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Sample records for emission tomography images

  1. 4D image reconstruction for emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reader, Andrew J.; Verhaeghe, Jeroen

    2014-11-01

    An overview of the theory of 4D image reconstruction for emission tomography is given along with a review of the current state of the art, covering both positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). By viewing 4D image reconstruction as a matter of either linear or non-linear parameter estimation for a set of spatiotemporal functions chosen to approximately represent the radiotracer distribution, the areas of so-called ‘fully 4D’ image reconstruction and ‘direct kinetic parameter estimation’ are unified within a common framework. Many choices of linear and non-linear parameterization of these functions are considered (including the important case where the parameters have direct biological meaning), along with a review of the algorithms which are able to estimate these often non-linear parameters from emission tomography data. The other crucial components to image reconstruction (the objective function, the system model and the raw data format) are also covered, but in less detail due to the relatively straightforward extension from their corresponding components in conventional 3D image reconstruction. The key unifying concept is that maximum likelihood or maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation of either linear or non-linear model parameters can be achieved in image space after carrying out a conventional expectation maximization (EM) update of the dynamic image series, using a Kullback-Leibler distance metric (comparing the modeled image values with the EM image values), to optimize the desired parameters. For MAP, an image-space penalty for regularization purposes is required. The benefits of 4D and direct reconstruction reported in the literature are reviewed, and furthermore demonstrated with simple simulation examples. It is clear that the future of reconstructing dynamic or functional emission tomography images, which often exhibit high levels of spatially correlated noise, should ideally exploit these 4D

  2. Positron emission tomography tracers for imaging angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Ambros J.; Wang, Hui; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    Position emission tomography imaging of angiogenesis may provide non-invasive insights into the corresponding molecular processes and may be applied for individualized treatment planning of antiangiogenic therapies. At the moment, most strategies are focusing on the development of radiolabelled proteins and antibody formats targeting VEGF and its receptor or the ED-B domain of a fibronectin isoform as well as radiolabelled matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors or αvβ3 integrin antagonists. Great efforts are being made to develop suitable tracers for different target structures. All of the major strategies focusing on the development of radiolabelled compounds for use with positron emission tomography are summarized in this review. However, because the most intensive work is concentrated on the development of radiolabelled RGD peptides for imaging αvβ3 expression, which has successfully made its way from bench to bedside, these developments are especially emphasized. PMID:20559632

  3. Positron emission tomography imaging of coronary atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Moss, Alastair J; Adamson, Philip D; Newby, David E; Dweck, Marc R

    2016-07-01

    Inflammation has a central role in the progression of coronary atherosclerosis. Recent developments in cardiovascular imaging with the advent of hybrid positron emission tomography have provided a window into the molecular pathophysiology underlying coronary plaque inflammation. Using novel radiotracers targeted at specific cellular pathways, the potential exists to observe inflammation, apoptosis, cellular hypoxia, microcalcification and angiogenesis in vivo. Several clinical studies are now underway assessing the ability of this hybrid imaging modality to inform about atherosclerotic disease activity and the prediction of future cardiovascular risk. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing coronary atherosclerosis may be the first step toward offering patients a more stratified, personalized approach to treatment. PMID:27322032

  4. Imaging tumor metabolism using positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Lewis, David Y; Soloviev, Dmitry; Brindle, Kevin M

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an extraordinarily sensitive clinical imaging modality for interrogating tumor metabolism. Radiolabeled PET substrates can be traced at subphysiological concentrations, allowing noninvasive imaging of metabolism and intratumoral heterogeneity in systems ranging from advanced cancer models to patients in the clinic. There are a wide range of novel and more established PET radiotracers, which can be used to investigate various aspects of the tumor, including carbohydrate, amino acid, and fatty acid metabolism. In this review, we briefly discuss the more established metabolic tracers and describe recent work on the development of new tracers. Some of the unanswered questions in tumor metabolism are considered alongside new technical developments, such as combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging scanners, which could provide new imaging solutions to some of the outstanding diagnostic challenges facing modern cancer medicine. PMID:25815854

  5. Imaging Tumor Metabolism Using Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, David Y.; Soloviev, Dmitry; Brindle, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an extraordinarily sensitive clinical imaging modality for interrogating tumor metabolism. Radiolabelled PET substrates can be traced at sub-physiological concentrations, allowing non-invasive imaging of metabolism and intra-tumoral heterogeneity in systems ranging from advanced cancer models to cancer patients in the clinic. There are a wide range of novel and more established PET radiotracers, which can be used to investigate various aspects of tumor metabolism, including carbohydrate, amino acid and fatty acid metabolism. In this review we will briefly discuss the more established metabolic tracers and describe recent work on the development of new tracers. Some of the unanswered questions in tumor metabolism will be considered alongside new technical developments, such as combined PET/MRI machines, that could provide new imaging solutions to some of the outstanding diagnostic challenges facing modern cancer medicine. PMID:25815854

  6. Imaging tumour hypoxia with positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, I N; Manavaki, R; Blower, P J; West, C; Williams, K J; Harris, A L; Domarkas, J; Lord, S; Baldry, C; Gilbert, F J

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia, a hallmark of most solid tumours, is a negative prognostic factor due to its association with an aggressive tumour phenotype and therapeutic resistance. Given its prominent role in oncology, accurate detection of hypoxia is important, as it impacts on prognosis and could influence treatment planning. A variety of approaches have been explored over the years for detecting and monitoring changes in hypoxia in tumours, including biological markers and noninvasive imaging techniques. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the preferred method for imaging tumour hypoxia due to its high specificity and sensitivity to probe physiological processes in vivo, as well as the ability to provide information about intracellular oxygenation levels. This review provides an overview of imaging hypoxia with PET, with an emphasis on the advantages and limitations of the currently available hypoxia radiotracers. PMID:25514380

  7. Bayesian image reconstruction: Application to emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, J.; Llacer, J.

    1989-02-01

    In this paper we propose a Maximum a Posteriori (MAP) method of image reconstruction in the Bayesian framework for the Poisson noise case. We use entropy to define the prior probability and likelihood to define the conditional probability. The method uses sharpness parameters which can be theoretically computed or adjusted, allowing us to obtain MAP reconstructions without the problem of the grey'' reconstructions associated with the pre Bayesian reconstructions. We have developed several ways to solve the reconstruction problem and propose a new iterative algorithm which is stable, maintains positivity and converges to feasible images faster than the Maximum Likelihood Estimate method. We have successfully applied the new method to the case of Emission Tomography, both with simulated and real data. 41 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Orbay, Hakan; Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular events are the leading causes of death in the industrialized world. Atherosclerosis develops insidiously and the initial manifestation is usually sudden cardiac death, stroke, or myocardial infarction. Molecular imaging is a valuable tool to identify the disease at an early stage before fatal manifestations occur. Among the various molecular imaging techniques, this review mainly focuses on positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of atherosclerosis. The targets and pathways that have been investigated to date for PET imaging of atherosclerosis include: glycolysis, cell membrane metabolism (phosphatidylcholine synthesis), integrin αvβ3, low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors (LDLr), natriuretic peptide clearance receptors (NPCRs), fatty acid synthesis, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), macrophages, platelets, etc. Many PET tracers have been investigated clinically for imaging of atherosclerosis. Early diagnosis of atherosclerotic lesions by PET imaging can help to prevent the premature death caused by atherosclerosis, and smooth translation of promising PET tracers into the clinic is critical to the benefit of patients. PMID:24312158

  9. Functional cardiac imaging: positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Mullani, N.A.; Gould, K.L.

    1984-02-01

    Dynamic cardiovascular imaging plays a vital role in the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease by providing information about the function of the heart. During the past 30 years, cardiovascular imaging has evolved from the simple chest x-ray and fluoroscopy to such sophisticated techniques as invasive cardiac angiography and cinearteriography and, more recently, to noninvasive cardiac CT scanning, nuclear magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography, which reflect more complex physiologic functions. As research tools, CT, NMR, and PET provide quantitative information on global as well as regional ventricular function, coronary artery stenosis, myocardial perfusion, glucose and fatty acid metabolism, or oxygen utilization, with little discomfort or risk to the patient. As imaging modalities become more sophisticated and more oriented toward clinical application, the prospect of routinely obtaining such functional information about the heart is becoming realistic. However, these advances are double-edged in that the interpretation of functional data is more complex than that of the anatomic imaging familiar to most physicians. They will require an enhanced understanding of the physiologic and biochemical processes, as well as of the instrumentation and techniques for analyzing the data. Of the new imaging modalities that provide functional information about the heart, PET is the most useful because it quantitates the regional distribution of radionuclides in vivo. Clinical applications, interpretation of data, and the impact of PET on our understanding of cardiac pathophysiology are discussed. 5 figures.

  10. Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Gastrointestinal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Goh, Vicky; Prezzi, Davide; Mallia, Andrew; Bashir, Usman; Stirling, J James; John, Joemon; Charles-Edwards, Geoff; MacKewn, Jane; Cook, Gary

    2016-08-01

    As an integrated system, hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) is able to provide simultaneously complementary high-resolution anatomic, molecular, and functional information, allowing comprehensive cancer phenotyping in a single imaging examination. In addition to an improved patient experience by combining 2 separate imaging examinations and streamlining the patient pathway, the superior soft tissue contrast resolution of MRI and the ability to acquire multiparametric MRI data is advantageous over computed tomography. For gastrointestinal cancers, this would improve tumor staging, assessment of neoadjuvant response, and of the likelihood of a complete (R0) resection in comparison with positron emission tomography or computed tomography. PMID:27342899

  11. A Review on Segmentation of Positron Emission Tomography Images

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Brent; Bagci, Ulas; Mansoor, Awais; Xu, Ziyue; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET), a non-invasive functional imaging method at the molecular level, images the distribution of biologically targeted radiotracers with high sensitivity. PET imaging provides detailed quantitative information about many diseases and is often used to evaluate inflammation, infection, and cancer by detecting emitted photons from a radiotracer localized to abnormal cells. In order to differentiate abnormal tissue from surrounding areas in PET images, image segmentation methods play a vital role; therefore, accurate image segmentation is often necessary for proper disease detection, diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-ups. In this review paper, we present state-of-the-art PET image segmentation methods, as well as the recent advances in image segmentation techniques. In order to make this manuscript self-contained, we also briefly explain the fundamentals of PET imaging, the challenges of diagnostic PET image analysis, and the effects of these challenges on the segmentation results. PMID:24845019

  12. Quantitative simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Petibon, Yoann; Huang, Chuan; Reese, Timothy G.; Kolnick, Aleksandra L.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MR) is an innovative and promising imaging modality that is generating substantial interest in the medical imaging community, while offering many challenges and opportunities. In this study, we investigated whether MR surface coils need to be accounted for in PET attenuation correction. Furthermore, we integrated motion correction, attenuation correction, and point spread function modeling into a single PET reconstruction framework. We applied our reconstruction framework to in vivo animal and patient PET-MR studies. We have demonstrated that our approach greatly improved PET image quality. PMID:26158055

  13. Quantitative simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Petibon, Yoann; Huang, Chuan; Reese, Timothy G; Kolnick, Aleksandra L; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-10-01

    Simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MR) is an innovative and promising imaging modality that is generating substantial interest in the medical imaging community, while offering many challenges and opportunities. In this study, we investigated whether MR surface coils need to be accounted for in PET attenuation correction. Furthermore, we integrated motion correction, attenuation correction, and point spread function modeling into a single PET reconstruction framework. We applied our reconstruction framework to in vivo animal and patient PET-MR studies. We have demonstrated that our approach greatly improved PET image quality. PMID:26158055

  14. Positron emission tomography and optical tissue imaging

    DOEpatents

    Falen, Steven W.; Hoefer, Richard A.; Majewski, Stanislaw; McKisson, John; Kross, Brian; Proffitt, James; Stolin, Alexander; Weisenberger, Andrew G.

    2012-05-22

    A mobile compact imaging system that combines both PET imaging and optical imaging into a single system which can be located in the operating room (OR) and provides faster feedback to determine if a tumor has been fully resected and if there are adequate surgical margins. While final confirmation is obtained from the pathology lab, such a device can reduce the total time necessary for the procedure and the number of iterations required to achieve satisfactory resection of a tumor with good margins.

  15. Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Renal Clearable Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Goel, Shreya; Hernandez, Reinier; Graves, Stephen A; Shi, Sixiang; Nickles, Robert J; Cai, Weibo

    2016-05-01

    Optical imaging has been the primary imaging modality for nearly all of the renal clearable nanoparticles since 2007. Due to the tissue depth penetration limitation, providing accurate organ kinetics non-invasively has long been a huge challenge. Although a more quantitative imaging technique has been developed by labeling nanoparticles with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) isotopes, the low temporal resolution of SPECT still limits its potential for visualizing the rapid dynamic process of renal clearable nanoparticles in vivo. The dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of renal clearable gold (Au) nanoparticles by labeling them with copper-64 ((64) Cu) to form (64) Cu-NOTA-Au-GSH is reported. Systematic nanoparticle synthesis and characterizations are performed to demonstrate the efficient renal clearance of as-prepared nanoparticles. A rapid renal clearance of (64) Cu-NOTA-Au-GSH is observed (>75%ID at 24 h post-injection) with its elimination half-life calculated to be less than 6 min, over 130 times shorter than previously reported similar nanoparticles. Dynamic PET imaging not only addresses the current challenges in accurately and non-invasively acquiring the organ kinetics, but also potentially provides a highly useful tool for studying renal clearance mechanism of other ultra-small nanoparticles, as well as the diagnosis of kidney diseases in the near future. PMID:27062146

  16. Positron emission tomography: physics, instrumentation, and image analysis.

    PubMed

    Porenta, G

    1994-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a noninvasive diagnostic technique that permits reconstruction of cross-sectional images of the human body which depict the biodistribution of PET tracer substances. A large variety of physiological PET tracers, mostly based on isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine is available and allows the in vivo investigation of organ perfusion, metabolic pathways and biomolecular processes in normal and diseased states. PET cameras utilize the physical characteristics of positron decay to derive quantitative measurements of tracer concentrations, a capability that has so far been elusive for conventional SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) imaging techniques. Due to the short half lives of most PET isotopes, an on-site cyclotron and a radiochemistry unit are necessary to provide an adequate supply of PET tracers. While operating a PET center in the past was a complex procedure restricted to few academic centers with ample resources, PET technology has rapidly advanced in recent years and has entered the commercial nuclear medicine market. To date, the availability of compact cyclotrons with remote computer control, automated synthesis units for PET radiochemistry, high-performance PET cameras, and user-friendly analysis workstations permits installation of a clinical PET center within most nuclear medicine facilities. This review provides simple descriptions of important aspects concerning physics, instrumentation, and image analysis in PET imaging which should be understood by medical personnel involved in the clinical operation of a PET imaging center. PMID:7941595

  17. Simultaneous in vivo positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Catana, Ciprian; Procissi, Daniel; Wu, Yibao; Judenhofer, Martin S; Qi, Jinyi; Pichler, Bernd J; Jacobs, Russell E; Cherry, Simon R

    2008-03-11

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely used in vivo imaging technologies with both clinical and biomedical research applications. The strengths of MRI include high-resolution, high-contrast morphologic imaging of soft tissues; the ability to image physiologic parameters such as diffusion and changes in oxygenation level resulting from neuronal stimulation; and the measurement of metabolites using chemical shift imaging. PET images the distribution of biologically targeted radiotracers with high sensitivity, but images generally lack anatomic context and are of lower spatial resolution. Integration of these technologies permits the acquisition of temporally correlated data showing the distribution of PET radiotracers and MRI contrast agents or MR-detectable metabolites, with registration to the underlying anatomy. An MRI-compatible PET scanner has been built for biomedical research applications that allows data from both modalities to be acquired simultaneously. Experiments demonstrate no effect of the MRI system on the spatial resolution of the PET system and <10% reduction in the fraction of radioactive decay events detected by the PET scanner inside the MRI. The signal-to-noise ratio and uniformity of the MR images, with the exception of one particular pulse sequence, were little affected by the presence of the PET scanner. In vivo simultaneous PET and MRI studies were performed in mice. Proof-of-principle in vivo MR spectroscopy and functional MRI experiments were also demonstrated with the combined scanner. PMID:18319342

  18. Simultaneous in vivo positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Catana, Ciprian; Procissi, Daniel; Wu, Yibao; Judenhofer, Martin S.; Qi, Jinyi; Pichler, Bernd J.; Jacobs, Russell E.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2008-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely used in vivo imaging technologies with both clinical and biomedical research applications. The strengths of MRI include high-resolution, high-contrast morphologic imaging of soft tissues; the ability to image physiologic parameters such as diffusion and changes in oxygenation level resulting from neuronal stimulation; and the measurement of metabolites using chemical shift imaging. PET images the distribution of biologically targeted radiotracers with high sensitivity, but images generally lack anatomic context and are of lower spatial resolution. Integration of these technologies permits the acquisition of temporally correlated data showing the distribution of PET radiotracers and MRI contrast agents or MR-detectable metabolites, with registration to the underlying anatomy. An MRI-compatible PET scanner has been built for biomedical research applications that allows data from both modalities to be acquired simultaneously. Experiments demonstrate no effect of the MRI system on the spatial resolution of the PET system and <10% reduction in the fraction of radioactive decay events detected by the PET scanner inside the MRI. The signal-to-noise ratio and uniformity of the MR images, with the exception of one particular pulse sequence, were little affected by the presence of the PET scanner. In vivo simultaneous PET and MRI studies were performed in mice. Proof-of-principle in vivo MR spectroscopy and functional MRI experiments were also demonstrated with the combined scanner. PMID:18319342

  19. Single photon emission tomography imaging in parkinsonian disorders: a review.

    PubMed

    Acton, P D; Mozley, P D

    2000-01-01

    Parkinsonian symptoms are associated with a number of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy and progressive supranuclear palsy. Pathological evidence has shown clearly that these disorders are associated with a loss of neurons, particularly in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) now are able to visualise and quantify changes in cerebral blood flow, glucose metabolism, and dopaminergic function produced by parkinsonian disorders. Both PET and SPECT have become important tools in the differential diagnosis of these diseases, and may have sufficient sensitivity to detect neuronal changes before the onset of clinical symptoms. Imaging is now being utilised to elucidate the genetic contribution to Parkinson's disease, and in longitudinal studies to assess the efficacy and mode of action of neuroprotective drug and surgical treatments. This review summarises recent applications of SPECT imaging in the study of parkinsonian disorders, with particular reference to the increasing role it is playing in the understanding, diagnosis and management of these diseases. PMID:11455039

  20. Fuzzy-rule-based image reconstruction for positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Partha P.; Rajan, K.

    2005-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography have revolutionized the field of medicine and biology. Penalized iterative algorithms based on maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation eliminate noisy artifacts by utilizing available prior information in the reconstruction process but often result in a blurring effect. MAP-based algorithms fail to determine the density class in the reconstructed image and hence penalize the pixels irrespective of the density class. Reconstruction with better edge information is often difficult because prior knowledge is not taken into account. The recently introduced median-root-prior (MRP)-based algorithm preserves the edges, but a steplike streaking effect is observed in the reconstructed image, which is undesirable. A fuzzy approach is proposed for modeling the nature of interpixel interaction in order to build an artifact-free edge-preserving reconstruction. The proposed algorithm consists of two elementary steps: (1) edge detection, in which fuzzy-rule-based derivatives are used for the detection of edges in the nearest neighborhood window (which is equivalent to recognizing nearby density classes), and (2) fuzzy smoothing, in which penalization is performed only for those pixels for which no edge is detected in the nearest neighborhood. Both of these operations are carried out iteratively until the image converges. Analysis shows that the proposed fuzzy-rule-based reconstruction algorithm is capable of producing qualitatively better reconstructed images than those reconstructed by MAP and MRP algorithms. The reconstructed images are sharper, with small features being better resolved owing to the nature of the fuzzy potential function.

  1. Simulation of Medical Imaging Systems: Emission and Transmission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Robert L.

    Simulation is an important tool in medical imaging research. In patient scans the true underlying anatomy and physiology is unknown. We have no way of knowing in a given scan how various factors are confounding the data: statistical noise; biological variability; patient motion; scattered radiation, dead time, and other data contaminants. Simulation allows us to isolate a single factor of interest, for instance when researchers perform multiple simulations of the same imaging situation to determine the effect of statistical noise or biological variability. Simulations are also increasingly used as a design optimization tool for tomographic scanners. This article gives an overview of the mechanics of emission and transmission tomography simulation, reviews some of the publicly available simulation tools, and discusses trade-offs between the accuracy and efficiency of simulations.

  2. The methodology of TSPO imaging with positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Turkheimer, Federico E; Rizzo, Gaia; Bloomfield, Peter S; Howes, Oliver; Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Bertoldo, Alessandra; Veronese, Mattia

    2015-08-01

    The 18-kDA translocator protein (TSPO) is consistently elevated in activated microglia of the central nervous system (CNS) in response to a variety of insults as well as neurodegenerative and psychiatric conditions. It is therefore a target of interest for molecular strategies aimed at imaging neuroinflammation in vivo. For more than 20 years, positron emission tomography (PET) has allowed the imaging of TSPO density in brain using [(11)C]-(R)-PK11195, a radiolabelled-specific antagonist of the TSPO that has demonstrated microglial activation in a large number pathological cohorts. The significant clinical interest in brain immunity as a primary or comorbid factor in illness has sparked great interest in the TSPO as a biomarker and a surprising number of second generation TSPO radiotracers have been developed aimed at improving the quality of TSPO imaging through novel radioligands with higher affinity. However, such major investment has not yet resulted in the expected improvement in image quality. We here review the main methodological aspects of TSPO PET imaging with particular attention to TSPO genetics, cellular heterogeneity of TSPO in brain tissue and TSPO distribution in blood and plasma that need to be considered in the quantification of PET data to avoid spurious results as well as ineffective development and use of these radiotracers. PMID:26551697

  3. The methodology of TSPO imaging with positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Turkheimer, Federico E.; Rizzo, Gaia; Bloomfield, Peter S.; Howes, Oliver; Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Bertoldo, Alessandra; Veronese, Mattia

    2015-01-01

    The 18-kDA translocator protein (TSPO) is consistently elevated in activated microglia of the central nervous system (CNS) in response to a variety of insults as well as neurodegenerative and psychiatric conditions. It is therefore a target of interest for molecular strategies aimed at imaging neuroinflammation in vivo. For more than 20 years, positron emission tomography (PET) has allowed the imaging of TSPO density in brain using [11C]-(R)-PK11195, a radiolabelled-specific antagonist of the TSPO that has demonstrated microglial activation in a large number pathological cohorts. The significant clinical interest in brain immunity as a primary or comorbid factor in illness has sparked great interest in the TSPO as a biomarker and a surprising number of second generation TSPO radiotracers have been developed aimed at improving the quality of TSPO imaging through novel radioligands with higher affinity. However, such major investment has not yet resulted in the expected improvement in image quality. We here review the main methodological aspects of TSPO PET imaging with particular attention to TSPO genetics, cellular heterogeneity of TSPO in brain tissue and TSPO distribution in blood and plasma that need to be considered in the quantification of PET data to avoid spurious results as well as ineffective development and use of these radiotracers. PMID:26551697

  4. Segmentation and analysis of emission-computed-tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Valen E.; Bowsher, James E.; Qian, Jiang; Jaszczak, Ronald J.

    1992-12-01

    This paper describes a statistical model for reconstruction of emission computed tomography (ECT) images. A distinguishing feature of this model is that it is parameterized in terms of quantities of direct physiological significance, rather than only in terms of grey-level voxel values. Specifically, parameters representing regions, region means, and region volumes are included in the model formulation and are estimated directly from projection data. The model is specified hierarchically within the Bayesian paradigm. At the lowest level of the hierarchy, a Gibbs distribution is employed to specify a probability distribution on the space of all possible partitions of the discretized image scene. A novel feature of this distribution is that the number of partitioning elements, or image regions, is not assumed known a priori. In contrast, any other segmentation models (e.g., Liang et al., 1991, Amit et al., 1991) require that the number of regions be specified prior to image reconstruction. Since the number of regions in a source distribution is seldom known a priori, allowing the number of regions to vary within the model framework is an important practical feature of this model. In the second level of the model hierarchy, random variables representing emission intensity are associated with each partitioning element or region. Individual voxel intensities are assumed to be drawn from a gamma distribution with mean equal to the region mean in the third stage, and in the final stage of the hierarchy projection data are assumed to be generated from Poisson distributions with means equal to weighted sums of voxel intensities.

  5. Imaging Cellular Proliferation in Prostate Cancer with Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains a major public health problem worldwide. Imaging plays an important role in the assessment of disease at all its clinical phases, including staging, restaging after definitive therapy, evaluation of therapy response, and prognostication. Positron emission tomography with a number of biologically targeted radiotracers has been demonstrated to have potential diagnostic and prognostic utility in the various clinical phases of this prevalent disease. Given the remarkable biological heterogeneity of prostate cancer, one major unmet clinical need that remains is the non-invasive imaging-based characterization of prostate tumors. Accurate tumor characterization allows for image-targeted biopsy and focal therapy as well as facilitates objective assessment of therapy effect. PET in conjunction with radiotracers that track the thymidine salvage pathway of DNA synthesis may be helpful to fulfill this necessity. We review briefly the preclinical and pilot clinical experience with the two major cellular proliferation radiotracers, [18F]-3’-deoxy-3’-fluorothymidine and [18F]-2’-fluoro-5-methyl-1-beta-D-arabinofuranosyluracil in prostate cancer. PMID:27408885

  6. Clinical positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging applications.

    PubMed

    von Schulthess, Gustav K; Kuhn, Felix Pierre; Kaufmann, Philipp; Veit-Haibach, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Although clinical positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) applications were obvious and have completely replaced PET in oncology, clinical applications of PET/magnetic resonance (MR) are currently not clearly defined. This is due to the lack of clinical data, which is mainly because PET/MR technology is not clinically mature at this point. Open issues are technical and concern ease of obtaining PET attenuation correction maps, dealing with, for example, MR surface coil metal in the PET field-of-view and appropriate workflows leading to a cost-effective examination. All issues can be circumvented by using a shuttle-connected PET/CT-MR system, but the penalty is that simultaneous PET and MR imaging are not possible and potential motion between examinations may occur. Clinically, some systems installed worldwide start to have a reasonable bulk of clinical data. Preliminary results suggest that in oncology, PET/MR may have advantages over PET/CT in head and neck imaging. In liver imaging, more PET-positive lesions are seen on MR than on CT, but that does not mean that PET/MR is superior to PET/CT. Possibly in some settings where a contrast-enhanced PET/CT is needed to be diagnostic, PET/MR can be done without contrast media. Although PET/CT has virtually no role in brain imaging, this may be an important domain for PET/MR, particularly in dementia imaging. The role of PET/MR in the heart is as yet undefined, and much research will have to be done to elucidate this role. At this point, it is also not clear where the simultaneity afforded by a fully integrated PET/MR is really needed. Sequential data acquisition even on separate systems and consecutive software image fusion may well be appropriate. With the increasing installed base of systems, clinical data will be forthcoming and define more clearly where there is clinical value in PET/MR at an affordable price. PMID:23178084

  7. Enhancement of positron emission tomography-computed tomography image quality using the principle of stochastic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Sanjay Kumar; Sharma, Punit; Singh, Harmandeep; Patel, Chetan; Sarkar, Kaushik; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandra Sekhar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Acquisition of higher counts improves visual perception of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) image. Larger radiopharmaceutical doses (implies more radiation dose) are administered to acquire this count in a short time period. However, diagnostic information does not increase after a certain threshold of counts. This study was conducted to develop a post processing method based on principle of “stochastic resonance” to improve visual perception of the PET-CT image having a required threshold counts. Materials and Methods: PET-CT images (JPEG file format) with low, medium, and high counts in the image were included in this study. The image was corrupted with the addition of Poisson noise. The amplitude of the Poisson noise was adjusted by dividing each pixel by a constant 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32. The best amplitude of the noise that gave best images quality was selected based on high value of entropy of the output image, high value of structural similarity index and feature similarity index. Visual perception of the image was evaluated by two nuclear medicine physicians. Results: The variation in structural and feature similarity of the image was not appreciable visually, but statistically images deteriorated as the noise amplitude increases although maintaining structural (above 70%) and feature (above 80%) similarity of input images in all cases. We obtained the best image quality at noise amplitude “4” in which 88% structural and 95% feature similarity of the input images was retained. Conclusion: This method of stochastic resonance can be used to improve the visual perception of the PET-CT image. This can indirectly lead to reduction of radiation dose. PMID:25400362

  8. Microfluidics for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging Probe Development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming-Wei; Lin, Wei-Yu; Liu, Kan; Masterman-Smith, Michael; Shen, Clifton Kwang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    Due to increased needs for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanning, high demands for a wide variety of radiolabeled compounds will have to be met by exploiting novel radiochemistry and engineering technologies to improve the production and development of PET probes. The application of microfluidic reactors to perform radiosyntheses is currently attracting a great deal of interest because of their potential to deliver many advantages over conventional labeling systems. Microfluidic-based radiochemistry can lead to the use of smaller quantities of precursors, accelerated reaction rates and easier purification processes with greater yield and higher specific activity of desired probes. Several ‘proof-of-principle’ examples, along with basics of device architecture and operation, and potential limitations of each design are discussed here. Along with the concept of radioisotope distribution from centralized cyclotron facilities to individual imaging centers and laboratories (“decentralized model”), an easy-to-use, standalone, flexible, fully-automated radiochemical microfluidic platform can open up to simpler and more cost-effective procedures for molecular imaging using PET. PMID:20643021

  9. Radiopharmaceuticals for single-photon emission computed tomography brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Kung, Hank F; Kung, Mei-Ping; Choi, Seok Rye

    2003-01-01

    In the past 10 years, significant progress on the development of new brain-imaging agents for single-photon emission computed tomography has been made. Most of the new radiopharmaceuticals are designed to bind specific neurotransmitter receptor or transporter sites in the central nervous system. Most of the site-specific brain radiopharmaceuticals are labeled with (123)I. Results from imaging of benzodiazepine (gamma-aminobutyric acid) receptors by [(123)I]iomazenil are useful in identifying epileptic seizure foci and changes of this receptor in psychiatric disorders. Imaging of dopamine D2/D3 receptors ([(123)I]iodobenzamide and [(123)I]epidepride) and transporters [(123)I]CIT (2-beta-carboxymethoxy-3-beta(4-iodophenyl)tropane) and [(123)I]FP-beta-CIT (N-propyl-2-beta-carboxymethoxy-3-beta(4-iodophenyl)-nortropane has proven to be a simple but powerful tool for differential diagnosis of Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative diseases. A (99m)Tc-labeled agent, [(99m)Tc]TRODAT (technetium, 2-[[2-[[[3-(4-chlorophenyl)-8-methyl-8-azabicyclo [3,2,1]oct-2-yl]methyl](2-mercaptoethyl)amino]ethyl]amino] ethanethiolato(3-)]oxo-[1R-(exo-exo)]-), for imaging dopamine transporters in the brain has been successfully applied in the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Despite the fact that (123)I radiopharmaceuticals have been widely used in Japan and in Europe, clinical application of (123)I-labeled brain radiopharmaceuticals in the United States is limited because of the difficulties in supplying such agents. Development of (99m)Tc agents will likely extend the application of site-specific brain radiopharmaceuticals for routine applications in aiding the diagnosis and monitoring treatments of various neurologic and psychiatric disorders. PMID:12605353

  10. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Using Radiolabeled Inorganic Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaolian; Cai, Weibo; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Positron emission tomography (PET) is a radionuclide imaging technology that plays an important role in preclinical and clinical research. With administration of a small amount of radiotracer, PET imaging can provide a noninvasive, highly sensitive, and quantitative readout of its organ/tissue targeting efficiency and pharmacokinetics. Various radiotracers have been designed to target specific molecular events. Compared with antibodies, proteins, peptides, and other biologically relevant molecules, nanoparticles represent a new frontier in molecular imaging probe design, enabling the attachment of different imaging modalities, targeting ligands, and therapeutic payloads in a single vector. We introduce the radiolabeled nanoparticle platforms that we and others have developed. Due to the fundamental differences in the various nanoparticles and radioisotopes, most radiolabeling methods are designed case-by-case. We focus on some general rules about selecting appropriate isotopes for given types of nanoparticles, as well as adjusting the labeling strategies according to specific applications. We classified these radiolabeling methods into four categories: (1) complexation reaction of radiometal ions with chelators via coordination chemistry; (2) direct bombardment of nanoparticles via hadronic projectiles; (3) synthesis of nanoparticles using a mixture of radioactive and nonradioactive precursors; (4) chelator-free postsynthetic radiolabeling. Method 1 is generally applicable to different nanomaterials as long as the surface chemistry is well-designed. However, the addition of chelators brings concerns of possible changes to the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and detachment of the radiometal. Methods 2 and 3 have improved radiochemical stability. The applications are, however, limited by the possible damage to the nanocomponent caused by the proton beams (method 2) and harsh synthetic conditions (method 3). Method 4 is still in its infancy

  11. Noninvasive imaging of islet grafts using positron-emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yuxin; Dang, Hoa; Middleton, Blake; Zhang, Zesong; Washburn, Lorraine; Stout, David B.; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Atkinson, Mark A.; Phelps, Michael; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Tian, Jide; Kaufman, Daniel L.

    2006-07-01

    Islet transplantation offers a potential therapy to restore glucose homeostasis in type 1 diabetes patients. However, islet transplantation is not routinely successful because most islet recipients gradually lose graft function. Furthermore, serological markers of islet function are insensitive to islet loss until the latter stages of islet graft rejection. A noninvasive method of monitoring islet grafts would aid in the assessment of islet graft survival and the evaluation of interventions designed to prolong graft survival. Here, we show that recombinant adenovirus can engineer isolated islets to express a positron-emission tomography (PET) reporter gene and that these islets can be repeatedly imaged by using microPET after transplantation into mice. The magnitude of signal from engineered islets implanted into the axillary cavity was directly related to the implanted islet mass. PET signals attenuated over the following weeks because of the transient nature of adenovirus-mediated gene expression. Because the liver is the preferred site for islet implantation in humans, we also tested whether islets could be imaged after transfusion into the mouse liver. Control studies revealed that both intrahepatic islet transplantation and hyperglycemia altered the biodistribution kinetics of the PET probe systemically. Although transplanted islets were dispersed throughout the liver, clear signals from the liver region of mice receiving PET reporter-expressing islets were detectable for several weeks. Viral transduction, PET reporter expression, and repeated microPET imaging had no apparent deleterious effects on islet function after implantation. These studies lay a foundation for noninvasive quantitative assessments of islet graft survival using PET. diabetes | transplantation

  12. High-resolution positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging of the mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Greco, Adelaide; Fiumara, Giovanni; Gargiulo, Sara; Gramanzini, Matteo; Brunetti, Arturo; Cuocolo, Alberto

    2013-03-01

    Different animal models have been used to reproduce coronary heart disease, but in recent years mice have become the animals of choice, because of their short life cycle and the possibility of genetic manipulation. Various techniques are currently used for cardiovascular imaging in mice, including high-resolution ultrasound, X-ray computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear medicine procedures. In particular, molecular imaging with cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) allows non-invasive evaluation of changes in myocardial perfusion, metabolism, apoptosis, inflammation and gene expression or measurement of changes in left ventricular functional parameters. With technological advances, dedicated small laboratory PET/CT imaging has emerged in cardiovascular research, providing in vivo a non-invasive, serial and quantitative assessment of left ventricular function, myocardial perfusion and metabolism at a molecular level. This non-invasive methodology might be useful in longitudinal studies to monitor cardiac biochemical parameters and might facilitate studies to assess the effect of different interventions after acute myocardial ischaemia. PMID:23118016

  13. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography--imaging protocols, artifacts, and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Bockisch, Andreas; Beyer, Thomas; Antoch, Gerald; Freudenberg, Lutz S; Kühl, Hilmar; Debatin, Jörg F; Müller, Stefan P

    2004-01-01

    There has been a longstanding interest in fused images of anatomical information, such as that provided by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, with biological information obtainable by positron emission tomography (PET). The near-simultaneous data acquisition in a fixed combination of a PET and a CT scanner in a combined PET/CT imaging system minimizes spatial and temporal mismatches between the modalities by eliminating the need to move the patient in between exams. In addition, using the fast CT scan for PET attenuation correction, the duration of the examination is significantly reduced compared to standalone PET imaging with standard rod-transmission sources. The main source of artifacts arises from the use of the CT-data for scatter and attenuation correction of the PET images. Today, CT reconstruction algorithms cannot account for the presence of metal implants, such as dental fillings or prostheses, properly, thus resulting in streak artifacts, which are propagated into the PET image by the attenuation correction. The transformation of attenuation coefficients at X-ray energies to those at 511 keV works well for soft tissues, bone, and air, but again is insufficient for dense CT contrast agents, such as iodine or barium. Finally, mismatches, for example, due to uncoordinated respiration result in incorrect attenuation-corrected PET images. These artifacts, however, can be minimized or avoided prospectively by careful acquisition protocol considerations. In doubt, the uncorrected images almost always allow discrimination between true and artificial finding. PET/CT has to be integrated into the diagnostic workflow for harvesting the full potential of the new modality. In particular, the diagnostic power of both, the CT and the PET within the combination must not be underestimated. By combining multiple diagnostic studies within a single examination, significant logistic advantages can be expected if the combined PET

  14. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography-computed tomography in oncology.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Gerwin P; Kramer, Harald; Reiser, Maximilian F; Glaser, Christian

    2007-06-01

    The advent of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) has introduced tumor imaging with a systemic and functional approach compared with established sequential, multimodal diagnostic algorithms.Whole-body PET with [18F]-fluoro-2-desoxy-glucose is a useful imaging procedure for tumor staging and monitoring that can visualize active tumor tissue by detecting pathological glucose metabolism. The combination of PET with the detailed anatomical information of multislice computed tomography as dual-modality scanners has markedly increased lesion localization and diagnostic accuracy compared with both modalities as standalone applications.Hardware innovations, such as the introduction of multi-receiver channel whole-body MRI scanners at 1.5 and, recently, 3 T, combined with acquisition acceleration techniques, have made high-resolution WB-MRI clinically feasible. Now, a dedicated assessment of individual organs with various soft tissue contrast, spatial resolution, and contrast media dynamics can be combined with whole-body anatomical coverage in a multiplanar imaging approach. More flexible protocols (eg, T1-weighted turbo spin-echo and short inversion recovery imaging, dedicated lung imaging or dynamic contrast-enhanced studies of the abdomen) can be performed within 45 minutes.Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging has recently been proposed for tumor screening of asymptomatic individuals, and potentially life-changing diagnoses, such as formerly unknown malignancy, have been reported. However, larger patient cohort studies will have to show the cost efficiency and the clinical effectiveness of such an approach.For initial tumor staging, PET-CT has proved more accurate for the definition of T-stage and lymph node assessment, mainly because of the missing metabolic information in WB-MRI. However, new applications, such as magnetic resonance whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging or lymphotropic contrast

  15. Trends in radiation protection of positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Alenezi, A; Soliman, K

    2015-06-01

    Over the past decade, the number of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging procedures has increased substantially. This imaging technique provides accurate functional and anatomical information, particularly for oncological applications. Separately, both PET and CT are considered as high-dose imaging modalities. With the increased use of PET/CT, one could expect an increase in radiation doses to staff and patients. As such, major efforts have been made to reduce radiation dose in PET/CT facilities. Variations in working techniques have made it difficult to compare published results. This study aimed to review the literature on proposed methods to reduce patient and staff dose in clinical PET/CT imaging. A brief overview of some published information on staff and patient doses will be analysed and presented. Recent trends regarding radiation protection in PET/CT imaging will be discussed, and practical recommendations for reducing radiation doses to staff and patients will be discussed and summarised. Generally, the CT dose component is often higher in magnitude than the dose from PET alone; as such, focusing on CT dose reduction will decrease the overall patient dose in PET/CT imaging studies. The following factors should be considered in order to reduce the patient's dose from CT alone: proper justification for ordering contrast-enhanced CT; use of automatic exposure control features; use of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithms; and optimisation of scan parameters, especially scan length. The PET dose component can be reduced by administration of lower activity to the patient, optimisation of the workflow, and appropriate use of protective devices and engineered systems. At the international level, there is wide variation in work practices among institutions. The current observed trends are such that the annual dose limits for radiation workers in PET/CT imaging are unlikely to be exceeded. PMID:25915553

  16. Imaging local brain function with emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1984-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to map local cerebral glucose utilization in the study of local cerebral function. This information differs fundamentally from structural assessment by means of computed tomography (CT). In normal human volunteers, the FDG scan was used to determine the cerebral metabolic response to conrolled sensory stimulation and the effects of aging. Cerebral metabolic patterns are distinctive among depressed and demented elderly patients. The FDG scan appears normal in the depressed patient, studded with multiple metabolic defects in patients with multiple infarct dementia, and in the patients with Alzheimer disease, metabolism is particularly reduced in the parietal cortex, but only slightly reduced in the caudate and thalamus. The interictal FDG scan effectively detects hypometabolic brain zones that are sites of onset for seizures in patients with partial epilepsy, even though these zones usually appear normal on CT scans. The future prospects of PET are discussed.

