistry Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir ...

  3. TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Nadir (TL2H2ONS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Nadir (TL2H2ONS) News:  TES News ... Title:  TES Discipline:  Tropospheric Chemistry Level:  L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor Spatial Coverage:  5.3 8.5 km nadir ...

  4. TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2N)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2N) News:  TES News ... L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide Spatial Coverage:  5.2 x 8.5 km nadir ... Subset Data: TES Order Tool Parameters:  Carbon Dioxide Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  5. TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2NS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2NS) News:  TES News ... L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir ... Subset Data: TES Order Tool Parameters:  Carbon Dioxide Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  6. TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Nadir (TL2NH3NS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Nadir (TL2NH3NS) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Ammonia Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir ... Data: TES Order Tool Parameters:  Ammonia Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  7. TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Nadir (TL2NH3N)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Nadir (TL2NH3N) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Ammonia Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir ... Data: TES Order Tool Parameters:  Ammonia Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  8. TES/Aura L3 Ammonia (NH3) Daily (TL3NH3D)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-08-28

    TES/Aura L3 Ammonia (NH3) Daily (TL3NH3D) News:  TES News ... Level:  L3 Instrument:  TES/Aura L3 Ammonia Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km Spatial ... Data: TES Order Tool Parameters:  Ammonia Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  9. Evaluation of ACCMIP Outgoing Longwave Radiation from Tropospheric Ozone Using TES Satellite Observations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Kevin W.; Shindell, Drew Todd; Worden, H. M.; Lamarque, J. F.; Young, P. J.; Stevenson, D. S.; Qu, Z.; delaTorre, M.; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, P. J.; Collins, W. J.; Doherty, R.; Dalsoren, S. B.; Faluvegi, G.; Folberth, G.; Horowitz, L. W.; Josse, B. M.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Myhre, G.; Nagashima, T.; Naik, V.; Strode, S. A.; Kulawik, S. S..; Worden, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    We use simultaneous observations of tropospheric ozone and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) sensitivity to tropospheric ozone from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) to evaluate model tropospheric ozone and its effect on OLR simulated by a suite of chemistry-climate models that participated in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The ensemble mean of ACCMIP models show a persistent but modest tropospheric ozone low bias (5-20 ppb) in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) and modest high bias (5-10 ppb) in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) relative to TES ozone for 2005-2010. These ozone biases have a significant impact on the OLR. Using TES instantaneous radiative kernels (IRK), we show that the ACCMIP ensemble mean tropospheric ozone low bias leads up to 120mW/ sq. m OLR high bias locally but zonally compensating errors reduce the global OLR high bias to 39+/- 41mW/ sq. m relative to TES data. We show that there is a correlation (Sq. R = 0.59) between the magnitude of the ACCMIP OLR bias and the deviation of the ACCMIP preindustrial to present day (1750-2010) ozone radiative forcing (RF) from the ensemble ozone RF mean. However, this correlation is driven primarily by models whose absolute OLR bias from tropospheric ozone exceeds 100mW/ sq. m. Removing these models leads to a mean ozone radiative forcing of 394+/- 42mW/ sq. m. The mean is about the same and the standard deviation is about 30% lower than an ensemble ozone RF of 384 +/- 60mW/ sq. m derived from 14 of the 16 ACCMIP models reported in a companion ACCMIP study. These results point towards a profitable direction of combining satellite observations and chemistry-climate model simulations to reduce uncertainty in ozone radiative forcing.

  10. Water Ice Clouds in the Martian Atmosphere: A View from MGS TES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, A. S.; Tamppari, L. K.; Christensen, P. R.; Smith, M. D.; Bass, Deborah; Qu, Zheng; Pearl, J. C.

    2005-01-01

    We use the method of Tamppari et al. to map water ice clouds in the Martian atmosphere. This technique was originally developed to analyze the broadband Viking IRTM channels and we have now applied it to the TES data. To do this, the TES spectra are convolved to the IRTM bandshapes and spatial resolutions, enabling use of the same processing techniques as were used in Tamppari et al.. This retrieval technique relies on using the temperature difference recorded in the 20 micron and 11 micron IRTM bands (or IRTM convolved TES bands) to map cold water ice clouds above the warmer Martian surface. Careful removal of surface contributions to the observed radiance is therefore necessary, and we have used both older Viking-derived basemaps of the surface emissivity and albedo, and new MGS derived basemaps in order the explore any possible differences on cloud retrieval due to differences in surface contribution removal. These results will be presented in our poster. Our previous work has concentrated primarily on comparing MGS TES to Viking data; that work saw that large-scale cloud features, such as the aphelion cloud belt, are quite repeatable from year to year, though small scale behavior shows some variation. Comparison of Viking and MGS era cloud maps will be presented in our poster. In the current stage of our study, we have concentrated our efforts on close analysis of water ice cloud behavior in the northern summer of the three MGS mapping years on relatively small spatial scales, and present our results below. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  11. Spectral Resolution and Coverage Impact on Advanced Sounder Information Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced satellite sensors are tasked with improving global measurements of the Earth s atmosphere, clouds, and surface to enable enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Achieving such measurement improvements requires instrument system advancements. This presentation focuses on the impact of spectral resolution and coverage changes on remote sensing system information content, with a specific emphasis on thermodynamic state and trace species variables obtainable from advanced atmospheric sounders such as the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) and Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) systems on the MetOp and NPP/NPOESS series of satellites. Key words: remote sensing, advanced sounders, information content, IASI, CrIS

  12. A Multi-sensor Upper Tropospheric Ozone Product (MUTOP) based on TES ozone and GOES water vapor: derivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felker, S. R.; Moody, J. L.; Wimmers, A. J.; Osterman, G.; Bowman, K.

    2010-12-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), a hyperspectral infrared instrument on the Aura satellite, retrieves a vertical profile of tropospheric ozone. However, polar-orbiting instruments like TES provide limited nadir-view coverage. This work illustrates the value of these observations when taken in context with information about synoptic-scale weather patterns. The goal of this study is to create map-view products of upper troposphere (UT) ozone through the integration of TES ozone measurements with two synoptic dynamical tracers of stratospheric influence: specific humidity derived from the GOES Imager, and potential vorticity from an operational forecast model. As a mixing zone between tropospheric and stratospheric reservoirs, the upper troposphere (UT) exhibits a complex chemical makeup. Determination of ozone mixing ratios in this layer is especially difficult without direct in-situ measurement. However, it is well understood that UT ozone is correlated with dynamical tracers like low specific humidity and high potential vorticity. Blending the advantages of two remotely sensed quantities (GOES water vapor and TES ozone) is at the core of the Multi-sensor Upper Tropospheric Ozone Product (MUTOP). Our approach results in the temporal and spatial coverage of a geostationary platform, a major improvement over individual polar overpasses, while retaining TES's ability to characterize UT ozone. Results suggest that over 70% of TES-observed UT ozone variability can be explained by correlation with the two dynamical tracers. MUTOP reproduces TES retrievals across the GOES-West domain with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 19.2 ppbv. There are several advantages to this multi-sensor derived product approach: (1) it is calculated from 2 operational fields (GOES specific humidity and GFS PV), so the layer-average ozone can be created and used in near real-time; (2) the product provides the spatial resolution and coverage of a geostationary platform as it depicts

  13. TES Carbon Monoxide Validation during the Two AVE Campaigns using the Argus and ALIAS Instruments on NASA's WB-57F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Jinena P.; Luo, Ming; Christensen, Lance E.; Loewenstein, Max; Jost, Hansjurg; Webster, Christopher R.; Osterman, Greg

    2008-01-01

    The Aura Validation Experiment (AVE) focuses on validating Aura satellite measurements of important atmospheric trace gases using ground-based, aircraft, and balloon-borne instruments. Global satellite observations of CO from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the EOS Aura satellite have been ongoing since September 2004. This paper discusses CO validation experiments during the Oct-AVE (2004 Houston, Texas) and CR-AVE (2006 San Jose, Costa Rica) campaigns. The coincidences in location and time between the satellite observations and the available in situ profiles for some cases are not ideal. However, the CO distribution patterns in the two validation flight areas are shown to have very little variability in the aircraft and satellite . observations, thereby making them suitable for validation comparisons. TES CO profiles, which typically have a retrieval uncertainty of 10-20%, are compared with in situ CO measurements from NASA Ames Research Center's Argus instrument taken on board the WB-57F aircraft during Oct-AVE. TES CO retrievals during CR-AVE are compared with in situ measurements from Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Aircraft Laser Infrared Absorption Spectrometer (ALIAS) instrument as well as with the Argus instrument, both taken on board the WB-57F aircraft. During CR-AVE, the average overall difference between ALIAS and Argus CO was 4%, with the ALIAS measurement higher. During individual flights, 2-min time-averaged differences between the two in situ instruments had standard deviation of 14%. The TES averaging kernels and a priori constraint profiles for CO are applied to the in situ data for proper comparisons to account for the reduced vertical resolution and the influence of the a priori in the satellite-derived profile. In the TES sensitive pressure range, approx.700-200 hPa, the in situ profiles and TES profiles agree within 5-10%, less than the variability in CO distributions obtained by both TES and the aircraft instruments in the two

