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Sample records for emissions database gfed

  1. Global Fire Emissions Database version 4 (GFED4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Werf, G.; Randerson, J. T.; Giglio, L.; Chen, Y.; Rogers, B. M.; Van Leeuwen, T. T.

    2014-12-01

    We present the fourth generation of our Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED4). Burned area was derived from satellite-based 500-meter maps (MODIS MCD64A1 burned area product) for the MODIS era and relations with active fire detections from the VIRS and ATSR sensors for the pre-MODIS era as described in the GFED4 burned area dataset. In addition, we added new estimates of contributions in burned area from relatively small fires that were detected by active fire algorithms but not the MCD64A1 product. Modeled fuel consumption was optimized in the modeling framework by adjusting turnover rates and compared reasonably well with measurements at the biome-level. However, discrepancies are still substantial in some biomes, highlighting the difficulty in representing fuel dynamics. For the boreal biome, we used new satellite-derived information to inform combustion completeness and fire-induced tree mortality. In general, fuel consumption (kg C m-2 of burned area) decreased compared to GFED3, especially in regions dominated by herbaceous fuels. This is compensated for by the higher burned area estimates due to the addition of small fire burned area. However, these small fires are difficult to validate at large scales, which adds to our uncertainty. In regions where small fires may play a large role, including the US, Central America, Europe, and parts of Southeast Asia, emissions have increased substantially and are now sometimes twice as high as GFED3 estimates. Global mean annual emissions over 1997-2013 were 2.1 Pg C, 350 Tg CO, and 16 Tg CH4; in general somewhat higher than GFED3 because increases in burned area were larger than decreases in fuel consumption. Interannual variability was especially large in the first years of our record with high emissions in 1997 and 1998 (3.0 and 2.7 Pg C, respectively), while the lowest year in our record was 2000 (1.8 Pg C). Emissions were also relatively low during the latter part of the record with decreasing emissions from fires associated with tropical deforestation and with socio-economic developments in northern hemisphere Africa. Interannual variability was still substantial after 2000 in many regions, especially those with high forest cover, but these regions tended to cancel each other out on a global scale; emissions remained between 1.8 and 2.3 Pg C per year after 2000.

  2. Analysis of daily, monthly, and annual burned area using the fourth-generation global fire emissions database (GFED4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giglio, Louis; Randerson, James T.; Werf, Guido R.

    2013-03-01

    Abstract We describe the fourth generation of the Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>4) burned area data set, which provides global monthly burned area at 0.25 spatial resolution from mid-1995 through the present and daily burned area for the time series extending back to August 2000. We produced the full data set by combining 500 m MODIS burned area maps with active fire data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Visible and Infrared Scanner (VIRS) and the Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) family of sensors. We found that the global annual area burned for the years 1997 through 2011 varied from 301 to 377Mha, with an average of 348Mha. We assessed the interannual variability and trends in burned area on the basis of a region-specific definition of fire years. With respect to trends, we found a gradual decrease of 1.7Mhayr - 1 ( - 1.4%yr - 1) in Northern Hemisphere Africa since 2000, a gradual increase of 2.3Mhayr - 1 (+1.8%yr - 1) in Southern Hemisphere Africa also since 2000, a slight increase of 0.2Mhayr - 1 (+2.5%yr - 1) in Southeast Asia since 1997, and a rapid decrease of approximately 5.5Mhayr - 1 ( - 10.7%yr - 1) from 2001 through 2011 in Australia, followed by a major upsurge in 2011 that exceeded the annual area burned in at least the previous 14 years. The net trend in global burned area from 2000 to 2012 was a modest decrease of 4.3Mhayr - 1 ( - 1.2%yr - 1). We also performed a spectral analysis of the daily burned area time series and found no vestiges of the 16 day MODIS repeat cycle.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..1213010V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..1213010V"><span id="translatedtitle">The improved Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>) version 3: contribution of savanna, forest, deforestation, and peat fires to the global fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> budget</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>van der Werf, Guido; Randerson, Jim; Giglio, Louis; Collatz, Jim; Kasibhatla, Prasad; Morton, Doug; Defries, Ruth</p> <p>2010-05-01</p> <p>Global fire activity is an important contributor to the atmospheric trace gas and aerosol burdens. New burned area datasets and top-down constraints from atmospheric concentration measurements of pyrogenic gases have decreased the large uncertainty in fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> estimates, but little is known about the contribution of deforestation, agricultural waste, peat, forest, and savanna fires to total global fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. Here we used a revised version of the CASA biogeochemical model and improved satellite-derived estimates of area burned, fire activity, and plant productivity to calculate fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> for the 1997-2008 period on a 0.5°×0.5° spatial resolution with a monthly time step. For November 2000 onwards, estimates were based on burned area, active fire detections, and plant productivity from the MODIS sensor. For this time period we also calculated the breakdown of <span class="hlt">emissions</span> into different sources. We used TRMM-VIRS and ATSR data to extend our fire time series back in time, combined with AVHRR-derived plant productivity in the pre-MODIS era. Average global fire carbon <span class="hlt">emissions</span> were 1.9 Pg C / year with significant interannual variability over 1997-2001 (2.6 Pg C / year in 1998 and 1.5 Pg C / year in 2001) while <span class="hlt">emissions</span> over 2002-2007 were relatively constant (varying between 1.9 and 2.0 Pg C / year), before declining in 2008 (1.6 Pg C / year). Over 2002-2007, interannual variability was still large on regional scales but on a global scale high fire years in some regions were balanced by low fire years in other regions. In the MODIS era (2001 onwards), most carbon losses were the result of fires in (wooded) savannas (68%) with lower contributions from deforestation (13%), forest (12%), agricultural waste (4%), and tropical peat fires (3%). On regional scales, these contributions vary to a large degree, and the contribution of peat fires would increase when including the 1997/1998 El Niño period with record-high fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in Equatorial Asia. For reduced trace gases such as CO and CH4, deforestation and peat fires were the largest contributors due to higher <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of reduced trace gases per unit carbon combusted compared to savanna fires. Net fire carbon losses (tropical deforestation and peat fires) were on average 0.3 Pg C / year, which is likely a conservative estimate because our deforestation rates were lower than reported. Our results provide the first global assessment of the contribution of different sources to total global fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> for the past 13 years, and provide the community with more reliable fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> estimates that will be updated frequently.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140011121','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140011121"><span id="translatedtitle">Direct Top-down Estimates of Biomass Burning CO <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> Using TES and MOPITT Versus Bottom-up <span class="hlt">GFED</span> Inventory</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Pechony, Olga; Shindell, Drew T.; Faluvegi, Greg</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>In this study, we utilize near-simultaneous observations from two sets of multiple satellite sensors to segregate Tropospheric <span class="hlt">Emission</span> Spectrometer (TES) and Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) CO observations over active fire sources from those made over clear background. Hence, we obtain direct estimates of biomass burning CO <span class="hlt">emissions</span> without invoking inverse modeling as in traditional top-down methods. We find considerable differences between Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>) versions 2.1 and 3.1 and satellite-based <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates in many regions. Both inventories appear to greatly underestimate South and Southeast Asia <span class="hlt">emissions</span>, for example. On global scales, however, CO <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in both inventories and in the MOPITT-based analysis agree reasonably well, with the largest bias (30%) found in the Northern Hemisphere spring. In the Southern Hemisphere, there is a one-month shift between the <span class="hlt">GFED</span> and MOPITT-based fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> peak. Afternoon tropical fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> retrieved from TES are about two times higher than the morning MOPITT retrievals. This appears to be both a real difference due to the diurnal fire activity variations, and a bias due to the scarcity of TES data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160001762','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160001762"><span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of <span class="hlt">GFED</span>3, QFED2 and FEER1 Biomass Burning <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> Datasets in a Global Model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Pan, Xiaohua; Ichoku, Charles; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Ellison, Luke; da Silva, Arlindo; Darmenov, Anton</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Biomass burning contributes about 40% of the global loading of carbonaceous aerosols, significantly affecting air quality and the climate system by modulating solar radiation and cloud properties. However, fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are poorly constrained in models on global and regional levels. In this study, we investigate 3 global biomass burning <span class="hlt">emission</span> datasets in NASA GEOS5, namely: (1) GFEDv3.1 (Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> version 3.1); (2) QFEDv2.4 (Quick Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> Dataset version 2.4); (3) FEERv1 (Fire Energetics and <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> Research version 1.0). The simulated aerosol optical depth (AOD), absorption AOD (AAOD), angstrom exponent and surface concentrations of aerosol plumes dominated by fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are evaluated and compared to MODIS, OMI, AERONET, and IMPROVE data over different regions. In general, the spatial patterns of biomass burning <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from these inventories are similar, although the strength of the <span class="hlt">emissions</span> can be noticeably different. The <span class="hlt">emissions</span> estimates from QFED are generally larger than those of FEER, which are in turn larger than those of <span class="hlt">GFED</span>. AOD simulated with all these 3 <span class="hlt">databases</span> are lower than the corresponding observations in Southern Africa and South America, two of the major biomass burning regions in the world.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998larm.confE.176B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998larm.confE.176B"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> of <span class="hlt">emission</span> lines</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Binette, L.; Ortiz, P.; Joguet, B.; Rola, C.</p> <p>1998-11-01</p> <p>A widely accessible data bank (available through Netscape) and consiting of all (or most) of the <span class="hlt">emission</span> lines reported in the litterature is being built. It will comprise objects as diverse as HII regions, PN, AGN, HHO. One of its use will be to define/refine existing diagnostic <span class="hlt">emission</span> line diagrams.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=33280&keyword=printer&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=57445543&CFTOKEN=65965030','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=33280&keyword=printer&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=57445543&CFTOKEN=65965030"><span id="translatedtitle">GLOBAL <span class="hlt">EMISSIONS</span> <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span> (GLOED) DEMONSTRATION</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The paper describes the EPA-developed Global <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (GloED) and how it works. t was prepared to accompany a demonstration of GloED, a powerful software package. loED is a user-friendly, menu-driven tool for storing and retriEving <span class="hlt">emissions</span> factors and activity data on...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940033096','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940033096"><span id="translatedtitle">Stratospheric <span class="hlt">emissions</span> effects <span class="hlt">database</span> development</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Baughcum, Steven L.; Henderson, Stephen C.; Hertel, Peter S.; Maggiora, Debra R.; Oncina, Carlos A.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>This report describes the development of a stratospheric <span class="hlt">emissions</span> effects <span class="hlt">database</span> (SEED) of aircraft fuel burn and <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from projected Year 2015 subsonic aircraft fleets and from projected fleets of high-speed civil transports (HSCT's). This report also describes the development of a similar <span class="hlt">database</span> of <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from Year 1990 scheduled commercial passenger airline and air cargo traffic. The objective of this work was to initiate, develop, and maintain an engineering <span class="hlt">database</span> for use by atmospheric scientists conducting the Atmospheric Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft (AESA) modeling studies. Fuel burn and <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of nitrogen oxides (NO(x) as NO2), carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons (as CH4) have been calculated on a 1-degree latitude x 1-degree longitude x 1-kilometer altitude grid and delivered to NASA as electronic files. This report describes the assumptions and methodology for the calculations and summarizes the results of these calculations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6952854','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6952854"><span id="translatedtitle">Stratospheric <span class="hlt">emissions</span> effects <span class="hlt">database</span> development</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Baughcum, S.L.; Henderson, S.C.; Hertel, P.S.; Maggiora, D.R.; Oncina, C.A.</p> <p>1994-07-01</p> <p>This report describes the development of a stratospheric <span class="hlt">emissions</span> effects <span class="hlt">database</span> (SEED) of aircraft fuel burn and <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from projected Year 2015 subsonic aircraft fleets and from projected fleets of high-speed civil transports (HSCT's). This report also describes the development of a similar <span class="hlt">database</span> of <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from Year 1990 scheduled commercial passenger airline and air cargo traffic. The objective of this work was to initiate, develop, and maintain an engineering <span class="hlt">database</span> for use by atmospheric scientists conducting the Atmospheric Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft (AESA) modeling studies. Fuel burn and <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of nitrogen oxides (NO(x) as NO2), carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons (as CH4) have been calculated on a 1-degree latitude x 1-degree longitude x 1-kilometer altitude grid and delivered to NASA as electronic files. This report describes the assumptions and methodology for the calculations and summarizes the results of these calculations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008P%26SS...56..420M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008P%26SS...56..420M"><span id="translatedtitle">The Berlin <span class="hlt">emissivity</span> <span class="hlt">database</span> (BED)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Maturilli, A.; Helbert, J.; Moroz, L.</p> <p>2008-03-01</p> <p>Remote-sensing infrared spectroscopy is the principal field of investigation for planetary surfaces composition. Past, present and future missions to the solar system bodies include in their payload, instruments measuring the emerging radiation in the infrared range. Apart from measuring the reflected radiance, more and more spacecrafts are equipped with instruments measuring directly the emitted radiation from the planetary surface. The emitted radiation is not only a function of the composition of the material but also of its texture and especially the grain size distribution. For the interpretation of the measured data an <span class="hlt">emissivity</span> spectral library of planetary analogue materials in grain size fractions appropriate for planetary surfaces is needed. The Berlin <span class="hlt">emissivity</span> <span class="hlt">database</span> (BED) presented here is focused on relatively fine-grained size separates, providing thereby a realistic basis for the interpretation of thermal <span class="hlt">emission</span> spectra of planetary regoliths. The BED is therefore complimentary to existing thermal <span class="hlt">emission</span> libraries, like the ASU library for example. BED currently contains <span class="hlt">emissivity</span> spectra of plagioclase and potassium feldspars, low Ca and high Ca pyroxenes, olivine, elemental sulfur, Martian analogue minerals and volcanic soils, and a lunar highland soil sample measured in the wavelength range from 7 to 22 ?m as a function of particle size. For each sample we measured the spectra of four particle size separates ranging from <25 to 250 ?m. The device we used is built at DLR (Berlin) and is coupled to a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer Bruker IFS 88 purged with dry air and equipped with a nitrogen-cooled MCT detector. All spectra were acquired with a spectral resolution of 4 cm -1. We are currently working on upgrading our <span class="hlt">emissivity</span> facility. A new spectrometer (Bruker VERTEX 80 V) and new detectors will allow us to measure the <span class="hlt">emissivity</span> of samples in the wavelength range from 1 to 50 ?m in a vacuum environment. This will be particularly important for the interpretation of the MERcury Thermal Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (MERTIS) data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Greenhouse+AND+effect+AND+Atmospheric&id=EJ493792','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Greenhouse+AND+effect+AND+Atmospheric&id=EJ493792"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Emission</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Olivier, J. G. J.; And Others</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Presents the objective and methodology chosen for the construction of a global <span class="hlt">emissions</span> source <span class="hlt">database</span> called EDGAR and the structural design of the <span class="hlt">database</span> system. The <span class="hlt">database</span> estimates on a regional and grid basis, 1990 annual <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of greenhouse gases, and of ozone depleting compounds from all known sources. (LZ)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24213893','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24213893"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Emission</span> <span class="hlt">database</span> for global atmospheric research (Edgar).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Olivier, J G; Bouwman, A F; van der Maas, C W; Berdowski, J J</p> <p>1994-05-01</p> <p>Atmospheric chemistry and climate modellers require gridded global <span class="hlt">emissions</span> data as input into their models. To meet this urgent need a global <span class="hlt">emissions</span> source <span class="hlt">database</span> called EDGAR is being developed by TNO and RIVM to estimate for 1990, on a regional and on a grid basis, annual <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, N2O, CO, NOx, non-methane VOC, SOx), of NH3, and of ozone depleting compounds (halocarbons) from all known sources. The aim is to establish at due levels of spatial, temporal and source aggregation the <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from both anthropogenic and biogenic sources: a complete set of data required to estimate the total source strength of the various gases with a 11 resolution (altitude resolution of 1 km) and a temporal resolution of a month, supplemented by diurnal variation, as agreed upon in the Global <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> Inventory Activity (GEIA) of the International Atmospheric Chemistry Programme (IGAC). In this way EDGAR will meet the requirements of present and future developments in the field of atmospheric modelling. The data comprise demographic data, social and economic factors, land use distributions and <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors (with due emphasis on the uncertainty). As understanding in this field is still changing, due attention is paid to flexibility regarding the disaggregation of sources, spatial and temporal resolution and species. The objective and methodology chosen for the construction of the <span class="hlt">database</span> and the structural design of the <span class="hlt">database</span> system are presented, as well as the type and sources of data and the approach used for data collection. As an example, the construction of the N2O inventory is discussed. PMID:24213893</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFM.P23C0064M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFM.P23C0064M"><span id="translatedtitle">Martian Analogues <span class="hlt">Emissivity</span> Spectra From the Berlin <span class="hlt">Emissivity</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (BED)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Maturilli, A.; Helbert, J.; Moroz, L.</p> <p>2006-12-01</p> <p>Remote sensing infrared spectroscopy is the principal field of investigation for planetary surfaces composition. Past, present and future missions to bodies in the solar system include in their payload instruments measuring the emerging radiation in the infrared range. For the interpretation of the measured data an <span class="hlt">emissivity</span> spectral library of planetary analog materials is needed. The Berlin <span class="hlt">Emissivity</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (BED) currently contains <span class="hlt">emissivity</span> spectra of plagioclase and potassium feldspars, low Ca and high Ca pyroxenes, olivine, elemental sulphur, and Martian analogue minerals, measured in the wavelength range from 7 to 22 microns as a function of particle size. For each sample we measured the spectra of four particle size separates ranging from 0 to 250 microns. The device we used is built at DLR (Berlin) and is coupled to a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (Bruker IFS 88), purged with dry air and equipped with a cooled detector (MCT). All spectra were acquired with a spectral resolution of 4 cm-1. We present here the results of our analysis on well knew and characterized Martian analogue minerals: JSC Mars-1, Salten Skov, and Palagonite from Mauna Kea, Hawaii. We are currently working to upgrade our <span class="hlt">emissivity</span> facility. A new spectrometer (Bruker VERTEX 80v) and new detectors will allow us to measure the <span class="hlt">emissivity</span> of samples in the wavelength range from 1 to 50 microns, even in a vacuum environment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=47889&keyword=printer&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=57445543&CFTOKEN=65965030','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=47889&keyword=printer&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=57445543&CFTOKEN=65965030"><span id="translatedtitle">GLOED - GLOBAL <span class="hlt">EMISSIONS</span> <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span> SOFTWARE DEVELOPED BY EPA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The paper describes an EPA-developed, powerful software package called the Global <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (GloED). loED is a user-friendly, menu-driven tool for storage and retrieval of <span class="hlt">emissions</span> factors and activity data on a country-specific basis. ata can be selected from <span class="hlt">databases</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20030064046','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20030064046"><span id="translatedtitle">Commercial Aircraft <span class="hlt">Emission</span> Scenario for 2020: <span class="hlt">Database</span> Development and Analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Sutkus, Donald J., Jr.; Baughcum, Steven L.; DuBois, Douglas P.; Wey, Chowen C. (Technical Monitor)</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>This report describes the development of a three-dimensional <span class="hlt">database</span> of aircraft fuel use and <span class="hlt">emissions</span> (NO(x), CO, and hydrocarbons) for the commercial aircraft fleet projected to 2020. Global totals of <span class="hlt">emissions</span> and fuel burn for 2020 are compared to global totals from previous aircraft <span class="hlt">emission</span> scenario calculations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26281761','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26281761"><span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of global inventories of CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from biomass burning during 2002-2011 derived from multiple satellite products.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shi, Yusheng; Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Saito, Makoto; Yamaguchi, Yasushi; Chen, Xuehong</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>This study compared five widely used globally gridded biomass burning <span class="hlt">emissions</span> inventories for the 2002-2011 period (Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> 3 (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>3), Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> 4 (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>4), Global Fire Assimilation System 1.0 (GFAS1.0), Fire INventory from NCAR 1.0 (FINN1.0) and Global Inventory for Chemistry-Climate studies-<span class="hlt">GFED</span>4 (G-G)). Average annual CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> range from 6521.3 to 9661.5Tgyear(-1) for five inventories, with extensive amounts in Africa, South America and Southeast Asia. Coefficient of Variation for Southern America, Northern and Southern Africa are 30%, 39% and 48%. Globally, the majority of CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are released from savanna burnings, followed by forest and cropland burnings. The largest differences among the five inventories are mainly attributable to the overestimation of CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> by FINN1.0 in Southeast Asia savanna and cropland burning, and underestimation in Southern Africa savanna and Amazon forest burning. The overestimation in Africa by G-G also contributes to the differences. PMID:26281761</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGRD..11718212P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGRD..11718212P"><span id="translatedtitle">The use of satellite-measured aerosol optical depth to constrain biomass burning <span class="hlt">emissions</span> source strength in the global model GOCART</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Petrenko, Mariya; Kahn, Ralph; Chin, Mian; Soja, Amber; Kucsera, Tom; Harshvardhan, null</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p>Simulations of biomass burning (BB) <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in chemistry transport models strongly depend on the inventories that define <span class="hlt">emission</span> source location and strength. We use 13 global biomass burning <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates, including the widely used Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emission</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>) monthly and daily versions, Fire Radiative Power (FRP)-based Quick Fire <span class="hlt">Emission</span> Data set QFED, and 11 calculated <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from different combinations of burned area based on the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) products, effective fuel load, and species <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors as alternative inputs to the global Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model. The resultant simulated aerosol optical depth (AOD) and its spatial distribution are compared to AOD snapshots measured by the MODIS instrument for 124 fire events occurring between 2006 and 2007. This comparison exposes the regional biases of each <span class="hlt">emission</span> option. GOCART average fire AOD values compare best to MODIS-measured AOD when the daily <span class="hlt">GFED</span> inventory is used as input to GOCART. Even though <span class="hlt">GFED</span>-based <span class="hlt">emission</span> options provide the lowest <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in the tropics, <span class="hlt">GFED</span>-based GOCART AOD compares best with MODIS AOD in tropical cases. Fire-counts-based <span class="hlt">emission</span> options give the largest <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates in the boreal regions, and the model performs best at higher latitudes with these inputs when compared to MODIS. Comparison of total annual BB <span class="hlt">emissions</span> by all inventories suggests that burned area estimates are usually the largest source of disagreement. It is also shown that the quantitative relationship between BB aerosol <span class="hlt">emission</span> rate and model-simulated AOD is related to the horizontal plume dispersion, which can be approximated by the wind speed in the planetary boundary layer in most cases. Thus, given average wind speed of the smoke plume environment, MODIS-measured AOD can provide a constraint to the strength of BB sources at the level of individual plumes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=164604&keyword=audio&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=55682692&CFTOKEN=11465630','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=164604&keyword=audio&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=55682692&CFTOKEN=11465630"><span id="translatedtitle">SPECIATE - EPA'S <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span> OF SPECIATED <span class="hlt">EMISSION</span> PROFILES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>SPECIATE is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) repository of total organic compound (TOC) and particulate matter (PM) speciation profiles for <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from air pollution sources. The data base has recently been updated and an associated report has recently been re...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.1901K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14.1901K"><span id="translatedtitle">Fossil-Fuel C02 <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> and Exploration System</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Krassovski, M.; Boden, T.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>Fossil-Fuel C02 <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> and Exploration System Misha Krassovski and Tom Boden Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) quantifies the release of carbon from fossil-fuel use and cement production each year at global, regional, and national spatial scales. These estimates are vital to climate change research given the strong evidence suggesting fossil-fuel <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are responsible for unprecedented levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere. The CDIAC fossil-fuel <span class="hlt">emissions</span> time series are based largely on annual energy statistics published for all nations by the United Nations (UN). Publications containing historical energy statistics make it possible to estimate fossil-fuel CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> back to 1751 before the Industrial Revolution. From these core fossil-fuel CO2 <span class="hlt">emission</span> time series, CDIAC has developed a number of additional data products to satisfy modeling needs and to address other questions aimed at improving our understanding of the global carbon cycle budget. For example, CDIAC also produces a time series of gridded fossil-fuel CO2 <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates and isotopic (e.g., C13) <span class="hlt">emissions</span> estimates. The gridded data are generated using the methodology described in Andres et al. (2011) and provide monthly and annual estimates for 1751-2008 at 1 latitude by 1 longitude resolution. These gridded <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates are being used in the latest IPCC Scientific Assessment (AR4). Isotopic estimates are possible thanks to detailed information for individual nations regarding the carbon content of select fuels (e.g., the carbon signature of natural gas from Russia). CDIAC has recently developed a relational <span class="hlt">database</span> to house these baseline <span class="hlt">emissions</span> estimates and associated derived products and a web-based interface to help users worldwide query these data holdings. Users can identify, explore and download desired CDIAC fossil-fuel CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> data. This presentation introduces the architecture and design of the new relational <span class="hlt">database</span> and web interface, summarizes the present state and functionality of the Fossil-Fuel CO2 <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> and Exploration System, and highlights future plans for expansion of the relational <span class="hlt">database</span> and interface.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007epsc.conf..919M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007epsc.conf..919M"><span id="translatedtitle">The Berlin <span class="hlt">Emissivity</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (BED): a collection of planetary analogues</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Maturilli, A.; Helbert, J.</p> <p>2007-08-01</p> <p>Mineralogical composition study of planetary surfaces is mostly performed by means of remote sensing infrared spectroscopy. The interpretation of measured spectra should take advantage of laboratory measurements of analogue minerals. The Berlin <span class="hlt">Emissivity</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (BED) is focused on relatively fine-grained size separates to provide a realistic basis for the interpretation of remote sensing thermal <span class="hlt">emission</span> spectra of planetary regoliths. The Berlin <span class="hlt">Emissivity</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (BED) currently contains <span class="hlt">emissivity</span> spectra of plagioclase and potassium feldspars, low Ca and high Ca pyroxenes, olivine, elemental sulphur, Martian analogue minerals, and volcanic soils measured in the wavelength range from 7 to 22 ?m as a function of particle size. For each sample we measured the spectra of four particle size separates ranging from <25 to 250 ?m. The <span class="hlt">emissivity</span> device is built at DLR (Berlin) and is coupled to a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (Bruker IFS 88), purged with dry air and equipped with a cooled MTC detector. All spectra were acquired with a spectral resolution of 4 cm-1. We are currently working to upgrade our <span class="hlt">emissivity</span> facility: a new spectrometer (Bruker VERTEX 80v) and new detectors will allow us to measure the <span class="hlt">emissivity</span> of samples in the wavelength range from 1 to 50 ?m, even in a vacuum environment.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li class="active"><span>1</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_1 --> <div id="page_2" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li class="active"><span>2</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="21"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMGC23C1093K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMGC23C1093K"><span id="translatedtitle">Fossil-Fuel C02 <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> and Exploration System</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Krassovski, M.; Boden, T.; Andres, R. J.; Blasing, T. J.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) quantifies the release of carbon from fossil-fuel use and cement production at global, regional, and national spatial scales. The CDIAC <span class="hlt">emission</span> time series estimates are based largely on annual energy statistics published at the national level by the United Nations (UN). CDIAC has developed a relational <span class="hlt">database</span> to house collected data and information and a web-based interface to help users worldwide identify, explore and download desired <span class="hlt">emission</span> data. The available information is divided in two major group: time series and gridded data. The time series data is offered for global, regional and national scales. Publications containing historical energy statistics make it possible to estimate fossil fuel CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> back to 1751. Etemad et al. (1991) published a summary compilation that tabulates coal, brown coal, peat, and crude oil production by nation and year. Footnotes in the Etemad et al.(1991) publication extend the energy statistics time series back to 1751. Summary compilations of fossil fuel trade were published by Mitchell (1983, 1992, 1993, 1995). Mitchell's work tabulates solid and liquid fuel imports and exports by nation and year. These pre-1950 production and trade data were digitized and CO2 <span class="hlt">emission</span> calculations were made following the procedures discussed in Marland and Rotty (1984) and Boden et al. (1995). The gridded data presents annual and monthly estimates. Annual data presents a time series recording 1 latitude by 1 longitude CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in units of million metric tons of carbon per year from anthropogenic sources for 1751-2008. The monthly, fossil-fuel CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> estimates from 1950-2008 provided in this <span class="hlt">database</span> are derived from time series of global, regional, and national fossil-fuel CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> (Boden et al. 2011), the references therein, and the methodology described in Andres et al. (2011). The data accessible here take these tabular, national, mass-<span class="hlt">emissions</span> data and distribute them spatially on a one degree latitude by one degree longitude grid. The within-country spatial distribution is achieved through a fixed population distribution as reported in Andres et al. (1996). This presentation introduces newly build <span class="hlt">database</span> and web interface, reflects the present state and functionality of the Fossil-Fuel CO2 <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> and Exploration System as well as future plans for expansion.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ERL.....8a5009T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ERL.....8a5009T"><span id="translatedtitle">The FAOSTAT <span class="hlt">database</span> of greenhouse gas <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from agriculture</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tubiello, Francesco N.; Salvatore, Mirella; Rossi, Simone; Ferrara, Alessandro; Fitton, Nuala; Smith, Pete</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>Greenhouse gas (GHG) <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from agriculture, including crop and livestock production, forestry and associated land use changes, are responsible for a significant fraction of anthropogenic <span class="hlt">emissions</span>, up to 30% according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Yet while <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from fossil fuels are updated yearly and by multiple sourcesincluding national-level statistics from the International Energy Agency (IEA)no comparable efforts for reporting global statistics for agriculture, forestry and other land use (AFOLU) <span class="hlt">emissions</span> exist: the latest complete assessment was the 2007 IPCC report, based on 2005 <span class="hlt">emission</span> data. This gap is critical for several reasons. First, potentially large climate funding could be linked in coming decades to more precise estimates of <span class="hlt">emissions</span> and mitigation potentials. For many developing countries, and especially the least developed ones, this requires improved assessments of AFOLU <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. Second, growth in global <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from fossil fuels has outpaced that from AFOLU during every decade of the period 1961-2010, so the relative contribution of the latter to total climate forcing has diminished over time, with a need for regular updates. We present results from a new GHG <span class="hlt">database</span> developed at FAO, providing a complete and coherent time series of <span class="hlt">emission</span> statistics over a reference period 1961-2010, at country level, based on FAOSTAT activity data and IPCC Tier 1 methodology. We discuss results at global and regional level, focusing on trends in the agriculture sector and net deforestation. Our results complement those available from the IPCC, extending trend analysis to a longer historical period and, critically, beyond 2005 to more recent years. In particular, from 2000 to 2010, we find that agricultural <span class="hlt">emissions</span> increased by 1.1% annually, reaching 4.6 Gt CO2 yr-1 in 2010 (up to 5.4-5.8 Gt CO2 yr-1 with <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from biomass burning and organic soils included). Over the same decade 2000-2010, the ratio of agriculture to fossil fuel <span class="hlt">emissions</span> has decreased, from 17.2% to 13.7%, and the decrease is even greater for the ratio of net deforestation to fossil fuel <span class="hlt">emissions</span>: from 19.1% to 10.1%. In fact, in the year 2000, <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from agriculture have been consistently largerabout 1.2 Gt CO2 yr-1 in 2010than those from net deforestation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ApJ...744...99L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ApJ...744...99L"><span id="translatedtitle">CHIANTIAn Atomic <span class="hlt">Database</span> for <span class="hlt">Emission</span> Lines. XII. Version 7 of the <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Landi, E.; Del Zanna, G.; Young, P. R.; Dere, K. P.; Mason, H. E.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The CHIANTI spectral code consists of an atomic <span class="hlt">database</span> and a suite of computer programs to calculate the optically thin spectrum of astrophysical objects and carry out spectroscopic plasma diagnostics. The <span class="hlt">database</span> includes atomic energy levels, wavelengths, radiative transition probabilities, collision excitation rate coefficients, and ionization and recombination rate coefficients, as well as data to calculate free-free, free-bound, and two-photon continuum <span class="hlt">emission</span>. Version 7 has been released, which includes several new ions, significant updates to existing ions, as well as Chianti-Py, the implementation of CHIANTI software in the Python programming language. All data and programs are freely available at http://www.chiantidatabase.org, while the Python interface to CHIANTI can be found at http://chiantipy.sourceforge.net.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22004290','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22004290"><span id="translatedtitle">CHIANTI-AN ATOMIC <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span> FOR <span class="hlt">EMISSION</span> LINES. XII. VERSION 7 OF THE <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Landi, E.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.; Young, P. R.; Dere, K. P.</p> <p>2012-01-10</p> <p>The CHIANTI spectral code consists of an atomic <span class="hlt">database</span> and a suite of computer programs to calculate the optically thin spectrum of astrophysical objects and carry out spectroscopic plasma diagnostics. The <span class="hlt">database</span> includes atomic energy levels, wavelengths, radiative transition probabilities, collision excitation rate coefficients, and ionization and recombination rate coefficients, as well as data to calculate free-free, free-bound, and two-photon continuum <span class="hlt">emission</span>. Version 7 has been released, which includes several new ions, significant updates to existing ions, as well as Chianti-Py, the implementation of CHIANTI software in the Python programming language. All data and programs are freely available at http://www.chiantidatabase.org, while the Python interface to CHIANTI can be found at http://chiantipy.sourceforge.net.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19960013903','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19960013903"><span id="translatedtitle">Jet aircraft engine <span class="hlt">emissions</span> <span class="hlt">database</span> development: 1992 military, charter, and nonscheduled traffic</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Metwally, Munir</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Studies relating to environmental <span class="hlt">emissions</span> <span class="hlt">database</span> for the military, charter, and non-scheduled traffic for the year 1992 were conducted by McDonnell Douglas Aerospace Transport Aircraft. The report also includes a comparison with a previous <span class="hlt">emission</span> <span class="hlt">database</span> for year 1990. Discussions of the methodology used in formulating these <span class="hlt">databases</span> are provided.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015A%26A...582A..56D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015A%26A...582A..56D"><span id="translatedtitle">CHIANTI - An atomic <span class="hlt">database</span> for <span class="hlt">emission</span> lines. Version 8</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Del Zanna, G.; Dere, K. P.; Young, P. R.; Landi, E.; Mason, H. E.</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>We present version 8 of the CHIANTI <span class="hlt">database</span>. This version includes a large amount of new data and ions, which represent a significant improvement in the soft X-ray, extreme UV (EUV) and UV spectral regions, which several space missions currently cover. New data for neutrals and low charge states are also added. The data are assessed, but to improve the modelling of low-temperature plasma the effective collision strengths for most of the new datasets are not spline-fitted as previously, but are retained as calculated. This required a change of the format of the CHIANTI electron excitation files. The format of the energy files has also been changed. Excitation rates between all the levels are retained for most of the new datasets, so the data can in principle be used to model high-density plasma. In addition, the method for computing the differential <span class="hlt">emission</span> measure used in the CHIANTI software has been changed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.A24C..05P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.A24C..05P"><span id="translatedtitle">The Use of Satellite-Measured Aerosol Optical Depth to Constrain Biomass Burning <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> Source Strength in the GOCART Model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Petrenko, M. M.; Kahn, R. A.; Chin, M.; Kucsera, T.; Soja, A. J.; Harshvardhan, D.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Simulations of biomass burning (BB) <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in chemistry transport models strongly depend on the inventories that define <span class="hlt">emission</span> source location and strength. We compare snapshots of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for 124 fire events occurring between 2006 and 2007 with AOD simulate by the GOCART model in 13 runs using different BB <span class="hlt">emission</span> options, exposing regional biases of each <span class="hlt">emission</span> option. The BB <span class="hlt">emissions</span> input into the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) include the widely used Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emission</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>) monthly and daily versions, Fire Radiative Power (FRP)-based Quick Fire <span class="hlt">Emission</span> Dataset QFED, and 11 calculated <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from different combinations of burned area based on the MODIS products, effective fuel load, and species <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors. MODIS AOD snapshots for 124 globally distributed fire events serve as instantaneous constraint to the strength of the BB sources in the model. Even though globally GOCART average fire AOD values compare best to MODIS-measured AOD when the daily <span class="hlt">GFED</span> inventory is used as input to GOCART, the regional performance of each inventory is essential when evaluating BB <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. Even though <span class="hlt">GFED</span>-based <span class="hlt">emission</span> options provide the lowest <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in the tropics, <span class="hlt">GFED</span>-based GOCART AOD compares best with MODIS AOD in tropical cases. Fire-counts-based <span class="hlt">emission</span> options give the largest <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates in the boreal regions, and the model performs best at higher latitudes with these inputs when compared to MODIS. Comparison of total annual BB <span class="hlt">emissions</span> by all inventories suggests that burned area estimates are usually the largest source of disagreement. It is also shown that the quantitative relationship between BB aerosol <span class="hlt">emission</span> rate and model-simulated AOD is related to the horizontal plume dispersion, which can be approximated by the wind speed in the planetary boundary layer in most cases. Thus, given average wind speed of the smoke plume environment, MODIS-measured AOD can provide a constraint to the strength of BB sources at the level of individual plumes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006epsc.conf..275M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006epsc.conf..275M"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Emissivity</span> measurements of Mercury analogue materials from the Berlin <span class="hlt">Emissivity</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (BED)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Maturilli, A.; Helbert, J.; Moroz, L.</p> <p></p> <p>To determine the planetary surfaces composition, remote sensing infrared spectroscopy is a suitable and powerful method of investigation. Past, present and future missions to bodies in the solar system include in their payload instruments measuring the emerging radiation in the infrared range. The MERTIS instrument, a TIR spectrometer combined with a radiometer, is part of the scientific payload of the ESA BepiColombo mission to Mercury, scheduled for 2013. The Berlin <span class="hlt">Emissivity</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (BED) is an <span class="hlt">emissivity</span> spectral library of planetary analogue materials, essential for the interpretation of the measured data. Our unique <span class="hlt">database</span> is focused on relatively fine-grained size separates, providing a realistic basis for interpretation of thermal <span class="hlt">emission</span> spectra of Mercury and other planetary bodies. The BED spectral library currently contains <span class="hlt">emissivity</span> spectra of plagioclase and potassium feldspars, low Ca and high Ca pyroxenes, olivine, elemental sulfur and a lunar highland soil sample measured in the wavelength range from 7 to 22 m as a function of particle size. For each sample we measured the spectra of four particle size separates ranging from 0 to 250 m. The device we used is built at DLR (Berlin) and is coupled to a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (Bruker IFS 88), purged with dry air and equipped with a cooled detector (MCT). All spectra were acquired with a spectral resolution of 4 cm-1 . We present here the <span class="hlt">emissivity</span> spectra of a basic set of analogue materials reflecting the current knowledge of the surface composition of Mercury. We are currently working to upgrade our <span class="hlt">emissivity</span> facility: a new spectrometer (Bruker VERTEX 80v) and new detectors will allow us to measure the <span class="hlt">emissivity</span> of samples in the wavelength range from 1 to 50 m, even in a vacuum environment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25968276','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25968276"><span id="translatedtitle">Development of <span class="hlt">database</span> of real-world diesel vehicle <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors for China.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shen, Xianbao; Yao, Zhiliang; Zhang, Qiang; Wagner, David Vance; Huo, Hong; Zhang, Yingzhi; Zheng, Bo; He, Kebin</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">database</span> of real-world diesel vehicle <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors, based on type and technology, has been developed following tests on more than 300 diesel vehicles in China using a portable <span class="hlt">emission</span> measurement system. The <span class="hlt">database</span> provides better understanding of diesel vehicle <span class="hlt">emissions</span> under actual driving conditions. We found that although new regulations have reduced real-world <span class="hlt">emission</span> levels of diesel trucks and buses significantly for most pollutants in China, NOx <span class="hlt">emissions</span> have been inadequately controlled by the current standards, especially for diesel buses, because of bad driving conditions in the real world. We also compared the <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors in the <span class="hlt">database</span> with those calculated by <span class="hlt">emission</span> factor models and used in inventory studies. The <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors derived from COPERT (Computer Programmer to calculate <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> from Road Transport) and MOBILE may both underestimate real <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors, whereas the updated COPERT and PART5 (Highway Vehicle Particulate <span class="hlt">Emission</span> Modeling Software) models may overestimate <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors in China. Real-world measurement results and <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors used in recent <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventory studies are inconsistent, which has led to inaccurate estimates of <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from diesel trucks and buses over recent years. This suggests that <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors derived from European or US-based models will not truly represent real-world <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in China. Therefore, it is useful and necessary to conduct systematic real-world measurements of vehicle <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in China in order to obtain the optimum inputs for <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventory models. PMID:25968276</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ACPD...1322757C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ACPD...1322757C"><span id="translatedtitle">Satellite observations indicate substantial spatiotemporal variability in biomass burning NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors for South America</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Castellanos, P.; Boersma, K. F.; van der Werf, G. R.