  17. Molecular Imaging of Transporters with Positron Emission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoni, Gunnar; Sörensen, Jens; Hall, Håkan

    Positron emission tomography (PET) visualization of brain components in vivo is a rapidly growing field. Molecular imaging with PET is also increasingly used in drug development, especially for the determination of drug receptor interaction for CNS-active drugs. This gives the opportunity to relate clinical efficacy to per cent receptor occupancy of a drug on a certain targeted receptor and to relate drug pharmacokinetics in plasma to interaction with target protein. In the present review we will focus on the study of transporters, such as the monoamine transporters, the P-glycoprotein (Pgp) transporter, the vesicular monoamine transporter type 2, and the glucose transporter using PET radioligands. Neurotransmitter transporters are presynaptically located and in vivo imaging using PET can therefore be used for the determination of the density of afferent neurons. Several promising PET ligands for the noradrenaline transporter (NET) have been labeled and evaluated in vivo including in man, but a really useful PET ligand for NET still remains to be identified. The most promising tracer to date is (S,S)-[18F]FMeNER-D2. The in vivo visualization of the dopamine transporter (DAT) may give clues in the evaluation of conditions related to dopamine, such as Parkinson's disease and drug abuse. The first PET radioligands based on cocaine were not selective, but more recently several selective tracers such as [11C]PE2I have been characterized and shown to be suitable as PET radioligands. Although there are a large number of serotonin transporter inhibitors used today as SSRIs, it was not until very recently, when [11C]McN5652 was synthesized, that this transporter was studied using PET. New candidates as PET radioligands for the SERT have subsequently been developed and [11C]DASB and [11C]MADAM and their analogues are today the most promising ligands. The existing radioligands for Pgp transporters seem to be suitable tools for the study of both peripheral and central drug

  18. Imaging of Tumor Metabolism Using Positron Emission Tomography (PET).

    PubMed

    Apostolova, Ivayla; Wedel, Florian; Brenner, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging employing PET/CT enables in vivo visualization, characterization, and measurement of biologic processes in tumors at a molecular and cellular level. Using specific metabolic tracers, information about the integrated function of multiple transporters and enzymes involved in tumor metabolic pathways can be depicted, and the tracers can be directly applied as biomarkers of tumor biology. In this review, we discuss the role of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) as an in vivo glycolytic marker which reflects alterations of glucose metabolism in cancer cells. This functional molecular imaging technique offers a complementary approach to anatomic imaging such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and has found widespread application as a diagnostic modality in oncology to monitor tumor biology, optimize the therapeutic management, and guide patient care. Moreover, emerging methods for PET imaging of further biologic processes relevant to cancer are reviewed, with a focus on tumor hypoxia and aberrant tumor perfusion. Hypoxic tumors are associated with poor disease control and increased resistance to cytotoxic and radiation treatment. In vivo imaging of hypoxia, perfusion, and mismatch of metabolism and perfusion has the potential to identify specific features of tumor microenvironment associated with poor treatment outcome and, thus, contribute to personalized treatment approaches. PMID:27557539

  19. Imaging of transplanted islets by positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Naoaki; Yoshimatsu, Gumpei; Tsuchiya, Haruyuki; Aoki, Takeshi; Mizuma, Masamichi; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Katayose, Yu; Kodama, Tetsuya; Egawa, Shinichi; Unno, Michiaki

    2013-01-01

    While islet transplantation is considered a useful therapeutic option for severe diabetes mellitus (DM), the outcome of this treatment remains unsatisfactory. This is largely due to the damage and loss of islets in the early transplant stage. Thus, it is important to monitor the condition of the transplanted islets, so that a treatment can be selected to rescue the islets from damage if needed. Recently, numerous trials have been performed to investigate the efficacy of different imaging modalities for visualizing transplanted islets. Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the most commonly used imaging modalities for this purpose. Some groups, including ours, have also tried to visualize transplanted islets by ultrasonography (US). In this review article, we discuss the recent progress in islet imaging. PMID:24231367

  20. Positron Emission Tomography: Current Challenges and Opportunities for Technological Advances in Clinical and Preclinical Imaging Systems.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, Juan José; Kinahan, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is based on detecting two time-coincident high-energy photons from the emission of a positron-emitting radioisotope. The physics of the emission, and the detection of the coincident photons, give PET imaging unique capabilities for both very high sensitivity and accurate estimation of the in vivo concentration of the radiotracer. PET imaging has been widely adopted as an important clinical modality for oncological, cardiovascular, and neurological applications. PET imaging has also become an important tool in preclinical studies, particularly for investigating murine models of disease and other small-animal models. However, there are several challenges to using PET imaging systems. These include the fundamental trade-offs between resolution and noise, the quantitative accuracy of the measurements, and integration with X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. In this article, we review how researchers and industry are addressing these challenges. PMID:26643024

  1. Positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging: the next generation of multimodality imaging?

    PubMed

    Pichler, Bernd J; Wehrl, Hans F; Kolb, Armin; Judenhofer, Martin S

    2008-05-01

    Multimodal imaging is now well-established in routine clinical practice. Especially in the field of nuclear medicine, new positron emission tomography (PET) installations comprise almost exclusively combined PET/computed tomography (CT) scanners rather than PET-only systems. However, PET/CT has certain notable shortcomings, including the inability to perform simultaneous data acquisition and the significant radiation dose to the patient contributed by CT. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers, compared with CT, better contrast among soft tissues as well as functional-imaging capabilities. Therefore, the combination of PET with MRI provides many advantages that go far beyond simply combining functional PET information with structural MRI information. Many technical challenges, including possible interference between these modalities, have to be solved when combining PET and MRI, and various approaches have been adapted to resolving these issues. Here, we present an overview of current working prototypes of combined PET/MRI scanners from different groups. In addition, besides PET/MRI images of mice, the first such images of a rat acquired with the first commercial clinical PET/MRI scanner, are presented. The combination of PET and MRI is a promising tool in preclinical research and will certainly progress to clinical application. PMID:18396179

  2. Optical clearing of unsectioned specimens for three-dimensional imaging via optical transmission and emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Oldham, Mark; Sakhalkar, Harshad; Oliver, Tim; Johnson, G. Allan; Dewhirst, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Optical computed tomography (optical-CT) and optical emission computed tomography (optical-ECT) are new techniques that enable unprecedented high-resolution 3-D multimodal imaging of tissue structure and function. Applications include imaging macroscopic gene expression and microvasculature structure in unsectioned biological specimens up to 8 cm3. A key requisite for these imaging techniques is effective sample preparation including optical clearing, which enables light transport through the sample while preserving the signal (either light absorbing stain or fluorescent proteins) in representative form. We review recent developments in optical-CT and optical-ECT, and compatible “fluorescence-friendly” optical clearing protocols. PMID:18465962

  3. Monte Carlo Simulation of Emission Tomography and other Medical Imaging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    As an introduction to Monte Carlo simulation of emission tomography, this paper reviews the history and principles of Monte Carlo simulation, then applies these principles to emission tomography using the public domain simulation package SimSET (a Simulation System for Emission Tomography) as an example. Finally, the paper discusses how the methods are modified for X-ray computed tomography and radiotherapy simulations.

  4. Positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, E J; Phelps, M E

    1979-01-01

    Conventional nuclear imaging techniques utilizing lead collimation rely on radioactive tracers with little role in human physiology. The principles of imaging based on coincidence detection of the annihilation radiation produced in positron decay indicate that this mode of detection is uniquely suited for use in emission computed tomography. The only gamma-ray-emitting isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen are positron emitters, which yield energies too high for conventional imaging techniques. Thus development of positron emitters in nuclear medicine imaging would make possible the use of a new class of physiologically active, positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. The application of these principles is described in the use of a physiologically active compound labeled with a positron emitter and positron-emission computed tomography to measure the local cerebral metabolic rate in humans. PMID:440173

  5. Future imaging of atherosclerosis: molecular imaging of coronary atherosclerosis with (18)F positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Daniel J; Psaltis, Peter J

    2016-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by the formation of complex atheroma lesions (plaques) in arteries that pose risk by their flow-limiting nature and propensity for rupture and thrombotic occlusion. It develops in the context of disturbances to lipid metabolism and immune response, with inflammation underpinning all stages of plaque formation, progression and rupture. As the primary disease process responsible for myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral vascular disease, atherosclerosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality on a global scale. A precise understanding of its pathogenic mechanisms is therefore critically important. Integral to this is the role of vascular wall imaging. Over recent years, the rapidly evolving field of molecular imaging has begun to revolutionize our ability to image beyond just the anatomical substrate of vascular disease, and more dynamically assess its pathobiology. Nuclear imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) can target specific molecular and biological pathways involved in atherosclerosis, with the application of (18)Fluoride PET imaging being widely studied for its potential to identify plaques that are vulnerable or high risk. In this review, we discuss the emergence of (18)Fluoride PET as a promising modality for the assessment of coronary atherosclerosis, focusing on the strengths and limitations of the two main radionuclide tracers that have been investigated to date: 2-deoxy-2-((18)F)fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) and sodium (18)F-fluoride ((18)F-NaF). PMID:27500093

  6. Future imaging of atherosclerosis: molecular imaging of coronary atherosclerosis with 18F positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Psaltis, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by the formation of complex atheroma lesions (plaques) in arteries that pose risk by their flow-limiting nature and propensity for rupture and thrombotic occlusion. It develops in the context of disturbances to lipid metabolism and immune response, with inflammation underpinning all stages of plaque formation, progression and rupture. As the primary disease process responsible for myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral vascular disease, atherosclerosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality on a global scale. A precise understanding of its pathogenic mechanisms is therefore critically important. Integral to this is the role of vascular wall imaging. Over recent years, the rapidly evolving field of molecular imaging has begun to revolutionize our ability to image beyond just the anatomical substrate of vascular disease, and more dynamically assess its pathobiology. Nuclear imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) can target specific molecular and biological pathways involved in atherosclerosis, with the application of 18Fluoride PET imaging being widely studied for its potential to identify plaques that are vulnerable or high risk. In this review, we discuss the emergence of 18Fluoride PET as a promising modality for the assessment of coronary atherosclerosis, focusing on the strengths and limitations of the two main radionuclide tracers that have been investigated to date: 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) and sodium 18F-fluoride (18F-NaF). PMID:27500093

  7. Molecular Imaging Probes for Positron Emission Tomography and Optical Imaging of Sentinel Lymph Node and Tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhengtao

    Molecular imaging is visualizations and measurements of in vivo biological processes at the molecular or cellular level using specific imaging probes. As an emerging technology, biocompatible macromolecular or nanoparticle based targeted imaging probes have gained increasing popularities. Those complexes consist of a carrier, an imaging reporter, and a targeting ligand. The active targeting ability dramatically increases the specificity. And the multivalency effect may further reduce the dose while providing a decent signal. In this thesis, sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping and cancer imaging are two research topics. The focus is to develop molecular imaging probes with high specificity and sensitivity, for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and optical imaging. The objective of this thesis is to explore dextran radiopharmaceuticals and porous silicon nanoparticles based molecular imaging agents. Dextran polymers are excellent carriers to deliver imaging reporters or therapeutic agents due to its well established safety profile and oligosaccharide conjugation chemistry. There is also a wide selection of dextran polymers with different lengths. On the other hand, Silicon nanoparticles represent another class of biodegradable materials for imaging and drug delivery. The success in fluorescence lifetime imaging and enhancements of the immune activation potency was briefly discussed. Chapter 1 begins with an overview on current molecular imaging techniques and imaging probes. Chapter 2 presents a near-IR dye conjugated probe, IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept. Fluorophore density was optimized to generate the maximum brightness. It was labeled with 68Ga and 99mTc and in vivo SLN mapping was successfully performed in different animals, such as mice, rabbits, dogs and pigs. With 99mTc labeled IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept, chapter 3 introduces a two-day imaging protocol with a hand-held imager. Chapter 4 proposed a method to dual radiolabel the IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept with both 68Ga and

  8. Utility of positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging in musculoskeletal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Ammar A; Gul, Maryam; Gould, Elaine; Teng, Mathew; Baker, Kevin; Matthews, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation between neoplastic and nonneoplastic conditions magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has established itself as one of the key clinical tools in evaluation of musculoskeletal pathology. However, MRI still has several key limitations which require supplemental information from additional modalities to complete evaluation of various disorders. This has led to the development hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)-MRI which is rapidly evolving to address key clinical questions by using the morphological strengths of MRI and functional information of PET imaging. In this article, we aim to review physical principles and techniques of PET-MRI and discuss clinical utility of functional information obtained from PET imaging and structural information obtained from MRI imaging for the evaluation of musculoskeletal pathology. More specifically, this review highlights the role of PET-MRI in musculoskeletal oncology including initial diagnosis and staging, treatment planning and post-treatment follow-up. Also we will review utility of PET-MRI in evaluating musculoskeletal infections (especially in the immunocompromised and diabetics) and inflammatory condition. Additionally, common pitfalls of PET-MRI will be addressed. PMID:27027320

  9. Imaging Multimodalities for Dissecting Alzheimer's Disease: Advanced Technologies of Positron Emission Tomography and Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shimojo, Masafumi; Higuchi, Makoto; Suhara, Tetsuya; Sahara, Naruhiko

    2015-01-01

    The rapid progress in advanced imaging technologies has expanded our toolbox for monitoring a variety of biological aspects in living subjects including human. In vivo radiological imaging using small chemical tracers, such as with positron emission tomography, represents an especially vital breakthrough in the efforts to improve our understanding of the complicated cascade of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD), and it has provided the most reliable visible biomarkers for enabling clinical diagnosis. At the same time, in combination with genetically modified animal model systems, the most recent innovation of fluorescence imaging is helping establish diverse applications in basic neuroscience research, from single-molecule analysis to animal behavior manipulation, suggesting the potential utility of fluorescence technology for dissecting the detailed molecular-based consequence of AD pathophysiology. In this review, our primary focus is on a current update of PET radiotracers and fluorescence indicators beneficial for understanding the AD cascade, and discussion of the utility and pitfalls of those imaging modalities for future translational research applications. We will also highlight current cutting-edge genetic approaches and discuss how to integrate individual technologies for further potential innovations. PMID:26733795

  10. Positron emission tomography: a technology assessment of PET imaging--past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Frazee, David

    2004-01-01

    Emerging from its origins in the basements of research laboratories, positron emission tomography (PET), has established itself as a premier clinical imaging modality. It just took 50 years to get there. PET and the ever-popular, dual imaging modality combination of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) have taken hold of the spotlight at the national meetings of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) and the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM)--and they are not about to give it up. Many major imaging manufacturers--those companies that make up the majority of imaging sales in the US--now offer some type of PET and or PET/CT scanner. The technology of PET imaging continues to improve in image resolution, speed, and acceptance by its skeptical, but continually growing, referral base. With the increasing number of regional cyclotron facilities throughout the US each year, the abundance of mobile PET companies competing for business, and, most important, the number of clinical procedures that now qualify for reimbursement, more facilities now have the ability to implement PETimaging. This article discusses the progress of PET, from its beginnings 50 years ago, to where it is today--and the direction it is headed in the future. PMID:15633509

  11. Targeted positron emission tomography imaging of CXCR4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Herhaus, Peter; Habringer, Stefan; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Vag, Tibor; Gerngross, Carlos; Schottelius, Margret; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Steiger, Katja; Altmann, Torben; Weißer, Tanja; Steidle, Sabine; Schick, Markus; Jacobs, Laura; Slawska, Jolanta; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Verbeek, Mareike; Subklewe, Marion; Peschel, Christian; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Götze, Katharina; Keller, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia originates from leukemia-initiating cells that reside in the protective bone marrow niche. CXCR4/CXCL12 interaction is crucially involved in recruitment and retention of leukemia-initiating cells within this niche. Various drugs targeting this pathway have entered clinical trials. To evaluate CXCR4 imaging in acute myeloid leukemia, we first tested CXCR4 expression in patient-derived primary blasts. Flow cytometry revealed that high blast counts in patients with acute myeloid leukemia correlate with high CXCR4 expression. The wide range of CXCR4 surface expression in patients was reflected in cell lines of acute myeloid leukemia. Next, we evaluated the CXCR4-specific peptide Pentixafor by positron emission tomography imaging in mice harboring CXCR4 positive and CXCR4 negative leukemia xenografts, and in 10 patients with active disease. [68Ga]Pentixafor-positron emission tomography showed specific measurable disease in murine CXCR4 positive xenografts, but not when CXCR4 was knocked out with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. Five of 10 patients showed tracer uptake correlating well with leukemia infiltration assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean maximal standard uptake value was significantly higher in visually CXCR4 positive patients compared to CXCR4 negative patients. In summary, in vivo molecular CXCR4 imaging by means of positron emission tomography is feasible in acute myeloid leukemia. These data provide a framework for future diagnostic and theranostic approaches targeting the CXCR4/CXCL12-defined leukemia-initiating cell niche. PMID:27175029

  12. Stable confinement of positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance agents within carbon nanotubes for bimodal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, Brandon T; Law, Justin J; Matson, Michael L; Azhdarinia, Ali; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M; Wilson, Lon J

    2014-01-01

    Aims Simultaneous positron emission tomography/MRI has recently been introduced to the clinic and dual positron emission tomography/MRI probes are rare and of growing interest. We have developed a strategy for producing multimodal probes based on a carbon nanotube platform without the use of chelating ligands. Materials & methods Gd3+ and 64Cu2+ ions were loaded into ultra-short single-walled carbon nanotubes by sonication. Normal, tumor-free athymic nude mice were injected intravenously with the probe and imaged over 48 h. Results & conclusion The probe was stable for up to 24 h when challenged with phosphate-buffered saline and mouse serum. Positron emission tomography imaging also confirmed the stability of the probe in vivo for up to 48 h. The probe was quickly cleared from circulation, with enhanced accumulation in the lungs. Stable encapsulation of contrast agents within ultra-short single-walled carbon nanotubes represents a new strategy for the design of advanced imaging probes with variable multimodal imaging capabilities. PMID:24628687

  13. Targeted positron emission tomography imaging of CXCR4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Herhaus, Peter; Habringer, Stefan; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Vag, Tibor; Gerngross, Carlos; Schottelius, Margret; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Steiger, Katja; Altmann, Torben; Weißer, Tanja; Steidle, Sabine; Schick, Markus; Jacobs, Laura; Slawska, Jolanta; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Verbeek, Mareike; Subklewe, Marion; Peschel, Christian; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Götze, Katharina; Keller, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia originates from leukemia-initiating cells that reside in the protective bone marrow niche. CXCR4/CXCL12 interaction is crucially involved in recruitment and retention of leukemia-initiating cells within this niche. Various drugs targeting this pathway have entered clinical trials. To evaluate CXCR4 imaging in acute myeloid leukemia, we first tested CXCR4 expression in patient-derived primary blasts. Flow cytometry revealed that high blast counts in patients with acute myeloid leukemia correlate with high CXCR4 expression. The wide range of CXCR4 surface expression in patients was reflected in cell lines of acute myeloid leukemia. Next, we evaluated the CXCR4-specific peptide Pentixafor by positron emission tomography imaging in mice harboring CXCR4 positive and CXCR4 negative leukemia xenografts, and in 10 patients with active disease. [(68)Ga]Pentixafor-positron emission tomography showed specific measurable disease in murine CXCR4 positive xenografts, but not when CXCR4 was knocked out with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. Five of 10 patients showed tracer uptake correlating well with leukemia infiltration assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean maximal standard uptake value was significantly higher in visually CXCR4 positive patients compared to CXCR4 negative patients. In summary, in vivo molecular CXCR4 imaging by means of positron emission tomography is feasible in acute myeloid leukemia. These data provide a framework for future diagnostic and theranostic approaches targeting the CXCR4/CXCL12-defined leukemia-initiating cell niche. PMID:27175029

  14. Positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y. Lucas; Thompson, Christopher J.; Diksic, Mirko; Meyer, Ernest; Feindel, William H.

    One of the most exciting new technologies introduced in the last 10 yr is positron emission tomography (PET). PET provides quantitative, three-dimensional images for the study of specific biochemical and physiological processes in the human body. This approach is analogous to quantitative in-vivo autoradiography but has the added advantage of permitting non-invasive in vivo studies. PET scanning requires a small cyclotron to produce short-lived positron emitting isotopes such as oxygen-15, carbon-11, nitrogen-13 and fluorine-18. Proper radiochemical facilities and advanced computer equipment are also needed. Most important, PET requires a multidisciplinary scientific team of physicists, radiochemists, mathematicians, biochemists and physicians. This review analyzes the most recent trends in the imaging technology, radiochemistry, methodology and clinical applications of positron emission tomography.

  15. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  16. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  17. Multimodality imaging probe for positron emission tomography and fluorescence imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Suresh K; Kaur, Jasmeet; Easwaramoorthy, Balu; Shah, Ankur; Coleman, Robert; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar

    2014-01-01

    Our goal is to develop multimodality imaging agents for use in cell tracking studies by positron emission tomography (PET) and optical imaging (OI). For this purpose, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was complexed with biotin (histologic studies), 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein, succinimidyl ester (FAM SE) (OI studies), and diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) for chelating gallium 68 (PET studies). For synthesis of BSA-biotin-FAM-DTPA, BSA was coupled to (+)-biotin N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (biotin-NHSI). BSA-biotin was treated with DTPA-anhydride and biotin-BSA-DTPA was reacted with FAM. The biotin-BSA-DTPA-FAM was reacted with gallium chloride 3 to 5 mCi eluted from the generator using 0.1 N HCl and was passed through basic resin (AG 11 A8) and 150 μCi (100 μL, pH 7-8) was incubated with 0.1 mg of FAM conjugate (100 μL) at room temperature for 15 minutes to give 68Ga-BSA-biotin-DTPA-FAM. A shaved C57 black mouse was injected with FAM conjugate (50 μL) at one flank and FAM-68Ga (50 μL, 30 μCi) at the other. Immediately after injection, the mouse was placed in a fluorescence imaging system (Kodak In-Vivo F, Bruker Biospin Co., Woodbridge, CT) and imaged (λex: 465 nm, λem: 535 nm, time: 8 seconds, Xenon Light Source, Kodak). The same mouse was then placed under an Inveon microPET scanner (Siemens Medical Solutions, Knoxville, TN) injected (intravenously) with 25 μCi of 18F and after a half-hour (to allow sufficient bone uptake) was imaged for 30 minutes. Molecular weight determined using matrix-associated laser desorption ionization (MALDI) for the BSA sample was 66,485 Da and for biotin-BSA was 67,116 Da, indicating two biotin moieties per BSA molecule; for biotin-BSA-DTPA was 81,584 Da, indicating an average of 30 DTPA moieties per BSA molecule; and for FAM conjugate was 82,383 Da, indicating an average of 1.7 fluorescent moieties per BSA molecule. Fluorescence imaging clearly showed localization of FAM conjugate and FAM-68Ga at respective flanks of the mouse

  18. Influence of slice overlap on positron emission tomography image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Clare; Gillen, Gerry; Dempsey, Mary Frances; Findlay, Caroline

    2016-02-01

    PET scans use overlapping acquisition beds to correct for reduced sensitivity at bed edges. The optimum overlap size for the General Electric (GE) Discovery 690 has not been established. This study assesses how image quality is affected by slice overlap. Efficacy of 23% overlaps (recommended by GE) and 49% overlaps (maximum possible overlap) were specifically assessed. European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) guidelines for calculating minimum injected activities based on overlap size were also reviewed. A uniform flood phantom was used to assess noise (coefficient of variation, (COV)) and voxel accuracy (activity concentrations, Bq ml-1). A NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturers Association) body phantom with hot/cold spheres in a background activity was used to assess contrast recovery coefficients (CRCs) and signal to noise ratios (SNR). Different overlap sizes and sphere-to-background ratios were assessed. COVs for 49% and 23% overlaps were 9% and 13% respectively. This increased noise was difficult to visualise on the 23% overlap images. Mean voxel activity concentrations were not affected by overlap size. No clinically significant differences in CRCs were observed. However, visibility and SNR of small, low contrast spheres (⩽13 mm diameter, 2:1 sphere to background ratio) may be affected by overlap size in low count studies if they are located in the overlap area. There was minimal detectable influence on image quality in terms of noise, mean activity concentrations or mean CRCs when comparing 23% overlap with 49% overlap. Detectability of small, low contrast lesions may be affected in low count studies—however, this is a worst-case scenario. The marginal benefits of increasing overlap from 23% to 49% are likely to be offset by increased patient scan times. A 23% overlap is therefore appropriate for clinical use. An amendment to EANM guidelines for calculating injected activities is also proposed which better reflects the effect overlap size has

  19. An X-ray Computed Tomography/Positron Emission Tomography System Designed Specifically for Breast Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Boone, John M.; Yang, Kai; Burkett, George W.; Packard, Nathan J.; Huang, Shih-ying; Bowen, Spencer; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Lindfors, Karen K.

    2011-01-01

    Mammography has served the population of women who are at-risk for breast cancer well over the past 30 years. While mammography has undergone a number of changes as digital detector technology has advanced, other modalities such as computed tomography have experienced technological sophistication over this same time frame as well. The advent of large field of view flat panel detector systems enable the development of breast CT and several other niche CT applications, which rely on cone beam geometry. The breast, it turns out, is well suited to cone beam CT imaging because the lack of bones reduces artifacts, and the natural tapering of the breast anteriorly reduces the x-ray path lengths through the breast at large cone angle, reducing cone beam artifacts as well. We are in the process of designing a third prototype system which will enable the use of breast CT for image guided interventional procedures. This system will have several copies fabricated so that several breast CT scanners can be used in a multi-institutional clinical trial to better understand the role that this technology can bring to breast imaging. PMID:20082528

  20. Time sequence image analysis of positron emission tomography using wavelet transformation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chih-Yu; Lai, Yeong-Lin; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Lee, Yu-Tzu; Tseng, Kuo-Kun; Lai, Yeong-Kang; Zheng, Chun-Yi; Jheng, Huai-Cian

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the time sequence image analysis technique of positron emission tomography (PET) using a wavelet transformation method. The abdominal cavity of a person taking [18F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-2-D-glucose (18F-FDG) was scanned by the dynamic PET. The organ selection with dynamic PET images was conducted by the wavelet transformation to implement automatic selection of the region of interest (ROI). The image segmentation was carried out by the processes of sampling, wavelet transformation, erosion, dilation, and superimposition. Wavelet constructed image (WCI) contours were created by sampling 512 images from 1960 consecutive dynamic sequence PET images. The image segmentation technology developed can help doctors automatically select ROI, accurately identify lesion locations of organs, and thus effectively reduce human operation time and errors. PMID:26578275

  1. Monte Carlo Simulation Of Emission Tomography And Other Medical Imaging Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    An introduction to Monte Carlo simulation of emission tomography. This paper reviews the history and principles of Monte Carlo simulation, then applies these principles to emission tomography using the public domain simulation package SimSET (a Simulation System for Emission Tomography) as an example. Finally, the paper discusses how the methods are modified for X-ray computed tomography and radiotherapy simulations. PMID:20733931

  2. Simultaneous fluorescence and positron emission tomography for in vivo imaging of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Liu, Shuangquan; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Xiaochun; Xu, Yanyan; Luo, Jianwen; Shan, Baoci; Bai, Jing

    2011-12-01

    Simultaneous positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence tomography (FT) for in vivo imaging of small animals is proposed by a dual-modality system. This system combines a charge-coupled device-based near-infrared fluorescence imaging with a planar detector pair-based PET. With [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose radioactive tracer and the protease activated fluorescence probe, on the one hand, the simultaneous metabolic activity and protease activity in tumor region are revealed by the PET and FT, respectively. On the other hand, the protease activity both on the surface layer and the deep tissue of the tumor is provided by the fluorescence reflection imaging and FT, respectively.

  3. 18F-FLT Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging in Pancreatic Cancer: Determination of Tumor Proliferative Activity and Comparison with Glycolytic Activity as Measured by 18F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Debebe, Senait Aknaw; Goryawala, Mohammed; Adjouadi, Malek; Mcgoron, Anthony J.; Güleç, Seza A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This phase-I imaging study examined the imaging characteristic of 3’-deoxy-3’-(18F)-fluorothymidine (18F-FLT) positron emission tomography (PET) in patients with pancreatic cancer and comparisons were made with (18F)-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG). The ultimate aim was to develop a molecular imaging tool that could better define the biologic characteristics of pancreas cancer, and to identify the patients who could potentially benefit from surgical resection who were deemed inoperable by conventional means of staging. Methods: Six patients with newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer underwent a combined FLT and FDG computed tomography (CT) PET/CT imaging protocol. The FLT PET/CT scan was performed within 1 week of FDG PET/CT imaging. Tumor uptake of a tracer was determined and compared using various techniques; statistical thresholding (z score=2.5), and fixed standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds of 1.4 and 2.5, and applying a threshold of 40% of maximum SUV (SUVmax) and mean SUV (SUVmean). The correlation of functional tumor volumes (FTV) between 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT was assessed using linear regression analysis. Results: It was found that there is a correlation in FTV due to metabolic and proliferation activity when using a threshold of SUV 2.5 for FDG and 1.4 for FLT (r=0.698, p=ns), but a better correlation was obtained when using SUV of 2.5 for both tracers (r=0.698, p=ns). The z score thresholding (z=2.5) method showed lower correlation between the FTVs (r=0.698, p=ns) of FDG and FLT PET. Conclusion: Different tumor segmentation techniques yielded varying degrees of correlation in FTV between FLT and FDG-PET images. FLT imaging may have a different meaning in determining tumor biology and prognosis. PMID:27299286

  4. X-ray Fluorescence Emission Tomography (XFET) with Novel Imaging Geometries – A Monte Carlo Study

    PubMed Central

    Meng, L. J.; Li, Nan; La Riviere, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a feasibility study for using two new imaging geometries for synchrotron X-ray fluorescence emission tomography (XFET) applications. In the proposed approaches, the object is illuminated with synchrotron X-ray beams of various cross-sectional dimensions. The resultant fluorescence photons are detected by high-resolution imaging-spectrometers coupled to collimation apertures. To verify the performance benefits of the proposed methods over the conventional line-by-line scanning approach, we have used both Monte Carlo simulations and an analytical system performance index to compare several different imaging geometries. This study has demonstrated that the proposed XFET approach could lead to a greatly improved imaging speed, which is critical for making XFET a practical imaging modality for a wide range of applications. PMID:22228913

  5. TOPICAL REVIEW: Biological imaging in radiation therapy: role of positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestle, Ursula; Weber, Wolfgang; Hentschel, Michael; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2009-01-01

    In radiation therapy (RT), staging, treatment planning, monitoring and evaluation of response are traditionally based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These radiological investigations have the significant advantage to show the anatomy with a high resolution, being also called anatomical imaging. In recent years, so called biological imaging methods which visualize metabolic pathways have been developed. These methods offer complementary imaging of various aspects of tumour biology. To date, the most prominent biological imaging system in use is positron emission tomography (PET), whose diagnostic properties have clinically been evaluated for years. The aim of this review is to discuss the valences and implications of PET in RT. We will focus our evaluation on the following topics: the role of biological imaging for tumour tissue detection/delineation of the gross tumour volume (GTV) and for the visualization of heterogeneous tumour biology. We will discuss the role of fluorodeoxyglucose-PET in lung and head and neck cancer and the impact of amino acids (AA)-PET in target volume delineation of brain gliomas. Furthermore, we summarize the data of the literature about tumour hypoxia and proliferation visualized by PET. We conclude that, regarding treatment planning in radiotherapy, PET offers advantages in terms of tumour delineation and the description of biological processes. However, to define the real impact of biological imaging on clinical outcome after radiotherapy, further experimental, clinical and cost/benefit analyses are required.

  6. Evaluation of dosimetry and image of very low-dose computed tomography attenuation correction for pediatric positron emission tomography/computed tomography: phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahn, Y. K.; Park, H. H.; Lee, C. H.; Kim, H. S.; Lyu, K. Y.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.; Cho, J. H.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, phantom was used to evaluate attenuation correction computed tomography (CT) dose and image in case of pediatric positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan. Three PET/CT scanners were used along with acryl phantom in the size for infant and ion-chamber dosimeter. The CT image acquisition conditions were changed from 10 to 20, 40, 80, 100 and 160 mA and from 80 to 100, 120 and 140 kVp, which aimed at evaluating penetrate dose and computed tomography dose indexvolume (CTDIvol) value. And NEMA PET Phantom™ was used to obtain PET image under the same CT conditions in order to evaluate each attenuation-corrected PET image based on standard uptake value (SUV) value and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In general, the penetrate dose was reduced by around 92% under the minimum CT conditions (80 kVp and 10 mA) with the decrease in CTDIvol value by around 88%, compared with the pediatric abdomen CT conditions (100 kVp and 100 mA). The PET image with its attenuation corrected according to each CT condition showed no change in SUV value and no influence on the SNR. In conclusion, if the minimum dose CT that is properly applied to body of pediatric patient is corrected for attenuation to ensure that the effective dose is reduced by around 90% or more compared with that for adult patient, this will be useful to reduce radiation exposure level.

  7. Digital contrast enhancement of 18Fluorine-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography images in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Sanjay Kumar; Agarwal, Krishan Kant; Sharma, Punit; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The role of 18fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) is limited for detection of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) due to low contrast to the tumor, and normal hepatocytes (background). The aim of the present study was to improve the contrast between the tumor and background by standardizing the input parameters of a digital contrast enhancement technique. Materials and Methods: A transverse slice of PET image was adjusted for the best possible contrast, and saved in JPEG 2000 format. We processed this image with a contrast enhancement technique using 847 possible combinations of input parameters (threshold “m” and slope “e”). The input parameters which resulted in an image having a high value of 2nd order entropy, and edge content, and low value of absolute mean brightness error, and saturation evaluation metrics, were considered as standardized input parameters. The same process was repeated for total nine PET-computed tomography studies, thus analyzing 7623 images. Results: The selected digital contrast enhancement technique increased the contrast between the HCC tumor and background. In seven out of nine images, the standardized input parameters “m” had values between 150 and 160, and for other two images values were 138 and 175, respectively. The value of slope “e” was 4 in 4 images, 3 in 3 images and 1 in 2 images. It was found that it is important to optimize the input parameters for the best possible contrast for each image; a particular value was not sufficient for all the HCC images. Conclusion: The use of above digital contrast enhancement technique improves the tumor to background ratio in PET images of HCC and appears to be useful. Further clinical validation of this finding is warranted. PMID:26917889

  8. Importance of assessing nonattenuation-corrected positron emission tomography images in treatment response evaluation of primary cutaneous lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Piyush; Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown previously that nonattenuated corrected (AC) positron emission tomography (PET) images improve detection of superficial lesions when compared to AC images. We present a case of cutaneous lymphoma to demonstrate the importance of assessing nonattenuation-corrected PET images in treatment response evaluation. PMID:27385905

  9. Optical imaging of reporter gene expression using a positron-emission-tomography probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongguang; Ren, Gang; Liu, Shuanglong; Zhang, Xiaofen; Chen, Luxi; Han, Peizhen; Cheng, Zhen

    2010-11-01

    Reporter gene/reporter probe technology is one of the most important techniques in molecular imaging. Lately, many reporter gene/reporter probe systems have been coupled to different imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET) and optical imaging (OI). It has been recently found that OI techniques could be used to monitor radioactive tracers in vitro and in living subjects. In this study, we further demonstrate that a reporter gene/nuclear reporter probe system [herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and 9-(4-18F-fluoro-3-[hydroxymethyl] butyl) guanine ([18F]FHBG)] could be successfully imaged by OI in vitro and in vivo. OI with radioactive reporter probes will facilitate and broaden the applications of reporter gene/reporter probe techniques in medical research.