  14. View to the eastnortheast of the Sounder Antenna OvertheHorizon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View to the east-northeast of the Sounder Antenna - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Five Sounder Antennas, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  15. View to the northeast of the Sounder Antenna OvertheHorizon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View to the northeast of the Sounder Antenna - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Five Sounder Antennas, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  16. Identifying and Mapping Seasonal Surface Water Frost with MGS TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bapst, J.; Bandfield, J. L.; Wood, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) visible/near-infrared and thermal infrared bolometers measured surface broadband albedo and temperature for more than three Mars years. As seasons progress on Mars, surface temperatures may fall below the frost point of volatiles in the atmosphere (namely, carbon dioxide and water). Systematic mapping of the spatial and temporal occurrence of these volatiles in the martian atmosphere, on the surface, and in the subsurface has shown their importance in understanding the climate of Mars. However, few studies have investigated seasonal surface water frost and its role in the global water cycle. We examine zonally-averaged TES daytime albedo, temperature, and water vapor abundance data [after Smith, 2004] to map the presence of surface water frost on Mars. Surface water frost occurs in the polar and mid latitudes, in regions with surface temperatures less than 220 K and above 150 K, and can significantly increase albedo relative to the bare surface. In the northern hemisphere water frost is most apparent in late fall/early winter, before the onset of carbon dioxide frost. Dust storms occurring near northern winter solstice affect albedo data and prevent us from putting a latitudinal lower limit on the water frost in the northern hemisphere. Regardless, seasonal water frost occurs at least as low as 48°N in Utopia Planitia, beginning at Ls=~230°, as observed by Viking Lander 2 [Svitek and Murray, 1990]. Daytime surface water frost was also observed at the Phoenix Lander site (68°N) beginning at Ls=~160° [Cull et al., 2010]. The timing of albedo variations observed by TES agree relatively well with lander observations of seasonal frost. Seasonal water frost is not detected during fall in the southern hemisphere. A potential explanation for this discrepancy, compared with frost detections in the north, is the disparity in atmospheric water vapor abundance between the two hemispheres. The frost point temperatures for water vapor

  17. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder on the Earth Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, H. H.

    1995-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a high spectral resolution IR spectrometer. AIRS, together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS), is designed to meet the operational weather prediction requirements of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the global change research objectives of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The three instruments will be launched in the year 2000 on the EOS-PM spacecraft. Testing of the AIRS engineering model will start in 1996.

  18. TES Detector Noise Limited Readout Using SQUID Multiplexers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staguhn, J. G.; Benford, D. J.; Chervenak, J. A.; Khan, S. A.; Moseley, S. H.; Shafer, R. A.; Deiker, S.; Grossman, E. N.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.

    2004-01-01

    The availability of superconducting Transition Edge Sensors (TES) with large numbers of individual detector pixels requires multiplexers for efficient readout. The use of multiplexers reduces the number of wires needed between the cryogenic electronics and the room temperature electronics and cuts the number of required cryogenic amplifiers. We are using an 8 channel SQUID multiplexer to read out one-dimensional TES arrays which are used for submillimeter astronomical observations. We present results from test measurements which show that the low noise level of the SQUID multiplexers allows accurate measurements of the TES Johnson noise, and that in operation, the readout noise is dominated by the detector noise. Multiplexers for large number of channels require a large bandwidth for the multiplexed readout signal. We discuss the resulting implications for the noise performance of these multiplexers which will be used for the readout of two dimensional TES arrays in next generation instruments.

  19. IMAGE Observations of Sounder Stimulated and Naturally Occurring Fast Z mode Cavity Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonwalkar, V. S.; Taylor, C.; Reddy, A.

    2015-12-01

    We report first observations of sounder stimulated and naturally occurring fast Z mode (ZM) cavity noise detected by the Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) on the IMAGE satellite. The fast Z mode cavity noise is a banded, structure-less radio emission trapped inside fast Z mode cavities, which are characterized by a minimum (fz,min) in fast Z mode cut-off frequency (fz) along a geomagnetic field line [Gurnett et al., JGR, 1983]. Fast Z mode waves reflect at fz ~ f, where f is the wave frequency. Waves in the frequency range fz,min < f < fz,max, where fz,max is the maximum fz above fz,min altitude, are trapped within the cavity as they bounce back and forth between reflection altitudes (fz ~ f) above and below the fz,min altitude. These trapped waves will be observed by a satellite passing through the cavity. The observed cavity noise lower cutoff is at the local Z mode cut-off frequency (fz,Sat) and the upper cut-off is presumably close to fz,max. The cavity noise is observed typically inside the plasmasphere. Comparison of cavity noise as observed on the plasmagram obtained during active sounding with that observed on the dynamic spectra obtained from the interspersed passive wave measurements indicate that the cavity noise is either stimulated by transmissions from the sounder (RPI) or is of natural origin. The sounder stimulated noise is often accompanied by fast Z mode echoes. The naturally occurring cavity noise is observed on both the plasmagram and the dynamic spectra. We believe the stimulated cavity noise is generated due to scattering from small-scale irregularities of waves transmitted by RPI. One potential candidate for the source of naturally occurring Z mode cavity noise is the ring current electrons that can generate fast ZM waves via higher order cyclotron resonance [Nishimura et al., Earth Planets Space, 2007].

  20. Note on the Effect of Horizontal Gradients for Nadir-Viewing Microwave and Infrared Sounders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, J.; Poli, P.

    2004-01-01

    Passive microwave and infrared nadir sounders such as the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit A (AMSU-A) and the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS), both flying on NASA s EOS Aqua satellite, provide information about vertical temperature and humidity structure that is used in data assimilation systems for numerical weather prediction and climate applications. These instruments scan cross track so that at the satellite swath edges, the satellite zenith angles can reach approx. 60 deg. The emission path through the atmosphere as observed by the satellite is therefore slanted with respect to the satellite footprint s zenith. Although radiative transfer codes currently in use at operational centers use the appropriate satellite zenith angle to compute brightness temperature, the input atmospheric fields are those from the vertical profile above the center of the satellite footprint. If horizontal gradients are present in the atmospheric fields, the use of a vertical atmospheric profile may produce an error. This note attempts to quantify the effects of horizontal gradients on AIRS and AMSU-A channels by computing brightness temperatures with accurate slanted atmospheric profiles. We use slanted temperature, water vapor, and ozone fields from data assimilation systems. We compare the calculated slanted and vertical brightness temperatures with AIRS and AMSU-A observations. We show that the effects of horizontal gradients on these sounders are generally small and below instrument noise. However, there are cases where the effects are greater than the instrument noise and may produce erroneous increments in an assimilation system. The majority of the affected channels have weighting functions that peak in the upper troposphere (water vapor sensitive channels) and above (temperature sensitive channels) and are unlikely t o significantly impact tropospheric numerical weather prediction. However, the errors could be significant for other applications such as stratospheric

  1. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) High Spectral Resolution Radiance Climate-Quality Dataset for Validating Climate Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, M.; Zhou, L.; Liu, X.; Cheng, Z.

    2009-12-01

    There is growing consensus that persistent and increasing anthropogenic emissions, since the beginning of the industrial revolution in the 19th century, are increasing atmospheric temperatures, increasing sea levels, melting ice caps and glaciers, increasing the occurrence of severe weather, and causing regional shifts in precipitation patterns. Changes in these parameters or occurrences are responses to changes in climate forcing terms, notably greenhouse gases. The NASA Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS), launched in May of 2002, is the first high spectral resolution infrared sounder with nearly complete global coverage on a daily basis. High spectral resolution in the infrared provides sensitivity to nearly all climate forcings, responses and feedbacks. The AIRS radiances are sensitive to changes in carbon dioxide, methane, carbon monoxide, ozone, water vapor, temperature, clouds, aerosols, and surface characteristics, and also have been demonstrated through intercomparisons with airborne interferometers and with the EUMETSAT Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer(IASI) to have excellent accuracy, stability and precision. Such "benchmark" attributes are important for validating climate models and analyses. The AIRS data are applied to generate the first ever spectrally resolved infrared radiance (SRIR) dataset (2002- 2006) for monitoring changes in atmospheric temperature and constituents and for assessing the accuracy of climate and weather model analyses and forecasts. The SRIR dataset is a very powerful climate application. Spectral signatures derived from the dataset confirmed the largest depletion of ozone over the Arctic in 2005, and also verified that the European Center for Medium Range Weather (ECMWF) model analysis water vapor fields are significantly more accurate than the analyses of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The NCEP moisture fields are generally 20% more moist than those from ECMWF. Applications included

  2. Film handling procedures for Apollo 17 lunar sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. S.

    1972-01-01

    Film handling procedures for the Apollo 17 Lunar Sounder are itemized, including purchase of flight film, establishment of processing standards, transportation of flight films, flight film certification, application of pre- and post-sensitometry, film loading and downloading, film processing, titling, and duplication.