</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>Biomass burning is an important contributor to global total <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of NOx (NO + NO2). Generally bottom-up fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> models calculate NOx <span class="hlt">emissions</span> by multiplying fuel consumption estimates with static biome specific <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors, defined in units of grams of NO per kilogram of dry matter consumed. <span class="hlt">Emission</span> factors are a significant source of uncertainty in bottom-up fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> modeling because relatively few observations are available to characterize the large spatial and temporal variability of burning conditions. In this paper we use NO2 tropospheric column observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) from the year 2005 over South America to calculate monthly NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors for four fire types: deforestation, savanna/grassland, woodland, and agricultural waste burning. In general, the spatial trends in NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors calculated in this work are consistent with <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors derived from in situ measurements from the region, but are more variable than published biome specific global average <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors widely used in bottom up fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> inventories such as the Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>) v3. Satellite based NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors also indicate substantial temporal variability in burning conditions. Overall, we found that deforestation fires have the lowest NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors, on average 30 % lower than the <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors used in <span class="hlt">GFED</span> v3. Agricultural fire NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors were the highest, on average a factor of 2 higher than <span class="hlt">GFED</span> v3 values. For savanna, woodland, and deforestation fires early dry season NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors were a factor of ~1.5-2.0 higher than late dry season <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors. A minimum in the NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factor seasonal cycle for deforestation fires occurred in August, the time period of severe drought in South America in 2005. Our results support the hypothesis that prolonged dry spells may lead to an increase in the contribution of smoldering combustion from large diameter fuels to total fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span>, which would lower the overall modified combustion efficiency (MCE) and NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factor, and offset the higher combustion efficiency of dryer fine fuels. We evaluated the OMI derived NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors with SCIAMACHY NO2 tropospheric column observations and found improved model performance in regions dominated by fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.A31C0072C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.A31C0072C"><span id="translatedtitle">Satellite observations indicate substantial spatiotemporal variability in biomass burning NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors for South America</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Castellanos, P.; Boersma, F.; van der Werf, G.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Biomass burning is an important contributor to global total <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of NOx (NO+NO2). Generally bottom-up fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> models calculate NOx <span class="hlt">emissions</span> by multiplying fuel consumption estimates with static biome specific <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors, defined in units of grams of NO per kilogram of dry matter consumed. <span class="hlt">Emission</span> factors are a significant source of uncertainty in bottom-up fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> modeling because relatively few observations are available to characterize the large spatial and temporal variability of burning conditions. In this paper we use NO2 tropospheric column observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) from the year 2005 over South America to calculate monthly NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors for four fire types: deforestation, savanna/grassland, woodland, and agricultural waste burning. In general, the spatial trends in NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors calculated in this work are consistent with <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors derived from in situ measurements from the region, but are more variable than published biome specific global average <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors widely used in bottom up fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> inventories such as the Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>) v3. Satellite based NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors also indicate substantial temporal variability in burning conditions. Overall, we found that deforestation fires have the lowest NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors, on average 30% lower than the <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors used in <span class="hlt">GFED</span> v3. Agricultural fire NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors were the highest, on average 80% higher than <span class="hlt">GFED</span> v3 values. For savanna, woodland, and deforestation fires early dry season NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors were a factor of ~1.5-2.0 higher than late dry season <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors. A minimum in the NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factor seasonal cycle for deforestation fires occurred in August, the time period of severe drought in South America in 2005. Our results support the hypothesis that prolonged dry spells may lead to an increase in the contribution of smoldering combustion from large diameter fuels to total fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span>, which would lower the overall modified combustion efficiency (MCE) and NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factor, and offset the higher combustion efficiency of dryer fine fuels. We evaluated the OMI derived NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors with SCIAMACHY NO2 tropospheric column observations and found improved model performance in regions dominated by fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ACP....14.3929C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ACP....14.3929C"><span id="translatedtitle">Satellite observations indicate substantial spatiotemporal variability in biomass burning NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors for South America</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Castellanos, P.; Boersma, K. F.; van der Werf, G. R.</p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>Biomass burning is an important contributor to global total <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of NOx (NO+NO2). Generally bottom-up fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> models calculate NOx <span class="hlt">emissions</span> by multiplying fuel consumption estimates with static biome-specific <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors, defined in units of grams of NO per kilogram of dry matter consumed. <span class="hlt">Emission</span> factors are a significant source of uncertainty in bottom-up fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> modeling because relatively few observations are available to characterize the large spatial and temporal variability of burning conditions. In this paper we use NO2 tropospheric column observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) from the year 2005 over South America to calculate monthly NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors for four fire types: deforestation, savanna/grassland, woodland, and agricultural waste burning. In general, the spatial patterns in NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors calculated in this work are consistent with <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors derived from in situ measurements from the region but are more variable than published biome-specific global average <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors widely used in bottom-up fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> inventories such as the Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>). Satellite-based NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors also indicate substantial temporal variability in burning conditions. Overall, we found that deforestation fires have the lowest NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors, on average 30% lower than the <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors used in <span class="hlt">GFED</span> v3. Agricultural fire NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors were the highest, on average a factor of 1.8 higher than <span class="hlt">GFED</span> v3 values. For savanna, woodland, and deforestation fires, early dry season NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors were a factor of ~1.5-2 higher than late dry season <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors. A minimum in the NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factor seasonal cycle for deforestation fires occurred in August, the time period of severe drought in South America in 2005, supporting the hypothesis that prolonged dry spells may lead to an increase in the contribution of smoldering combustion from large-diameter fuels, offsetting the higher combustion efficiency of dryer fine fuels. We evaluated the OMI-derived NOx <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors with SCIAMACHY NO2 tropospheric column observations and found improved model performance in regions dominated by fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=42778&keyword=microcomputer&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=49885066&CFTOKEN=16867813','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=42778&keyword=microcomputer&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=49885066&CFTOKEN=16867813"><span id="translatedtitle">DEVELOPMENT OF AN INDOOR AIR POLLUTION SOURCE <span class="hlt">EMISSIONS</span> <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The paper discusses the design, structure, and theory of a microcomputer-based relational <span class="hlt">database</span> which has been created to archive and retrieve published information concerning sources of indoor air pollutants. The <span class="hlt">database</span> is designed to be used by researchers, architects, pol...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996GBioC..10..543S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996GBioC..10..543S"><span id="translatedtitle">Biomass of termites and their <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of methane and carbon dioxide: A global <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sanderson, M. G.</p> <p>1996-12-01</p> <p>A global <span class="hlt">database</span> describing the geographical distribution of the biomass of termites and their <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of methane and carbon dioxide has been constructed. Termite biomasses were assigned to various ecosystems using published measurements and a recent high-resolution (10' 10') <span class="hlt">database</span> of vegetation categories. The assigned biomasses were then combined with literature measurements of fluxes of methane and carbon dioxide from termites and extrapolated to give global <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates for each gas. The global <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of methane and carbon dioxide are 19.7 1.5 and 3500 700 Mt yr-1, respectively (1 Mt = 1012 g). These <span class="hlt">emissions</span> contribute approximately 4% and 2%, respectively, to the total global fluxes of these gases. This <span class="hlt">database</span> gives an accurate distribution of the biomasses and gaseous <span class="hlt">emissions</span> by termites and may be incorporated into global models of the atmosphere.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=90420&keyword=printer&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=57445543&CFTOKEN=65965030','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=90420&keyword=printer&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=57445543&CFTOKEN=65965030"><span id="translatedtitle">USER'S GUIDE FOR GLOED VERSION 1.0 - THE GLOBAL <span class="hlt">EMISSIONS</span> <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The document is a user's guide for the EPA-developed, powerful software package, Global <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (GloED). GloED is a user-friendly, menu-driven tool for storing and retrieving <span class="hlt">emissions</span> factors and activity data on a country-specific basis. Data can be selected from dat...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940032744','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940032744"><span id="translatedtitle">Jet aircraft engine exhaust <span class="hlt">emissions</span> <span class="hlt">database</span> development: Year 1990 and 2015 scenarios</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Landau, Z. Harry; Metwally, Munir; Vanalstyne, Richard; Ward, Clay A.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Studies relating to environmental <span class="hlt">emissions</span> associated with the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) military jet and charter jet aircraft were conducted by McDonnell Douglas Aerospace Transport Aircraft. The report includes engine <span class="hlt">emission</span> results for baseline 1990 charter and military scenario and the projected jet engine <span class="hlt">emissions</span> results for a 2015 scenario for a Mach 1.6 HSCT charter and military fleet. Discussions of the methodology used in formulating these <span class="hlt">databases</span> are provided.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/658802','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/658802"><span id="translatedtitle">Global <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (GLoED) version 1.0 (on diskette). Software</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p></p> <p>1997-09-01</p> <p>The Global <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (GloED) is a user-friendly, menu-driven tool for storing and retrieving <span class="hlt">emissions</span> factors and activity data on a country-specific basis. Data can be selected from <span class="hlt">databases</span> resident within GloED and/or supplied by the user. The data are used to construct <span class="hlt">emissions</span> scenarios for the countries and sources selected. References are linked to the data to ensure clear data pedigrees. The scenario outputs can be displayed on thematic global maps or other graphic outputs such as pie or bar charts. In addition, data files can be exported to a printer. The majority of the datasets are single gas (i.e., methane <span class="hlt">emissions</span> datasets). Some of the datasets include <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from several greenhouse gases. The sources included <span class="hlt">emission</span> from: motor vehicles, landfills, minor CH{sub 4} sources, rice cultivation, fuelwood burning, global VOC, animal waste methane, animal enteric CH{sub 4}, domestic waste water, underground mines, biomass burning, and CH{sub 4} from oil and gas production. GloED is a software system designed as a tool to generate estimates of global <span class="hlt">emissions</span> by combining pollutant-specific <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors with quantitative data on <span class="hlt">emission</span>-producing activities for that source. GloED also serves as a repository for <span class="hlt">emissions</span> data, activity data, and <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.A21B0037L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.A21B0037L"><span id="translatedtitle">A Prescribed Fire <span class="hlt">Emission</span> Factors <span class="hlt">Database</span> for Land Management and Air Quality Applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lincoln, E.; Hao, W.; Baker, S.; Yokelson, R. J.; Burling, I. R.; Urbanski, S. P.; Miller, W.; Weise, D. R.; Johnson, T. J.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>Prescribed fire is a significant <span class="hlt">emissions</span> source in the U.S. and that needs to be adequately characterized in atmospheric transport/chemistry models. In addition, the Clean Air Act, its amendments, and air quality regulations require that prescribed fire managers estimate the quantity of <span class="hlt">emissions</span> that a prescribed fire will produce. Several published papers contain a few <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors for prescribed fire and additional results are found in unpublished documents whose quality has to be assessed. In conjunction with three research projects developing detailed new <span class="hlt">emissions</span> data and meteorological tools to assist prescribed fire managers, the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) is supporting development of a <span class="hlt">database</span> that contains <span class="hlt">emissions</span> information related to prescribed burning. Ultimately, this <span class="hlt">database</span> will be available on the Internet and will contain older <span class="hlt">emissions</span> information that has been assessed and newer <span class="hlt">emissions</span> information that has been developed from both laboratory-scale and field measurements. The <span class="hlt">database</span> currently contains <span class="hlt">emissions</span> information from over 300 burns of different wildland vegetation types, including grasslands, shrublands, woodlands, forests, and tundra over much of North America. A summary of the compiled data will be presented, along with suggestions for additional categories.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020012699','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020012699"><span id="translatedtitle">Scheduled Civil Aircraft <span class="hlt">Emission</span> Inventories for 1999: <span class="hlt">Database</span> Development and Analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Sutkus, Donald J., Jr.; Baughcum, Steven L.; DuBois, Douglas P.</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>This report describes the development of a three-dimensional <span class="hlt">database</span> of aircraft fuel burn and <span class="hlt">emissions</span> (NO(x), CO, and hydrocarbons) for the scheduled commercial aircraft fleet for each month of 1999. Global totals of <span class="hlt">emissions</span> and fuel burn for 1999 are compared to global totals from 1992 and 2015 <span class="hlt">databases</span>. 1999 fuel burn, departure and distance totals for selected airlines are compared to data reported on DOT Form 41 to evaluate the accuracy of the calculations. DOT Form T-100 data were used to determine typical payloads for freighter aircraft and this information was used to model freighter aircraft more accurately by using more realistic payloads. Differences in the calculation methodology used to create the 1999 fuel burn and <span class="hlt">emissions</span> <span class="hlt">database</span> from the methodology used in previous work are described and evaluated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMNH53A1807F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMNH53A1807F"><span id="translatedtitle">Estimating Biomass Burning <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> for Carbon Cycle Science and Resource Monitoring & Management</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>French, N. H.; McKenzie, D.; Erickson, T. A.; McCarty, J. L.; Ottmar, R. D.; Kasischke, E. S.; Prichard, S. J.; Hoy, E.; Endsley, K.; Hamermesh, N. K.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Biomass burning <span class="hlt">emissions</span>, including <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from wildland fire, agricultural and rangeland burning, and peatland fires, impact the atmosphere dramatically. Current tools to quantify <span class="hlt">emission</span> sources are developing quickly in a response to the need by the modeling community to assess fire's role in the carbon cycle and the land management community to understand fire effects and impacts on air quality. In a project funded by NASA, our team has developed methods to spatially quantify wildland fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> for the contiguous United States (CONUS) and Alaska (AK) at regional scales. We have also developed a prototype web-based information system, the Wildland Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> Information System (WFEIS) to make <span class="hlt">emissions</span> modeling tools and estimates for the CONUS and AK available to the user community. With new funding through two NASA programs, our team from MTRI, USFS, and UMd will be further developing WFEIS to provide biomass burning <span class="hlt">emissions</span> estimates for the carbon cycle science community and for land and air quality managers, to improve the way <span class="hlt">emissions</span> estimates are calculated for a variety of disciplines. In this poster, we review WFEIS as it currently operates and the plans to extend the current system for use by the carbon cycle science community (through the NASA Carbon Monitoring System Program) and resource management community (through the NASA Applications Program). Features to be enhanced include an improved accounting of biomass present in canopy fuels that are available for burning in a forest fire, addition of annually changing vegetation biomass/fuels used in computing fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span>, and quantification of the errors present in the estimation methods in order to provide uncertainty of <span class="hlt">emissions</span> estimates across CONUS and AK. Additionally, WFEIS <span class="hlt">emissions</span> estimates will be compared with results obtained with the Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>), which operates at a global scale at a coarse spatial resolution, to help improve <span class="hlt">GFED</span> estimates and possibly integrate some <span class="hlt">GFED</span> concepts into WFEIS. Possibilities for WFEIS are broad, and as more funding is secured the WFEIS team foresees development of similar regional biomass burning estimation systems developing in other regions beyond the US.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li class="active"><span>2</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_2 --> <div id="page_3" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li class="active"><span>3</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="41"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1613715C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1613715C"><span id="translatedtitle">MAGA, a new <span class="hlt">database</span> of gas natural <span class="hlt">emissions</span>: a collaborative web environment for collecting data.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cardellini, Carlo; Chiodini, Giovanni; Frigeri, Alessandro; Bagnato, Emanuela; Frondini, Francesco; Aiuppa, Alessandro</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>The data on volcanic and non-volcanic gas <span class="hlt">emissions</span> available online are, as today, are incomplete and most importantly, fragmentary. Hence, there is need for common frameworks to aggregate available data, in order to characterize and quantify the phenomena at various scales. A new and detailed web <span class="hlt">database</span> (MAGA: MApping GAs <span class="hlt">emissions</span>) has been developed, and recently improved, to collect data on carbon degassing form volcanic and non-volcanic environments. MAGA <span class="hlt">database</span> allows researchers to insert data interactively and dynamically into a spatially referred relational <span class="hlt">database</span> management system, as well as to extract data. MAGA kicked-off with the <span class="hlt">database</span> set up and with the ingestion in to the <span class="hlt">database</span> of the data from: i) a literature survey on publications on volcanic gas fluxes including data on active craters degassing, diffuse soil degassing and fumaroles both from dormant closed-conduit volcanoes (e.g., Vulcano, Phlegrean Fields, Santorini, Nysiros, Teide, etc.) and open-vent volcanoes (e.g., Etna, Stromboli, etc.) in the Mediterranean area and Azores, and ii) the revision and update of Googas <span class="hlt">database</span> on non-volcanic <span class="hlt">emission</span> of the Italian territory (Chiodini et al., 2008), in the framework of the Deep Earth Carbon Degassing (DECADE) research initiative of the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO). For each geo-located gas <span class="hlt">emission</span> site, the <span class="hlt">database</span> holds images and description of the site and of the <span class="hlt">emission</span> type (e.g., diffuse <span class="hlt">emission</span>, plume, fumarole, etc.), gas chemical-isotopic composition (when available), gas temperature and gases fluxes magnitude. Gas sampling, analysis and flux measurement methods are also reported together with references and contacts to researchers expert of each site. In this phase data can be accessed on the network from a web interface, and data-driven web service, where software clients can request data directly from the <span class="hlt">database</span>, are planned to be implemented shortly. This way Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and Virtual Globes (e.g., Google Earth) could easily access the <span class="hlt">database</span>, and data could be exchanged with other <span class="hlt">database</span>. At the moment the <span class="hlt">database</span> includes: i) more than 1000 flux data about volcanic plume degassing from Etna and Stromboli volcanoes, ii) data from ~ 30 sites of diffuse soil degassing from Napoletan volcanoes, Azores, Canary, Etna, Stromboli, and Vulcano Island, several data on fumarolic <span class="hlt">emissions</span> (~ 7 sites) with CO2 fluxes; iii) data from ~ 270 non volcanic gas <span class="hlt">emission</span> site in Italy. We believe MAGA <span class="hlt">data-base</span> is an important starting point to develop a large scale, expandable <span class="hlt">data-base</span> aimed to excite, inspire, and encourage participation among researchers. In addition, the possibility to archive location and qualitative information for gas <span class="hlt">emission</span>/sites not yet investigated, could stimulate the scientific community for future researches and will provide an indication on the current uncertainty on deep carbon fluxes global estimates</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19960038445','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19960038445"><span id="translatedtitle">Scheduled civil aircraft <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventories for 1992: <span class="hlt">Database</span> development and analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Baughcum, Steven L.; Tritz, Terrance G.; Henderson, Stephen C.; Pickett, David C.</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>This report describes the development of a three-dimensional <span class="hlt">database</span> of aircraft fuel burn and <span class="hlt">emissions</span> (fuel burned, NOx, CO, and hydrocarbons) from scheduled commercial aircraft for each month of 1992. The seasonal variation in aircraft <span class="hlt">emissions</span> was calculated for selected regions (global, North America, Europe, North Atlantic, and North Pacific). A series of parametric calculations were done to quantify the possible errors introduced from making approximations necessary to calculate the global <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventory. The effects of wind, temperature, load factor, payload, and fuel tankering on fuel burn were evaluated to identify how they might affect the accuracy of aircraft <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventories. These <span class="hlt">emissions</span> inventories are available for use by atmospheric scientists conducting the Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP) modeling studies. Fuel burned and <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of nitrogen oxides (NOx as N02), carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons have been calculated on a 1 degree latitude x 1 degree longitude x 1 kilometer altitude grid and delivered to NASA as electronic files.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1510593G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1510593G"><span id="translatedtitle">Access to <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> Distributions and Related Ancillary Data through the ECCAD <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Granier, Claire; Boulanger, Damien; D'Angiola, Ariela; Darras, Sabine; Liousse, Catherine; Marlire, Jean-Francois; Miville, Aude; Paulin, Mireille; Pignot, Vincent; Zemankova, Katerina</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>During the past few years, the ECCAD (<span class="hlt">Emissions</span> of atmospheric Compounds & Compilation of Ancillary Data) <span class="hlt">database</span> was developed in order to provide a user-friendly access to surface <span class="hlt">emissions</span> and ancillary data, i.e. data on land use, active fires, burned areas, population, etc. This <span class="hlt">database</span> and the <span class="hlt">emissions</span> portal of the GEIA (Global <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> InitiAtive) project have been merged. ECCAD is a sub-project of the ETHER French Atmospheric Chemistry Data Centre (CNES and CNRS, http://www.pole-ether.fr). The ECCAD <span class="hlt">database</span> includes currently a large diversity of datasets, which provide global and regional surface <span class="hlt">emissions</span> for a large set of chemical compounds. All the data are provided at a 0.5x0.5 or 1x1 degree resolution. ECCAD provides detailed metadata on each of the datasets, including information on complete references and methodology, and links to the original inventories. Several tools are provided for the visualization of the data, for computing global and regional totals and for an interactive spatial and temporal analysis. The data can be downloaded as interoperable NetCDF CF-compliant files, i.e. the data are compatible with many other client interfaces and can be downloaded through requests as geographical coverage or geo-referenced maps. ECCAD has currently more than 700 users originating from more than 30 countries. ECCAD benefits from this large international community of users to expand the number of <span class="hlt">emission</span> datasets made available. The ECCAD <span class="hlt">database</span> and the web interface are in continuous development: new tools are being built to improve the analysis and comparison of <span class="hlt">emissions</span> and ancillary data. These new tools include a regridding tool, arithmetic expressions to combine different maps, interactive selection of scale values, and new tools for temporal profiles analysis. Comparisons of data at different scales is also in development. An online module to calculate biomass burning <span class="hlt">emissions</span> is being improved, and will also be extended to anthropogenic <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. The presentation will provide information on all the datasets available within ECCAD, as well as examples of the analysis work that can be done online from the <span class="hlt">database</span>. All the datasets, associated metadata, tools and download can be achieved from the ECCAD website: http://eccad.pole-ether.fr</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JGRD..118.6797L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JGRD..118.6797L"><span id="translatedtitle">Dynamic biomass burning <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors and their impact on atmospheric CO mixing ratios</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Leeuwen, T. T.; Peters, W.; Krol, M. C.; Werf, G. R.</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p>Biomass burning is a major source of trace gases and aerosols, influencing atmospheric chemistry and climate. To quantitatively assess its impact, an accurate representation of fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> is crucial for the atmospheric modeling community. So far, most studies rely on static <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors (EF) which convert estimates of dry matter burned to trace gas and aerosol <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. These EFs are often based on the arithmetic mean of field measurements stratified by biome, neglecting the variability in time and space. Here we present global carbon monoxide (CO) <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates from fires based on six EF scenarios with different spatial and temporal variability, using dry matter <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates from the Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>). We used the TM5 model to transport these different bottom-up estimates in the atmosphere and found that including spatial and temporal variability in EFs impacted CO mixing ratios substantially. Most scenarios estimated higher CO mixing ratios (up to 40% more CO from fires during the burning season) over boreal regions compared to the <span class="hlt">GFED</span> standard run, while a decrease (~15%) was estimated over the continent of Africa. A comparison to atmospheric CO observations showed differences of 10-20 ppb between the scenarios and systematic deviations from local observations. Although temporal correlations of specific EF scenarios improved for certain regions, an overall "best" set of EFs could not be selected. Our results provide a new set of <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates that can be used for sensitivity analyses and highlight the importance of better understanding spatial and temporal variability in EFs for atmospheric studies in general and specifically when using CO or aerosols concentration measurements to top-down constrain fire carbon <span class="hlt">emissions</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.6705D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.6705D"><span id="translatedtitle">Access to <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> Distributions and Related Ancillary Data through the ECCAD <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Darras, Sabine; Granier, Claire; Liousse, Catherine; Mieville, Aude; Boulanger, Damien; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Paulin, Mireille; Richard, Hitier</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> of atmospheric Compounds & Compilation of Ancillary Data (ECCAD) <span class="hlt">database</span> provides a user-friendly access to surface <span class="hlt">emissions</span> and ancillary data, i.e. data on land use, active fires, burned areas, population, etc. ECCAD is the <span class="hlt">emissions</span> <span class="hlt">database</span> of the GEIA (Global <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> InitiAtive) project. ECCAD is a sub-project of the ETHER French Atmospheric Chemistry Data Centre (CNES and CNRS, http://www.pole-ether.fr). The ECCAD <span class="hlt">database</span> includes a large diversity of datasets, which provide global and regional surface <span class="hlt">emissions</span> for a large set of chemical compounds, at a 0.5x0.5 or 1x1 degree resolution. A new version of ECCAD is being developped allowing to handle any resolution grid and geographical coverage. ECCAD provides detailed metadata for each of the datasets, including information on references, how to cite the datasets when used, the methodology, and links to the original inventories. Several tools are provided for the visualization of the data, for computing global and regional totals and for an interactive spatial and temporal analysis. The data can be downloaded as interoperable NetCDF CF-compliant files, i.e. the data are compatible with many other client interfaces. ECCAD has currently more than 1200 users originating from more than 70 countries. The project benefits from this large international community of users to expand the number of <span class="hlt">emission</span> datasets made available. The ECCAD <span class="hlt">database</span> and the web interface are in continuous development: new tools are being built to improve the analysis and comparison of <span class="hlt">emissions</span> and ancillary data. They include a regridding tool, arithmetic expressions to combine different maps, new tools for temporal profiles analysis, and comparisons of data at different scales. An online module to calculate biomass burning <span class="hlt">emissions</span> is being improved and will be extended to anthropogenic <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. The presentation will provide information on all the datasets available within ECCAD, as well as examples of the analysis work that can be done online through the website: http://eccad.pole-ether.fr</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.5663D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.5663D"><span id="translatedtitle">Access to <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> Distributions and Related Ancillary Data through the ECCAD <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Darras, Sabine; Granier, Claire; Liousse, Catherine; Enriquez, Edgar; Boulanger, Damien; Mieville, Aude</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>The ECCAD (<span class="hlt">Emissions</span> of atmospheric Compounds & Compilation of Ancillary Data) <span class="hlt">database</span> provides a user-friendly access to global and regional surface <span class="hlt">emissions</span> for a large set of chemical compounds and ancillary data (land use, active fires, burned areas, population, etc.) at a 0.5x0.5 or 1x1 degree resolution. ECCAD is the <span class="hlt">emissions</span> <span class="hlt">database</span> of the GEIA (Global <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> InitiAtive) project and a sub-project of the French Atmospheric Chemistry Data Centre Ether (CNES and CNRS). ECCAD has currently more than 1700 users originating from more than 70 countries. The project benefits from this large international community of users to expand the number of <span class="hlt">emission</span> datasets available. ECCAD provides detailed metadata for each of the datasets and various tools for data visualization, for computing global and regional totals and for interactive spatial and temporal analysis. The data can be downloaded as interoperable NetCDF CF-compliant files, i.e. the data are compatible with many other client interfaces. ECCAD will soon allow to handle any resolution grid and geographical coverage. The presentation will provide information on the datasets available within ECCAD, as well as examples of the analysis work that can be done online through the website: http://eccad.pole-ether.fr eccad@sedoo.fr.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.P21A0209M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.P21A0209M"><span id="translatedtitle">Spectral Characterization of Mars Analogues From the Berlin <span class="hlt">Emissivity</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (BED)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Maturilli, A.; Helbert, J.</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>Several well-recognized Martian soil analogues have been classified and studied in the past years. The JSC Mars-1, collected and distributed under control of the NASA Johnson Space Center, originates from Pu Nene cinder cone in Hawaii, USA. It is a palagonitic tephra (glassy volcanic ash altered at low temperatures), whose spectral features resemble the bright regions on Mars. The Salten Skov, coming from a subsurface deposit in the Midjutland region of Denmark, is a Fe-oxide precipitate with a dark red color, composed mainly of goethite, hematite and maghemite, with mineralogical and magnetic close to those of the martian soil. Montmorillonite and palagonite are other natural materials commonly referred as Martian soil analogues. We present and discuss the <span class="hlt">emissivity</span> spectra of these analogue minerals from the Berlin <span class="hlt">Emissivity</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> spectral library. The Berlin <span class="hlt">Emissivity</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (BED) currently contains also <span class="hlt">emissivity</span> spectra of plagioclase and potassium feldspars, low Ca and high Ca pyroxenes, olivine, elemental sulfur and a lunar highland soil sample measured in the wavelength range from 3 to 50 ?m as a function of particle size. For each sample we measured the spectra of four particle size separates ranging from < 25 to 250 ?m. The current main setup at the Planetary <span class="hlt">Emissivity</span> Laboratory (PEL) at DLR consist of an <span class="hlt">emissivity</span> device built at DLR coupled to a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (Bruker VERTEX 80v) equipped with both a cooled MTC detector and a room temperature DTGS detector. All spectra were acquired with a spectral resolution of 4 cm- 1. The combination of detectors and spectrometer allows a unique wavelength coverage encompassing the whole thermal radiation range measured by spacecraft instruments. The <span class="hlt">emissivity</span> device is currently purged with dry air, while the spectrometer is evacuated. In a future upgrade of the facility the <span class="hlt">emissivity</span> device will be replaced by a planetary simulation chamber which can be evacuated and which allows to heat sample up to Mercury surface temperatures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.V13A2588M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.V13A2588M"><span id="translatedtitle">Towards improved volcanic <span class="hlt">emissions</span> budgets: opportunities arising from a new global <span class="hlt">database</span> of volcanic degassing data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>McCormick, B. T.; Cottrell, E.; Lopez, O. G.; Venzke, E.; Mather, T. A.; Pyle, D. M.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Accurate global budgets of volcanic <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are essential to constrain the flux of key volatile species (CO2, SO2, halogens) between major Earth reservoirs, to assess the climatic and environmental impact of volcanic degassing, and for the insights they may provide into volcanic processes, e.g. the style, onset and duration of eruptions. Whilst degassing budgets have been determined for many species, these are inherently limited, being largely static and time-averaged, with coarse spatial resolution and inadequate (or lacking) error analyses. Herein we demonstrate the potential improvements in both regional and global budgets enabled by the use of a new relational volcanic <span class="hlt">emissions</span> <span class="hlt">database</span> that is being developed within the online <span class="hlt">database</span> of Holocene volcanic activity maintained by the Global Volcanism Program (GVP), Volcanoes Of The World 4.0. Funded by the Deep Carbon Observatory's DECADE initiative and GVP, this new <span class="hlt">database</span> will enable users to link volcanic degassing to coincident activity, which is central to our scientific objectives. This <span class="hlt">database</span> will explicitly quantify data quality, which has largely been neglected in previous compilations and budget estimates. Observations reveal that volcanic <span class="hlt">emissions</span> often vary by orders of magnitude, between peak syn-eruptive output and much lower persistent quiescent degassing. For example, timeseries analysis of SO2 <span class="hlt">emission</span> data at Soufriere Hills points to strong periodicity in degassing, akin to that seen in other geophysical datasets (Nicholson et al., 2013, EPSL). By closely linking degassing and activity datasets, we show that for certain volcanoes a more representative characterization of long term volatile output can be achieved than by the use of a single mean value. We demonstrate that different activity/degassing states can be identified and assess the relative contribution of these states to a volcano's overall output. We also explore the potential for statistical models of degassing trends at well-studied volcanoes to be applied to more poorly-studied analogues, thus providing a means to estimate degassing behavior in these systems, where otherwise sparse, non-representative measurements must be relied upon. We also investigate means of extrapolating measurements of degassing at individual volcanoes to arc and ultimately global totals. Although a power law distribution of gas <span class="hlt">emissions</span> may not be appropriate (Mori et al., 2013, JVGR), characterization of major degassing sources alone may closely approximate total arc and hence global <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. We investigate this hypothesis, and consider whether a broad categorization of volcanoes based on their assumed degassing/activity characteristics can offer insight into how best to estimate <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from those without direct measurements of degassing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110022984','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110022984"><span id="translatedtitle">Daily and Hourly Variability in Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> and Consequences for Atmospheric Model Predictions of Carbon Monoxide</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mu, M.; Randerson, J. T.; van der Werf, G. R.; Giglio, L.; Kasibhatla, P.; Morton, D.; Collatz, G. J.; DeFries, R. S.; Hyer, E. J.; Prins, E. M.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Wunch, D.; Toon, G. C.; Sherlock, V.; Wennberg, P. O.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Attribution of the causes of atmospheric trace gas and aerosol variability often requires the use of high resolution time series of anthropogenic and natural <span class="hlt">emissions</span> inventories. Here we developed an approach for representing synoptic- and diurnal-scale temporal variability in fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> for the Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> version 3 (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>3). We distributed monthly <span class="hlt">GFED</span>3 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> during 2003-2009 on a daily time step using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-derived measurements of active fires from Terra and Aqua satellites. In parallel, mean diurnal cycles were constructed from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) active fire observations. We found that patterns of daily variability in fires varied considerably across different biomes, with short but intense periods of daily <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in boreal ecosystems and lower intensity (but more continuous) periods of bunting in savannas. On diurnal timescales, our analysis of the GOES active fires indicated that fires in savannas, grasslands, and croplands occurred earlier in the day as compared to fires in nearby forests. Comparison with Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) and Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) column CO observations provided evidence that including daily variability in <span class="hlt">emissions</span> moderately improved atmospheric model simulations, particularly during the fire season and near regions with high levels of biomass burning. The high temporal resolution estimates of fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> developed here may ultimately reduce uncertainties related to fire contributions to atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. Important future directions include reconciling top-down and bottom up estimates of fire radiative power and integrating burned area and active fire time series from multiple satellite sensors to improve daily <span class="hlt">emissions</span> estimates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20120013667&hterms=fire+simulation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dfire%2Bsimulation','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20120013667&hterms=fire+simulation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dfire%2Bsimulation"><span id="translatedtitle">Daily and 3-hourly Variability in Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> and Consequences for Atmospheric Model Predictions of Carbon Monoxide</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mu, M.; Randerson, J. T.; vanderWerf, G. R.; Giglio, L.; Kasibhatla, P.; Morton, D.; Collatz, G. J.; DeFries, R. S.; Hyer, E. J.; Prins, E. M.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Wunch, D.; Toon, G. C.; Sherlock, V.; Wennberg, P. O.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Attribution of the causes of atmospheric trace gas and aerosol variability often requires the use of high resolution time series of anthropogenic and natural <span class="hlt">emissions</span> inventories. Here we developed an approach for representing synoptic- and diurnal-scale temporal variability in fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> for the Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> version 3 (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>3). We disaggregated monthly <span class="hlt">GFED</span>3 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> during 2003.2009 to a daily time step using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) ]derived measurements of active fires from Terra and Aqua satellites. In parallel, mean diurnal cycles were constructed from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) Wildfire Automated Biomass Burning Algorithm (WF_ABBA) active fire observations. Daily variability in fires varied considerably across different biomes, with short but intense periods of daily <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in boreal ecosystems and lower intensity (but more continuous) periods of burning in savannas. These patterns were consistent with earlier field and modeling work characterizing fire behavior dynamics in different ecosystems. On diurnal timescales, our analysis of the GOES WF_ABBA active fires indicated that fires in savannas, grasslands, and croplands occurred earlier in the day as compared to fires in nearby forests. Comparison with Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) and Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) column CO observations provided evidence that including daily variability in <span class="hlt">emissions</span> moderately improved atmospheric model simulations, particularly during the fire season and near regions with high levels of biomass burning. The high temporal resolution estimates of fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> developed here may ultimately reduce uncertainties related to fire contributions to atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. Important future directions include reconciling top ]down and bottom up estimates of fire radiative power and integrating burned area and active fire time series from multiple satellite sensors to improve daily <span class="hlt">emissions</span> estimates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Icar..241..190D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014Icar..241..190D"><span id="translatedtitle">Charting thermal <span class="hlt">emission</span> variability at Amirani with the Galileo NIMS Io Thermal <span class="hlt">Emission</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (NITED)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Davies, A. G.; Veeder, G. J.; Hill, S. I.; Matson, D. L.; Johnson, T. V.</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>We have examined the variability of thermal <span class="hlt">emission</span> from lava flows at Amirani on Io, using measurements of radiant flux from detections by the Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) between 1996 and 2001. Amirani is the longest currently active lava flow field in the Solar System and a persistent thermal source in every Galileo NIMS observation that covers its location. We have quantified the thermal <span class="hlt">emission</span> from hot spots correlated with discrete areas of new lava flow emplacement at points along the length of the Amirani flow field in high spatial resolution NIMS observations in 2000 and 2001. Where discernible, the position of some effusive activity changes from orbit to orbit. We find the implied style of emplacement of lava at Amirani is consistent with pahoehoe-like flows. There is an estimated 50% decrease in discharge rate between 1997 and late 2001, perhaps linked to an outburst eruption in the Amirani vicinity in February 2001. The variability of thermal <span class="hlt">emission</span> from Amirani is less than that seen at a number of other persistently active ionian volcanoes (such as Prometheus, Culann, and Loki Patera). All of these volcanoes exhibit large increases and decreases in the absolute magnitude of thermal <span class="hlt">emission</span> (see Matson et al., 2006 [Loki Patera]; Davies, A.G. et al. [2006]. Icarus 184, 460-477 [Prometheus]; and Davies, A.G., Ennis, M.E. [2011]. Icarus 215, 401-416 [Culann]). At Amirani, as at these volcanoes, the thermal <span class="hlt">emission</span> measured between 1996 and 2001 indicates a persistent, although variable, supply of magma to the surface. In high spatial resolution NIMS observations of hot spots obtained in 2000 and 2001 we estimate the emitted power from active lava flows associated with Amirani to be ?170 30 GW, which corresponds to total effusion rates (assuming a basaltic composition) from multiple points along the Amirani flow of 34-56 m3/s.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19960035824','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19960035824"><span id="translatedtitle">Scheduled Civil Aircraft <span class="hlt">Emission</span> Inventories for 1976 and 1984: <span class="hlt">Database</span> Development and Analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Baughcum, Steven L.; Henderson, Stephen C.; Tritz, Terrance G.</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>This report describes the development of a three-dimensional <span class="hlt">database</span> of aircraft fuel burn and <span class="hlt">emissions</span> (fuel burned, NOx, CO, and hydrocarbons) from scheduled commercial aircraft for four months (February, May, August, and November) of 1976 and 1984. Combining this data with earlier published data for 1990 and 1992, trend analyses for fuel burned, NOx, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons were calculated for selected regions (global, North America, Europe, North Atlantic, and North Pacific). These <span class="hlt">emissions</span> inventories are available for use by atmospheric scientists conducting the Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP) modeling studies. Fuel burned and <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of nitrogen oxides (NOx as NO2), carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons have been calculated on a 1 degree latitude x 1 degree longitude x 1 kilometer altitude grid and delivered to NASA as electronic files.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008JGRD..11314218L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008JGRD..11314218L"><span id="translatedtitle">Modeling mineral dust <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from the Sahara desert using new surface properties and soil <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Laurent, B.; Marticorena, B.; Bergametti, G.; LOn, J. F.; Mahowald, N. M.</p> <p>2008-07-01</p> <p>The present study investigates the mineral dust <span class="hlt">emissions</span> and the occurrence of dust <span class="hlt">emission</span> events over the Sahara desert from 1996 to 2001. Mineral dust <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are simulated over a region extending from 16N to 38N and from 19W to 40E with a ? ? spatial resolution. The input parameters required by the dust <span class="hlt">emission</span> model are surface features data (aerodynamic roughness length, dry soil size distribution and texture for erodible soils), and meteorological surface data (mainly surface wind velocity and soil moisture). A map of the aerodynamic roughness lengths is established based on a composition of protrusion coefficients derived from the POLDER-1 surface products. Soil dry size distribution and texture are derived from measurements performed on soil samples from desert areas, and from a soil map derived from a geomorphologic analysis of desert landscapes. Surface re-analyzed meteorological <span class="hlt">databases</span> (ERA-40) of the European Centre for Medium range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) are used. The influence of soil moisture on simulated dust <span class="hlt">emissions</span> is quantified. The main Saharan dust sources identified during the 6-year simulated period are in agreement with the previous studies based on in situ or satellite observations. The relevance of the simulated large dust sources and point sources ("hot spots") is tested using aerosol indexes derived from satellite observations (TOMS Absorbing Aerosol Index and Infrared Dust Difference Index Meteosat). The Saharan dust <span class="hlt">emissions</span> simulated from 1996 to 2001 range from 585 to 759 Tg a-1. The simulations show marked seasonal cycles with a maximum in summer for the western Sahara and in spring for the eastern Sahara. The interannual variability of dust <span class="hlt">emissions</span> is pronounced in the eastern part of the Sahara while the <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from the western Sahara are more regular over the studied period. The soil moisture does not noticeably affect the Saharan dust <span class="hlt">emissions</span>, their seasonal cycle or their interannual variability, but it can partly control and limit the dust <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in some parts of the northern desert margin, where the precipitation rates are higher. Our simulations also tend to confirm that the Sahara is the major terrestrial source of mineral dust.