  10. Clinical Utility of Positron Emission Tomography Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET-MRI) in Gastrointestinal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Robert; Choi, Minsig

    2016-01-01

    Anatomic imaging utilizing both CT (computed tomography) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) limits the assessment of cancer metastases in lymph nodes and distant organs while functional imaging like PET (positron emission tomography) scan has its limitation in spatial resolution capacity. Hybrid imaging utilizing PET-CT and PET-MRI are novel imaging modalities that are changing the current landscape in cancer diagnosis, staging, and treatment response. MRI has shown to have higher sensitivity in soft tissue, head and neck pathology, and pelvic disease, as well as, detecting small metastases in the liver and bone compared to CT. Combining MRI with PET allows for detection of metastases that may have been missed with current imaging modalities. In this review, we will examine the clinical utility of FDG PET-MRI in the diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal cancers with focus on esophageal, stomach, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers. We will also explore its role in treatment response and future directions associated with it. PMID:27618106

  11. [18F]-fluoride positron emission tomography for imaging condylar hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Laverick, S; Bounds, G; Wong, Wai Lup

    2009-04-01

    The management of condylar hyperplasia depends on the diagnosis of continued growth in the affected condyle, and there is currently no satisfactory way of imaging it. [(18)F]-fluoride positron emission tomography (PET) was included in the investigation of 5 patients who were suspected of having condylar hyperplasia, and the results were correlated with the operative findings. The technique correctly identified condylar hyperplasia in all patients. Our results suggest that [(18)F]-fluoride PET is a valid way of assessing patients with condylar hyperplasia. PMID:18926607

  12. Radiolabeled Phosphonium Salts as Mitochondrial Voltage Sensors for Positron Emission Tomography Myocardial Imaging Agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Yeon; Min, Jung-Joon

    2016-09-01

    Despite substantial advances in the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, (18)F-labeled positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceuticals remain necessary to diagnose heart disease because clinical use of current PET tracers is limited by their short half-life. Lipophilic cations such as phosphonium salts penetrate the mitochondrial membranes and accumulate in mitochondria of cardiomyocytes in response to negative inner-transmembrane potentials. Radiolabeled tetraphenylphosphonium cation derivatives have been developed as myocardial imaging agents for PET. In this review, a general overview of these radiotracers, including their radiosynthesis, in vivo characterization, and evaluation is provided and clinical perspectives are discussed. PMID:27540422

  13. 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging in paediatric oncology

    PubMed Central

    Freebody, John; Wegner, Eva A; Rossleigh, Monica A

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a minimally invasive technique which has been well validated for the diagnosis, staging, monitoring of response to therapy, and disease surveillance of adult oncology patients. Traditionally the value of PET and PET/computed tomography (CT) hybrid imaging has been less clearly defined for paediatric oncology. However recent evidence has emerged regarding the diagnostic utility of these modalities, and they are becoming increasingly important tools in the evaluation and monitoring of children with known or suspected malignant disease. Important indications for 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) PET in paediatric oncology include lymphoma, brain tumours, sarcoma, neuroblastoma, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, urogenital tumours and neurofibromatosis type I. This article aims to review current evidence for the use of FDG PET and PET/CT in these indications. Attention will also be given to technical and logistical issues, the description of common imaging pitfalls, and dosimetric concerns as they relate to paediatric oncology. PMID:25349660

  14. Positron Emission Tomography.

    PubMed

    Lameka, Katherine; Farwell, Michael D; Ichise, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a minimally invasive imaging procedure with a wide range of clinical and research applications. PET allows for the three-dimensional mapping of administered positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals such as (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (for imaging glucose metabolism). PET enables the study of biologic function in both health and disease, in contrast to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT), that are more suited to study a body's morphologic changes, although functional MRI can also be used to study certain brain functions by measuring blood flow changes during task performance. This chapter first provides an overview of the basic physics principles and instrumentation behind PET methodology, with an introduction to the merits of merging functional PET imaging with anatomic CT or MRI imaging. We then focus on clinical neurologic disorders, and reference research on relevant PET radiopharmaceuticals when applicable. We then provide an overview of PET scan interpretation and findings in several specific neurologic disorders such as dementias, epilepsy, movement disorders, infection, cerebrovascular disorders, and brain tumors. PMID:27432667

  15. Sparse representation and dictionary learning penalized image reconstruction for positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuhang; Liu, Huafeng; Shi, Pengcheng; Chen, Yunmei

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and robust reconstruction of the radioactivity concentration is of great importance in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Given the Poisson nature of photo-counting measurements, we present a reconstruction framework that integrates sparsity penalty on a dictionary into a maximum likelihood estimator. Patch-sparsity on a dictionary provides the regularization for our effort, and iterative procedures are used to solve the maximum likelihood function formulated on Poisson statistics. Specifically, in our formulation, a dictionary could be trained on CT images, to provide intrinsic anatomical structures for the reconstructed images, or adaptively learned from the noisy measurements of PET. Accuracy of the strategy with very promising application results from Monte-Carlo simulations, and real data are demonstrated.

  16. Modifying constrained least-squares restoration for application to single photon emission computed tomography projection images

    SciTech Connect

    Penney, B.C.; King, M.A.; Schwinger, R.B.; Baker, S.P.; Doherty, P.W.

    1988-05-01

    Image restoration methods have been shown to increase the contrast of nuclear medicine images by decreasing the effects of scatter and septal penetration. Image restoration can also reduce the high-frequency noise in the image. This study applies constrained least-squares (CLS) restoration to the projection images of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In a previous study, it was noted that CLS restoration has the potential advantage of automatically adapting to the blurred object. This potential is confirmed using planar images. CLS restoration is then modified to improve its performance when applied to SPECT projection image sets. The modification was necessary because the Poisson noise in low count SPECT images causes considerable variation in the CLS filter. On phantom studies, count-dependent Metz restoration was slightly better than the modified CLS restoration method, according to measures of contrast and noise. However, CLS restoration was generally judged as yielding the best results when applied to clinical studies, apparently because of its ability to adapt to the image being restored.

  17. Advances in pinhole and multi-pinhole collimators for single photon emission computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Azazrm, AhmadReza; Mahmoudian, Babak; Gharapapagh, Esmail

    2015-01-01

    The collimator in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), is an important part of the imaging chain. One of the most important collimators that used in research, preclinical study, small animal, and organ imaging is the pinhole collimator. Pinhole collimator can improve the tradeoff between sensitivity and resolution in comparison with conventional parallel-hole collimator and facilities diagnosis. However, a major problem with pinhole collimator is a small field of view (FOV). Multi-pinhole collimator has been investigated in order to increase the sensitivity and FOV with a preserved spatial resolution. The geometry of pinhole and multi-pinhole collimators is a critical factor in the image quality and plays a key role in SPECT imaging. The issue of the material and geometry for pinhole and multi-pinhole collimators have been a controversial and much disputed subject within the field of SPECT imaging. On the other hand, recent developments in collimator optimization have heightened the need for appropriate reconstruction algorithms for pinhole SPECT imaging. Therefore, iterative reconstruction algorithms were introduced to minimize the undesirable effect on image quality. Current researches have focused on geometry and configuration of pinhole and multi-pinhole collimation rather than reconstruction algorithm. The lofthole and multi-lofthole collimator are samples of novel designs. The purpose of this paper is to provide a review on recent researches in the pinhole and multi-pinhole collimators for SPECT imaging. PMID:25709537

  18. Advances in Pinhole and Multi-Pinhole Collimators for Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Azazrm, AhmadReza; Mahmoudian, Babak; Gharapapagh, Esmail

    2015-01-01

    The collimator in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), is an important part of the imaging chain. One of the most important collimators that used in research, preclinical study, small animal, and organ imaging is the pinhole collimator. Pinhole collimator can improve the tradeoff between sensitivity and resolution in comparison with conventional parallel-hole collimator and facilities diagnosis. However, a major problem with pinhole collimator is a small field of view (FOV). Multi-pinhole collimator has been investigated in order to increase the sensitivity and FOV with a preserved spatial resolution. The geometry of pinhole and multi-pinhole collimators is a critical factor in the image quality and plays a key role in SPECT imaging. The issue of the material and geometry for pinhole and multi-pinhole collimators have been a controversial and much disputed subject within the field of SPECT imaging. On the other hand, recent developments in collimator optimization have heightened the need for appropriate reconstruction algorithms for pinhole SPECT imaging. Therefore, iterative reconstruction algorithms were introduced to minimize the undesirable effect on image quality. Current researches have focused on geometry and configuration of pinhole and multi-pinhole collimation rather than reconstruction algorithm. The lofthole and multi-lofthole collimator are samples of novel designs. The purpose of this paper is to provide a review on recent researches in the pinhole and multi-pinhole collimators for SPECT imaging. PMID:25709537

  19. Positron emission tomography in imaging evaluation of staging, restaging, treatment response, and prognosis in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2016-05-01

    Prostate cancer is a prevalent public health problem worldwide. While imaging has played a major role in this disease, there still remain many challenges and opportunities. Positron emission tomography with various physiologically based radiotracers is fundamentally suited to interrogate this biologically and clinically heterogeneous disease along the course of its natural history. In this article, I review briefly the published evidence for the use of positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose, 11C-acetate, and 18F- or 11C-choline in the imaging evaluation of prostate cancer. Although the focus of the article will be on these radiotracers given the accumulated experience with them, but I will also comment on the outlook for the use of other emerging PET radiotracers such as those targeted to the prostate-specific membrane antigen and the amino acid metabolism pathway. It is anticipated that PET will play major role in the evaluation of prostate cancer in the current evidence-based medicine environment. There will also be exciting novel prospects for the use of therapeutic-diagnostic (theransotic) pairs in the management of patients with prostate cancer. PMID:27193789

  20. Evaluation of focal thyroid lesions incidentally detected in fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography images.

    PubMed

    Yaylali, O; Kirac, F S; Yuksel, D; Marangoz, E

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Increased uptake in the thyroid gland (TG) is often identified as an incidental finding on the whole body fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT) in non-thyroid cancer patients. Currently, there is no consensus on the appropriate approach for the management of these cases. Thyroid ultrasound, scintigraphy and fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) are suggested to exclude malignant thyroid lesions. Our aim is to determine the importance of increased F-18-FDG uptake in the TG on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans in patients who are being screened for various forms of non-thyroid cancer. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 2000 cases undergoing whole body PET/CT scanning between April 2011 and October 2012. The age, sex, type of primary cancer, maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ), size of the thyroid nodules and cervical lymph nodes (CLNs) on 18 F-FDG PET/CT images and if available, the biopsy results were evaluated. Results: In total, 57 patients (23 men, 34 women, mean age ± standard deviation (SD), 60.89 ± 14 years) showed an increased fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) uptake by the TG (average SUV max : 4.07 ± 3.7). The CLNs were detected in 19/57 patients (33%). Only 20 cases (35%) received FNAB. The final histopathological diagnosis was papillary thyroid carcinoma in seven patients (mean SUV max ± SD: 6.0 ± 5.43) and benign thyroid disease in seven patients (mean SUV max ± SD: 2.36 ± 0.63). The FNAB results were undetermined for six patients. Conclusion: Focal high 18 F-FDG uptake in the TG may be associated with an increased risk of malignancy, but the clinical significance is unclear. More data are needed to elucidate the role of the SUV in the differentiation of benign and malign thyroid lesions. If a focal increase in 18 F-FDG uptake in the TG on PET/CT is present, a prompt histopathological evaluation should be suggested

  1. Improving (18)F-Fluoro-D-Glucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging in Alzheimer's Disease Studies.

    PubMed

    Knešaurek, Karin

    2015-01-01

    The goal was to improve Alzheimer's 2-deoxy-2-(18)F-fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) imaging through application of a novel, hybrid Fourier-wavelet windowed Fourier transform (WFT) restoration technique, in order to provide earlier and more accurate clinical results. General Electric Medical Systems downward-looking sonar PET/CT 16 slice system was used to acquire studies. Patient data were acquired according the Alzheimer's disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) protocol. Here, we implemented Fourier-wavelet regularized restoration, with a Butterworth low-pass filter, order n = 6 and a cut-off frequency f = 0.35 cycles/pixel and wavelet (Daubechies, order 2) noise suppression. The original (PET-O) and restored (PET-R) ADNI subject PET images were compared using the Alzheimer's discrimination analysis by dedicated software. Forty-two PET/CT scans were used in the study. They were performed on eleven ADNI subjects at intervals of approximately 6 months. The final clinical diagnosis was used as a gold standard. For three subjects, the final clinical diagnosis was mild cognitive impairment and those 13 PET/CT studies were not included in the final comparison, as the result was considered as inconclusive. Using the reminding 29 PET/CT studies (23 AD and 6 normal), the sensitivity and specificity of the PET-O and PET-R were calculated. The sensitivity was 0.65 and 0.96 for PET-O and PET-R, respectively, and the specificity was 0.67 and 0.50 for PET-O and PET-R. The accuracy was 0.66 and 0.86 for PET-O and PET-R, respectively. The results of the study demonstrated that the accuracy of three-dimensional brain F-18 FDG PET images was significantly improved by Fourier-wavelet restoration filtering. PMID:26420987

  2. Imaging Brain Metabolism and Pathology in Alzheimer’s Disease with Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhi, S; Claassen, D; Riddle, WR

    2014-01-01

    Current Positron Emission Tomography (PET) biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) assess either neuronal function, or associated pathological features of this common neurodegenerative disease. The most widely accepted clinical PET tool for AD is 18-fluorodeoxyglucose PET (FDG-PET), which measures cerebral metabolic glucose utilization rate (CMRglc). FDG-PET is a marker of synaptic activity, neuronal function, and neuronal metabolic activity. AD is characterized by a distinct pattern of hypometabolism, as seen with the FDG images. This pattern can show variability across different subjects and is present before a patient is demented, specifically in amnestic mild cognitive impairment a clinical diagnosis defined as an intermediate state from normal aging to dementia. In addition to FDG PET, novel PET approaches assess known pathological hallmarks of AD including extracellular amyloid-beta plaques (Aβ) and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles composed of tau fibrils. Already, amyloid PET imaging is a tool that allows in vivo imaging of extracellular beta-amyloid levels. Efforts to bring tau imaging into clinical use continue, but this approach is hampered by the intracellular nature of tau protein deposition, subsequent weak radiotracer binding, and low image contrast. Several new candidate probes for tau-specific PET imaging are currently available but have not found their way into broad clinical applications. This study gives an overview of the most recent PET-based neuroimaging techniques for AD. We place special emphasis on PET data analysis and interpretation techniques, as well as radiochemistry for imaging metabolism and assessing Aβ and tau pathology. PMID:25343059

  3. Strategies for displaying computer simulated three-dimensional images from emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Schlusselberg, D.S.; Simon, T.R.; Smith, W.K.; Woodward, D.J.; Parkey, R.W.

    1985-05-01

    Emission computed tomography (ECT) quantitatively localizes radionuclide tracer distributions within a three-dimensional (3D) volume. Currently available techniques limit the display of this information to series of cross-sectional or rotating images. Such techniques of ten rely on special viewing equipment to synthesize the image series into a volumetric display. The authors have developed new algorithms that generate 3D images of radiotracer distributions using computerized analysis of tomographic data. Imaging strategies including transparent volumes, surface models, color-coded circumferential histograms and transparent slices are combined to produce a single image that contains the quantitative distributional information. While the images can be displayed on most raster-based display devices, they are suitable for archiving and distribution as single image photographs. This choice of formats enhances the value of the technique for communicating scintigraphic information to referring physicians while maintaining the quantitative integrity of the data. The technique has been successfully applied to a variety of ECT examination including brain, heart, liver and bone studies.

  4. Myelin imaging with C-11 labeled diphenylmethanol and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Herscovitch, P.; Dischino, D.D.; Kilbourn, M.R.; Welch, M.J.; Raichle, M.E.

    1985-05-01

    The authors have recently studied several C-11-labeled radiopharmaceuticals for their suitability as myelin imaging agents with positron emission tomography (PET). C-11 diphenylmethanol (DPM) was selected on the basis of its in vivo metabolic stability and high extraction and lipophilicity. PET studies were performed in three normal subjects and in one patient with multiple sclerosis (MS). Myelin distribution was imaged following the bolus intravenous administration of 25-30 mCi of C-11 DPM. Sequential scans were obtained after radiotracer administration to measure the DPM distribution as a function of time. In addition, regional cerebral blood flow was measured after the bolus intravenous injection of 0-15 water. A tomographic slice through the centrum semiovale was used to obtain regional data for gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM).

  5. Positron emission tomography radioligands for in vivo imaging of Aβ plaques

    PubMed Central

    Mason, N. Scott; Mathis, Chester A.; Klunk, William E.

    2014-01-01

    The development of positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands for the non-invasive imaging of amyloid-β plaque burden has been the focus of intense research efforts over the last decade. A variety of structural backbones have been investigated and several radiolabeled molecules have been evaluated in phase I (and later) clinical studies. These efforts have been driven by the desire not only to develop a suitable diagnostic imaging agent but also to develop a means to evaluate potential therapies for Alzheimer’s disease. This review focuses on the development of these ligands, as well as the radiochemistry and current regulatory status of these PET radioligands. Particular attention is given to those ligands that have progressed to the later stages of drug development (phase II/III clinical trial studies) or approved New Drug Application status. PMID:24285314

  6. Positron emission tomography imaging approaches for external beam radiation therapies: current status and future developments

    PubMed Central

    Price, P M; Green, M M

    2011-01-01

    In an era in which it is possible to deliver radiation with high precision, there is a heightened need for enhanced imaging capabilities to improve tumour localisation for diagnostic, planning and delivery purposes. This is necessary to increase the accuracy and overall efficacy of all types of external beam radiotherapy (RT), including particle therapies. Positron emission tomography (PET) has the potential to fulfil this need by imaging fundamental aspects of tumour biology. The key areas in which PET may support the RT process include improving disease diagnosis and staging; assisting tumour volume delineation; defining tumour phenotype or biological tumour volume; assessment of treatment response; and in-beam monitoring of radiation dosimetry. The role of PET and its current developmental status in these key areas are overviewed in this review, highlighting the advantages and drawbacks. PMID:21427180

  7. Radiological diagnosis in cholangiocarcinoma: Application of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Ringe, Kristina I; Wacker, Frank

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of radiological imaging in patients with suspected or known cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is tumour detection, lesion characterization and assessment of resectability. Different imaging modalities are implemented complementary in the diagnostic work-up. Non-invasive imaging should be performed prior to invasive biliary procedures in order to avoid false positive results. For assessment of intraparenchymal tumour extension and evaluation of biliary and vascular invasion, MRI including MRCP and CT are the primarily used imaging modalities. The role of PET remains controversial with few studies showing benefit with the detection of unexpected metastatic spread, the differentiation between benign and malignant biliary strictures, and for discriminating post therapeutic changes and recurrent CCA. PMID:25966426

  8. Design of brain imaging agents for positron emission tomography: do large bioconjugates provide an opportunity for in vivo brain imaging?

    PubMed

    Schirrmacher, Ralf; Bernard-Gauthier, Vadim; Reader, Andrew; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Schirrmacher, Esther; Wängler, Björn; Wängler, Carmen

    2013-09-01

    The development of brain imaging agents for positron emission tomography and other in vivo imaging modalities mostly relies on small compounds of low MW as a result of the restricted transport of larger molecules, such as peptides and proteins, across the blood-brain barrier. Besides passive transport, only a few active carrier mechanisms, such as glucose transporters and amino acid transporters, have so far been exploited to mediate the accumulation of imaging probes in the brain. An important question for the future is whether some of the abundant active carrier systems located at the blood-brain barrier can be used to shuttle potential, but non-crossing, imaging agents into the brain. What are the biological and chemical constrictions toward such bioconjugates and is it worthwhile to persue such a delivery strategy? PMID:24047268

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/MRI for Lung Cancer Staging.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Lee, Ho Yun; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2016-07-01

    Tumor, lymph node, and metastasis (TNM) classification of lung cancer is typically performed with the TNM staging system, as recommended by the Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC), the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC), and the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC). Radiologic examinations for TNM staging of lung cancer patients include computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography with 2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG-PET), and FDG-PET combined with CT (FDG-PET/CT) and are used for pretherapeutic assessments. Recent technical advances in MR systems, application of fast and parallel imaging and/or introduction of new MR techniques, and utilization of contrast media have markedly improved the diagnostic utility of MRI in this setting. In addition, FDG-PET can be combined or fused with MRI (PET/MRI) for clinical practice. This review article will focus on these recent advances in MRI as well as on PET/MRI for lung cancer staging, in addition to a discussion of their potential and limitations for routine clinical practice in comparison with other modalities such as CT, FDG-PET, and PET/CT. PMID:27075745

  10. Image-Guided Drug Delivery with Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography: A Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Rubel; Hong, Hao; Cai, Weibo

    2014-01-01

    Tremendous resources are being invested all over the world for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of various types of cancer. Successful cancer management depends on accurate diagnosis of the disease along with precise therapeutic protocol. The conventional systemic drug delivery approaches generally cannot completely remove the competent cancer cells without surpassing the toxicity limits to normal tissues. Therefore, development of efficient drug delivery systems holds prime importance in medicine and healthcare. Also, molecular imaging can play an increasingly important and revolutionizing role in disease management. Synergistic use of molecular imaging and targeted drug delivery approaches provides unique opportunities in a relatively new area called `image-guided drug delivery' (IGDD). Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is the most widely used nuclear imaging modality in clinical context and is increasingly being used to guide targeted therapeutics. The innovations in material science have fueled the development of efficient drug carriers based on, polymers, liposomes, micelles, dendrimers, microparticles, nanoparticles, etc. Efficient utilization of these drug carriers along with SPECT imaging technology have the potential to transform patient care by personalizing therapy to the individual patient, lessening the invasiveness of conventional treatment procedures and rapidly monitoring the therapeutic efficacy. SPECT-IGDD is not only effective for treatment of cancer but might also find utility in management of several other diseases. Herein, we provide a concise overview of the latest advances in SPECT-IGDD procedures and discuss the challenges and opportunities for advancement of the field. PMID:25182469

  11. Whole body positron emission tomography imaging of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus macaques.

    PubMed Central

    Scharko, A M; Perlman, S B; Hinds PW2nd; Hanson, J M; Uno, H; Pauza, C D

    1996-01-01

    Pathogenesis of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in rhesus macaques begins with acute viremia and then progresses to a distributed infection in the solid lymphoid tissues, which is followed by a process of cellular destruction leading to terminal disease and death. Blood and tissue specimens show the progress of infection at the cellular level but do not reveal the pattern of infection and host responses occurring throughout the body. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with intravenous 2-18F-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) could identify activated lymphoid tissues in a living animal and whether this pattern would reflect the extent of SIV infection. PET images from SIV-infected animals were distinguishable from uninfected controls and revealed a pattern consistent with widespread lymphoid tissue activation. Significant FDG accumulation in colon along with mesenteric and ileocaecal lymph nodes was found in SIV infection, especially during terminal disease stages. Areas of elevated FDG uptake in the PET images were correlated with productive SIV infection using in situ hybridization as a test for virus replication. PET-FDG images of SIV-infected animals correlated sites of virus replication with high FDG accumulation. These data show that the method can be used to evaluate the distribution and activity of infected tissues in a living animal without biopsy. Fewer tissues had high FDG uptake in terminal animals than midstage animals, and both were clearly distinguishable from uninfected animal scans. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8692831

  12. Advances in Immuno–Positron Emission Tomography: Antibodies for Molecular Imaging in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Scott M.; Wu, Anna M.

    2012-01-01

    Identification of cancer cell–surface biomarkers and advances in antibody engineering have led to a sharp increase in the development of therapeutic antibodies. These same advances have led to a new generation of radiolabeled antibodies and antibody fragments that can be used as cancer-specific imaging agents, allowing quantitative imaging of cell-surface protein expression in vivo. Immuno–positron emission tomography (immunoPET) imaging with intact antibodies has shown success clinically in diagnosing and staging cancer. Engineered antibody fragments, such as diabodies, minibodies, and single-chain Fv (scFv) –Fc, have been successfully employed for immunoPET imaging of cancer cell–surface biomarkers in preclinical models and are poised to bring same-day imaging into clinical development. ImmunoPET can potentially provide a noninvasive approach for obtaining target-specific information useful for titrating doses for radioimmunotherapy, for patient risk stratification and selection of targeted therapies, for evaluating response to therapy, and for predicting adverse effects, thus contributing to the ongoing development of personalized cancer treatment. PMID:22987087

  13. Primary Cardiac Angiosarcoma Treated With Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Adaptive Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Elsayad, Khaled; Lehrich, Philipp; Yppaerilae-Wolters, Heidi; Dieckmann, Chantal; Kriz, Jan; Haverkamp, Uwe; Eich, Hans Theodor

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) for inoperable patients with primary cardiac sarcomas or residual tumor is often limited by the sensitivity of the heart and lung to radiation injury. We describe a novel treatment modality with adaptive radiotherapy (ART) using tumor volume tracking in a 37-year-old woman who presented with unresectable primary cardiac angiosarcoma. The patient was treated using positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging-guided ART with 55.8 Gy concomitant with paclitaxel chemotherapy. In conclusion, the treatment was well tolerated, and a significant tumor volume reduction of ∼ 57% was achieved during radiotherapy, suggesting the effectiveness and tolerability of ART in combination with paclitaxel-based chemotherapy. PMID:26514752

  14. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Cancer Biology: Current Status and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the most rapidly growing areas of medical imaging, with many applications in the clinical management of patients with cancer. The principal goal of PET imaging is to visualize, characterize, and measure biological processes at the cellular, subcellular, and molecular levels in living subjects using noninvasive procedures. PET imaging takes advantage of the traditional diagnostic imaging techniques and introduces positron-emitting probes to determine the expression of indicative molecular targets at different stages of cancer progression. Although [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG)-PET has been widely utilized for staging and restaging of cancer, evaluation of response to treatment, differentiation of post-therapy alterations from residual or recurrent tumor, and assessment of prognosis, [18F]FDG is not a target-specific PET tracer. Over the last decade, numerous target-specific PET tracers have been developed and evaluated in preclinical and clinical studies. This review provides an overview of the current status and trends in the development of non-[18F]FDG PET probes in oncology and their application in the investigation of cancer biology. PMID:21362517

  15. Bioimpedance-based respiratory gating method for oncologic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with first clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivumäki, T.; Vauhkonen, M.; Teuho, J.; Teräs, M.; Hakulinen, M. A.

    2013-04-01

    Respiratory motion may cause significant image artefacts in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging. This study introduces a new bioimpedance-based gating method for minimizing respiratory artefacts. The method was studied in 12 oncologic patients by evaluating the following three parameters: maximum metabolic activity of radiopharmaceutical accumulations, the size of these targets as well as their target-to-background ratio. The bioimpedance-gated images were compared with non-gated images and images that were gated with a reference method, chest wall motion monitoring by infrared camera. The bioimpedance method showed clear improvement as increased metabolic activity and decreased target volume compared to non-gated images and produced consistent results with the reference method. Thus, the method may have great potential in the future of respiratory gating in nuclear medicine imaging.

  16. Caged [(18)F]FDG Glycosylamines for Imaging Acidic Tumor Microenvironments Using Positron Emission Tomography.

    PubMed

    Flavell, Robert R; Truillet, Charles; Regan, Melanie K; Ganguly, Tanushree; Blecha, Joseph E; Kurhanewicz, John; VanBrocklin, Henry F; Keshari, Kayvan R; Chang, Christopher J; Evans, Michael J; Wilson, David M

    2016-01-20

    Solid tumors are hypoxic with altered metabolism, resulting in secretion of acids into the extracellular matrix and lower relative pH, a feature associated with local invasion and metastasis. Therapeutic and diagnostic agents responsive to this microenvironment may improve tumor-specific delivery. Therefore, we pursued a general strategy whereby caged small-molecule drugs or imaging agents liberate their parent compounds in regions of low interstitial pH. In this manuscript, we present a new acid-labile prodrug method based on the glycosylamine linkage, and its application to a class of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging tracers, termed [(18)F]FDG amines. [(18)F]FDG amines operate via a proposed two-step mechanism, in which an acid-labile precursor decomposes to form the common radiotracer 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-d-glucose, which is subsequently accumulated by glucose avid cells. The rate of decomposition of [(18)F]FDG amines is tunable in a systematic fashion, tracking the pKa of the parent amine. In vivo, a 4-phenylbenzylamine [(18)F]FDG amine congener showed greater relative accumulation in tumors over benign tissue, which could be attenuated upon tumor alkalinization using previously validated models, including sodium bicarbonate treatment, or overexpression of carbonic anhydrase. This new class of PET tracer represents a viable approach for imaging acidic interstitial pH with potential for clinical translation. PMID:26649808

  17. A New Approach to Image Reconstruction in Positron Emission Tomography Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevilacqua, A.; Bollini, D.; Campanini, R.; Lanconelli, N.; Galli, M.

    This study investigates the possibility of using an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) for reconstructing Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images. The network is trained with simulated data which include physical effects such as attenuation and scattering. Once the training ends, the weights of the network are held constant. The network is able to reconstruct every type of source distribution contained inside the area mapped during the learning. The reconstruction of a simulated brain phantom in a noiseless case shows an improvement if compared with Filtered Back-Projection reconstruction (FBP). In noisy cases there is still an improvement, even if we do not compensate for noise fluctuations. These results show that it is possible to reconstruct PET images using ANNs. Initially we used a Dec Alpha; then, due to the high data parallelism of this reconstruction problem, we ported the learning on a Quadrics (SIMD) machine, suited for the realization of a small medical dedicated system. These results encourage us to continue in further studies that will make possible reconstruction of images of bigger dimension than those used in the present work (32 × 32 pixels).

  18. Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography Image Restoration via a Kinetics-Induced Bilateral Filter

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Zhaoying; Huang, Jing; Ma, Jianhua; Lu, Lijun; Niu, Shanzhou; Zeng, Dong; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is a powerful tool that provides useful quantitative information on physiological and biochemical processes. However, low signal-to-noise ratio in short dynamic frames makes accurate kinetic parameter estimation from noisy voxel-wise time activity curves (TAC) a challenging task. To address this problem, several spatial filters have been investigated to reduce the noise of each frame with noticeable gains. These filters include the Gaussian filter, bilateral filter, and wavelet-based filter. These filters usually consider only the local properties of each frame without exploring potential kinetic information from entire frames. Thus, in this work, to improve PET parametric imaging accuracy, we present a kinetics-induced bilateral filter (KIBF) to reduce the noise of dynamic image frames by incorporating the similarity between the voxel-wise TACs using the framework of bilateral filter. The aim of the proposed KIBF algorithm is to reduce the noise in homogeneous areas while preserving the distinct kinetics of regions of interest. Experimental results on digital brain phantom and in vivo rat study with typical 18F-FDG kinetics have shown that the present KIBF algorithm can achieve notable gains over other existing algorithms in terms of quantitative accuracy measures and visual inspection. PMID:24586657

  19. Imaging of peritoneal catheter tunnel infection using positron-emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pooja; Wiggins, Brenda; Sun, Yijuan; Servilla, Karen S; Last, Reuben E; Hartshorne, Michael F; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2010-01-01

    Imaging by ultrasonography or scintigraphy may assist in the diagnosis and management of tunnel infections of the peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter. Here, we report a case of tunnel infection in which imaging with positron-emission tomography (PET) correctly predicted failure of conservative management. A 61-year-old man with diabetic nephropathy commenced PD in January 2008. He developed erythema and drainage at the exit site, with negative cultures in February 2008, and frank exit-site infection (ESI) with purulent drainage growing methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus [MSSA (treated with 3 weeks of oral dicloxacillin)] in August 2008. Subsequently, MSSA-growing purulent drainage from the exit site persisted. Systemic antibiotics were not administered, but there was gradual improvement with gentamicin ointment alone. In November 2008, the patient developed partial extrusion of the outer cuff of the PD catheter. In January 2009, a new ESI developed. Despite a week of treatment with cefazolin and gentamicin, the patient still developed his first episode of peritonitis with coagulase-negative Staphylococcus. He then received intraperitoneal vancomycin with good response. Although the ESI appeared to have responded to the treatment, PET imaging showed increased fludeoxyglucose (FDG) activity in the whole abdominal wall portion of the PD catheter. The patient resisted removal of the catheter and had no further signs of infection until June 2009. At that time he presented with exuberant inflammatory tissue ("proud flesh") at the exit site. Repeated PET imaging again showed increased FDG activity along the abdominal wall portion of the catheter. The PD catheter was removed and found to be infected. The patient was placed on temporary hemodialysis. This case demonstrates that PET imaging, in addition to other imaging techniques, may be useful for diagnosing and managing PD catheter infections. PMID:21348389

  20. The use of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for imaging human motor neuronal activation in the brain

    PubMed Central

    PAHK, KISOO; PARK, KUN-WOO; PYUN, SUNG BOM; LEE, JAE SUNG; KIM, SUNGEUN; CHOE, JAE GOL

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to visualize human motor neuronal activation in the brain using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), and to develop an FDG-PET procedure for imaging neuronal activation. A male volunteer underwent 20 min periods of rest and motor activation, whilst being assessed using FDG-PET on two consecutive days. The motor task, which involved repetitively grasping and releasing the right hand, was performed during the initial 5 min of the activation period. Subtraction of the rest period signal from the activation PET images was performed using the subtraction ictal single-photon emission computed tomography co-registered to magnetic resonance imaging method. The subtracted image detected activation of the contralateral (left) primary motor cortex, supplementary motor area, and ipsilateral (right) cerebellum. In the present study, FDG-PET detected significantly increased motor-associated activation of the brain in a subject performing a motor task. PMID:26668604

  1. Positron Emission Tomography Image-Guided Drug Delivery: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an important modality in the field of molecular imaging, which is gradually impacting patient care by providing safe, fast, and reliable techniques that help to alter the course of patient care by revealing invasive, de facto procedures to be unnecessary or rendering them obsolete. Also, PET provides a key connection between the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of disease and the according targeted therapies. Recently, PET imaging is also gaining ground in the field of drug delivery. Current drug delivery research is focused on developing novel drug delivery systems with emphasis on precise targeting, accurate dose delivery, and minimal toxicity in order to achieve maximum therapeutic efficacy. At the intersection between PET imaging and controlled drug delivery, interest has grown in combining both these paradigms into clinically effective formulations. PET image-guided drug delivery has great potential to revolutionize patient care by in vivo assessment of drug biodistribution and accumulation at the target site and real-time monitoring of the therapeutic outcome. The expected end point of this approach is to provide fundamental support for the optimization of innovative diagnostic and therapeutic strategies that could contribute to emerging concepts in the field of “personalized medicine”. This review focuses on the recent developments in PET image-guided drug delivery and discusses intriguing opportunities for future development. The preclinical data reported to date are quite promising, and it is evident that such strategies in cancer management hold promise for clinically translatable advances that can positively impact the overall diagnostic and therapeutic processes and result in enhanced quality of life for cancer patients. PMID:24865108

  2. Evaluation and clinically relevant applications of a fluorescent imaging analog to fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Rahul A.; Josephson, Lee; Mahmood, Umar

    2009-11-01

    A fluorescent analog to 2-deoxy-2 [18F] fluoro-D-glucose position emission tomography (FDG-PET) would allow for the introduction of metabolic imaging into intraoperative and minimally invasive settings. We present through in vitro and in vivo experimentation an evaluation of 2-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)-2-deoxyglucose (2-NBDG), a fluorescently labeled glucose molecule, as a molecular beacon of glucose utilization. The competitive inhibition of 2-NBDG uptake by excess free glucose is directly compared against FDG uptake inhibition in cultured cells. 2-NBDG uptake in the brain of a mouse experiencing a generalized seizure is measured, as well as in subcutaneously implanted tumors in mice during fed and fasting states. Localization of 2-NBDG into malignant tissues is studied by laser scanning microscopy. The clinical relevance of 2-NBDG imaging is examined by performing fluorescence colonoscopy, and by correlating preoperative FDG-PET with intraoperative fluorescence imaging. 2-NBDG exhibits a similar uptake inhibition to FDG by excess glucose in the growth media. Uptake is significantly increased in the brain of an animal experiencing seizures versus control, and in subcutaneous tumors after the animals are kept nil per os (NPO) for 24 h versus ad libidum feeding. The clinical utility of 2-NBDG is confirmed by the demonstration of very high target-to-background ratios in minimally invasive and intraoperative imaging of malignant lesions. We present an optical analog of FDG-PET to extend the applicability of metabolic imaging to minimally invasive and intraoperative settings.