  3. Results of the international ionospheric Doppler sounder network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lastovicka, Jan; Chum, Jaroslav

    2016-07-01

    This paper summarizes main recent results reached by the Czech-lead international network of ionospheric Doppler sounders. The network consists of Doppler sounders in the western half of Czechia (5 measuring paths, 3 frequencies with central receivers in Prague), northern Taiwan (3 transmitters, two separated receivers, 1 frequency), and three similar systems (3 measuring paths with 1 receiver and 1 frequency) in Tucuman (north-western Argentina), Hermanus (the southernmost South Africa) and Luisville (northern South Africa). Three main areas of research have been (1) statistical properties of gravity waves, (2) ionospheric effects of earthquakes, and (3) low latitude/equatorial phenomena. Some results: (1) the theoretically expected dominance of gravity wave propagation against wind has been confirmed; (2) impact of the Tohoku 2001 M9.0 earthquake was registered in the ionosphere over the Czech Republic as long-period infrasound on the distance of about 9000 km from epicenter; analysis of ionospheric infrasound excited by the Nepal 2015 M7.8 earthquake observed by the Czech and Taiwan Doppler sounders showed that the intensity of ionospheric signal is significantly height dependent and that the Doppler shift depends not only on the advection (up and down motion) of the reflecting layer but also on the compression/rarefaction of the electron gas; (3) spread F structures observed by Doppler sounders in Tucuman and Taiwan (both under the crest of equatorial ionization anomaly) provide results consistent with S4 scintillation data and with previous optical, GPS and satellite measurements.

  4. Hematite spherules at Meridiani: Results from MI, Mini-TES, and Pancam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvin, W. M.; Shoffner, J. D.; Johnson, J. R.; Knoll, A. H.; Pocock, J. M.; Squyres, S. W.; Weitz, C. M.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bell, J. F.; Christensen, P. R.; de Souza, P. A.; Farrand, W. H.; Glotch, T. D.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Jolliff, B. L.; Knudson, A. T.; McLennan, S. M.; Rogers, A. D.; Thompson, S. D.

    2008-12-01

    We report on observations of hematite-bearing spherules at Meridiani Planum made using the Microscopic Imager (MI), Mini-Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES), and Panoramic Camera (Pancam) instruments on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. Spherules were observed on soil surfaces and in outcrop rocks, both on undisturbed surfaces and in abraded surfaces ground using the Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT). Spherule size and shape change little along the 850 m eastward traverse from Eagle Crater to Endurance Crater, but spherules decrease and then slightly increase in size along the 6 km traverse from Endurance south to Victoria Crater. Local populations range from submillimeters to several millimeters in diameter. An additional small diameter (100 μm) size population is possible. An increase in irregular shapes is found near Victoria Crater. This, combined with the size decrease south of Endurance, suggests either a changing depositional environment, or variation in the duration and timing of diagenetic events. The dominant smaller size population observed early in the mission in aeolian areas and ripple crests is observed as the primary size population in abraded outcrop farther south. This suggests that successively younger beds are exposed at the surface along the southward traverse. Stratigraphically higher units removed by erosion could be recorded by the present surface lag deposit. Coordinated systematic observations are used to determine optical and infrared hematite indices of the surface soils in Pancam and Mini-TES. In spite of the systematic variation seen in MI, both Pancam and Mini-TES indices are highly variable based on the local surface, and neither show systematic trends south of Endurance. The lack of a 390 cm-1 feature in Mini-TES spectra suggests concentric or radial interior structure within the spherules at scales too fine for MI to observe. Mini-TES does not detect any silicate component in the spherules. A bound water component in soils or in

  5. Hematite spherules at Meridiani: results from MI, Mini-TES, and Pancam

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvin, W.M.; Shoffner, J.D.; Johnson, J. R.; Knoll, A.H.; Pocock, J.M.; Squyres, S. W.; Weitz, C.M.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bell, J.F., III; Christensen, P.R.; de Souza, P. A., Jr.; Farrand, W. H.; Glotch, T.D.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Jolliff, B.L.; Knudson, A.T.; McLennan, S.M.; Rogers, A.D.; Thompson, S.D.

    2008-01-01

    We report on observations of hematite-bearing spherules at Meridiani Planum made using the Microscopic Imager (MI), Mini-Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES), and Panoramic Camera (Pancam) instruments on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. Spherules were observed on soil surfaces and in outcrop rocks, both on undisturbed surfaces and in abraded surfaces ground using the Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT). Spherule size and shape change little along the 850 m eastward traverse from Eagle Crater to Endurance Crater, but spherules decrease and then slightly increase in size along the 6 km traverse from Endurance south to Victoria Crater. Local populations range from submillimeters to several millimeters in diameter. An additional small diameter (100 μm) size population is possible. An increase in irregular shapes is found near Victoria Crater. This, combined with the size decrease south of Endurance, suggests either a changing depositional environment, or variation in the duration and timing of diagenetic events. The dominant smaller size population observed early in the mission in aeolian areas and ripple crests is observed as the primary size population in abraded outcrop farther south. This suggests that successively younger beds are exposed at the surface along the southward traverse. Stratigraphically higher units removed by erosion could be recorded by the present surface lag deposit. Coordinated systematic observations are used to determine optical and infrared hematite indices of the surface soils in Pancam and Mini-TES. In spite of the systematic variation seen in MI, both Pancam and Mini-TES indices are highly variable based on the local surface, and neither show systematic trends south of Endurance. The lack of a 390 cm?1 feature in Mini-TES spectra suggests concentric or radial interior structure within the spherules at scales too fine for MI to observe. Mini-TES does not detect any silicate component in the spherules. A bound water component in soils or in

  6. Optimal Estimation of the Carbonyl Sulfide Surface Flux Through Inverse Modeling of TES Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuai, L.; Worden, J.; Lee, M.; Campbell, J. E.; Kulawik, S. S.; Weidner, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is the most abundant sulfur gas in the troposphere with a global averaging mixing ratio of about 500 part per trillion (ppt). The ocean is the primary source of OCS, emitting OCS directly or its precursors, carbon disulfide and dimethyl sulfide. The most important atmospheric sink of OCS is uptake by terrestrial plants via photosynthesis. Although the global budget of atmospheric OCS has been studied, the global integrated OCS fluxes have large uncertainties, e.g. the uncertainties of the ocean fluxes are as large as 100% or more and a large missing ocean sources required to balance the global budgets. A first tropical ocean map of the free tropospheric OCS has been developed using retrieval data from radiance measurements from the AURA Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES). The monthly mean ocean data has been evaluated to estimate the biases and uncertainties in the TES OCS against aircraft profiles from the HIPPO campaign and ground data from the NOAA Mauna Loa site. We found the TES OCS data to be consistent (within the calculated uncertainties) with NOAA ground observations and HIPPO aircraft measurements and it captured the seasonal and latitudinal variations observed by these in situ data within the estimated uncertainties. In this study, we first update bottom-up estimate of global source and sinks of atmospheric OCS. The global forward simulations of atmospheric OCS using updated bottom-up fluxes with GEOS-Chem show improvement of the seasonal variation over multiple NOAA ground stations in both north and south hemispheres. Inverse analysis of surface fluxes from TES OCS data will provide further constraints to estimate the missing ocean source and understand the enhanced OCS over eastern Asia and west Pacific, which could be driven by wind, Asian outflow, a mystery process, or a combination of all of the above. The investigation will provide the fundamental measurements and analysis needed to estimate the missing source in the

  7. Stratospheric and mesospheric HO2 observations from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millán, L.; Wang, S.; Livesey, N.; Kinnison, D.; Sagawa, H.; Kasai, Y.

    2014-09-01

    This study introduces stratospheric and mesospheric hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) estimates from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) using an offline retrieval (i.e. run separately from the standard MLS algorithm). This new dataset provides two daily zonal averages, one during daytime and one during nighttime, with a varying vertical resolution from about 4 km at 10 hPa to around 14 km at 0.0032 hPa. A description of the methodology and an error analysis are presented. Comparisons against the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) and the Far Infrared Spectrometer (FIRS-2) measurements, as well as, photochemical simulations demonstrate the robustness of the retrieval and indicate that the retrieval is sensitive enough to detect mesospheric HO2 layers during both day and night. This new dataset is the first long-term HO2 stratospheric and mesospheric satellite record and it provides needed constraints to help resolve the O3 deficit problem and the "HOx dilemma".