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AtmEn..71..115V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AtmEn..71..115V"><span id="translatedtitle">Methane <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from 2000 to 2011 wildfires in Northeast Eurasia estimated with MODIS burned area data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vasileva, Anastasia; Moiseenko, Konstantin</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p>Estimates of methane wildfire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from Northeast Eurasia for years 2000-2011 are reported on the basis of satellite burned area data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS MCD45 data product) and ecosystem-dependent fire <span class="hlt">emission</span> parameters. Average (with standard deviations) <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are 1.0 0.2 Tg CH4 year-1, with interannual variations of 0.4-2.3 Tg CH4 year-1. Most of the <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are located within 48-55N, in the southern part of the boreal forest zone, mostly in Siberia and Far East. The largest discrepancies among independent present-day estimates are found in the sub-polar regions of West Siberia and Far East (60-65N). Compared to the methane wetland <span class="hlt">emissions</span> reported in literature, the wildfire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in the south add about 5-20% to their estimated average annual values and are compared with the magnitudes of their interannual variability. Average seasonal cycle peaks in April-May and July-August, which partially overlaps the summertime peak in wetland <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. The independent estimates from version 3 of Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>3) are by 50% higher (compared to this study) for average annual <span class="hlt">emissions</span> over the decade (which is quite good regarding the uncertainties) and showed larger differences for individual years. Possible applications of the results are considered for climate research and inverse modeling studies, as well as for assessment of the uncertainties in the present-day wildfire <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10158948','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10158948"><span id="translatedtitle">Estimating monthly and state-level NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, VOC and CO{sub 2} <span class="hlt">emissions</span> using the MSCET <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Cilek, C.M.; Kohout, E.</p> <p>1992-07-01</p> <p>This paper describes the Month and State Current <span class="hlt">Emission</span> Trends (MSCET) <span class="hlt">database</span>. It describes the methodology used to estimate NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, VOC, and CO{sub 2} <span class="hlt">emissions</span> and the data sources used by the methodology. Selected <span class="hlt">emissions</span> results from the <span class="hlt">database</span> are presented. 2 refs., 6 figs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/7067780','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/7067780"><span id="translatedtitle">Estimating monthly and state-level NO sub x , SO sub 2 , VOC and CO sub 2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> using the MSCET <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Cilek, C.M.; Kohout, E.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>This paper describes the Month and State Current <span class="hlt">Emission</span> Trends (MSCET) <span class="hlt">database</span>. It describes the methodology used to estimate NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, VOC, and CO{sub 2} <span class="hlt">emissions</span> and the data sources used by the methodology. Selected <span class="hlt">emissions</span> results from the <span class="hlt">database</span> are presented. 2 refs., 6 figs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.V31B2708C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.V31B2708C"><span id="translatedtitle">The development of a new <span class="hlt">database</span> of gas <span class="hlt">emissions</span>: MAGA, a collaborative web environment for collecting data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cardellini, C.; Chiodini, G.; Frigeri, A.; Bagnato, E.; Aiuppa, A.; McCormick, B.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>The data on volcanic and non-volcanic gas <span class="hlt">emissions</span> available online are, as today, incomplete and most importantly, fragmentary. Hence, there is need for common frameworks to aggregate available data, in order to characterize and quantify the phenomena at various spatial and temporal scales. Building on the Googas experience we are now extending its capability, particularly on the user side, by developing a new web environment for collecting and publishing data. We have started to create a new and detailed web <span class="hlt">database</span> (MAGA: MApping GAs <span class="hlt">emissions</span>) for the deep carbon degassing in the Mediterranean area. This project is part of the Deep Earth Carbon Degassing (DECADE) research initiative, lunched in 2012 by the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) to improve the global budget of endogenous carbon from volcanoes. MAGA <span class="hlt">database</span> is planned to complement and integrate the work in progress within DECADE in developing CARD (Carbon Degassing) <span class="hlt">database</span>. MAGA <span class="hlt">database</span> will allow researchers to insert data interactively and dynamically into a spatially referred relational <span class="hlt">database</span> management system, as well as to extract data. MAGA kicked-off with the <span class="hlt">database</span> set up and a complete literature survey on publications on volcanic gas fluxes, by including data on active craters degassing, diffuse soil degassing and fumaroles both from dormant closed-conduit volcanoes (e.g., Vulcano, Phlegrean Fields, Santorini, Nysiros, Teide, etc.) and open-vent volcanoes (e.g., Etna, Stromboli, etc.) in the Mediterranean area and Azores. For each geo-located gas <span class="hlt">emission</span> site, the <span class="hlt">database</span> holds images and description of the site and of the <span class="hlt">emission</span> type (e.g., diffuse <span class="hlt">emission</span>, plume, fumarole, etc.), gas chemical-isotopic composition (when available), gas temperature and gases fluxes magnitude. Gas sampling, analysis and flux measurement methods are also reported together with references and contacts to researchers expert of the site. Data can be accessed on the network from a web interface or as a data-driven web service, where software clients can request data directly from the <span class="hlt">database</span>. This way Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and Virtual Globes (e.g., Google Earth) can easily access the <span class="hlt">database</span>, and data can be exchanged with other <span class="hlt">database</span>. In details the <span class="hlt">database</span> now includes: i) more than 1000 flux data about volcanic plume degassing from Etna (4 summit craters and bulk degassing) and Stromboli volcanoes, with time averaged CO2 fluxes of ~ 18000 and 766 t/d, respectively; ii) data from ~ 30 sites of diffuse soil degassing from Napoletan volcanoes, Azores, Canary, Etna, Stromboli, and Vulcano Island, with a wide range of CO2 fluxes (from les than 1 to 1500 t/d) and iii) several data on fumarolic <span class="hlt">emissions</span> (~ 7 sites) with CO2 fluxes up to 1340 t/day (i.e., Stromboli). When available, time series of compositional data have been archived in the <span class="hlt">database</span> (e.g., for Campi Flegrei fumaroles). We believe MAGA <span class="hlt">data-base</span> is an important starting point to develop a large scale, expandable <span class="hlt">data-base</span> aimed to excite, inspire, and encourage participation among researchers. In addition, the possibility to archive location and qualitative information for gas <span class="hlt">emission</span>/sites not yet investigated, could stimulate the scientific community for future researches and will provide an indication on the current uncertainty on deep carbon fluxes global estimates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.B11G..03H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.B11G..03H"><span id="translatedtitle">Interannual Variability of Wetland and Fire Methane <span class="hlt">Emissions</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hodson, E. L.; Poulter, B.; Prigent, C.; Spahni, R.; Zimmermann, N. E.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>Methane (CH4) has the second highest radiative forcing of any anthropogenic greenhouse gas. The land surface including natural wetlands, rice growing regions, lakes, geologic sources, and fires is estimated to contribute ~50% to global annual methane <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. Natural wetlands are the largest single source of methane to the atmosphere and the largest land surface source. Understanding the response of methane sources to changes in climate is therefore important for improving estimates of future greenhouse gas <span class="hlt">emissions</span> to the atmosphere. Inverse modeling studies investigating the impact of wetland, rice, and fire CH4 <span class="hlt">emissions</span>, conclude that wetlands and rice contribute far more (70% vs. 15%) to year-to-year changes in methane <span class="hlt">emissions</span> than fires. In this study, we use the same dynamic global vegetation process model LPJ to model both wetland and fire methane <span class="hlt">emissions</span> for the recent past (1997-2007), which as far as we know has never been done from a process model perspective. We use multiple global satellite products for burned and inundated area as inputs for our model. In addition, we test two concepts for wetland area, using either satellite input only or a mixture of satellite input and modeled partially saturated soils to define wetland area. We compare our fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> output to the Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>) project and use inverse modeling studies to constrain our wetland <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. We conclude that the interannual variability in global fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> (-5 to +30 Tg CH4/year) is similar to that for natural wetlands and rice (-10 to +20 Tg CH4/year) when estimated using a process model, which disagree with conclusions from inverse model results. The timing of positive and negative variations in <span class="hlt">emissions</span> is also quite similar across the different land processes, indicating that climate variations may often suppress or accentuate CH4 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from all land sources in the same year.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011BGD.....8.7339K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011BGD.....8.7339K"><span id="translatedtitle">Biomass burning <span class="hlt">emissions</span> estimated with a global fire assimilation system based on observed fire radiative power</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kaiser, J. W.; Heil, A.; Andreae, M. O.; Benedetti, A.; Chubarova, N.; Jones, L.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Razinger, M.; Schultz, M. G.; Suttie, M.; van der Werf, G. R.</p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>The Global Fire Assimilation System (GFASv1.0) calculates biomass burning <span class="hlt">emissions</span> by assimilating Fire Radiative Power (FRP) observations from the MODIS instruments onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites. It corrects for gaps in the observations, which are mostly due to cloud cover, and filters spurious FRP observations of volcanoes, gas flares and other industrial activity. The combustion rate is subsequently calculated with land cover-specific conversion factors. <span class="hlt">Emission</span> factors for 40 gas-phase and aerosol trace species have been compiled from a literature survey. The corresponding daily <span class="hlt">emissions</span> have been calculated on a global 0.5 0.5 grid from 2003 to the present. General consistency with the Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emission</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> version 3.1 (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>3.1) within its accuracy is achieved while maintaining the advantages of an FRP-based approach: GFASv1.0 makes use of the quantitative information on the combustion rate that is contained in the observations, and it detects fires in real time at high spatial and temporal resolution. GFASv1.0 indicates omission errors in <span class="hlt">GFED</span>3.1 due to undetected small fires. It also exhibits slightly longer fire seasons in South America and North Africa and a slightly shorter fire season in Southeast Asia. GFASv1.0 has already been used for atmospheric reactive gas simulations in an independent study, which found good agreement with atmospheric observations. We have performed simulations of the atmospheric aerosol distribution with and without the assimilation of MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD). They indicate that the <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of particulate matter need to be boosted with a factor of 2-4 to reproduce the global distribution of organic matter and black carbon. This discrepancy is also evident in the comparison of previously published top-down and bottom-up estimates. For the time being, a global enhancement of the particulate matter <span class="hlt">emissions</span> by 3.4 is recommended. Validation with independent AOD and PM10 observations recorded during the Russian fires in summer 2010 show that the global Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Change (MACC) aerosol model with GFASv1.0 aerosol <span class="hlt">emissions</span> captures the smoke plume evolution well when organic matter and black carbon are enhanced by the recommended factor. In conjunction with the assimilation of MODIS AOD, the use of GFASv1.0 with enhanced <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors quantitatively improves the forecast of the aerosol load near the surface sufficiently to allow air quality warnings with a lead time of up to four days.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012BGeo....9..527K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012BGeo....9..527K"><span id="translatedtitle">Biomass burning <span class="hlt">emissions</span> estimated with a global fire assimilation system based on observed fire radiative power</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kaiser, J. W.; Heil, A.; Andreae, M. O.; Benedetti, A.; Chubarova, N.; Jones, L.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Razinger, M.; Schultz, M. G.; Suttie, M.; van der Werf, G. R.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The Global Fire Assimilation System (GFASv1.0) calculates biomass burning <span class="hlt">emissions</span> by assimilating Fire Radiative Power (FRP) observations from the MODIS instruments onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites. It corrects for gaps in the observations, which are mostly due to cloud cover, and filters spurious FRP observations of volcanoes, gas flares and other industrial activity. The combustion rate is subsequently calculated with land cover-specific conversion factors. <span class="hlt">Emission</span> factors for 40 gas-phase and aerosol trace species have been compiled from a literature survey. The corresponding daily <span class="hlt">emissions</span> have been calculated on a global 0.5 0.5 grid from 2003 to the present. General consistency with the Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emission</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> version 3.1 (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>3.1) within its accuracy is achieved while maintaining the advantages of an FRP-based approach: GFASv1.0 makes use of the quantitative information on the combustion rate that is contained in the FRP observations, and it detects fires in real time at high spatial and temporal resolution. GFASv1.0 indicates omission errors in <span class="hlt">GFED</span>3.1 due to undetected small fires. It also exhibits slightly longer fire seasons in South America and North Africa and a slightly shorter fire season in Southeast Asia. GFASv1.0 has already been used for atmospheric reactive gas simulations in an independent study, which found good agreement with atmospheric observations. We have performed simulations of the atmospheric aerosol distribution with and without the assimilation of MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD). They indicate that the <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of particulate matter need to be boosted by a factor of 2-4 to reproduce the global distribution of organic matter and black carbon. This discrepancy is also evident in the comparison of previously published top-down and bottom-up estimates. For the time being, a global enhancement of the particulate matter <span class="hlt">emissions</span> by 3.4 is recommended. Validation with independent AOD and PM10 observations recorded during the Russian fires in summer 2010 show that the global Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Change (MACC) aerosol model with GFASv1.0 aerosol <span class="hlt">emissions</span> captures the smoke plume evolution well when organic matter and black carbon are enhanced by the recommended factor. In conjunction with the assimilation of MODIS AOD, the use of GFASv1.0 with enhanced <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors quantitatively improves the forecast of the aerosol load near the surface sufficiently to allow air quality warnings with a lead time of up to four days.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li class="active"><span>3</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_3 --> <div id="page_4" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li class="active"><span>4</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="61"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=115128&keyword=Artificial+AND+Intelligence&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=55717145&CFTOKEN=38047129','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=115128&keyword=Artificial+AND+Intelligence&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=55717145&CFTOKEN=38047129"><span id="translatedtitle">IMPROVING <span class="hlt">EMISSIONS</span> ESTIMATES WITH COMPUTATIONAL INTELLIGENCE, <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span> EXPANSION, AND COMPREHENSIVE VALIDATION</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The report discusses an EPA investigation of techniques to improve methods for estimating volatile organic compound (VOC) <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from area sources. Using the automobile refinishing industry for a detailed area source case study, an <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimation method is being developed...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGRG..117.4012R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGRG..117.4012R"><span id="translatedtitle">Global burned area and biomass burning <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from small fires</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Randerson, J. T.; Chen, Y.; van der Werf, G. R.; Rogers, B. M.; Morton, D. C.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>In several biomes, including croplands, wooded savannas, and tropical forests, many small fires occur each year that are well below the detection limit of the current generation of global burned area products derived from moderate resolution surface reflectance imagery. Although these fires often generate thermal anomalies that can be detected by satellites, their contributions to burned area and carbon fluxes have not been systematically quantified across different regions and continents. Here we developed a preliminary method for combining 1-km thermal anomalies (active fires) and 500 m burned area observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to estimate the influence of these fires. In our approach, we calculated the number of active fires inside and outside of 500 m burn scars derived from reflectance data. We estimated small fire burned area by computing the difference normalized burn ratio (dNBR) for these two sets of active fires and then combining these observations with other information. In a final step, we used the Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> version 3 (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>3) biogeochemical model to estimate the impact of these fires on biomass burning <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. We found that the spatial distribution of active fires and 500 m burned areas were in close agreement in ecosystems that experience large fires, including savannas across southern Africa and Australia and boreal forests in North America and Eurasia. In other areas, however, we observed many active fires outside of burned area perimeters. Fire radiative power was lower for this class of active fires. Small fires substantially increased burned area in several continental-scale regions, including Equatorial Asia (157%), Central America (143%), and Southeast Asia (90%) during 2001-2010. Globally, accounting for small fires increased total burned area by approximately by 35%, from 345 Mha/yr to 464 Mha/yr. A formal quantification of uncertainties was not possible, but sensitivity analyses of key model parameters caused estimates of global burned area increases from small fires to vary between 24% and 54%. Biomass burning carbon <span class="hlt">emissions</span> increased by 35% at a global scale when small fires were included in <span class="hlt">GFED</span>3, from 1.9 Pg C/yr to 2.5 Pg C/yr. The contribution of tropical forest fires to year-to-year variability in carbon fluxes increased because small fires amplified <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from Central America, South America and Southeast Asiaregions where drought stress and burned area varied considerably from year to year in response to El Nino-Southern Oscillation and other climate modes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140000253','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140000253"><span id="translatedtitle">Global Burned Area and Biomass Burning <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> from Small Fires</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Randerson, J. T.; Chen, Y.; vanderWerf, G. R.; Rogers, B. M.; Morton, D. C.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>In several biomes, including croplands, wooded savannas, and tropical forests, many small fires occur each year that are well below the detection limit of the current generation of global burned area products derived from moderate resolution surface reflectance imagery. Although these fires often generate thermal anomalies that can be detected by satellites, their contributions to burned area and carbon fluxes have not been systematically quantified across different regions and continents. Here we developed a preliminary method for combining 1-km thermal anomalies (active fires) and 500 m burned area observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to estimate the influence of these fires. In our approach, we calculated the number of active fires inside and outside of 500 m burn scars derived from reflectance data. We estimated small fire burned area by computing the difference normalized burn ratio (dNBR) for these two sets of active fires and then combining these observations with other information. In a final step, we used the Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> version 3 (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>3) biogeochemical model to estimate the impact of these fires on biomass burning <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. We found that the spatial distribution of active fires and 500 m burned areas were in close agreement in ecosystems that experience large fires, including savannas across southern Africa and Australia and boreal forests in North America and Eurasia. In other areas, however, we observed many active fires outside of burned area perimeters. Fire radiative power was lower for this class of active fires. Small fires substantially increased burned area in several continental-scale regions, including Equatorial Asia (157%), Central America (143%), and Southeast Asia (90%) during 2001-2010. Globally, accounting for small fires increased total burned area by approximately by 35%, from 345 Mha/yr to 464 Mha/yr. A formal quantification of uncertainties was not possible, but sensitivity analyses of key model parameters caused estimates of global burned area increases from small fires to vary between 24% and 54%. Biomass burning carbon <span class="hlt">emissions</span> increased by 35% at a global scale when small fires were included in <span class="hlt">GFED</span>3, from 1.9 Pg C/yr to 2.5 Pg C/yr. The contribution of tropical forest fires to year-to-year variability in carbon fluxes increased because small fires amplified <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from Central America, South America and Southeast Asia-regions where drought stress and burned area varied considerably from year to year in response to El Nino-Southern Oscillation and other climate modes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGRD..11715308H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JGRD..11715308H"><span id="translatedtitle">Interannual variability of carbon monoxide <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates over South America from 2006 to 2010</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hooghiemstra, P. B.; Krol, M. C.; van Leeuwen, T. T.; van der Werf, G. R.; Novelli, P. C.; Deeter, M. N.; Aben, I.; Röckmann, T.</p> <p>2012-08-01</p> <p>We present the first inverse modeling study to estimate CO <span class="hlt">emissions</span> constrained by both surface and satellite observations. Our 4D-Var system assimilates National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory (NOAA/ESRL) Global Monitoring Division (GMD) surface and Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT) satellite observations jointly by fitting a bias correction scheme. This approach leads to the identification of a positive bias of maximum 5 ppb in MOPITT column-averaged CO mixing ratios in the remote Southern Hemisphere (SH). The 4D-Var system is used to estimate CO <span class="hlt">emissions</span> over South America in the period 2006-2010 and to analyze the interannual variability (IAV) of these <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. We infer robust, high spatial resolution CO <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates that show slightly smaller IAV due to fires compared to the Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>3) prior <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. South American dry season (August and September) biomass burning <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates amount to 60, 92, 42, 16 and 93 Tg CO/yr for 2006 to 2010, respectively. Moreover, CO <span class="hlt">emissions</span> probably associated with pre-harvest burning of sugar cane plantations in São Paulo state are underestimated in current inventories by 50-100%. We conclude that climatic conditions (such as the widespread drought in 2010) seem the most likely cause for the IAV in biomass burning CO <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. However, socio-economic factors (such as the growing global demand for soy, beef and sugar cane ethanol) and associated deforestation fires, are also likely as drivers for the IAV of CO <span class="hlt">emissions</span>, but are difficult to link directly to CO <span class="hlt">emissions</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMIN53A1156C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMIN53A1156C"><span id="translatedtitle">The development of a new <span class="hlt">database</span> of gas <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in Italy: a collaborative web environment for collecting and publishing data on natural gas <span class="hlt">emissions</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cardellini, C.; Frigeri, A.; Frondini, F.; Chiodini, G.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>In spite of the large extension of the Earth degassing process and of the correlations with geodynamic processes and large scale geochemical processes, the Earth degassing process in the world is still poorly known. Beside the scientific interest on studying gas <span class="hlt">emissions</span>, a better knowledge of the degassing process is crucial for mitigate gas hazard correlated to the release of dangerous gases (e.g., CO2, H2S) from natural <span class="hlt">emissions</span>, that, like in Italy, caused many lethal accidents to animals and humans. After years of data collection organized on a base of a single research group, institution, or project, there is clearly a need for common frameworks that allow to aggregate data in order to observe the phenomena at various scale. The development of Googas in 2007 (Chiodini et al., 2008), funded by the Italian Civil Defence and focused on the serialization of data and the publication of a web map of gas <span class="hlt">emissions</span>, was the first attempt to create a collaborative <span class="hlt">database</span> on gas <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. Googas, that represented an important advance in the knowledge of the phenomenon at the national scale, is however a static representation of the results of the project. Starting from the Googas experience, we are now extending the capabilities of Googas on the user side, developing a new web environment for collecting and publishing data of gas natural <span class="hlt">emissions</span> dynamically. The collaborative environment allows researchers from different institutions to collect data in the most seamless way, and data to be published directly from within the same system. The web interface allows to insert data interactively into a spatially referred relational <span class="hlt">database</span> management system. Moreover, researchers are aware of the activity of the others and can access data, leave comments as soon as data is being inserted. This new system aims to excite, inspire, and encourage participation among researchers. As gas <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are inherently referred to geographic locations, published digital data will be available in several formats, including the ones conformant to Open Gis Consortium (OGC) standards, for an easy access by using Geographical Information Systems (GIS). The publication of data on the website will be ruled by a licensing system that facilitates and encourages the scientific method processes. The license will allow to use and distribute the data, to produce works from the data and to build up new data from it, as long as these rules are maintained and the attribution to the original work is being referred. In this way, the efforts to publish the data are balanced by the guarantees that the data's access will remain open. This new <span class="hlt">database</span> of Italian gas <span class="hlt">emissions</span> is an interesting environment where researchers can insert data in a common interface asynchronously and the results are immediately tangible. The development of this project is undergoing and researchers and developers interact closely, introducing and testing new features during the development phase. We believe that the development of this new environment represent a starting point towards the foundation of a collaborative <span class="hlt">database</span> of gas <span class="hlt">emissions</span> at global scale.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040031536','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040031536"><span id="translatedtitle">A USA Commercial Flight Track <span class="hlt">Database</span> for Upper Tropospheric Aircraft <span class="hlt">Emission</span> Studies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Garber, Donald P.; Minnis, Patrick; Costulis, Kay P.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>A new air traffic <span class="hlt">database</span> over the contiguous United States of America (USA) has been developed from a commercially available real-time product for 2001-2003 for all non-military flights above 25,000 ft. Both individual flight tracks and gridded spatially integrated flight legs are available. On average, approximately 24,000 high-altitude flights were recorded each day. The diurnal cycle of air traffic over the USA is characterized by a broad daytime maximum with a 0130-LT minimum and a mean day-night air traffic ratio of 2.4. Each week, the air traffic typically peaks on Thursday and drops to a low Saturday with a range of 18%. Flight density is greatest during late summer and least during winter. The <span class="hlt">database</span> records the disruption of air traffic after the air traffic shutdown during September 2001. The dataset should be valuable for realistically simulating the atmospheric effects of aircraft in the upper troposphere.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ApJ...763...86L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ApJ...763...86L"><span id="translatedtitle">CHIANTIAn Atomic <span class="hlt">Database</span> for <span class="hlt">Emission</span> Lines. XIII. Soft X-Ray Improvements and Other Changes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Landi, E.; Young, P. R.; Dere, K. P.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.</p> <p>2013-02-01</p> <p>The CHIANTI spectral code consists of two parts: an atomic <span class="hlt">database</span> and a suite of computer programs in Python and IDL. Together, they allow the calculation of the optically thin spectrum of astrophysical objects and provide spectroscopic plasma diagnostics for the analysis of astrophysical spectra. The <span class="hlt">database</span> includes atomic energy levels, wavelengths, radiative transition probabilities, collision excitation rate coefficients, ionization, and recombination rate coefficients, as well as data to calculate free-free, free-bound, and two-photon continuum <span class="hlt">emission</span>. Version 7.1 has been released, which includes improved data for several ions, recombination rates, and element abundances. In particular, it provides a large expansion of the CHIANTI models for key Fe ions from Fe VIII to Fe XIV to improve the predicted <span class="hlt">emission</span> in the 50-170 wavelength range. All data and programs are freely available at http://www.chiantidatabase.org and in SolarSoft, while the Python interface to CHIANTI can be found at http://chiantipy.sourceforge.net.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22167158','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22167158"><span id="translatedtitle">CHIANTI-AN ATOMIC <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span> FOR <span class="hlt">EMISSION</span> LINES. XIII. SOFT X-RAY IMPROVEMENTS AND OTHER CHANGES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Landi, E.; Young, P. R.; Dere, K. P.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.</p> <p>2013-02-15</p> <p>The CHIANTI spectral code consists of two parts: an atomic <span class="hlt">database</span> and a suite of computer programs in Python and IDL. Together, they allow the calculation of the optically thin spectrum of astrophysical objects and provide spectroscopic plasma diagnostics for the analysis of astrophysical spectra. The <span class="hlt">database</span> includes atomic energy levels, wavelengths, radiative transition probabilities, collision excitation rate coefficients, ionization, and recombination rate coefficients, as well as data to calculate free-free, free-bound, and two-photon continuum <span class="hlt">emission</span>. Version 7.1 has been released, which includes improved data for several ions, recombination rates, and element abundances. In particular, it provides a large expansion of the CHIANTI models for key Fe ions from Fe VIII to Fe XIV to improve the predicted <span class="hlt">emission</span> in the 50-170 A wavelength range. All data and programs are freely available at http://www.chiantidatabase.org and in SolarSoft, while the Python interface to CHIANTI can be found at http://chiantipy.sourceforge.net.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014BGD....11.8115V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014BGD....11.8115V"><span id="translatedtitle">Biomass burning fuel consumption rates: a field measurement <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>van Leeuwen, T. T.; van der Werf, G. R.; Hoffmann, A. A.; Detmers, R. G.; Rücker, G.; French, N. H. F.; Archibald, S.; Carvalho, J. A., Jr.; Cook, G. D.; de Groot, W. J.; Hély, C.; Kasischke, E. S.; Kloster, S.; McCarty, J. L.; Pettinari, M. L.; Savadogo, P.; Alvarado, E. C.; Boschetti, L.; Manuri, S.; Meyer, C. P.; Siegert, F.; Trollope, L. A.; Trollope, W. S. W.</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>Landscape fires show large variability in the amount of biomass or fuel consumed per unit area burned. These fuel consumption (FC) rates depend on the biomass available to burn and the fraction of the biomass that is actually combusted, and can be combined with estimates of area burned to assess <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. While burned area can be detected from space and estimates are becoming more reliable due to improved algorithms and sensors, FC rates are either modeled or taken selectively from the literature. We compiled the peer-reviewed literature on FC rates for various biomes and fuel categories to better understand FC rates and variability, and to provide a~<span class="hlt">database</span> that can be used to constrain biogeochemical models with fire modules. We compiled in total 76 studies covering 10 biomes including savanna (15 studies, average FC of 4.6 t DM (dry matter) ha-1), tropical forest (n = 19, FC = 126), temperate forest (n = 11, FC = 93), boreal forest (n = 16, FC = 39), pasture (n = 6, FC = 28), crop residue (n = 4, FC = 6.5), chaparral (n = 2, FC = 32), tropical peatland (n = 4, FC = 314), boreal peatland (n = 2, FC = 42), and tundra (n = 1, FC = 40). Within biomes the regional variability in the number of measurements was sometimes large, with e.g. only 3 measurement locations in boreal Russia and 35 sites in North America. Substantial regional differences were found within the defined biomes: for example FC rates of temperate pine forests in the USA were 38% higher than Australian forests dominated by eucalypt trees. Besides showing the differences between biomes, FC estimates were also grouped into different fuel classes. Our results highlight the large variability in FC rates, not only between biomes but also within biomes and fuel classes. This implies that care should be taken with using averaged values, and our comparison with FC rates from <span class="hlt">GFED</span>3 indicates that also modeling studies have difficulty in representing the dynamics governing FC.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/93474','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/93474"><span id="translatedtitle">Getting the most from your AQUIS <span class="hlt">database</span> for air <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventories</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Alex, G.S.; Rasmussen, S.; Monarch, M.</p> <p>1995-07-01</p> <p>During the early 1990s, air quality managers at Hill Air Force Base (Hill) in Ogden, Utah saw the number of <span class="hlt">emission</span> sources they were required to track escalating rapidly to over. 1,200. They felt the only way to effectively manage the associated data was using an electronic system. The US Air Force Material Command had just developed the Air Quality Utility Information System (AQUIS), as a means of helping bases manage their air <span class="hlt">emission</span> sources. As Hill experimented with the system, it became evident that the air quality staff did not have the time and resources to keep the system updated. Hill determined that if they hired a contractor to become intimately familiar with AQUIS, they could receive on-going support without constantly retraining new full-time staff and AQUIS could become a valuable tool in managing its <span class="hlt">emission</span> sources. In this way, Hill was able to manage the effort, while placing the responsibility for a cost effective, quality product on dedicated specialists. The contractor was asked to: (1) to find an efficient, cost effective method for collecting and entering data into AQUIS; (2) to determine whether the AQUIS <span class="hlt">emission</span> algorithms and factors were appropriate for all of Hill`s sources; (3) if AQUIS did not have the capability to calculate <span class="hlt">emissions</span> for some sources, to change the system or prepare supplementary spreadsheets for future inventories, until AQUIS generated the appropriate <span class="hlt">emissions</span>; (4) to figure out a flexible method for generating the needed information from AQUIS for in-house and regulatory reporting, and (5) coordinate these efforts with the system development contractor (Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)) to limit duplication of effort. This paper discusses some of the methods the contractor used to achieve the goals set by Hill. The reader will be introduced to some methods that go beyond what AQUIS is currently designed to do.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JQSRT.113.1575L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JQSRT.113.1575L"><span id="translatedtitle">HITEMP derived spectral <span class="hlt">database</span> for the prediction of jet engine exhaust infrared <span class="hlt">emission</span> using a statistical band model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lindermeir, E.; Beier, K.</p> <p>2012-08-01</p> <p>The spectroscopic <span class="hlt">database</span> HITEMP 2010 is used to upgrade the parameters of the statistical molecular band model which is part of the infrared signature prediction code NIRATAM (NATO InfraRed Air TArget Model). This band model was recommended by NASA and is applied in several codes that determine the infrared <span class="hlt">emission</span> of combustion gases. The upgrade regards spectral absorption coefficients and line densities of the gases H2O, CO2, and CO in the spectral region 400-5000 cm-1 (2-25μm) with a spectral resolution of 5 cm-1. The temperature range 100-3000 K is covered. Two methods to update the <span class="hlt">database</span> are presented: the usually applied method as provided in the literature and an alternative, more laborious procedure that employs least squares fitting. The achieved improvements resulting from both methods are demonstrated by comparisons of radiance spectra obtained from the band model to line-by-line results. The performance in a realistic scenario is investigated on the basis of measured and predicted spectra of a jet aircraft plume in afterburner mode.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014BGeo...11.7305V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014BGeo...11.7305V"><span id="translatedtitle">Biomass burning fuel consumption rates: a field measurement <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>van Leeuwen, T. T.; van der Werf, G. R.; Hoffmann, A. A.; Detmers, R. G.; Rücker, G.; French, N. H. F.; Archibald, S.; Carvalho, J. A., Jr.; Cook, G. D.; de Groot, W. J.; Hély, C.; Kasischke, E. S.; Kloster, S.; McCarty, J. L.; Pettinari, M. L.; Savadogo, P.; Alvarado, E. C.; Boschetti, L.; Manuri, S.; Meyer, C. P.; Siegert, F.; Trollope, L. A.; Trollope, W. S. W.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Landscape fires show large variability in the amount of biomass or fuel consumed per unit area burned. Fuel consumption (FC) depends on the biomass available to burn and the fraction of the biomass that is actually combusted, and can be combined with estimates of area burned to assess <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. While burned area can be detected from space and estimates are becoming more reliable due to improved algorithms and sensors, FC is usually modeled or taken selectively from the literature. We compiled the peer-reviewed literature on FC for various biomes and fuel categories to understand FC and its variability better, and to provide a <span class="hlt">database</span> that can be used to constrain biogeochemical models with fire modules. We compiled in total 77 studies covering 11 biomes including savanna (15 studies, average FC of 4.6 t DM (dry matter) ha-1 with a standard deviation of 2.2), tropical forest (n = 19, FC = 126 ± 77), temperate forest (n = 12, FC = 58 ± 72), boreal forest (n = 16, FC = 35 ± 24), pasture (n = 4, FC = 28 ± 9.3), shifting cultivation (n = 2, FC = 23, with a range of 4.0-43), crop residue (n = 4, FC = 6.5 ± 9.0), chaparral (n = 3, FC = 27 ± 19), tropical peatland (n = 4, FC = 314 ± 196), boreal peatland (n = 2, FC = 42 [42-43]), and tundra (n = 1, FC = 40). Within biomes the regional variability in the number of measurements was sometimes large, with e.g. only three measurement locations in boreal Russia and 35 sites in North America. Substantial regional differences in FC were found within the defined biomes: for example, FC of temperate pine forests in the USA was 37% lower than Australian forests dominated by eucalypt trees. Besides showing the differences between biomes, FC estimates were also grouped into different fuel classes. Our results highlight the large variability in FC, not only between biomes but also within biomes and fuel classes. This implies that substantial uncertainties are associated with using biome-averaged values to represent FC for whole biomes. Comparing the compiled FC values with co-located Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> version 3 (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>3) FC indicates that modeling studies that aim to represent variability in FC also within biomes, still require improvements as they have difficulty in representing the dynamics governing FC.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMGC43D1059M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMGC43D1059M"><span id="translatedtitle">Influence of daily versus monthly fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> on atmospheric model applications in the tropics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Marlier, M. E.; Voulgarakis, A.; Faluvegi, G.; Shindell, D. T.; DeFries, R. S.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Fires are widely used throughout the tropics to create and maintain areas for agriculture, but are also significant contributors to atmospheric trace gas and aerosol concentrations. However, the timing and magnitude of fire activity can vary strongly by year and ecosystem type. For example, frequent, low intensity fires dominate in African savannas whereas Southeast Asian peatland forests are susceptible to huge pulses of <span class="hlt">emissions</span> during regional El Nio droughts. Despite the potential implications for modeling interactions with atmospheric chemistry and transport, fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> have commonly been input into global models at a monthly resolution. Recognizing the uncertainty that this can introduce, several datasets have parsed fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> to daily and sub-daily scales with satellite active fire detections. In this study, we explore differences between utilizing the monthly and daily Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> version 3 (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>3) products as inputs into the NASA GISS-E2 composition climate model. We aim to understand how the choice of the temporal resolution of fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> affects uncertainty with respect to several common applications of global models: atmospheric chemistry, air quality, and climate. Focusing our analysis on tropical ozone, carbon monoxide, and aerosols, we compare modeled concentrations with available ground and satellite observations. We find that increasing the temporal frequency of fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from monthly to daily can improve correlations with observations, predominately in areas or during seasons more heavily affected by fires. Differences between the two datasets are more evident with public health applications: daily resolution fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> increases the number of days exceeding World Health Organization air quality targets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.A12A..06V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.A12A..06V"><span id="translatedtitle">High-Resolution Spatially Gridded Biomass Burning <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> Inventory In Asia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vadrevu, K. P.; Lau, W. K.; da Silva, A.; Justice, C. O.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Biomass burning is long recognized an important source of greenhouse gas (GHG) <span class="hlt">emissions</span> (CO2, CO, CH4, H2, CH3Cl, NO, HCN, CH3CN, COS, etc) and aerosols. In the Asian region, the current estimates of greenhouse gas <span class="hlt">emissions</span> and aerosols from biomass burning are severely constrained by the lack of reliable statistics on fire distribution and frequency, and the lack of accurate estimates of area burned, fuel load, etc. As a part of NASA funded interdisciplinary research project entitled "Effects of biomass burning on water cycle and climate in the monsoon Asia", we initially developed a high resolution spatially gridded <span class="hlt">emissions</span> inventory from the biomass burning for Indo-Ganges region and then extended the inventory to the entire Asia. Active fires from MODIS as well as high resolution LANDSAT data have been used to fine-tune the MODIS burnt area products for estimating the <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. Locally based <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors were used to refine the gaseous <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. The resulting <span class="hlt">emissions</span> data has been gridded at 5-minute intervals. We also compared our <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates with the other <span class="hlt">emission</span> products such as Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS), Quick fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> <span class="hlt">database</span> (QFED) and Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>). Our results revealed significant vegetation fires from Myanmar, India, Indonesia, China, Laos, Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam. These seven countries accounted for 92.4% of all vegetation fires in the Asian region. Satellite-based vegetation fire analysis showed the highest fire occurrence in the closed to open shrub land category, (19%) followed by closed to open, broadleaved evergreen-semi deciduous forest (16%), rain fed croplands (17%), post flooded or irrigated croplands (12%), mosaic cropland vegetation (11%), mosaic vegetation/cropland (10%). <span class="hlt">Emission</span> contribution from agricultural fires was significant, however, showed discrepancies due to low confidence in burnt areas and lack of crop specific <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors. Further, our results suggest that FRP products underestimate <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from agriculture fires compared to burnt area products. Details on uncertainties in <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates from biomass burning in Asia will also be presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.A53C1337C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFM.A53C1337C"><span id="translatedtitle">Improved temporal constraints on and vertical injections of biomass burning <span class="hlt">emissions</span>: Implications on global aerosol simulation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, Y.; Li, Q.; Randerson, J.; Lyons, E.; Nelson, D.; Diner, D.; Kahn, R.</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>Biomass burning from wild fires is a major source of air pollutants including aerosols and some other climate forcing agents. Biomass burning <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are typically prescribed on a monthly base in most global chemistry and transport models (CTMs). We investigated the sensitivity of global aerosol transport and distribution to the diurnal cycle, synoptic variability, and vertical injection height of biomass burning <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. Global simulations of aerosols were conducted using the GEOS-Chem global 3-D chemistry and transport model for summer 2004, with the aforementioned constraints imposed on the 8-day Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span> v2). The diurnal cycle was determined using active fire data. The synoptic variability, which depends on temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed, was derived from a fire model. The injection height was derived from MISR smoke plume stereoheights. Model results, with monthly or 8-day (with or without the additional constraints) biomass burning <span class="hlt">emissions</span>, were compared with aerosol optical depths (AOD) from MISR/MODIS/OMI and the AERONET network, and (mass) concentrations from the IMPROVE network and the INTEX-NA aircraft campaign. Using 8-day instead of monthly biomass burning <span class="hlt">emissions</span> significantly improves the comparison of mass concentrations of BC, OC, and sulfate with observations. The inclusion of diurnal cycle, synoptic variability, and vertical injection height in the 8-day biomass burning <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventory lead to more efficient transport of aerosols out of the boundary layer, resulting in lower aerosol loadings over the biomass burning source regions and higher loadings downwind, compared with simulations with monthly inventory. The inclusion of the additional constraints also reduces the discrepancies, both in magnitude and daily variability, between observed and simulated aerosol optical depths (AODs), especially downwind of the biomass burning source regions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17..869M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17..869M"><span id="translatedtitle">INFERNO, a simple approach for interactive fires and their <span class="hlt">emissions</span> within the Met Office Unified Model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mangeon, Stephane; Voulgarakis, Apostolos; Folberth, Gerd</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Forest fires remain a crucial element of the Earth system, affecting and affected by the biosphere and the atmosphere. In particular <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of trace gases (CO2, CO, NOx...) from forest fires can affect radiative forcing as well as atmospheric composition, similarly aerosols such as Black Carbon (also a strong sunlight absorber) and Organic Carbon emitted by fires can participate in cloud droplet nucleation, contributing to the aerosol indirect effect. Global estimates of fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> have greatly improved over the last decade, mainly through the developments in satellite observations. However, such estimates remain constrained to the recent satellite observational period; to study fires under past and future climates one has to resort to models. We will present the INteractive Fire and <span class="hlt">Emission</span> algoRithm for Natural envirOnments (INFERNO) scheme for the Met Office's Unified Model, which builds on previous work for the GISS climate model. We start from simulated fire counts using proxies for flammability (meteorology and vegetation), ignitions and fire suppression. We then extend this parameterisation to predict burnt area, burnt biomass and subsequent <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. This climate-sensitive parameterisation utilises temperature, relative humidity, precipitation and vegetation modelling (biomass and leaf area index) to model flammability. Ignitions depend on population density and lightning strikes. Of all these variables, only population density needs to be prescribed, hence INFERNO can be run interactively within a coupled earth system model. Our approach is also distinct owing to its simplicity and is computationally inexpensive, a necessary characteristic as it is aimed to run interactively over climatological timescales. The performance of this scheme is assessed against the Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>); early analysis shows this new approach effectively captures the spatial and inter-annual variability of burnt area and fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of CO2 and CO over the 2003-2011 present-day period. We will also provide early estimates of the sensitivity of fires in our model to meteorology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.A51P..07V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.A51P..07V"><span id="translatedtitle">Precipitation - fire linkages and variability in continental-scale fire carbon <span class="hlt">emissions</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>van der Werf, G.; Andela, N.; Randerson, J. T.