  3. Quantification of Regional Myocardial Oxygenation by Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Validation with Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    McCommis, Kyle S.; Goldstein, Thomas A.; Abendschein, Dana R.; Herrero, Pilar; Misselwitz, Bernd; Gropler, Robert J.; Zheng, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Background A comprehensive evaluation of myocardial ischemia requires measures of both oxygen supply and demand. Positron emission tomography (PET) is currently the gold standard for such evaluations, but its use is limited due to its ionizing radiation, limited availability, and high cost. A cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method was developed for assessing myocardial oxygenation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and validate this technique compared to PET during pharmacologic stress in a canine model of coronary artery stenosis. Methods and Results Twenty-one beagles and small mongrel dogs without coronary artery stenosis (controls), or with moderate to severe acute coronary artery stenosis underwent MRI and PET imaging at rest and during dipyridamole vasodilation or dobutamine stress to induce a wide range of changes in cardiac perfusion and oxygenation. MRI first-pass perfusion imaging was performed to quantify myocardial blood flow (MBF) and volume (MBV). The MRI blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) technique was used to determine the myocardial oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) during pharmacologic hyperemia. Myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) was determined by Fick’s law. In the same dogs, 15O-water and 11C-acetate were used to measure MBF and MVO2, respectively, by PET. Regional assessments were performed for both MR and PET. MRI data correlated nicely with PET values for MBF (R2 = 0.79, P < 0.001), MVO2 (R2 = 0.74, P < 0.001), and OEF (R2 = 0.66, P < 0.01). Conclusions Cardiac MRI methods may provide an alternative to radionuclide imaging in settings of myocardial ischemia. Our newly developed quantitative MRI oxygenation imaging technique may be a valuable non-invasive tool to directly evaluate myocardial energetics and efficiency. PMID:19933371

  4. Graphics processing unit (GPU)-accelerated particle filter framework for positron emission tomography image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fengchao; Liu, Huafeng; Hu, Zhenghui; Shi, Pengcheng

    2012-04-01

    As a consequence of the random nature of photon emissions and detections, the data collected by a positron emission tomography (PET) imaging system can be shown to be Poisson distributed. Meanwhile, there have been considerable efforts within the tracer kinetic modeling communities aimed at establishing the relationship between the PET data and physiological parameters that affect the uptake and metabolism of the tracer. Both statistical and physiological models are important to PET reconstruction. The majority of previous efforts are based on simplified, nonphysical mathematical expression, such as Poisson modeling of the measured data, which is, on the whole, completed without consideration of the underlying physiology. In this paper, we proposed a graphics processing unit (GPU)-accelerated reconstruction strategy that can take both statistical model and physiological model into consideration with the aid of state-space evolution equations. The proposed strategy formulates the organ activity distribution through tracer kinetics models and the photon-counting measurements through observation equations, thus making it possible to unify these two constraints into a general framework. In order to accelerate reconstruction, GPU-based parallel computing is introduced. Experiments of Zubal-thorax-phantom data, Monte Carlo simulated phantom data, and real phantom data show the power of the method. Furthermore, thanks to the computing power of the GPU, the reconstruction time is practical for clinical application. PMID:22472843

  5. Respective roles of thyroglobulin, radioiodine imaging, and positron emission tomography in the assessment of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Lind, Peter; Kohlfürst, Susanne

    2006-07-01

    Depending on the iodine supply of an area, the incidence of thyroid cancer ranges between 4 and 12/100,000 per year. To detect thyroid cancer in an early stage, the assessment of thyroid nodules includes ultrasonography, ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy, and conventional scintigraphic methods using (99m)Tc-pertechnetate, (99m)Tc-sestamibi or -tetrofosmin, and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in selected cases. After treatment of thyroid cancer, a consequent follow-up is necessary over a period of several years. For following up low-risk patients, recombinant thyroid-stimulating hormone-stimulated thyroglobulin and ultrasonography is sufficient in most cases. After total thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation therapy, thyroid-stimulating hormone-stimulated thyroglobulin should be below the detection limit (eg, <0.5 ng/mL, R: 70-130). An increase of thyroglobulin over time is suspicious for recurrent or metastatic disease. Especially in high-risk patients, aside from the use of ultrasonography for the detection of local recurrence and cervial lymph node metastases, nuclear medicine methods such as radioiodine imaging and FDG-PET are the methods of choice for localizing metastatic disease. Radioiodine imaging detects well-differentiated recurrences and metastases with a high specificity but only moderate sensitivity. The sensitivity of radioiodine imaging depends on the activity administered. Therefore a low activity diagnostic (131)I whole-body scan (74-185 MBq) has a lower detection rate than a high activity post-therapy scan (3700-7400 MBq). In patients with low or dedifferentiated thyroid cancer and after several courses of radioiodine therapy caused by metastatic disease, iodine negative metastases may develop. In these cases, despite clearly elevated levels of thyroglobulin, radioiodine imaging is negative or demonstrates only faint iodine uptake. The method of choice to image these iodine negative metastases is

  6. New Glucocyclic RGD Dimers for Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Tumor Integrin Receptors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Woong; Park, Ji-Ae; Lee, Yong Jin; Shin, Un Chol; Kim, Suhng Wook; Kim, Byung Il; Lim, Sang Moo; An, Gwang Il; Kim, Jung Young; Lee, Kyo Chul

    2016-08-01

    Most studies of radiolabeled arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptides have shown in vitro affinity for integrin ανβ3, allowing for the targeting of receptor-positive tumors in vivo. However, major differences have been found in the pharmacokinetic profiles of different radiolabeled RGD peptide analogs. The purposes of this study were to prepare (64)Cu-DOTA-gluco-E[c(RGDfK)]2 (R8), (64)Cu-NOTA-gluco-E[c(RGDfK)]2 (R9), and (64)Cu-NODAGA-gluco-E[c(RGDfK)]2 (R10) and compare their pharmacokinetics and tumor imaging properties using small-animal positron emission tomography (PET). All three compounds were produced with high specific activity within 10 minutes. The IC50 values were similar for all the substances, and their affinities were greater than that of c(RGDyK). R8, R9, and R10 were stable for 24 hours in human and mouse serums and showed high uptake in U87MG tumors with high tumor-to-blood ratios. Compared to the control, a cyclic RGD peptide dimer without glucosamine, R10, showed low uptake in the liver. Because of their good imaging qualities and improved pharmacokinetics, (64)Cu-labeled dimer RGD conjugates (R8, R9, and R10) may have potential applications as PET radiotracers. R9 (NOTA) with highly in vivo stability consequentially showed an improved PET tumor uptake than R8 (DOTA) or R10 (NODAGA). PMID:27403677

  7. In vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) receptor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunying; Tang, Zhe; Fan, Weiwen; Zhu, Wenxia; Wang, Changning; Somoza, Edurado; Owino, Norbert; Li, Ruoshi; Ma, Patrick C; Wang, Yanming

    2010-01-14

    We report the radiosynthesis and evaluation of 3-[3,5-dimethyl-4-(4-[11C]methylpiperazinecarbonyl)-1H-pyrrol-2-ylmethylene]-2-oxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-indole-5-sulfonic acid (3-chlorophenyl)methylamide, termed [11C]SU11274 ([11C]14) for in vivo imaging of mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) receptor by positron emission tomography (PET). Following the synthesis of the precursor (13) that was achieved in 10 steps with a total yield of 9.7%, [11C]14 was obtained through radiomethylation in a range of 5-10% radiochemical yield and over 95% radiochemical purity. For in vivo PET studies, two human lung cancer xenograft models were established using MET-positive NCI-H1975 and MET-negative NCI-H520 cell lines. Quantitative [11C]14-PET studies showed that the tumor uptake of [11C]14 in the NCI-H1975 xenografts was significantly higher than that in the NCI-H520 xenografts, which is consistent with their corresponding immunohistochemical tissue staining patterns of MET receptors from the same animals. These studies demonstrated that [11C]14-PET is an appropriate imaging marker for quantification of MET receptor in vivo, which can facilitate efficacy evaluation in the clinical development of MET-targeted cancer therapeutics. PMID:19968287

  8. A Novel Potential Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Agent for Vesicular Monoamine Transporter Type 2.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zih-Rou; Tsai, Chia-Ling; Huang, Ya-Yao; Shiue, Chyng-Yann; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Yen, Ruoh-Fang; Hsin, Ling-Wei

    2016-01-01

    In the early 1990s, 9-(+)-11C-dihydrotetrabenazine (9-(+)-11C-DTBZ) was shown to be a useful positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agent for various neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we described the radiosynthesis and evaluation of the 9-(+)-11C-DTBZ analog, 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ, as a vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) imaging agent and compare it with 9-(+)-11C-DTBZ. 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ was obtained by 11C-MeI methylation with its 10 hydroxy precursor in the presence of 5 M NaOH. It had a slightly better average radiochemical yield of 35.3 ± 3.6% (decay-corrected to end of synthesis (EOS)) than did 9-(+)-11C-DTBZ (30.5 ± 2.3%). MicroPET studies showed that 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ had a striatum-to-cerebellum ratio of 3.74 ± 0.21 at 40 min post-injection, while the ratio of 9-(+)-11C-DTBZ was 2.50 ± 0.33. This indicated that 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ has a higher specific uptake in VMAT2-rich brain regions, and 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ may be a potential VMAT2 radioligand. Our experiment is the first study of 10-(+)-11C-DTBZ to include dynamic brain distribution in rat brains. PMID:27612194

  9. A Novel Technology for the Imaging of Acidic Prostate Tumors by Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    V vere, Amy L.; Biddlecombe, Gráinne B.; Spees, William M.; Garbow, Joel R.; Wijesinghe, Dayanjali; Andreev, Oleg A.; Engelman, Donald M.; Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Lewis, Jason S.

    2009-01-01

    Solid tumors often develop an acidic environment due to the Warburg Effect. The effectiveness of diagnosis and therapy may therefore be enhanced by the design and use of pH-sensitive agents that target acidic tumors. Recently, a novel technology was introduced to target acidic tumors using pHLIP (pH Low Insertion Peptide), a peptide that inserts across cell membranes as an α-helix when the extracellular pH is acidic. In this study we expanded the application of the pHLIP technology to include positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the acidic environment in prostate tumors using 64Cu conjugated to the pHLIP peptide (64Cu-DOTA-pHLIP). Studies demonstrated that this construct avidly accumulated in LNCaP and PC-3 tumors, with higher uptake and retention in the LNCaP tumors. Uptake correlated with differences in the bulk extracellular pH (pHe) of PC-3 and LNCaP tumors measured in MR spectroscopy experiments by the 31P chemical shift of the extracellular pH marker 3-aminopropylphosphonate. This manuscript introduces a novel class of non-invasive pH-selective PET imaging agents and opens new research directions in the diagnosis of acidic solid tumors. PMID:19417132

  10. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography imaging of T-lymphoblastic lymphoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Hoon; Pahk, Kisoo; Kim, Sungeun; Lim, Sang Moo; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Park, Yeon Hee; Lee, Seung-Sook; Choe, Jae Gol

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) findings in patients with T-lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL). In total, 9 patients with histopathologically confirmed T-LBL were included in the study. Bone marrow (BM) involvement and leukemic transformation (LT) were evaluated through iliac crest marrow biopsy and peripheral blood blast count. FDG-PET scans were performed at the initial pre-treatment point. Two experienced nuclear medicine physicians evaluated the FDG-PET images by visual analysis and using the maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of the malignant lesions. Overall, 8 out 9 patients presented with BM involvement; 7 showed LT, while 1 showed BM involvement without LT. All involved T-LBL lesions were FDG-avid with variable uptake. The mean SUVmax was 6.4±3.3. T-LBL patients with BM involvement showed diffuse or nodular marrow uptake. In addition, all the patients with LT showed diffuse marrow FDG activity. However, the patient with BM involvement but no LT showed nodular FDG uptake in the marrow. In conclusion, the present study indicates that it is possible to use FDG-PET for the evaluation of the disease extent of T-LBL. Furthermore, the imaging technique could provide a diagnostic clue for determining BM involvement or LT. PMID:27446482

  11. Importance of Defect Detectability in Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Abdominal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Shozo; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Yamamoto, Haruki; Nakaichi, Tetsu; Tsuji, Shiro; Nakajima, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): This study was designed to assess defect detectability in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of abdominal lesions. Methods: A National Electrical Manufactures Association International Electrotechnical Commission phantom was used. The simulated abdominal lesion was scanned for 10 min using dynamic list-mode acquisition method. Images, acquired with scan duration of 1-10 min, were reconstructed using VUE point HD and a 4.7 mm full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) Gaussian filter. Iteration-subset combinations of 2-16 and 2-32 were used. Visual and physical analyses were performed using the acquired images. To sequentially evaluate defect detectability in clinical settings, we examined two middle-aged male subjects. One had a liver cyst (approximately 10 mm in diameter) and the other suffered from pancreatic cancer with an inner defect region (approximately 9 mm in diameter). Results: In the phantom study, at least 6 and 3 min acquisition durations were required to visualize 10 and 13 mm defect spheres, respectively. On the other hand, spheres with diameters ≥17 mm could be detected even if the acquisition duration was only 1 min. The visual scores were significantly correlated with background (BG) variability. In clinical settings, the liver cyst could be slightly visualized with an acquisition duration of 6 min, although image quality was suboptimal. For pancreatic cancer, the acquisition duration of 3 min was insufficient to clearly describe the defect region. Conclusion: The improvement of BG variability is the most important factor for enhancing lesion detection. Our clinical scan duration (3 min/bed) may not be suitable for the detection of small lesions or accurate tumor delineation since an acquisition duration of at least 6 min is required to visualize 10 mm lesions, regardless of reconstruction parameters. Improvements in defect detectability are important for radiation treatment planning and accurate PET-based diagnosis. PMID:27408887

  12. Image findings of monomorphic non-hogdkin lymphoproliferative disorder in a post renal transplant patient diagnosed with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Rajasekar, Thirugnanam; Shibu, Deepu; Radhakrishnan, Edathurthy Kalarikal; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2014-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a heterogeneous group of lymphoid proliferations caused by immunosuppression after solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. PTLD is categorized by early lesion, polymorphic PTLD and monomorphic PTLD. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG-PET/CT) scans have clinical significance in the evaluation of PTLD following renal transplantation. We report imaging findings of a monomorphic non-Hodgkin lymphoma, post renal transplant seen on FDG PET/CT in a 32-year-old lactating woman. Whole body FDG- ET/CT demonstrated uptake in right external iliac and inguinal lymph nodes. PMID:25210292

  13. Image findings of monomorphic non-hogdkin lymphoproliferative disorder in a post renal transplant patient diagnosed with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Rajasekar, Thirugnanam; Shibu, Deepu; Radhakrishnan, Edathurthy Kalarikal; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2014-07-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a heterogeneous group of lymphoid proliferations caused by immunosuppression after solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. PTLD is categorized by early lesion, polymorphic PTLD and monomorphic PTLD. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG-PET/CT) scans have clinical significance in the evaluation of PTLD following renal transplantation. We report imaging findings of a monomorphic non-Hodgkin lymphoma, post renal transplant seen on FDG PET/CT in a 32-year-old lactating woman. Whole body FDG- ET/CT demonstrated uptake in right external iliac and inguinal lymph nodes. PMID:25210292

  14. Functional imaging in bulk tissue specimens using optical emission tomography: fluorescence preservation during optical clearing.

    PubMed

    Sakhalkar, H S; Dewhirst, M; Oliver, T; Cao, Y; Oldham, M

    2007-04-21

    Optical emission computed tomography (optical-ECT) is a technique for imaging the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of fluorescent probes in biological tissue specimens with high contrast and spatial resolution. In optical-ECT, functional information can be imaged by (i) systemic application of functional labels (e.g. fluorophore labelled proteins) and/or (ii) endogenous expression of fluorescent reporter proteins (e.g. red fluorescent protein (RFP), green fluorescent protein (GFP)) in vivo. An essential prerequisite for optical-ECT is optical clearing, a procedure where tissue specimens are made transparent to light by sequential perfusion with fixing, dehydrating and clearing agents. In this study, we investigate clearing protocols involving a selection of common fixing (4% buffered paraformaldehyde (PFA), methanol and ethanol), dehydrating (methanol and ethanol) and clearing agents (methyl salicylate and benzyl-alcohol-benzyl-benzoate (BABB)) in order to determine a 'fluorescence friendly' clearing procedure. Cell culture experiments were employed to optimize the sequence of chemical treatments that best preserve fluorescence. Texas red (TxRed), fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), RFP and GFP were tested as fluorophores and fluorescent reporter proteins of interest. Fluorescent and control cells were imaged on a microscope using a DSred2 and FITC filter set. The most promising clearing protocols of cell culture experiments were applied to whole xenograft tumour specimens, to test their effectiveness in large unsectioned samples. Fluorescence of TxRed/FITC fluorophores was not found to be significantly affected by any of the test clearing protocols. RFP and GFP fluorescence, however, was found to be significantly greater when cell fixation was in ethanol. Fixation in either PFA or methanol resulted in diminished fluorescence. After ethanol fixation, the RFP and GFP fluorescence proved remarkably robust to subsequent exposure to either methyl salicylate or BABB

  15. Functional imaging in bulk tissue specimens using optical emission tomography: fluorescence preservation during optical clearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhalkar, H. S.; Dewhirst, M.; Oliver, T.; Cao, Y.; Oldham, M.

    2007-04-01

    Optical emission computed tomography (optical-ECT) is a technique for imaging the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of fluorescent probes in biological tissue specimens with high contrast and spatial resolution. In optical-ECT, functional information can be imaged by (i) systemic application of functional labels (e.g. fluorophore labelled proteins) and/or (ii) endogenous expression of fluorescent reporter proteins (e.g. red fluorescent protein (RFP), green fluorescent protein (GFP)) in vivo. An essential prerequisite for optical-ECT is optical clearing, a procedure where tissue specimens are made transparent to light by sequential perfusion with fixing, dehydrating and clearing agents. In this study, we investigate clearing protocols involving a selection of common fixing (4% buffered paraformaldehyde (PFA), methanol and ethanol), dehydrating (methanol and ethanol) and clearing agents (methyl salicylate and benzyl-alcohol-benzyl-benzoate (BABB)) in order to determine a 'fluorescence friendly' clearing procedure. Cell culture experiments were employed to optimize the sequence of chemical treatments that best preserve fluorescence. Texas red (TxRed), fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), RFP and GFP were tested as fluorophores and fluorescent reporter proteins of interest. Fluorescent and control cells were imaged on a microscope using a DSred2 and FITC filter set. The most promising clearing protocols of cell culture experiments were applied to whole xenograft tumour specimens, to test their effectiveness in large unsectioned samples. Fluorescence of TxRed/FITC fluorophores was not found to be significantly affected by any of the test clearing protocols. RFP and GFP fluorescence, however, was found to be significantly greater when cell fixation was in ethanol. Fixation in either PFA or methanol resulted in diminished fluorescence. After ethanol fixation, the RFP and GFP fluorescence proved remarkably robust to subsequent exposure to either methyl salicylate or BABB

  16. Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cellular Inflammation in Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    McBride, O.M.B.; Joshi, N.V.; Robson, J.M.J.; MacGillivray, T.J.; Gray, C.D.; Fletcher, A.M.; Dweck, M.R.; van Beek, E.J.R.; Rudd, J.H.F.; Newby, D.E.; Semple, S.I.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Inflammation is critical in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease. Combined 18F-fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET-CT) and ultrasmall superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide (USPIO)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are non-invasive methods of assessing tissue inflammation. The aim of this study was to compare these techniques in patients with AAA. Materials and methods Fifteen patients with asymptomatic AAA with diameter 46 ± 7 mm underwent PET-CT with 18F-FDG, and T2*-weighted MRI before and 24 hours after administration of USPIO. The PET-CT and MRI data were then co-registered. Standardised uptake values (SUVs) were calculated to measure 18F-FDG activity, and USPIO uptake was determined using the change in R2*. Comparisons between the techniques were made using a quadrant analysis and a voxel-by-voxel evaluation. Results When all areas of the aneurysm were evaluated, there was a modest correlation between the SUV on PET-CT and the change in R2* on USPIO-enhanced MRI (n = 70,345 voxels; r = .30; p < .0001). Although regions of increased 18F-FDG and USPIO uptake co-localised on occasion, this was infrequent (kappa statistic 0.074; 95% CI 0.026–0.122). 18F-FDG activity was commonly focused in the shoulder region whereas USPIO uptake was more apparent in the main body of the aneurysm. Maximum SUV was lower in patients with mural USPIO uptake. Conclusions Both 18F-FDG PET-CT and USPIO-MRI uptake identify vascular inflammation associated with AAA. Although they demonstrate a modest correlation, there are distinct differences in the pattern and distribution of uptake, suggesting a differential detection of macrophage glycolytic and phagocytic activity respectively. PMID:26919936

  17. Occupational Exposure to Veterinary Workers from the Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Agent 64Cu-ATSM.

    PubMed

    Hetrick, Lucas D; Kraft, Susan L; Johnson, Thomas E

    2015-11-01

    Cu-ATSM is an emerging radiopharmaceutical for diagnostic use in positron emission tomography (PET), but to date there are no studies that assess the potential occupational doses to workers in either human or veterinary medicine. This study was aimed at determining the external radiation dose to veterinary workers from clinical PET/CT (PET combined with computed tomography) procedures using Cu-ATSM. To determine the dose to the workers, each worker was assigned two Electronic Personal Dosimeters (EPDs) to be worn on the chest and waist during the entirety of each procedure. The workers monitored during this study included a radiobiologist, a nuclear medicine technologist, an anesthesiologist, and a veterinary surgeon. Seven canine patients were imaged with an average mass of 33.7 kg (a range of 20.0-55.1 kg) with an average injected activity of 5 MBq kg. The dose range for the radiobiologist was 2-17 μSv (mean of 7.1 μSv), for the nuclear medicine technologist 0-14 μSv (mean of 5.6 μSv), for the anesthesiologist 0-12 μSv (mean of 4.0 μSv), and for the surgeon 0-10 μSv (mean of 3.6 μSv). In a comparison between the results of this study and published literature on occupational exposures from veterinary FDG PET/CT procedures, Cu-ATSM veterinary PET/CT procedures, on a per patient bias, exposed workers to less radiation. PMID:26425985

  18. Brain tumor imaging with synthesized /sup 18/F-fluorophenylalanine and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Mineura, K.; Kowada, M.; Shishido, F.

    1989-06-01

    Two patients with cerebral gliomas were studied with 18F-fluorophenylalanine, newly synthesized by the electrophilic substitution reaction, using positron emission tomography. The tracer accumulated markedly in the tumor lesion and delineated the extent of the lesion. This new tracer will be promising in the diagnosis of gliomas.

  19. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis with a 66Ga-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Engle, Jonathan W.; Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Myklejord, Duane V.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Theuer, Charles P.; Nickles, Robert J.; Cai, Weibo

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a 66Ga-based positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for non-invasive imaging of CD105 expression during tumor angiogenesis, a hallmark of cancer. 66Ga was produced using a cyclotron with natZn or isotopically enriched 66Zn targets. TRC105, a chimeric anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody, was conjugated to 2-S-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-1, 4, 7-triazacyclononane-1, 4, 7-triacetic acid (p-SCN-Bn-NOTA) and labeled with 66Ga. No difference in CD105 binding affinity or specificity was observed between TRC105 and NOTATRC105 based on flow cytometry analysis. Reactivity of 66Ga for NOTA, corrected to the end of bombardment, was between 74 and 222 GBq/μmol for both target enrichments with < 2 ppb of cold gallium. 66Ga-labeling was achieved with > 80% radiochemical yield. Serial PET imaging revealed that the murine breast cancer 4T1 tumor uptake of 66Ga-NOTA-TRC105 was 5.9 ± 1.6, 8.5 ± 0.6, and 9.0 ± 0.6 %ID/g at 4, 20, and 36 h post-injection, respectively (n = 4). At the last time point, tumor uptake was higher than all organs which gave excellent tumor contrast with a tumor/muscle ratio of 10.1 ± 1.1. Biodistribution data as measured by gamma counting were consistent with the PET findings. Blocking experiment, control studies with 66Ga-NOTA-cetuximab, as well as ex vivo histology all confirmed the in vivo target specificity of 66Ga-NOTA-TRC105. Successful PET imaging with high specific activity 66Ga (> 700 GBq/μmol has been achieved) as the radiolabel opens many new possibilities for future PET research with antibodies or other targeting ligands. PMID:22519890

  20. Positron emission tomography imaging of tumor angiogenesis with a 66Ga-labeled monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Engle, Jonathan W; Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Valdovinos, Hector F; Myklejord, Duane V; Barnhart, Todd E; Theuer, Charles P; Nickles, Robert J; Cai, Weibo

    2012-05-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a (66)Ga-based positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for noninvasive imaging of CD105 expression during tumor angiogenesis, a hallmark of cancer. (66)Ga was produced using a cyclotron with (nat)Zn or isotopically enriched (66)Zn targets. TRC105, a chimeric anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody, was conjugated to 2-S-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (p-SCN-Bn-NOTA) and labeled with (66)Ga. No difference in CD105 binding affinity or specificity was observed between TRC105 and NOTA-TRC105 based on flow cytometry analysis. Reactivity of (66)Ga for NOTA, corrected to the end of bombardment, was between 74 and 222 GBq/μmol for both target enrichments with <2 ppb of cold gallium. (66)Ga-labeling was achieved with >80% radiochemical yield. Serial PET imaging revealed that the murine breast cancer 4T1 tumor uptake of (66)Ga-NOTA-TRC105 was 5.9 ± 1.6, 8.5 ± 0.6, and 9.0 ± 0.6% ID/g at 4, 20, and 36 h postinjection, respectively (n = 4). At the last time point, tumor uptake was higher than that of all organs, which gave excellent tumor contrast with a tumor/muscle ratio of 10.1 ± 1.1. Biodistribution data as measured by gamma counting were consistent with the PET findings. Blocking experiment, control studies with (66)Ga-NOTA-cetuximab, as well as ex vivo histology all confirmed the in vivo target specificity of (66)Ga-NOTA-TRC105. Successful PET imaging with high specific activity (66)Ga (>700 GBq/μmol has been achieved) as the radiolabel opens many new possibilities for future PET research with antibodies or other targeting ligands. PMID:22519890

  1. Positron-emission tomography imaging of early events after transplantation of islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed

    Toso, Christian; Zaidi, Habib; Morel, Philippe; Armanet, Mathieu; Andres, Axel; Pernin, Nadine; Baertschiger, Reto; Slosman, Daniel; Bühler, Leo H; Bosco, Domenico; Berney, Thierry

    2005-02-15

    The aim of our study was to assess cell trafficking and early events after intraportal islet transplantation. Sprague-Dawley rat islets were incubated for various times, with various concentrations of 2-[F]fluoro-2deoxy-D-glucose (FDG), and in presence of various glucose concentrations. FDG-labeled syngeneic islets or FDG alone were injected in rats. Radioactivity was measured in the liver and in various organs by positron-emission tomography for 6 hours. FDG uptake increased with incubation time or FDG concentration and decreased in presence of glucose. In vivo, all islets implanted in the liver, with an uptake 4.4 times higher than controls (44.2% vs. 10.1%, P=0.02). Radioactivity in the liver decreased at the same rate after injection of labeled-islets and FDG alone. Ex vivo labeling of islets and imaging of posttransplant early events were feasible. Islets engrafted exclusively in the liver. No islet loss could be demonstrated 6 hours after transplantation. PMID:15699768

  2. Acute infantile bilateral striatal necrosis: single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and review.

    PubMed

    Zevit, Noam; Steinmetz, Adam; Kornreich, Liora; Straussberg, Rachel

    2007-10-01

    Acute infantile bilateral striatal necrosis is a rarely described acute neurological syndrome associated with radiological findings. Its etiology and pathogenic mechanisms are unknown. Clinically, the syndrome usually follows respiratory illnesses and presents with an array of neurological findings, including axial ataxia, grimacing, mutism, head nodding, and high-pitched cry. This study follows a child with acute infantile bilateral striatal necrosis both clinically and radiologically. In addition, for the first time, the authors describe the serial findings of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) from onset of illness through 20 months. Their findings indicate an initial insult apparent on both magnetic resonance imaging and SPECT localized to the basal ganglia, which, although improved over time, does not fully regress. The residual lesion on SPECT was clinically associated with only mild attention deficit disorder and no motor pathology. The authors review the published literature concerning acute infantile bilateral striatal necrosis and suggest possible mechanisms of this poorly understood and probably underreported condition. PMID:17940250

  3. Quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging by cardiovascular magnetic resonance and positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Bratis, K; Mahmoud, I; Chiribiri, A; Nagel, E

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that a detailed knowledge of the extent of angiographic coronary artery disease (CAD) is not a prerequisite for clinical decision making, and the clinical management of patients with CAD is more and more focused towards the identification of myocardial ischemia and the quantification of ischemic burden. In this view, non-invasive assessment of ischemia and in particular stress imaging techniques are emerging as preferred and non-invasive options. A quantitative assessment of regional myocardial perfusion can provide an objective estimate of the severity of myocardial injury and may help clinicians to discriminate regions of the heart that are at increased risk for myocardial infarction. Positron emission tomography (PET) has established itself as the reference standard for myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR) quantification. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is increasingly used to measure MBF and MPR by means of first-pass signals, with a well-defined diagnostic performance and prognostic value. The aim of this article is to review the currently available evidence on the use of both PET and CMR for quantification of MPR, with particular attention to the studies that directly compared these two diagnostic methods. PMID:23868071

  4. A behavioral and micro positron emission tomography imaging study in a rat model of hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Tang, Yi-Yuang; Feng, Hong-Bo; Cheng, Xiao-Xin

    2014-09-01

    Hypothyroidism leads to somatic, neuropsychological, and psychiatric changes that are similar to depression. The mechanisms underlying the behavioral abnormalities in adult onset hypothyroidism remain ambiguous. Hypothyroidism was induced in adult male Wistar rats by the maintenance of 0.05% propylthiouracil (PTU) in drinking water for 5 weeks (hypothyroid group; HP group); control rats (CON group) received an equivalent amount of water. The open field and sucrose preference tests were employed, and the link between behavioral changes and brain glucose metabolism was evaluated using micro positron emission tomography imaging. The open field test revealed slightly decreased locomotor activity and significantly reduced rearing and defecation in the hypothyroid group. Hypothyroid rats were also characterized by decreased body weight, sucrose preference, and relative sucrose intake compared to control rats. Hypothyroidism induced reduced brain glucose metabolism in the bilateral motor cortex, the caudate putamen, the cortex cingulate, the nucleus accumbens, and the frontal association cortex. A decreased sucrose preference was positively correlated with metabolic glucose changes in the caudate putamen and the nucleus accumbens. The results indicate that the activity pattern in adult onset hypothyroidism is different from the activity pattern when hypothyroidism is induced in the developmental period of the central nervous system. Decreased sucrose preference in hypothyroid rats may be attributed to anhedonia. Furthermore, these findings suggest there may be a common mechanism underlying adult onset hypothyroidism and depression. PMID:24933189

  5. Digital superimposition of emission tomography and X-CT images for immunoscintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Lumbroso, J.; Di Paola, R.; Aubert, B.; Mach, J.P.; Rougier, P.; Parmentier, C.; Tubiana, M.

    1985-05-01

    In immunoscintigraphy (IS), single photon emission tomography (SPET) provides an accurate space localization of any uptake area but is affected by the lack of anatomical landmarks. The authors developed a technique where precise anatomical data are linked to the distribution of a tracer in SPET transverse slices. Twenty-two patients essentially bearing gastro-intestinal cancers were referred for IS after injection of an anti-CEA mouse monoclonal antibody (Mab) labelled with Iodine-131, SPET transverse slices were immediately analyzed. In the case of the presence of uptake areas which could correspond to a tumor site, the level of the transverse planes was marked on the patient's skin; corresponding X-CT scanner slices were performed, and using a magnetic tape transferred to the Nuclear Medicine computer system (Sopha Medical). An abdomen-like phantom was used to define the best conditions for the digital superimposition of SPET and X-CT images, using an original color scale. The method was useful for 7 patients. The uptake of the Mab was clearly confirmed in 1 case of left colon cancer and 3 cases of hepatic metastasis (HM), was ruled out in 1 case of HM and 1 case of gastric cancer, and remained doubtful in 1 case of HM associated with steatosis. They believe that this method increases the clinical specificity of IS and can be extended to any isotope study providing valuable functional information which has to be coupled with accurate morphological data.

  6. Performance and Limitations of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Scanners for Imaging Very Low Activity Sources

    PubMed Central

    Freedenberg, Melissa; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Tarantal, Alice F.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging applications for positron emission tomography (PET) may require the ability to image very low activity source distributions in the body. The performance of clinical PET scanners in the regime where activity in the field of view is <1 MBq has not previously been explored. In this study, we compared the counting rate performance of two clinical PET/CT scanners, the Siemens Biograph Reveal 16 scanner which is based on lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) detectors and the GE Discovery-ST scanner which is based on bismuth germanate (BGO) detectors using a modified National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU 2-2007 protocol. Across the activity range studied (2-100 kBq/mL in a 5.5 mL line source in the NEMA scatter phantom), the BGO-based scanner significantly outperformed the LSO-based scanner. This was largely due to the effect of background counts emanating from naturally occurring but radioactive 176Lu within the LSO detector material, which dominates the observed counting rate at the lowest activities. Increasing the lower energy threshold from 350 keV to 425 keV in an attempt to reduce this background did not significantly improve the measured NECR performance. The measured singles rate due to 176Lu emissions within the scanner energy window was also found to be dependent on temperature, and to be affected by the operation of CT component, making approaches to correct or compensate for the background more challenging. We conclude that for PET studies in a very low activity range, BGO-based scanners are likely to have better performance because of the lack of significant background. PMID:23680361

  7. Development of Traceable Phantoms for Improved Image Quantification in Positron Emission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Brian

    2014-03-01

    Clinical trials for new drugs increasingly rely on imaging data to monitor patient response to the therapy being studied. In the case of radiopharmaceutical applications, imaging data are also used to estimate organ and tumor doses in order to arrive at the optimal dosage for safe and effective treatment. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is one of the most commonly used imaging modalities for these types of applications. In large, multicenter trials it is crucial to minimize as much as possible the variability that arises due to use of different types of scanners and other instrumentation so that the biological response can be more readily evaluated. This can be achieved by ensuring that all the instruments are calibrated to a common standard and that their performance is continuously monitored throughout the trial. Maintaining links to a single standard also enables the comparability of data acquired on a heterogeneous collection of instruments in different clinical settings. As the standards laboratory for the United States, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has been developing a suite of phantoms having traceable activity content to enable scanner calibration and performance testing. The configurations range from small solid cylindrical sources having volumes from 1 mL to 23 mL to large cylinders having a total volume of 9 L. The phantoms are constructed with 68Ge as a long-lived substitute for the more clinically useful radionuclide 18F. The contained activity values are traceable to the national standard for 68Ge and are also linked to the standard for 18F through a careful series of comparisons. The techniques that have been developed are being applied to a variety of new phantom configurations using different radionuclides. Image-based additive manufacturing techniques are also being investigated to create fillable phantoms having irregular shapes which can better mimic actual organs and tumors while still maintaining traceability

  8. Dynamic Imaging of Fluid Flow in Sandstones by Nuclear Emission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pini, R.; Hingerl, F.; Benson, S. M.; Druhan, J. L.; Vandehey, N. T.; Van Hise, A. T.; O'Neil, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    The heterogeneity of geological formations varies over a wide range of length-scales and represents a major challenge for predicting the movement of fluids in the subsurface. Millimeters to cm-scale features that are commonly observed in sedimentary rocks have been shown to greatly influence fluid transport over much larger observational scales. From a practical perspective, these features give rise to capillary phenomena that affect process-relevant parameters, such as sweep or trapping efficiencies. Measurements on core samples represent a major input for field-scale flow models and the latter adopt multistage up-scaling approaches to link the core-scale to the size of a grid-block. The lack of access to information about rock property heterogeneity at the sub-core scale has restricted the ability to fully take advantage of these methods; in fact, properties derived from the latter are inherently 'effective', their spatial resolution being limited to a minimum of several centimeters by the measurement or sampling technique. However, making accurate predictions of multiphase flows and dispersion coefficients for single phase flow requires making measurements at the full range of relevant spatial scales, thus referring to the internal structure of the sample and the small-scale features described above. Essential components in this description include continuum properties that are related to the rock (porosity and permeability), to the fluids (saturation) and to both of them (capillary pressure-saturation relationship); the ability to create a link among all these properties is key to a physically-sound description of these naturally complex systems. One way to accomplish this is by adopting an integrated approach that combines displacement experiments in naturally heterogeneous core-samples with the simultaneous imaging of flow as well as with the support of detailed numerical simulations. In this paper, nuclear emission tomography is applied to visualize fluid

  9. Dynamic Imaging of Fluid Flow in Sandstones by Nuclear Emission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pini, Ronny; Benson, Sally; Druhan, Jenny; Hingerl, Ferdinand; O'Neil, James P.; Vandehey, Nicholas T.

    2014-05-01

    The heterogeneity of geological formations varies over a wide range of length-scales and represents a major challenge for predicting the movement of fluids in the subsurface. Millimeters to cm-scale features that are commonly observed in sedimentary rocks have been shown to greatly influence fluid transport over much larger observational scales. From a practical perspective, these features give rise to capillary phenomena that affect process-relevant parameters, such as sweep or trapping efficiencies. Measurements on core samples represent a major input for field-scale flow models and the latter adopt multistage up-scaling approaches to link the core-scale to the size of a grid-block. The lack of access to information about rock property heterogeneity at the sub-core scale has restricted the ability to fully take advantage of these methods; in fact, properties derived from the latter are inherently "effective", their spatial resolution being limited to a minimum of several centimeters by the measurement or sampling technique. However, making accurate predictions of multiphase flows and dispersion coefficients for single phase flow requires making measurements at the full range of relevant spatial scales, thus referring to the internal structure of the sample and the small-scale features described above. Essential components in this description include continuum properties that are related to the rock (porosity and permeability), to the fluids (saturation) and to both of them (capillary pressure-saturation relationship); the ability to create a link among all these properties is key to a physically-sound description of these naturally complex systems. One way to accomplish this is by adopting an integrated approach that combines displacement experiments in naturally heterogeneous core-samples with the simultaneous imaging of flow as well as with the support of detailed numerical simulations. In this paper, nuclear emission tomography is applied to visualize fluid

  10. Instrumentation in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-11

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a three-dimensional medical imaging technique that noninvasively measures the concentration of radiopharmaceuticals in the body that are labeled with positron emitters. With the proper compounds, PET can be used to measure metabolism, blood flow, or other physiological values in vivo. The technique is based on the physics of positron annihilation and detection and the mathematical formulations developed for x-ray computed tomography. Modern PET systems can provide three-dimensional images of the brain, the heart, and other internal organs with resolutions on the order of 4 to 6 mm. With the selectivity provided by a choice of injected compounds, PET has the power to provide unique diagnostic information that is not available with any other imaging modality. This is the first five reports on the nature and uses of PET that have been prepared for the American Medical Association's Council on Scientific Affairs by an authoritative panel.

  11. Single-photon emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Goffin, Karolien; van Laere, Koen

    2016-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a functional nuclear imaging technique that allows visualization and quantification of different in vivo physiologic and pathologic features of brain neurobiology. It has been used for many years in diagnosis of several neurologic and psychiatric disorders. In this chapter, we discuss the current state-of-the-art of SPECT imaging of brain perfusion and dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging. Brain perfusion SPECT imaging plays an important role in the localization of the seizure onset zone in patients with refractory epilepsy. In cerebrovascular disease, it can be useful in determining the cerebrovascular reserve. After traumatic brain injury, SPECT has shown perfusion abnormalities despite normal morphology. In the context of organ donation, the diagnosis of brain death can be made with high accuracy. In neurodegeneration, while amyloid or (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) are the nuclear diagnostic tools of preference for early and differential diagnosis of dementia, perfusion SPECT imaging can be useful, albeit with slightly lower accuracy. SPECT imaging of the dopamine transporter system is widely available in Europe and Asia, but since recently also in the USA, and has been accepted as an important diagnostic tool in the early and differential diagnosis of parkinsonism in patients with unclear clinical features. The combination of perfusion SPECT (or FDG-PET) and DAT imaging provides differential diagnosis between idiopathic Parkinson's disease, Parkinson-plus syndromes, dementia with Lewy bodies, and essential tremor. PMID:27432669

  12. Repeated Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography and Perfusion-Computed Tomography Imaging in Rectal Cancer: Fluorodeoxyglucose Uptake Corresponds With Tumor Perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, Marco H.M.; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.; Buijsen, Jeroen; Lambin, Philippe; Lammering, Guido; Oellers, Michel C.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze both the intratumoral fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake and perfusion within rectal tumors before and after hypofractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Rectal cancer patients, referred for preoperative hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT), underwent FDG-positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) and perfusion-CT (pCT) imaging before the start of hypofractionated RT and at the day of the last RT fraction. The pCT-images were analyzed using the extended Kety model, quantifying tumor perfusion with the pharmacokinetic parameters K{sup trans}, v{sub e}, and v{sub p}. The mean and maximum FDG uptake based on the standardized uptake value (SUV) and transfer constant (K{sup trans}) within the tumor were correlated. Also, the tumor was subdivided into eight subregions and for each subregion the mean and maximum SUVs and K{sup trans} values were assessed and correlated. Furthermore, the mean FDG uptake in voxels presenting with the lowest 25% of perfusion was compared with the FDG uptake in the voxels with the 25% highest perfusion. Results: The mean and maximum K{sup trans} values were positively correlated with the corresponding SUVs ({rho} = 0.596, p = 0.001 and {rho} = 0.779, p < 0.001). Also, positive correlations were found for K{sup trans} values and SUVs within the subregions (mean, {rho} = 0.413, p < 0.001; and max, {rho} = 0.540, p < 0.001). The mean FDG uptake in the 25% highest-perfused tumor regions was significantly higher compared with the 25% lowest-perfused regions (10.6% {+-} 5.1%, p = 0.017). During hypofractionated radiotherapy, stable mean (p = 0.379) and maximum (p = 0.280) FDG uptake levels were found, whereas the mean (p = 0.040) and maximum (p = 0.003) K{sup trans} values were found to significantly increase. Conclusion: Highly perfused rectal tumors presented with higher FDG-uptake levels compared with relatively low perfused tumors. Also, intratumor regions with a high FDG

  13. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Townsend, David W

    2008-05-01

    Accurate anatomical localization of functional abnormalities obtained with the use of positron emission tomography (PET) is known to be problematic. Although tracers such as (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) visualize certain normal anatomical structures, the spatial resolution is generally inadequate for accurate anatomic localization of pathology. Combining PET with a high-resolution anatomical imaging modality such as computed tomography (CT) can resolve the localization issue as long as the images from the two modalities are accurately coregistered. However, software-based registration techniques have difficulty accounting for differences in patient positioning and involuntary movement of internal organs, often necessitating labor-intensive nonlinear mapping that may not converge to a satisfactory result. Acquiring both CT and PET images in the same scanner obviates the need for software registration and routinely provides accurately aligned images of anatomy and function in a single scan. A CT scanner positioned in line with a PET scanner and with a common patient couch and operating console has provided a practical solution to anatomical and functional image registration. Axial translation of the couch between the 2 modalities enables both CT and PET data to be acquired during a single imaging session. In addition, the CT images can be used to generate essentially noiseless attenuation correction factors for the PET emission data. By minimizing patient movement between the CT and PET scans and accounting for the axial separation of the two modalities, accurately registered anatomical and functional images can be obtained. Since the introduction of the first PET/CT prototype more than 6 years ago, numerous patients with cancer have been scanned on commercial PET/CT devices worldwide. The commercial designs feature multidetector spiral CT and high-performance PET components. Experience has demonstrated an increased level of accuracy and confidence in the

  14. The role of positron emission tomography-computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosis and follow up of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Caers, Jo; Withofs, Nadia; Hillengass, Jens; Simoni, Paolo; Zamagni, Elena; Hustinx, Roland; Beguin, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is the second most common hematologic malignancy and occurs most commonly in elderly patients. Almost all multiple myeloma patients develop bone lesions in the course of their disease or have evidence of bone loss at initial diagnosis. Whole-body conventional radiography remains the gold standard in the diagnostic evaluation, but computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography are increasingly used as complementary techniques in the detection of bone lesions. Moreover, the number of lesions detected and the presence of extramedullary disease give strong prognostic information. These new techniques may help to assess treatment response in solitary plasmacytoma or in multiple myeloma. In this article, we review recent data on the different imaging techniques used at diagnosis and in the assessment of treatment response, and discuss some current issues. PMID:24688111

  15. Tracking neuroinflammation in Alzheimer’s disease: the role of positron emission tomography imaging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has been reconceptualized as a dynamic pathophysiological process, where the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) is thought to trigger a cascade of neurodegenerative events resulting in cognitive impairment and, eventually, dementia. In addition to Aβ pathology, various lines of research have implicated neuroinflammation as an important participant in AD pathophysiology. Currently, neuroinflammation can be measured in vivo using positron emission tomography (PET) with ligands targeting diverse biological processes such as microglial activation, reactive astrocytes and phospholipase A2 activity. In terms of therapeutic strategies, despite a strong rationale and epidemiological studies suggesting that the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the prevalence of AD, clinical trials conducted to date have proven inconclusive. In this respect, it has been hypothesized that NSAIDs may only prove protective if administered early on in the disease course, prior to the accumulation of significant AD pathology. In order to test various hypotheses pertaining to the exact role of neuroinflammation in AD, studies in asymptomatic carriers of mutations deterministic for early-onset familial AD may prove of use. In this respect, PET ligands for neuroinflammation may act as surrogate markers of disease progression, allowing for the development of more integrative models of AD, as well as for the measuring of target engagement in the context of clinical trials using NSAIDs. In this review, we address the biological basis of neuroinflammatory changes in AD, underscore therapeutic strategies using anti-inflammatory compounds, and shed light on the possibility of tracking neuroinflammation in vivo using PET imaging ligands. PMID:25005532

  16. Radiolabeling, whole-body single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography imaging, and pharmacokinetics of carbon nanohorns in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Minfang; Jasim, Dhifaf A; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Nunes, Antonio; Iijima, Sumio; Bianco, Alberto; Yudasaka, Masako; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report that the biodistribution and excretion of carbon nanohorns (CNHs) in mice are dependent on their size and functionalization. Small-sized CNHs (30–50 nm; S-CNHs) and large-sized CNHs (80–100 nm; L-CNHs) were chemically functionalized and radiolabeled with [111In]-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and intravenously injected into mice. Their tissue distribution profiles at different time points were determined by single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography. The results showed that the S-CNHs circulated longer in blood, while the L-CNHs accumulated faster in major organs like the liver and spleen. Small amounts of S-CNHs- and L-CNHs were excreted in urine within the first few hours postinjection, followed by excretion of smaller quantities within the next 48 hours in both urine and feces. The kinetics of excretion for S-CNHs were more rapid than for L-CNHs. Both S-CNH and L-CNH material accumulated mainly in the liver and spleen; however, S-CNH accumulation in the spleen was more prominent than in the liver. PMID:27524892

  17. Emission tomography of the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Teates, C.D.; Croft, B.Y.; Brenbridge, N.A.; Bray, S.T.; Williamson, B.R.