  8. Stratospheric and mesospheric HO2 observations from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millán, L.; Wang, S.; Livesey, N.; Kinnison, D.; Sagawa, H.; Kasai, Y.

    2015-03-01

    This study introduces stratospheric and mesospheric hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) estimates from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) using an offline retrieval (i.e. run separately from the standard MLS algorithm). This new data set provides two daily zonal averages, one during daytime from 10 to 0.0032 hPa (using day-minus-night differences between 10 and 1 hPa to ameliorate systematic biases) and one during nighttime from 1 to 0.0032 hPa. The vertical resolution of this new data set varies from about 4 km at 10 hPa to around 14 km at 0.0032 hPa. A description of the methodology and an error analysis are presented. Comparisons against the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) and the Far Infrared Spectrometer (FIRS-2) measurements, as well as photochemical simulations, demonstrate the robustness of the retrieval and indicate that the retrieval is sensitive enough to detect mesospheric HO2 layers during both day and night. This new data set is the first long-term HO2 stratospheric and mesospheric satellite record and it provides needed constraints to help resolve the O3 deficit problem and the "HOx dilemma".

  9. Estimation of planetary surface roughness by HF sounder observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Ono, T.

    Japanese Martian exploration project "Nozomi" was to carry out several science missions. Plasma Wave Sounder, one of those onboard missions, was an HF sounder to study Martian plasma environment, and Martian surface with the altimetry mode (Oya and Ono, 1998) as well. The altimetry mode observation was studied by means of computer simulations utilizing the KiSS code which had been originally designed to simulate the SELENE Lunar Radar Sounder, a spaceborne HF GPR, based on Kirchhoff approximation theory (Kobayashi, Oya and Ono, 2002). We found an empirical power law for the standard deviation of observed altitudes over Gaussian random rough surfaces: it varies in proportion to the square of the RMS gradient of the surface √{2} hRMS{λ_0, where hRMS and λ_0 are the RMS height of the surface and the correlation distance of the surface, respectively. We applied Geometrical optics to understand this empirical power law, and derived a square power law for the standard deviation of the observed altitude. Our Geometrical optics model assumed the followings: 1) the observed surface is a Gaussian random rough surface, 2) the mean surface is a flat horizontal plane, 3) the observed surface echo is the back scattering echoes, 4) the observed altitude is the mean value of the apparent range of those back scattering echoes. These results imply that HF sounder may be utilized to measure the surface roughness of planetary bodies in terms of the RMS gradient of the surface. Refrence: H. Oya and T. Ono, A new altimeter for Mars land shape observations utilizing the ionospheric sounder system onboard the Planet-B spacecraft, Earth Planets Space, Vol. 50, pp.229-234, 1998 T. Kobayashi, H. Oya, and T. Ono, A-scope analysis of subsurface radar sounding of lunar mare region, Earth Planets Space, Vol. 54, pp.973-982, 2002

  10. On-Orbit Performance of the TES Pulse Tube Cryocooler System and the Instrument - Six Years in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, J. I.; Na-Nakornpanom, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument pulse tube cryocoolers began operation 36 days after launch of the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura spacecraft on July 15, 2004. TES is designed with four infrared Mercury Cadmium Telluride focal plane arrays in two separate housings cooled by a pair of Northrup Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) single-stage pulse tube cryocoolers. The instrument also makes use of a two-stage passive cooler to cool the optical bench. The instrument is a high-resolution infrared imaging Fourier transform spectrometer with 3.3-15.4 micron spectral coverage. After four weeks of outgassing, the instrument optical bench and focal planes were cooled to their operating temperatures to begin science operations. During the early months of the mission, ice contamination of the cryogenic surfaces including the focal planes led to increased cryocooler loads and the need for periodic decontamination cycles. After a highly successful 5 years of continuous in-space operations, TES was granted a 2 year extension. This paper reports on the TES cryogenic system performance including the two-stage passive cooler. After a brief overview of the cryogenic design, the paper presents detailed data on the highly successful space operation of the pulse tube cryocoolers and instrument thermal design over the past six years since the original turn-on in 2004. The data shows the cryogenic contamination decreased substantially to where decontamination cycles are now performed every six months. The cooler stroke required for constant-temperature operation has not increased indicating near-constant cooler efficiency and the instrument's thermal design has also provided a nearly constant heat rejection sink. At this time TES continues to operate in space providing important Earth science data.

  11. Constraints on Asian ozone using Aura TES, OMI and Terra MOPITT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z.; Worden, J. R.; Jones, D. B. A.; Lin, J. T.; Verstraeten, W. W.; Henze, D. K.

    2014-07-01

    Rapid industrialization in Asia in the last two decades has resulted in a significant increase in Asian ozone (O3) pre-cursor emissions with likely a corresponding increase in the export of O3 and its pre-cursors. However, the relationship between this increasing O3, the chemical environment, O3 production efficiency, and the partitioning between anthropogenic and natural precursors is unclear. In this work, we use satellite measurements of O3, CO and NO2 from TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer), MOPITT (Measurement of Pollution In The Troposphere) and OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) to quantify O3 pre-cursor emissions for 2006 and their impact on free-tropospheric O3 over North-East Asia, where pollution is typically exported globally due to strong westerlies. Using the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model, we show that the modeled seasonal variation of O3 based on these updated O3 pre-cursor emissions is consistent with the observed O3 variability and amount, after accounting for known biases in the TES O3 data. Using the adjoint of GEOS-Chem we then partition the relative contributions of natural and anthropogenic sources to free troposphere O3 in this region. We find that the influence of lightning NOx is important in summer. The contribution from anthropogenic NOx is dominant in other seasons. China is the major contributor of anthropogenic VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds), whereas the influence of biogenic VOCs is mainly from Southeast Asia. Our result shows that the influence of India and Southeast Asia emissions on O3 pollution export is significant, comparable with Chinese emisisons in winter and about 50% of Chinese emissions in other seasons.

  12. A Multi-sensor Upper Tropospheric Ozone Product (MUTOP) based on TES ozone and GOES water vapor: validation with ozonesondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, J. L.; Felker, S. R.; Wimmers, A. J.; Osterman, G.; Bowman, K.; Thompson, A. M.; Tarasick, D. W.

    2011-11-01

    Accurate representation of ozone in the extratropical upper troposphere (UT) remains a challenge. However, the implementation of hyper-spectral remote sensing using satellite instruments such as the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) provides an avenue for mapping ozone in this region, from 500 to 300 hPa. As a polar orbiting satellite TES observations are limited, but in this paper they are combined with geostationary satellite observations of water vapor. This paper describes a validation of the Multi-sensor UT Ozone Product (MUTOP). MUTOP is statistical retrieval method, a derived product image based on the correlation of two remotely sensed quantities, TES ozone, against geostationary (GOES) specific humidity and modeled potential vorticity, a dynamical tracer in the UT. These TES-derived UT ozone mixing ratios are compared to coincident ozonesonde measurements of layer-average UT ozone mixing ratios made during the NASA INTEX/B field campaign in the spring of 2006; the region for this study is effectively the GOES west domain covering the Eastern North Pacific Ocean and the Western United States. This intercomparison evaluates MUTOP skill at representing ozone magnitude and variability in this region of complex dynamics. In total, 11 ozonesonde launch sites were available for this study, providing 127 individual sondes for comparison; the overall mean ozone of the 500-300 hPa layer for these sondes was 78.0 ppbv. MUTOP reproduces in-situ measurements reasonably well, producing an UT mean of 82.3 ppbv, with a mean absolute error of 12.2 ppbv and a root mean square error of 16.4 ppbv relative to ozonesondes across all sites. An overall UT mean bias of 4.3 ppbv relative to sondes was determined for MUTOP. Considered in the context of past TES validation studies, these results illustrate that MUTOP is able to maintain accuracy similar to TES while expanding coverage to the entire GOES-West satellite domain. In addition MUTOP provides six-hour temporal

  13. A multi-sensor upper tropospheric ozone product (MUTOP) based on TES ozone and GOES water vapor: validation with ozonesondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, J. L.; Felker, S. R.; Wimmers, A. J.; Osterman, G.; Bowman, K.; Thompson, A. M.; Tarasick, D. W.