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The link between drought and fire is not universal because for fires to occur rainfall is needed for fuel build-up but drought is required to make vegetation ignitable. We present an overview of how precipitation patterns and changes therein have shaped spatial and temporal variability in fire occurrence and associated carbon <span class="hlt">emissions</span> over the past 17 years, using the latest version of the satellite-derived Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>4). We start in tropical savannas where there is a clear dualistic relation between precipitation and fire and show how trends and interannual variability in rainfall have modified annual <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in Africa and Australia. Because savannas are the main source of fire carbon <span class="hlt">emissions</span>, this variability can be seen in atmospheric abundances of several trace gases. We then zoom in on tropical forest regions and show that the link between drought and fire activity is most pronounced in the Indonesian archipelago where tropical peatlands require prolonged droughts to burn. Highest <span class="hlt">emissions</span> occurred there in 1997-1998 when a strong El Niño hit the region, but also moderate drought years have boosted fire activity here more recently. Recent Amazonian droughts in 2005, 2007, and 2010 also led to increased fire activity in forested regions in South America, mostly in degraded lands and offsetting some of the reductions in carbon <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from deforestation achieved in Brazil. Finally we focus on the boreal region, where potentially large climate-carbon feedbacks are present due to the strong linkages between drought and fire in combination with climate change and arctic amplification.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ACP....11..543O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ACP....11..543O"><span id="translatedtitle">A very high-resolution (1km1 km) global fossil fuel CO2 <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventory derived using a point source <span class="hlt">database</span> and satellite observations of nighttime lights</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Oda, T.; Maksyutov, S.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Emissions</span> of CO2 from fossil fuel combustion are a critical quantity that must be accurately given in established flux inversion frameworks. Work with emerging satellite-based inversions requires spatiotemporally-detailed inventories that permit analysis of regional natural sources and sinks. Conventional approaches for disaggregating national <span class="hlt">emissions</span> beyond the country and city levels based on population distribution have certain difficulties in their application. We developed a global 1 km1 km annual fossil fuel CO2 <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventory for the years 1980-2007 by combining a worldwide point source <span class="hlt">database</span> and satellite observations of the global nightlight distribution. In addition to estimating the national <span class="hlt">emissions</span> using global energy consumption statistics, <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from point sources were estimated separately and were spatially allocated to exact locations indicated by the point source <span class="hlt">database</span>. <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> from other sources were distributed using a special nightlight dataset that had fewer saturated pixels compared with regular nightlight datasets. The resulting spatial distributions differed in several ways from those derived using conventional population-based approaches. Because of the inherent characteristics of the nightlight distribution, source regions corresponding to human settlements and land transportation were well articulated. Our distributions showed good agreement with a high-resolution inventory across the US at spatial resolutions that were adequate for regional flux inversions. The inventory can be extended to the future using updated data, and is expected to be incorporated into models for operational flux inversions that use observational data from the Japanese Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ACPD...1016307O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ACPD...1016307O"><span id="translatedtitle">A very high-resolution global fossil fuel CO2 <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventory derived using a point source <span class="hlt">database</span> and satellite observations of nighttime lights, 1980-2007</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Oda, T.; Maksyutov, S.</p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Emissions</span> of CO2 from fossil fuel combustion are a critical quantity that must be accurately given in established flux inversion frameworks. Work with emerging satellite-based inversions requires spatiotemporally-detailed inventories that permit analysis of regional sources and sinks. Conventional approaches for disaggregating national <span class="hlt">emissions</span> beyond the country and city levels based on population distribution have certain difficulties in their application. We developed a global 1 km1 km fossil fuel CO2 <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventory for the years 1980-2007 by combining a worldwide point source <span class="hlt">database</span> and satellite observations of the global nightlight distribution. In addition to estimating the national <span class="hlt">emissions</span> using global energy consumption statistics, <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from point sources were estimated separately and were spatially allocated to exact locations indicated by the point source <span class="hlt">database</span>. <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> from other sources were distributed using a special nightlight dataset that had fewer saturated pixels compared with regular nightlight datasets. The resulting spatial distributions differed in several ways from those derived using conventional population-based approaches. Because of the inherent characteristics of the nightlight distribution, source regions corresponding to human settlements and land transportation were well articulated. Our distributions showed good agreement with a high-resolution inventory across the US at spatial resolutions that were adequate for regional flux inversions. The inventory will be incorporated into models for operational flux inversions that use observational data from the Japanese Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AtmEn.107..342S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AtmEn.107..342S"><span id="translatedtitle">Long-term variations in PM2.5 <span class="hlt">emission</span> from open biomass burning in Northeast Asia derived from satellite-derived data for 2000-2013</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shon, Zang-Ho</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>PM2.5 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from open biomass burning (BB) in Northeast Asia (NEA: China, Mongolia, Korea, and Japan) during 2000-2013 were estimated using satellite-derived data (GFASv1.0 and <span class="hlt">GFED</span>3). The annual mean BB PM2.5 <span class="hlt">emission</span> in NEA during the study period was 660 Gg yr-1, in which considerable inter-annual variability was observed. In general, PM2.5 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in NEA were the highest in spring (Mar.-May), likely due to the burning of crop residues and forest fire. The contribution of PM2.5 from open BB in Northeast Asia was less than 10% of the anthropogenic PM2.5 <span class="hlt">emission</span>, except in Mongolia, wherein BB <span class="hlt">emission</span> was the predominant source of PM2.5. Although the <span class="hlt">emissions</span> calculated by GFASv1.0 were significantly higher than <span class="hlt">GFED</span>3 by a factor of 2.66 (Mongolia) to 10.9 (South Korea) due to difficulty in small fire detection by <span class="hlt">GFED</span>3, they generally showed consistent temporal variation on average. In general, statistically significant long-term trends of open BB PM2.5 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> were not observed in NEA, except in South Korea.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li class="active"><span>4</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_4 --> <div id="page_5" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="81"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhDT........95H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhDT........95H"><span id="translatedtitle">Constraining CO <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates using atmospheric observations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hooghiemstra, P. B.</p> <p>2012-06-01</p> <p>We apply a four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation system to optimize carbon monoxide (CO) <span class="hlt">emissions</span> and to reduce the uncertainty of <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates from individual sources using the chemistry transport model TM5. In the first study only a limited amount of surface network observations from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory (NOAA/ESRL) Global Monitoring Division (GMD) is used to test the 4D-Var system. Uncertainty reduction up to 60% in yearly <span class="hlt">emissions</span> is observed over well-constrained regions and the inferred <span class="hlt">emissions</span> compare well with recent studies for 2004. However, since the observations only constrain total CO <span class="hlt">emissions</span>, the 4D-Var system has difficulties separating anthropogenic and biogenic sources in particular. The inferred <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are validated with NOAA aircraft data over North America and the agreement is significantly improved from the prior to posterior simulation. Validation with the Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT) instrument shows a slight improved agreement over the well-constrained Northern Hemisphere and in the tropics (except for the African continent). However, the model simulation with posterior <span class="hlt">emissions</span> underestimates MOPITT CO total columns on the remote Southern Hemisphere (SH) by about 10%. This is caused by a reduction in SH CO sources mainly due to surface stations on the high southern latitudes. In the second study, we compare two global inversions to estimate carbon monoxide (CO) <span class="hlt">emissions</span> for 2004. Either surface flask observations from NOAA or CO total columns from the MOPITT instrument are assimilated in a 4D-Var framework. In the Southern Hemisphere (SH) three important findings are reported. First, due to their different vertical sensitivity, the stations-only inversion increases SH biomass burning <span class="hlt">emissions</span> by 108 Tg CO/yr more than the MOPITT-only inversion. Conversely, the MOPITT-only inversion results in SH natural <span class="hlt">emissions</span> (mainly CO from oxidation of NMVOCs) that are 185 Tg CO/yr higher compared to the stations-only inversion. Second, MOPITT-only derived biomass burning <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are reduced with respect to the prior which is in contrast to previous (inverse) modeling studies. Finally, MOPITT derived total <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are significantly higher for South America and Africa compared to the stations-only inversion. This is likely due to a positive bias in the MOPITT V4 product. This bias is also apparent from validation with surface stations and ground-truth FTIR columns. In the final study we present the first inverse modeling study to estimate CO <span class="hlt">emissions</span> constrained by both surface (NOAA) and satellite (MOPITT) observations using a bias correction scheme. This approach leads to the identification of a positive bias of maximum 5 ppb in MOPITT column-averaged CO mixing ratios in the remote Southern Hemisphere (SH). The 4D-Var system is used to estimate CO <span class="hlt">emissions</span> over South America in the period 2006-2010 and to analyze the interannual variability (IAV) of these <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. We infer robust, high spatial resolution CO <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates that show slightly smaller IAV due to fires compared to the Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>3) prior <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. Moreover, CO <span class="hlt">emissions</span> probably associated with pre-harvest burning of sugar cane plantations are underestimated in current inventories by 50-100%.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ACP....1011707V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ACP....1011707V"><span id="translatedtitle">Global fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> and the contribution of deforestation, savanna, forest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997-2009)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>van der Werf, G. R.; Randerson, J. T.; Giglio, L.; Collatz, G. J.; Mu, M.; Kasibhatla, P. S.; Morton, D. C.; Defries, R. S.; Jin, Y.; van Leeuwen, T. T.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>New burned area datasets and top-down constraints from atmospheric concentration measurements of pyrogenic gases have decreased the large uncertainty in fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> estimates. However, significant gaps remain in our understanding of the contribution of deforestation, savanna, forest, agricultural waste, and peat fires to total global fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. Here we used a revised version of the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford-Approach (CASA) biogeochemical model and improved satellite-derived estimates of area burned, fire activity, and plant productivity to calculate fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> for the 1997-2009 period on a 0.5° spatial resolution with a monthly time step. For November 2000 onwards, estimates were based on burned area, active fire detections, and plant productivity from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. For the partitioning we focused on the MODIS era. We used maps of burned area derived from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Visible and Infrared Scanner (VIRS) and Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) active fire data prior to MODIS (1997-2000) and estimates of plant productivity derived from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) observations during the same period. Average global fire carbon <span class="hlt">emissions</span> according to this version 3 of the Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>3) were 2.0 Pg C year-1 with significant interannual variability during 1997-2001 (2.8 Pg C year-1 in 1998 and 1.6 Pg C year-1 in 2001). Globally, <span class="hlt">emissions</span> during 2002-2007 were relatively constant (around 2.1 Pg C year-1) before declining in 2008 (1.7 Pg C year-1) and 2009 (1.5 Pg C year-1) partly due to lower deforestation fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in South America and tropical Asia. On a regional basis, <span class="hlt">emissions</span> were highly variable during 2002-2007 (e.g., boreal Asia, South America, and Indonesia), but these regional differences canceled out at a global level. During the MODIS era (2001-2009), most carbon <span class="hlt">emissions</span> were from fires in grasslands and savannas (44%) with smaller contributions from tropical deforestation and degradation fires (20%), woodland fires (mostly confined to the tropics, 16%), forest fires (mostly in the extratropics, 15%), agricultural waste burning (3%), and tropical peat fires (3%). The contribution from agricultural waste fires was likely a lower bound because our approach for measuring burned area could not detect all of these relatively small fires. Total carbon <span class="hlt">emissions</span> were on average 13% lower than in our previous (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>2) work. For reduced trace gases such as CO and CH4, deforestation, degradation, and peat fires were more important contributors because of higher <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of reduced trace gases per unit carbon combusted compared to savanna fires. Carbon <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from tropical deforestation, degradation, and peatland fires were on average 0.5 Pg C year-1. The carbon <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from these fires may not be balanced by regrowth following fire. Our results provide the first global assessment of the contribution of different sources to total global fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> for the past decade, and supply the community with an improved 13-year fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> time series.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..12.6550O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..12.6550O"><span id="translatedtitle">A high-resolution global inventory of fossil fuel CO2 <span class="hlt">emission</span> derived using a global power plant <span class="hlt">database</span> and satellite-observed nightlight data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Oda, Tomohiro; Maksyutov, Shamil</p> <p>2010-05-01</p> <p>We developed the Open-source Data Inventory of Anthropogenic CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> (ODIAC), a global high-resolution fossil fuel CO2 <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventory for the years 1980-2007, by applying a combination of country-level fuel consumption statistics, a global point source <span class="hlt">database</span>, and satellite-observed nightlight data. The primary goal of ODIAC is to provide a-priori information of fossil fuel CO2 <span class="hlt">emission</span> to the flux inversions using observational data of the Japanese Greenhouse Gas Observing Satellite (GOSAT). Fossil fuel CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are a critical quantity required by the established flux inversion framework, as it is assumed to be a known quantity. Recent studies have suggested the feasibility of regional flux inversions using satellite-observed CO2 beyond the established global inversion, and thus spatiotemporally detailed information of fossil fuel CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> will be needed for emerging regional flux inversions. National <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are often available in the gridded form, and the disaggregation of national <span class="hlt">emissions</span> have been done using a common surrogate such as population and nightlight data; however, these approaches correlate poorly with sources at a resolution beyond country and city level. In this study, national total <span class="hlt">emissions</span> were derived from country-level fuel consumption statistics and <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from point sources were separately calculated. We utilized point source <span class="hlt">emission</span> and geographic location data available in the global power plant <span class="hlt">database</span> CARMA (Carbon Monitoring and Action). The individual point source <span class="hlt">emissions</span> were placed at the exact locations specified by CARMA. <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> from other sources, the residual of national total <span class="hlt">emissions</span> minus point source <span class="hlt">emissions</span>, were distributed using nightlight data obtained by the US Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Project-Operational Line Scan (DMSP-OSL) instruments. As DMSP-OSL instruments often meet instrumental saturation over bright regions such as city cores, the single use of normal nightlight product might not be suitable for spatially allocating <span class="hlt">emissions</span> at finer scales. We used the calibrated radiance data instead, which were obtained by special measurements operated in the reduced gain mode. Due to the low sensitivity of the instruments, the calibrated radiance data provide spatial variation in light intensity even in cities cores with less saturate pixels compared to the normal product. Due to the spatial pattern inherited from nightlight data, the resulting spatial distribution of <span class="hlt">emissions</span> is fairly different from that of conventional population-based <span class="hlt">emission</span> maps. As nightlight data indicate exact locations of possible source regions, which mostly correspond to human settlements, source regions were well depicted up to city level. In addition to high spatial resolution, prominent point source <span class="hlt">emissions</span>, which often do not appear on conventional maps, are presented in our inventory. Nighttime data may also work as a surrogate for applications other than human settlements, namely land transportation. We compared the ODIAC inventory and other four existing inventories with the Vulcan US detailed comprehensive CO2 <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventory for the year 2002. The ODIAC inventory showed the best agreement in spatial pattern with the Vulcan among the participant inventories at reduced spatial resolutions, which are adequately useful for suggested emerging regional inversions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.H53D1440M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.H53D1440M"><span id="translatedtitle">Multi-model estimates of fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> and air quality degradation in Southeast Asia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Marlier, M. E.; DeFries, R. S.; Kasibhatla, P. S.; Voulgarakis, A.; Kinney, P. L.; Shindell, D. T.; Randerson, J. T.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>Like fossil fuel pollution, fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> affect both climate change and air quality. In this study, we combine satellite-derived fire estimates and atmospheric modeling to quantify potential population exposure to particulate matter and ozone from fires in Southeast Asia from 1997 to 2007. This region has large interannual variability in fire activity due to El Nio-induced droughts and anthropogenic drivers. Though typically too wet to combust, increased sources of deforestation and degradation are enhancing the susceptibility of forests and underlying carbon-rich peat deposits to fire during drought, as documented in the extreme fires of the 1997-98 El Nio. Concerns of a positive feedback between fire activity and a warming climate would further increase the influence of fires on air quality degradation. Monthly fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are estimated from the Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span> version 3) and transported in two atmospheric models to assess population exposure. We show that during strong El Nio years, fires contribute to daily fine particulate matter and afternoon maximum ozone surface concentrations over 150 ?g/m3 and 240 ?g/m3, respectively. Exposure to these two types of pollutants increases mortality and hospital admissions from respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, even at low concentrations. This fire pollutant burden corresponds to 200 added days per year exceeding the World Health Organization fine particulate matter guideline and exposes up to 50 million additional people to more than 25 days above the most extreme pollutant concentrations. Our results indicate that substantial health and economic co-benefits would result from reducing fires in locations where transported <span class="hlt">emissions</span> lead to enhanced exposure to air pollution during high fire years.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.A11H0152A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.A11H0152A"><span id="translatedtitle">Modeling Aircraft <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> for Regional-scale Air Quality: Adapting a New Global Aircraft <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> for the U.S</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Arunachalam, S.; Baek, B. H.; Vennam, P. L.; Woody, M. C.; Omary, M.; Binkowski, F.; Fleming, G.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Commercial aircraft emit substantial amounts of pollutants during their complete activity cycle that ranges from landing-and-takeoff (LTO) at airports to cruising in upper elevations of the atmosphere, and affect both air quality and climate. Since these <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are not uniformly emitted over the earth, and have substantial temporal and spatial variability, it is vital to accurately evaluate and quantify the relative impacts of aviation <span class="hlt">emissions</span> on ambient air quality. Regional-scale air quality modeling applications do not routinely include these aircraft <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from all cycles. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has developed the Aviation Environmental Design Tool (AEDT), a software system that dynamically models aircraft performance in space and time to calculate fuel burn and <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from gate-to-gate for all commercial aviation activity from all airports globally. To process in-flight aircraft <span class="hlt">emissions</span> and to provide a realistic representation of these for treatment in grid-based air quality models, we have developed an interface processor called AEDTproc that accurately distributes full-flight chorded <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in time and space to create gridded, hourly model-ready <span class="hlt">emissions</span> input data. Unlike the traditional <span class="hlt">emissions</span> modeling approach of treating aviation <span class="hlt">emissions</span> as ground-level sources or processing <span class="hlt">emissions</span> only from the LTO cycles in regional-scale air quality studies, AEDTproc distributes chorded inventories of aircraft <span class="hlt">emissions</span> during LTO cycles and cruise activities into a time-variant 3-D gridded structure. We will present results of processed 2006 global <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from AEDT over a continental U.S. modeling domain to support a national-scale air quality assessment of the incremental impacts of aircraft <span class="hlt">emissions</span> on surface air quality. This includes about 13.6 million flights within the U.S. out of 31.2 million flights globally. We will focus on assessing spatio-temporal variability of these commercial aircraft <span class="hlt">emissions</span>, and comparing upper tropospheric budgets of NOx from aircraft and lightning sources in the modeling domain.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6952617','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6952617"><span id="translatedtitle">Heavy duty liquid and gaseous fuel <span class="hlt">emissions</span> <span class="hlt">database</span> test results from four alternative fuel configurations of the Caterpillar 3406 engine</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Waldman, D.J. )</p> <p>1990-06-01</p> <p>Through the cooperation of several organizations including the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) acting under the auspices of the Doe Alternative Fuels Utilization Program, heavy duty transient and steady-state <span class="hlt">emissions</span> tests were conducted on four alternative fuel configurations of the Caterpillar 3406 engine. These included a diesel baseline, glow plug ignited methanol (diesel cycle), lean-burn spark ignited natural gas, and dual fuel (diesel pilot ignited natural gas). Results indicated methanol and natural gas both show excellent potential for low NOx and low particulate <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. With these fuels however, unburned fuel <span class="hlt">emissions</span> were much higher, especially in the dual fuel case, than the diesel baseline. Particulate <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from the methanol and lean burn gas engines are thought to be almost entirely lube oil sourced. All of the configurations will require significant reduction in hydrocarbon and/or particulate <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in order to meet the 1994 EPA <span class="hlt">emissions</span> standards for heavy duty truck engines. 3 refs., 23 figs., 15 tabs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.A34B..07C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.A34B..07C"><span id="translatedtitle">Seasonality in fire <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors using satellite observations of CO and NO2</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Castellanos, P.; Boersma, K. F.; van der Werf, G.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Burning of vegetation for deforestation, agriculture, land management, and other purposes releases large amounts of trace gases and aerosols into the atmosphere, clearly visible in satellite data records. While burned area and active fire observations in combination with biogeochemical models can provide constraints on the timing, spatial extent, and total fuel consumed by fires, further calculation of trace gas <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from fires requires partitioning of total fuel consumed into different trace gases using <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors. In the current formulation of Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>), <span class="hlt">emissions</span> factors vary by biome but do not vary in time. This is because only a few direct measurements of these <span class="hlt">emissions</span> factors exist, and of those none encompass a full fire season. In this work, we take advantage of the long data records of CO and NO2 tropospheric columns from the MOPITT and OMI satellites, respectively, to better characterize the seasonal variability of these trace gas <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from fires. Field measurements have shown that the <span class="hlt">emissions</span> factors of CO and NO2 are inversely related and are dependent on fuel characteristics and ambient conditions. We analyze a 6-year monthly climatology (2005-2010) of CO to NO2 ratios over important fire regions: central Amazonia, northern Australia, equatorial Africa, and southern Africa. We use the TM5 chemical transport model to separate the fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> signal from background variability and the contributions from lightning NOx and anthropogenic <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. We find that in general the CO:NO2 ratio decreases over the course of the fire season and is correlated with the minimum in rainfall, possibly indicating an increase in flaming combustion, and an increase (decrease) in NOx (CO) <span class="hlt">emissions</span> factors as fuel beds become dryer. We also analyze trends in fire-isolated NO2 and CO concentrations and find indications of increasing <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from fires in northern Africa. These results can be used as large-scale indicators of fire characteristics. They have the potential to constrain trace gas <span class="hlt">emission</span> variability and therefore atmospheric trace gas budgets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.V13A4763F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.V13A4763F"><span id="translatedtitle">MaGa, a web-based collaborative <span class="hlt">database</span> for gas <span class="hlt">emissions</span>: a tool to improve the knowledge on Earth degassing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Frigeri, A.; Cardellini, C.; Chiodini, G.; Frondini, F.; Bagnato, E.; Aiuppa, A.; Fischer, T. P.; Lehnert, K. A.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The study of the main pathways of carbon flux from the deep Earth requires the analysis of a large quantity and variety of data on volcanic and non-volcanic gas <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. Hence, there is need for common frameworks to aggregate available data and insert new observations. Since 2010 we have been developing the Mapping Gas <span class="hlt">emissions</span> (MaGa) web-based <span class="hlt">database</span> to collect data on carbon degassing form volcanic and non-volcanic environments. MaGa uses an Object-relational model, translating the experience of field surveyors into the <span class="hlt">database</span> schema. The current web interface of MaGa allows users to browse the data in tabular format or by browsing an interactive web-map. Enabled users can insert information as measurement methods, instrument details as well as the actual values collected in the field. Measurements found in the literature can be inserted as well as direct field observations made by human-operated instruments. Currently the <span class="hlt">database</span> includes fluxes and gas compositions from active craters degassing, diffuse soil degassing and fumaroles both from dormant volcanoes and open-vent volcanoes from literature survey and data about non-volcanic <span class="hlt">emission</span> of the Italian territory. Currently, MaGa holds more than 1000 volcanic plume degassing fluxes, data from 30 sites of diffuse soil degassing from italian volcanoes, and about 60 measurements from fumarolic and non volcanic <span class="hlt">emission</span> sites. For each gas <span class="hlt">emission</span> site, the MaGa holds data, pictures, descriptions on gas sampling, analysis and measurement methods, together with bibliographic references and contacts to researchers having experience on each site. From 2012, MaGa developments started to be focused towards the framework of the Deep Earth Carbon Degassing research initiative of the Deep Carbon Observatory. Whithin the DECADE initiative, there are others data systems, as EarthChem and the Smithsonian Institution's Global Volcanism Program. An interoperable interaction between the DECADE data systems is being planned. MaGa is showing good potentials to improve the knowledge on Earth degassing firstly by making data more accessible and encouraging participation among researchers, and secondly by allowing to observe and explore, for the first time, a gas <span class="hlt">emission</span> dataset with spatial and temporal extents never analyzed before.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AtmEn..95..629L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AtmEn..95..629L"><span id="translatedtitle">A regression approach for estimation of anthropogenic heat flux based on a bottom-up air pollutant <span class="hlt">emission</span> <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lee, Sang-Hyun; McKeen, Stuart A.; Sailor, David J.</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>A statistical regression method is presented for estimating hourly anthropogenic heat flux (AHF) using an anthropogenic pollutant <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventory for use in mesoscale meteorological and air-quality modeling. Based on bottom-up AHF estimated from detailed energy consumption data and anthropogenic pollutant <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the US National <span class="hlt">Emission</span> Inventory year 2005 (NEI-2005), a robust regression relation between the AHF and the pollutant <span class="hlt">emissions</span> is obtained for Houston. This relation is a combination of two power functions (Y = aXb) relating CO and NOx <span class="hlt">emissions</span> to AHF, giving a determinant coefficient (R2) of 0.72. The AHF for Houston derived from the regression relation has high temporal (R = 0.91) and spatial (R = 0.83) correlations with the bottom-up AHF. Hourly AHF for the whole US in summer is estimated by applying the regression relation to the NEI-2005 summer pollutant <span class="hlt">emissions</span> with a high spatial resolution of 4-km. The summer daily mean AHF range 10-40 W m-2 on a 4 4 km2 grid scale with maximum heat fluxes of 50-140 W m-2 for major US cities. The AHFs derived from the regression relations between the bottom-up AHF and either CO or NOx <span class="hlt">emissions</span> show a small difference of less than 5% (4.7 W m-2) in city-scale daily mean AHF, and similar R2 statistics, compared to results from their combination. Thus, <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of either species can be used to estimate AHF in the US cities. An hourly AHF inventory at 4 4 km2 resolution over the entire US based on the combined regression is derived and made publicly available for use in mesoscale numerical modeling.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ACPD...1411221A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ACPD...1411221A"><span id="translatedtitle">Importance of transboundary transport of biomass burning <span class="hlt">emissions</span> to regional air quality in Southeast Asia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Aouizerats, B.; van der Werf, G. R.; Balasubramanian, R.; Betha, R.</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Smoke from biomass and peat burning has a notable impact on ambient air quality and climate in the Southeast Asia (SEA) region. We modeled the largest fire-induced haze episode in the past decade (2006) in Indonesia using the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem). We focused mainly on the evolution of the fire plume composition and its interaction with the urbanized area of the city-state of Singapore, and on comparisons of modeled and measured aerosol and CO concentrations. Two simulations were run with the model using the complex Volatility Basis Set (VBS) scheme to reproduce primary and secondary aerosol evolution and concentration. The first simulation referred to as WRF-FIRE included anthropogenic, biogenic, and b iomass burning <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from the Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>3) while the second simulation referred to as WRF-NOFIRE was run without <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from biomass burning. To test model performance, we used three independent datasets for comparison including airborne measurements of Particulate Matter with a diameter of 10 ?m or less (PM10) in Singapore, CO measurements in Sumatra, and Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) column observations from 4 satellite-based sensors. We found reasonable agreement of the model runs with both ground-based measurements of CO and PM10. The comparison with AOD was less favorable and indicated the model underestimated AOD, although the degree of mismatch varied between different satellite data sets. During our study period, forest and peat fires in Sumatra were the main cause of enhanced aerosol concentrations from regional transport over Singapore. Analysis of the biomass burning plume showed high concentrations of primary organic aerosols (POA) with values up to 600 ?g m-3 over the fire locations. The concentration of POA remained quite stable within the plume between the main burning region and Singapore while secondary organic aerosol (SOA) concentration slightly increased. The absolute values of SOA (up to 20 ?g m-3) were much lower than those from POA, indicating a minor role of SOA in biomass burning plumes. Our results show that about 21% of the total mass loading of ambient PM10 during the July-October study period in Singapore was due to biomass and peat burning in Sumatra, but this contribution increased during high burning periods. In total, our model results indicated that during 35 days aerosol concentrations in Singapore were above the threshold of 50 ?g m-3 day-1 indicating poor air quality. During 17 days this was due to fires, based on the difference between the simulations with and without fires. Local pollution in combination with recirculation of air masses was probably the main cause of poor air quality during the other 18 days, although fires from Sumatra and probably also from Borneo added to the enhanced PM10 concentrations. The model vs. measurement comparisons highlighted that for our study period and region the <span class="hlt">GFED</span>3 biomass burning aerosol <span class="hlt">emissions</span> were more in line with observations than found in other studies. This indicates that care should be taken when using AOD to constrain <span class="hlt">emissions</span> or estimate ground-level air quality. This study also shows the need for relatively high resolution modeling to accurately reproduce the advection of air masses necessary to quantify the impacts and feedbacks on air quality.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..1410521K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..1410521K"><span id="translatedtitle">Assimilation of FRP Observations for Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emission</span> Estimation in MACC-II</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kaiser, J. W.; Benedetti, A.; Detmers, R.; Heil, A.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Schultz, M. G.; van der Werf, G. R.; Wooster, M. J.; Xu, W.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>We present the Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS) that is run routinely at ECMWF by the MACC-II project in preparation of the operational GMES atmospheric service. The GFAS currently combines Fire Radiative Power (FRP) observations from the polar orbiting MODIS instruments and applies a quality control, a partial cloud cover correction and observation gap filling with a Kalman filter to generate daily global FRP maps. These are subsequently used to calculate the daily average dry matter combustion rate and <span class="hlt">emission</span> rates for 40 atmospheric trace constituents in real time with a time lag of 7 hours. The <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates are consistent with the <span class="hlt">GFED</span>3 <span class="hlt">emission</span> dataset, but FRP appears to have a lower detection threshold than the burnt area observations used in <span class="hlt">GFED</span>3. The <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are further validated with the atmospheric composition models of MACC by comparing the simulated smoke plumes with atmospheric observations. The temporal and spatial patterns of the <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are shown to be realistic. However, a general mismatch between various aerosol smoke <span class="hlt">emission</span> rates from bottom-up and top-down inventories is evident. Upcoming upgrades of GFAS will include FRP observations from the geostationary instruments aboard Meteosat-9, GOES-East and GOES-West and improve the temporal resolution to one hour.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ACP....15..363A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ACP....15..363A"><span id="translatedtitle">Importance of transboundary transport of biomass burning <span class="hlt">emissions</span> to regional air quality in Southeast Asia during a high fire event</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Aouizerats, B.; van der Werf, G. R.; Balasubramanian, R.; Betha, R.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Smoke from biomass and peat burning has a notable impact on ambient air quality and climate in the Southeast Asia (SEA) region. We modeled a large fire-induced haze episode in 2006 stemming mostly from Indonesia using the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem). We focused on the evolution of the fire plume composition and its interaction with the urbanized area of the city state of Singapore, and on comparisons of modeled and measured aerosol and carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations. Two simulations were run with WRF-Chem using the complex volatility basis set (VBS) scheme to reproduce primary and secondary aerosol evolution and concentration. The first simulation referred to as WRF-FIRE included anthropogenic, biogenic and biomass burning <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from the Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>3) while the second simulation referred to as WRF-NOFIRE was run without <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from biomass burning. To test model performance, we used three independent data sets for comparison including airborne measurements of particulate matter (PM) with a diameter of 10 ?m or less (PM10) in Singapore, CO measurements in Sumatra, and aerosol optical depth (AOD) column observations from four satellite-based sensors. We found reasonable agreement between the model runs and both ground-based measurements of CO and PM10. The comparison with AOD was less favorable and indicated the model underestimated AOD, although the degree of mismatch varied between different satellite data sets. During our study period, forest and peat fires in Sumatra were the main cause of enhanced aerosol concentrations from regional transport over Singapore. Analysis of the biomass burning plume showed high concentrations of primary organic aerosols (POA) with values up to 600 ?g m-3 over the fire locations. The concentration of POA remained quite stable within the plume between the main burning region and Singapore while the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) concentration slightly increased. However, the absolute concentrations of SOA (up to 20 ?g m-3) were much lower than those from POA, indicating a minor role of SOA in these biomass burning plumes. Our results show that about 21% of the total mass loading of ambient PM10 during the July-October study period in Singapore was due to biomass and peat burning in Sumatra, but this contribution increased during high burning periods. In total, our model results indicated that during 35 days aerosol concentrations in Singapore were above the threshold of 50 ?g m-3 day-1 indicating poor air quality. During 17 days this was due to fires, based on the difference between the simulations with and without fires. Local pollution in combination with recirculation of air masses was probably the main cause of poor air quality during the other 18 days, although fires from Sumatra and probably also from Kalimantan (Indonesian part of the island of Borneo) added to the enhanced PM10 concentrations. The model versus measurement comparisons highlighted that for our study period and region the <span class="hlt">GFED</span>3 biomass burning aerosol <span class="hlt">emissions</span> were more in line with observations than found in other studies. This indicates that care should be taken when using AOD to constrain <span class="hlt">emissions</span> or estimate ground-level air quality. This study also shows the need for relatively high resolution modeling to accurately reproduce the advection of air masses necessary to quantify the impacts and feedbacks on regional air quality.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26101085','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26101085"><span id="translatedtitle">Machine learning for toxicity characterization of organic chemical <span class="hlt">emissions</span> using USEtox <span class="hlt">database</span>: Learning the structure of the input space.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Marvuglia, Antonino; Kanevski, Mikhail; Benetto, Enrico</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Toxicity characterization of chemical <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a complex task which usually proceeds via multimedia (fate, exposure and effect) models attached to models of dose-response relationships to assess the effects on target. Different models and approaches do exist, but all require a vast amount of data on the properties of the chemical compounds being assessed, which are hard to collect or hardly publicly available (especially for thousands of less common or newly developed chemicals), therefore hampering in practice the assessment in LCA. An example is USEtox, a consensual model for the characterization of human toxicity and freshwater ecotoxicity. This paper places itself in a line of research aiming at providing a methodology to reduce the number of input parameters necessary to run multimedia fate models, focusing in particular to the application of the USEtox toxicity model. By focusing on USEtox, in this paper two main goals are pursued: 1) performing an extensive exploratory analysis (using dimensionality reduction techniques) of the input space constituted by the substance-specific properties at the aim of detecting particular patterns in the data manifold and estimating the dimension of the subspace in which the data manifold actually lies; and 2) exploring the application of a set of linear models, based on partial least squares (PLS) regression, as well as a nonlinear model (general regression neural network--GRNN) in the seek for an automatic selection strategy of the most informative variables according to the modelled output (USEtox factor). After extensive analysis, the intrinsic dimension of the input manifold has been identified between three and four. The variables selected as most informative may vary according to the output modelled and the model used, but for the toxicity factors modelled in this paper the input variables selected as most informative are coherent with prior expectations based on scientific knowledge of toxicity factors modelling. Thus the outcomes of the analysis are promising for the future application of the approach to other portions of the model, affected by important data gaps, e.g., to the calculation of human health effect factors. PMID:26101085</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://bioinfo.nist.gov/biofuels/','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://bioinfo.nist.gov/biofuels/"><span id="translatedtitle">Biofuel <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Biofuel <span class="hlt">Database</span> (Web, free access)   This <span class="hlt">database</span> brings together structural, biological, and thermodynamic data for enzymes that are either in current use or are being considered for use in the production of biofuels.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=commerce&pg=6&id=EJ916638','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=commerce&pg=6&id=EJ916638"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> Administrator</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Moore, Pam</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The Internet and electronic commerce (e-commerce) generate lots of data. Data must be stored, organized, and managed. <span class="hlt">Database</span> administrators, or DBAs, work with <span class="hlt">database</span> software to find ways to do this. They identify user needs, set up computer <span class="hlt">databases</span>, and test systems. They ensure that systems perform as they should and add people to the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=e-commerce&pg=4&id=EJ916638','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=e-commerce&pg=4&id=EJ916638"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> Administrator</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Moore, Pam</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The Internet and electronic commerce (e-commerce) generate lots of data. Data must be stored, organized, and managed. <span class="hlt">Database</span> administrators, or DBAs, work with <span class="hlt">database</span> software to find ways to do this. They identify user needs, set up computer <span class="hlt">databases</span>, and test systems. They ensure that systems perform as they should and add people to the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..1411338D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..1411338D"><span id="translatedtitle">Estimating nitrate <span class="hlt">emissions</span> to surface water at regional and national scale: comparison of models using detailed regional and national-wide <span class="hlt">databases</span> (France)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dupas, R.; Gascuel-Odoux, C.; Durand, P.; Parnaudeau, V.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>The European Union (EU) Water Framework Directive (WFD) requires River Basin District managers to carry out an analysis of nutrient pressures and impacts, in order to evaluate the risk of water bodies failing to reach "good ecological status" and to identify those catchments where prioritized nonpoint-source control measures should be implemented. A model has been developed to estimate nitrate nonpoint-source <span class="hlt">emissions</span> to surface water, using readily available data in France. It was inspired from US model SPARROW (Smith al., 1997) and European model GREEN (Grizzetti et al., 2008), i.e. statistical approaches consisting of linking nitrogen sources and catchments' land and rivers characteristics. The N-nitrate load (L) at the outlet of a catchment is expressed as: L= R*(B*Lsgw+Ldgw+PS)-denitlake Where denitlake is a denitrification factor for lakes and reservoirs, Lsgw is the shallow groundwater discharge to streams (derived from the base flow index and N surplus in kgN.ha-1.yr-1), Ldgw is the deep groundwater discharge to streams (derived from total runoff, the base flow index and deep groundwater N concentration), PS is point sources from domestic and industrial origin (kgN.ha-1.yr-1) and R and B are the river system and basin reduction factor, respectively. Besides calibrating and evaluating the model at a national scale, its predictive quality was compared with those of regionalized models in Brittany (Western France) and in the Seine river basin (Paris basin), where detailed regional <span class="hlt">databases</span> are available. The national-scale model proved to provide robust predictions in most conditions encountered in France, as it fitted observed N-nitrate load with an efficiency of 0.69. Regionalization of the model reduced the standard error in the prediction of N-nitrate loads by about 19 Hence, the development of regionalized models should be advocated only after the trade-off between improvement of fit and degradation of parameters' estimation has come under scrutiny.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1511222R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1511222R"><span id="translatedtitle">Burned area, active fires and biomass burning - approaches to account for <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from fires in Tanzania</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ruecker, Gernot; Hoffmann, Anja; Leimbach, David; Tiemann, Joachim; Ng'atigwa, Charles</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>Eleven years of data from the globally available MODIS burned area and the MODS Active Fire Product have been analysed for Tanzania in conjunction with GIS data on land use and cover to provide a baseline for fire activity in this East African country. The total radiated energy (FRE) emitted by fires that were picked up by the burned area and active fire product is estimated based on a spatio-temporal clustering algorithm over the burned areas, and integration of the fire radiative power from the MODIS Active Fires product over the time of burning and the area of each burned area cluster. Resulting biomass combusted by unit area based on Woosteŕs scaling factor for FRE to biomass combusted is compared to values found in the literature, and to values found in the Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>). Pyrogenic <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are then estimated using <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors. According to our analysis, an average of 11 million ha burn annually (ranging between 8.5 and 12.9 million ha) in Tanzania corresponding to between 10 and 14 % of Tanzaniás land area. Most burned area is recorded in the months from May to October. The land cover types most affected are woodland and shrubland cover types: they comprise almost 70 % of Tanzania's average annual burned area or 6.8 million ha. Most burning occurs in gazetted land, with an annual average of 3.7 million ha in forest reserves, 3.3 million ha in game reserves and 1.46 million ha in national parks, totalling close to 8.5 million ha or 77 % of the annual average burned area of Tanzania. Annual variability of burned area is moderate for most of the analysed classes, and in most cases there is no clear trend to be detected in burned area, except for the Lindi region were annual burned area appears to be increasing. Preliminary results regarding <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from fires show that for larger fires that burn over a longer time, biomass burned derived through the FRP method compares well to literature values, while the integration over smaller fires with fewer observations yields unstable results due to undersampling issues and uncertainty in the start and end time of the fire events. Options for mitigating these issues using ancillary data such as fire weather information are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.B14C..01R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.B14C..01R"><span id="translatedtitle">Improving global fire carbon <span class="hlt">emissions</span> estimates by combining moderate resolution burned area and active fire observations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Randerson, J. T.; Chen, Y.; Giglio, L.; Rogers, B. M.; van der Werf, G.