    1983-12-01

    Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) was done on two patients with suspected renal masses. Nuclear scintigraphy was equivocal on two tumors readily identified by SPECT. Single photon tomography is cost effective and increases the reliability of nuclear scintigraphy.

  18. Evaluation of single-photon emission computed tomography images obtained with and without copper filter by segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Kheruka, Subhash Chand; Aggarwal, Lalit Mohan; Sharma, Neeraj; Naithani, Umesh Chand; Maurya, Anil Kumar; Gambhir, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Measurement of accurate attenuation of photon flux in tissue is important to obtain reconstructed images using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Computed tomography (CT) scanner provides attenuation correction data for SPECT as well as anatomic information for diagnostic purposes. Segmentation is a process of dividing an image into regions having similar properties such as gray level, color, texture, brightness, and contrast. Image segmentation is an important tool for evaluation of medical images. X-ray beam used in CT scan is poly-energetic; therefore, we have used a copper filter to remove the low energy X-rays for obtaining correct attenuation factor. Images obtained with and without filters were quantitatively evaluated by segmentation method to avoid human error. Materials and Methods: Axial images of AAPM CT phantom were acquired with 3 mm copper filter (low intensity) and without copper filter (high intensity) using low-dose CT (140 kvp and 2.5 mA) of SPECT/CT system (Hawkeye, GE Healthcare). For segmentation Simulated Annealing Based Fuzzy c-means, algorithm is applied. Quantitative measurement of quality is done based on universal image quality index. Further, for the validation of attenuation correction map of filtered CT images, Jaszczak SPECT phantom was filled with 500 MBq of 99mTc and SPECT study was acquired. Low dose CT images were acquired for attenuation correction to be used for reconstruction of SPECT images. Another set of CT images were acquired after applying additional 3 mm copper filter. Two sets of axial SPECT images were reconstructed using attenuation map from both the CT images obtained without and with a filter. Results and Conclusions: When we applied Simulated Annealing Based Fuzzy c-means segmentation on both the CT images, the CT images with filter shows remarkable improvement and all the six section of the spheres in the Jaszczak SPECT phantom were clearly visualized. PMID:27095859

  19. The relationship between cerebrospinal fluid markers of Alzheimer pathology and positron emission tomography tau imaging.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Brian A; Friedrichsen, Karl; Brier, Matthew; Blazey, Tyler; Su, Yi; Christensen, Jon; Aldea, Patricia; McConathy, Jonathan; Holtzman, David M; Cairns, Nigel J; Morris, John C; Fagan, Anne M; Ances, Beau M; Benzinger, Tammie L S

    2016-08-01

    The two primary molecular pathologies in Alzheimer's disease are amyloid-β plaques and tau-immunoreactive neurofibrillary tangles. Investigations into these pathologies have been restricted to cerebrospinal fluid assays, and positron emission tomography tracers that can image amyloid-β plaques. Tau tracers have recently been introduced into the field, although the utility of the tracer and its relationship to other Alzheimer biomarkers are still unknown. Here we examined tau deposition in 41 cognitively normal and 11 cognitively impaired older adults using the radioactive tau ligand (18)F-AV-1451 (previously known as T807) who also underwent a lumbar puncture to assess cerebrospinal fluid levels of total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau181 (p-tau181) and amyloid-β42 Voxel-wise statistical analyses examined spatial patterns of tau deposition associated with cognitive impairment. We then related the amount of tau tracer uptake to levels of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. All analyses controlled for age and gender and, when appropriate, the time between imaging and lumbar puncture assessments. Symptomatic individuals (Clinical Dementia Rating > 0) demonstrated markedly increased levels of tau tracer uptake. This elevation was most prominent in the temporal lobe and temporoparietal junction, but extended more broadly into parietal and frontal cortices. In the entire cohort, there were significant relationships among all cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and tracer uptake, notably for tau-related cerebrospinal fluid markers. After controlling for levels of amyloid-β42, the correlations with tau uptake were r = 0.490 (P < 0.001) for t-tau and r = 0.492 (P < 0.001) for p-tau181 Within the cognitively normal cohort, levels of amyloid-β42, but not t-tau or p-tau181, were associated with elevated tracer binding that was confined primarily to the medial temporal lobe and adjacent neocortical regions. AV-1451 tau binding in the medial temporal, parietal, and frontal cortices

  20. Synthesis of heterodimer radionuclide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance and single-photon emission computed tomography dual-modality imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Bin; Tian, Jian; Wang, Jiaqing; Chong, Yu; Wang, Xin; Deng, Yaoyao; Tang, Minghua; Li, Yonggang; Ge, Cuicui; Pan, Yue; Gu, Hongwei

    2015-02-01

    We report a facile synthesis of bifunctional Fe3O4-Ag125I heterodimers for use as dual-modality imaging agents in magnetic resonance (MR) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). We introduced 125I, which is a clinically used radioisotope, as a SPECT reporter, into Fe3O4-Ag heterodimer nanoparticles to provide a new type of bifunctional contrast agent for MRI and SPECT imaging.We report a facile synthesis of bifunctional Fe3O4-Ag125I heterodimers for use as dual-modality imaging agents in magnetic resonance (MR) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). We introduced 125I, which is a clinically used radioisotope, as a SPECT reporter, into Fe3O4-Ag heterodimer nanoparticles to provide a new type of bifunctional contrast agent for MRI and SPECT imaging. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of general experimental procedures, TEM image. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07255c

  1. Improving the quantitative accuracy of optical-emission computed tomography by incorporating an attenuation correction: application to HIF1 imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E.; Bowsher, J.; Thomas, A. S.; Sakhalkar, H.; Dewhirst, M.; Oldham, M.

    2008-10-01

    Optical computed tomography (optical-CT) and optical-emission computed tomography (optical-ECT) are new techniques for imaging the 3D structure and function (including gene expression) of whole unsectioned tissue samples. This work presents a method of improving the quantitative accuracy of optical-ECT by correcting for the 'self'-attenuation of photons emitted within the sample. The correction is analogous to a method commonly applied in single-photon-emission computed tomography reconstruction. The performance of the correction method was investigated by application to a transparent cylindrical gelatin phantom, containing a known distribution of attenuation (a central ink-doped gelatine core) and a known distribution of fluorescing fibres. Attenuation corrected and uncorrected optical-ECT images were reconstructed on the phantom to enable an evaluation of the effectiveness of the correction. Significant attenuation artefacts were observed in the uncorrected images where the central fibre appeared ~24% less intense due to greater attenuation from the surrounding ink-doped gelatin. This artefact was almost completely removed in the attenuation-corrected image, where the central fibre was within ~4% of the others. The successful phantom test enabled application of attenuation correction to optical-ECT images of an unsectioned human breast xenograft tumour grown subcutaneously on the hind leg of a nude mouse. This tumour cell line had been genetically labelled (pre-implantation) with fluorescent reporter genes such that all viable tumour cells expressed constitutive red fluorescent protein and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 transcription-produced green fluorescent protein. In addition to the fluorescent reporter labelling of gene expression, the tumour microvasculature was labelled by a light-absorbing vasculature contrast agent delivered in vivo by tail-vein injection. Optical-CT transmission images yielded high-resolution 3D images of the absorbing contrast agent, and

  2. Imaging and modeling of flow in porous media using clinical nuclear emission tomography systems and computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutchko, Rostyslav; Rayz, Vitaliy L.; Vandehey, Nicholas T.; O'Neil, James P.; Budinger, Thomas F.; Nico, Peter S.; Druhan, Jennifer L.; Saloner, David A.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Moses, William W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents experimental and modeling aspects of applying nuclear emission tomography to study fluid flow in laboratory packed porous media columns of the type frequently used in geophysics, geochemistry and hydrology research. Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are used as non-invasive tools to obtain dynamic 3D images of radioactive tracer concentrations. Dynamic sequences obtained using 18F-FDG PET are used to trace flow through a 5 cm diameter × 20 cm tall sand packed column with and without an impermeable obstacle. In addition, a custom-made rotating column setup placed in a clinical two-headed SPECT camera is used to image 99mTc-DTPA tracer propagation in a through-flowing column (10 cm diameter × 30 cm tall) packed with recovered aquifer sediments. A computational fluid dynamics software package FLUENT is used to model the observed flow dynamics. Tracer distributions obtained in the simulations in the smaller column uniformly packed with sand and in the column with an obstacle are remarkably similar to the reconstructed images in the PET experiments. SPECT results demonstrate strongly non-uniform flow patterns for the larger column slurry-packed with sub-surface sediment and slow upward flow. In the numerical simulation of the SPECT study, two symmetric channels with increased permeability are prescribed along the column walls, which result in the emergence of two well-defined preferential flow paths. Methods and results of this work provide new opportunities in hydrologic and biogeochemical research. The primary target application for developed technologies is non-destructive, non-perturbing, quantitative imaging of flow dynamics within laboratory scale porous media systems.

  3. Generalized local emission tomography

    DOEpatents

    Katsevich, Alexander J.

    1998-01-01

    Emission tomography enables locations and values of internal isotope density distributions to be determined from radiation emitted from the whole object. In the method for locating the values of discontinuities, the intensities of radiation emitted from either the whole object or a region of the object containing the discontinuities are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the isotope density discontinuity. The asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) is determined in a neighborhood of S, and the value for the discontinuity is estimated from the asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) knowing pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object. In the method for determining the location of the discontinuity, the intensities of radiation emitted from an object are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the density discontinuity and the location .GAMMA. of the attenuation coefficient discontinuity. Pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object need not be known in this case.

  4. Whole-body imaging of adoptively transferred T cells using magnetic resonance imaging, single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography techniques, with a focus on regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Leech, J M; Sharif-Paghaleh, E; Maher, J; Livieratos, L; Lechler, R I; Mullen, G E; Lombardi, G; Smyth, L A

    2013-01-01

    Cell-based therapies using natural or genetically modified regulatory T cells (Tregs) have shown significant promise as immune-based therapies. One of the main difficulties facing the further advancement of these therapies is that the fate and localization of adoptively transferred Tregs is largely unknown. The ability to dissect the migratory pathway of these cells in a non-invasive manner is of vital importance for the further development of in-vivo cell-based immunotherapies, as this technology allows the fate of the therapeutically administered cell to be imaged in real time. In this review we will provide an overview of the current clinical imaging techniques used to track T cells and Tregs in vivo, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In addition, we will discuss how the finding of these studies can be used, in the context of transplantation, to define the most appropriate Treg subset required for cellular therapy. PMID:23574314

  5. A novel three-dimensional image reconstruction method for near-field coded aperture single photon emission computerized tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Zhiping; Hong, Baoming; Li, Shimin; Liu, Yi-Hwa

    2009-01-01

    Coded aperture imaging for two-dimensional (2D) planar objects has been investigated extensively in the past, whereas little success has been achieved in imaging 3D objects using this technique. In this article, the authors present a novel method of 3D single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) reconstruction for near-field coded aperture imaging. Multiangular coded aperture projections are acquired and a stack of 2D images is reconstructed separately from each of the projections. Secondary projections are subsequently generated from the reconstructed image stacks based on the geometry of parallel-hole collimation and the variable magnification of near-field coded aperture imaging. Sinograms of cross-sectional slices of 3D objects are assembled from the secondary projections, and the ordered subset expectation and maximization algorithm is employed to reconstruct the cross-sectional image slices from the sinograms. Experiments were conducted using a customized capillary tube phantom and a micro hot rod phantom. Imaged at approximately 50 cm from the detector, hot rods in the phantom with diameters as small as 2.4 mm could be discerned in the reconstructed SPECT images. These results have demonstrated the feasibility of the authors’ 3D coded aperture image reconstruction algorithm for SPECT, representing an important step in their effort to develop a high sensitivity and high resolution SPECT imaging system. PMID:19544769

  6. Positron emission tomography and autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Mazziotta, J.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    This a text on cerebral and myocardial imaging using positron emission tomography and autoradiography. Authorities in nuclear medicine and biophysics define the central principles of these complex and rapidly evolving imagine technologies-their theoretical foundations, the nature of the biochemical events being measured, the basis for constructing tracer kinetic models, the criteria governing radiopharmaceutical design, and the rationale for PET in the clinical setting. After reviewing the characteristics of cerebral and myocardial hemodynamics, transport, and metabolism, the contributors detail the theory of PET and autoradiography, the instrumentation required, and the procedures involved.

  7. Head sinuses, melon, and jaws of bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus, observed with computed tomography structural and single photon emission computed tomography functional imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgway, Sam; Houser, Dorian; Finneran, James J.; Carder, Don; van Bonn, William; Smith, Cynthia; Hoh, Carl; Corbeil, Jacqueline; Mattrey, Robert

    2003-04-01

    The head sinuses, melon, and lower jaws of dolphins have been studied extensively with various methods including radiography, chemical analysis, and imaging of dead specimens. Here we report the first structural and functional imaging of live dolphins. Two animals were imaged, one male and one female. Computed tomography (CT) revealed extensive air cavities posterior and medial to the ear as well as between the ear and sound-producing nasal structures. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) employing 50 mCi of the intravenously injected ligand technetium [Tc-99m] biscisate (Neurolite) revealed extensive and uptake in the core of the melon as well as near the pan bone area of the lower jaw. Count density on SPECT images was four times greater in melon as in the surrounding tissue and blubber layer suggesting that the melon is an active rather than a passive tissue. Since the dolphin temporal bone is not attached to the skull except by fibrous suspensions, the air cavities medial and posterior to the ear as well as the abutment of the temporal bone, to the acoustic fat bodies of each lower jaw, should be considered in modeling the mechanism of sound transmission from the environment to the dolphin ear.

  8. Hodgkin lymphoma patients in first remission: routine positron emission tomography/computerized tomography imaging is not superior to clinical follow-up for patients with no residual mass.

    PubMed

    Dann, Eldad J; Berkahn, Leanne; Mashiach, Tatiana; Frumer, Michael; Agur, Ariel; McDiarmid, Bridgett; Bar-Shalom, Rachel; Paltiel, Ora; Goldschmidt, Neta

    2014-03-01

    There is no consensus regarding optimal follow-up mode for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients that achieve complete remission following chemotherapy or combined chemo- and radiation therapy. Several studies demonstrated high sensitivity of positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) in detecting disease progression; however, these techniques are currently not recommended for routine follow-up. This retrospective study conducted in two Israeli (N = 291) and one New Zealand academic centres (N = 77), compared a group of HL patients, followed-up with routine imaging every 6 months during the first 2 years after achieving remission, once in the third year, with additional dedicated studies performed due to symptoms or physical findings (Group I) to a group of patients without residual masses who underwent clinically-based surveillance with dedicated imaging upon relapse suspicion (Group II). Five-year overall survival (OS) was 94% and median time to relapse was 8·6 months for both modes. Relapse rates in Groups I and II were 13% and 9%, respectively. During the first 3 years of follow-up, 47·5 and 4·7 studies were performed per detected relapse in Groups I and II, respectively. The current study demonstrated no benefit in either progression-free survival (PFS) or OS in HL patients followed by routine imaging versus clinical follow-up. The cost was 10 times higher for routine imaging. PMID:24313286

  9. Single photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Piez, C.W. Jr.; Holman, B.L.

    1985-07-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is becoming an increasingly important part of routine clinical nuclear medicine. By providing tomographic reconstructions in multiple planes through the patient, SPECT expands the clinical applications in nuclear medicine as well as providing better contrast, edge definition and separation of target from background activities. Imaging techniques have been developed for the evaluation of regional cerebral blood flow using radiolabeled amines. Thus, cerebral functional imaging can be used in the diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction, cerebral vascular disease, dementia and epilepsy. SPECT plays a complementary role in the evaluation of coronary artery disease, particularly when it is coupled with thallium-201 and exercise testing. SPECT extends our diagnostic capabilities in additional areas, such as liver and bone scintigraphy as well as tumor imaging with gallium-67.

  10. Imaging Spectrum and Pitfalls of 11C-Methionine Positron Emission Tomography in a Series of Patients with Intracranial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Kubota, Kazoo

    2016-01-01

    11C-methionine (Met) positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the most commonly used PET tracers for evaluating brain tumors. However, few reports have described tips and pitfalls of 11C-Met PET for general practitioners. Physiological 11C-Met uptake, anatomical variations, vascular disorders, non-tumorous lesions such as inflammation or dysplasia, benign brain tumors and patient condition during 11C-Met PET examination can potentially affect the image interpretation and cause false positives and negatives. These pitfalls in the interpretation of 11C-Met PET images are important for not only nuclear medicine physicians but also general radiologists. Familiarity with the spectrum and pitfalls of 11C-Met images could help prevent unfavorable clinical results caused by misdiagnoses. PMID:27134530

  11. Imaging Spectrum and Pitfalls of (11)C-Methionine Positron Emission Tomography in a Series of Patients with Intracranial Lesions.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kimiteru; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Kubota, Kazoo

    2016-01-01

    (11)C-methionine (Met) positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the most commonly used PET tracers for evaluating brain tumors. However, few reports have described tips and pitfalls of (11)C-Met PET for general practitioners. Physiological (11)C-Met uptake, anatomical variations, vascular disorders, non-tumorous lesions such as inflammation or dysplasia, benign brain tumors and patient condition during (11)C-Met PET examination can potentially affect the image interpretation and cause false positives and negatives. These pitfalls in the interpretation of (11)C-Met PET images are important for not only nuclear medicine physicians but also general radiologists. Familiarity with the spectrum and pitfalls of (11)C-Met images could help prevent unfavorable clinical results caused by misdiagnoses. PMID:27134530

  12. Cardiac positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Geltman, E.M.

    1985-12-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a new technique for noninvasively assessing myocardial metabolism and perfusion. It has provided new insight into the dynamics of myocardial fatty acid and glucose metabolism in normal subjects, patients with ischemic heart disease and those with cardiomyopathies, documenting regionally depressed fatty acid metabolism during myocardial ischemia and infarction and spatial heterogeneity of fatty acid metabolism in patients with cardiomyopathy. Regional myocardial perfusion has been studied with PET using water, ammonia and rubidium labeled with positron emitters, permitting the noninvasive detection of hypoperfused zones at rest and during vasodilator stress. With these techniques the relationship between perfusion and the metabolism of a variety of substrates has been studied. The great strides that have been made in developing faster high-resolution instruments and producing new labeled intermediates indicate the promise of this technique for facilitating an increase in the understanding of regional metabolism and blood flow under normal and pathophysiologic conditions. 16 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Positron emission tomography imaging as a key enabling technology in drug development.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, T J

    2007-01-01

    The use of positron emission tomography (PET) in drug development has become more common in the pharmaceutical industry in recent years. One of the biggest challenges to gaining acceptance of this technology is for project teams to understand when to use PET. This chapter reviews the usage of PET in drug development in the context of target, mechanism and efficacy biomarkers. Examples are drawn from a number of therapeutic areas, but we also show that the relative penetration of this technology beyond CNS and oncology applications has been relatively small. However, with the increasing availability of PET and development of novel radiotracers it is expected that the utilization will be much broader in future years, with the additional expectation that the use of PET as an efficacy biomarker will also become more evident. PMID:17172162

  14. Treatment of advanced solid tumours with NSAIDs: Correlation of quantitative monitoring of circulating tumour cells and positron emission tomography-computed tomography imaging

    PubMed Central

    Willecke-Hochmuth, Regina; Pachmann, Katharina; Drevs, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The detection and characterisation of tumour-derived circulating epithelial tumor cells (CETCs) or circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been a main focus of basic oncological research over previous years. Numerous studies in the past decade have shown that CTCs are a promising tool for the estimation of the risk for metastatic relapse. The present observational study describes treatment results using tumour imaging and the quantification of CTCs. A group of 14 patients with advanced carcinomas was followed during their anticancer treatments. CTC numbers were serially detected and treatment success was estimated by positron emission tomography-computed tomography. A connection was found between tumour remission and a decreasing CTC count in 83%, a connection between stable disease and stable CTC numbers in 78% and a connection between progressive disease (PD) and an increase in CTC count in 50% of cases. In the patients with PD, an incomplete response was observed affecting the CTCs, but not the solid region of the tumour. As a result of this study, it may be concluded that patients with solid tumours benefit from serial quantification of CTCs in addition to imaging, as this combination of techniques provides a more sensitive result than imaging alone. PMID:27588120

  15. Description of a prototype emission-transmission computed tomography imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, T. F.; Hasegawa, B. H.; Liew, S. C.; Brown, J. K.; Blankespoor, S. C.; Reilly, S. M.; Gingold, E. L.; Cann, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a prototype imaging system that can perform simultaneous x-ray transmission CT and SPECT phantom studies. This system employs a 23-element high-purity-germanium detector array. The detector array is coupled to a collimator with septa angled toward the focal spot of an x-ray tube. During image acquisition, the x-ray fan beam and the detector array move synchronously along an arc pivoted at the x-ray source. Multiple projections are obtained by rotating the object, which is mounted at the center of rotation of the system. The detector array and electronics can count up to 10(6) cps/element with sufficient energy-resolution to discriminate between x-rays at 100-120 kVp and gamma rays from 99mTc. We have used this device to acquire x-ray CT and SPECT images of a three-dimensional Hoffman brain phantom. The emission and transmission images may be superimposed in order to localize the emission image on the transmission map.

  16. Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging of Residual Skull Base Chordoma Before Radiotherapy Using Fluoromisonidazole and Fluorodeoxyglucose: Potential Consequences for Dose Painting

    SciTech Connect

    Mammar, Hamid; Kerrou, Khaldoun; Nataf, Valerie; Pontvert, Dominique; Clemenceau, Stephane; Lot, Guillaume; George, Bernard; Polivka, Marc; Mokhtari, Karima; Ferrand, Regis; Feuvret, Loiec; Habrand, Jean-louis; Pouyssegur, Jacques; Mazure, Nathalie; Talbot, Jean-Noeel

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To detect the presence of hypoxic tissue, which is known to increase the radioresistant phenotype, by its uptake of fluoromisonidazole (18F) (FMISO) using hybrid positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging, and to compare it with the glucose-avid tumor tissue imaged with fluorodeoxyglucose (18F) (FDG), in residual postsurgical skull base chordoma scheduled for radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Seven patients with incompletely resected skull base chordomas were planned for high-dose radiotherapy (dose {>=}70 Gy). All 7 patients underwent FDG and FMISO PET/CT. Images were analyzed qualitatively by visual examination and semiquantitatively by computing the ratio of the maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of the tumor and cerebellum (T/C R), with delineation of lesions on conventional imaging. Results: Of the eight lesion sites imaged with FDG PET/CT, only one was visible, whereas seven of nine lesions were visible on FMISO PET/CT. The median SUVmax in the tumor area was 2.8 g/mL (minimum 2.1; maximum 3.5) for FDG and 0.83 g/mL (minimum 0.3; maximum 1.2) for FMISO. The T/C R values ranged between 0.30 and 0.63 for FDG (median, 0.41) and between 0.75 and 2.20 for FMISO (median,1.59). FMISO T/C R >1 in six lesions suggested the presence of hypoxic tissue. There was no correlation between FMISO and FDG uptake in individual chordomas (r = 0.18, p = 0.7). Conclusion: FMISO PET/CT enables imaging of the hypoxic component in residual chordomas. In the future, it could help to better define boosted volumes for irradiation and to overcome the radioresistance of these lesions. No relationship was founded between hypoxia and glucose metabolism in these tumors after initial surgery.

  17. Metabolism of [123I]epidepride may affect brain dopamine D2 receptor imaging with single-photon emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Bergström, K A; Yu, M; Kuikka, J T; Akerman, K K; Hiltunen, J; Lehtonen, J; Halldin, C; Tiihonen, J

    2000-02-01

    Iodine-123 labelled epidepride is a novel radiopharmaceutical for the study of cerebral dopamine D2 receptors using single-photon emission tomography (SPET). A lipophilic labelled metabolite of [123I]epidepride which may enter the brain and hamper the quantitation of receptors has been observed in human plasma. In the present study, gradient high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to investigate the plasma concentration of the lipophilic labelled metabolite and its correlation to SPET imaging of striatal dopamine D2 receptors. A linear regression fit showed a negative correlation between the amount of the lipophilic labelled metabolite and the striatum to cerebellum ratio (n=16, R=-0.58, P<0.02), suggesting that plasma metabolite analysis is essential when imaging dopamine D2 receptors with SPET using [123I]epidepride. PMID:10755727

  18. Positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance hybrid scanner imaging of cerebral blood flow using 15O-water positron emission tomography and arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging in newborn piglets

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Julie B; Henning, William S; Lindberg, Ulrich; Ladefoged, Claes N; Højgaard, Liselotte; Greisen, Gorm; Law, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Abnormality in cerebral blood flow (CBF) distribution can lead to hypoxic–ischemic cerebral damage in newborn infants. The aim of the study was to investigate minimally invasive approaches to measure CBF by comparing simultaneous 15O-water positron emission tomography (PET) and single TI pulsed arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MR) on a hybrid PET/MR in seven newborn piglets. Positron emission tomography was performed with IV injections of 20 MBq and 100 MBq 15O-water to confirm CBF reliability at low activity. Cerebral blood flow was quantified using a one-tissue-compartment-model using two input functions: an arterial input function (AIF) or an image-derived input function (IDIF). The mean global CBF (95% CI) PET-AIF, PET-IDIF, and ASL at baseline were 27 (23; 32), 34 (31; 37), and 27 (22; 32) mL/100 g per minute, respectively. At acetazolamide stimulus, PET-AIF, PET-IDIF, and ASL were 64 (55; 74), 76 (70; 83) and 79 (67; 92) mL/100 g per minute, respectively. At baseline, differences between PET-AIF, PET-IDIF, and ASL were 22% (P<0.0001) and −0.7% (P=0.9). At acetazolamide, differences between PET-AIF, PET-IDIF, and ASL were 19% (P=0.001) and 24% (P=0.0003). In conclusion, PET-IDIF overestimated CBF. Injected activity of 20 MBq 15O-water had acceptable concordance with 100 MBq, without compromising image quality. Single TI ASL was questionable for regional CBF measurements. Global ASL CBF and PET CBF were congruent during baseline but not during hyperperfusion. PMID:26058699

  19. Patient Study of In Vivo Verification of Beam Delivery and Range, Using Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography Imaging After Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Parodi, Katia . E-mail: Katia.Parodi@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Paganetti, Harald; Shih, Helen A.; Michaud, Susan; Loeffler, Jay S.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Liebsch, Norbert J.; Munzenrider, John E.; Fischman, Alan J.; Knopf, Antje; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and value of positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) for treatment verification after proton radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: This study included 9 patients with tumors in the cranial base, spine, orbit, and eye. Total doses of 1.8-3 GyE and 10 GyE (for an ocular melanoma) per fraction were delivered in 1 or 2 fields. Imaging was performed with a commercial PET/CT scanner for 30 min, starting within 20 min after treatment. The same treatment immobilization device was used during imaging for all but 2 patients. Measured PET/CT images were coregistered to the planning CT and compared with the corresponding PET expectation, obtained from CT-based Monte Carlo calculations complemented by functional information. For the ocular case, treatment position was approximately replicated, and spatial correlation was deduced from reference clips visible in both the planning radiographs and imaging CT. Here, the expected PET image was obtained from an analytical model. Results: Good spatial correlation and quantitative agreement within 30% were found between the measured and expected activity. For head-and-neck patients, the beam range could be verified with an accuracy of 1-2 mm in well-coregistered bony structures. Low spine and eye sites indicated the need for better fixation and coregistration methods. An analysis of activity decay revealed as tissue-effective half-lives of 800-1,150 s. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of postradiation PET/CT for in vivo treatment verification. It also indicates some technological and methodological improvements needed for optimal clinical application.

  20. Safety and biodistribution of 111In-amatuximab in patients with mesothelin expressing cancers using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography-Computed Tomography (SPECT-CT) imaging

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Stephen; Mena, Esther; Kurdziel, Karen; Maltzman, Julia; Wallin, Bruce; Hoffman, Kimberly; Pastan, Ira; Paik, Chang Hum; Choyke, Peter; Hassan, Raffit

    2015-01-01

    Amatuximab is a chimeric high-affinity monoclonal IgG1/k antibody targeting mesothelin that is being developed for treatment of mesothelin-expressing cancers. Considering the ongoing clinical development of amatuximab in these cancers, our objective was to characterize the biodistribution, and dosimetry of 111Indium (111In) radiolabelled amatuximab in mesothelin-expressing cancers. Between October 2011 and February 2013, six patients including four with malignant mesothelioma and two with pancreatic adenocarcinoma underwent Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography-Computed Tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging following administration of 111In amatuximab. SPECT/CT images were obtained at 2–4 hours, 24–48 hours and 96–168 hours after radiotracer injection. In all patients, tumor to background ratios (TBR) consistently met or exceeded an uptake of 1.2 (range 1.2–62.0) which is considered the minimum TBR that can be visualized. TBRs were higher in tumors of patients with mesothelioma than pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 111In-amatuximab uptake was noted in both primary tumors and metastatic sites. The radiotracer dose was generally well-tolerated and demonstrated physiologic uptake in the heart, liver, kidneys and spleen. This is the first study to show tumor localization of an anti-mesothelin antibody in humans. Our results show that 111In-amatuximab was well tolerated with a favorable dosimetry profile. It localizes to mesothelin expressing cancers with a higher uptake in mesothelioma than pancreatic cancer. PMID:25756664

  1. Disease-specific cardiovascular positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging: a brief review of the current literature

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) is a new imaging tool that has garnered immense research interest for its potentials to assist clinical investigations. PET/MR combines the quantitative measurement of PET with dynamic functional and anatomic assessment of MR and can deliver a robust clinical examination. Currently, simultaneous cardiovascular PET/MR imaging remains in the pre-clinical research stage, and most institutions have not adopted a clinical PET/MR clinical imaging service. Nevertheless, PET/MR examination has unique promises in several areas of cardiovascular medicine, and in recent years more and more research publications have become available to lend us insight into its utility in cardiovascular imaging. Here we review the existing literature on simultaneous cardiovascular PET/MR imaging, with an emphasis on organizing the current literature into disease-specific discussions. These areas include coronary artery disease (CAD), carotid atherosclerosis, various infiltrative, inflammatory and hereditary heart diseases, myocarditis, vasculitis, and cardiac mass assessment. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the current understanding of cardiovascular PET/MR clinical imaging, in a disease-specific manner, from a clinician’s perspective. Potential limitations of simultaneous PET/MR, such as cost effectiveness, artifacts, contraindications, and radiation exposure, are briefly discussed. PMID:27429913

  2. Iterative three-dimensional expectation maximization restoration of single photon emission computed tomography images: Application in striatal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gantet, Pierre; Payoux, Pierre; Celler, Anna; Majorel, Cynthia; Gourion, Daniel; Noll, Dominikus; Esquerre, Jean-Paul

    2006-01-15

    Single photon emission computed tomography imaging suffers from poor spatial resolution and high statistical noise. Consequently, the contrast of small structures is reduced, the visual detection of defects is limited and precise quantification is difficult. To improve the contrast, it is possible to include the spatially variant point spread function of the detection system into the iterative reconstruction algorithm. This kind of method is well known to be effective, but time consuming. We have developed a faster method to account for the spatial resolution loss in three dimensions, based on a postreconstruction restoration method. The method uses two steps. First, a noncorrected iterative ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction is performed and, in the second step, a three-dimensional (3D) iterative maximum likelihood expectation maximization (ML-EM) a posteriori spatial restoration of the reconstructed volume is done. In this paper, we compare to the standard OSEM-3D method, in three studies (two in simulation and one from experimental data). In the two first studies, contrast, noise, and visual detection of defects are studied. In the third study, a quantitative analysis is performed from data obtained with an anthropomorphic striatal phantom filled with 123-I. From the simulations, we demonstrate that contrast as a function of noise and lesion detectability are very similar for both OSEM-3D and OSEM-R methods. In the experimental study, we obtained very similar values of activity-quantification ratios for different regions in the brain. The advantage of OSEM-R compared to OSEM-3D is a substantial gain of processing time. This gain depends on several factors. In a typical situation, for a 128x128 acquisition of 120 projections, OSEM-R is 13 or 25 times faster than OSEM-3D, depending on the calculation method used in the iterative restoration. In this paper, the OSEM-R method is tested with the approximation of depth independent

  3. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Tumor Cell Metabolism and Application to Therapy Response Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Challapalli, Amarnath; Aboagye, Eric O.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells do reprogram their energy metabolism to enable several functions, such as generation of biomass including membrane biosynthesis, and overcoming bioenergetic and redox stress. In this article, we review both established and evolving radioprobes developed in association with positron emission tomography (PET) to detect tumor cell metabolism and effect of treatment. Measurement of enhanced tumor cell glycolysis using 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose is well established in the clinic. Analogs of choline, including [11C]choline and various fluorinated derivatives are being tested in several cancer types clinically with PET. In addition to these, there is an evolving array of metabolic tracers for measuring intracellular transport of glutamine and other amino acids or for measuring glycogenesis, as well as probes used as surrogates for fatty acid synthesis or precursors for fatty acid oxidation. In addition to providing us with opportunities for examining the complex regulation of reprogramed energy metabolism in living subjects, the PET methods open up opportunities for monitoring pharmacological activity of new therapies that directly or indirectly inhibit tumor cell metabolism. PMID:26973812

  4. Regional brain hematocrit in stroke by single photon emission computed tomography imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Loutfi, I.; Frackowiak, R.S.; Myers, M.J.; Lavender, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    Nineteen studies on 18 subjects were performed by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the head after the successive intravenous administration of a plasma label (/sup 99m/Tc-human serum albumin (HSA)) and /sup 99m/Tc-labeled autologous red blood cells (RBC). Two sets of cerebral tomographic sections were generated: for cerebral /sup 99m/Tc-HSA alone and for combined /sup 99m/Tc-HSA and /sup 99m/Tc-RBC. By relating counts in regions of interest from the cerebral tomograms to counts from blood samples obtained during each tomographic acquisition, regional cerebral haematocrit (Hct) was calculated by the application of a simple formula. Results show 1) lower cerebral Hct than venous Hct (ratio of HCT brain/Hct venous 0.65-0.90) in all subjects, and 2) comparison between right and left hemisphere Hct in 3/3 normal subjects, 6/6 patients with transient ischaemic attacks and 3/8 patients with stroke showed no significant difference. However, in 3/8 patients with stroke (most recent strokes) significant differences were found, the higher Hct value corresponding to the affected side.

  5. A New Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Radioligand for Imaging Sigma-1 Receptors in Living Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Zavaleta, Cristina L.; Nielsen, Carsten H.; Mesangeau, Christophe; Vuppala, Pradeep K.; Chan, Carmel; Avery, Bonnie A.; Fishback, James A.; Matsumoto, Rae R.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; McCurdy, Christopher R.; Chin, Frederick T.