    2012-06-01

    Accurate representation of ozone in the extratropical upper troposphere (UT) remains a challenge. However, the implementation of hyper-spectral remote sensing using satellite instruments such as the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) provides an avenue for mapping ozone in this region, from 500 to 300 hPa. As a polar orbiting satellite TES observations are limited, but in this paper they are combined with geostationary satellite observations of water vapor. This paper describes a validation of the Multi-sensor UT Ozone Product (MUTOP). MUTOP, based on a statistical retrieval method, is an image product derived from the multiple regression of remotely sensed TES ozone, against geostationary (GOES) specific humidity (remotely sensed) and potential vorticity (a modeled dynamical tracer in the UT). These TES-derived UT ozone mixing ratios are compared to coincident ozonesonde measurements of layer-average UT ozone mixing ratios made during the NASA INTEX/B field campaign in the spring of 2006; the region for this study is effectively the GOES west domain covering the eastern North Pacific Ocean and the western United States. This intercomparison evaluates MUTOP skill at representing ozone magnitude and variability in this region of complex dynamics. In total, 11 ozonesonde launch sites were available for this study, providing 127 individual sondes for comparison; the overall mean ozone of the 500-300 hPa layer for these sondes was 78.0 ppbv. MUTOP reproduces in~situ measurements reasonably well, producing an UT mean of 82.3 ppbv, with a mean absolute error of 12.2 ppbv and a root mean square error of 16.4 ppbv relative to ozonesondes across all sites. An overall UT mean bias of 4.3 ppbv relative to sondes was determined for MUTOP. Considered in the context of past TES validation studies, these results illustrate that MUTOP is able to maintain accuracy similar to TES while expanding coverage to the entire GOES-West satellite domain. In addition MUTOP provides six

  14. A multi-sensor upper tropospheric ozone product (MUTOP) based on TES Ozone and GOES water vapor: derivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felker, S. R.; Moody, J. L.; Wimmers, A. J.; Osterman, G.; Bowman, K.

    2011-07-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), a hyperspectral infrared instrument on the Aura satellite, retrieves a vertical profile of tropospheric ozone. However, polar-orbiting instruments like TES provide limited nadir-view coverage. This work illustrates the value of these observations when taken in context with geostationary imagery describing synoptic-scale weather patterns. The goal of this study is to create map-view products of upper troposphere (UT) ozone through the integration of TES ozone measurements with two synoptic dynamic tracers of stratospheric influence: specific humidity derived from the GOES Imager water vapor absorption channel, and potential vorticity (PV) from an operational forecast model. As a mixing zone between tropospheric and stratospheric reservoirs, the upper troposphere (UT) exhibits a complex chemical makeup. Determination of ozone mixing ratios in this layer is especially difficult without direct in situ measurement. However, it is well understood that UT ozone is correlated with dynamical tracers like low specific humidity and high potential vorticity. Blending the advantages of two remotely sensed quantities (GOES water vapor and TES ozone) is at the core of the Multi-sensor Upper Tropospheric Ozone Product (MUTOP). Our results suggest that 72 % of TES-observed UT ozone variability can be explained by its correlation with dry air and high PV. MUTOP reproduces TES retrievals across the GOES-West domain with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 18 ppbv (part per billion by volume). There are several advantages to this multi-sensor derived product approach: (1) it is calculated from two operational fields (GOES specific humidity and GFS PV), so maps of layer-average ozone can be created and used in near real-time; (2) the product provides the spatial resolution and coverage of a geostationary image as it depicts the variable distribution of ozone in the UT; and (3) the 6 h temporal resolution of the derived product imagery allows

  15. Observations of the north polar water ice annulus on Mars using THEMIS and TES

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagstaff, K.L.; Titus, T.N.; Ivanov, A.B.; Castano, R.; Bandfield, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    The Martian seasonal CO2 ice caps advance and retreat each year. In the spring, as the CO2 cap gradually retreats, it leaves behind an extensive defrosting zone from the solid CO2 cap to the location where all CO2 frost has sublimated. We have been studying this phenomenon in the north polar region using data from the THermal EMission Imaging System (THEMIS), a visible and infra-red (IR) camera on the Mars Odyssey spacecraft, and the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on Mars Global Surveyor. Recently, we discovered that some THEMIS images of the CO2 defrosting zone contain evidence for a distinct defrosting phenomenon: some areas just south of the CO2 cap edge are too bright in visible wavelengths to be defrosted terrain, but too warm in the IR to be CO2 ice. We hypothesize that we are seeing evidence for a seasonal annulus of water ice (frost) that recedes with the seasonal CO2 cap, as predicted by previous workers. In this paper, we describe our observations with THEMIS and compare them to simultaneous observations by TES and OMEGA. All three instruments find that this phenomenon is distinct from the CO2 cap and most likely composed of water ice. We also find strong evidence that the annulus widens as it recedes. Finally, we show that this annulus can be detected in the raw THEMIS data as it is collected, enabling future long-term onboard monitoring. ?? 2007.

  16. The DST group ionospheric sounder replacement for JORN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, T. J.; Quinn, A. D.; Pederick, L. H.

    2016-06-01

    The Jindalee Over-the-horizon Radar Network (JORN) is an integral part of Australia's national defense capability. JORN uses a real-time ionospheric model as part of its operations. The primary source of data for this model is a set of 13 vertical-incidence sounders (VIS) scattered around the Australian coast and inland locations. These sounders are a mix of Lowell digisonde portable sounder (DPS)-1 and DPS-4. Both of these sounders, the DPS-1 in particular, are near the end of their maintainable life. A replacement for these aging sounders was required as part of the ongoing sustainment program for JORN. Over the last few years the High-Frequency Radar Branch (HFRB) of the Defence Science and Technology (DST) Group, Australian Department of Defence, has been developing its own sounders based on its successful radar hardware technology. The DST Group VIS solution known as PRIME (Portable Remote Ionospheric Monitoring Equipment) is a 100% duty cycle, continuous wave system that receives the returned ionospheric signal while it is still transmitting and operates the receiver in the near field of the transmitter. Of considerable importance to a successful VIS is the autoscaling software, which takes the ionogram data and produces an ionogram trace (group delay as a function of frequency), and from that produces a set of ionospheric parameters that represent the (bottomside) overhead electron density profile. HFRB has developed its own robust autoscaling software. The performance of DST Group's PRIME under a multitude of challenging ionospheric conditions has been studied. In December 2014, PRIME was trialed at a JORN VIS site collocated with the existing Lowell Digisonde DPS-1. This side-by-side testing determined that PRIME was fit for purpose. A summary of the results of this comparison and example PRIME output will be discussed. Note that this paper compares PRIME with the 25 year old Lowell Digisonde DPS-1, which is planned to be replaced. Our future plans include

  17. Local, regional, and global views of tropospheric carbon monoxide from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, W. Wallace; Yurganov, Leonid

    2008-04-01

    More than five years of CO retrievals from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) onboard NASA's Aqua satellite reveal variations in tropospheric CO on timescales from twelve hours to five years and on spatial scales from local to global. The shorter timescales are invaluable to monitor daily variations in CO emissions, to enable three-dimensional tracking of atmospheric motions, and to enhance insights into atmospheric mixing. Previous studies have utilized AIRS CO retrievals over the course of days to weeks to track plumes from large forest fires. On the local scale, we will present AIRS observations of pollution from several northern hemisphere Megacities. On the regional scale, we will present AIRS observations of the Mexico City pollution plume. We will illustrate global scale AIRS CO observations of interannual variations linked to the influence of large-scale atmospheric perturbations from the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In particular, we observe a quasi-biennial variation in CO emissions from Indonesia with varying magnitudes in peak emission occurring in 2002, 2004, and 2006. Examining satellite rainfall measurements over Indonesia, we find the enhanced CO emission correlates with occasions of less rainfall during the month of October. Continuing this satellite record of tropospheric CO with measurements from the European IASI instrument will permit construction of a long time-series useful for further investigations of climatological variations in CO emissions and their impact on the health of the atmosphere.

  18. Calibration of the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarnot, R. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Waters, J. W.; Flower, D. A.; Peckham, G. E.

    1996-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) is a three-radiometer, passive, limb emission instrument onboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). Radiometric, spectral and field-of-view calibrations of the MLS instrument are described in this paper. In-orbit noise performance, gain stability, spectral baseline and dynamic range are described, as well as use of in-flight data for validation and refinement of prelaunch calibrations. Estimated systematic scaling uncertainties (3 sigma) on calibrated limb radiances from prelaunch calibrations are 2.6% in bands 1 through 3, 3.4% in band 4, and 6% in band 5. The observed systematic errors in band 6 are about 15%, consistent with prelaunch calibration uncertainties. Random uncertainties on individual limb radiance measurements are very close to the levels predicted from measured radiometer noise temperature, with negligible contribution from noise and drifts on the regular in-flight gain calibration measurements.

  19. Integrating CRISM and TES hyperspectral data to characterize a halloysite-bearing deposit in Kashira crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudge, Timothy A.; Mustard, John F.; Head, James W.; Salvatore, Mark R.; Wiseman, Sandra M.