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>In several important biomes, including croplands and tropical forests, many small fires exist that have sizes that are well below the detection limit for the current generation of burned area products derived from moderate resolution spectroradiometers. These fires likely have important effects on greenhouse gas and aerosol <span class="hlt">emissions</span> and regional air quality. Here we developed an approach for combining 1km thermal anomalies (active fires; MOD14A2) and 500m burned area observations (MCD64A1) to estimate the prevalence of these fires and their likely contribution to burned area and carbon <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. We first estimated active fires within and outside of 500m burn scars in 0.5 degree grid cells during 2001-2010 for which MCD64A1 burned area observations were available. For these two sets of active fires we then examined mean fire radiative power (FRP) and changes in enhanced vegetation index (EVI) derived from 16-day intervals immediately before and after each active fire observation. To estimate the burned area associated with sub-500m fires, we first applied burned area to active fire ratios derived solely from within burned area perimeters to active fires outside of burn perimeters. In a second step, we further modified our sub-500m burned area estimates using EVI changes from active fires outside and within of burned areas (after subtracting EVI changes derived from control regions). We found that in northern and southern Africa savanna regions and in Central and South America dry forest regions, the number of active fires outside of MCD64A1 burned areas increased considerably towards the end of the fire season. EVI changes for active fires outside of burn perimeters were, on average, considerably smaller than EVI changes associated with active fires inside burn scars, providing evidence for burn scars that were substantially smaller than the 25 ha area of a single 500m pixel. FRP estimates also were lower for active fires outside of burn perimeters. In our analysis we quantified how including sub-500m burned area influenced global burned area, carbon <span class="hlt">emissions</span>, and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) in different continental regions using the Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>) biogeochemical model. We conclude by discussing validation needs using higher resolution visible and thermal imagery.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMPA41A1958J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFMPA41A1958J"><span id="translatedtitle">No Smoke Without Fire: the hidden costs of early life exposure to landscape fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in Indonesia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jina, A.; Marlier, M. E.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Air pollution from landscape fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> can have devastating effects upon public health. The consequent health costs place a burden upon the economies of many nations, particularly in developing countries. Recent research has assessed contemporaneous mortality due to respiratory infections or cardiovascular disease, but little has looked at the potential long-term consequences and hidden costs of exposure to fire pollution at a population scale. The difficulty of quantifying these costs is partly due to incomplete or inaccurate health data in many developing countries, and is further compounded by sparse air pollution monitoring data. While satellite data partially compensates for this, there can still be significant gaps in data availability and difficulty in retrieving surface concentrations. In this study, we demonstrate the dramatic long-term health and human development consequences of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) exposure by using modeled PM2.5 to quantify repeated exposure to landscape fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in Indonesia, which is prone to large, catastrophic fires during El Niño conditions. Surface PM2.5 concentrations at 2x2.5° resolution are obtained from GISS-E2-Puccini (the new version of the NASA GISS ModelE general circulation model), run with monthly fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from the Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> version 3 (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>3). 24-hour ambient PM2.5 concentrations across Indonesia are matched to geographically and socioeconomically representative longitudinal surveys conducted by the Indonesian government. We find important medium- to long-term morbidity associated with early life exposure to ambient air pollution from fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. Our analysis indicates that children exposed to high levels of PM2.5 in utero are more likely to suffer from impaired physical and cognitive development. A one standard deviation increase in ambient air pollution, derived from the GISS-E2-Puccini model, leads to effects that are directly comparable to those from indoor air pollution. In addition, income shocks due to pollution-caused family illness can lead to an antenatal amplification of these in utero effects. The impacts of exposure in early life can be difficult to reverse, leading to a persistent effects upon a society which may contribute a significant cost to the more readily demonstrated losses associated with immediate health impacts.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_5 --> <div id="page_6" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="101"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://nlte.nist.gov/NLTE4/','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://nlte.nist.gov/NLTE4/"><span id="translatedtitle">NLTE4 Plasma Population Kinetics <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>SRD 159 NLTE4 Plasma Population Kinetics <span class="hlt">Database</span> (Web <span class="hlt">database</span> for purchase)   This <span class="hlt">database</span> contains benchmark results for simulation of plasma population kinetics and <span class="hlt">emission</span> spectra. The data were contributed by the participants of the 4th Non-LTE Code Comparison Workshop who have unrestricted access to the <span class="hlt">database</span>. The only limitation for other users is in hidden labeling of the output results. Guest users can proceed to the <span class="hlt">database</span> entry page without entering userid and password.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=computer+AND+information&pg=4&id=EJ889164','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=computer+AND+information&pg=4&id=EJ889164"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> Manager</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Martin, Andrew</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>It is normal practice today for organizations to store large quantities of records of related information as computer-based files or <span class="hlt">databases</span>. Purposeful information is retrieved by performing queries on the data sets. The purpose of <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span> MANAGER is to communicate to students the method by which the computer performs these queries. This…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=299264','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=299264"><span id="translatedtitle">Maize <span class="hlt">databases</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This chapter is a succinct overview of maize data held in the species-specific <span class="hlt">database</span> MaizeGDB (the Maize Genomics and Genetics <span class="hlt">Database</span>), and selected multi-species data repositories, such as Gramene/Ensembl Plants, Phytozome, UniProt and the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=database&pg=6&id=EJ889164','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=database&pg=6&id=EJ889164"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> Manager</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Martin, Andrew</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>It is normal practice today for organizations to store large quantities of records of related information as computer-based files or <span class="hlt">databases</span>. Purposeful information is retrieved by performing queries on the data sets. The purpose of <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span> MANAGER is to communicate to students the method by which the computer performs these queries. This</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=85844&keyword=birth+AND+order&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=58532087&CFTOKEN=10380755','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=85844&keyword=birth+AND+order&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=58532087&CFTOKEN=10380755"><span id="translatedtitle">BIOMARKERS <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This <span class="hlt">database</span> was developed by assembling and evaluating the literature relevant to human biomarkers. It catalogues and evaluates the usefulness of biomarkers of exposure, susceptibility and effect which may be relevant for a longitudinal cohort study. In addition to describing ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010idac.book..335V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010idac.book..335V"><span id="translatedtitle">Experiment <span class="hlt">Databases</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vanschoren, Joaquin; Blockeel, Hendrik</p> <p></p> <p>Next to running machine learning algorithms based on inductive queries, much can be learned by immediately querying the combined results of many prior studies. Indeed, all around the globe, thousands of machine learning experiments are being executed on a daily basis, generating a constant stream of empirical information on machine learning techniques. While the information contained in these experiments might have many uses beyond their original intent, results are typically described very concisely in papers and discarded afterwards. If we properly store and organize these results in central <span class="hlt">databases</span>, they can be immediately reused for further analysis, thus boosting future research. In this chapter, we propose the use of experiment <span class="hlt">databases</span>: <span class="hlt">databases</span> designed to collect all the necessary details of these experiments, and to intelligently organize them in online repositories to enable fast and thorough analysis of a myriad of collected results. They constitute an additional, queriable source of empirical meta-data based on principled descriptions of algorithm executions, without reimplementing the algorithms in an inductive <span class="hlt">database</span>. As such, they engender a very dynamic, collaborative approach to experimentation, in which experiments can be freely shared, linked together, and immediately reused by researchers all over the world. They can be set up for personal use, to share results within a lab or to create open, community-wide repositories. Here, we provide a high-level overview of their design, and use an existing experiment <span class="hlt">database</span> to answer various interesting research questions about machine learning algorithms and to verify a number of recent studies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ACP....1012173S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ACP....1012173S"><span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of global inventories of CO <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from biomass burning derived from remotely sensed data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Stroppiana, D.; Brivio, P. A.; Grgoire, J.-M.; Liousse, C.; Guillaume, B.; Granier, C.; Mieville, A.; Chin, M.; Ptron, G.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>We compare five global inventories of monthly CO <span class="hlt">emissions</span> named VGT, ATSR, MODIS, <span class="hlt">GFED</span>3 and MOPITT based on remotely sensed active fires and/or burned area products for the year 2003. The objective is to highlight similarities and differences by focusing on the geographical and temporal distribution and on the <span class="hlt">emissions</span> for three broad land cover classes (forest, savanna/grassland and agriculture). Globally, CO <span class="hlt">emissions</span> for the year 2003 range between 365 Tg CO (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>3) and 1422 Tg CO (VGT). Despite the large uncertainty in the total amounts, some common spatial patterns typical of biomass burning can be identified in the boreal forests of Siberia, in agricultural areas of Eastern Europe and Russia and in savanna ecosystems of South America, Africa and Australia. Regionally, the largest difference in terms of total amounts (CV > 100%) and seasonality is observed at the northernmost latitudes, especially in North America and Siberia where VGT appears to overestimate the area affected by fires. On the contrary, Africa shows the best agreement both in terms of total annual amounts (CV = 31%) and of seasonality despite some overestimation of <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from forest and agriculture observed in the MODIS inventory. In Africa VGT provides the most reliable seasonality. Looking at the broad land cover types, the range of contribution to the global <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of CO is 64-74%, 23-32% and 3-4% for forest, savanna/grassland and agriculture, respectively. These results suggest that there is still large uncertainty in global estimates of <span class="hlt">emissions</span> and it increases if the comparison is carried by out taking into account the temporal (month) and spatial (0.5 0.5 cell) dimensions. Besides the area affected by fires, also vegetation characteristics and conditions at the time of burning should also be accurately parameterized since they can greatly influence the global estimates of CO <span class="hlt">emissions</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://srdata.nist.gov/solubility/','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/solubility/"><span id="translatedtitle">Solubility <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>SRD 106 IUPAC-NIST Solubility <span class="hlt">Database</span> (Web, free access)   These solubilities are compiled from 18 volumes (Click here for List) of the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry(IUPAC)-NIST Solubility Data Series. The <span class="hlt">database</span> includes liquid-liquid, solid-liquid, and gas-liquid systems. Typical solvents and solutes include water, seawater, heavy water, inorganic compounds, and a variety of organic compounds such as hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons, alcohols, acids, esters and nitrogen compounds. There are over 67,500 solubility measurements and over 1800 references.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5162396','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5162396"><span id="translatedtitle">National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP): Pollutant <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventories available on tape. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic <span class="hlt">database</span>). Published Search</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>1994-03-01</p> <p>The bibliography contains citations concerning electric utility pollutant <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventories developed within the National Acid Precipitation Program (NAPAP), relating to the acid deposition phenomenon. The inventory, covering the 48 contiguous United States and 10 Canadian provinces, provides detailed point source data and area source information. Special emphasis is placed on fulfilling data needs of atmospheric modelers, <span class="hlt">emission</span> forecasters, and policy analysts. Information is available on magnetic tape, including tape documentations and reports. (Contains a minimum of 164 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20221916','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20221916"><span id="translatedtitle">Enzyme <span class="hlt">databases</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Schomburg, Dietmar; Schomburg, Ida</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Enzymes are catalysts for the chemical reactions in the metabolism of all organisms and play a key role in the regulation of metabolic steps within the cells, as drug targets, and in a wide range of biotechnological applications. With respect to reaction type, they are grouped into six classes, namely oxidoreductases, transferases, hydrolases, lyases, and ligases. EC-Numbers are assigned by the IUBMB. Enzyme functional <span class="hlt">databases</span> cover a wide range of properties and functions, such as occurrence, kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions, structure, or metabolic function. BRENDA stores a large variety of different data for all classified enzymes whereas KEGG, MEROPS, MetaCyc, REBASE, CAzy, ESTHER, PeroxiBase, and KinBase specialize in either certain aspects of enzyme function or specific enzyme classes, organisms, or metabolic pathways. <span class="hlt">Databases</span> covering enzyme nomenclature are ExplorEnz, SIB-ENZYME, and IntEnz. PMID:20221916</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20130009449','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20130009449"><span id="translatedtitle">Stackfile <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>deVarvalho, Robert; Desai, Shailen D.; Haines, Bruce J.; Kruizinga, Gerhard L.; Gilmer, Christopher</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This software provides storage retrieval and analysis functionality for managing satellite altimetry data. It improves the efficiency and analysis capabilities of existing <span class="hlt">database</span> software with improved flexibility and documentation. It offers flexibility in the type of data that can be stored. There is efficient retrieval either across the spatial domain or the time domain. Built-in analysis tools are provided for frequently performed altimetry tasks. This software package is used for storing and manipulating satellite measurement data. It was developed with a focus on handling the requirements of repeat-track altimetry missions such as Topex and Jason. It was, however, designed to work with a wide variety of satellite measurement data [e.g., Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment -- GRACE). The software consists of several command-line tools for importing, retrieving, and analyzing satellite measurement data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22881452','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22881452"><span id="translatedtitle">Estimates of embodied global energy and air-<span class="hlt">emission</span> intensities of Japanese products for building a Japanese input-output life cycle assessment <span class="hlt">database</span> with a global system boundary.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nansai, Keisuke; Kondo, Yasushi; Kagawa, Shigemi; Suh, Sangwon; Nakajima, Kenichi; Inaba, Rokuta; Tohno, Susumu</p> <p>2012-08-21</p> <p>To build a life cycle assessment (LCA) <span class="hlt">database</span> of Japanese products embracing their global supply chains in a manner requiring lower time and labor burdens, this study estimates the intensity of embodied global environmental burden for commodities produced in Japan. The intensity of embodied global environmental burden is a measure of the environmental burden generated globally by unit production of the commodity and can be used as life cycle inventory data in LCA. The calculation employs an input-output LCA method with a global link input-output model that defines a global system boundary grounded in a simplified multiregional input-output framework. As results, the intensities of embodied global environmental burden for 406 Japanese commodities are determined in terms of energy consumption, greenhouse-gas <span class="hlt">emissions</span> (carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, perfluorocarbons, hydrofluorocarbons, sulfur hexafluoride, and their summation), and air-pollutant <span class="hlt">emissions</span> (nitrogen oxide and sulfur oxide). The uncertainties in the intensities of embodied global environmental burden attributable to the simplified structure of the global link input-output model are quantified using Monte Carlo simulation. In addition, by analyzing the structure of the embodied global greenhouse-gas intensities we characterize Japanese commodities in the context of LCA embracing global supply chains. PMID:22881452</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMGC13A1046E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMGC13A1046E"><span id="translatedtitle">Fire and <span class="hlt">Emission</span> Characterization in the Northern Sub-Saharan Africa (NSSA) Region and their Potential Effects on the Regional Climate System</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ellison, L.; Ichoku, C. M.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Northern Sub-Saharan Africa (NSSA) is known for its consistent vast amounts of seasonal biomass burning each year. These mostly anthropogenic slash-and-burn fires typically used for farming and grazing purposes contributes to a significant proportion of the total global <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of particulate matter (PM). The consequences of such severe burning could potentially have a noticeable influence on local climate patterns, such as the frequent severe droughts over the past century or the drying of Lake Chad, through both direct and indirect causes. This research therefore focuses on: 1) characterizing the burning patterns and extent within NSSA, 2) accurately quantifying PM <span class="hlt">emissions</span> that have a direct impact on climate, and 3) exploring potential indirect impacts of burning on climate through evaluation of correlations with various environmental and meteorological parameters. In this study, the NSSA region was first split into nine distinct sub-regions to better analyze the burning patters and climatological changes. The diurnal cycle of fire radiative power (FRP, a quantifiable way of measuring fire radiant heat output) within these different regions differ in amplitude and shape, though the basic shape is the same with months of maximum FRP being between November and January and with practically no fires during the rainy season. Corresponding changes in other climatological variables were studied against changes seen in FRP on a monthly scale, including precipitation, soil moisture, surface evaporation, evapotranspiration (ET), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and aerosol optical depth (AOD). This study includes an analysis of the distinct change in FRP signal that occurred in 2006 for the middle of the NSSA region, which is the area with the highest concentration of fires. A decrease in maximum monthly FRP has been observed since 2006 in this region. Regional changes in PM <span class="hlt">emissions</span> have also been observed since then, including a large region of decreasing <span class="hlt">emissions</span> southwest of Lake Chad. These <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are taken from the new Fire Energetics and <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> Research (FEER) <span class="hlt">emissions</span> product that was developed as part of this NSSA research and is based on a global coefficient of <span class="hlt">emission</span> (Ce) map with high spatial resolution. The FEER algorithm is a top-down approach in an effort to properly account for all emitted PM, which is especially important in the NSSA region because of its high concentration of fire events. When the FEER Ce v1.0 product is combined with the global FRP dataset from the Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS) v1.0 product to generate PM <span class="hlt">emissions</span>, estimates of total particulate matter (TPM) are generated. The FEER product estimates average annual TPM <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in the NSSA region to be around 14 Tg between 2004-2010, which is greater than GFAS v1.0 by a factor of 1.8, and greater than the Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>) v3.1 by a factor of 1.6. Future work will plug these new <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates into regional models to gain a better understanding of the impacts of biomass burning on climate in NSSA.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014BGeo...11.3205E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014BGeo...11.3205E"><span id="translatedtitle">An ensemble approach to simulate CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from natural fires</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Eliseev, A. V.; Mokhov, I. I.; Chernokulsky, A. V.</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>This paper presents ensemble simulations with the global climate model developed at the A. M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (IAP RAS CM). These simulations are forced by historical reconstructions of concentrations of well-mixed greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, and N2O), sulfate aerosols (both in the troposphere and stratosphere), extent of crops and pastures, and total solar irradiance for AD 850-2005 (hereafter all years are taken as being AD) and by the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios for the same forcing agents until the year 2300. Our model implements GlobFIRM (Global FIRe Model) as a scheme for calculating characteristics of natural fires. Comparing to the original GlobFIRM model, in our implementation, the scheme is extended by a module accounting for CO2 release from soil during fires. The novel approach of our paper is to simulate natural fires in an ensemble fashion. Different ensemble members in the present paper are constructed by varying the values of parameters of the natural fires module. These members are constrained by the <span class="hlt">GFED</span>-3.1 data set for the burnt area and CO2 release from fires and further subjected to Bayesian averaging. Our simulations are the first coupled model assessment of future changes in gross characteristics of natural fires. In our model, the present-day (1998-2011) global area burnt due to natural fires is (2.1 0.4) 106 km2 yr-1 (ensemble mean and intra-ensemble standard deviation are presented), and the respective CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> to the atmosphere are (1.4 0.2) Pg C yr-1. The latter value is in agreement with the corresponding <span class="hlt">GFED</span> estimates. The area burnt by natural fires is generally larger than the <span class="hlt">GFED</span> estimates except in boreal Eurasia, where it is realistic, and in Australia, where it is smaller than these estimates. Regionally, the modelled CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are larger (smaller) than the <span class="hlt">GFED</span> estimates in Europe (in the tropics and north-eastern Eurasia). From 1998-2011 to 2091-2100, the ensemble mean global burnt area is increased by 13% (28%, 36%, 51%) under scenario RCP 2.6 (RCP 4.5, RCP 6.0, RCP 8.5). The corresponding global <span class="hlt">emissions</span> increase is 14% (29%, 37%, 42%). From 2091-2100 to 2291-2300, under the mitigation scenario RCP 2.6 the ensemble mean global burnt area and the respective CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> slightly decrease, both by 5% relative to their values in the period 2091-2100. In turn, under scenario RCP 4.5 (RCP 6.0, RCP 8.5) the ensemble mean burnt area in the period 2291-2100 is higher by 15% (44%, 83%) than its mean value, and the ensemble mean CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are correspondingly higher by 9% (19%, 31%). The simulated changes of natural fire characteristics in the 21st-23rd centuries are associated mostly with the corresponding changes in boreal regions of Eurasia and North America. However, under the RCP 8.5 scenario, the increase of the burnt area and CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in boreal regions during the 22nd and 23rd centuries is accompanied by the respective decreases in the tropics and subtropics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFM.P31B0984H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFM.P31B0984H"><span id="translatedtitle">Mars Digital Dune <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hayward, R. K.; Titus, T. N.; Mullins, K. F.; Fenton, L. K.; Bourke, M.; Christensen, P. R.</p> <p>2004-12-01</p> <p>Currently, there is no comprehensive, global, digital <span class="hlt">database</span> for dune deposits on Mars. The advent of a series of successful Mars missions, coupled with advances in technology enabling a significant increase in instrument resolution, have provided a large compilation of data covering a wide range of wavelengths for the Martian surface. Given the recent availability of high-resolution data and detailed surficial information returned from orbital and rover missions, it is critical that we update the Mars global information base by creating a digital <span class="hlt">database</span> of dune deposits that includes this new influx of data. As of spring 2004, the Thermal <span class="hlt">Emission</span> Imaging System (THEMIS) infrared (IR) coverage of the surface of Mars was 98% for nighttime and 75% for daytime acquired images, forming a data set of global coverage at a resolution not previously possible. The combination of high-resolution and global coverage makes the THEMIS IR data set the logical choice for a planet wide inventory of dune deposits. Data sets of a global scale like those of Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) and Thermal <span class="hlt">Emission</span> Spectrometer (TES) will enable rapid and contiguous comparisons with the dune <span class="hlt">database</span>. Other imagery like that of Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) will provide very high-resolution, localized visual data for accurate interpretations of morphological characterizations. The dune <span class="hlt">database</span> will provide researchers with an extensive, comprehensive and stable <span class="hlt">database</span> for use in a wide-array of global studies. The <span class="hlt">database</span> will also offer researchers a centralized depository for updating physical parameters with newly validated findings. The initial construction of the <span class="hlt">database</span> is based upon dune forms or deposits identified, classified and digitized using only THEMIS IR images. These digitized polygons are converted from THEMIS image coordinates to ARCMAP aerographical coordinates, allowing delineation of areal extent of the deposits and preserving relevant THEMIS image information such as Ls, local time, and sun azimuth/angle. The ARCMAP polygons will also retain reference to all THEMIS IR images used in their construction. Where available, THEMIS VIS and/or MOC images will be used to confirm, modify or refine original classifications. In addition to providing an improved resolution for features below the IR image threshold, this secondary examination will also provide a list of cross-referenced THEMIS VIS and MOC images for future investigations. Physical parameters such as wind direction based on slip-face geometry, dune wavelength, elevation, and volume of the deposits will be incorporated into the <span class="hlt">database</span> on a priority-based schedule. In addition to THEMIS VIS and MOC images, supplemental data sets, such as TES and others, will be used where available to further refine and/or validate existing data on global wind patterns, sediment transport, sources and sinks, and stratigraphic units.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=set+AND+theory&pg=5&id=EJ676557','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=set+AND+theory&pg=5&id=EJ676557"><span id="translatedtitle">Overlap in Bibliographic <span class="hlt">Databases</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hood, William W.; Wilson, Concepcion S.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Examines the topic of Fuzzy Set Theory to determine the overlap of coverage in bibliographic <span class="hlt">databases</span>. Highlights include examples of comparisons of <span class="hlt">database</span> coverage; frequency distribution of the degree of overlap; records with maximum overlap; records unique to one <span class="hlt">database</span>; intra-<span class="hlt">database</span> duplicates; and overlap in the top ten <span class="hlt">databases</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED267812.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED267812.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Databases</span> for Communications Research.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Alberico, Ralph; Snow, Maxine</p> <p></p> <p>Electronic <span class="hlt">databases</span> have become important resources for researchers in many disciplines. While there is no single <span class="hlt">database</span> designed to cover the field of communications, there are several <span class="hlt">databases</span> which include material that is of interest to investigators in the field. An experiment was performed to determine which <span class="hlt">databases</span> would be most</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=relational+AND+database&pg=7&id=EJ265959','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=relational+AND+database&pg=7&id=EJ265959"><span id="translatedtitle">Creating Your Own <span class="hlt">Database</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Blair, John C., Jr.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>Outlines the important factors to be considered in selecting a <span class="hlt">database</span> management system for use with a microcomputer and presents a series of guidelines for developing a <span class="hlt">database</span>. General procedures, report generation, data manipulation, information storage, word processing, data entry, <span class="hlt">database</span> indexes, and relational <span class="hlt">databases</span> are among the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Database+AND+Management+AND+System&pg=2&id=ED526040','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Database+AND+Management+AND+System&pg=2&id=ED526040"><span id="translatedtitle">Reflective <span class="hlt">Database</span> Access Control</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Olson, Lars E.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>"Reflective <span class="hlt">Database</span> Access Control" (RDBAC) is a model in which a <span class="hlt">database</span> privilege is expressed as a <span class="hlt">database</span> query itself, rather than as a static privilege contained in an access control list. RDBAC aids the management of <span class="hlt">database</span> access controls by improving the expressiveness of policies. However, such policies introduce new interactions</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=THC&pg=3&id=ED271124','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=THC&pg=3&id=ED271124"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Databases</span>: Beyond the Basics.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Whittaker, Robert</p> <p></p> <p>This presented paper offers an elementary description of <span class="hlt">database</span> characteristics and then provides a survey of <span class="hlt">databases</span> that may be useful to the teacher and researcher in Slavic and East European languages and literatures. The survey focuses on commercial <span class="hlt">databases</span> that are available, usable, and needed. Individual <span class="hlt">databases</span> discussed include:</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_6 --> <div id="page_7" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="121"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=database+AND+security&pg=2&id=ED526040','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=database+AND+security&pg=2&id=ED526040"><span id="translatedtitle">Reflective <span class="hlt">Database</span> Access Control</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Olson, Lars E.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>"Reflective <span class="hlt">Database</span> Access Control" (RDBAC) is a model in which a <span class="hlt">database</span> privilege is expressed as a <span class="hlt">database</span> query itself, rather than as a static privilege contained in an access control list. RDBAC aids the management of <span class="hlt">database</span> access controls by improving the expressiveness of policies. However, such policies introduce new interactions…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ACP....10.9631L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ACP....10.9631L"><span id="translatedtitle">Updated African biomass burning <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventories in the framework of the AMMA-IDAF program, with an evaluation of combustion aerosols</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liousse, C.; Guillaume, B.; Grgoire, J. M.; Mallet, M.; Galy, C.; Pont, V.; Akpo, A.; Bedou, M.; Castra, P.; Dungall, L.; Gardrat, E.; Granier, C.; Konar, A.; Malavelle, F.; Mariscal, A.; Mieville, A.; Rosset, R.; Sera, D.; Solmon, F.; Tummon, F.; Assamoi, E.; Yobou, V.; van Velthoven, P.</p> <p>2010-10-01</p> <p>African biomass burning <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventories for gaseous and particulate species have been constructed at a resolution of 1 km by 1km with daily coverage for the 2000-2007 period. These inventories are higher than the <span class="hlt">GFED</span>2 inventories, which are currently widely in use. Evaluation specifically focusing on combustion aerosol has been carried out with the ORISAM-TM4 global chemistry transport model which includes a detailed aerosol module. This paper compares modeled results with measurements of surface BC concentrations and scattering coefficients from the AMMA Enhanced Observations period, aerosol optical depths and single scattering albedo from AERONET sunphotometers, LIDAR vertical distributions of extinction coefficients as well as satellite data. Aerosol seasonal and interannual evolutions over the 2004-2007 period observed at regional scale and more specifically at the Djougou (Benin) and Banizoumbou (Niger) AMMA/IDAF sites are well reproduced by our global model, indicating that our biomass burning <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventory appears reasonable.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://bioinfo.nist.gov/hmpd/','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://bioinfo.nist.gov/hmpd/"><span id="translatedtitle">Human Mitochondrial Protein <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>SRD 131 Human Mitochondrial Protein <span class="hlt">Database</span> (Web, free access)   The Human Mitochondrial Protein <span class="hlt">Database</span> (HMPDb) provides comprehensive data on mitochondrial and human nuclear encoded proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. This <span class="hlt">database</span> consolidates information from SwissProt, LocusLink, Protein Data Bank (PDB), GenBank, Genome <span class="hlt">Database</span> (GDB), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Human Mitochondrial Genome <span class="hlt">Database</span> (mtDB), MITOMAP, Neuromuscular Disease Center and Human 2-D PAGE <span class="hlt">Databases</span>. This <span class="hlt">database</span> is intended as a tool not only to aid in studying the mitochondrion but in studying the associated diseases.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8295541','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8295541"><span id="translatedtitle">Medical <span class="hlt">database</span> security policies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pangalos, G J</p> <p>1993-11-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Database</span> security plays an important role in the overall security of medical information systems. Security does not only involve fundamental ethical principles such as privacy and confidentiality, but is also an essential prerequisite for effective medical care. The general framework and the requirements for medical <span class="hlt">database</span> security are presented. The three prominent proposals for medical <span class="hlt">database</span> security are discussed in some detail, together with specific proposals for medical <span class="hlt">database</span> security. A number of parameters for a secure medical <span class="hlt">database</span> development are presented and discussed, and guidelines are given for the development of secure medical <span class="hlt">database</span> systems. PMID:8295541</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://appliedresearch.cancer.gov/paq/search.html','NCI'); return false;" href="http://appliedresearch.cancer.gov/paq/search.html"><span id="translatedtitle">Search the PAQ <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.cancer.gov">Cancer.gov</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Use this interface to search through all the physical activity-related questions in our <span class="hlt">database</span>. See below for some tips on how to search. If you have any comments concerning this <span class="hlt">database</span>, please e-mail David Berrigan.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://imaging.cancer.gov/programsandresources/reportsandpublications/LungImageDatabases-2','NCI'); return false;" href="http://imaging.cancer.gov/programsandresources/reportsandpublications/LungImageDatabases-2"><span id="translatedtitle">Lung Image <span class="hlt">Databases</span>-2</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.cancer.gov">Cancer.gov</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Lung Image <span class="hlt">Database</span> Consortiums Normalized Relational <span class="hlt">Database</span> De-identified (anonymized) CT datasets Publicly accessible Web search tools Cases from search results can be downloaded ftp or DICOM De-identified CT datasets Digital Imaging and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=62445&keyword=Deer&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=58823612&CFTOKEN=79558359','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=62445&keyword=Deer&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=58823612&CFTOKEN=79558359"><span id="translatedtitle">THE ECOTOX <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The <span class="hlt">database</span> provides chemical-specific toxicity information for aquatic life, terrestrial plants, and terrestrial wildlife. ECOTOX is a comprehensive ecotoxicology <span class="hlt">database</span> and is therefore essential for providing and suppoirting high quality models needed to estimate population...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Optical+AND+design&pg=6&id=EJ384419','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Optical+AND+design&pg=6&id=EJ384419"><span id="translatedtitle">WLN's <span class="hlt">Database</span>: New Directions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ziegman, Bruce N.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Describes features of the Western Library Network's <span class="hlt">database</span>, including the <span class="hlt">database</span> structure, authority control, contents, quality control, and distribution methods. The discussion covers changes in distribution necessitated by increasing telecommunications costs and the development of optical data disk products. (CLB)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=20007&keyword=internet+AND+life&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=58447116&CFTOKEN=64572047','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=20007&keyword=internet+AND+life&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=58447116&CFTOKEN=64572047"><span id="translatedtitle">ECOTOX <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span> SYSTEM</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The ECOTOXicology <span class="hlt">database</span> is a source for locating single chemical toxicity data for aquatic life, terrestrial plants and wildlife. ECOTOX integrates three toxicology effects <span class="hlt">databases</span>: AQUIRE (aquatic life), PHYTOTOX (terrestrial plants), and TERRETOX (terrestrial wildlife). Th...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1230083-network-ii-database','SCIGOV-ESTSC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1230083-network-ii-database"><span id="translatedtitle">Network II <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/">Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1994-11-07</p> <p>The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Rail and Barge Network II <span class="hlt">Database</span> is a representation of the rail and barge system of the United States. The network is derived from the Federal Rail Administration (FRA) rail <span class="hlt">database</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ceramics.nist.gov/srd/scd/scdquery.htm','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://www.ceramics.nist.gov/srd/scd/scdquery.htm"><span id="translatedtitle">Structural Ceramics <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>SRD 30 NIST Structural Ceramics <span class="hlt">Database</span> (Web, free access) The NIST Structural Ceramics <span class="hlt">Database</span> (WebSCD) provides evaluated materials property data for a wide range of advanced ceramics known variously as structural ceramics, engineering ceramics, and fine ceramics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/prodtree?prodcat=Pesticides','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/prodtree?prodcat=Pesticides"><span id="translatedtitle">Household Products <span class="hlt">Database</span>: Pesticides</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... Names Types of Products Manufacturers Ingredients About the <span class="hlt">Database</span> FAQ Product Recalls Help Glossary Contact Us More ... holders. Information is extracted from Consumer Product Information <span class="hlt">Database</span> 2001-2015 by DeLima Associates. All rights reserved. ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=202847&keyword=early+AND+childhood&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=58569571&CFTOKEN=22629922','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=202847&keyword=early+AND+childhood&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=58569571&CFTOKEN=22629922"><span id="translatedtitle">Physiological Information <span class="hlt">Database</span> (PID)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>EPA has developed a physiological information <span class="hlt">database</span> (created using Microsoft ACCESS) intended to be used in PBPK modeling. The <span class="hlt">database</span> contains physiological parameter values for humans from early childhood through senescence as well as similar data for laboratory animal spec...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090015390','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090015390"><span id="translatedtitle">Aviation Safety Issues <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Morello, Samuel A.; Ricks, Wendell R.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The aviation safety issues <span class="hlt">database</span> was instrumental in the refinement and substantiation of the National Aviation Safety Strategic Plan (NASSP). The issues <span class="hlt">database</span> is a comprehensive set of issues from an extremely broad base of aviation functions, personnel, and vehicle categories, both nationally and internationally. Several aviation safety stakeholders such as the Commercial Aviation Safety Team (CAST) have already used the <span class="hlt">database</span>. This broader interest was the genesis to making the <span class="hlt">database</span> publically accessible and writing this report.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5345282','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5345282"><span id="translatedtitle">MPlus <span class="hlt">Database</span> system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>1989-01-20</p> <p>The MPlus <span class="hlt">Database</span> program was developed to keep track of mail received. This system was developed by TRESP for the Department of Energy/Oak Ridge Operations. The MPlus <span class="hlt">Database</span> program is a PC application, written in dBase III+'' and compiled with Clipper'' into an executable file. The files you need to run the MPLus <span class="hlt">Database</span> program can be installed on a Bernoulli, or a hard drive. This paper discusses the use of this <span class="hlt">database</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=235491','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=235491"><span id="translatedtitle">Plant and Crop <span class="hlt">Databases</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Databases</span> have become an integral part of all aspects of biological research, including basic and applied plant biology. The importance of <span class="hlt">databases</span> continues to increase as the volume of data from direct and indirect genomics approaches expands. What is not always obvious to users of <span class="hlt">databases</span> is t...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090008630','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090008630"><span id="translatedtitle">Mission and Assets <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Baldwin, John; Zendejas, Silvino; Gutheinz, Sandy; Borden, Chester; Wang, Yeou-Fang</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Mission and Assets <span class="hlt">Database</span> (MADB) Version 1.0 is an SQL <span class="hlt">database</span> system with a Web user interface to centralize information. The <span class="hlt">database</span> stores flight project support resource requirements, view periods, antenna information, schedule, and forecast results for use in mid-range and long-term planning of Deep Space Network (DSN) assets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMNH33C..01J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMNH33C..01J"><span id="translatedtitle">Long-term Health and Socioeconomic Impacts of Landscape Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> in Indonesia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jina, A.; Marlier, M. E.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Among natural disasters, wildfires are perhaps the most complex case of a coupled human-natural system, with both direct and indirect costs to society. A major contributor to these indirect costs is the impact upon health in the short- and long-term. Air pollution from fires is associated with more deaths from cardio-pulmonary diseases, yet little or no research has looked beyond the short-term mortality and morbidity associated with wildfire pollution, particularly in developing countries where impacts may be greatest but monitoring presents a constant challenge. We address this by using an interdisciplinary approach combining modeled air pollution with econometric methods to identify the long-term effects of air pollution on health and cognitive ability. These impacts will persist in society, and can lead to decreased education, loss of earnings, and a suppression of economic activity. We take the case of Indonesia, which is prone to large, catastrophic fires during El Niño conditions. Satellite data partially compensate for the lack of monitoring data for air pollution, but there are still significant gaps in data availability and difficulty in retrieving surface concentrations. In this study, surface fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations at 2x2.5° resolution are obtained from GISS-E2-Puccini (the new version of the NASA GISS ModelE General Circulation Model (GCM)), run with monthly fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from the Global Fire <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> <span class="hlt">Database</span> version 3 (<span class="hlt">GFED</span>3). 24-hour ambient PM2.5 concentrations across Indonesia are matched to geographically and socioeconomic surveys. We find that exposure to high levels of PM2.5 at birth (and in utero) has negative impacts upon physical development of infants. This is associated with health problems later in life, as well as lower educational and labor market outcomes. A one standard deviation increase in ambient air pollution exposure leads to effects comparable to those from indoor air pollution. We also find a negative effect on cognitive ability in adults. The unique data allows us to identify whether it is cumulative exposure, maximum exposure, or exceeding certain thresholds which lead to the largest effects on health. We also test for non-linearity in the response to exposure and for interactions with socioeconomic status. We see worse health outcomes in poorer households, which may contribute the large gradient in health status in Indonesia. Identifying and quantifying these long-term impacts has implications for disaster relief policy in Indonesia, as it demands including populations that may be physically remote from the wildfires themselves. It also changes the cost-benefit analysis of interventions to mitigate the impacts of wildfires. The extra costs associated with these impacts have not been considered in disaster policy, so this research has implications beyond this specific case. It is hoped that the strongly interdisciplinary approach presented herein, of combining physically derived datasets with socioeconomic data, may be applied to identify the effects of many natural hazards in many other settings.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Database+AND+Management+AND+System&pg=5&id=EJ307172','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Database+AND+Management+AND+System&pg=5&id=EJ307172"><span id="translatedtitle">An Introduction to <span class="hlt">Database</span> Structure and <span class="hlt">Database</span> Machines.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Detweiler, Karen</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>Enumerates principal management objectives of <span class="hlt">database</span> management systems (data independence, quality, security, multiuser access, central control) and criteria for comparison (response time, size, flexibility, other features). Conventional <span class="hlt">database</span> management systems, relational <span class="hlt">databases</span>, and <span class="hlt">database</span> machines used for backend processing are</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=supplier+AND+quality&pg=4&id=EJ307172','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=supplier+AND+quality&pg=4&id=EJ307172"><span id="translatedtitle">An Introduction to <span class="hlt">Database</span> Structure and <span class="hlt">Database</span> Machines.