    2014-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (S1R) radioligands have the potential to detect and monitor various neurological diseases. Herein we report the synthesis, radiofluorination and evaluation of a new S1R ligand 6-(3-fluoropropyl)-3-(2-(azepan-1-yl)ethyl)benzo[d]thiazol-2(3H)-one ([18F]FTC-146, [18F]13). [18F]13 was synthesized by nucleophilic fluorination, affording a product with >99% radiochemical purity (RCP) and specific activity (SA) of 2.6 ± 1.2 Ci/Amol (n = 13) at end of synthesis (EOS). Positron emission tomography (PET) and ex vivo autoradiography studies of [18F]13 in mice showed high uptake of the radioligand in S1R rich regions of the brain. Pre treatment with 1 mg/kg haloperidol (2), non radioactive 13, or BD1047 (18) reduced the binding of [18F]13 in the brain at 60 min by 80%, 82% and 81% respectively, suggesting that [18F]13 accumulation in mouse brain represents specific binding to S1Rs. These results indicate that [18F]13 is a promising candidate radiotracer for further evaluation as a tool for studying S1Rs in living subjects. PMID:22853801

  6. Validation of 3'-deoxy-3'-fluorine-18-fluorothymidine positron emission tomography for image-guidance in biologically adaptive radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axente, Marian

    Accelerated tumor cell repopulation during radiation therapy is one of the leading causes for low survival rates of head-and-neck cancer patients. The therapeutic effectiveness of radiotherapy could be improved by selectively targeting proliferating tumor subvolumes with higher doses of radiation. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 3'-deoxy-3 '-18F-fluorothymidine (FLT) has shown great potential as a non-invasive approach to characterizing the proliferation status of tumors. This thesis focuses on histopathological validation of FLT PET imaging specifically for image-guidance applications in biologically adaptive radiotherapy. The lack of experimental data supporting the use of FLT PET imaging for radiotherapy guidance is addressed by developing a novel methodology for histopathological validation of PET imaging. Using this new approach, the spatial concordance between the intratumoral pattern of FLT uptake and the spatial distribution of cell proliferation is demonstrated in animal tumors. First, a two-dimensional analysis is conducted comparing the microscopic FLT uptake as imaged with autoradiography and the distribution of active cell proliferation markers imaged with immunofluorescent microscopy. It was observed that when tumors present a pattern of cell proliferation that is highly dispersed throughout the tumor, even high-resolution imaging modalities such as autoradiography could not accurately determine the extent and spatial distribution of proliferative tumor subvolumes. While microscopic spatial coincidence between high FLT uptake regions and actively proliferative subvolumes was demonstrated in tumors with highly compartmentalized/aggregated features of cell proliferation, there were no conclusive results across the entire set of utilized tumor specimens. This emphasized the need for addressing the limited resolution of FLT PET when imaging microscopic patterns of cell proliferation. This issue was emphasized in the second part of the

  7. Sodium-22-radiolabeled silica nanoparticles as new radiotracer for biomedical applications: in vivo positron emission tomography imaging, biodistribution, and biocompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Al Faraj, Achraf; Alotaibi, Basem; Shaik, Abjal Pasha; Shamma, Khaled Z; Al Jammaz, Ibrahim; Gerl, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Despite their advantageous chemical properties for nuclear imaging, radioactive sodium-22 (22Na) tracers have been excluded for biomedical applications because of their extremely long lifetime. In the current study, we proposed, for the first time, the use of 22Na radiotracers for pre-clinical applications by efficiently loading with silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) and thus offering a new life for this radiotracer. Crown-ether-conjugated SiNPs (300 nm; −0.18±0.1 mV) were successfully loaded with 22Na with a loading efficacy of 98.1%±1.4%. Noninvasive positron emission tomography imaging revealed a transient accumulation of 22Na-loaded SiNPs in the liver and to a lower extent in the spleen, kidneys, and lung. However, the signal gradually decreased in a time-dependent manner to become not detectable starting from 2 weeks postinjection. These observations were confirmed ex vivo by quantifying 22Na radioactivity using γ-counter and silicon content using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry in the blood and the different organs of interest. Quantification of Si content in the urine and feces revealed that SiNPs accumulated in the organs were cleared from the body within a period of 2 weeks and completely in 1 month. Biocompatibility evaluations performed during the 1-month follow-up study to assess the possibility of synthesized nanocarriers to induce oxidative stress or DNA damage confirmed their safety for pre-clinical applications. 22Na-loaded nanocarriers can thus provide an innovative diagnostic agent allowing ultra-sensitive positron emission tomography imaging. On the other hand, with its long lifetime, onsite generators or cyclotrons will not be required as 22Na can be easily stored in the nuclear medicine department and be used on-demand. PMID:26504381

  8. A rare cause of tube arcing artifact seen in computed tomography image of a positron emission tomography/computed tomography scanner

    PubMed Central

    Mithun, Sneha; Jha, Ashish Kumar; Panchal, Ketan; Purandare, Nilendu C; Shah, Sneha; Agrawal, Archi; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Tube arcing artifact is known to be caused by a temporary short circuit in the X-ray tube causing momentary loss of X-ray output. It is seen as near-parallel and an equidistant streak pattern on transaxial computed tomography (CT) images and as a “horizontal” hypodense band on the coronal and sagittal CT images. This artifact can be a random occurrence and was caused in this particular case due to voltage fluctuations in the high-voltage supply transformer supplying the rotor of the anode in the X-ray tube. This problem was initially corrected by reducing the tube voltage to 120 kV from the original 140 kV and, subsequently, replacing the faulty transformer. This kind of artifact, which is a very rare situation, can affect the image quality, and could also be an early sign of equipment failure. To the authors’ knowledge, such an artifact has not been reported till date in a clinical scenario. Hence, we would like to report a rare situation of tube arcing artifact along with a unique remedy. PMID:27081241

  9. A rare cause of tube arcing artifact seen in computed tomography image of a positron emission tomography/computed tomography scanner.

    PubMed

    Mithun, Sneha; Jha, Ashish Kumar; Panchal, Ketan; Purandare, Nilendu C; Shah, Sneha; Agrawal, Archi; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Tube arcing artifact is known to be caused by a temporary short circuit in the X-ray tube causing momentary loss of X-ray output. It is seen as near-parallel and an equidistant streak pattern on transaxial computed tomography (CT) images and as a "horizontal" hypodense band on the coronal and sagittal CT images. This artifact can be a random occurrence and was caused in this particular case due to voltage fluctuations in the high-voltage supply transformer supplying the rotor of the anode in the X-ray tube. This problem was initially corrected by reducing the tube voltage to 120 kV from the original 140 kV and, subsequently, replacing the faulty transformer. This kind of artifact, which is a very rare situation, can affect the image quality, and could also be an early sign of equipment failure. To the authors' knowledge, such an artifact has not been reported till date in a clinical scenario. Hence, we would like to report a rare situation of tube arcing artifact along with a unique remedy. PMID:27081241

  10. Tumor-Specific Targeting With Modified Sindbis Viral Vectors: Evaluation with Optical Imaging and Positron Emission Tomography In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Stelter, Lars; Tseng, Jen-Chieh; Torosjan, Armen; Levin, Brandi; Longo, Valerie A.; Pillarsetty, Nagavarakishore; Zanzonico, Pat; Meruelo, Daniel; Daniel, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Sindbis virus (SINV) infect tumor cells specifically and systemically throughout the body. Sindbis vectors are capable of expressing high levels of transduced suicide genes and thus efficiently produce enzymes for prodrug conversion in infected tumor cells. The ability to monitor suicide gene expression levels and viral load in patients, after administration of the vectors, would significantly enhance this tumor-specific therapeutic option. Procedures The tumor specificity of SINV is mediated by the 67-kDa laminin receptor (LR). We probed different cancer cell lines for their LR expression and, to determine the specific role of LR-expression in the infection cycle, used different molecular imaging strategies, such as bioluminescence, fluorescence molecular tomography, and positron emission tomography, to evaluate SINV-mediated infection in vitro and in vivo. Results All cancer cell lines showed a marked expression of LR. The infection rates of the SINV particles, however, differed significantly among the cell lines. Conclusion We used novel molecular imaging techniques to visualize vector delivery to different neoplatic cells. SINV infection rates proofed to be not solely dependent on cellular LR expression. Further studies need to evaluate the herein discussed ways of cellular infection and viral replication. PMID:22847302

  11. Dual-Modality Positron Emission Tomography/Optical Image-Guided Photodynamic Cancer Therapy with Chlorin e6-Containing Nanomicelles.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liang; Kamkaew, Anyanee; Sun, Haiyan; Jiang, Dawei; Valdovinos, Hector F; Gong, Hua; England, Christopher G; Goel, Shreya; Barnhart, Todd E; Cai, Weibo

    2016-08-23

    Multifunctional nanoparticles with combined diagnostic and therapeutic functions show great promise in nanomedicine. Herein, we develop an organic photodynamic therapy (PDT) system based on polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated nanomicelles conjugated with ∼20% chlorin e6 (PEG-Ce 6 nanomicelles), which functions as an optical imaging agent, as well as a PDT agent. The formed PEG-Ce 6 nanomicelles with the size of ∼20 nm were highly stable in various physiological solutions for a long time. Moreover, Ce 6 can also be a (64)Cu chelating agent for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET). By simply mixing, more than 90% of (64)Cu was chelator-free labeled on PEG-Ce 6 nanomicelles, and they also showed high stability in serum conditions. Both fluorescence imaging and PET imaging revealed that PEG-Ce 6 nanomicelles displayed high tumor uptake (13.7 ± 2.2%ID/g) after intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice at the 48 h time point. In addition, PEG-Ce 6 nanomicelles exhibited excellent PDT properties upon laser irradiation, confirming the theranostic properties of PEG-Ce 6 nanomicelles for imaging and treatment of cancer. In addition, PDT was not shown to render any appreciable toxicity. This work presents a theranostic platform based on polymer nanomicelles with great potential in multimodality imaging-guided photodynamic cancer therapy. PMID:27459277

  12. Comparison of meta-analyses among elastosonography (ES) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging techniques in the application of prostate cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Qiaohong; Duan, Zhongxiang; Lei, Jixiao; Jiao, Guangli

    2016-03-01

    The early diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) appears to be of vital significance for the provision of appropriate treatment programs. Even though several sophisticated imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and elastosonography (ES) have already been developed for PCa diagnosis, the diagnostic accuracy of these imaging techniques is still controversial to some extent. Therefore, a comprehensive meta-analysis in this study was performed to compare the accuracy of various diagnostic imaging methods for PCa, including 11C-choline PET/CT, 11C-acetate PET/CT, 18F-fluorocholine PET/CT, 18F-fluoroglucose PET/CT, transrectal real-time elastosonography (TRTE), and shear-wave elastosonography (SWE). The eligible studies were identified through systematical searching for the literature in electronic databases including PubMed, Cochrane, and Web of Science. On the basis of the fixed-effects model, the pooled sensitivity (SEN), specificity (SPE), and area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) were calculated to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of 11C-choline PET/CT, 11C-acetate PET/CT, 18F-fluorocholine (FCH) PET/CT, 18F-fluoroglucose (FDG) PET/CT, TRTE, and SWE. All the statistical analyses were conducted with R language Software. The present meta-analysis incorporating a total of 82 studies demonstrated that the pooled sensitivity of the six imaging techniques were sorted as follows: SWE > 18F-FCH PET/CT > 11C-choline PET/CT > TRTE > 11C-acetate PET/CT > 18F-FDG PET/CT; the pooled specificity were also compared: SWE > 18F-FCH PET/CT > 11C-choline PET/CT > TRTE > 18F-FDG PET/CT > 11C-acetate PET/CT; finally, the pooled diagnostic accuracy of the six imaging techniques based on AUC were ranked as below: SWE > 18F-FCH PET/CT > 11C-choline PET/CT > TRTE > 11C-acetate PET/CT > 18F-FDG PET/CT. SWE and 18F-FCH PET/CT imaging could offer more assistance in the

  13. F-18-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/computed tomography imaging in primary staging of patients with malignant melanoma: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this systematic review was to systematically assess the potential patient-relevant benefit (primary aim) and diagnostic and prognostic accuracy (secondary aim) of positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/computed tomography (CT) in primary staging of malignant melanoma. This systematic review updates the previous evidence for PET(/CT) in malignant melanoma. Materials and methods For the first aim, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating patient-relevant outcomes and comparing PET and PET(/CT) with each other or with conventional imaging were considered. For the secondary aim, a review of reviews was conducted, which was amended by an update search for primary studies. MEDLINE, EMBASE and four databases of the Cochrane Library were searched. The risk of bias was assessed using a modified QUADAS tool. Results No RCTs investigating the patient-relevant benefit of PET(/CT) and no prognostic accuracy studies were found. Seventeen diagnostic accuracy studies of varying quality were identified. For patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stages I and II, sensitivity mostly ranged from 0 to 67%. Specificity ranged from 77 to 100%. For AJCC stages III and IV, sensitivity ranged from 68 to 87% and specificity from 92 to 98%. Conclusion There is currently no evidence of a patient-relevant benefit of PET(/CT) in the primary staging of malignant melanoma. RCTs investigating patient-relevant outcomes are therefore required. The diagnostic accuracy of PET(/CT) appears to increase with higher AJCC stages. PMID:23237499

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of fluorinated fingolimod (FTY720) analogues for sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor molecular imaging by positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Rizwan S; Schilson, Stefanie S; Wagner, Stefan; Hermann, Sven; Keul, Petra; Levkau, Bodo; Schäfers, Michael; Haufe, Günter

    2015-04-23

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a lysophospholipid that evokes a variety of biological responses via stimulation of a set of cognate G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): S1P1-S1P5. S1P and its receptors (S1PRs) play important roles in the immune, cardiovascular, and central nervous systems and have also been implicated in carcinogenesis. Recently, the S1P analogue Fingolimod (FTY720) has been approved for the treatment of patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis. This work presents the synthesis of various fluorinated structural analogues of FTY720, their in vitro and in vivo biological testing, and their development and application as [(18)F]radiotracers for the study of S1PR biodistribution and imaging in mice using small-animal positron emission tomography (PET). PMID:25826109

  15. Imaging of cellular proliferation in liver metastasis by [18F]fluorothymidine positron emission tomography: effect of therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contractor, Kaiyumars; Challapalli, Amarnath; Tomasi, Giampaolo; Rosso, Lula; Wasan, Harpreet; Stebbing, Justin; Kenny, Laura; Mangar, Stephen; Riddle, Pippa; Palmieri, Carlo; Al-Nahhas, Adil; Sharma, Rohini; Turkheimer, Federico; Coombes, R. Charles; Aboagye, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Although [18F]fluorothymidine positron emission tomography (FLT-PET) permits estimation of tumor thymidine kinase-1 expression, and thus, cell proliferation, high physiological uptake of tracer in liver tissue can limit its utility. We evaluated FLT-PET combined with a temporal-intensity information-based voxel-clustering approach termed kinetic spatial filtering (FLT-PETKSF) for detecting drug response in liver metastases. FLT-PET and computed tomography data were collected from patients with confirmed breast or colorectal liver metastases before, and two weeks after the first cycle of chemotherapy. Changes in tumor FLT-PET and FLT-PETKSF variables were determined. Visual distinction between tumor and normal liver was seen in FLT-PETKSF images. Of the 33 metastases from 20 patients studied, 26 were visible after kinetic filtering. The net irreversible retention of the tracer (Ki; from unfiltered data) in the tumor, correlated strongly with tracer uptake when the imaging variable was an unfiltered average or maximal standardized uptake value, 60 min post-injection (SUV60,av: r = 0.9, SUV60,max: r = 0.7; p < 0.0001 for both) and occurrence of high intensity voxels derived from FLT-PETKSF (r = 0.7, p < 0.0001). Overall, a significant reduction in the imaging variables was seen in responders compared to non-responders; however, the two week time point selected for imaging was too early to allow prediction of long term clinical benefit from chemotherapy. FLT-PET and FLT-PETKSF detected changes in proliferation in liver metastases.

  16. Positron emission tomography imaging of braintumors with Cobalt-55 and L-[1-C11]-tyrosine

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, H.M.L.; Pruim J.; Willemsen, A.T.M.

    1994-05-01

    The applicability of positron emission tomography (PET) with [C-11] tyrosine (TYR) and Cobalt-55 (Co) in patients with known primary brain tumors is reported. We used Co as a Calcium (Ca) marker to study Ca influx in degenerating neural tissue and TYR to indicate incorporation of amino acids into protein. Four patients showing a primary brain tumor with central necrosis on CT/MRI were studied with Co-PET. Additionally, 2 of these patients were consecutively studied with TYR-PET. Diagnostic confirmation was obtained by means of histology and/or cytology shortly after PET. Thirty-seven MBq Co was administered iv. approximately 24 hours before acquisition. The Co-scan was acquired for I hour. Immediately following Co-PET, 2 patients received 370 MBq TYR iv. TYR-PET acquisition was done dynamically for 55 minutes starting from the time of injection. The necrotic center of the tumor revealed no uptake of either Co or TYR. Vital tumor tissue showed intense uptake of TYR, indicating a high protein synthesis rate (PSR). The circumferent zone between necrotic and tumor tissue showed evident uptake of Co, suggesting cell-decay. In conclusion, TYR and Co are both suitable tracers for visualization of different aspects of brain malignancies, ie. PSR and cell-decay. Combining Co and TYR enables differentiation of necrosis vs. tumor growth with clear marking of the border zone. We think these complementary PET-techniques in conjunction with CT and/or MRI allow the visualization of different aspects of tumor tissue: central necrosis (CT/MRI), cell-decay (Co-PET) and vital tumor tissue (TYR-PET).

  17. SU-D-201-06: Random Walk Algorithm Seed Localization Parameters in Lung Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Images

    SciTech Connect

    Soufi, M; Asl, A Kamali; Geramifar, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to find the best seed localization parameters in random walk algorithm application to lung tumor delineation in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images. Methods: PET images suffer from statistical noise and therefore tumor delineation in these images is a challenging task. Random walk algorithm, a graph based image segmentation technique, has reliable image noise robustness. Also its fast computation and fast editing characteristics make it powerful for clinical purposes. We implemented the random walk algorithm using MATLAB codes. The validation and verification of the algorithm have been done by 4D-NCAT phantom with spherical lung lesions in different diameters from 20 to 90 mm (with incremental steps of 10 mm) and different tumor to background ratios of 4:1 and 8:1. STIR (Software for Tomographic Image Reconstruction) has been applied to reconstruct the phantom PET images with different pixel sizes of 2×2×2 and 4×4×4 mm{sup 3}. For seed localization, we selected pixels with different maximum Standardized Uptake Value (SUVmax) percentages, at least (70%, 80%, 90% and 100%) SUVmax for foreground seeds and up to (20% to 55%, 5% increment) SUVmax for background seeds. Also, for investigation of algorithm performance on clinical data, 19 patients with lung tumor were studied. The resulted contours from algorithm have been compared with nuclear medicine expert manual contouring as ground truth. Results: Phantom and clinical lesion segmentation have shown that the best segmentation results obtained by selecting the pixels with at least 70% SUVmax as foreground seeds and pixels up to 30% SUVmax as background seeds respectively. The mean Dice Similarity Coefficient of 94% ± 5% (83% ± 6%) and mean Hausdorff Distance of 1 (2) pixels have been obtained for phantom (clinical) study. Conclusion: The accurate results of random walk algorithm in PET image segmentation assure its application for radiation treatment planning and

  18. An adaptive patient specific deformable registration for breast images of positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging using finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Cheng; Tang, Fuk-Hay

    2014-03-01

    A patient specific registration model based on finite element method was investigated in this study. Image registration of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI) has been studied a lot. Surface-based registration is extensively applied in medical imaging. We develop and evaluate a registration method combine surface-based registration with biomechanical modeling. .Four sample cases of patients with PET and MRI breast scans performed within 30 days were collected from hospital. K-means clustering algorithm was used to segment images into two parts, which is fat tissue and neoplasm [2]. Instead of placing extrinsic landmarks on patients' body which may be invasive, we proposed a new boundary condition to simulate breast deformation during two screening. Then a three dimensional model with meshes was built. Material properties were assigned to this model according to previous studies. The whole registration was based on a biomechanical finite element model, which could simulate deformation of breast under pressure.

  19. Interrogating Tumor Metabolism and Tumor Microenvironments Using Molecular Positron Emission Tomography Imaging. Theranostic Approaches to Improve Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Orit

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a noninvasive molecular imaging technology that is becoming increasingly important for the measurement of physiologic, biochemical, and pharmacological functions at cellular and molecular levels in patients with cancer. Formation, development, and aggressiveness of tumor involve a number of molecular pathways, including intrinsic tumor cell mutations and extrinsic interaction between tumor cells and the microenvironment. Currently, evaluation of these processes is mainly through biopsy, which is invasive and limited to the site of biopsy. Ongoing research on specific target molecules of the tumor and its microenvironment for PET imaging is showing great potential. To date, the use of PET for diagnosing local recurrence and metastatic sites of various cancers and evaluation of treatment response is mainly based on [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG), which measures glucose metabolism. However, [18F]FDG is not a target-specific PET tracer and does not give enough insight into tumor biology and/or its vulnerability to potential treatments. Hence, there is an increasing need for the development of selective biologic radiotracers that will yield specific biochemical information and allow for noninvasive molecular imaging. The possibility of cancer-associated targets for imaging will provide the opportunity to use PET for diagnosis and therapy response monitoring (theranostics) and thus personalized medicine. This article will focus on the review of non-[18F]FDG PET tracers for specific tumor biology processes and their preclinical and clinical applications. PMID:24064460

  20. Non-invasive imaging and cellular tracking of pulmonary emboli by near-infrared fluorescence and positron-emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Page, Michael J; Lourenço, André L; David, Tovo; LeBeau, Aaron M; Cattaruzza, Fiore; Castro, Helena C; VanBrocklin, Henry F; Coughlin, Shaun R; Craik, Charles S

    2015-01-01

    Functional imaging of proteolytic activity is an emerging strategy to quantify disease and response to therapy at the molecular level. We present a new peptide-based imaging probe technology that advances these goals by exploiting enzymatic activity to deposit probes labelled with near-infrared (NIR) fluorophores or radioisotopes in cell membranes of disease-associated proteolysis. This strategy allows for non-invasive detection of protease activity in vivo and ex vivo by tracking deposited probes in tissues. We demonstrate non-invasive detection of thrombin generation in a murine model of pulmonary embolism using our protease-activated peptide probes in microscopic clots within the lungs with NIR fluorescence optical imaging and positron-emission tomography. Thrombin activity is imaged deep in tissue and tracked predominantly to platelets within the lumen of blood vessels. The modular design of our probes allows for facile investigation of other proteases, and their contributions to disease by tailoring the protease activation and cell-binding elements. PMID:26423607

  1. Feasibility study of the use of similarity maps in the evaluation of oncological dynamic positron emission tomography images.

    PubMed

    Thireou, T; Kontaxakis, G; Strauss, L G; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A; Pavlopoulos, S; Santos, A

    2005-01-01

    A preliminary study is presented on the potential role of similarity mapping (SM) in the evaluation of oncological dynamic 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography studies, mainly in lesion localisation and detectability. Similarity maps were calculated using previously described (correlation coefficient (COR) and normalised correlation coefficient (NCOR)) and newly introduced similarity measures (sum of squares coefficient (SSQ), squared sum coefficient (SQS), sum of cubes coefficient (SC) and cubed sum coefficient (CS)). The results were evaluated using simulated and clinical data. The study revealed that the best-suited similarity measure for such applications was the CS similarity coefficient, which provided the best parametric images, delineating structures of interest and supporting the visual interpretation of data sets. It was shown that SM and standardised uptake value (SUV) images had comparable diagnostic performance, although SM was able to offer additional time-related information in a single image. For the case of colorectal recurrences (17 cases), the measured contrast values for the CS and SUV images were 2.36 +/- 0.47 and 4.12 +/- 0.42, respectively, whereas, for three cases of giant cell tumours, these values were 11.6 +/- 2.1 and 11.9 +/- 1.8, respectively. PMID:15742716

  2. Non-invasive imaging and cellular tracking of pulmonary emboli by near-infrared fluorescence and positron-emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Page, Michael J.; Lourenço, André L.; David, Tovo; LeBeau, Aaron M.; Cattaruzza, Fiore; Castro, Helena C.; VanBrocklin, Henry F.; Coughlin, Shaun R.; Craik, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Functional imaging of proteolytic activity is an emerging strategy to quantify disease and response to therapy at the molecular level. We present a new peptide-based imaging probe technology that advances these goals by exploiting enzymatic activity to deposit probes labelled with near-infrared (NIR) fluorophores or radioisotopes in cell membranes of disease-associated proteolysis. This strategy allows for non-invasive detection of protease activity in vivo and ex vivo by tracking deposited probes in tissues. We demonstrate non-invasive detection of thrombin generation in a murine model of pulmonary embolism using our protease-activated peptide probes in microscopic clots within the lungs with NIR fluorescence optical imaging and positron-emission tomography. Thrombin activity is imaged deep in tissue and tracked predominantly to platelets within the lumen of blood vessels. The modular design of our probes allows for facile investigation of other proteases, and their contributions to disease by tailoring the protease activation and cell-binding elements. PMID:26423607

  3. Detecting primary bladder cancer using delayed 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging after forced diuresis

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Laura S; Fioole-Bruining, Annemarie; Vegt, Erik; Vogel, Wouter V; van Rhijn, Bas WG; Horenblas, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of delayed pelvic 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography combined with the computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) imaging, according to a standardized protocol including, pre-hydration and forced diuresis, for the detection of primary bladder cancer. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 38 consecutive patients with primary cT1-4 bladder cancer. They underwent standard FDG-PET/CT followed by delayed pelvic imaging after administration of 20 mg furosemide intravenously and extra oral water intake of 0.5 L. Two observers, blinded for patient data, scored both image sets for tumor visibility using a 3-point ordinal scale: (1) negative; (2) indeterminate; (3) positive. FDG-PET/CT findings were compared with histopathology and/or follow-up imaging. Results: The procedure was completed successfully in 37/38 patients and the reference standard revealed a bladder tumor in 26/37 patients. Delayed PET/CT images showed reduction of urinary bladder activity to (near) background levels in 17 of 37 cases (45.9%). Standard PET/CT detected hyper-metabolic bladder lesions in 15/37 patients (40.5%) of which 8 were indeterminate. Delayed FDG-PET/CT showed hyper-metabolic bladder lesions in 30/37 (81.1%) patients, of which 5 were indeterminate. When indeterminate lesions were considered positive, the sensitivity of standard and delayed PET/CT was 46% versus 88%, respectively. The specificity was 72% versus 36%. When indeterminate lesions were considered negative, the sensitivity of standard and delayed PET/CT was 23% and 85%. The specificity was 93% versus 73%. Conclusions: Our data suggest that delayed pelvic FDG-PET/CT imaging after forced detects more primary bladder tumors than standard FDG-PET/CT protocols. However, indeterminate bladder lesions on delayed PET/CT remain a problem and should be interpreted cautiously in order to avoid false positive results. PMID:23919066

  4. Imaging tumor angiogenesis in breast cancer experimental lung metastasis with positron emission tomography, near-infrared fluorescence, and bioluminescence

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Nayak, Tapas R.; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Myklejord, Duane V.; Theuer, Charles P.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Cai, Weibo

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a molecular imaging agent that can allow for both positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging of CD105 expression in metastatic breast cancer. TRC105, a chimeric anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody, was labeled with both a NIRF dye (i.e., IRDye 800CW) and 64Cu to yield 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Flow cytometry analysis revealed no difference in CD105 binding affinity/specificity between TRC105 and NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Serial bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was carried out to non-invasively monitor the lung tumor burden in BALB/c mice, after intravenous injection of firefly luciferase-transfected 4T1 (i.e., fLuc-4T1) murine breast cancer cells to establish the experimental lung metastasis model. Serial PET imaging revealed that fLuc-4T1 lung tumor uptake of 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW was 11.9 ± 1.2, 13.9 ± 3.9, and 13.4 ± 2.1 %ID/g at 4, 24, and 48 h post-injection respectively (n = 3). Biodistribution studies, blocking fLuc-4T1 lung tumor uptake with excess TRC105, control experiments with 64Cu-NOTA-cetuximab-800CW (which served as an isotype-matched control), ex vivo BLI/PET/NIRF imaging, autoradiography, and histology all confirmed CD105 specificity of 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Successful PET/NIRF imaging of tumor angiogenesis (i.e., CD105 expression) in the breast cancer experimental lung metastasis model warrants further investigation and clinical translation of dual-labeled TRC105-based agents, which can potentially enable early detection of small metastases and image-guided surgery for tumor removal. PMID:23471463

  5. Defining risk groups of patients with cancer of unknown primary site and cervical nodal metastases by F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Su, Yung-Yueh; Chen, Shih-Shin; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun; Liao, Chun-Ta; Lin, Chien-Yu; Kang, Chung-Jan; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2016-08-01

    We sought to investigate the clinical utility of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) in Taiwanese patients with cancer of unknown primary site (CUP) and cervical nodal metastases. We also aimed to study the impact of F-18 FDG PET/CT on clinical treatment priority in this patient group. Between September 2006 and May 2014, patients with CUP and cervical nodal metastases who underwent F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging study were retrospectively identified. The clinicopathological risk factors and PET parameters were analyzed in relation to 2-year overall survival (OS) rates using univariate and multivariate analyses. Two-year OS curves were plotted with the Kaplan-Meier method. Of the eligible patients (n = 54), 12 (22.2%) had distant metastases (DM) at presentation. A total of 13 (24.1%) and 15 (27.8%) primary tumors were identified by FDG PET/CT imaging and an additional triple biopsy, respectively. The results of multivariate analysis identified smoking [p = 0.033, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.197-40.342], a maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of cervical nodes ≥ 14.2 (p = 0.035, 95% CI = 1.134-28.029), and DM at presentation (p = 0.031, 95% CI = 1.257-114.854) as independent predictors of 2-year OS. Specifically, patients who carried ≥ 2 risk factors showed poorer outcomes (70.3% vs. 11.8%, p < 0.001). Fifteen study patients (27.8%) had their treatment modified by FDG PET/CT findings. We conclude that FDG PET/CT is clinically useful in CUP patients not only for tumor staging, but also for modifying treatment regimens. PMID:27523454

  6. Contrast-enhanced [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography as an initial imaging modality in patients presenting with metastatic malignancy of undefined primary origin

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Avani; Srivastava, Madhur Kumar; Pawaskar, Alok Suresh; Shelley, Simon; Elangovan, Indirani; Jain, Hasmukh; Pandey, Somnath; Kalal, Shilpa; Amalachandran, Jaykanth

    2015-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the advantages of contrast enhanced F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-contrast enhanced CT [CECT]) when used as an initial imaging modality in patients presenting with metastatic malignancy of undefined primary origin (MUO). Materials and Methods: A total of 243 patients with fine needle aspiration cytology/biopsy proven MUO were included in this prospective study. Patients who were thoroughly evaluated for primary or primary tumor was detected by any other investigation were excluded from the analysis. Totally, 163 patients with pathological diagnosis of malignancy but no apparent sites of the primary tumor were finally selected for analysis. The site of probable primary malignancy suggested by PET-CECT was confirmed by biopsy/follow-up. Results: PET-CECT suggested probable site of primary in 128/163 (78.52%) patients. In 30/35 remaining patients, primary tumor was not detected even after extensive work-up. In 5 patients, where PET-CECT was negative, primary was found on further extensive investigations or follow-up. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the study were 95.76%, 66.67%, 88.28% and 85.71% respectively. Conclusions: F-18 FDG PET-CECT aptly serves the purpose of initial imaging modality owing to high sensitivity, negative and positive predictive value. PET-CECT not only surveys the whole body for the primary malignancy but also stages the disease accurately. Use of contrast improves the diagnostic utility of modality as well as help in staging of the primary tumor. Although benefits of using PET-CECT as initial diagnostic modality are obvious from this study, there is a need for a larger study comparing conventional methods for diagnosing primary in patients with MUO versus PET-CECT. PMID:26170563

  7. [{sup 18}F]Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT) Physiologic Imaging of Choroidal Melanoma: Before and After Ophthalmic Plaque Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, Paul T.; Chin, Kimberly J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate changes in [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) standardized uptake values (SUV) in uveal melanoma before and after plaque brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 217 patients diagnosed with uveal melanoma and eligible for ophthalmic plaque brachytherapy underwent preoperative PET/CT to evaluate their intraocular tumor and screen for metastasis. Subsequent to undergoing plaque brachytherapy, patients' PET/CT SUV were periodically reevaluated over 42 months. Results: In this series, 37 (17%) choroidal melanoma patients were found to have an SUV of >2.0. Of these, 18 patients were able to undergo interval follow-up PET/CT scanning. There were 3 patients with T2, 11 patients with T3, and 4 patients with T4 melanomas according to 7th edition AJCC-UICC criteria. Mean apical thickness was 8.8 mm (range, 3-12.3 mm), and the largest mean tumor diameter was 15.1 mm (range, 12-19.9 mm). The mean initial SUV was 3.7 (range, 2.1-7.3). Patients were followed for a median 16 months (range, 6-42 months). The median time to a tumor SUV of 0 was 8.0 months (range, 6-18 months). There was one case of one interval increase in SUV that diminished after circumferential laser treatment. Conclusions: Intraocular PET/CT imaging provides a physiological assessment of tumor metabolism that can be used to evaluate changes after treatment. In this study, ophthalmic plaque radiation therapy was associated with extinguished tumor PET/CT SUV over time. PET/CT imaging can be used to assess choroidal melanomas for their response to treatment.

  8. Simultaneous whole body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of pediatric cancer: Preliminary experience and comparison with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Pugmire, Brian S; Guimaraes, Alexander R; Lim, Ruth; Friedmann, Alison M; Huang, Mary; Ebb, David; Weinstein, Howard; Catalano, Onofrio A; Mahmood, Umar; Catana, Ciprian; Gee, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To describe our preliminary experience with simultaneous whole body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MRI) in the evaluation of pediatric oncology patients. METHODS: This prospective, observational, single-center study was Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, and institutional review board approved. To be eligible, a patient was required to: (1) have a known or suspected cancer diagnosis; (2) be under the care of a pediatric hematologist/oncologist; and (3) be scheduled for clinically indicated 18F-FDG positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) examination at our institution. Patients underwent PET-CT followed by PET-MRI on the same day. PET-CT examinations were performed using standard department protocols. PET-MRI studies were acquired with an integrated 3 Tesla PET-MRI scanner using whole body T1 Dixon, T2 HASTE, EPI diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and STIR sequences. No additional radiotracer was given for the PET-MRI examination. Both PET-CT and PET-MRI examinations were reviewed by consensus by two study personnel. Test performance characteristics of PET-MRI, for the detection of malignant lesions, including FDG maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCmin), were calculated on a per lesion basis using PET-CT as a reference standard. RESULTS: A total of 10 whole body PET-MRI exams were performed in 7 pediatric oncology patients. The mean patient age was 16.1 years (range 12-19 years) including 6 males and 1 female. A total of 20 malignant and 21 benign lesions were identified on PET-CT. PET-MRI SUVmax had excellent correlation with PET-CT SUVmax for both benign and malignant lesions (R = 0.93). PET-MRI SUVmax > 2.5 had 100% accuracy for discriminating benign from malignant lesions using PET-CT reference. Whole body DWI was also evaluated: the mean ADCmin of malignant lesions (780.2 + 326.6) was

  9. Synthesis and Evaluation of [(18) F]-Ammonium BODIPY Dyes as Potential Positron Emission Tomography Agents for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chansaenpak, Kantapat; Wang, Hui; Wang, Mengzhe; Giglio, Benjamin; Ma, Xiaofeng; Yuan, Hong; Hu, Shuo; Wu, Zhanhong; Li, Zibo

    2016-08-16

    Recently, we demonstrated the potential of a [(18) F]-trimethylammonium BODIPY dye for cardiac imaging. This is the first example of the use of the [(18) F]-ammonium BODIPY dye for positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). In this report, we extend our study to other ammonium BODIPY dyes with different nitrogen substituents. These novel ammonium BODIPY dyes were successfully prepared and radiolabeled by the SnCl4 -assisted (18) F-(19) F isotopic exchange method. The microPET results and the biodistribution data reveal that nitrogen substituent changes have a significant effect on the in vivo and pharmacological properties of the tracers. Of the novel [(18) F]-ammonium BODIPY dyes prepared in this work, the [(18) F]-dimethylethylammonium BODIPY is superior in terms of myocardium uptake and PET imaging contrast. These results support our hypothesis that the ammonium BODIPY dyes have a great potential for use as PET/optical dual-modality MPI probes. PMID:27405398

  10. Exploring the use of shape and texture descriptors of positron emission tomography tracer distribution in imaging studies of neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Klyuzhin, Ivan S; Gonzalez, Marjorie; Shahinfard, Elham; Vafai, Nasim; Sossi, Vesna

    2016-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) data related to neurodegeneration are most often quantified using methods based on tracer kinetic modeling. In contrast, here we investigate the ability of geometry and texture-based metrics that are independent of kinetic modeling to convey useful information on disease state. The study was performed using data from Parkinson's disease subjects imaged with (11)C-dihydrotetrabenazine and (11)C-raclopride. The pattern of the radiotracer distribution in the striatum was quantified using image-based metrics evaluated over multiple regions of interest that were defined on co-registered PET and MRI images. Regression analysis showed a significant degree of correlation between several investigated metrics and clinical evaluations of the disease (p < 0.01). The best results were obtained with the first-order moment invariant of the radioactivity concentration values estimated over the full structural extent of the region as defined by MRI (R(2 )= 0.94). These results demonstrate that there is clinically relevant quantitative information in the tracer distribution pattern that can be captured using geometric and texture descriptors. Such metrics may provide an alternate and complementary data analysis approach to traditional kinetic modeling. PMID:26661171

  11. One-step (18)F-labeling of peptides for positron emission tomography imaging using the SiFA methodology.

    PubMed

    Wängler, Carmen; Niedermoser, Sabrina; Chin, Joshua; Orchowski, Katy; Schirrmacher, Esther; Jurkschat, Klaus; Iovkova-Berends, Liuba; Kostikov, Alexey P; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Wängler, Björn

    2012-11-01

    Here we present a procedure to label peptides with the positron-emitting radioisotope fluorine-18 ((18)F) using the silicon-fluoride acceptor (SiFA) labeling methodology. Positron emission tomography (PET) has gained high importance in noninvasive imaging of various diseases over the past decades, and thus new specific imaging probes for PET imaging, especially those labeled with (18)F, because of the advantageous properties of this nuclide, are highly sought after. N-terminally SiFA-modified peptides can be labeled with (18)F(-) in one step at room temperature (20-25 °C) or below without forming side products, thereby producing satisfactory radiochemical yields of 46 ± 1.5% (n = 10). The degree of chemoselectivity of the (18)F-introduction, which is based on simple isotopic exchange, allows for a facile cartridge-based purification fully devoid of HPLC implementation, thereby yielding peptides with specific activities between 44.4 and 62.9 GBq μmol(-1) (1,200-1,700 Ci mmol(-1)) within 25 min. PMID:23037309

  12. Intrinsically Zirconium-89 Labeled Gd2 O2 S:Eu Nanoprobes for In Vivo Positron Emission Tomography and Gamma-Ray-Induced Radioluminescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yonghua; Ai, Fanrong; Chen, Feng; Valdovinos, Hector F; Orbay, Hakan; Sun, Haiyan; Liang, Jimin; Barnhart, Todd E; Tian, Jie; Cai, Weibo

    2016-06-01

    The engineering of a novel dual-modality imaging probe is reported here by intrinsically labeling zirconium-89 ((89) Zr, a positron emission radioisotope with a half-life of 78.4 h) to PEGylated Gd2 O2 S:Eu nanophorphors, forming [(89) Zr]Gd2 O2 S:Eu@PEG for in vivo positron emission tomography/radioluminescence lymph node mapping. PMID:27106630

  13. Positron Emission Tomography and Optical Imaging of Tumor CD105 Expression with a Dual-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Engle, Jonathan W.; Yang, Yunan; Theuer, Charles P.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Cai, Weibo

    2012-01-01

    CD105 (endoglin) is an independent prognostic marker for poor prognosis in > 10 solid tumor types, including breast cancer. The goal of this study was to develop a CD105-specific agent for both positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging, which can have potential clinical applications in diagnosis and imaged-guided surgery of breast cancer. TRC105, a chimeric anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody, was labeled with both a NIRF dye (i.e. 800CW) and 64Cu to yield 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Flow cytometry analysis revealed no difference in CD105 binding affinity/specificity between TRC105 and NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Serial PET imaging revealed that the 4T1 murine breast tumor uptake of 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW was 5.2 ± 2.7, 11.0 ± 1.4, and 13.0 ± 0.4 %ID/g at 4, 24, and 48 h post-injection respectively. Tumor uptake as measured by ex vivo NIRF imaging exhibited a good linear correlation with the %ID/g values obtained from PET (R = 0.74). Biodistribution data were consistent with the PET/NIRF findings. Blocking experiments, control studies with dual-labeled cetuximab (an isotype-matched control antibody), and histology confirmed the CD105 specificity of 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Successful PET/NIRF imaging of CD105 expression warrants further investigation and clinical translation of dual-labeled TRC105-based imaging agents. PMID:22292418

  14. Positron emission tomography and optical imaging of tumor CD105 expression with a dual-labeled monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Engle, Jonathan W; Yang, Yunan; Theuer, Charles P; Barnhart, Todd E; Cai, Weibo

    2012-03-01

    CD105 (endoglin) is an independent prognostic marker for poor prognosis in >10 solid tumor types, including breast cancer. The goal of this study was to develop a CD105-specific agent for both positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging, which can have potential clinical applications in diagnosis and imaged-guided surgery of breast cancer. TRC105, a chimeric anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody, was labeled with both a NIRF dye (i.e., 800CW) and (64)Cu to yield (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Flow cytometry analysis revealed no difference in CD105 binding affinity/specificity between TRC105 and NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Serial PET imaging revealed that the 4T1 murine breast tumor uptake of (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW was 5.2 ± 2.7, 11.0 ± 1.4, and 13.0 ± 0.4% ID/g at 4, 24, and 48 h postinjection respectively. Tumor uptake as measured by ex vivo NIRF imaging exhibited a good linear correlation with the % ID/g values obtained from PET (R = 0.74). Biodistribution data were consistent with the PET/NIRF findings. Blocking experiments, control studies with dual-labeled cetuximab (an isotype-matched control antibody), and histology confirmed the CD105 specificity of (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Successful PET/NIRF imaging of CD105 expression warrants further investigation and clinical translation of dual-labeled TRC105-based imaging agents. PMID:22292418

  15. Facile synthesis, pharmacokinetic and systemic clearance evaluation, and positron emission tomography cancer imaging of 64Cu-Au alloy nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongfeng; Sultan, Deborah; Detering, Lisa; Luehmann, Hannah; Liu, Yongjian

    2014-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been widely used for oncological applications including diagnosis and therapy. However, the non-specific mononuclear phagocyte system accumulation and potential long-term toxicity have significantly limited clinical translation. One strategy to overcome these shortcomings is to reduce the size of gold nanoparticles to allow renal clearance. Herein, we report the preparation of 64Cu alloyed gold nanoclusters (64CuAuNCs) for in vivo evaluation of pharmacokinetics, systemic clearance, and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in a mouse prostate cancer model. The facile synthesis in acqueous solution allowed precisely controlled 64Cu incorporation for high radiolabeling specific activity and stability for sensitive and accurate detection. Through surface pegylation with 350 Da polyethylene glycol (PEG), the 64CuAuNCs-PEG350 afforded optimal biodistribution and significant renal and hepatobiliary excretion. PET imaging showed low non-specific tumor uptake, indicating its potential for active targeting of clinically relevant biomarkers in tumor and metastatic organs.Gold nanoparticles have been widely used for oncological applications including diagnosis and therapy. However, the non-specific mononuclear phagocyte system accumulation and potential long-term toxicity have significantly limited clinical translation. One strategy to overcome these shortcomings is to reduce the size of gold nanoparticles to allow renal clearance. Herein, we report the preparation of 64Cu alloyed gold nanoclusters (64CuAuNCs) for in vivo evaluation of pharmacokinetics, systemic clearance, and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in a mouse prostate cancer model. The facile synthesis in acqueous solution allowed precisely controlled 64Cu incorporation for high radiolabeling specific activity and stability for sensitive and accurate detection. Through surface pegylation with 350 Da polyethylene glycol (PEG), the 64CuAuNCs-PEG350 afforded optimal

  16. Acceptance test of a commercially available software for automatic image registration of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 99mTc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain images.