    2015-04-01

    We present morphologic observations and spectral modeling results of a large, kaolin-group mineral-bearing deposit within Kashira crater in the southern highlands of Mars. We employ both non-linear unmixing of Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) visible to near-infrared (VNIR) reflectance data and linear unmixing of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) thermal infrared (TIR) emissivity data to quantitatively analyze the kaolin-group mineral within this deposit. We use a novel approach for quantitative analysis of CRISM data through non-linear unmixing with in-scene, orbitally-derived endmembers combined with laboratory measured endmembers. Results from this approach indicate that the deposit within Kashira crater is best modeled as a combination of surrounding spectral units (i.e., in-scene derived endmembers) with the addition of the kaolin-group mineral halloysite. Linear unmixing of TES data suggest that the deposit contains ∼30% halloysite, a result that is supported by a sensitivity analysis. Potential formation mechanisms for this deposit include hydrothermal alteration, arid-environment pedogenic weathering of a basaltic mound deposit, or pedogenic weathering of a volcanic ash deposit. Our modeling results offer a quantitative reconciliation of the CRISM and TES datasets, and provide a consistent mineralogy from spectral unmixing for an aqueous alteration mineral-bearing deposit on Mars using a combined analysis of both VNIR and TIR hyperspectral data.

  20. Next Generation Grating Spectrometer Sounders for LEO and GEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.

    2011-01-01

    AIRS and MODIS are widely used for weather, climate, composition, carbon cycle, cross-calibration, and applications. The community asking for new capability in the 2020 timeframe, capabilities desired: (1) Hyperspectral UV to LWIR, High Spatial ?1km IFOV (2) Maximize Synergies of Solar Reflected and IR. Synergies with OCO-2. We expect more users and applications of next gen LEO IR Sounder than GEO. These include: weather, climate, GHG monitoring, aviation, disaster response. There is a new direction for imagers and sounders: (1) Separate Vis/NIR/SWIR from MWIR/LWIR instruments reduces technology risk and complexity. (2) Expect Costs to be lower than CrIS & VIIRS Some additional ideas to reduce costs include: (1) minimum set of requirements (2) mini-grating spectrometers. supports constellation for higher revisit (3) new technology to reduce instrument size (large format fpa's) (4) hosted payloads

  1. Ultraspectral sounder data compression using the Tunstall coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Bormin; Gu, Lingjia

    2007-09-01

    In an error-prone environment the compression of ultraspectral sounder data is vulnerable to error propagation. The Tungstall coding is a variable-to-fixed length code which compresses data by mapping a variable number of source symbols to a fixed number of codewords. It avoids the resynchronization difficulty encountered in fixed-to-variable length codes such as Huffman coding and arithmetic coding. This paper explores the use of the Tungstall coding in reducing the error propagation for ultraspectral sounder data compression. The results show that our Tunstall approach has a favorable compression ratio compared with JPEG-2000, 3D SPIHT, JPEG-LS, CALIC and CCSDS IDC 5/3. It also has less error propagation compared with JPEG-2000.

  2. SAR/InSAR observation by an HF sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Ono, T.

    2007-03-01

    Application of SAR imaging algorithm to spaceborne HF sounder observation was studied. Two types of image ambiguity problems were addressed in the application. One is surface/subsurface image ambiguity arising from deep penetration of HF wave, and another is mirror image ambiguity that is inherent to dipole antenna SAR. A numerical model demonstrated that the surface/subsurface ambiguity can be mitigated by taking a synthetic aperture large enough to defocus subsurface objects. In order to resolve the mirror image ambiguity problem, an image superposition technique was proposed. The performance of the technique was demonstrated by using simulation data of the HF sounder observation to confirm the feasibility of HF SAR and HF InSAR observation.

  3. The topside sounder database - Data screening and systematic biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhulst, Tobias; Stankov, Stanimir M.

    2013-06-01

    The ionospheric topside sounder measurement database developed at the US National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) is a valuable source of information when investigating the composition and complex dynamics of the upper ionosphere. The database is increasingly used by many scientists around the world for both research and development of empirical models. However, there is always a danger of indiscriminately using the data without properly assessing the data quality and applicability for a given purpose. This paper is concerned with the issue of data screening and pre-processing of the Alouette/ISIS topside sounder database. An overview of the original database availability and formatting is given and the use of solar and geomagnetic indices is discussed. Data screening procedures, concerning detection and handling of erroneous profiles, are also presented. Special attention is drawn to the systematic biases observed in the database and the possibilities for their removal.

  4. Integrated Microcalorimeters Using Ir TES And Sn Mushroom Absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Bogorin, D.; Galeazzi, M.

    2006-09-07

    Cryogenic microcalorimeters have the potential to meet the requirements of future x-ray missions. The University of Miami has recently started a program to fabricate fully integrated microcalorimeter arrays. We deposit high purity iridium thin film as Transition Edge Sensors (TES). We chose iridium because it has a bulk transition temperature of 112 mK and we expect single layer TES to have good reproducibility and long term stability. Also we use integrated tin film in a mushroom geometry as the absorbers to get high filling factor, low heat capacity and easy array manufacturing process. We present here our preliminary results in both areas.

  5. HIS analyses of mesoscale phenomena. [High resolution Interferometer Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, John T.; Fuelberg, Henry E.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented from two sets of measurements made by the High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS) during two aircraft flights over the Cooperative-Huntsville-Meteorological-Experiment region on June 15 and 19, 1986. It is shown that the temperature and the dew-point field retrieved from HIS spectra contain distinct mesoscale structures. The features in the HIS dew-point fields agreed well with the cloud and moisture structures observed in visible and 6.7 micron GOES imagery.

  6. High resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS), volume 1, book 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The following topics are presented with respect to the high resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS) that is to be used as an instrument for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS): (1) an instrument overview; (2) an instrument description; (3) the instrument's conceptual design; (4) technical risks and offsets; (5) instrument reliability; (6) commands and telemetry; (7) mass and power budgets; (8) integration and test program; (9) program implementation; and (10) phase CD schedule.

  7. The Apollo 17 Lunar Sounder. [lunar orbit coherent radar experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. J.; Brown, W. E., Jr.; Jordan, R.; Adams, G. F.; Jackson, P.; Peeples, W. J.; Porcello, L. J.; Ryu, J.; Eggleton, R. E.; Schaber, G.

    1973-01-01

    The Apollo Lunar Sounder Experiment, a coherent radar operated from lunar orbit during the Apollo 17 mission, has scientific objectives of mapping lunar subsurface structure, surface profiling, surface imaging, and galactic noise measurement. Representative results from each of the four disciplines are presented. Subsurface reflections have been interpreted in both optically and digitally processed data. Images and profiles yield detailed selenomorphological information. The preliminary galactic noise results are consistent with earlier measurements by other workers.

  8. High resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS), volume 1, book 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The following topics are presented with respect to the high resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS) that is to be used as an instrument for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS): (1) preliminary program plans; (2) contract end item (CEI) specification; and (3) the instrument interface description document. Under the preliminary program plans section, plans dealing with the following subject areas are discussed: spares, performance assurance, configuration management, software implementation, contamination, calibration management, and verification.

  9. On Cirrus Cloud Fields Measured by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Brian H.; Eldering, Annmarie; Liou, Kuo Nan

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation showing trends in clouds measured by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is given. The topics include: 1) Trends in clouds measured by AIRS: Are they reasonable? 2) Single and multilayered cloud trends; 3) Retrievals of thin cirrus D(sub e) and tau: Single-layered cloud only; 4) Relationships between ECF, D(sub e), tau, and T(sub CLD); and 5) MODIS vs. AIRS retrievals.

  10. Compositional provinces of Mars from statistical analyses of TES, GRS, OMEGA and CRISM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, A. Deanne; Hamilton, Victoria E.

    2015-01-01

    identified 10 distinct classes of mineral assemblage on Mars through statistical analyses of mineral abundances derived from Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data at a spatial resolution of 8 pixels per degree. Two classes are new regions in Sinus Meridiani and northern Hellas basin. Except for crystalline hematite abundance, Sinus Meridiani exhibits compositional characteristics similar to Meridiani Planum; these two regions may share part of a common history. The northern margin of Hellas basin lacks olivine and high-Ca pyroxene compared to terrains just outside the Hellas outer ring; this may reflect a difference in crustal compositions and/or aqueous alteration. Hesperian highland volcanic terrains are largely mapped into one class. These terrains exhibit low-to-intermediate potassium and thorium concentrations (from Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) data) compared to older highland terrains, indicating differences in the complexity of processes affecting mantle melts between these different-aged terrains. A previously reported, locally observed trend toward decreasing proportions of low-calcium pyroxene relative to total pyroxene with time is also apparent over the larger scales of our study. Spatial trends in olivine and pyroxene abundance are consistent with those observed in near-infrared data sets. Generally, regions that are distinct in TES data also exhibit distinct elemental characteristics in GRS data, suggesting that surficial coatings are not the primary control on TES mineralogical variations, but rather reflect regional differences in igneous and large-scale sedimentary/glacial processes. Distinct compositions measured over large, low-dust regions from multiple data sets indicate that global homogenization of unconsolidated surface materials has not occurred.