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Detweiler, Karen</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>Enumerates principal management objectives of <span class="hlt">database</span> management systems (data independence, quality, security, multiuser access, central control) and criteria for comparison (response time, size, flexibility, other features). Conventional <span class="hlt">database</span> management systems, relational <span class="hlt">databases</span>, and <span class="hlt">database</span> machines used for backend processing are…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_7 --> <div id="page_8" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="141"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22736059','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22736059"><span id="translatedtitle">IDPredictor: predict <span class="hlt">database</span> links in biomedical <span class="hlt">database</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mehlhorn, Hendrik; Lange, Matthias; Scholz, Uwe; Schreiber, Falk</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Knowledge found in biomedical <span class="hlt">databases</span>, in particular in Web information systems, is a major bioinformatics resource. In general, this biological knowledge is worldwide represented in a network of <span class="hlt">databases</span>. These data is spread among thousands of <span class="hlt">databases</span>, which overlap in content, but differ substantially with respect to content detail, interface, formats and data structure. To support a functional annotation of lab data, such as protein sequences, metabolites or DNA sequences as well as a semi-automated data exploration in information retrieval environments, an integrated view to <span class="hlt">databases</span> is essential. Search engines have the potential of assisting in data retrieval from these structured sources, but fall short of providing a comprehensive knowledge except out of the interlinked <span class="hlt">databases</span>. A prerequisite of supporting the concept of an integrated data view is to acquire insights into cross-references among <span class="hlt">database</span> entities. This issue is being hampered by the fact, that only a fraction of all possible cross-references are explicitely tagged in the particular biomedical informations systems. In this work, we investigate to what extend an automated construction of an integrated data network is possible. We propose a method that predicts and extracts cross-references from multiple life science <span class="hlt">databases</span> and possible referenced data targets. We study the retrieval quality of our method and report on first, promising results. The method is implemented as the tool IDPredictor, which is published under the DOI 10.5447/IPK/2012/4 and is freely available using the URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.5447/IPK/2012/4. PMID:22736059</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1077685','SCIGOV-DOEDE'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1077685"><span id="translatedtitle">2010 Worldwide Gasification <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/dataexplorer">DOE Data Explorer</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The 2010 Worldwide Gasification <span class="hlt">Database</span> describes the current world gasification industry and identifies near-term planned capacity additions. The <span class="hlt">database</span> lists gasification projects and includes information (e.g., plant location, number and type of gasifiers, syngas capacity, feedstock, and products). The <span class="hlt">database</span> reveals that the worldwide gasification capacity has continued to grow for the past several decades and is now at 70,817 megawatts thermal (MWth) of syngas output at 144 operating plants with a total of 412 gasifiers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://srdata.nist.gov/its90/main/','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/its90/main/"><span id="translatedtitle">ITS-90 Thermocouple <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>SRD 60 NIST ITS-90 Thermocouple <span class="hlt">Database</span> (Web, free access)   Web version of Standard Reference <span class="hlt">Database</span> 60 and NIST Monograph 175. The <span class="hlt">database</span> gives temperature -- electromotive force (emf) reference functions and tables for the letter-designated thermocouple types B, E, J, K, N, R, S and T. These reference functions have been adopted as standards by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NDS...120..291P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NDS...120..291P"><span id="translatedtitle">Nuclear Science References <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pritychenko, B.; B?tk, E.; Singh, B.; Totans, J.</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>The Nuclear Science References (NSR) <span class="hlt">database</span> together with its associated Web interface, is the world's only comprehensive source of easily accessible low- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics bibliographic information for more than 210,000 articles since the beginning of nuclear science. The weekly-updated NSR <span class="hlt">database</span> provides essential support for nuclear data evaluation, compilation and research activities. The principles of the <span class="hlt">database</span> and Web application development and maintenance are described. Examples of nuclear structure, reaction and decay applications are specifically included. The complete NSR <span class="hlt">database</span> is freely available at the websites of the National Nuclear Data Center http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920018027&hterms=relational+database&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Drelational%2Bdatabase','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920018027&hterms=relational+database&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Drelational%2Bdatabase"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Databases</span> for LDEF results</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Bohnhoff-Hlavacek, Gail</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>One of the objectives of the team supporting the LDEF Systems and Materials Special Investigative Groups is to develop <span class="hlt">databases</span> of experimental findings. These <span class="hlt">databases</span> identify the hardware flown, summarize results and conclusions, and provide a system for acknowledging investigators, tracing sources of data, and future design suggestions. To date, <span class="hlt">databases</span> covering the optical experiments, and thermal control materials (chromic acid anodized aluminum, silverized Teflon blankets, and paints) have been developed at Boeing. We used the Filemaker Pro software, the <span class="hlt">database</span> manager for the Macintosh computer produced by the Claris Corporation. It is a flat, text-retrievable <span class="hlt">database</span> that provides access to the data via an intuitive user interface, without tedious programming. Though this software is available only for the Macintosh computer at this time, copies of the <span class="hlt">databases</span> can be saved to a format that is readable on a personal computer as well. Further, the data can be exported to more powerful relational <span class="hlt">databases</span>, capabilities, and use of the LDEF <span class="hlt">databases</span> and describe how to get copies of the <span class="hlt">database</span> for your own research.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4505447','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4505447"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Databases</span> for Microbiologists</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Databases</span> play an increasingly important role in biology. They archive, store, maintain, and share information on genes, genomes, expression data, protein sequences and structures, metabolites and reactions, interactions, and pathways. All these data are critically important to microbiologists. Furthermore, microbiology has its own <span class="hlt">databases</span> that deal with model microorganisms, microbial diversity, physiology, and pathogenesis. Thousands of biological <span class="hlt">databases</span> are currently available, and it becomes increasingly difficult to keep up with their development. The purpose of this minireview is to provide a brief survey of current <span class="hlt">databases</span> that are of interest to microbiologists. PMID:26013493</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020006918&hterms=Migration+database&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DMigration%2Bdatabase','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020006918&hterms=Migration+database&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DMigration%2Bdatabase"><span id="translatedtitle">Backing up DMF <span class="hlt">Databases</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Cardo, Nicholas P.; Woodrow, Thomas (Technical Monitor)</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>A complete backup of the Cray Data Migration Facility (DMF) <span class="hlt">databases</span> should include the data migration <span class="hlt">databases</span>, all media specific process' (MSP's) <span class="hlt">databases</span>, and the journal file. The backup should be able to accomplished without impacting users or stopping DMF. The High Speed Processors group at the Numerical Aerodynamics Simulation (NAS) Facility at NASA Ames Research Center undertook the task of finding an effective and efficient way to backup all DMF <span class="hlt">databases</span>. This has been accomplished by taking advantage of new features introduced in DMF 2.0 and adding a minor modification to the dmdaemon. This paper discusses the investigation and the changes necessary to implement these enhancements.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://epi.grants.cancer.gov/pharm/pharmacoepi_db/va.html','NCI'); return false;" href="http://epi.grants.cancer.gov/pharm/pharmacoepi_db/va.html"><span id="translatedtitle">Veterans Administration <span class="hlt">Databases</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.cancer.gov">Cancer.gov</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The Veterans Administration Information Resource Center provides <span class="hlt">database</span> and informatics experts, customer service, expert advice, information products, and web technology to VA researchers and others.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AAS...22513802H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AAS...22513802H"><span id="translatedtitle">The RECONS 25 Parsec <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Henry, Todd J.; Jao, Wei-Chun; Pewett, Tiffany; Riedel, Adric R.; Silverstein, Michele L.; Slatten, Kenneth J.; Winters, Jennifer G.; Recons Team</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The REsearch Consortium On Nearby Stars (RECONS, www.recons.org) Team has been mapping the solar neighborhood since 1994. Nearby stars provide the fundamental framework upon which all of stellar astronomy is based, both for individual stars and stellar populations. The nearest stars are also the primary targets for extrasolar planet searches, and will undoubtedly play key roles in understanding the prevalence and structure of solar systems, and ultimately, in our search for life elsewhere.We have built the RECONS 25 Parsec <span class="hlt">Database</span> to encourage and enable exploration of the Sun's nearest neighbors. The <span class="hlt">Database</span>, slated for public release in 2015, contains 3088 stars, brown dwarfs, andexoplanets in 2184 systems as of October 1, 2014. All of these systems have accurate trigonometric parallaxes in the refereed literature placing them closer than 25.0 parsecs, i.e., parallaxes greater than 40 mas with errors less than 10 mas. Carefully vetted astrometric, photometric, and spectroscopic data are incorporated intothe <span class="hlt">Database</span> from reliable sources, including significant original data collected by members of the RECONS Team.Current exploration of the solar neighborhood by RECONS, enabled by the <span class="hlt">Database</span>, focuses on the ubiquitous red dwarfs, including: assessing the stellar companion population of ~1200 red dwarfs (Winters), investigating the astrophysical causes that spread red dwarfs of similar temperatures by a factor of 16 in luminosity (Pewett), and canvassing ~3000 red dwarfs for excess <span class="hlt">emission</span> due to unseen companions and dust (Silverstein). In addition, a decade long astrometric survey of ~500 red dwarfs in the southern sky has begun, in an effort to understand the stellar, brown dwarf, and planetary companion populations for the stars that make up at least 75% of all stars in the Universe.This effort has been supported by the NSF through grants AST-0908402, AST-1109445, and AST-1412026, and via observations made possible by the SMARTS Consortium.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=turing+AND+machine&id=EJ344316','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=turing+AND+machine&id=EJ344316"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> in Artificial Intelligence.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Wilkinson, Julia</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Describes a specialist bibliographic <span class="hlt">database</span> of literature in the field of artificial intelligence created by the Turing Institute (Glasgow, Scotland) using the BRS/Search information retrieval software. The subscription method for end-users--i.e., annual fee entitles user to unlimited access to <span class="hlt">database</span>, document provision, and printed awareness</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=BANK+AND+RISK&pg=7&id=ED245687','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=BANK+AND+RISK&pg=7&id=ED245687"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> Searching by Managers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Arnold, Stephen E.</p> <p></p> <p>Managers and executives need the easy and quick access to business and management information that online <span class="hlt">databases</span> can provide, but many have difficulty articulating their search needs to an intermediary. One possible solution would be to encourage managers and their immediate support staff members to search textual <span class="hlt">databases</span> directly as they now</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=export+OR+import&pg=4&id=ED437942','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=export+OR+import&pg=4&id=ED437942"><span id="translatedtitle">Build Your Own <span class="hlt">Database</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Jacso, Peter; Lancaster, F. W.</p> <p></p> <p>This book is intended to help librarians and others to produce <span class="hlt">databases</span> of better value and quality, especially if they have had little previous experience in <span class="hlt">database</span> construction. Drawing upon almost 40 years of experience in the field of information retrieval, this book emphasizes basic principles and approaches rather than in-depth and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Knowledge+AND+Discovery&pg=3&id=EJ595481','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Knowledge+AND+Discovery&pg=3&id=EJ595481"><span id="translatedtitle">Knowledge Discovery in <span class="hlt">Databases</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Norton, M. Jay</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>Knowledge discovery in <span class="hlt">databases</span> (KDD) revolves around the investigation and creation of knowledge, processes, algorithms, and mechanisms for retrieving knowledge from data collections. The article is an introductory overview of KDD. The rationale and environment of its development and applications are discussed. Issues related to <span class="hlt">database</span> design</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=279608','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=279608"><span id="translatedtitle">Morchella MLST <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Welcome to the Morchella MLST <span class="hlt">database</span>. This dedicated <span class="hlt">database</span> was set up at the CBS-KNAW Biodiversity Center by Vincent Robert in February 2012, using BioloMICS software (Robert et al., 2011), to facilitate DNA sequence-based identifications of Morchella species via the Internet. The current datab...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://xpdb.nist.gov:8060/BMCD4/index.faces','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://xpdb.nist.gov:8060/BMCD4/index.faces"><span id="translatedtitle">Biological Macromolecule Crystallization <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>SRD 21 Biological Macromolecule Crystallization <span class="hlt">Database</span> (Web, free access)   The Biological Macromolecule Crystallization <span class="hlt">Database</span> and NASA Archive for Protein Crystal Growth Data (BMCD) contains the conditions reported for the crystallization of proteins and nucleic acids used in X-ray structure determinations and archives the results of microgravity macromolecule crystallization studies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://physics.nist.gov/asd','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://physics.nist.gov/asd"><span id="translatedtitle">Atomic Spectra <span class="hlt">Database</span> (ASD)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra <span class="hlt">Database</span> (ASD) (Web, free access)   This <span class="hlt">database</span> provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JIPM...31..859A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JIPM...31..859A"><span id="translatedtitle">Assignment to <span class="hlt">database</span> industy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Abe, Kohichiroh</p> <p></p> <p>Various kinds of <span class="hlt">databases</span> are considered to be essential part in future large sized systems. Information provision only by <span class="hlt">databases</span> is also considered to be growing as the market becomes mature. This paper discusses how such circumstances have been built and will be developed from now on.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850013932&hterms=oracle&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Doracle','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850013932&hterms=oracle&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Doracle"><span id="translatedtitle">The intelligent <span class="hlt">database</span> machine</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Yancey, K. E.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>The IDM data base was compared with the data base crack to determine whether IDM 500 would better serve the needs of the MSFC data base management system than Oracle. The two were compared and the performance of the IDM was studied. Implementations that work best on which <span class="hlt">database</span> are implicated. The choice is left to the <span class="hlt">database</span> administrator.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Trademarks&pg=6&id=EJ307106','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Trademarks&pg=6&id=EJ307106"><span id="translatedtitle">First Look: TRADEMARKSCAN <span class="hlt">Database</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fernald, Anne Conway; Davidson, Alan B.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>Describes <span class="hlt">database</span> produced by Thomson and Thomson and available on Dialog which contains over 700,000 records representing all active federal trademark registrations and applications for registrations filed in United States Patent and Trademark Office. A typical record, special features, <span class="hlt">database</span> applications, learning to use TRADEMARKSCAN, and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://srdata.nist.gov/CeramicDataPortal/scd','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/CeramicDataPortal/scd"><span id="translatedtitle">Structural Ceramics <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>SRD 30 NIST Structural Ceramics <span class="hlt">Database</span> (Web, free access)   The NIST Structural Ceramics <span class="hlt">Database</span> (WebSCD) provides evaluated materials property data for a wide range of advanced ceramics known variously as structural ceramics, engineering ceramics, and fine ceramics.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_8 --> <div id="page_9" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="161"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100012797','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100012797"><span id="translatedtitle">A Quality System <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Snell, William H.; Turner, Anne M.; Gifford, Luther; Stites, William</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>A quality system <span class="hlt">database</span> (QSD), and software to administer the <span class="hlt">database</span>, were developed to support recording of administrative nonconformance activities that involve requirements for documentation of corrective and/or preventive actions, which can include ISO 9000 internal quality audits and customer complaints.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=import+AND+export&pg=4&id=ED437942','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=import+AND+export&pg=4&id=ED437942"><span id="translatedtitle">Build Your Own <span class="hlt">Database</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Jacso, Peter; Lancaster, F. W.</p> <p></p> <p>This book is intended to help librarians and others to produce <span class="hlt">databases</span> of better value and quality, especially if they have had little previous experience in <span class="hlt">database</span> construction. Drawing upon almost 40 years of experience in the field of information retrieval, this book emphasizes basic principles and approaches rather than in-depth and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=knowledge+AND+discovery&pg=3&id=EJ595481','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=knowledge+AND+discovery&pg=3&id=EJ595481"><span id="translatedtitle">Knowledge Discovery in <span class="hlt">Databases</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Norton, M. Jay</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>Knowledge discovery in <span class="hlt">databases</span> (KDD) revolves around the investigation and creation of knowledge, processes, algorithms, and mechanisms for retrieving knowledge from data collections. The article is an introductory overview of KDD. The rationale and environment of its development and applications are discussed. Issues related to <span class="hlt">database</span> design…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ilthermo.boulder.nist.gov/ILThermo/mainmenu.uix','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://ilthermo.boulder.nist.gov/ILThermo/mainmenu.uix"><span id="translatedtitle">Ionic Liquids <span class="hlt">Database</span>- (ILThermo)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>SRD 147 Ionic Liquids <span class="hlt">Database</span>- (ILThermo) (Web, free access)   IUPAC Ionic Liquids <span class="hlt">Database</span>, ILThermo, is a free web research tool that allows users worldwide to access an up-to-date data collection from the publications on experimental investigations of thermodynamic, and transport properties of ionic liquids as well as binary and ternary mixtures containing ionic liquids.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED314084.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED314084.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> Reviews: Legal Information.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Seiser, Virginia</p> <p></p> <p>Detailed reviews of two legal information <span class="hlt">databases</span>--"Laborlaw I" and "Legal Resource Index"--are presented in this paper. Each <span class="hlt">database</span> review begins with a bibliographic entry listing the title; producer; vendor; cost per hour contact time; offline print cost per citation; time period covered; frequency of updates; and size of file. A detailed…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=540075','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=540075"><span id="translatedtitle">The Diatom EST <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Maheswari, Uma; Montsant, Anton; Goll, Johannes; Krishnasamy, S.; Rajyashri, K. R.; Patell, Villoo Morawala; Bowler, Chris</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>The Diatom EST <span class="hlt">database</span> provides integrated access to expressed sequence tag (EST) data from two eukaryotic microalgae of the class Bacillariophyceae, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana. The <span class="hlt">database</span> currently contains sequences of close to 30?000 ESTs organized into PtDB, the P.tricornutum EST <span class="hlt">database</span>, and TpDB, the T.pseudonana EST <span class="hlt">database</span>. The EST sequences were clustered and assembled into a non-redundant set for each organism, and these non-redundant sequences were then subjected to automated annotation using similarity searches against protein and domain <span class="hlt">databases</span>. EST sequences, clusters of contiguous sequences, their annotation and analysis with reference to the publicly available <span class="hlt">databases</span>, and a codon usage table derived from a subset of sequences from PtDB and TpDB can all be accessed in the Diatom EST <span class="hlt">Database</span>. The underlying RDBMS enables queries over the raw and annotated EST data and retrieval of information through a user-friendly web interface, with options to perform keyword and BLAST searches. The EST data can also be retrieved based on Pfam domains, Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG) and Gene Ontologies (GO) assigned to them by similarity searches. The <span class="hlt">Database</span> is available at http://avesthagen.sznbowler.com. PMID:15608213</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=intermediary+AND+business&pg=7&id=ED245687','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=intermediary+AND+business&pg=7&id=ED245687"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> Searching by Managers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Arnold, Stephen E.</p> <p></p> <p>Managers and executives need the easy and quick access to business and management information that online <span class="hlt">databases</span> can provide, but many have difficulty articulating their search needs to an intermediary. One possible solution would be to encourage managers and their immediate support staff members to search textual <span class="hlt">databases</span> directly as they now…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1230918-bioimaging-database','SCIGOV-ESTSC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1230918-bioimaging-database"><span id="translatedtitle">BioImaging <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/">Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2006-10-25</p> <p>The Biolmaging <span class="hlt">Database</span> (BID) is a relational <span class="hlt">database</span> developed to store the data and meta-data for the 3D gene expression in early Drosophila embryo development on a cellular level. The schema was written to be used with the MySQL DBMS but with minor modifications can be used on any SQL compliant relational DBMS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://xpdb.nist.gov/hivsdb/hivsdb.html','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://xpdb.nist.gov/hivsdb/hivsdb.html"><span id="translatedtitle">HIV Structural <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>SRD 102 HIV Structural <span class="hlt">Database</span> (Web, free access)   The HIV Protease Structural <span class="hlt">Database</span> is an archive of experimentally determined 3-D structures of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1), Human Immunodeficiency Virus 2 (HIV-2) and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Proteases and their complexes with inhibitors or products of substrate cleavage.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Oxford+AND+English+AND+dictionary&pg=2&id=EJ520282','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Oxford+AND+English+AND+dictionary&pg=2&id=EJ520282"><span id="translatedtitle">Dictionary as <span class="hlt">Database</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Painter, Derrick</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>Discussion of dictionaries as <span class="hlt">databases</span> focuses on the digitizing of The Oxford English dictionary (OED) and the use of Standard Generalized Mark-Up Language (SGML). Topics include the creation of a consortium to digitize the OED, document structure, relational <span class="hlt">databases</span>, text forms, sequence, and discourse. (LRW)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2003/0013/','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2003/0013/"><span id="translatedtitle">Cascadia Tsunami Deposit <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Peters, Robert; Jaffe, Bruce; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Peterson, Curt</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>The Cascadia Tsunami Deposit <span class="hlt">Database</span> contains data on the location and sedimentological properties of tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin. Data have been compiled from 52 studies, documenting 59 sites from northern California to Vancouver Island, British Columbia that contain known or potential tsunami deposits. Bibliographical references are provided for all sites included in the <span class="hlt">database</span>. Cascadia tsunami deposits are usually seen as anomalous sand layers in coastal marsh or lake sediments. The studies cited in the <span class="hlt">database</span> use numerous criteria based on sedimentary characteristics to distinguish tsunami deposits from sand layers deposited by other processes, such as river flooding and storm surges. Several studies cited in the <span class="hlt">database</span> contain evidence for more than one tsunami at a site. Data categories include age, thickness, layering, grainsize, and other sedimentological characteristics of Cascadia tsunami deposits. The <span class="hlt">database</span> documents the variability observed in tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14969171','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14969171"><span id="translatedtitle">[Glaucoma Service <span class="hlt">Database</span>].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jamrozy-Witkowska, Agnieszka M; Witkowski, Tomasz; Krzyzanowska, Patrycja</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>We present the common problems related to clinical <span class="hlt">databases</span>. The Glaucoma Service <span class="hlt">Database</span> created in our clinic is an attempt of developing the optimal medical <span class="hlt">database</span>. The system organizes our repository of clinical data. It consist of 3 modules: 1) the users list with predefined privileges and rights, 2) lists of coded data for further use, that facilitate filling in the fields, 3) clinical details of all patients. The user interface of our <span class="hlt">database</span> is very simply, thus it is very easy to use it even by unskilled staff. The accuracy of data is protected by system's internal algorithms. It could be used to investigate clinical epidemiology, risk assessment, post-marketing surveillance of drugs, practice variation and decision analysis. Data from Glaucoma Service <span class="hlt">Database</span> can also help in the management of health service. PMID:14969171</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.3824G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.3824G"><span id="translatedtitle">The Mars Express limbs observations <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gondet, Brigitte; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Montmessin, Franck; Giuranna, Marco; Hoffmann, Harald; Cardesin, Alejandro</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>The capability to orient Mars Express allows a great diversity of observations modes, in particular nadir and limb. During day and night limb's observations, 4 out of 7 MEX instruments (the spectrometers: SPICAM, OMEGA, PFS and the high-resolution camera HRSC) work together to provide spectra (.12 m to 45 m) of the Martian atmosphere, at each altitude step, with the associated image. We will present the limbs <span class="hlt">database</span> of more than 10 years in orbit with striking results (dust and clouds detached layers, day and night <span class="hlt">emissions</span>). The <span class="hlt">database</span> is now accessible to the scientific community via the ESA/PSA website (www.rssd.esa.int/PSA).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/805649','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/805649"><span id="translatedtitle">Hazard Analysis <span class="hlt">Database</span> Report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>GRAMS, W.H.</p> <p>2000-12-28</p> <p>The Hazard Analysis <span class="hlt">Database</span> was developed in conjunction with the hazard analysis activities conducted in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U S . Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, for HNF-SD-WM-SAR-067, Tank Farms Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The FSAR is part of the approved Authorization Basis (AB) for the River Protection Project (RPP). This document describes, identifies, and defines the contents and structure of the Tank Farms FSAR Hazard Analysis <span class="hlt">Database</span> and documents the configuration control changes made to the <span class="hlt">database</span>. The Hazard Analysis <span class="hlt">Database</span> contains the collection of information generated during the initial hazard evaluations and the subsequent hazard and accident analysis activities. The Hazard Analysis <span class="hlt">Database</span> supports the preparation of Chapters 3 ,4 , and 5 of the Tank Farms FSAR and the Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process and consists of two major, interrelated data sets: (1) Hazard Analysis <span class="hlt">Database</span>: Data from the results of the hazard evaluations, and (2) Hazard Topography <span class="hlt">Database</span>: Data from the system familiarization and hazard identification.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3245000','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3245000"><span id="translatedtitle">The NCBI Taxonomy <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Federhen, Scott</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The NCBI Taxonomy <span class="hlt">database</span> (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/taxonomy) is the standard nomenclature and classification repository for the International Nucleotide Sequence <span class="hlt">Database</span> Collaboration (INSDC), comprising the GenBank, ENA (EMBL) and DDBJ <span class="hlt">databases</span>. It includes organism names and taxonomic lineages for each of the sequences represented in the INSDCs nucleotide and protein sequence <span class="hlt">databases</span>. The taxonomy <span class="hlt">database</span> is manually curated by a small group of scientists at the NCBI who use the current taxonomic literature to maintain a phylogenetic taxonomy for the source organisms represented in the sequence <span class="hlt">databases</span>. The taxonomy <span class="hlt">database</span> is a central organizing hub for many of the resources at the NCBI, and provides a means for clustering elements within other domains of NCBI web site, for internal linking between domains of the Entrez system and for linking out to taxon-specific external resources on the web. Our primary purpose is to index the domain of sequences as conveniently as possible for our user community. PMID:22139910</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/798148','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/798148"><span id="translatedtitle">Hazard Analysis <span class="hlt">Database</span> Report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>GAULT, G.W.</p> <p>1999-10-13</p> <p>The Hazard Analysis <span class="hlt">Database</span> was developed in conjunction with the hazard analysis activities conducted in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The FSAR is part of the approved TWRS Authorization Basis (AB). This document describes, identifies, and defines the contents and structure of the TWRS FSAR Hazard Analysis <span class="hlt">Database</span> and documents the configuration control changes made to the <span class="hlt">database</span>. The TWRS Hazard Analysis <span class="hlt">Database</span> contains the collection of information generated during the initial hazard evaluations and the subsequent hazard and accident analysis activities. The <span class="hlt">database</span> supports the preparation of Chapters 3,4, and 5 of the TWRS FSAR and the USQ process and consists of two major, interrelated data sets: (1) Hazard Evaluation <span class="hlt">Database</span>--Data from the results of the hazard evaluations; and (2) Hazard Topography <span class="hlt">Database</span>--Data from the system familiarization and hazard identification.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18592192','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18592192"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> similarity searches.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Plewniak, Frédéric</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>With genome sequencing projects producing huge amounts of sequence data, <span class="hlt">database</span> sequence similarity search has become a central tool in bioinformatics to identify potentially homologous sequences. It is thus widely used as an initial step for sequence characterization and annotation, phylogeny, genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics studies. <span class="hlt">Database</span> similarity search is based upon sequence alignment methods also used in pairwise sequence comparison. Sequence alignment can be global (whole sequence alignment) or local (partial sequence alignment) and there are algorithms to find the optimal alignment given particular comparison criteria. However, as <span class="hlt">database</span> searches require the comparison of the query sequence with every single sequence in the <span class="hlt">database</span>, heuristic algorithms have been designed to reduce the time required to build an alignment that has a reasonable chance to be the best one. Such algorithms have been implemented as fast and efficient programs (Blast, FastA) available in different types to address different kinds of problems. After searching the appropriate <span class="hlt">database</span>, similarity search programs produce a list of similar sequences and local alignments. These results should be carefully examined before coming to any conclusion, as many traps await the similarity seeker: paralogues, multidomain proteins, pseudogenes, etc. This chapter presents points that should always be kept in mind when performing <span class="hlt">database</span> similarity searches for various goals. It ends with a practical example of sequence characterization from a single protein <span class="hlt">database</span> search using Blast. PMID:18592192</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005ESASP.576...67D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005ESASP.576...67D"><span id="translatedtitle">The Gaia Parameter <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Lammers, U.; Perryman, M. A. C.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>The parallel development of many aspects of a complex mission like Gaia, which includes numerous participants in ESA, industrial companies, and a large and active scientific collaboration throughout Europe, makes keeping track of the many design changes, instrument and operational complexities, and numerical values for the data analysis a very challenging problem. A comprehensive, easily-accessible, up-to-date, and definitive compilation of a large range of numerical quantities is required, and the Gaia parameter <span class="hlt">database</span> has been established to satisfy these needs. The <span class="hlt">database</span> is a centralised repository containing, besides mathematical, physical, and astronomical constants, many satellite and subsystem design parameters. At the end of 2004, more than 1600 parameters had been included. Version control has been implemented, providing, next to a `live' version with the most recent parameters, well-defined reference versions of the full <span class="hlt">database</span> contents. The <span class="hlt">database</span> can be queried or browsed using a regular Web browser (http://www.rssd.esa.int/Gaia/paramdb). Query results are formated by default in HTML. Data can also be retrieved as Fortran-77, Fortran-90, Java, ANSIC, C++, or XML structures for direct inclusion into software codes in these languages. The idea is that all collaborating scientists can use the <span class="hlt">database</span> parameters and values, once retrieved, directly linked to computational routines. An off-line access mode is also available, enabling users to automatically download the contents of the <span class="hlt">database</span>. The <span class="hlt">database</span> will be maintained actively, and significant extensions of the contents are planned. Consistent use in the future of the <span class="hlt">database</span> by the Gaia community at large, including all industrial teams, will ensure correct numerical values throughout the complex software systems being built up as details of the Gaia design develop. The <span class="hlt">database</span> is already being used for the telemetry simulation chain in ESTEC, and in the data simulations for GDAAS2.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940011576','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940011576"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> for propagation models</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kantak, Anil V.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>A propagation researcher or a systems engineer who intends to use the results of a propagation experiment is generally faced with various <span class="hlt">database</span> tasks such as the selection of the computer software, the hardware, and the writing of the programs to pass the data through the models of interest. This task is repeated every time a new experiment is conducted or the same experiment is carried out at a different location generating different data. Thus the users of this data have to spend a considerable portion of their time learning how to implement the computer hardware and the software towards the desired end. This situation may be facilitated considerably if an easily accessible propagation <span class="hlt">database</span> is created that has all the accepted (standardized) propagation phenomena models approved by the propagation research community. Also, the handling of data will become easier for the user. Such a <span class="hlt">database</span> construction can only stimulate the growth of the propagation research it if is available to all the researchers, so that the results of the experiment conducted by one researcher can be examined independently by another, without different hardware and software being used. The <span class="hlt">database</span> may be made flexible so that the researchers need not be confined only to the contents of the <span class="hlt">database</span>. Another way in which the <span class="hlt">database</span> may help the researchers is by the fact that they will not have to document the software and hardware tools used in their research since the propagation research community will know the <span class="hlt">database</span> already. The following sections show a possible <span class="hlt">database</span> construction, as well as properties of the <span class="hlt">database</span> for the propagation research.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://icdb.nist.gov','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://icdb.nist.gov"><span id="translatedtitle">International Comparisions <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>International Comparisions <span class="hlt">Database</span> (Web, free access)   The International Comparisons <span class="hlt">Database</span> (ICDB) serves the U.S. and the Inter-American System of Metrology (SIM) with information based on Appendices B (International Comparisons), C (Calibration and Measurement Capabilities) and D (List of Participating Countries) of the Comit� International des Poids et Mesures (CIPM) Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA). The official source of the data is The BIPM key comparison <span class="hlt">database</span>. The ICDB provides access to results of comparisons of measurements and standards organized by the consultative committees of the CIPM and the Regional Metrology Organizations.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JIPM...31...21A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JIPM...31...21A"><span id="translatedtitle">JICST Factual <span class="hlt">Database</span>(2)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Araki, Keisuke</p> <p></p> <p>The computer programme, which builds atom-bond connection tables from nomenclatures, is developed. Chemical substances with their nomenclature and varieties of trivial names or experimental code numbers are inputted. The chemical structures of the <span class="hlt">database</span> are stereospecifically stored and are able to be searched and displayed according to stereochemistry. Source data are from laws and regulations of Japan, RTECS of US and so on. The <span class="hlt">database</span> plays a central role within the integrated fact <span class="hlt">database</span> service of JICST and makes interrelational retrieval possible.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.nist.gov/srd/nist31.cfm','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://www.nist.gov/srd/nist31.cfm"><span id="translatedtitle">Phase Equilibria Diagrams <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>SRD 31 NIST/ACerS Phase Equilibria Diagrams <span class="hlt">Database</span> (PC <span class="hlt">database</span> for purchase) The Phase Equilibria Diagrams <span class="hlt">Database</span> contains commentaries and more than 21,000 diagrams for non-organic systems, including those published in all 21 hard-copy volumes produced as part of the ACerS-NIST Phase Equilibria Diagrams Program (formerly titled Phase Diagrams for Ceramists): Volumes I through XIV (blue books); Annuals 91, 92, 93; High Tc Superconductors I & II; Zirconium & Zirconia Systems; and Electronic Ceramics I. Materials covered include oxides as well as non-oxide systems such as chalcogenides and pnictides, phosphates, salt systems, and mixed systems of these classes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3699145','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3699145"><span id="translatedtitle">Working with Existing <span class="hlt">Databases</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Murphy, Melissa; Alavi, Karim; Maykel, Justin</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Outcomes research has established itself as an integral part of surgical research as physicians and hospitals are increasingly required to demonstrate attainment of performance markers and surgical safety indicators. Large-volume and clinical and administrative <span class="hlt">databases</span> are used to study regional practice pattern variations, health care disparities, and resource utilization. Understanding the unique strengths and limitations of these large <span class="hlt">databases</span> is critical to performing quality surgical outcomes research. In the current work, we review the currently available large-volume <span class="hlt">databases</span> including selection processes, modes of analyses, data application, and limitations. PMID:24436641</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JIPM...31...41S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JIPM...31...41S"><span id="translatedtitle">JICST Factual <span class="hlt">Database</span>(3)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shimura, Kazuki; Abe, Atsushi</p> <p></p> <p>This paper describes the system outline, characteristics and use of JICST Thermophysical and Thermochemical Properties <span class="hlt">Database</span> of which service was started as one part of JICST Factual <span class="hlt">Database</span> System. This system enables to store data of more than 60 kinds of physical or chemical thermal properties. It covers elements, pure substances of inorganic and low molecular organic compounds, and two or three component systems of these compounds. The system is designed to enable to deal with floating decimal point numerical data identifying significant figures, to provide versatile searching supports, and to link its searching to other <span class="hlt">databases</span>. The actual use examples and some points to be careful are also described.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110013611','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110013611"><span id="translatedtitle">Hybrid Terrain <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Arthur, Trey</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>A prototype hybrid terrain <span class="hlt">database</span> is being developed in conjunction with other <span class="hlt">databases</span> and with hardware and software that constitute subsystems of aerospace cockpit display systems (known in the art as synthetic vision systems) that generate images to increase pilots' situation awareness and eliminate poor visibility as a cause of aviation accidents. The basic idea is to provide a clear view of the world around an aircraft by displaying computer-generated imagery derived from an onboard <span class="hlt">database</span> of terrain, obstacle, and airport information.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=61983&keyword=PID&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=62252322&CFTOKEN=31699070','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=61983&keyword=PID&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=62252322&CFTOKEN=31699070"><span id="translatedtitle">THE CTEPP <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The CTEPP (Children's Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Organic Pollutants) <span class="hlt">database</span> contains a wealth of data on children's aggregate exposures to pollutants in their everyday surroundings. Chemical analysis data for the environmental media and ques...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/93534','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/93534"><span id="translatedtitle">ARTI Refrigerant <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Calm, J.M.</p> <p>1995-06-01</p> <p>The Refrigerant <span class="hlt">Database</span> consolidates and facilitates access to information to assist industry in developing equipment using alternative refrigerants. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/35387','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/35387"><span id="translatedtitle">ARTI Refrigerant <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Calm, J.M.</p> <p>1995-02-01</p> <p>The Refrigerant <span class="hlt">Database</span> consolidates and facilitates access to information to assist industry in developing equipment using alternative refrigerants. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase-out of chemical compounds of environmental concern.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2026662','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2026662"><span id="translatedtitle">The PHARMSEARCH <span class="hlt">database</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>O'Hara, M P; Pagis, C</p> <p>1991-02-01</p> <p>PHARMSEARCH, a <span class="hlt">database</span> produced by the French Patent and Trademark Office (INPI), covers pharmaceutical patents issued by the Europeans, French, and United States patent offices from November 1986 onward. PHARMSEARCH is composed of MPHARM, a structure file searchable using Markush DARC software, and PHARM, the companion bibliographic file. Markush structures claimed in the patent documents are entered into the <span class="hlt">database</span> as variable generic structures. Specific structures are also included in the <span class="hlt">database</span>, when they are not part of a Markush structure in the patent document. Chemical index terms describe all moieties of the structure. Indexing also describes the therapeutic activities and preparation processes for the compounds. The indexing policies used in the production of this <span class="hlt">database</span> are described. PMID:2026662</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=211206&keyword=%28American+AND+literature%29&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=58823345&CFTOKEN=72977528','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=211206&keyword=%28American+AND+literature%29&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=58823345&CFTOKEN=72977528"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> Delivers Contaminant Resources</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The US Environmental Protection Agency's Drinking Water Treatability <span class="hlt">Database</span> presents referenced information on the control of contaminants in drinking water. The TDB allows a variety of drinking water professionals to access information gathered from thousands of literature so...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/430886','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/430886"><span id="translatedtitle">Hybrid knowledge- and <span class="hlt">databases</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Taylor, M.</p> <p>1996-12-31</p> <p>In the modern era, <span class="hlt">databases</span> have been created spanning many domains. However, these <span class="hlt">databases</span> do not contain general knowledge about their respective domains. For example, whereas a medical <span class="hlt">database</span> could contain an entry for a patient with some medical disorder, it would not normally contain taxonomic information about medical disorders, known causal agents, symptoms, etc. Collections of this sort of general information are usually called knowledge bases and powerful tools have been developed for querying these collections in complex and flexible ways. The research described in this abstract aims to develop methodologies for merging existing <span class="hlt">databases</span> with knowledge bases, so that the power and flexibility of knowledge base technology can be applied to existing collections of data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1231223-requirements-management-database','SCIGOV-ESTSC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1231223-requirements-management-database"><span id="translatedtitle">Requirements Management <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/">Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2009-08-13</p> <p>This application is a simplified and customized version of the RBA and CTS <span class="hlt">databases</span> to capture federal, site, and facility requirements, link to actions that must be performed to maintain compliance with their contractual and other requirements.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22436747','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22436747"><span id="translatedtitle">Nuclear Science References <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Pritychenko, B.; Běták, E.; Singh, B.; Totans, J.</p> <p>2014-06-15</p> <p>The Nuclear Science References (NSR) <span class="hlt">database</span> together with its associated Web interface, is the world's only comprehensive source of easily accessible low- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics bibliographic information for more than 210,000 articles since the beginning of nuclear science. The weekly-updated NSR <span class="hlt">database</span> provides essential support for nuclear data evaluation, compilation and research activities. The principles of the <span class="hlt">database</span> and Web application development and maintenance are described. Examples of nuclear structure, reaction and decay applications are specifically included. The complete NSR <span class="hlt">database</span> is freely available at the websites of the National Nuclear Data Center (http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (http://www-nds.iaea.org/nsr)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://kinetics.nist.gov/kinetics/','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://kinetics.nist.gov/kinetics/"><span id="translatedtitle">Chemical Kinetics <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>SRD 17 NIST Chemical Kinetics <span class="hlt">Database</span> (Web, free access)   The NIST Chemical Kinetics <span class="hlt">Database</span> includes essentially all reported kinetics results for thermal gas-phase chemical reactions. The <span class="hlt">database</span> is designed to be searched for kinetics data based on the specific reactants involved, for reactions resulting in specified products, for all the reactions of a particular species, or for various combinations of these. In addition, the bibliography can be searched by author name or combination of names. The <span class="hlt">database</span> contains in excess of 38,000 separate reaction records for over 11,700 distinct reactant pairs. These data have been abstracted from over 12,000 papers with literature coverage through early 2000.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7829977','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7829977"><span id="translatedtitle">Enhancing medical <span class="hlt">database</span> security.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pangalos, G; Khair, M; Bozios, L</p> <p>1994-08-01</p> <p>A methodology for the enhancement of <span class="hlt">database</span> security in a hospital environment is presented in this paper which is based on both the discretionary and the mandatory <span class="hlt">database</span> security policies. In this way the advantages of both approaches are combined to enhance medical <span class="hlt">database</span> security. An appropriate classification of the different types of users according to their different needs and roles and a User Role Definition Hierarchy has been used. The experience obtained from the experimental implementation of the proposed methodology in a major general hospital is briefly discussed. The implementation has shown that the combined discretionary and mandatory security enforcement effectively limits the unauthorized access to the medical <span class="hlt">database</span>, without severely restricting the capabilities of the system. PMID:7829977</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10159245','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10159245"><span id="translatedtitle">ARTI Refrigerant <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Calm, J.M.</p> <p>1994-05-27</p> <p>The Refrigerant <span class="hlt">Database</span> consolidates and facilitates access to information to assist industry in developing equipment using alternative refrigerants. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=132598&keyword=diabetes+AND+nutrition&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=58471065&CFTOKEN=22874747','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=132598&keyword=diabetes+AND+nutrition&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=58471065&CFTOKEN=22874747"><span id="translatedtitle">NCCDPHP PUBLICATION <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This <span class="hlt">database</span> provides bibliographic citations and abstracts of publications produced by the CDC's National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP) including journal articles, monographs, book chapters, reports, policy documents, and fact sheets. Full...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18428234','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18428234"><span id="translatedtitle">Human mapping <span class="hlt">databases</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Talbot, C; Cuticchia, A J</p> <p>2001-05-01</p> <p>This unit concentrates on the data contained within two human genome <span class="hlt">databases</span>GDB (Genome <span class="hlt">Database</span>) and OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man)and includes discussion of different methods for submitting and accessing data. An understanding of electronic mail, FTP, and the use of a World Wide Web (WWW) navigational tool such as Netscape or Internet Explorer is a prerequisite for utilizing the information in this unit. PMID:18428234</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940017902','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940017902"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> computing in HEP</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Day, C. T.; Loken, S.; Macfarlane, J. F.; May, E.; Lifka, D.; Lusk, E.; Price, L. E.; Baden, A.; Grossman, R.; Qin, X.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>The major SSC experiments are expected to produce up to 1 Petabyte of data per year each. Once the primary reconstruction is completed by farms of inexpensive processors, I/O becomes a major factor in further analysis of the data. We believe that the application of <span class="hlt">database</span> techniques can significantly reduce the I/O performed in these analyses. We present examples of such I/O reductions in prototypes based on relational and object-oriented <span class="hlt">databases</span> of CDF data samples.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6578125','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6578125"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> computing in HEP</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Day, C.T.; Loken, S.; MacFarlane, J.F. ); May, E.; Lifka, D.; Lusk, E.; Price, L.E. ); Baden, A. . Dept. of Physics); Grossman, R.; Qin, X. . Dept. of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science); Cormell, L.; Leibold, P.; Liu, D</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>The major SSC experiments are expected to produce up to 1 Petabyte of data per year each. Once the primary reconstruction is completed by farms of inexpensive processors. I/O becomes a major factor in further analysis of the data. We believe that the application of <span class="hlt">database</span> techniques can significantly reduce the I/O performed in these analyses. We present examples of such I/O reductions in prototype based on relational and object-oriented <span class="hlt">databases</span> of CDF data samples.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880006454','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19880006454"><span id="translatedtitle">SSME environment <span class="hlt">database</span> development</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Reardon, John</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>The internal environment of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is being determined from hot firings of the prototype engines and from model tests using either air or water as the test fluid. The objectives are to develop a <span class="hlt">database</span> system to facilitate management and analysis of test measurements and results, to enter available data into the the <span class="hlt">database</span>, and to analyze available data to establish conventions and procedures to provide consistency in data normalization and configuration geometry references.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.nist.gov/srd/nist10.cfm','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://www.nist.gov/srd/nist10.cfm"><span id="translatedtitle">Steam Properties <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>SRD 10 NIST/ASME Steam Properties <span class="hlt">Database</span> (PC <span class="hlt">database</span> for purchase)   Based upon the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam (IAPWS) 1995 formulation for the thermodynamic properties of water and the most recent IAPWS formulations for transport and other properties, this updated version provides water properties over a wide range of conditions according to the accepted international standards.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1077565','SCIGOV-DOEDE'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1077565"><span id="translatedtitle">Crude Oil Analysis <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/dataexplorer">DOE Data Explorer</a></p> <p>Shay, Johanna Y.</p> <p></p> <p>The composition and physical properties of crude oil vary widely from one reservoir to another within an oil field, as well as from one field or region to another. Although all oils consist of hydrocarbons and their derivatives, the proportions of various types of compounds differ greatly. This makes some oils more suitable than others for specific refining processes and uses. To take advantage of this diversity, one needs access to information in a large <span class="hlt">database</span> of crude oil analyses. The Crude Oil Analysis <span class="hlt">Database</span> (COADB) currently satisfies this need by offering 9,056 crude oil analyses. Of these, 8,500 are United States domestic oils. The <span class="hlt">database</span> contains results of analysis of the general properties and chemical composition, as well as the field, formation, and geographic location of the crude oil sample. [Taken from the Introduction to COAMDATA_DESC.pdf, part of the zipped software and <span class="hlt">database</span> file at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/<span class="hlt">database</span>.html] Save the zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain PDF documents and a large Excel spreadsheet. It will also contain the <span class="hlt">database</span> in Microsoft Access 2002.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4250581','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4250581"><span id="translatedtitle">The Halophile Protein <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sharma, Naveen; Farooqi, Mohammad Samir; Chaturvedi, Krishna Kumar; Lal, Shashi Bhushan; Grover, Monendra; Rai, Anil; Pandey, Pankaj</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Halophilic archaea/bacteria adapt to different salt concentration, namely extreme, moderate and low. These type of adaptations may occur as a result of modification of protein structure and other changes in different cell organelles. Thus proteins may play an important role in the adaptation of halophilic archaea/bacteria to saline conditions. The Halophile protein <span class="hlt">database</span> (HProtDB) is a systematic attempt to document the biochemical and biophysical properties of proteins from halophilic archaea/bacteria which may be involved in adaptation of these organisms to saline conditions. In this <span class="hlt">database</span>, various physicochemical properties such as molecular weight, theoretical pI, amino acid composition, atomic composition, estimated half-life, instability index, aliphatic index and grand average of hydropathicity (Gravy) have been listed. These physicochemical properties play an important role in identifying the protein structure, bonding pattern and function of the specific proteins. This <span class="hlt">database</span> is comprehensive, manually curated, non-redundant catalogue of proteins. The <span class="hlt">database</span> currently contains 59 897 proteins properties extracted from 21 different strains of halophilic archaea/bacteria. The <span class="hlt">database</span> can be accessed through link. <span class="hlt">Database</span> URL: http://webapp.cabgrid.res.in/protein/ PMID:25468930</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6264003','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6264003"><span id="translatedtitle">Open systems and <span class="hlt">databases</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Martire, G.S. ); Nuttall, D.J.H. )</p> <p>1993-05-01</p> <p>This paper is part of a series of papers invited by the IEEE POWER CONTROL CENTER WORKING GROUP concerning the changing designs of modern control centers. Papers invited by the Working Group discuss the following issues: Benefits of Openness, Criteria for Evaluating Open EMS Systems, Hardware Design, Configuration Management, Security, Project Management, <span class="hlt">Databases</span>, SCADA, Inter- and Intra-System Communications and Man-Machine Interfaces,'' The goal of this paper is to provide an introduction to the issues pertaining to Open Systems and <span class="hlt">Databases</span>.'' The intent is to assist understanding of some of the underlying factors that effect choices that must be made when selecting a <span class="hlt">database</span> system for use in a control room environment. This paper describes and compares the major <span class="hlt">database</span> information models which are in common use for <span class="hlt">database</span> systems and provides an overview of SQL. A case for the control center community to follow the workings of the non-formal standards bodies is presented along with possible uses and the benefits of commercially available <span class="hlt">databases</span> within the control center. The reasons behind the emergence of industry supported standards organizations such as the Open Software Foundation (OSF) and SQL Access are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20050186783','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20050186783"><span id="translatedtitle">Drinking Water <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Murray, ShaTerea R.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>This summer I had the opportunity to work in the Environmental Management Office (EMO) under the Chemical Sampling and Analysis Team or CS&AT. This team s mission is to support Glenn Research Center (GRC) and EM0 by providing chemical sampling and analysis services and expert consulting. Services include sampling and chemical analysis of water, soil, fbels, oils, paint, insulation materials, etc. One of this team s major projects is the Drinking Water Project. This is a project that is done on Glenn s water coolers and ten percent of its sink every two years. For the past two summers an intern had been putting together a <span class="hlt">database</span> for this team to record the test they had perform. She had successfully created a <span class="hlt">database</span> but hadn't worked out all the quirks. So this summer William Wilder (an intern from Cleveland State University) and I worked together to perfect her <span class="hlt">database</span>. We began be finding out exactly what every member of the team thought about the <span class="hlt">database</span> and what they would change if any. After collecting this data we both had to take some courses in Microsoft Access in order to fix the problems. Next we began looking at what exactly how the <span class="hlt">database</span> worked from the outside inward. Then we began trying to change the <span class="hlt">database</span> but we quickly found out that this would be virtually impossible.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1513778K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1513778K"><span id="translatedtitle">Recent developments in Fire <span class="hlt">Emission</span> Monitoring in MACC-II using Fire Radiative Power Observations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kaiser, Johannes W.; Andela, Niels; Heil, Angelika; Paugam, Ronan; Schultz, Martin G.; van der Werf, Guido R.; Wooster, Martin J.; Remy, Samuel</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>We will present the latest developments of the Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS), which has been implemented by the MACC-II project in order to provide accurate fire biomass burning <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates for the real time and retrospective Copernicus/GMES atmospheric monitoring and forecasting services. Accurate fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> have been shown to be a crucial input for air quality forecasts even when satellite-based atmospheric observations are being assimilated. On the other hand, comparisons of the simulated smoke plumes and atmospheric observations provide information on the accuracy of the bottom-up fire <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates. The <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates of GFAS are generally consistent with those of the <span class="hlt">GFED</span> inventory, but they are available with 1-day temporal resoution and in real time. There are also a few small systematic differences between the <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates of the two inventories. The general consistency is achieved by assimilating Fire Radiative Power (FRP) observations from the MODIS instruments, and by a conversion of the daily FRP to dry matter combustion rate that depends on the fire type. <span class="hlt">Emission</span> rates for forty smoke constituents are subsequently calculated from the dry matter combustion rate. The emisson estimates have been validated against atmospheric observations of aerosol optical depth, carbon monoxide, ozone, nitrogen dioxide and formaldehyde using the atmospheric models of MACC. The GFAS data are currently produced with resolutions of 1 day and 0.1 deg, and a time lag of seven hours. They cover the period since January 2003 and are publicly available. In the future, the inclusion of FRP products from the geostationary satellites Meteosat-9, GOES-East, and GOES-West will lead to a finer temporal resolution as well as to an improved accuracy of the daily <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates. Estimates of smoke injection height will also become available</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://cfpub.epa.gov/ncea/iris2/chemicalLanding.cfm?substance_nmbr=395','SCIGOV-IRIS'); return false;" href="https://cfpub.epa.gov/ncea/iris2/chemicalLanding.cfm?substance_nmbr=395"><span id="translatedtitle">Coke oven <span class="hlt">emissions</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.epa.gov/iris">Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Coke oven <span class="hlt">emissions</span> ; CASRN NA Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS <span class="hlt">database</span> only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3013653','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3013653"><span id="translatedtitle">Indian genetic disease <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pradhan, Sanchari; Sengupta, Mainak; Dutta, Anirban; Bhattacharyya, Kausik; Bag, Sumit K.; Dutta, Chitra; Ray, Kunal</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Indians, representing about one-sixth of the world population, consist of several thousands of endogamous groups with strong potential for excess of recessive diseases. However, no <span class="hlt">database</span> is available on Indian population with comprehensive information on the diseases common in the country. To address this issue, we present Indian Genetic Disease <span class="hlt">Database</span> (IGDD) release 1.0 (http://www.igdd.iicb.res.in)an integrated and curated repository of growing number of mutation data on common genetic diseases afflicting the Indian populations. Currently the <span class="hlt">database</span> covers 52 diseases with information on 5760 individuals carrying the mutant alleles of causal genes. Information on locus heterogeneity, type of mutation, clinical and biochemical data, geographical location and common mutations are furnished based on published literature. The <span class="hlt">database</span> is currently designed to work best with Internet Explorer 8 (optimal resolution 1440??900) and it can be searched based on disease of interest, causal gene, type of mutation and geographical location of the patients or carriers. Provisions have been made for deposition of new data and logistics for regular updation of the <span class="hlt">database</span>. The IGDD web portal, planned to be made freely available, contains user-friendly interfaces and is expected to be highly useful to the geneticists, clinicians, biologists and patient support groups of various genetic diseases. PMID:21037256</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21037256','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21037256"><span id="translatedtitle">Indian genetic disease <span class="hlt">database</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pradhan, Sanchari; Sengupta, Mainak; Dutta, Anirban; Bhattacharyya, Kausik; Bag, Sumit K; Dutta, Chitra; Ray, Kunal</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Indians, representing about one-sixth of the world population, consist of several thousands of endogamous groups with strong potential for excess of recessive diseases. However, no <span class="hlt">database</span> is available on Indian population with comprehensive information on the diseases common in the country. To address this issue, we present Indian Genetic Disease <span class="hlt">Database</span> (IGDD) release 1.0 (http://www.igdd.iicb.res.in)--an integrated and curated repository of growing number of mutation data on common genetic diseases afflicting the Indian populations. Currently the <span class="hlt">database</span> covers 52 diseases with information on 5760 individuals carrying the mutant alleles of causal genes. Information on locus heterogeneity, type of mutation, clinical and biochemical data, geographical location and common mutations are furnished based on published literature. The <span class="hlt">database</span> is currently designed to work best with Internet Explorer 8 (optimal resolution 1440 900) and it can be searched based on disease of interest, causal gene, type of mutation and geographical location of the patients or carriers. Provisions have been made for deposition of new data and logistics for regular updation of the <span class="hlt">database</span>. The IGDD web portal, planned to be made freely available, contains user-friendly interfaces and is expected to be highly useful to the geneticists, clinicians, biologists and patient support groups of various genetic diseases. PMID:21037256</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/303939','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/303939"><span id="translatedtitle">ADANS <span class="hlt">database</span> specification</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p></p> <p>1997-01-16</p> <p>The purpose of the Air Mobility Command (AMC) Deployment Analysis System (ADANS) <span class="hlt">Database</span> Specification (DS) is to describe the <span class="hlt">database</span> organization and storage allocation and to provide the detailed data model of the physical design and information necessary for the construction of the parts of the <span class="hlt">database</span> (e.g., tables, indexes, rules, defaults). The DS includes entity relationship diagrams, table and field definitions, reports on other <span class="hlt">database</span> objects, and a description of the ADANS data dictionary. ADANS is the automated system used by Headquarters AMC and the Tanker Airlift Control Center (TACC) for airlift planning and scheduling of peacetime and contingency operations as well as for deliberate planning. ADANS also supports planning and scheduling of Air Refueling Events by the TACC and the unit-level tanker schedulers. ADANS receives input in the form of movement requirements and air refueling requests. It provides a suite of tools for planners to manipulate these requirements/requests against mobility assets and to develop, analyze, and distribute schedules. Analysis tools are provided for assessing the products of the scheduling subsystems, and editing capabilities support the refinement of schedules. A reporting capability provides formatted screen, print, and/or file outputs of various standard reports. An interface subsystem handles message traffic to and from external systems. The <span class="hlt">database</span> is an integral part of the functionality summarized above.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110014936','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110014936"><span id="translatedtitle">NASA Records <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Callac, Christopher; Lunsford, Michelle</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>The NASA Records <span class="hlt">Database</span>, comprising a Web-based application program and a <span class="hlt">database</span>, is used to administer an archive of paper records at Stennis Space Center. The system begins with an electronic form, into which a user enters information about records that the user is sending to the archive. The form is smart : it provides instructions for entering information correctly and prompts the user to enter all required information. Once complete, the form is digitally signed and submitted to the <span class="hlt">database</span>. The system determines which storage locations are not in use, assigns the user s boxes of records to some of them, and enters these assignments in the <span class="hlt">database</span>. Thereafter, the software tracks the boxes and can be used to locate them. By use of search capabilities of the software, specific records can be sought by box storage locations, accession numbers, record dates, submitting organizations, or details of the records themselves. Boxes can be marked with such statuses as checked out, lost, transferred, and destroyed. The system can generate reports showing boxes awaiting destruction or transfer. When boxes are transferred to the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), the system can automatically fill out NARA records-transfer forms. Currently, several other NASA Centers are considering deploying the NASA Records <span class="hlt">Database</span> to help automate their records archives.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22700314','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22700314"><span id="translatedtitle">Using the reactome <span class="hlt">database</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Haw, Robin; Stein, Lincoln</p> <p>2012-06-01</p> <p>There is considerable interest in the bioinformatics community in creating pathway <span class="hlt">databases</span>. The Reactome project (a collaboration between the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, New York University Medical Center, and the European Bioinformatics Institute) is one such pathway <span class="hlt">database</span> and collects structured information on all the biological pathways and processes in the human. It is an expert-authored and peer-reviewed, curated collection of well-documented molecular reactions that span the gamut from simple intermediate metabolism to signaling pathways and complex cellular events. This information is supplemented with likely orthologous molecular reactions in mouse, rat, zebrafish, worm, and other model organisms. This unit describes how to use the Reactome <span class="hlt">database</span> to learn the steps of a biological pathway; navigate and browse through the Reactome <span class="hlt">database</span>; identify the pathways in which a molecule of interest is involved; use the Pathway and Expression analysis tools to search the <span class="hlt">database</span> for and visualize possible connections within user-supplied experimental data set and Reactome pathways; and the Species Comparison tool to compare human and model organism pathways. PMID:22700314</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20110015595&hterms=database&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Ddatabase','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20110015595&hterms=database&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Ddatabase"><span id="translatedtitle">Shuttle Hypervelocity Impact <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hyde, James L.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Lear, Dana M.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>With three missions outstanding, the Shuttle Hypervelocity Impact <span class="hlt">Database</span> has nearly 3000 entries. The data is divided into tables for crew module windows, payload bay door radiators and thermal protection system regions, with window impacts compromising just over half the records. In general, the <span class="hlt">database</span> provides dimensions of hypervelocity impact damage, a component level location (i.e., window number or radiator panel number) and the orbiter mission when the impact occurred. Additional detail on the type of particle that produced the damage site is provided when sampling data and definitive analysis results are available. Details and insights on the contents of the <span class="hlt">database</span> including examples of descriptive statistics will be provided. Post flight impact damage inspection and sampling techniques that were employed during the different observation campaigns will also be discussed. Potential enhancements to the <span class="hlt">database</span> structure and availability of the data for other researchers will be addressed in the Future Work section. A related <span class="hlt">database</span> of returned surfaces from the International Space Station will also be introduced.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110008185','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110008185"><span id="translatedtitle">Shuttle Hypervelocity Impact <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hyde, James I.; Christiansen, Eric I.; Lear, Dana M.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>With three flights remaining on the manifest, the shuttle impact hypervelocity <span class="hlt">database</span> has over 2800 entries. The data is currently divided into tables for crew module windows, payload bay door radiators and thermal protection system regions, with window impacts compromising just over half the records. In general, the <span class="hlt">database</span> provides dimensions of hypervelocity impact damage, a component level location (i.e., window number or radiator panel number) and the orbiter mission when the impact occurred. Additional detail on the type of particle that produced the damage site is provided when sampling data and definitive analysis results are available. The paper will provide details and insights on the contents of the <span class="hlt">database</span> including examples of descriptive statistics using the impact data. A discussion of post flight impact damage inspection and sampling techniques that were employed during the different observation campaigns will be presented. Future work to be discussed will be possible enhancements to the <span class="hlt">database</span> structure and availability of the data for other researchers. A related <span class="hlt">database</span> of ISS returned surfaces that are under development will also be introduced.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3427849','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3427849"><span id="translatedtitle">Using the Reactome <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Haw, Robin</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>There is considerable interest in the bioinformatics community in creating pathway <span class="hlt">databases</span>. The Reactome project (a collaboration between the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, New York University Medical Center and the European Bioinformatics Institute) is one such pathway <span class="hlt">database</span> and collects structured information on all the biological pathways and processes in the human. It is an expert-authored and peer-reviewed, curated collection of well-documented molecular reactions that span the gamut from simple intermediate metabolism to signaling pathways and complex cellular events. This information is supplemented with likely orthologous molecular reactions in mouse, rat, zebrafish, worm and other model organisms. This unit describes how to use the Reactome <span class="hlt">database</span> to learn the steps of a biological pathway; navigate and browse through the Reactome <span class="hlt">database</span>; identify the pathways in which a molecule of interest is involved; use the Pathway and Expression analysis tools to search the <span class="hlt">database</span> for and visualize possible connections within user-supplied experimental data set and Reactome pathways; and the Species Comparison tool to compare human and model organism pathways. PMID:22700314</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70044355','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70044355"><span id="translatedtitle">FishTraits <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Angermeier, Paul L.; Frimpong, Emmanuel A.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The need for integrated and widely accessible sources of species traits data to facilitate studies of ecology, conservation, and management has motivated development of traits <span class="hlt">databases</span> for various taxa. In spite of the increasing number of traits-based analyses of freshwater fishes in the United States, no consolidated <span class="hlt">database</span> of traits of this group exists publicly, and much useful information on these species is documented only in obscure sources. The largely inaccessible and unconsolidated traits information makes large-scale analysis involving many fishes and/or traits particularly challenging. FishTraits is a <span class="hlt">database</span> of >100 traits for 809 (731 native and 78 exotic) fish species found in freshwaters of the conterminous United States, including 37 native families and 145 native genera. The <span class="hlt">database</span> contains information on four major categories of traits: (1) trophic ecology, (2) body size and reproductive ecology (life history), (3) habitat associations, and (4) salinity and temperature tolerances. Information on geographic distribution and conservation status is also included. Together, we refer to the traits, distribution, and conservation status information as attributes. Descriptions of attributes are available here. Many sources were consulted to compile attributes, including state and regional species accounts and other <span class="hlt">databases</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930020049&hterms=Database+Management+System&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3DDatabase%2BManagement%2BSystem','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930020049&hterms=Database+Management+System&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3DDatabase%2BManagement%2BSystem"><span id="translatedtitle">VIEWCACHE: An incremental <span class="hlt">database</span> access method for autonomous interoperable <span class="hlt">databases</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Roussopoulos, Nick; Sellis, Timoleon</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>The objective is to illustrate the concept of incremental access to distributed <span class="hlt">databases</span>. An experimental <span class="hlt">database</span> management system, ADMS, which has been developed at the University of Maryland, in College Park, uses VIEWCACHE, a <span class="hlt">database</span> access method based on incremental search. VIEWCACHE is a pointer-based access method that provides a uniform interface for accessing distributed <span class="hlt">databases</span> and catalogues. The compactness of the pointer structures formed during <span class="hlt">database</span> browsing and the incremental access method allow the user to search and do inter-<span class="hlt">database</span> cross-referencing with no actual data movement between <span class="hlt">database</span> sites. Once the search is complete, the set of collected pointers pointing to the desired data are dereferenced.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14..786B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012EGUGA..14..786B"><span id="translatedtitle">Open Geoscience <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bashev, A.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>Currently there is an enormous amount of various geoscience <span class="hlt">databases</span>. Unfortunately the only users of the majority of the <span class="hlt">databases</span> are their elaborators. There are several reasons for that: incompaitability, specificity of tasks and objects and so on. However the main obstacles for wide usage of geoscience <span class="hlt">databases</span> are complexity for elaborators and complication for users. The complexity of architecture leads to high costs that block the public access. The complication prevents users from understanding when and how to use the <span class="hlt">database</span>. Only <span class="hlt">databases</span>, associated with GoogleMaps don't have these drawbacks, but they could be hardly named "geoscience" Nevertheless, open and simple geoscience <span class="hlt">database</span> is necessary at least for educational purposes (see our abstract for ESSI20/EOS12). We developed a <span class="hlt">database</span> and web interface to work with them and now it is accessible at maps.sch192.ru. In this <span class="hlt">database</span> a result is a value of a parameter (no matter which) in a station with a certain position, associated with metadata: the date when the result was obtained; the type of a station (lake, soil etc); the contributor that sent the result. Each contributor has its own profile, that allows to estimate the reliability of the data. The results can be represented on GoogleMaps space image as a point in a certain position, coloured according to the value of the parameter. There are default colour scales and each registered user can create the own scale. The results can be also extracted in *.csv file. For both types of representation one could select the data by date, object type, parameter type, area and contributor. The data are uploaded in *.csv format: Name of the station; Lattitude(dd.dddddd); Longitude(ddd.dddddd); Station type; Parameter type; Parameter value; Date(yyyy-mm-dd). The contributor is recognised while entering. This is the minimal set of features that is required to connect a value of a parameter with a position and see the results. All the complicated data treatment could be conducted in other programs after extraction the filtered data into *.csv file. It makes the <span class="hlt">database</span> understandable for non-experts. The <span class="hlt">database</span> employs open data format (*.csv) and wide spread tools: PHP as the program language, MySQL as <span class="hlt">database</span> management system, JavaScript for interaction with GoogleMaps and JQueryUI for create user interface. The <span class="hlt">database</span> is multilingual: there are association tables, which connect with elements of the <span class="hlt">database</span>. In total the development required about 150 hours. The <span class="hlt">database</span> still has several problems. The main problem is the reliability of the data. Actually it needs an expert system for estimation the reliability, but the elaboration of such a system would take more resources than the <span class="hlt">database</span> itself. The second problem is the problem of stream selection - how to select the stations that are connected with each other (for example, belong to one water stream) and indicate their sequence. Currently the interface is English and Russian. However it can be easily translated to your language. But some problems we decided. For example problem "the problem of the same station" (sometimes the distance between stations is smaller, than the error of position): when you adding new station to the <span class="hlt">database</span> our application automatically find station near this place. Also we decided problem of object and parameter type (how to regard "EC" and "electrical conductivity" as the same parameter). This problem has been solved using "associative tables". If you would like to see the interface on your language, just contact us. We should send you the list of terms and phrases for translation on your language. The main advantage of the <span class="hlt">database</span> is that it is totally open: everybody can see, extract the data from the <span class="hlt">database</span> and use them for non-commercial purposes with no charge. Registered users can contribute to the <span class="hlt">database</span> without getting paid. We hope, that it will be widely used first of all for education purposes, but professional scientists could use it also.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8072337','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8072337"><span id="translatedtitle">Medical <span class="hlt">database</span> security evaluation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pangalos, G J</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Users of medical information systems need confidence in the security of the system they are using. They also need a method to evaluate and compare its security capabilities. Every system has its own requirements for maintaining confidentiality, integrity and availability. In order to meet these requirements a number of security functions must be specified covering areas such as access control, auditing, error recovery, etc. Appropriate confidence in these functions is also required. The 'trust' in trusted computer systems rests on their ability to prove that their secure mechanisms work as advertised and cannot be disabled or diverted. The general framework and requirements for medical <span class="hlt">database</span> security and a number of parameters of the evaluation problem are presented and discussed. The problem of <span class="hlt">database</span> security evaluation is then discussed, and a number of specific proposals are presented, based on a number of existing medical <span class="hlt">database</span> security systems. PMID:8072337</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/827391','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/827391"><span id="translatedtitle">National Ambient Radiation <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Dziuban, J.; Sears, R.</p> <p>2003-02-25</p> <p>The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently developed a searchable <span class="hlt">database</span> and website for the Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System (ERAMS) data. This site contains nationwide radiation monitoring data for air particulates, precipitation, drinking water, surface water and pasteurized milk. This site provides location-specific as well as national information on environmental radioactivity across several media. It provides high quality data for assessing public exposure and environmental impacts resulting from nuclear emergencies and provides baseline data during routine conditions. The <span class="hlt">database</span> and website are accessible at www.epa.gov/enviro/. This site contains (1) a query for the general public which is easy to use--limits the amount of information provided, but includes the ability to graph the data with risk benchmarks and (2) a query for a more technical user which allows access to all of the data in the <span class="hlt">database</span>, (3) background information on ER AMS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996IJT....17..223T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996IJT....17..223T"><span id="translatedtitle">The DIPPR <span class="hlt">databases</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Thomson, G. H.</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>The Design Institute for Physical Property Data (DIPPR), one of the Sponsored Research groups of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), has been in existence for 15 years and has supported a total of 14 projects, some completed, some ongoing. Four of these projects are <span class="hlt">database</span> projects for which the primary product is a <span class="hlt">database</span> of carefully evaluated property data. These projects are Data Compilation; Evaluated Data on Mixtures; Environmental, Safety, and Health Data Compilation; and Difusivities and Thermal Properties of Polymer Solutions. This paper lists the existing DIPPR projects; discusses DIPPR's structure and modes of dissemination of results; describes DIPPR's supporters and its unique characteristics; and finally, discusses the origin, nature, and content of the four <span class="hlt">database</span> projects.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006SPD....37.0120S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006SPD....37.0120S"><span id="translatedtitle">Coronal Loop <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Scott, Jason; Martens, P.</p> <p>2006-06-01</p> <p>We have created a <span class="hlt">database</span> of all coronal loops for which we have been able to find measurements in the published open literature, from Skylab to TRACE. The loops and a set of their physical parameters are stored in the form of an IDL structure. The physical parameters considered are: the loop half length, the electron density of the loop, and the loop temperature. The studies that produced the physical parameters along with their observing instruments are recorded in the <span class="hlt">database</span> as well. Correlations of pressure vs. temperature and heating rates vs. loop length are investigated. Instrumental selection effects are also considered. The loop parameters and correlations derived from the loop <span class="hlt">database</span> are then compared to theoretical and numerical models for scaling laws and heating rates.This work is supported by NASA GSRP fellowship NNG05GK64H</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10153986','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10153986"><span id="translatedtitle">ARTI Refrigerant <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Calm, J.M.</p> <p>1992-04-30</p> <p>The Refrigerant <span class="hlt">Database</span> consolidates and facilitates access to information to assist industry in developing equipment using alternative refrigerants. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern. The <span class="hlt">database</span> provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air- conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The complete documents are not included, though some may be added at a later date. The <span class="hlt">database</span> identifies sources of specific information on R-32, R-123, R-124, R- 125, R-134a, R-141b, R142b, R-143a, R-152a, R-290 (propane), R-717 (ammonia), ethers, and others as well as azeotropic and zeotropic blends of these fluids. It addresses polyalkylene glycol (PAG), ester, and other lubricants. It also references documents addressing compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4702860','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4702860"><span id="translatedtitle">Mouse genome <span class="hlt">database</span> 2016</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The Mouse Genome <span class="hlt">Database</span> (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism <span class="hlt">database</span> for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the <span class="hlt">database</span>, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24639157','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24639157"><span id="translatedtitle">An introduction to RNA <span class="hlt">databases</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hoeppner, Marc P; Barquist, Lars E; Gardner, Paul P</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>We present an introduction to RNA <span class="hlt">databases</span>. The history and technology behind RNA <span class="hlt">databases</span> are briefly discussed. We examine differing methods of data collection and curation and discuss their impact on both the scope and accuracy of the resulting <span class="hlt">databases</span>. Finally, we demonstrate these principles through detailed examination of four leading RNA <span class="hlt">databases</span>: Noncode, miRBase, Rfam, and SILVA. PMID:24639157</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1885851','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1885851"><span id="translatedtitle">The Genopolis Microarray <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Splendiani, Andrea; Brandizi, Marco; Even, Gael; Beretta, Ottavio; Pavelka, Norman; Pelizzola, Mattia; Mayhaus, Manuel; Foti, Maria; Mauri, Giancarlo; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Background Gene expression <span class="hlt">databases</span> are key resources for microarray data management and analysis and the importance of a proper annotation of their content is well understood. Public repositories as well as microarray <span class="hlt">database</span> systems that can be implemented by single laboratories exist. However, there is not yet a tool that can easily support a collaborative environment where different users with different rights of access to data can interact to define a common highly coherent content. The scope of the Genopolis <span class="hlt">database</span> is to provide a resource that allows different groups performing microarray experiments related to a common subject to create a common coherent knowledge base and to analyse it. The Genopolis <span class="hlt">database</span> has been implemented as a dedicated system for the scientific community studying dendritic and macrophage cells functions and host-parasite interactions. Results The Genopolis <span class="hlt">Database</span> system allows the community to build an object based MIAME compliant annotation of their experiments and to store images, raw and processed data from the Affymetrix GeneChip platform. It supports dynamical definition of controlled vocabularies and provides automated and supervised steps to control the coherence of data and annotations. It allows a precise control of the visibility of the <span class="hlt">database</span> content to different sub groups in the community and facilitates exports of its content to public repositories. It provides an interactive users interface for data analysis: this allows users to visualize data matrices based on functional lists and sample characterization, and to navigate to other data matrices defined by similarity of expression values as well as functional characterizations of genes involved. A collaborative environment is also provided for the definition and sharing of functional annotation by users. Conclusion The Genopolis <span class="hlt">Database</span> supports a community in building a common coherent knowledge base and analyse it. This fills a gap between a local <span class="hlt">database</span> and a public repository, where the development of a common coherent annotation is important. In its current implementation, it provides a uniform coherently annotated dataset on dendritic cells and macrophage differentiation. PMID:17430566</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020086972','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020086972"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> Management System</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>In 1981 Wayne Erickson founded Microrim, Inc, a company originally focused on marketing a microcomputer version of RIM (Relational Information Manager). Dennis Comfort joined the firm and is now vice president, development. The team developed an advanced spinoff from the NASA system they had originally created, a microcomputer <span class="hlt">database</span> management system known as R:BASE 4000. Microrim added many enhancements and developed a series of R:BASE products for various environments. R:BASE is now the second largest selling line of microcomputer <span class="hlt">database</span> management software in the world.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMGC43A1037M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMGC43A1037M"><span id="translatedtitle">Future fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> associated with projected land use change in Indonesia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Marlier, M. E.; DeFries, R. S.; Pennington, D.; Ordway, E.; Nelson, E.; Mickley, L.; Koplitz, S.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Indonesia has experienced rapid land use change in past decades as forests and peatlands are cleared for agricultural development, including oil palm and timber plantations1. Fires are the predominant method of clearing and the subsequent <span class="hlt">emissions</span> can have important public health impacts by contributing to regional particulate matter and ozone concentrations2. This regional haze was dramatically seen in Singapore during June 2013 due to the transport of <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from fires in Sumatra. Our study is part of a larger project that will quantify the public health impact of various land use development scenarios for Sumatra over the coming decades. Here, we describe how we translate economic projections of land use change into future fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> inventories for GEOS-Chem atmospheric transport simulations. We relate past <span class="hlt">GFED</span>3 fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span>3 to detailed 1-km land use change data and MODIS fire radiative power observations, and apply these relationships to future estimates of land use change. The goal of this interdisciplinary project is to use modeling results to interact with policy makers and influence development strategies in ways that protect public health. 1Miettinen et al. 2011. Deforestation rates in insular Southeast Asia between 2000 and 2010. Glob. Change Biol.,17 (7), 2261-2270. 2Marlier et al. 2013. El Nio and health risks from landscape fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in southeast Asia. Nature Clim. Change, 3, 131-136. 3van der Werf et al. 2010. Global fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> and the contribution of deforestation, savanna, forest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997-2009). Atmos. Chem. Physics, 10 (23), 11707-11735.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JPhCS.396e2034G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JPhCS.396e2034G"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">DataBase</span> on Demand</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gaspar Aparicio, R.; Gomez, D.; Coterillo Coz, I.; Wojcik, D.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>At CERN a number of key <span class="hlt">database</span> applications are running on user-managed MySQL <span class="hlt">database</span> services. The <span class="hlt">database</span> on demand project was born out of an idea to provide the CERN user community with an environment to develop and run <span class="hlt">database</span> services outside of the actual centralised Oracle based <span class="hlt">database</span> services. The <span class="hlt">Database</span> on Demand (DBoD) empowers the user to perform certain actions that had been traditionally done by <span class="hlt">database</span> administrators, DBA's, providing an enterprise platform for <span class="hlt">database</span> applications. It also allows the CERN user community to run different <span class="hlt">database</span> engines, e.g. presently open community version of MySQL and single instance Oracle <span class="hlt">database</span> server. This article describes a technology approach to face this challenge, a service level agreement, the SLA that the project provides, and an evolution of possible scenarios.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=23876&keyword=server&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=64499374&CFTOKEN=60807669','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=23876&keyword=server&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=64499374&CFTOKEN=60807669"><span id="translatedtitle">GENERAL PERMITS <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><B>Resource Purpose:</B>This <span class="hlt">database</span> was used to provide permit writers with a library of examples for writing general permits. It has not been maintained and is outdated and will be removed. Water Permits Division is trying to determine whether or not to recreate this databas...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1077656','SCIGOV-DOEDE'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1077656"><span id="translatedtitle">High Performance Buildings <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/dataexplorer">DOE Data Explorer</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The High Performance Buildings <span class="hlt">Database</span> is a shared resource for the building industry, a unique central repository of in-depth information and data on high-performance, green building projects across the United States and abroad. The <span class="hlt">database</span> includes information on the energy use, environmental performance, design process, finances, and other aspects of each project. Members of the design and construction teams are listed, as are sources for additional information. In total, up to twelve screens of detailed information are provided for each project profile. Projects range in size from small single-family homes or tenant fit-outs within buildings to large commercial and institutional buildings and even entire campuses. The <span class="hlt">database</span> is a data repository as well. A series of Web-based data-entry templates allows anyone to enter information about a building project into the <span class="hlt">database</span>. Once a project has been submitted, each of the partner organizations can review the entry and choose whether or not to publish that particular project on its own Web site.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1231634-redis-database-administration-tool','SCIGOV-ESTSC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1231634-redis-database-administration-tool"><span id="translatedtitle">Redis <span class="hlt">database</span> administration tool</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/">Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-02-13</p> <p>MyRedis is a product of the Lorenz subproject under the ASC Scirntific Data Management effort. MyRedis is a web based utility designed to allow easy administration of instances of Redis <span class="hlt">databases</span>. It can be usedd to view and manipulate data as well as run commands directly against a variety of different Redis hosts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=23832&keyword=oracle&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=57982578&CFTOKEN=52387540','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=23832&keyword=oracle&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=57982578&CFTOKEN=52387540"><span id="translatedtitle">NATIONAL CONTAMINANT OCCURRENCE <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><B>Resource Purpose:</B>Under the 1996 Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments, EPA is to assemble a National Drinking Water Occurrence <span class="hlt">Database</span> (NCOD) by August 1999. The NCOD is a collection of data of documented quality on unregulated and regulated chemical, radiological, microbia...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=23869&keyword=oracle&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=57982578&CFTOKEN=52387540','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=23869&keyword=oracle&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=57982578&CFTOKEN=52387540"><span id="translatedtitle">NATIONAL ASSESSMENT <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span> (NAD)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><B>Resource Purpose:</B>The National Assessment <span class="hlt">Database</span> stores State water quality assessments that are reported under Section 305(b) of the Clean Water Act. The data are stored by individual water quality assessments. Threatened, partially and not supporting waters also have da...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1020899','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1020899"><span id="translatedtitle">The CEBAF Element <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Theodore Larrieu, Christopher Slominski, Michele Joyce</p> <p>2011-03-01</p> <p>With the inauguration of the CEBAF Element <span class="hlt">Database</span> (CED) in Fall 2010, Jefferson Lab computer scientists have taken a step toward the eventual goal of a model-driven accelerator. Once fully populated, the <span class="hlt">database</span> will be the primary repository of information used for everything from generating lattice decks to booting control computers to building controls screens. A requirement influencing the CED design is that it provide access to not only present, but also future and past configurations of the accelerator. To accomplish this, an introspective <span class="hlt">database</span> schema was designed that allows new elements, types, and properties to be defined on-the-fly with no changes to table structure. Used in conjunction with Oracle Workspace Manager, it allows users to query data from any time in the <span class="hlt">database</span> history with the same tools used to query the present configuration. Users can also check-out workspaces to use as staging areas for upcoming machine configurations. All Access to the CED is through a well-documented Application Programming Interface (API) that is translated automatically from original C++ source code into native libraries for scripting languages such as perl, php, and TCL making access to the CED easy and ubiquitous.