    PubMed

    Loi, Gianfranco; Dominietto, Marco; Manfredda, Irene; Mones, Eleonora; Carriero, Alessandro; Inglese, Eugenio; Krengli, Marco; Brambilla, Marco

    2008-09-01

    This note describes a method to characterize the performances of image fusion software (Syntegra) with respect to accuracy and robustness. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies were acquired from two phantoms and 10 patients. Image registration was performed independently by two couples composed of one radiotherapist and one physicist by means of superposition of anatomic landmarks. Each couple performed jointly and saved the registration. The two solutions were averaged to obtain the gold standard registration. A new set of estimators was defined to identify translation and rotation errors in the coordinate axes, independently from point position in image field of view (FOV). Algorithms evaluated were local correlation (LC) for CT-MRI, normalized mutual information (MI) for CT-MRI, and CT-SPECT registrations. To evaluate accuracy, estimator values were compared to limiting values for the algorithms employed, both in phantoms and in patients. To evaluate robustness, different alignments between images taken from a sample patient were produced and registration errors determined. LC algorithm resulted accurate in CT-MRI registrations in phantoms, but exceeded limiting values in 3 of 10 patients. MI algorithm resulted accurate in CT-MRI and CT-SPECT registrations in phantoms; limiting values were exceeded in one case in CT-MRI and never reached in CT-SPECT registrations. Thus, the evaluation of robustness was restricted to the algorithm of MI both for CT-MRI and CT-SPECT registrations. The algorithm of MI proved to be robust: limiting values were not exceeded with translation perturbations up to 2.5 cm, rotation perturbations up to 10 degrees and roto-translational perturbation up to 3 cm and 5 degrees. PMID:17549564

  17. Characteristics of feasible images obtained from real PET (Positron Emission Tomography) data by MLE (Maximum Likelihood Estimator), Bayesian and sieve methods

    SciTech Connect

    Llacer, J. ); Bajamonde, A.C. . Dept. of Statistics)

    1990-06-01

    The frequency spectral characteristics, bias and variance of images reconstructed from real Positron Emission Tomography (PET) data have been studied. Feasible images obtained from statistically based reconstruction methods have been compared to Filtered Backprojection (FBP) images. Feasible images have been described as those images that are compatible with the measured data by consideration of the Poisson nature of the emission process. The results show that the spectral characteristics of reconstructions obtained by statistically based methods are at least as good as those obtained by the FBP methods. With some exceptions, statistically based reconstructions do not exhibit abnormal amounts of bias. The most significant difference between the two groups of reconstructions is in the image variance, where the statistically based methods yield substantially smaller variances in the regions with smaller image intensity than the FBP images. 14 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Biologically optimized 3-dimensional in vivo predictive assay-based radiation therapy using positron emission tomography-computerized tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Brahme, Anders

    2003-01-01

    PET-CT is probably the ultimate tool for accurate tumor imaging and 3-dimensional in vivo predictive assay of radiation sensitivity. By imaging the tumor twice during the early course of therapy, it should be possible to quantify both the tumor responsiveness to therapy and the rate of loss of functional tumor cells using the presently derived equations. This new information is ideal for use together with biologically based therapy optimization and makes it possible accurately to quantitate the dose-response relation, at least for the bulk of the tumor cells. Since the tumor responsiveness is available after about one and a half weeks of therapy, the information is also ideal for use with adaptive therapy where all forms of deviations from the original treatment plan can be accurately corrected for since they generally influence the still functional, but mainly doomed tumor cell compartment. Thus, uncertainties such as: 1) the geometric misalignment of the therapeutic beam with the tumor, 2) deviations of the delivered dose distribution from the planned delivery whether due to 3) an erroneous treatment planning algorithm or 4) treatment equipment uncertainties and 5) deviations in the anticipated responsiveness of the tumor of the patient based on historical response data, can all be taken into account. Fortunately, when a larger tumor cell compartment than expected is seen an increased dose during the remainder of the treatment should always be delivered independently on whichever combination of the above deviations was the true reason. With high-energy photon and hadron therapy it is even possible to image the integral dose delivery in vivo during or after a treatment using PET-CT imaging. The high-energy photons above about 20 MeV produce positron emitters through photonuclear reactions in tissue which are proportional to the photon fluence and thus approximately also to the absorbed dose. Light ion beams, the ultimate radiation modality with regard to physical

  19. 12. Patterns of Adrenal Gland Involvement from Lung Cancer Shown by 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Compared to Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zubeldia; Abou-Zied; Nabi

    2000-07-01

    Purpose: The frequency of adrenal metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) varies between 4 to 25%. Adrenal metastases are frequently missed (78%) by Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The purpose of this study was to characterize the patterns of adrenal gland involvement from lung cancer by 18-F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (18FDG-PET).Methods: Retrospective review of patients evaluated for known or suspected lung carcinoma. Results of 18FDG-PET, CT, MRI, and scans were compared.Results: From February 1996 to May 2000, 91 patients with known (85 patients) or suspected (6 patients) lung cancer were evaluated with 18FDG-PET scan. Twenty-two patients (mean age 63, range 38-88 years) had abnormal adrenal glands by either 18FDG-PET (16 patients), CT (12 patients) or MRI (1 patient). In 13 cases 18FDG-PET scan was ordered to clarify CT or MRI findings. Only 7 patients showed adrenal gland involvement: 5 patients (5.5%) with unilateral disease and 2 patients (2.2%) with bilateral disease. PET depicted unsuspected findings in 9 patients: 8 patients (8.8%) with unilateral disease and 1 patient (1.1%) with bilateral disease.(18)FDG-PET upstaged 9 patients from limited (N1M0) to widespread disease (M1), thus obviating surgical intervention.Conclusion: This study demonstrates the potential of 18FDG-PET scanning in revealing unsuspected adrenal metastases in patients with early stages of NSCLC as well as characterizing CT or MRI equivocal adrenal masses. PMID:11150769

  20. Impacts of biological and procedural factors on semiquantification uptake value of liver in fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nordin, Abdul Jalil; Ahmad Saad, Fathinul Fikri; Azman, Ahmad Zaid Fattah

    2015-01-01

    Background Increased metabolic activity of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in tissue is not only resulting of pathological uptake, but due to physiological uptake as well. This study aimed to determine the impacts of biological and procedural factors on FDG uptake of liver in whole body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging. Methods Whole body fluorine-18 (18F) FDG PET/CT scans of 51 oncology patients have been reviewed. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of lesion-free liver was quantified in each patient. Pearson correlation was performed to determine the association between the factors of age, body mass index (BMI), blood glucose level, FDG dose and incubation period and liver SUVmax. Multivariate regression analysis was established to determine the significant factors that best predicted the liver SUVmax. Then the subjects were dichotomised into four BMI groups. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was established for mean difference of SUVmax of liver between those BMI groups. Results BMI and incubation period were significantly associated with liver SUVmax. These factors were accounted for 29.6% of the liver SUVmax variance. Statistically significant differences were observed in the mean SUVmax of liver among those BMI groups (P<0.05). Conclusions BMI and incubation period are significant factors affecting physiological FDG uptake of liver. It would be recommended to employ different cut-off value for physiological liver SUVmax as a reference standard for different BMI of patients in PET/CT interpretation and use a standard protocol for incubation period of patient to reduce variation in physiological FDG uptake of liver in PET/CT study. PMID:26682140

  1. Irbesartan attenuates atherosclerosis in Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits: noninvasive imaging of inflammation by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Fukao, Keita; Zhao, Songji; Watanabe, Ayahisa; Hamada, Tadateru; Yamasaki, Kazuaki; Shimizu, Yoichi; Kubo, Naoki; Ukon, Naoyuki; Nakano, Toru; Tamaki, Nagara; Kuge, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) in evaluating the antiatherogenic effects of irbesartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker. Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits were divided into the irbesartan-treated group (75 mg/kg/d; n  =  14) and the control group (n  =  14). After a 9-month treatment, rabbits underwent 18F-FDG PET. Using the aortic lesions, autoradiography and histologic examinations were performed. PET imaging clearly visualized the thoracic lesions of control rabbits and showed a significant decrease in the 18F-FDG uptake level of irbesartan-treated rabbits (78.8% of controls; p < .05). Irbesartan treatment significantly reduced the plaque size (43.1% of controls) and intraplaque macrophage infiltration level (48.1% of controls). The 18F-FDG uptake level in plaques positively correlated with the plaque size (r  =  .65, p < .05) and macrophage infiltration level (r  =  .57, p < .05). Noninvasive imaging by 18F-FDG PET is useful for evaluating the therapeutic effects of irbesartan and reflects inflammation, a key factor involved in the therapeutic effects. PMID:25812568

  2. Is Image Registration of Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Head-and-Neck Cancer Treatment Planning Necessary?

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, David; Lawrence, Michael; Khandani, Amir H.; Rosenman, Julian; Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC ; Cullip, Tim; Chera, Bhishamjit S.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetry and patterns of failure related to fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)-defined biological tumor volumes (BTVs) for head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective study of 91 HNSCC patients who received pretreatment PET/CT scans that were not formally used for target delineation. The median follow-up was 34.5 months. Image registration was performed for PET, planning CT, and post-RT failure CT scans. Previously defined primary (CT{sub PRIMARY}) and nodal (CT{sub NODE}) gross tumor volumes (GTV) were used. The primary BTV (BTV{sub PRIMARY}) and nodal BTV (BTV{sub NODE}) were defined visually (PET{sub vis}). The BTV{sub PRIMARY} was also contoured using 40% and 50% peak PET activity (PET{sub 40,} PET{sub 50}). The recurrent GTVs were contoured on post-RT CT scans. Dosimetry was evaluated on the planning-CT and pretreatment PET scan. PET and CT dosimetric/volumetric data was compared for those with and without local-regional failure (LRF). Results: In all, 29 of 91 (32%) patients experienced LRF: 10 local alone, 7 regional alone, and 12 local and regional. BTVs and CT volumes had less than complete overlap. BTVs were smaller than CT-defined targets. Dosimetric coverage was similar between failed and controlled groups as well as between BTVs and CT-defined volumes. Conclusions: PET and CT-defined tumor volumes received similar RT doses despite having less than complete overlap and the inaccuracies of image registration. LRF correlated with both CT and PET-defined volumes. The dosimetry for PET- and/or CT-based tumor volumes was not significantly inferior in patients with LRF. CT-based delineation alone may be sufficient for treatment planning in patients with HNSCC. Image registration of FDG-PET may not be necessary.

  3. Comparison of cerebral blood flow measurement with [15O]-water positron emission tomography and arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fan, Audrey P; Jahanian, Hesamoddin; Holdsworth, Samantha J; Zaharchuk, Greg

    2016-05-01

    Noninvasive imaging of cerebral blood flow provides critical information to understand normal brain physiology as well as to identify and manage patients with neurological disorders. To date, the reference standard for cerebral blood flow measurements is considered to be positron emission tomography using injection of the [(15)O]-water radiotracer. Although [(15)O]-water has been used to study brain perfusion under normal and pathological conditions, it is not widely used in clinical settings due to the need for an on-site cyclotron, the invasive nature of arterial blood sampling, and experimental complexity. As an alternative, arterial spin labeling is a promising magnetic resonance imaging technique that magnetically labels arterial blood as it flows into the brain to map cerebral blood flow. As arterial spin labeling becomes more widely adopted in research and clinical settings, efforts have sought to standardize the method and validate its cerebral blood flow values against positron emission tomography-based cerebral blood flow measurements. The purpose of this work is to critically review studies that performed both [(15)O]-water positron emission tomography and arterial spin labeling to measure brain perfusion, with the aim of better understanding the accuracy and reproducibility of arterial spin labeling relative to the positron emission tomography reference standard. PMID:26945019

  4. A wavelet phase filter for emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, E.T.; Lin, B.

    1995-07-01

    The presence of a high level of noise is a characteristic in some tomographic imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET). Wavelet methods can smooth out noise while preserving significant features of images. Mallat et al. proposed a wavelet based denoising scheme exploiting wavelet modulus maxima, but the scheme is sensitive to noise. In this study, the authors explore the properties of wavelet phase, with a focus on reconstruction of emission tomography images. Specifically, they show that the wavelet phase of regular Poisson noise under a Haar-type wavelet transform converges in distribution to a random variable uniformly distributed on [0, 2{pi}). They then propose three wavelet-phase-based denoising schemes which exploit this property: edge tracking, local phase variance thresholding, and scale phase variation thresholding. Some numerical results are also presented. The numerical experiments indicate that wavelet phase techniques show promise for wavelet based denoising methods.

  5. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT): Applications and potential

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, B.L.; Tumeh, S.S. )

    1990-01-26

    Single-photon emission computed tomography has received increasing attention as radiopharmaceuticals that reflect perfusion, metabolism, and receptor and cellular function have become widely available. Perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography of the brain provides functional information useful for the diagnosis and management of stroke, dementia, and epilepsy. Single-photon emission computed tomography has been applied to myocardial, skeletal, hepatic, and tumor scintigraphy, resulting in increased diagnostic accuracy over planar imaging because background activity and overlapping tissues interfere far less with activity from the target structure when tomographic techniques are used. Single-photon emission computed tomography is substantially less expensive and far more accessible than positron emission tomography and will become an increasingly attractive alternative for transferring the positron emission tomography technology to routine clinical use.

  6. Is hybridic positron emission tomography/computerized tomography the only option? The future of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Grammaticos, Philip; Zerva, Cherry; Asteriadis, Ioannis; Trontzos, Christos; Hatziioannou, Kostas

    2007-01-01

    sources of radiation" b) nuclear radiation and c) molecular nuclear medicine. The "European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging" shall have to erase the three last words of its title and be renamed. As Professor Abass Alavi et al (2007), have mentioned: "Is PET/CT the only option?" In favor of PET/CT are the following: Attenuation correction (AC) and better anatomical localization of lesions visualized with PET. Also PET/CT can be used as a diagnostic CT scanner (dCT). Against using the PET/CT scanners are the following arguments: a) This equipment is not necessary because we can always ask the Radiologists for a dCT scan. Many patients have already done a dCT scan at the time they are referred for a PET scan to the Nuclear Medicine Department. b) The absolute clinical indications for PET/CT with the use of a contrast agent, are under investigation. c) Although there is at present a list of indications suggested for the PET/CT scanner, there are studies disputing some of these indications, as for example in metastatic colon cancer where a high diagnostic accuracy for PET study alone, has been reported. d) The option of AC performed by the PET/CT scanner has also been questioned. Artifacts may be up to 84%. e) The PET/CT is expensive, time consuming, space occupying, and needs additional medical and technical personnel. f) Not to mention the extra radiation dose to the patients. g) Shall we inform those young medical students who wish to become nuclear medicine physicians, to hold their decision till the content of future Nuclear Medicine is clarified? We may suggest that: Our specialty could be renamed as: "Clinical Nuclear Medicine" and include additional "proper certified education" on the PET/CT equipment. The PET/CT scanner should remain in the Nuclear Medicine Department where Radiologists could act as advisors. PMID:17684579

  7. Potential role of 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging in patients presenting with generalized lymphadenopathy

    PubMed Central

    Karunanithi, Sellam; Kumar, Ganesh; Sharma, Punit; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Generalized lymphadenopathy is a common and often vexing clinical problem caused by various inflammatory, infective and malignant diseases. We aimed to review briefly and highlight the potential role of 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in such patients. 18F-FDG PET/CT can play an important role in the management of generalized lymphadenopathy. It can help in making an etiological diagnosis; can detect extranodal sites of involvement and employed for monitoring response to therapy. PMID:25589803

  8. Imaging tumor angiogenesis in breast cancer experimental lung metastasis with positron emission tomography, near-infrared fluorescence, and bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Nayak, Tapas R; Valdovinos, Hector F; Myklejord, Duane V; Theuer, Charles P; Barnhart, Todd E; Cai, Weibo

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a molecular imaging agent that can allow for both positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging of CD105 expression in metastatic breast cancer. TRC105, a chimeric anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody, was labeled with both a NIRF dye (i.e., IRDye 800CW) and (64)Cu to yield (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Flow cytometry analysis revealed no difference in CD105 binding affinity/specificity between TRC105 and NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Serial bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was carried out to non-invasively monitor the lung tumor burden in BALB/c mice, after intravenous injection of firefly luciferase-transfected 4T1 (i.e., fLuc-4T1) murine breast cancer cells to establish the experimental lung metastasis model. Serial PET imaging revealed that fLuc-4T1 lung tumor uptake of (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW was 11.9 ± 1.2, 13.9 ± 3.9, and 13.4 ± 2.1 %ID/g at 4, 24, and 48 h post-injection respectively (n = 3). Biodistribution studies, blocking fLuc-4T1 lung tumor uptake with excess TRC105, control experiments with (64)Cu-NOTA-cetuximab-800CW (which served as an isotype-matched control), ex vivo BLI/PET/NIRF imaging, autoradiography, and histology all confirmed CD105 specificity of (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105-800CW. Successful PET/NIRF imaging of tumor angiogenesis (i.e., CD105 expression) in the breast cancer experimental lung metastasis model warrants further investigation and clinical translation of dual-labeled TRC105-based agents, which can potentially enable early detection of small metastases and image-guided surgery for tumor removal. PMID:23471463

  9. ATLAAS: an automatic decision tree-based learning algorithm for advanced image segmentation in positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthon, Beatrice; Marshall, Christopher; Evans, Mererid; Spezi, Emiliano

    2016-07-01

    Accurate and reliable tumour delineation on positron emission tomography (PET) is crucial for radiotherapy treatment planning. PET automatic segmentation (PET-AS) eliminates intra- and interobserver variability, but there is currently no consensus on the optimal method to use, as different algorithms appear to perform better for different types of tumours. This work aimed to develop a predictive segmentation model, trained to automatically select and apply the best PET-AS method, according to the tumour characteristics. ATLAAS, the automatic decision tree-based learning algorithm for advanced segmentation is based on supervised machine learning using decision trees. The model includes nine PET-AS methods and was trained on a 100 PET scans with known true contour. A decision tree was built for each PET-AS algorithm to predict its accuracy, quantified using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), according to the tumour volume, tumour peak to background SUV ratio and a regional texture metric. The performance of ATLAAS was evaluated for 85 PET scans obtained from fillable and printed subresolution sandwich phantoms. ATLAAS showed excellent accuracy across a wide range of phantom data and predicted the best or near-best segmentation algorithm in 93% of cases. ATLAAS outperformed all single PET-AS methods on fillable phantom data with a DSC of 0.881, while the DSC for H&N phantom data was 0.819. DSCs higher than 0.650 were achieved in all cases. ATLAAS is an advanced automatic image segmentation algorithm based on decision tree predictive modelling, which can be trained on images with known true contour, to predict the best PET-AS method when the true contour is unknown. ATLAAS provides robust and accurate image segmentation with potential applications to radiation oncology.

  10. Lean body mass correction of standardized uptake value in simultaneous whole-body positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Jochimsen, Thies H; Schulz, Jessica; Busse, Harald; Werner, Peter; Schaudinn, Alexander; Zeisig, Vilia; Kurch, Lars; Seese, Anita; Barthel, Henryk; Sattler, Bernhard; Sabri, Osama

    2015-06-21

    This study explores the possibility of using simultaneous positron emission tomography--magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MRI) to estimate the lean body mass (LBM) in order to obtain a standardized uptake value (SUV) which is less dependent on the patients' adiposity. This approach is compared to (1) the commonly-used method based on a predictive equation for LBM, and (2) to using an LBM derived from PET-CT data. It is hypothesized that an MRI-based correction of SUV provides a robust method due to the high soft-tissue contrast of MRI. A straightforward approach to calculate an MRI-derived LBM is presented. It is based on the fat and water images computed from the two-point Dixon MRI primarily used for attenuation correction in PET-MRI. From these images, a water fraction was obtained for each voxel. Averaging over the whole body yielded the weight-normalized LBM. Performance of the new approach in terms of reducing variations of (18)F-Fludeoxyglucose SUVs in brain and liver across 19 subjects was compared with results using predictive methods and PET-CT data to estimate the LBM. The MRI-based method reduced the coefficient of variation of SUVs in the brain by 41 ± 10% which is comparable to the reduction by the PET-CT method (35 ± 10%). The reduction of the predictive LBM method was 29 ± 8%. In the liver, the reduction was less clear, presumably due to other sources of variation. In conclusion, employing the Dixon data in simultaneous PET-MRI for calculation of lean body mass provides a brain SUV which is less dependent on patient adiposity. The reduced dependency is comparable to that obtained by CT and predictive equations. Therefore, it is more comparable across patients. The technique does not impose an overhead in measurement time and is straightforward to implement. PMID:26020722

  11. ATLAAS: an automatic decision tree-based learning algorithm for advanced image segmentation in positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Berthon, Beatrice; Marshall, Christopher; Evans, Mererid; Spezi, Emiliano

    2016-07-01

    Accurate and reliable tumour delineation on positron emission tomography (PET) is crucial for radiotherapy treatment planning. PET automatic segmentation (PET-AS) eliminates intra- and interobserver variability, but there is currently no consensus on the optimal method to use, as different algorithms appear to perform better for different types of tumours. This work aimed to develop a predictive segmentation model, trained to automatically select and apply the best PET-AS method, according to the tumour characteristics. ATLAAS, the automatic decision tree-based learning algorithm for advanced segmentation is based on supervised machine learning using decision trees. The model includes nine PET-AS methods and was trained on a 100 PET scans with known true contour. A decision tree was built for each PET-AS algorithm to predict its accuracy, quantified using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), according to the tumour volume, tumour peak to background SUV ratio and a regional texture metric. The performance of ATLAAS was evaluated for 85 PET scans obtained from fillable and printed subresolution sandwich phantoms. ATLAAS showed excellent accuracy across a wide range of phantom data and predicted the best or near-best segmentation algorithm in 93% of cases. ATLAAS outperformed all single PET-AS methods on fillable phantom data with a DSC of 0.881, while the DSC for H&N phantom data was 0.819. DSCs higher than 0.650 were achieved in all cases. ATLAAS is an advanced automatic image segmentation algorithm based on decision tree predictive modelling, which can be trained on images with known true contour, to predict the best PET-AS method when the true contour is unknown. ATLAAS provides robust and accurate image segmentation with potential applications to radiation oncology. PMID:27273293

  12. A new technique for the radiolabelling of mixed leukocytes with zirconium-89 for inflammation imaging with positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Fairclough, M; Prenant, C; Ellis, B; Boutin, H; McMahon, A; Brown, G; Locatelli, P; Jones, A K P

    2016-06-15

    Mixed leukocyte (white blood cells [WBCs]) trafficking using positron emission tomography (PET) is receiving growing interest to diagnose and monitor inflammatory conditions. PET, a high sensitivity molecular imaging technique, allows precise quantification of the signal produced from radiolabelled moieties. We have evaluated a new method for radiolabelling WBCs with either zirconium-89 ((89) Zr) or copper-64 ((64) Cu) for PET imaging. Chitosan nanoparticles (CNs) were produced by a process of ionotropic gelation and used to deliver radiometals into WBCs. Experiments were carried out using mixed WBCs freshly isolated from whole human blood. WBCs radiolabelling efficiency was higher with [(89) Zr]-loaded CN (76.8 ± 9.6% (n = 12)) than with [(64) Cu]-loaded CN (26.3 ± 7.0 % (n = 7)). [(89) Zr]-WBCs showed an initial loss of 28.4 ± 5.8% (n = 2) of the radioactivity after 2 h. This loss was then followed by a plateau as (89) Zr remains stable in the cells. [(64) Cu]-WBCs showed a loss of 85 ± 6% (n = 3) of the radioactivity after 1 h, which increased to 96 ± 6% (n = 3) loss after 3 h. WBC labelling with [(89) Zr]-loaded CN showed a fast kinetic of leukocyte association, high labelling efficiency and a relatively good retention of the radioactivity. This method using (89) Zr has a potential application for PET imaging of inflammation. PMID:27061114

  13. A cerebral functional imaging study by positron emission tomography in healthy volunteers receiving true or sham acupuncture needling.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xinsheng; Zhang, Guifeng; Huang, Yong; Tang, Chunzhi; Yang, Junjun; Wang, Shuxia; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2009-03-13

    Our recent studies have demonstrated that needling in Baihui, Shuigou and Shenmen enhances glucose metabolism in the frontal lobes, thalamus, temporal lobe, and the lentiform nucleus in vascular dementia. This study examined the effect of true, sham and overt needling in Waiguan (TE5) on cerebral changes by positron emission tomography (PET) technique. Eighteen healthy volunteers were randomized to receive overt control, true or sham needling therapy. To manipulate true needling, a needle was inserted into 15+/-2mm into Waiguan and "deqi" was achieved by proper needle manipulation. For sham needling, needles with a blunt tip were pushed against the skin as the shaft moved into the handle, giving an illusion of insertion. For overt placebo, blunt needles were used and subjects did not receive any needling penetration. The tracer used was (18)fluoride-deoxygluocse. PET images obtained were processed and analyzed by the SPM2 software. Compared with overt needling, brain areas BA7, 13, 18, 19, 21, 22, 27, 38, 40, 42 and 45 in Waiguan true needling group were significantly activated and areas BA4, 6, 7, 19, 22 and 41 in sham needling group showed obvious activation. Compared to sham needling group, marked activation points were found in the areas of BA13 and 42 and left cerebellum in true needling group. Our study revealed a marked difference in brain metabolic changes between true and sham needling in Waiguan. Further studies are needed to explore the cerebral changes in patients with acupuncture and the pathological implications. PMID:19383438

  14. The fast method of Cu-porphyrin complex synthesis for potential use in positron emission tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Kilian, Krzysztof; Pęgier, Maria; Pyrzyńska, Krystyna

    2016-04-15

    Porphyrin based photosensitizers are useful agents for photodynamic therapy and fluorescence imaging of cancer. Additionally, porphyrins are excellent metal chelators, forming stable metalo-complexes and (64)Cu isotope can serve as a positron emitter (t1/2=12.7h). The other advantage of (64)Cu is its decay characteristics that facilitates the use of (64)Cu-porphyrin complex as a therapeutic agent. Thus, (64)Cu chelation with porphyrin photosensitizer may become a simple and versatile labeling strategy for clinical positron emission tomography. The present study reports a convenient method for the synthesis of Cu complex with tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin (TCPP). The experimental conditions for labeling, such as the metal-to-ligand molar ratio, pH and time of reaction were optimized to achieve a high complexation efficiency in a short period of time as possible. In order to accelerate the metallation, the use of substitution reactions of cadmium or lead porphyrin and the presence of reducing agent, such as ascorbic acid, hydroxylamine and flavonoid - morin, were evaluated. The optimum conditions for the synthesis of the copper complex were borate buffer at pH9 with the addition of 10-fold molar excess, with respect to Cu(2+) ions and TCPP and ascorbic acid which resulted in reduction of the reaction time from 30min to below 1min. PMID:26836453

  15. The fast method of Cu-porphyrin complex synthesis for potential use in positron emission tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, Krzysztof; Pęgier, Maria; Pyrzyńska, Krystyna

    2016-04-01

    Porphyrin based photosensitizers are useful agents for photodynamic therapy and fluorescence imaging of cancer. Additionally, porphyrins are excellent metal chelators, forming stable metalo-complexes and 64Cu isotope can serve as a positron emitter (t1/2 = 12.7 h). The other advantage of 64Cu is its decay characteristics that facilitates the use of 64Cu-porphyrin complex as a therapeutic agent. Thus, 64Cu chelation with porphyrin photosensitizer may become a simple and versatile labeling strategy for clinical positron emission tomography. The present study reports a convenient method for the synthesis of Cu complex with tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin (TCPP). The experimental conditions for labeling, such as the metal-to-ligand molar ratio, pH and time of reaction were optimized to achieve a high complexation efficiency in a short period of time as possible. In order to accelerate the metallation, the use of substitution reactions of cadmium or lead porphyrin and the presence of reducing agent, such as ascorbic acid, hydroxylamine and flavonoid - morin, were evaluated. The optimum conditions for the synthesis of the copper complex were borate buffer at pH 9 with the addition of 10-fold molar excess, with respect to Cu2 + ions and TCPP and ascorbic acid which resulted in reduction of the reaction time from 30 min to below 1 min.

  16. Instrumentation for positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Budinger, T F; Derenzo, S E; Huesman, R H

    1984-01-01

    Positron emission tomography with a spatial resolution of 2 mm full width at half maximum for quantitation in regions of interest 4 mm in diameter will become possible with the development of detectors that achieve ultrahigh resolution. Improved resolution will be possible using solid-state photodetectors for crystal identification or photomultiplier tubes with many small electron multipliers . Temporal resolution of 2 seconds and gating of cyclic events can be accomplished if statistical requirements are met. The major physical considerations in achieving high-resolution positron emission tomography are the degradation in resolution resulting from positron range, emission angle, parallax error, detector sampling density, the sensitivity of various detector materials and packing schemes, and the trade off between temporal resolution and statistical accuracy. The accuracy of data required for physiological models depends primarily on the fidelity of spatial sampling independent of statistical constraints. PMID:6611124

  17. Development of positron emission tomography (PET) labeled polypeptide nanoparticles for tumor imaging and targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Janib, Siti Najila

    The two main problems currently stalling the efficient treatment of cancer has been detecting cancer early enough in the disease process for successful treatment, and treating cancer cells while avoiding excessive toxicity to normal tissues. Arguably the most important factor in the fight against cancer, besides prevention is early detection because the cancer will be easier to treat and less likely to have drug resistance. The work highlighted in this thesis attempts to address the issues related to the effective treatment and management of cancer. The objective of this work is to develop new materials and methods for co-assembly of drugs and imaging agents that permit quantitative imaging of drug delivery and disease progression. By using molecular imaging technique to non-invasively study and detect various molecular markers of diseases can allow for much earlier diagnosis, earlier treatment, and better prognosis that will eventually lead to personalized medicine. Exploration of particulates and polymeric carriers is gaining momentum in diagnostic imaging, initiated by successful therapies using long circulating liposomes. However, liposomes are challenging pharmaceuticals, which include many chemical components, require complex drug encapsulation strategies, and must be physically sheared to control their particle diameter and polydispersity. Polymeric nanocarriers have emerged as an alternative to liposomes as carriers of drugs and imaging agents. Co-inclusion of therapeutic and imaging agents, into these carriers might be advantageous because they increase solubility of hydrophobic agents, may enhance permeability across physiological barriers, alter drug biodistribution, increase local bioavailability and reduce of side effects.

  18. Characterization of the image-derived carotid artery input function using independent component analysis for the quantitation of [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K.; Chen, X.; Renaut, R.; Alexander, G. E.; Bandy, D.; Guo, H.; Reiman, E. M.

    2007-12-01

    We previously developed a noninvasive technique for the quantification of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) images using an image-derived input function obtained from a manually drawn carotid artery region. Here, we investigate the use of independent component analysis (ICA) for more objective identification of the carotid artery and surrounding tissue regions. Using FDG PET data from 22 subjects, ICA was applied to an easily defined cubical region including the carotid artery and neighboring tissue. Carotid artery and tissue time activity curves and three venous samples were used to generate spillover and partial volume-corrected input functions and to calculate the parametric images of the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRgl). Different from a blood-sampling-free ICA approach, the results from our ICA approach are numerically well matched to those based on the arterial blood sampled input function. In fact, the ICA-derived input functions and CMRgl measurements were not only highly correlated (correlation coefficients >0.99) to, but also highly comparable (regression slopes between 0.92 and 1.09), with those generated using arterial blood sampling. Moreover, the reliability of the ICA-derived input function remained high despite variations in the location and size of the cubical region. The ICA procedure makes it possible to quantify FDG PET images in an objective and reproducible manner. Image-derived input function by ICA for FDG-PET.

  19. Development of novel emission tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Geng

    In recent years, small animals, such as mice and rats, have been widely used as subjects of study in biomedical research while molecular biology and imaging techniques open new opportunities to investigate disease model. With the help of medical imaging techniques, researchers can investigate underlying mechanisms inside the small animal, which are useful for both early diagnosis and treatment monitoring. Based on tracer principle single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has increased popularity in small animal imaging due to its higher spatial resolution and variety of single-photon emitting radionuclides. Since the image quality strongly depends on the detector properties, both scintillation and semiconductor detectors are under active investigation for high resolution X-ray and gamma ray photon detection. The desired detector properties include high intrinsic spatial resolution, high energy resolution, and high detection efficiency. In this thesis study, we have made extensive efforts to develop novel emission tomography system, and evaluate the use of both semiconductor and ultra-high resolution scintillation detectors for small animal imaging. This thesis work includes the following three areas. Firstly, we have developed a novel energy-resolved photon counting (ERPC) detector. With the benefits of high energy resolution, high spatial resolution, flexible detection area, and a wide dynamic range of 27--200keV, ERPC detector is well-suited for small animal SPECT applications. For prototype ERPC detector excellent imaging (˜350microm) and spectroscopic performance (4keV Co-57 122keV) has been demonstrated in preliminary study. Secondly, to further improve spatial resolution to hundred-micron level, an ultra-high resolution Intensified EMCCD (I-EMCCD) detector has been designed and evaluated. This detector consists of the newly developed electron multiplying CCD (EMCCD) sensor, columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator, and an electrostatic de-magnifier (DM) tube

  20. Amyloid-β Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Probes: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Kepe, Vladimir; Moghbel, Mateen C.; Långström, Bengt; Zaidi, Habib; Vinters, Harry V.; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Doudet, Doris; Mishani, Eyal; Cohen, Robert M.; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul F.; Alavi, Abass; Barrio, Jorge R.