  11. Satellite Sounder Data Assimilation for Improving Alaska Region Weather Forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Jiang; Stevens, E.; Zhang, X.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Heinrichs, T.; Broderson, D.

    2014-01-01

    A case study and monthly statistical analysis using sounder data assimilation to improve the Alaska regional weather forecast model are presented. Weather forecast in Alaska faces challenges as well as opportunities. Alaska has a large land with multiple types of topography and coastal area. Weather forecast models must be finely tuned in order to accurately predict weather in Alaska. Being in the high-latitudes provides Alaska greater coverage of polar orbiting satellites for integration into forecasting models than the lower 48. Forecasting marine low stratus clouds is critical to the Alaska aviation and oil industry and is the current focus of the case study. NASA AIRS/CrIS sounder profiles data are used to do data assimilation for the Alaska regional weather forecast model to improve Arctic marine stratus clouds forecast. Choosing physical options for the WRF model is discussed. Preprocess of AIRS/CrIS sounder data for data assimilation is described. Local observation data, satellite data, and global data assimilation data are used to verify and/or evaluate the forecast results by the MET tools Model Evaluation Tools (MET).

  12. Geophysical Information from Advanced Sounder Infrared Spectral Radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced satellite sensors are tasked with improving global observations of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface to enable enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Satisfying this type of improvement for inferred geophysical information from these observations requires optimal usage of data from current systems as well as enhancements to future sensors. This presentation addresses the information content present in infrared spectral radiance from advanced atmospheric sounders with an emphasis on knowledge of thermodynamic state and trace species. Results of trade-off studies conducted to evaluate the impact of spectral resolution, spectral coverage, instrument noise, and a priori knowledge on remote sensing system information content will be discussed. A focus is placed on information achievable from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) on the NASA EOS Aqua satellite in orbit since 2002, the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) aboard MetOp-A since 2006, and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) instrument aboard the NPP and JPSS series of satellites which began 28 October 2011.

  13. GEO/SAMS - The Geostationary Synthetic Aperture Microwave Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.

    2008-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has for many years operated two weather satellite systems, the Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite system (POES), using low-earth orbiting (LEO) satellites, and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite system (GOES), using geostationary earth orbiting (GEO) satellites. (Similar systems are also operated by other nations.) The POES satellites have been equipped with both infrared (IR) and microwave (MW) atmospheric sounders, which makes it possible to determine the vertical distribution of temperature and humidity in the troposphere even under cloudy conditions. Such satellite observations have had a significant impact on weather forecasting accuracy, especially in regions where in situ observations are sparse. In contrast, the GOES satellites have only been equipped with IR sounders, since it has not been feasible to build a large enough antenna to achieve sufficient spatial resolution for a MW sounder in GEO. As a result, GOES soundings can only be obtained in cloud free areas and in the less important upper atmosphere, above the cloud tops. This has hindered the effective use of GOES data in numerical weather prediction. Full sounding capabilities with the GOES system is highly desirable because of the advantageous spatial and temporal coverage that is possible from GEO. While POES satellites provide coverage in relatively narrow swaths, and with a revisit time of 12-24 hours or more, GOES satellites can provide continuous hemispheric coverage, making it possible to monitor highly dynamic phenomena such as hurricanes.

  14. Application of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Data to Climate Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Gregorich, David; Gaiser, Steve; Chahine, Moustafa T.

    2004-01-01

    The application of hyper spectral radiometric data to climate research requires very high absolute radiometric accuracy and stability. We use cloud-free tropical ocean data from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIR) Calibration Data Subset (ADCS) to show that the radiometric precision and stability required climate applications has been achieved. The sea surface skin temperatures derived from the AIRS 2616cm-1 super window channel are stable relative to the RTG.SST at the better than 8 mK/year level, and the spectral calibration is stable at the 1 ppm/year level. The excellent stability and accuracy are the result of the implementation of AIRS as a grating array spectrometer, which is cooled and stabilized within 10 mK at 155 K. Analysis of daily measurements of the temperature gradient between the surface and 7 km altitude show that the AIRS Calibration Data Subset has applications which extend its original intent for calibration support to climate research. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua satellite was launched into polar orbit in May 2002. AIRS covers the spectral region from 640 to 2700 cm-1 with 2378 independent channels and represents the first of a new generation of hyper spectral resolution sounders in support of global sounding data for weather forecasting and climate research.

  15. Satellite Monitoring Over the Canadian Oil Sands: Highlights from Aura OMI and TES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, Mark W.; McLinden, Chris; Fioletov, Vitali; Cady-Pereira, Karen E.; Krotkov, Nick A.; Boersma, Folkert; Li, Can; Luo, Ming; Bhartia, P. K.; Joiner, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing provides a unique perspective for air quality monitoring in and around the Canadian Oil Sands as a result of its spatial and temporal coverage. Presented are Aura satellite observations of key pollutants including nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbon monoxide (CO), ammonia (NH3), methanol (CH3OH), and formic acid (HCOOH) over the Canadian Oil Sands. Some of the highlights include: (i) the evolution of NO2 and SO2 from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), including comparisons with other nearby sources, (ii) two years of ammonia, carbon monoxide, methanol, and formic acid observations from 240 km North-South Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) transects through the oils sands, and (iii) preliminary insights into emissions derived from these observations.

  16. Inverse modeling of CO2 sources and sinks using satellite observations of CO2 from TES and surface flask measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nassar, Ray; Jones, DBA; Kulawik, SS; Worden, JR; Bowman, K; Andres, Robert Joseph; Suntharalingam, P; Chen, j.; Brenninkmeijer, CAM; Schuck, TJ; Conway, T.J.; Worthy, DE

    2011-01-01

    We infer CO2 surface fluxes using satellite observations of mid-tropospheric CO2 from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and measurements of CO2 from surface flasks in a time-independent inversion analysis based on the GEOS-Chem model. Using TES CO2 observations over oceans, spanning 40 S 40 N, we find that the horizontal and vertical coverage of the TES and flask data are complementary. This complementarity is demonstrated by combining the datasets in a joint inversion, which provides better constraints than from either dataset alone, when a posteriori CO2 distributions are evaluated against independent ship and aircraft CO2 data. In particular, the joint inversion offers improved constraints in the tropics where surface measurements are sparse, such as the tropical forests of South America. Aggregating the annual surface-to-atmosphere fluxes from the joint inversion for the year 2006 yields 1.13 0.21 PgC for the global ocean, 2.77 0.20 PgC for the global land biosphere and 3.90 0.29 PgC for the total global natural flux (defined as the sum of all biospheric, oceanic, and biomass burning contributions but excluding CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion). These global ocean and global land fluxes are shown to be near the median of the broad range of values from other inversion results for 2006. To achieve these results, a bias in TES CO2 in the Southern Hemisphere was assessed and corrected using aircraft flask data, and we demonstrate that our results have low sensitivity to variations in the bias correction approach. Overall, this analysis suggests that future carbon data assimilation systems can benefit by integrating in situ and satellite observations of CO2 and that the vertical information provided by satellite observations of mid-tropospheric CO2 combined with measurements of surface CO2, provides an important additional constraint for flux inversions.

  17. Physical properties of the Mars Exploration Rover landing sites as inferred from Mini-TES-derived thermal inertia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fergason, R.L.; Christensen, P.R.; Bell, J.F., III; Golombek, M.P.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Kieffer, H.H.

    2006-01-01

    The Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) on board the two Mars Exploration Rovers provides the first opportunity to observe thermal properties from the Martian surface, relate these properties to orbital data, and perform soil conductivity experiments under Martian conditions. The thermal inertias of soils, bedforms, and rock at each landing site were derived to quantify the physical properties of these features and understand geologic processes occurring at these localities. The thermal inertia for the. Gusev plains rock target Bonneville Beacon (???1200 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2) is consistent with a dense, basaltic rock, but the rocks at the Columbia Hills have a lower thermal inertia (???620 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2), suggesting that they have a volcaniclasic origin. Bedforms on the floors of craters at both landing sites have thermal inertias of 200 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2, consistent with a particle diameter of ???160 ??m. This diameter is comparable to the most easily moved grain size in the current atmosphere on Mars, suggesting that these bedforms may have formed under current atmospheric conditions. Along the Meridiani plains, the thermal inertia is lower than that derived from TES and Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) orbital data. This discrepancy is not well understood. Mini-TES-derived thermal inertias at Gusev along a ???2.5 km traverse follow trends in thermal inertia measured from orbit with TES and THEMIS. However, along the traverse, there are variability and mixing of particle sizes that are not resolved in the orbital thermal inertia data due to meter-scale processes that are not identifiable at larger scales. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Limb (TL2H2OL)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-02-06

    TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Limb (TL2H2OL) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor Spatial Coverage:  27 x 23 km Limb ... Access: OPeNDAP Parameters:  H2O Water Volume Mixing Radio Precision Vertical Resolution Order ...