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly rising prevalence and cost of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in recent decades has made the imaging of amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits the focus of intense research. Several amyloid imaging probes with purported specificity for Aβ plaques are currently at various stages of FDA approval. However, a number of factors appear to preclude these probes from clinical utilization. As the available “amyloid specific” PET imaging probes have failed to demonstrate diagnostic value and have shown limited utility for monitoring therapeutic interventions in humans, a debate on their significance has emerged. The aim of this review is to identify and discuss critically the scientific issues contributing to the extensive inconsistencies reported in the literature on their purported in vivo amyloid specificity and potential utilization in patients. PMID:23648516

  1. Positron emission tomography imaging of angiogenesis in a murine hindlimb ischemia model with 64Cu-labeled TRC105.

    PubMed

    Orbay, Hakan; Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Hacker, Timothy A; Valdovinos, Hector F; Zagzebski, James A; Theuer, Charles P; Barnhart, Todd E; Cai, Weibo

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to assess ischemia-induced angiogenesis with (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105 positron emission tomography (PET) in a murine hindlimb ischemia model of peripheral artery disease (PAD). CD105 binding affinity/specificity of NOTA-conjugated TRC105 (an anti-CD105 antibody) was evaluated by flow cytometry, which exhibited no difference from unconjugated TRC105. BALB/c mice were anesthetized, and the right femoral artery was ligated to induce hindlimb ischemia, with the left hindlimb serving as an internal control. Laser Doppler imaging showed that perfusion in the ischemic hindlimb plummeted to ∼ 20% of the normal level after surgery and gradually recovered to near normal level on day 24. Ischemia-induced angiogenesis was noninvasively monitored and quantified with (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105 PET on postoperative days 1, 3, 10, 17, and 24. (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105 uptake in the ischemic hindlimb increased significantly from the control level of 1.6 ± 0.2 %ID/g to 14.1 ± 1.9 %ID/g at day 3 (n = 3) and gradually decreased with time (3.4 ± 1.9 %ID/g at day 24), which correlated well with biodistribution studies performed on days 3 and 24. Blocking studies confirmed the CD105 specificity of tracer uptake in the ischemic hindlimb. Increased CD105 expression on days 3 and 10 following ischemia was confirmed by histology and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). This is the first report of PET imaging of CD105 expression during ischemia-induced angiogenesis. (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105 PET may play multiple roles in future PAD-related research and improve PAD patient management by identifying the optimal timing of treatment and monitoring the efficacy of therapy. PMID:23738915

  2. The use of molecular sieves to simulate hot lesions in (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose--positron emission tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Matheoud, R; Secco, C; Ridone, S; Inglese, E; Brambilla, M

    2008-04-21

    We investigated the use of a kind of zeolite, the Bowie chabazite, to produce radioactive sources of different shapes, dimensions and activity concentrations that can be used for lesion simulation in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) uptake of a group of 12 zeolites was studied as a function of their weight (120-1,520 mg) and of the activity concentration of the (18)F-FDG solution (1-37 MBq ml(-1)), using a multiple linear regression model. The reproducibility, homogeneity and stability over time of the (18)F-FDG uptake were assessed. The fit of the regression model is good (r(2) = 0.83). This relation allows the production of zeolites of a desired (18)F-FDG activity using knowledge of the concentration of the soaking solution and the weight of the zeolite. The reproducibility of the (18)F-FDG uptake after heating the zeolites is elevated (CV% = 3.68). The almost complete regeneration of the zeolites allows us to reuse them in successive experiments. The stability of the (18)F-FDG uptake on zeolites is far from ideal. When placed in a saline solution the 'activated' zeolites release the (18)F-FDG with an effective half-time of 53 min. The sealing of the zeolites in plastic film bags has been demonstrated to be effective in preventing any release of (18)F-FDG. These features, together with their variable dimensions and shapes, make them ideal (18)F-FDG sources with a fixed target-to-background ratio that can be placed anywhere in a phantom to study lesion detectability in PET imaging. PMID:18379022

  3. Design of an advanced positron emission tomography detector system and algorithms for imaging small animal models of human disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foudray, Angela Marie Klohs

    Detecting, quantifying and visualizing biochemical mechanism in a living system without perturbing function is the goal of the instrument and algorithms designed in this thesis. Biochemical mechanisms of cells have long been known to be dependent on the signals they receive from their environment. Studying biological processes of cells in-vitro can vastly distort their function, since you are removing them from their natural chemical signaling environment. Mice have become the biological system of choice for various areas of biomedical research due to their genetic and physiological similarities with humans, the relatively low cost of their care, and their quick breeding cycle. Drug development and efficacy assessment along with disease detection, management, and mechanism research all have benefited from the use of small animal models of human disease. A high resolution, high sensitivity, three-dimensional (3D) positioning positron emission tomography (PET) detector system was designed through device characterization and Monte Carlo simulation. Position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs) were characterized in various packaging configurations; coupled to various configurations of lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillation crystals. Forty novelly packaged final design devices were constructed and characterized, each providing characteristics superior to commercially available scintillation detectors used in small animal imaging systems: ˜1mm crystal identification, 14-15% of 511 keV energy resolution, and averaging 1.9 to 5.6 ns coincidence time resolution. A closed-cornered box-shaped detector configuration was found to provide optimal photon sensitivity (˜10.5% in the central plane) using dual LSO-PSAPD scintillation detector modules and Monte Carlo simulation. Standard figures of merit were used to determine optimal system acquisition parameters. A realistic model for constituent devices was developed for understanding the signals reported by the

  4. IMAGING SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION VIA ARACHIDONIC ACID IN THE HUMAN BRAIN DURING VISUAL STIMULATION, BY MEANS OF POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Giuseppe; Giovacchini, Giampiero; Der, Margaret; Liow, Jeih-San; Bhattacharjee, Abesh K.; Ma, Kaizong; Herscovitch, Peter; Channing, Michael; Eckelman, William C.; Hallett, Mark; Carson, Richard E.; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2007-01-01

    Background Arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6), an important second messenger, is released from membrane phospholipid following receptor mediated activation of phospholipase A2 (PLA2). This signaling process can be imaged in brain as a regional brain AA incorporation coefficient K*. Hypothesis K* will be increased in brain visual areas of subjects submitted to visual stimulation. Subjects and methods Regional values of K* were measured with positron emission tomography (PET), following the intravenous injection of [1-11C]AA, in 16 healthy volunteers subjected to visual stimulation at flash frequencies 2.9 Hz (8 subjects) or 7.8 Hz (8 subjects), compared with the dark (0 Hz) condition. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured with intravenous [15O]water under comparable conditions. Results During flash stimulation at 2.9 Hz or 7.8 Hz vs. 0 Hz, K* was increased significantly by 2.3–8.9% in Brodmann areas 17, 18 and 19, and in additional frontal, parietal and temporal cortical regions. rCBF was increased significantly by 3.1% – 22%, often in comparable regions. Increments at 7.8 Hz often exceeded those at 2.9 Hz for both K* and rCBF. Decrements in both parameters also were produced, particularly in frontal brain regions. Conclusions AA plays a role in signaling processes provoked by visual stimulation, since visual stimulation at flash frequencies of 2.9 and 7.8 Hz compared to 0 Hz modifies both K* for AA and rCBF in visual and related areas of the human brain. The two-stimulus condition paradigm of this study might be used with PET to image effects of other functional activations and of drugs on brain signaling via AA. PMID:17196833

  5. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Angiogenesis in a Murine Hindlimb Ischemia Model with 64Cu-Labeled TRC105

    PubMed Central

    Orbay, Hakan; Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Hacker, Timothy A.; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Zagzebski, James A.; Theuer, Charles P.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Cai, Weibo

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess ischemia-induced angiogenesis with 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105 positron emission tomography (PET) in a murine hindlimb ischemia model of peripheral artery disease (PAD). CD105 binding affinity/specificity of NOTA-conjugated TRC105 (an anti-CD105 antibody) was evaluated by flow cytometry, which exhibited no difference from unconjugated TRC105. BALB/c mice were anesthetized and the right femoral artery was ligated to induce hindlimb ischemia, with the left hindlimb serving as an internal control. Laser Doppler imaging showed that perfusion in the ischemic hindlimb plummeted to ~20% of the normal level after surgery, and gradually recovered to near normal level on day 24. Ischemia-induced angiogenesis was non-invasively monitored and quantified with 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105 PET on postoperative days 1, 3, 10, 17, & 24. 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105 uptake in the ischemic hindlimb increased significantly from the control level of 1.6±0.2 %ID/g to 14.1±1.9 %ID/g at day 3 (n=3), and gradually decreased with time (3.4±1.9 %ID/g at day 24), which correlated well with biodistribution studies performed on days 3 & 24. Blocking studies confirmed the CD105 specificity of tracer uptake in the ischemic hindlimb. Increased CD105 expression on days 3 and 10 following ischemia was confirmed by histology and RT-PCR. This is the first report of PET imaging of CD105 expression during ischemia-induced angiogenesis. 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105 PET may play multiple roles in future PAD-related research and improve PAD patient management by identifying the optimal timing of treatment and monitoring the efficacy of therapy. PMID:23738915

  6. Evaluation of treatment response using integrated 18F-labeled choline positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging in adolescents with intracranial non-germinomatous germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Tsouana, Eva; Stoneham, Sara; Fersht, Naomi; Kitchen, Neil; Gaze, Mark; Bomanji, Jamshed; Fraioli, Francesco; Hargrave, Darren; Shankar, Ananth

    2015-09-01

    The efficacy of hybrid 18F-Fluroethyl-Choline (FEC) positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was investigated as an imaging modality for diagnosis and assessment of treatment response and remission status in four patients with proven or suspected intracranial non-germinomatous germ cell tumours (NGGCT). In two patients faint or absent choline avidity correlated with negative histology, whereas in other two patients, persistent choline avidity in the residual mass was suggestive of presence of viable tumour, subsequently confirmed histologically. We conclude that FEC-PET/MRI may be an effective imaging tool in detecting viable residual tumour in patients with intracranial NGGCT post treatment. PMID:25854508

  7. A Novel Method to Label Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs) with 64Cu for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Andreozzi, Erica; Seo, Jai Woong; Ferrara, Katherine; Louie, Angelique

    2011-01-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) are sub-micron (1–1000 nm) colloidal carriers developed in the last decade as an alternative system to traditional carriers (emulsions, liposomes and polymeric nanoparticles) for intravenous applications.(1) Because of their potential as drug carriers, there is much interest in understanding the in vivo biodistribution of SLNs following intravenous (i.v) injection. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an attractive method for investigating biodistribution but requires a radiolabeled compound. In this work, we describe a method to radiolabel SLN for in vivo PET studies. A copper specific chelator, 6-[p-(bromoacetamido)benzyl]-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-N,N′,N″,N‴-tetraacetic acid (BAT), conjugated with a synthetic lipid,(2) was incorporated into the SLN. Following incubation with 64CuCl2 for 1 hr at 25 °C in 0.1 M NH4OAc buffer (pH 5.5), the SLNs (~150 nm) were successfully radiolabeled with 64Cu (66.5% radiolabeling yield), exhibiting >95% radiolabeled particles following purification. The 64Cu-SLNs were delivered intravenously to mice and imaged with PET at 0.5, 3, 20, and 48 hr post injection. Gamma counting was utilized post imaging to confirm organ distributions. Tissue radioactivity (% injected dose/gram, %ID/g) obtained by quantitative analysis of the images suggests that the 64Cu-SLNs are circulating in the bloodstream after 3 hr (blood half life ~1.4 hr), but are almost entirely cleared by 48 hr. PET and gamma counting confirm approximately 5–7 %ID/g 64Cu-SLNs remaining in the liver at 48 hr post injection. Stability assays confirm that copper remains associated with the SLN over the 48 hr time period and that the biodistribution patterns observed are not from free, dissociated copper. Our results indicate that SLNs can be radiolabeled with 64Cu and their biodistribution can be quantitatively evaluated by in vivo PET imaging and ex vivo gamma counting. PMID:21388194

  8. Identification of ABC Transporter Interaction of a Novel Cyanoquinoline Radiotracer and Implications for Tumour Imaging by Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Rozanna L.; Pisaneschi, Federica; Nguyen, Quang-De; Smith, Graham; Carroll, Laurence; Beckley, Alice; Kaliszczak, Maciej A.; Aboagye, Eric O.

    2016-01-01

    Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in many cancers including lung, ovarian, breast, head and neck and brain. Mutation of this receptor has been shown to play a crucial role in the response of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) to EGFR-targeted therapies. It is envisaged that imaging of EGFR using positron emission tomography (PET) could aid in selection of patients for treatment with novel inhibitors. We recognised multi-drug resistant phenotype as a threat to development of successful imaging agents. In this report, we describe discovery of a novel cyanoquinoline radiotracer that lacks ABC transporter activity. Methods Cellular retention of the prototype cyanoquinoline [18F](2E)-N-{4-[(3-chloro-4-fluorophenyl)amino]-3-cyano-7-ethoxyquinolin-6-yl}-4-({[1-(2-fluoroethyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl]methyl}amino)-but-2-enamide ([18F]FED6) and [18F](2E)-N-{4-[(3-chloro-4-fluorophenyl)amino]-3-cyano-7-ethoxyquinolin-6-yl}-4-[({1-[(2R,5S)-3-fluoro-4,5-dihydroxy-6-(hydroxymethyl)oxan-2-yl]-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl}methyl)amino]but-2-enamide ([18F]FED20) were evaluated to establish potential for imaging specificity. The substrate specificity of a number of cyanoquinolines towards ABC transporters was investigated in cell lines proficient or deficient in ABCB1 or ABCG2. Results FED6 demonstrated substrate specificity for both ABCG2 and ABCB1, a property that was not observed for all cyanoquinolines tested, suggesting scope for designing novel probes. ABC transporter activity was confirmed by attenuating the activity of transporters with drug inhibitors or siRNA. We synthesized a more hydrophilic compound [18F]FED20 to overcome ABC transporter activity. FED20 lacked substrate specificity for both ABCB1 and ABCG2, and maintained a strong affinity for EGFR. Furthermore, FED20 showed higher inhibitory affinity for active mutant EGFR versus wild-type or resistant mutant EGFR; this property resulted in higher [18F]FED20 cellular retention in active

  9. Carbon-11 and fluorine-18 chemistry devoted to molecular probes for imaging the brain with positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Dollé, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Exploration of the living human brain in real-time and in a noninvasive way was for centuries only a dream, made, however, possible today with the remarkable development during the four last decades of powerful molecular imaging techniques, and especially positron emission tomography (PET). Molecular PET imaging relies, from a chemical point of view, on the use and preparation of a positron-emitting radiolabelled probe or radiotracer, notably compounds incorporating one of two short-lived radionuclides fluorine-18 (T1/2 : 109.8 min) and carbon-11 (T1/2 : 20.38 min). The growing availability and interest for the radiohalogen fluorine-18 in radiopharmaceutical chemistry undoubtedly results from its convenient half-life and the successful use in clinical oncology of 2-[(18) F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ([(18) F]FDG). The special interest of carbon-11 is not only that carbon is present in virtually all biomolecules and drugs allowing therefore for isotopic labelling of their chemical structures but also that a given molecule could be radiolabelled at different functions or sites, permitting to explore (or to take advantage of) in vivo metabolic pathways. PET chemistry includes production of these short-lived radioactive isotopes via nuclear transmutation reactions using a cyclotron, and is directed towards the development of rapid synthetic methods, at the trace level, for the introduction of these nuclides into a molecule, as well as the use of fast purification, analysis and formulation techniques. PET chemistry is the driving force in molecular PET imaging, and this special issue of the Journal of Labelled Compounds and Radiopharmaceuticals, which is strongly chemistry and radiochemistry-oriented, aims at illustrating, be it in part only, the state-of-the-art arsenal of reactions currently available and its potential for the research and development of specific molecular probes labelled with the positron emitters carbon-11 and fluorine-18, with optimal imaging

  10. Micro-positron emission tomography imaging of rat brain metabolism during expression of contextual conditioning.

    PubMed

    Luyten, Laura; Casteels, Cindy; Vansteenwegen, Debora; van Kuyck, Kris; Koole, Michel; Van Laere, Koen; Nuttin, Bart

    2012-01-01

    Using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose microPET imaging, we investigated the neurocircuitry of contextual anxiety versus control in awake, conditioned rats (n = 7-10 per group). In addition, we imaged a group expressing cued fear. Simultaneous measurements of startle amplitude and freezing time were used to assess conditioning. To the best of our knowledge, no neuroimaging studies in conditioned rats have been conducted thus far, although visualizing and quantifying the metabolism of the intact brain in behaving animals is clearly of interest. In addition, more insight into the neurocircuitry involved in contextual anxiety may stimulate the development of new treatments for anxiety disorders. Our main finding was hypermetabolism in a cluster comprising the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) in rats expressing contextual anxiety compared with controls. Analysis of a subset of rats showing the best behavioral results (n = 5 per subgroup) confirmed this finding. We also observed hypermetabolism in the same cluster in rats expressing contextual anxiety compared with rats expressing cued fear. Our results provide novel evidence for a role of the BST in the expression of contextual anxiety. PMID:22219287

  11. Scintillators for positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1995-09-01

    Like most applications that utilize scintillators for gamma detection, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) desires materials with high light output, short decay time, and excellent stopping power that are also inexpensive, mechanically rugged, and chemically inert. Realizing that this ``ultimate`` scintillator may not exist, this paper evaluates the relative importance of these qualities and describes their impact on the imaging performance of PET. The most important PET scintillator quality is the ability to absorb 511 keV photons in a small volume, which affects the spatial resolution of the camera. The dominant factor is a short attenuation length ({le} 1.5 cm is required), although a high photoelectric fraction is also important (> 30% is desired). The next most important quality is a short decay time, which affects both the dead time and the coincidence timing resolution. Detection rates for single 511 keV photons can be extremely high, so decay times {le} 500 ns are essential to avoid dead time losses. In addition, positron annihilations are identified by time coincidence so {le}5 ns fwhm coincidence pair timing resolution is required to identify events with narrow coincidence windows, reducing contamination due to accidental coincidences. Current trends in PET cameras are toward septaless, ``fully-3D`` cameras, which have significantly higher count rates than conventional 2-D cameras and so place higher demands on scintillator decay time. Light output affects energy resolution, and thus the ability of the camera to identify and reject events where the initial 511 keV photon has undergone Compton scatter in the patient. The scatter to true event fraction is much higher in fully-3D cameras than in 2-D cameras, so future PET cameras would benefit from scintillators with a 511 keV energy resolution < 10--12% fwhm.

  12. In Vivo Targeting and Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Tumor Vasculature with 66Ga-Labeled Nano-Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Engle, Jonathan W.; Nayak, Tapas R.; Theuer, Charles P.; Nickles, Robert J.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Cai, Weibo

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to employ nano-graphene for tumor targeting in an animal tumor model, and quantitatively evaluate the pharmacokinetics and tumor targeting efficacy through positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using 66Ga as the radiolabel. Nano-graphene oxide (GO) sheets with covalently linked, amino group-terminated six-arm branched polyethylene glycol (PEG; 10 kDa) chains were conjugated to NOTA (1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid, for 66Ga-labeling) and TRC105 (an antibody that binds to CD105). Flow cytometry analyses, size measurements, and serum stability studies were performed to characterize the GO conjugates before in vivo investigations in 4T1 murine breast tumor-bearing mice, which were further validated by histology. TRC105-conjugated GO was specific for CD105 in cell culture. 66Ga-NOTA-GO-TRC105 and 66Ga-NOTA-GO exhibited excellent stability in complete mouse serum. In 4T1 tumor-bearing mice, these GO conjugates were primarily cleared through the hepatobiliary pathway. 66Ga-NOTA-GO-TRC105 accumulated quickly in the 4T1 tumors and tumor uptake remained stable over time (3.8 ± 0.4, 4.5 ± 0.4, 5.8 ± 0.3, and 4.5 ± 0.4 %ID/g at 0.5, 3, 7, and 24 h post-injection respectively; n = 4). Blocking studies with unconjugated TRC105 confirmed CD105 specificity of 66Ga-NOTA-GO-TRC105, which was corroborated by biodistribution and histology studies. Furthermore, histological examination revealed that targeting of NOTA-GO-TRC105 is tumor vasculature CD105 specific with little extravasation. Successful demonstration of in vivo tumor targeting with GO, along with the versatile chemistry of graphene-based nanomaterials, makes them suitable nanoplatforms for future biomedical research such as cancer theranostics. PMID:22386918

  13. Decreased Norepinephrine Transporter Availability in Obesity: Positron Emission Tomography Imaging with (S,S)-[11C]O-Methylreboxetine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chiang-shan R.; Potenza, Marc N.; Lee, Dianne E.; Planeta, Beata; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Labaree, David; Henry, Shannan; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Sinha, Rajita; Ding, Yu-Shin; Carson, Richard E.; Neumeister, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Noradrenergic dysfunction is implicated in obesity. The norepinephrine transporter (NET) regulates the synaptic availability of norepinephrine. However, NET availability has not been previously characterized in vivo in obese people using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging. Here we report findings evaluating NET availability in individuals with obesity and matched lean (i.e., normal weight) comparison subjects. Methods Seventeen obese but otherwise healthy individuals with a mean±SD body mass index (BMI) of 34.7±2.6 and 17 lean individuals with a mean±SD BMI of 23.1±1.4 were studied using a High-Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) and (S,S)-[11C]O-methylreboxetine ([11C]-MRB), a radioligand selective for the NET. The regional brain NET binding potential (BPND) was estimated by the multilinear reference tissue model 2 (MRTM2) with the occipital cortex as a reference region. BPND for regions of interest were obtained with the Automated Anatomic Labeling (AAL) template registered to individual’s structural MR scans. Results Obese individuals had lower NET BPND values in the thalamus (p<0.038, 27% reduction) including within the pulvinar (p<0.083, 30% reduction), but not in the hypothalamus, locus coeruleus or the raphe nuclei, compared to lean individuals. When age was included as a covariate, the difference in NET BPND values remained significant in the thalamus (p<0.025) and pulvinar (p<0.042). Conclusions These results indicate that NET availability is decreased in the thalamus, including the pulvinar, in obese individuals. These findings further support data indicating noradrenergic dysfunction in obesity and suggest impaired NE clearance in obesity. PMID:24121204

  14. Quantitative comparison of functional magnetic resonance imaging with positron emission tomography using a force-related paradigm.

    PubMed

    Dettmers, C; Connelly, A; Stephan, K M; Turner, R; Friston, K J; Frackowiak, R S; Gadian, D G

    1996-12-01

    The intention of our study was to compare functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with positron emission tomography (PET). We used the same force-related motor paradigm for both techniques, which allows for quantification of stimulus intensity. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was determined with PET in six male subjects (age 30 +/- 3) using the slow bolus injection technique and oxygen-15-labeled water. Scans were collected during six different conditions: at rest and during repetitive Morse key press at 1 Hz, with the right index finger at a range of different forces. In a second series of experiments fMRI data were acquired under similar conditions in six volunteers in a single slice parallel to and 51 +/- 3 mm dorsal to the anterior and posterior commissure (AC-PC). A conventional 1.5-T clinical magnetic resonance (MR) system and the FLASH technique were used. The data obtained in both series of experiments were subjected to the same statistical analyses. Statistical parametric maps (SPM) were generated by two different approaches: a correlation between peak force and rCBF or fMRI signal and using a categorical comparison of force exerted with rest. SPMs were coregistered with anatomical MR images. PET and fMRI measurements demonstrated activation in the primary motor cortex (M1) and posterior supplementary motor cortex in all subjects. Correlation analysis demonstrated foci in the M1 in four subjects with PET and in only one subject with fMRI. Locations of activation peaks differed by 2 to 8 mm between imaging methods. The relationship between fMRI signal or rCBF and peak force was logarithmic. The maximum increase in fMRI signal was 5.0% +/- 0.9 at 60% of the maximum voluntary contraction while the corresponding increase in rCBF was 13.7% +/- 1.2. The ratio of percentage rCBF change to percentage fMRI signal change was very similar across all force levels. The high degree of correspondence between PET and fMRI data provides good cross-validation for

  15. Iterative image reconstruction for positron emission tomography based on a detector response function estimated from point source measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohme, Michel S.; Qi, Jinyi

    2009-06-01

    The accuracy of the system model in an iterative reconstruction algorithm greatly affects the quality of reconstructed positron emission tomography (PET) images. For efficient computation in reconstruction, the system model in PET can be factored into a product of a geometric projection matrix and sinogram blurring matrix, where the former is often computed based on analytical calculation, and the latter is estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. Direct measurement of a sinogram blurring matrix is difficult in practice because of the requirement of a collimated source. In this work, we propose a method to estimate the 2D blurring kernels from uncollimated point source measurements. Since the resulting sinogram blurring matrix stems from actual measurements, it can take into account the physical effects in the photon detection process that are difficult or impossible to model in a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, and hence provide a more accurate system model. Another advantage of the proposed method over MC simulation is that it can easily be applied to data that have undergone a transformation to reduce the data size (e.g., Fourier rebinning). Point source measurements were acquired with high count statistics in a relatively fine grid inside the microPET II scanner using a high-precision 2D motion stage. A monotonically convergent iterative algorithm has been derived to estimate the detector blurring matrix from the point source measurements. The algorithm takes advantage of the rotational symmetry of the PET scanner and explicitly models the detector block structure. The resulting sinogram blurring matrix is incorporated into a maximum a posteriori (MAP) image reconstruction algorithm. The proposed method has been validated using a 3 × 3 line phantom, an ultra-micro resolution phantom and a 22Na point source superimposed on a warm background. The results of the proposed method show improvements in both resolution and contrast ratio when compared with the MAP

  16. Iterative Image Reconstruction for Positron Emission Tomography Based on Detector Response Function Estimated from Point Source Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Tohme, Michel S.; Qi, Jinyi

    2009-01-01

    The accuracy of the system model in an iterative reconstruction algorithm greatly affects the quality of reconstructed positron emission tomography (PET) images. For efficient computation in reconstruction, the system model in PET can be factored into a product of a geometric projection matrix and sinogram blurring matrix, where the former is often computed based on analytical calculation, and the latter is estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. Direct measurement of sinogram blurring matrix is difficult in practice because of the requirement of a collimated source. In this work, we propose a method to estimate the 2D blurring kernels from uncollimated point source measurements. Since the resulting sinogram blurring matrix stems from actual measurements, it can take into account the physical effects in the photon detection process that are difficult or impossible to model in a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, and hence provide a more accurate system model. Another advantage of the proposed method over MC simulation is that it can be easily applied to data that have undergone a transformation to reduce the data size (e.g., Fourier rebinning). Point source measurements were acquired with high count statistics in a relatively fine grid inside the microPET II scanner using a high-precision 2-D motion stage. A monotonically convergent iterative algorithm has been derived to estimate the detector blurring matrix from the point source measurements. The algorithm takes advantage of the rotational symmetry of the PET scanner and explicitly models the detector block structure. The resulting sinogram blurring matrix is incorporated into a maximum a posteriori (MAP) image reconstruction algorithm. The proposed method has been validated using a 3-by-3 line phantom, an ultra-micro resolution phantom, and a 22Na point source superimposed on a warm background. The results of the proposed method show improvements in both resolution and contrast ratio when compared with the MAP

  17. Radiohalogen-labeled imaging agents. 3. Compounds for measurement of brain blood flow by emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, T.; Shulgin, A.T.; Mathis, C.A.

    1984-08-01

    The radioiodine-labeled amines currently available as brain-imaging agents, based on our previous work and that of others, are prepared either by exchange labeling or by direct iodination of a protected intermediate. The intrinsic slowness of these processes limits their potential for use with the positron-emitting 122I, as it has a half-life of only 3.6 min. This isotope has advantages of a low dose to the patient and availability from a generator containing the parent 20-h 122Xe. To develop a radiopharmaceutical in which 122I could be utilized, we prepared a number of secondary and tertiary amines (maintaining the 2,5-dimethoxy substitution pattern which allows direct iodination at the 4-position) with 131I. The organ distributions of these compounds were studied, and the best properties were found in the N,N-dimethyl homologue (2,5-dimethoxy-N,N-dimethyl-4-iodoamphetamine). This compound was successfully synthesized in a matter of seconds, with a chemical yield and radioactive purity both in excess of 90% and an incorporation efficiency of radioiodine of about 40%.

  18. Imaging of acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma by contrast-enhanced ultrasonography with perflubutane microbubbles and positron emission tomography-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Isao; Morita, Kyoko; Hayama, Satoshi; Nakazawa, Tetsuya; Araki, Ichiro; Higashi, Kotaro; Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Suzuki, Koji; Nojima, Takayuki

    2011-02-01

    The preoperative assessment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) complicated with acquired renal cystic disease in a 63-year-old male patient on long-term hemodialysis (30 years and 8 months) that was difficult because of no or poor contrast enhancement by dynamic CT scan is reported. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography with perflubutane microbubbles and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxy glucose (FDG) in addition to dynamic CT were effective and useful for preoperative assessment of this patient. The pathological subtype of RCC in this patient was acquired cystic disease-associated RCC (ACD-associated RCC), which has been newly defined by Tickoo et al. (Am J Surg Pathol 30:141-153, 2006). PMID:20824295

  19. Imaging the role of toll-like receptor 4 on cell proliferation and inflammation after cerebral ischemia by positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Moraga, Ana; Gómez-Vallejo, Vanessa; Cuartero, María Isabel; Szczupak, Boguslaw; San Sebastián, Eneko; Markuerkiaga, Irati; Pradillo, Jesús M; Higuchi, Makoto; Llop, Jordi; Moro, María Ángeles; Martín, Abraham; Lizasoain, Ignacio

    2016-04-01

    The influence of toll-like receptor 4 on neurogenesis and inflammation has been scarcely explored so far by using neuroimaging techniques. For this purpose, we performed magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography with 3'-deoxy-3'-[(18)F]fluorothymidine and [(11)C]PK11195 at 2, 7, and 14 days following cerebral ischemia in TLR4(+/+)and TLR4(-/-)mice. MRI showed similar infarction volumes in both groups. Despite this, positron emission tomography with 3'-deoxy-3'-[(18)F]fluorothymidine and [(11)C]PK11195 evidenced an increase of neurogenesis and a decrease of inflammation in TLR4(-/-)mice after ischemia. These results evidence the versatility of neuroimaging techniques to monitor the role of toll-like receptor 4 after cerebral ischemia. PMID:26787106

  20. Positron Emission Tomography: Its 65 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Guerra, A.; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M.

    2016-04-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a well-established imaging technique for in vivo molecular imaging. In this review after a brief history of PET there are presented its physical principles and the technology that has been developed for bringing PET from a bench experiment to a clinical indispensable instrument. The limitations and performance of the PET tomographs are discussed, both as for the hardware and software aspects. The status of art of clinical, pre-clinical and hybrid scanners (, PET/CT and PET/MR) is reported. Finally the actual trend and the recent and future technological developments are fully illustrated.

  1. [Value of positron emission tomography and computer tomography (PET/CT) for urologic malignancies].

    PubMed

    Boujelbene, N; Prior, J O; Boubaker, A; Azria, D; Schaffer, M; Gez, E; Jichlinski, P; Meuwly, J-Y; Mirimanoff, R O; Ozsahin, M; Zouhair, A

    2011-07-01

    Positron emission tomography is a functional imaging technique that allows the detection of the regional metabolic rate, and is often coupled with other morphological imaging technique such as computed tomography. The rationale for its use is based on the clearly demonstrated fact that functional changes in tumor processes happen before morphological changes. Its introduction to the clinical practice added a new dimension in conventional imaging techniques. This review presents the current and proposed indications of the use of positron emission/computed tomography for prostate, bladder and testes, and the potential role of this exam in radiotherapy planning. PMID:21507695

  2. Current Opportunities and Challenges of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Positron Emission Tomography, and Mass Spectrometry Imaging for Mapping Cancer Metabolism In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yuen-Li

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is known to have unique metabolic features such as Warburg effect. Current cancer therapy has moved forward from cytotoxic treatment to personalized, targeted therapies, with some that could lead to specific metabolic changes, potentially monitored by imaging methods. In this paper we addressed the important aspects to study cancer metabolism by using image techniques, focusing on opportunities and challenges of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-MRS, positron emission tomography (PET), and mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) for mapping cancer metabolism. Finally, we highlighted the future possibilities of an integrated in vivo PET/MR imaging systems, together with an in situ MSI tissue analytical platform, may become the ultimate technologies for unraveling and understanding the molecular complexities in some aspects of cancer metabolism. Such comprehensive imaging investigations might provide information on pharmacometabolomics, biomarker discovery, and disease diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment response monitoring for clinical medicine. PMID:24724090

  3. [Fundamentals of positron emission tomography].

    PubMed

    Ostertag, H

    1989-07-01

    Positron emission tomography is a modern radionuclide method of measuring physiological quantities or metabolic parameters in vivo. The method is based on: (1) radioactive labelling with positron emitters; (2) the coincidence technique for the measurement of the annihilation radiation following positron decay; (3) analysis of the data measured using biological models. The basic aspects and problems of the method are discussed. The main fields of future research are the synthesis of new labelled compounds and the development of mathematical models of the biological processes to be investigated. PMID:2667029

  4. Compartmental Modeling in Emission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammertsma, Adriaan A.

    This chapter provides an overview of the basic principles of compartmental modeling as it is being applied to the quantitative analysis of positron emission tomography (PET) studies. Measurement of blood flow (perfusion) is used as an example of a single tissue compartment model and receptor studies are discussed in relation to a two tissue compartment model. Emphasis is placed on the accurate measurement of both arterial whole blood and metabolite-corrected plasma input functions. Reference tissue models are introduced as a noninvasive tool to investigate neuroreceptor studies. Finally, parametric methods are introduced in which calculations are performed at a voxel level.

  5. Positron emission tomography and radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, PhD, Gary D.; Fox, MD, Peter; Phillips, MD, William T.

    2001-10-01

    Medical physics research is providing new avenues for addressing the fundamental problem of radiation therapy-how to provide a tumor-killing dose while reducing the dose to a non-lethal level for critical organs in adjacent portions of the patient anatomy. This talk reviews the revolutionary impact of Positron Emission Tomography on the practice of radiation oncology. The concepts of PET imaging and the development of "tumor" imaging methods using 18F-DG flouro-deoxyglucose are presented to provide the foundation for contemporary research and application to therapy. PET imaging influences radiation therapy decisions in multiple ways. Imaging of occult but viable tumor metastases eliminates misguided therapy attempts. The ability to distinguish viable tumor from scar tissue and necroses allows reduction of treatment portals and more selective treatments. Much research remains before the clinical benefits of these advances are fully realized.

  6. Positron Emission Tomography with improved spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Drukier, A.K.

    1990-04-01

    Applied Research Corporation (ARC) proposed the development of a new class of solid state detectors called Superconducting Granular Detectors (SGD). These new detectors permit considerable improvements in medical imaging, e.g. Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The biggest impact of this technique will be in imaging of the brain. It should permit better clinical diagnosis of such important diseases as Altzheimer's or schizophrenia. More specifically, we will develop an improved PET-imager; a spatial resolution 2 mm may be achievable with SGD. A time-of-flight capability(t {approx} 100 psec) will permit better contrast and facilitate 3D imaging. In the following, we describe the results of the first 9 months of the development.

  7. An automated normative-based fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography image-analysis procedure to aid Alzheimer disease diagnosis using statistical parametric mapping and interactive image display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kewei; Ge, Xiaolin; Yao, Li; Bandy, Dan; Alexander, Gene E.; Prouty, Anita; Burns, Christine; Zhao, Xiaojie; Wen, Xiaotong; Korn, Ronald; Lawson, Michael; Reiman, Eric M.

    2006-03-01

    Having approved fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in some patients, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services suggested the need to develop and test analysis techniques to optimize diagnostic accuracy. We developed an automated computer package comparing an individual's FDG PET image to those of a group of normal volunteers. The normal control group includes FDG-PET images from 82 cognitively normal subjects, 61.89+/-5.67 years of age, who were characterized demographically, clinically, neuropsychologically, and by their apolipoprotein E genotype (known to be associated with a differential risk for AD). In addition, AD-affected brain regions functionally defined as based on a previous study (Alexander, et al, Am J Psychiatr, 2002) were also incorporated. Our computer package permits the user to optionally select control subjects, matching the individual patient for gender, age, and educational level. It is fully streamlined to require minimal user intervention. With one mouse click, the program runs automatically, normalizing the individual patient image, setting up a design matrix for comparing the single subject to a group of normal controls, performing the statistics, calculating the glucose reduction overlap index of the patient with the AD-affected brain regions, and displaying the findings in reference to the AD regions. In conclusion, the package automatically contrasts a single patient to a normal subject database using sound statistical procedures. With further validation, this computer package could be a valuable tool to assist physicians in decision making and communicating findings with patients and patient families.

  8. Array tomography: semiautomated image alignment.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time-consuming and require some practice to perfect. Successful array tomography requires that the captured images be properly stacked and aligned, and the software to achieve these ends is freely available. This protocol describes the construction of volumetric image stacks from images of fluorescently labeled arrays for three-dimensional image visualization, analysis, and archiving. PMID:21041400

  9. Single photon emission computed tomography-guided Cerenkov luminescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhenhua; Chen, Xueli; Liang, Jimin; Qu, Xiaochao; Chen, Duofang; Yang, Weidong; Wang, Jing; Cao, Feng; Tian, Jie

    2012-07-01

    Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT) has become a valuable tool for preclinical imaging because of its ability of reconstructing the three-dimensional distribution and activity of the radiopharmaceuticals. However, it is still far from a mature technology and suffers from relatively low spatial resolution due to the ill-posed inverse problem for the tomographic reconstruction. In this paper, we presented a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-guided reconstruction method for CLT, in which a priori information of the permissible source region (PSR) from SPECT imaging results was incorporated to effectively reduce the ill-posedness of the inverse reconstruction problem. The performance of the method was first validated with the experimental reconstruction of an adult athymic nude mouse implanted with a Na131I radioactive source and an adult athymic nude mouse received an intravenous tail injection of Na131I. A tissue-mimic phantom based experiment was then conducted to illustrate the ability of the proposed method in resolving double sources. Compared with the traditional PSR strategy in which the PSR was determined by the surface flux distribution, the proposed method obtained much more accurate and encouraging localization and resolution results. Preliminary results showed that the proposed SPECT-guided reconstruction method was insensitive to the regularization methods and ignored the heterogeneity of tissues which can avoid the segmentation procedure of the organs.

  10. Noninvasive Assessment of Tumor Microenvironment Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging and {sup 18}F-Fluoromisonidazole Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in Neck Nodal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Jacobus; Schoeder, Heiko; Lee, Nancy Y.; Wang Ya

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To assess noninvasively the tumor microenvironment of neck nodal metastases in patients with head-and-neck cancer by investigating the relationship between tumor perfusion measured using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and hypoxia measured by {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole ({sup 18}F-FMISO) positron emission tomography (PET). Methods and Materials: Thirteen newly diagnosed head-and-neck cancer patients with metastatic neck nodes underwent DCE-MRI and {sup 18}F-FMISO PET imaging before chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The matched regions of interests from both modalities were analyzed. To examine the correlations between DCE-MRI parameters and standard uptake value (SUV) measurements from {sup 18}F-FMISO PET, the nonparametric Spearman correlation coefficient was calculated. Furthermore, DCE-MRI parameters were compared between nodes with {sup 18}F-FMISO uptake and nodes with no {sup 18}F-FMISO uptake using Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: For the 13 patients, a total of 18 nodes were analyzed. The nodal size strongly correlated with the {sup 18}F-FMISO SUV ({rho} = 0.74, p < 0.001). There was a strong negative correlation between the median k{sub ep} (redistribution rate constant) value ({rho} = -0.58, p = 0.042) and the {sup 18}F-FMISO SUV. Hypoxic nodes (moderate to severe {sup 18}F-FMISO uptake) had significantly lower median K{sup trans} (volume transfer constant) (p = 0.049) and median k{sub ep} (p = 0.027) values than did nonhypoxic nodes (no {sup 18}F-FMISO uptake). Conclusion: This initial evaluation of the preliminary results support the hypothesis that in metastatic neck lymph nodes, hypoxic nodes are poorly perfused (i.e., have significantly lower K{sup trans} and k{sub ep} values) compared with nonhypoxic nodes.