  19. TES/Aura L2 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Lite Nadir (TL2COLN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-06-16

    TES/Aura L2 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Lite Nadir (TL2COLN) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Carbon Monoxide Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir ... OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Carbon Monoxide Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  20. TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid (FOR) Nadir (TL2FORN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-02-04

    TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid (FOR) Nadir (TL2FORN) News:  TES News Join ... L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir Spatial ... Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Formic Acid Volume Mixing Ratio Precision Vertical Resolution Order ...

  1. TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid (FOR) Lite Nadir (TL2FORLN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-06-16

    TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid (FOR) Lite Nadir (TL2FORLN) News:  TES News ... L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir Spatial ... Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Formic Acid Volume Mixing Ratio Vertical Resolution Precision Order ...

  2. TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid (FOR) Nadir (TL2FORNS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-02-04

    TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid (FOR) Nadir (TL2FORNS) News:  TES News Join ... L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir Spatial ... Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Formic Acid Volume Mixing Ratio Precision Vertical Resolution Order ...

  3. Sounder updates for statistical model predictions of maximum usable frequencies on HF sky wave paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Michael H.; Daehler, Mark

    1986-12-01

    A method is presented for the short-term prediction of maximum usable frequencies (MUFs) in a large communications region. It is shown how ionospheric measurements from a network of ionospheric sounders can be used to update sunspot number or solar 10.7 cm flux inputs to a climatological MUF prediction model. MINIMUF in this case, which is then used to predict MUFs on paths throughout the region. Analysis of mid-latitude oblique-incidence sounder data sets indicates the advantage gained from single-path sounder updates of flux for MUF predictions on adjacent paths. Under specified conditions a further dramatic improvement in MUF prediction accuracy is found from spatial interpolation of sounder-updated flux values. MUF prediction accuracies within 0.5 MHz are obtained for fairly modest sounder network deployments, in which the sounder midpath point distributions and updating frequency satisfy particular requirements.

  4. Thermal-infrared spectral observations of geologic materials in emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Philip R.; Luth, Sharon J.

    1987-01-01

    The thermal-infrared spectra of geologic materials in emission were studied using the prototype Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). A variety of of processes and surface modifications that may influence or alter the spectra of primary rock materials were studied. It was confirmed that thermal emission spectra contain the same absorption features as those observed in transmission and reflection spectra. It was confirmed that the TES instrument can be used to obtain relevant spectra for analysis of rock and mineral composition.

  5. Composition and thermal inertia of the Mawrth Vallis region of Mars from TES and THEMIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, Joseph R.; Fergason, Robin L.

    2009-01-01

    Clay mineral-bearing deposits previously discovered on Mars with near infrared ( λ=0.3-5 μm) remote sensing data are of major significance for understanding the aqueous history, geological evolution, and past habitability of Mars. In this study, we analyzed the thermal infrared ( λ=6-35 μm) surface properties of the most extensive phyllosilicate deposit on Mars: the Mawrth Vallis area. Clay mineral-bearing units, which in visible images appear to be relatively light-toned, layered bedrock, have thermal inertia values ranging from 150 to 460 J m -2 K -1 s -1/2. This suggests the deposits are composed of a mixture of rock with sand and dust at 100-meter scales. Dark-toned materials that mantle the clay-bearing surfaces have thermal inertia values ranging from 150 to 800, indicating variable degrees of rockiness or induration of this younger sedimentary or pyroclastic unit. Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) spectra of the light-toned rocks were analyzed with a number of techniques, but none of the results shows a large phyllosilicate component as has been detected in the same surfaces with near-infrared data. Instead, TES spectra of light-toned surfaces are best modeled by a combination of plagioclase feldspar, high-silica materials (similar to impure opaline silica or felsic glass), and zeolites. We propose three hypotheses for why the clay minerals are not apparent in thermal infrared data, including effects due to surface roughness, sub-pixel mixing of multiple surface temperatures, and low absolute mineral abundances combined with differences in spatial sampling between instruments. Zeolites modeled in TES spectra could be a previously unrecognized component of the alteration assemblage in the phyllosilicate-bearing rocks of the Mawrth Vallis area. TES spectral index mapping suggests that (Fe/Mg)-clays detected with near infrared data correspond to trioctahedral (Fe 2+) clay minerals rather than nontronite-like clays. The average mineralogy and geologic

  6. TES development for a frequency selective bolometer camera.

    SciTech Connect

    Datesman, A. M.; Downes, T. P.; Perera, T. A.; Wang, G.; Yefremenko, V. G.; Pearson, J. E.; Novosad, V.; Divan, R.; Chang, C. L.; Logan, D. W.; Meyer, S. S.; Wilson , G. W.; Bleem, L. E.; Crites, A. T.; McMahon, J. J.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Materials Science Division; Kavli Inst. Cosmological Phys.; Univ. of Massachusetts

    2009-06-01

    We discuss the development, at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), of a four-pixel camera with four spectral channels centered at 150, 220, 270, and 360 GHz. The scientific motivation involves photometry of distant dusty galaxies located by Spitzer and SCUBA, as well as the study of other millimeter-wave sources such as ultra-luminous infrared galaxies, the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect in clusters, and galactic dust. The camera incorporates Frequency Selective Bolometer (FSB) and superconducting Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) technology. The current generation of TES devices we examine utilizes proximity effect superconducting bilayers of Mo/Au, Ti, or Ti/Au as TESs, located along with frequency selective absorbing structures on silicon nitride membranes. The detector incorporates lithographically patterned structures designed to address both TES device stability and detector thermal transport concerns. The membrane is not perforated, resulting in a detector which is comparatively robust mechanically. In this paper, we report on the development of the superconducting bilayer TES technology, the design and testing of the detector thermal transport and device stability control structures, optical and thermal test results, and the use of new materials.

  7. Multiplexing Readout of TES Microcalorimeters Based on Analog Baseband Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Takei, Y.; Yamasaki, N.Y; Mitsuda, K.; Kimura, S.; Hirakoso, W.; Masui, K.; Korte, P. A. J. de; Kuur, J. van der; Gottardi, L.

    2009-12-16

    A TES microcalorimeter array is a promising spectrometer with excellent energy resolution and a moderate imaging capability. To realize a large format array in space, multiplexing the TES signals at the low tempersture stage is mandatory. We are developing frequency division multiplexing (FDM) based on baseband feedback technique. In FDM, each TES is AC-biased with a different carrier frequency. Signals from several pixels are summed and then read out by one SQUID. The maximum number of multiplexed pixels are limited by the frequency band in which the SQUID can be operated in a flux-locked loop, which is {approx}1 MHz with standard flux-locked loop circuit. In the baseband feedback, the signal ({approx}10 kHz band) from the TES is once demodulated. Then a reconstructed copy of the modulated signal with an appropriate phase is fed back to the SQUID input coil to maintain an approximately constant magnetic flux. This can be implemented even for large cable delays and automatically suppresses the carrier. We developed a prototype electronics for the baseband feedback based on an analog phase sensitive detector (PSD) and a multiplier. Combined with Seiko 80-SSA SQUID amp, open-loop gain of 8 has been obtained for 10 kHz baseband signal at 5 MHz carrier frequency, with a moderate noise contribution of 27pA/{radical}(Hz) at input.

  8. Analysis of test data film generated by the lunar sounder (S-209)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, N.

    1973-01-01

    The analysis of test films pertaining to the readiness of the Apollo 17 radar equipment is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the evaluation of the lunar sounder equipment. The lunar sounder experiment was to examine the lunar surface at three different radar frequencies of 2 meters, 60 meters, and 20 meters. Test films were made on the lunar sounder system to describe the purpose of the test, to describe the experiments used for analysis, and to provide conclusions reached after analysis.

  9. Atmospheric infrared sounder on AIRS with emphasis on level 2 products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sung-Yung; Fetzer, Eric; Granger, Stephanie; Hearty, Thomas; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Manning, Evan M.; Olsen, Edward; Pagano, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) was launched aboard EOS Aqua in May of 2002. AIRS is a grating spectrometer with almost 2400 channels covering the 3.74 to 15.40 micron spectral region with a nominal spectral resolution ((nu)/(delta)(nu)) of 1200, with some gaps. In addition, AIRS has 4 channels in the NIR/VIS region. The AIRS operates in conjunction with the microwave sounders Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-A) and Humidity Sounder of Brazil (HSB). The microwave sounders are mainly used for cloud clearing of IR radiances, or to remove the effect of cloud on the IR radiances.

  10. Tropospheric and Airborne Emission Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, Thomas; Beer, Reinhard

    1996-01-01

    X This paper describes the development of two related instruments, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES). Both instruments are infrared imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometers, used for measuring the state of the lower atmosphere, and in particular the measurement of ozone and ozone sources and sinks.