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=relational+AND+database&pg=5&id=EJ461624','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=relational+AND+database&pg=5&id=EJ461624"><span id="translatedtitle">MARC and Relational <span class="hlt">Databases</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Llorens, Jose; Trenor, Asuncion</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Discusses the use of MARC format in relational <span class="hlt">databases</span> and addresses problems of incompatibilities. A solution is presented that is in accordance with Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) standards and is based on experiences at the library of the Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain). (four references) (EA)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=146337','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=146337"><span id="translatedtitle">WHITHER BIOLOGICAL <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span> RESEARCH?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>We consider how the landscape of biological <span class="hlt">databases</span> may evolve in the future, and what research is needed to realize this evolution. We suggest today's dispersal of diverse resources will only increase as the number and size of those resources, driving the need for semantic interoperability even ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Weathering&pg=2&id=EJ722738','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Weathering&pg=2&id=EJ722738"><span id="translatedtitle">Weathering <span class="hlt">Database</span> Technology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Snyder, Robert</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Collecting weather data is a traditional part of a meteorology unit at the middle level. However, making connections between the data and weather conditions can be a challenge. One way to make these connections clearer is to enter the data into a <span class="hlt">database</span>. This allows students to quickly compare different fields of data and recognize which…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://physics.nist.gov/diatomic','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://physics.nist.gov/diatomic"><span id="translatedtitle">Diatomic Spectral <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>SRD 114 Diatomic Spectral <span class="hlt">Database</span> (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 121 diatomic molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty, and reference are given for each transition reported.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=217615','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=217615"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Databases</span> and data mining</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Over the course of the past decade, the breadth of information that is made available through online resources for plant biology has increased astronomically, as have the interconnectedness among <span class="hlt">databases</span>, online tools, and methods of data acquisition and analysis. For maize researchers, the numbe...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20050000704&hterms=1048&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3D%2526%25231048','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20050000704&hterms=1048&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3D%2526%25231048"><span id="translatedtitle">The Ribosomal <span class="hlt">Database</span> Project</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Olsen, G. J.; Overbeek, R.; Larsen, N.; Marsh, T. L.; McCaughey, M. J.; Maciukenas, M. A.; Kuan, W. M.; Macke, T. J.; Xing, Y.; Woese, C. R.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>The Ribosomal <span class="hlt">Database</span> Project (RDP) complies ribosomal sequences and related data, and redistributes them in aligned and phylogenetically ordered form to its user community. It also offers various software packages for handling, analyzing and displaying sequences. In addition, the RDP offers (or will offer) certain analytic services. At present the project is in an intermediate stage of development.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=142352&keyword=effects+AND+language&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=60192766&CFTOKEN=70535969','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=142352&keyword=effects+AND+language&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=60192766&CFTOKEN=70535969"><span id="translatedtitle">ECOREGION SPATIAL <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This spatial <span class="hlt">database</span> contains boundaries and attributes describing Level III ecoregions in EPA Region 8. The ecoregions shown here have been derived from Omernik (1987) and from refinements of Omernik's framework that have been made for other projects. These ongoing or re...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=meteorology&pg=2&id=EJ722738','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=meteorology&pg=2&id=EJ722738"><span id="translatedtitle">Weathering <span class="hlt">Database</span> Technology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Snyder, Robert</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Collecting weather data is a traditional part of a meteorology unit at the middle level. However, making connections between the data and weather conditions can be a challenge. One way to make these connections clearer is to enter the data into a <span class="hlt">database</span>. This allows students to quickly compare different fields of data and recognize which</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6062396','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6062396"><span id="translatedtitle">The ADAMS <span class="hlt">database</span> language</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Pfaltz, J.L.; French, J.C.; Grimshaw, A.; Son, Sang H.; Baron, P.; Janet, S.; Kim, A.; Klumpp, C.; Lin, Yi; Lloyd, L.</p> <p>1989-02-28</p> <p>ADAMS provides a mechanism for applications programs, written in many languages, to define and access common persistent <span class="hlt">databases</span>. The basic constructs are element, class, set, map, attribute and codomain. From these the user may define new data structures and new data classes belonging to a semantic hierarchy that supports multiple inheritance. 7 refs., 2 figs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=190436','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=190436"><span id="translatedtitle">Cotton Marker <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>To address the lack of available molecular markers for cotton, Cotton Incorporated has spearheaded an initiative to create the Cotton Microsatellite <span class="hlt">Database</span> (CMD), and several groups are actively involved in projects to generate, screen and map cotton molecular markers. CMD is a centralized databas...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15319051','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15319051"><span id="translatedtitle">Prototype <span class="hlt">database</span> for telerehabilitation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kaur, Kawaljeet; Forducey, Pamela G; Glueckauf, Robert L</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Telerehabilitation is a promising alternative health-care delivery system, but currently lacks broad-based empirical support for the efficacy and cost utility of its interventions. This article describes the development of a <span class="hlt">database</span> at INTEGRIS Jim Thorpe Rehabilitation Center (IJTRC) that will link the delivery of telerehabilitation services, reimbursement, and outcomes evaluation. The <span class="hlt">database</span> is a culmination of the combined efforts of administrators, clinicians, and information technology professionals. Feasibility of the project was first established from technical, economic, and organizational perspectives. The current workflow and documentation processes were analyzed and enhanced. This was followed by data modeling and design of the <span class="hlt">database</span> architecture in terms of network, security, scalability, and system specification. A prototype was created in Microsoft Access with the final product planned in Structured Query Language (SQL) with a front-end in JAVA JSP. The initial results with the <span class="hlt">database</span> have been encouraging in terms of increased efficacy and security, process streamlining, error reduction, and collection of comprehensive standardized data for statistical analysis of clinical and research outcomes. PMID:15319051</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://physics.nist.gov/hydrocarbon','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://physics.nist.gov/hydrocarbon"><span id="translatedtitle">Hydrocarbon Spectral <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>SRD 115 Hydrocarbon Spectral <span class="hlt">Database</span> (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 91 hydrocarbon molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20809527','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20809527"><span id="translatedtitle">LQTS gene LOVD <span class="hlt">database</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Tao; Moss, Arthur; Cong, Peikuan; Pan, Min; Chang, Bingxi; Zheng, Liangrong; Fang, Quan; Zareba, Wojciech; Robinson, Jennifer; Lin, Changsong; Li, Zhongxiang; Wei, Junfang; Zeng, Qiang; Qi, Ming</p> <p>2010-11-01</p> <p>The Long QT Syndrome (LQTS) is a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders that predisposes young individuals to ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death. LQTS is mainly caused by mutations in genes encoding subunits of cardiac ion channels (KCNQ1, KCNH2,SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2). Many other genes involved in LQTS have been described recently(KCNJ2, AKAP9, ANK2, CACNA1C, SCNA4B, SNTA1, and CAV3). We created an online <span class="hlt">database</span>(http://www.genomed.org/LOVD/introduction.html) that provides information on variants in LQTS-associated genes. As of February 2010, the <span class="hlt">database</span> contains 1738 unique variants in 12 genes. A total of 950 variants are considered pathogenic, 265 are possible pathogenic, 131 are unknown/unclassified, and 292 have no known pathogenicity. In addition to these mutations collected from published literature, we also submitted information on gene variants, including one possible novel pathogenic mutation in the KCNH2 splice site found in ten Chinese families with documented arrhythmias. The remote user is able to search the data and is encouraged to submit new mutations into the <span class="hlt">database</span>. The LQTS <span class="hlt">database</span> will become a powerful tool for both researchers and clinicians. PMID:20809527</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=142412&keyword=pesticide+AND+database&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=49617646&CFTOKEN=30033941','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=142412&keyword=pesticide+AND+database&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=49617646&CFTOKEN=30033941"><span id="translatedtitle">PESTICIDE USE REPORT <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This dataset summarizes pesticide use in California for year 1990-96 as extracted from the Pesticide Use Report (PUR) by county. The PUR is a comprehensive <span class="hlt">database</span> of Pesticide Use in the state of California supplied by the DPR (California Department of Pesticide Regulation).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/"><span id="translatedtitle">Household Products <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... etc... Advanced Search Auto Products Inside the Home Pesticides Landscape/Yard Personal Care Home Maintenance Arts & Crafts Pet Care Home Office Commercial / Institutional Product Names Types of Products Manufacturers Ingredients About the <span class="hlt">Database</span> FAQ Product Recalls Help Glossary Contact Us More ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=23829&keyword=web+AND+security&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=49679826&CFTOKEN=27181170','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=23829&keyword=web+AND+security&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=49679826&CFTOKEN=27181170"><span id="translatedtitle">NATIONAL NUTRIENTS <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><B>Resource Purpose:</B>The Nutrient Criteria Program has initiated development of a National relational <span class="hlt">database</span> application that will be used to store and analyze nutrient data. The ultimate use of these data will be to derive ecoregion- and waterbody-specific numeric nutrient...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=2896&keyword=hydrosphere&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=55030748&CFTOKEN=73179444','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=2896&keyword=hydrosphere&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=55030748&CFTOKEN=73179444"><span id="translatedtitle">ENVIRONMENTAL FATE <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span> (ENVIROFATE)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The Environmental Fate <span class="hlt">Database</span> contains more than 13,000 records of information on the environmental fate or behavior (i.e., transport and degradation) of approximately 800 chemical released into the environment. Chemicals selected for inclusion are produced in quantities exceed...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://physics.nist.gov/triatomic','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://physics.nist.gov/triatomic"><span id="translatedtitle">Triatomic Spectral <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>SRD 117 Triatomic Spectral <span class="hlt">Database</span> (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 55 triatomic molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFMOS62B0259P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFMOS62B0259P"><span id="translatedtitle">Visual Palaeomagnetic <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pisarevsky, S.</p> <p>2002-12-01</p> <p>The Global Palaeomagnetic <span class="hlt">Database</span> (GPMDB) created and developed by McElhinny and Lock (1991, 1996) is used by researchers all over the world. The user-friendly interface makes it unnecessary for users to learn about details of the Microsoft Access software. The next step in the development of these <span class="hlt">databases</span> lies in the visualisation of data and in the integration of the palaeomagnetic data with Geographical Information Systems (GIS). One of the most popular GIS software among Earth scientists is ArcView. Due to the relative simplicity of the structure of the GPMDB it quite easy to integrate palaeomagnetic data into GIS. It is just necessary to prepare a <span class="hlt">database</span> file in DBASE format (using the export option of the Microsoft Access, for example) and then to create a subsequent graphic theme (layer) in ArcView. The wide variety of ArcView options enable the use of graduated colours, labels, and different symbols to emphasise ages, palaeomagnetic directions, or other data features. Palaeomagnetic data may be combined with the geological, tectonic, and other maps using a variety of spherical projections. Palaeomagnetic data may be easily integrated into other GIS-oriented <span class="hlt">databases</span>, such as geochronological <span class="hlt">databases</span>. In addition to all "traditional" services known for the GPMDB users, such as queries, ArcView and supplementary Avenue scripts provide many new possibilities. For example, it is very easy now to choose data from a particular polygon (e.g. craton, terrane, orogenic belt etc.). Users of the new visual <span class="hlt">database</span> also can "instantly" create a stereoplot for any selected data subset and to calculate mean directions and palaeopoles. It is also possible to display palaeopoles for the selected group of data and to reconstruct a palaeoposition of the continental block using these poles, or Euler pole of rotation. There are obvious advantages of using the visual <span class="hlt">database</span>. For example, if there are some errors in the geographical position of some data, in many cases it is easy to find them. It is much easier now to test tectonic hypotheses. For instance, it is possible to compare data from two adjacent terranes to decide the time of their collision.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20050186583&hterms=seventeen&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dseventeen','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20050186583&hterms=seventeen&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dseventeen"><span id="translatedtitle">JDD, Inc. <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Miller, David A., Jr.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>JDD Inc, is a maintenance and custodial contracting company whose mission is to provide their clients in the private and government sectors "quality construction, construction management and cleaning services in the most efficient and cost effective manners, (JDD, Inc. Mission Statement)." This company provides facilities support for Fort Riley in Fo,rt Riley, Kansas and the NASA John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field here in Cleveland, Ohio. JDD, Inc. is owned and operated by James Vaughn, who started as painter at NASA Glenn and has been working here for the past seventeen years. This summer I worked under Devan Anderson, who is the safety manager for JDD Inc. in the Logistics and Technical Information Division at Glenn Research Center The LTID provides all transportation, secretarial, security needs and contract management of these various services for the center. As a safety manager, my mentor provides Occupational Health and Safety Occupation (OSHA) compliance to all JDD, Inc. employees and handles all other issues (Environmental Protection Agency issues, workers compensation, safety and health training) involving to job safety. My summer assignment was not as considered "groundbreaking research" like many other summer interns have done in the past, but it is just as important and beneficial to JDD, Inc. I initially created a <span class="hlt">database</span> using a Microsoft Excel program to classify and categorize data pertaining to numerous safety training certification courses instructed by our safety manager during the course of the fiscal year. This early portion of the <span class="hlt">database</span> consisted of only data (training field index, employees who were present at these training courses and who was absent) from the training certification courses. Once I completed this phase of the <span class="hlt">database</span>, I decided to expand the <span class="hlt">database</span> and add as many dimensions to it as possible. Throughout the last seven weeks, I have been compiling more data from day to day operations and been adding the information to the <span class="hlt">database</span>. It now consists of seven different categories of data (carpet cleaning, forms, NASA Event Schedules, training certifications, wall and vent cleaning, work schedules, and miscellaneous) . I also did some field inspecting with the supervisors around the site and was present at all of the training certification courses that have been scheduled since June 2004. My future outlook for the JDD, Inc. <span class="hlt">database</span> is to have all of company s information from future contract proposals, weekly inventory, to employee timesheets all in this same <span class="hlt">database</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..1211459B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010EGUGA..1211459B"><span id="translatedtitle">The AMMA <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Boichard, Jean-Luc; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Cloche, Sophie; Eymard, Laurence; Fleury, Laurence; Mastrorillo, Laurence; Moulaye, Oumarou; Ramage, Karim</p> <p>2010-05-01</p> <p>The AMMA project includes aircraft, ground-based and ocean measurements, an intensive use of satellite data and diverse modelling studies. Therefore, the AMMA <span class="hlt">database</span> aims at storing a great amount and a large variety of data, and at providing the data as rapidly and safely as possible to the AMMA research community. In order to stimulate the exchange of information and collaboration between researchers from different disciplines or using different tools, the <span class="hlt">database</span> provides a detailed description of the products and uses standardized formats. The AMMA <span class="hlt">database</span> contains: - AMMA field campaigns datasets; - historical data in West Africa from 1850 (operational networks and previous scientific programs); - satellite products from past and future satellites, (re-)mapped on a regular latitude/longitude grid and stored in NetCDF format (CF Convention); - model outputs from atmosphere or ocean operational (re-)analysis and forecasts, and from research simulations. The outputs are processed as the satellite products are. Before accessing the data, any user has to sign the AMMA data and publication policy. This chart only covers the use of data in the framework of scientific objectives and categorically excludes the redistribution of data to third parties and the usage for commercial applications. Some collaboration between data producers and users, and the mention of the AMMA project in any publication is also required. The AMMA <span class="hlt">database</span> and the associated on-line tools have been fully developed and are managed by two teams in France (IPSL <span class="hlt">Database</span> Centre, Paris and OMP, Toulouse). Users can access data of both data centres using an unique web portal. This website is composed of different modules : - Registration: forms to register, read and sign the data use chart when an user visits for the first time - Data access interface: friendly tool allowing to build a data extraction request by selecting various criteria like location, time, parameters... The request can concern local, satellite and model data. - Documentation: catalogue of all the available data and their metadata. These tools have been developed using standard and free languages and softwares: - Linux system with an Apache web server and a Tomcat application server; - J2EE tools : JSF and Struts frameworks, hibernate; - relational <span class="hlt">database</span> management systems: PostgreSQL and MySQL; - OpenLDAP directory. In order to facilitate the access to the data by African scientists, the complete system has been mirrored at AGHRYMET Regional Centre in Niamey and is operational there since January 2009. Users can now access metadata and request data through one or the other of two equivalent portals: http://<span class="hlt">database</span>.amma-international.org or http://amma.agrhymet.ne/amma-data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFMOS62B0261K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002AGUFMOS62B0261K"><span id="translatedtitle">PMAG: Relational <span class="hlt">Database</span> Definition</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Keizer, P.; Koppers, A.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Genevey, A.; Staudigel, H.; Helly, J.</p> <p>2002-12-01</p> <p>The Scripps center for Physical and Chemical Earth References (PACER) was established to help create <span class="hlt">databases</span> for reference data and make them available to the Earth science community. As part of these efforts PACER supports GERM, REM and PMAG and maintains multiple online <span class="hlt">databases</span> under the http://earthref.org umbrella website. This website has been built on top of a relational <span class="hlt">database</span> that allows for the archiving and electronic access to a great variety of data types and formats, permitting data queries using a wide range of metadata. These online <span class="hlt">databases</span> are designed in Oracle 8.1.5 and they are maintained at the San Diego Supercomputer Center. They are directly available via http://earthref.org/<span class="hlt">databases</span>/. A prototype of the PMAG relational <span class="hlt">database</span> is now operational within the existing EarthRef.org framework under http://earthref.org/<span class="hlt">databases</span>/PMAG/. As will be shown in our presentation, the PMAG design focuses around the general workflow that results in the determination of typical paleo-magnetic analyses. This ensures that individual data points can be traced between the actual analysis and the specimen, sample, site, locality and expedition it belongs to. These relations guarantee traceability of the data by distinguishing between original and derived data, where the actual (raw) measurements are performed on the specimen level, and data on the sample level and higher are then derived products in the <span class="hlt">database</span>. These relations may also serve to recalculate site means when new data becomes available for that locality. The PMAG data records are extensively described in terms of metadata. These metadata are used when scientists search through this online <span class="hlt">database</span> in order to view and download their needed data. They minimally include method descriptions for field sampling, laboratory techniques and statistical analyses. They also include selection criteria used during the interpretation of the data and, most importantly, critical information about the site location (latitude, longitude, elevation), geography (continent, country, region), geological setting (lithospheric plate or block, tectonic setting), geological age (age range, timescale name, stratigraphic position) and materials (rock type, classification, alteration state). Each data point and method description is also related to its peer-reviewed reference [citation ID] as archived in the EarthRef Reference <span class="hlt">Database</span> (ERR). This guarantees direct traceability all the way to its original source, where the user can find the bibliography of each PMAG reference along with every abstract, data table, technical note and/or appendix that are available in digital form and that can be downloaded as PDF/JPEG images and Microsoft Excel/Word data files. This may help scientists and teachers in performing their research since they have easy access to all the scientific data. It also allows for checking potential errors during the digitization process. Please visit the PMAG website at http://earthref.org/PMAG/ for more information.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2886898','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2886898"><span id="translatedtitle">Tautomerism in large <span class="hlt">databases</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sitzmann, Markus; Ihlenfeldt, Wolf-Dietrich</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>We have used the Chemical Structure <span class="hlt">DataBase</span> (CSDB) of the NCI CADD Group, an aggregated collection of over 150 small-molecule <span class="hlt">databases</span> totaling 103.5 million structure records, to conduct tautomerism analyses on one of the largest currently existing sets of real (i.e. not computer-generated) compounds. This analysis was carried out using calculable chemical structure identifiers developed by the NCI CADD Group, based on hash codes available in the chemoinformatics toolkit CACTVS and a newly developed scoring scheme to define a canonical tautomer for any encountered structure. CACTVSs tautomerism definition, a set of 21 transform rules expressed in SMIRKS line notation, was used, which takes a comprehensive stance as to the possible types of tautomeric interconversion included. Tautomerism was found to be possible for more than 2/3 of the unique structures in the CSDB. A total of 680 million tautomers were calculated from, and including, the original structure records. Tautomerism overlap within the same individual <span class="hlt">database</span> (i.e. at least one other entry was present that was really only a different tautomeric representation of the same compound) was found at an average rate of 0.3% of the original structure records, with values as high as nearly 2% for some of the <span class="hlt">databases</span> in CSDB. Projected onto the set of unique structures (by FICuS identifier), this still occurred in about 1.5% of the cases. Tautomeric overlap across all constituent <span class="hlt">databases</span> in CSDB was found for nearly 10% of the records in the collection. PMID:20512400</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JIPM...33..237A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JIPM...33..237A"><span id="translatedtitle">JICST Factual <span class="hlt">Database</span>JICST Chemical Substance Safety Regulation <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Abe, Atsushi; Sohma, Tohru</p> <p></p> <p>JICST Chemical Substance Safety Regulation <span class="hlt">Database</span> is based on the <span class="hlt">Database</span> of Safety Laws for Chemical Compounds constructed by Japan Chemical Industry Ecology-Toxicology & Information Center (JETOC) sponsored by the Sience and Technology Agency in 1987. JICST has modified JETOC <span class="hlt">database</span> system, added data and started the online service through JOlS-F (JICST Online Information Service-Factual <span class="hlt">database</span>) in January 1990. JICST <span class="hlt">database</span> comprises eighty-three laws and fourteen hundred compounds. The authors outline the <span class="hlt">database</span>, data items, files and search commands. An example of online session is presented.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFMIN41A0066R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007AGUFMIN41A0066R"><span id="translatedtitle">The GLIMS Glacier <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Raup, B. H.; Khalsa, S. S.; Armstrong, R.</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>The Global Land Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) project has built a geospatial and temporal <span class="hlt">database</span> of glacier data, composed of glacier outlines and various scalar attributes. These data are being derived primarily from satellite imagery, such as from ASTER and Landsat. Each "snapshot" of a glacier is from a specific time, and the <span class="hlt">database</span> is designed to store multiple snapshots representative of different times. We have implemented two web-based interfaces to the <span class="hlt">database</span>; one enables exploration of the data via interactive maps (web map server), while the other allows searches based on text-field constraints. The web map server is an Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) compliant Web Map Server (WMS) and Web Feature Server (WFS). This means that other web sites can display glacier layers from our site over the Internet, or retrieve glacier features in vector format. All components of the system are implemented using Open Source software: Linux, PostgreSQL, PostGIS (geospatial extensions to the <span class="hlt">database</span>), MapServer (WMS and WFS), and several supporting components such as Proj.4 (a geographic projection library) and PHP. These tools are robust and provide a flexible and powerful framework for web mapping applications. As a service to the GLIMS community, the <span class="hlt">database</span> contains metadata on all ASTER imagery acquired over glacierized terrain. Reduced-resolution of the images (browse imagery) can be viewed either as a layer in the MapServer application, or overlaid on the virtual globe within Google Earth. The interactive map application allows the user to constrain by time what data appear on the map. For example, ASTER or glacier outlines from 2002 only, or from Autumn in any year, can be displayed. The system allows users to download their selected glacier data in a choice of formats. The results of a query based on spatial selection (using a mouse) or text-field constraints can be downloaded in any of these formats: ESRI shapefiles, KML (Google Earth), MapInfo, GML (Geography Markup Language) and GMT (Generic Mapping Tools). This "clip-and-ship" function allows users to download only the data they are interested in. Our flexible web interfaces to the <span class="hlt">database</span>, which includes various support layers (e.g. a layer to help collaborators identify satellite imagery over their region of expertise) will facilitate enhanced analysis to be undertaken on glacier systems, their distribution, and their impacts on other Earth systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=132707&keyword=AI&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=55577433&CFTOKEN=98060520','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=132707&keyword=AI&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=55577433&CFTOKEN=98060520"><span id="translatedtitle">NATIVE HEALTH <span class="hlt">DATABASES</span>: NATIVE HEALTH RESEARCH <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span> (NHRD)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The Native Health <span class="hlt">Databases</span> contain bibliographic information and abstracts of health-related articles, reports, surveys, and other resource documents pertaining to the health and health care of American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Canadian First Nations. The <span class="hlt">databases</span> provide i...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=132626&keyword=hiv&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=55736744&CFTOKEN=61083757','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=132626&keyword=hiv&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=55736744&CFTOKEN=61083757"><span id="translatedtitle">NATIVE HEALTH <span class="hlt">DATABASES</span>: NATIVE HEALTH HISTORY <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span> (NHHD)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The Native Health <span class="hlt">Databases</span> contain bibliographic information and abstracts of health-related articles, reports, surveys, and other resource documents pertaining to the health and health care of American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Canadian First Nations. The <span class="hlt">databases</span> provide i...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8170012','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8170012"><span id="translatedtitle">Facial plastic surgery <span class="hlt">database</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mendelsohn, M; Conrad, K</p> <p>1994-02-01</p> <p>Every facial plastic surgeon accumulates a vast library of professional slides and photographs that document his work. Manual cataloguing of the clinical and operative documentation is time consuming and provides limited analysis capabilities. The facial plastic surgery <span class="hlt">database</span> is a state-of-the-art computer programme that allows the surgeon to sort and locate slides and photographs. Designed for the computer novice, it utilises a simple coding system to permit rapid data input. The codes can be tailored to allow for new procedures or alternative practice styles. There are sophisticated searching routines to quickly find slides and photographs based on any combination of patients and operative criteria. The <span class="hlt">database</span> also includes an online colour atlas and workspace for recording of presentations. There are automated routines to analyse patients' clinical features, operative trends, and surgical results. Ultimately, examination of this data can be used to facilitate peer review, research, and self-education. PMID:8170012</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21255675','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21255675"><span id="translatedtitle">THE EXTRAGALACTIC DISTANCE <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Tully, R. Brent; Courtois, Helene M.; Jacobs, Bradley A.; Rizzi, Luca; Shaya, Edward J.; Makarov, Dmitry I.</p> <p>2009-08-15</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">database</span> can be accessed on the Web at http://edd.ifa.hawaii.edu that was developed to promote access to information related to galaxy distances. The <span class="hlt">database</span> has three functional components. First, tables from many literature sources have been gathered and enhanced with links through a distinct galaxy naming convention. Second, comparisons of results both at the levels of parameters and of techniques have begun and are continuing, leading to increasing homogeneity and consistency of distance measurements. Third, new material is presented arising from ongoing observational programs at the University of Hawaii 2.2 m telescope, radio telescopes at Green Bank, Arecibo, and Parkes and with the Hubble Space Telescope. This new observational material is made available in tandem with related material drawn from archives and passed through common analysis pipelines.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10114201','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10114201"><span id="translatedtitle">ARTI Refrigerant <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Calm, J.M.</p> <p>1992-11-09</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">database</span> provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air- conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The <span class="hlt">database</span> identifies sources of specific information on R-32, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134, R-134a, R-141b, R-142b, R-143a, R-152a, R-245ca, R-290 (propane), R- 717 (ammonia), ethers, and others as well as azeotropic and zeotropic and zeotropic blends of these fluids. It addresses lubricants including alkylbenzene, polyalkylene glycol, ester, and other synthetics as well as mineral oils. It also references documents on compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits. A computerized version is available that includes retrieval software.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/204229','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/204229"><span id="translatedtitle">ARTI refrigerant <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Calm, J.M.</p> <p>1996-01-15</p> <p>The Refrigerant <span class="hlt">Database</span> is an information system on alternative refrigerants, associated lubricants, and their use in air conditioning and refrigeration. it consolidates and facilitates.access to property, compatibility, environmental, safety, application and other information. It provides corresponding information on older refrigerants, to assist manufacturers and those using alternative refrigerants, to make comparisons and determine differences. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3683745','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3683745"><span id="translatedtitle">Clinical Genomic <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Solomon, Benjamin D.; Nguyen, Anh-Dao; Bear, Kelly A.; Wolfsberg, Tyra G.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Technological advances have greatly increased the availability of human genomic sequencing. However, the capacity to analyze genomic data in a clinically meaningful way lags behind the ability to generate such data. To help address this obstacle, we reviewed all conditions with genetic causes and constructed the Clinical Genomic <span class="hlt">Database</span> (CGD) (http://research.nhgri.nih.gov/CGD/), a searchable, freely Web-accessible <span class="hlt">database</span> of conditions based on the clinical utility of genetic diagnosis and the availability of specific medical interventions. The CGD currently includes a total of 2,616 genes organized clinically by affected organ systems and interventions (including preventive measures, disease surveillance, and medical or surgical interventions) that could be reasonably warranted by the identification of pathogenic mutations. To aid independent analysis and optimize new data incorporation, the CGD also includes all genetic conditions for which genetic knowledge may affect the selection of supportive care, informed medical decision-making, prognostic considerations, reproductive decisions, and allow avoidance of unnecessary testing, but for which specific interventions are not otherwise currently available. For each entry, the CGD includes the gene symbol, conditions, allelic conditions, clinical categorization (for both manifestations and interventions), mode of inheritance, affected age group, description of interventions/rationale, links to other complementary <span class="hlt">databases</span>, including <span class="hlt">databases</span> of variants and presumed pathogenic mutations, and links to PubMed references (>20,000). The CGD will be regularly maintained and updated to keep pace with scientific discovery. Further content-based expert opinions are actively solicited. Eventually, the CGD may assist the rapid curation of individual genomes as part of active medical care. PMID:23696674</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=102440','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=102440"><span id="translatedtitle">MEROPS: the peptidase <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rawlings, Neil D.; Barrett, Alan J.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Important additions have been made to the MEROPS <span class="hlt">database</span> (http://www.bi.bbsrc.ac.uk/Merops/Merops.htm ). These include sequence alignments and cladograms for many of the families of peptidases, and these have proved very helpful in the difficult task of distinguishing the sequences of peptidases that are simply species variants of already known enzymes from those that represent novel enzymes. PMID:10592261</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JIPM...33..489F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JIPM...33..489F"><span id="translatedtitle">Real Time Baseball <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fukue, Yasuhiro</p> <p></p> <p>The author describes the system outline, features and operations of "Nikkan Sports Realtime Basaball <span class="hlt">Database</span>" which was developed and operated by Nikkan Sports Shimbun, K. K. The system enables to input numerical data of professional baseball games as they proceed simultaneously, and execute data updating at realtime, just-in-time. Other than serving as supporting tool for prepareing newspapers it is also available for broadcasting media, general users through NTT dial Q2 and others.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/418455','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/418455"><span id="translatedtitle">ARTI refrigerant <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Calm, J.M.</p> <p>1996-11-15</p> <p>The Refrigerant <span class="hlt">Database</span> is an information system on alternative refrigerants, associated lubricants, and their use in air conditioning and refrigeration. It consolidates and facilitates access to property, compatibility, environmental, safety, application and other information. It provides corresponding information on older refrigerants, to assist manufacturers and those using alternative refrigerants, to make comparisons and determine differences. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/366496','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/366496"><span id="translatedtitle">ARTI refrigerant <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Calm, J.M.</p> <p>1996-07-01</p> <p>The Refrigerant <span class="hlt">Database</span> is an information system on alternative refrigerants, associated lubricants, and their use in air conditioning and refrigeration. It consolidates and facilitates access to property, compatibility, environmental, safety, application and other information. It provides corresponding information on older refrigerants, to assist manufacturers and those using alternative refrigerants, to make comparisons and determine differences. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/334263','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/334263"><span id="translatedtitle">ARTI refrigerant <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Calm, J.M.</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>The Refrigerant <span class="hlt">Database</span> is an information system on alternative refrigerants, associated lubricants, and their use in air conditioning and refrigeration. It consolidates and facilities access to property, compatibility, environmental, safety, application and other information. It provides corresponding information on older refrigerants, to assist manufacturers and those using alternative refrigerants, to make comparisons and determine differences. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015A%26A...582A..68E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015A%26A...582A..68E"><span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">database</span> of circumstellar OH masers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Engels, D.; Bunzel, F.</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>We present a new <span class="hlt">database</span> of circumstellar OH masers at 1612, 1665, and 1667 MHz in the Milky Way galaxy. The <span class="hlt">database</span> (version 2.4) contains 13 655 observations and 2341 different stars detected in at least one transition. Detections at 1612 MHz are considered to be complete until the end of 2014 as long as they were published in refereed papers. Detections of the main lines (1665 and 1667 MHz) and non-detections in all transitions are included only if published after 1983. The <span class="hlt">database</span> contains flux densities and velocities of the two strongest maser peaks, the expansion velocity of the shell, and the radial velocity of the star. Links are provided for about 100 stars (<5% of all stars with OH masers) to interferometric observations and monitoring programs of the maser <span class="hlt">emission</span> published since their beginnings in the 1970s. Access to the <span class="hlt">database</span> is possible over the Web (http://www.hs.uni-hamburg.de/maserdb), allowing cone searches for individual sources and lists of sources. A general search is possible in selected regions of the sky and by defining ranges of flux densities and/or velocities. Alternative ways to access the data are via the German Virtual Observatory and the CDS. The data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/582/A68</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4254674','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4254674"><span id="translatedtitle">Human cancer <span class="hlt">databases</span> (Review)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>PAVLOPOULOU, ATHANASIA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; MICHALOPOULOS, IOANNIS</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Cancer is one of the four major non-communicable diseases (NCD), responsible for ~14.6% of all human deaths. Currently, there are >100 different known types of cancer and >500 genes involved in cancer. Ongoing research efforts have been focused on cancer etiology and therapy. As a result, there is an exponential growth of cancer-associated data from diverse resources, such as scientific publications, genome-wide association studies, gene expression experiments, gene-gene or protein-protein interaction data, enzymatic assays, epigenomics, immunomics and cytogenetics, stored in relevant repositories. These data are complex and heterogeneous, ranging from unprocessed, unstructured data in the form of raw sequences and polymorphisms to well-annotated, structured data. Consequently, the storage, mining, retrieval and analysis of these data in an efficient and meaningful manner pose a major challenge to biomedical investigators. In the current review, we present the central, publicly accessible <span class="hlt">databases</span> that contain data pertinent to cancer, the resources available for delivering and analyzing information from these <span class="hlt">databases</span>, as well as <span class="hlt">databases</span> dedicated to specific types of cancer. Examples for this wealth of cancer-related information and bioinformatic tools have also been provided. PMID:25369839</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4516778','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4516778"><span id="translatedtitle">Curcumin Resource <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kumar, Anil; Chetia, Hasnahana; Sharma, Swagata; Kabiraj, Debajyoti; Talukdar, Narayan Chandra; Bora, Utpal</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Curcumin is one of the most intensively studied diarylheptanoid, Curcuma longa being its principal producer. This apart, a class of promising curcumin analogs has been generated in laboratories, aptly named as Curcuminoids which are showing huge potential in the fields of medicine, food technology, etc. The lack of a universal source of data on curcumin as well as curcuminoids has been felt by the curcumin research community for long. Hence, in an attempt to address this stumbling block, we have developed Curcumin Resource <span class="hlt">Database</span> (CRDB) that aims to perform as a gateway-cum-repository to access all relevant data and related information on curcumin and its analogs. Currently, this <span class="hlt">database</span> encompasses 1186 curcumin analogs, 195 molecular targets, 9075 peer reviewed publications, 489 patents and 176 varieties of C. longa obtained by extensive data mining and careful curation from numerous sources. Each data entry is identified by a unique CRDB ID (identifier). Furnished with a user-friendly web interface and in-built search engine, CRDB provides well-curated and cross-referenced information that are hyperlinked with external sources. CRDB is expected to be highly useful to the researchers working on structure as well as ligand-based molecular design of curcumin analogs. <span class="hlt">Database</span> URL: http://www.crdb.in PMID:26220923</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/226034','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/226034"><span id="translatedtitle">ARTI refrigerant <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Calm, J.M.</p> <p>1996-04-15</p> <p>The Refrigerant <span class="hlt">Database</span> is an information system on alternative refrigerants, associated lubricants, and their use in air conditioning and refrigeration. It consolidates and facilitates access to property, compatibility, environmental, safety, application and other information. It provides corresponding information on older refrigerants, to assist manufacturers and those using alternative refrigerants, to make comparisons and determine differences. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern. The <span class="hlt">database</span> provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The complete documents are not included, though some may be added at a later date. The <span class="hlt">database</span> identifies sources of specific information on refrigerants. It addresses lubricants including alkylbenzene, polyalkylene glycol, polyolester, and other synthetics as well as mineral oils. It also references documents addressing compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits. Incomplete citations or abstracts are provided for some documents. They are included to accelerate availability of the information and will be completed or replaced in future updates. Citations in this report are divided into the following topics: thermophysical properties; materials compatibility; lubricants and tribology; application data; safety; test and analysis methods; impacts; regulatory actions; substitute refrigerants; identification; absorption and adsorption; research programs; and miscellaneous documents. Information is also presented on ordering instructions for the computerized version.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17991683','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17991683"><span id="translatedtitle">MEROPS: the peptidase <span class="hlt">database</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rawlings, Neil D; Morton, Fraser R; Kok, Chai Yin; Kong, Jun; Barrett, Alan J</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Peptidases (proteolytic enzymes or proteases), their substrates and inhibitors are of great relevance to biology, medicine and biotechnology. The MEROPS <span class="hlt">database</span> (http://merops.sanger.ac.uk) aims to fulfil the need for an integrated source of information about these. The organizational principle of the <span class="hlt">database</span> is a hierarchical classification in which homologous sets of peptidases and protein inhibitors are grouped into protein species, which are grouped into families and in turn grouped into clans. Important additions to the <span class="hlt">database</span> include newly written, concise text annotations for peptidase clans and the small molecule inhibitors that are outside the scope of the standard classification; displays to show peptidase specificity compiled from our collection of known substrate cleavages; tables of peptidase-inhibitor interactions; and dynamically generated alignments of representatives of each protein species at the family level. New ways to compare peptidase and inhibitor complements between any two organisms whose genomes have been completely sequenced, or between different strains or subspecies of the same organism, have been devised. PMID:17991683</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19892822','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19892822"><span id="translatedtitle">MEROPS: the peptidase <span class="hlt">database</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rawlings, Neil D; Barrett, Alan J; Bateman, Alex</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Peptidases, their substrates and inhibitors are of great relevance to biology, medicine and biotechnology. The MEROPS <span class="hlt">database</span> (http://merops.sanger.ac.uk) aims to fulfil the need for an integrated source of information about these. The <span class="hlt">database</span> has a hierarchical classification in which homologous sets of peptidases and protein inhibitors are grouped into protein species, which are grouped into families, which are in turn grouped into clans. The classification framework is used for attaching information at each level. An important focus of the <span class="hlt">database</span> has become distinguishing one peptidase from another through identifying the specificity of the peptidase in terms of where it will cleave substrates and with which inhibitors it will interact. We have collected over 39,000 known cleavage sites in proteins, peptides and synthetic substrates. These allow us to display peptidase specificity and alignments of protein substrates to give an indication of how well a cleavage site is conserved, and thus its probable physiological relevance. While the number of new peptidase families and clans has only grown slowly the number of complete genomes has greatly increased. This has allowed us to add an analysis tool to the relevant species pages to show significant gains and losses of peptidase genes relative to related species. PMID:19892822</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/463612','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/463612"><span id="translatedtitle">ARTI refrigerant <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Calm, J.M.</p> <p>1997-02-01</p> <p>The Refrigerant <span class="hlt">Database</span> is an information system on alternative refrigerants, associated lubricants, and their use in air conditioning and refrigeration. It consolidates and facilitates access to property, compatibility, environmental, safety, application and other information. It provides corresponding information on older refrigerants, to assist manufacturers and those using alterative refrigerants, to make comparisons and determine differences. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern. The <span class="hlt">database</span> provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The complete documents are not included, though some may be added at a later date. The <span class="hlt">database</span> identifies sources of specific information on various refrigerants. It addresses lubricants including alkylbenzene, polyalkylene glycol, polyolester, and other synthetics as well as mineral oils. It also references documents addressing compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits. Incomplete citations or abstracts are provided for some documents. They are included to accelerate availability of the information and will be completed or replaced in future updates.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/674946','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/674946"><span id="translatedtitle">ARTI refrigerant <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Calm, J.M.</p> <p>1998-08-01</p> <p>The Refrigerant <span class="hlt">Database</span> is an information system on alternative refrigerants, associated lubricants, and their use in air conditioning and refrigeration. It consolidates and facilitates access to property, compatibility, environmental, safety, application and other information. It provides corresponding information on older refrigerants, to assist manufactures and those using alternative refrigerants, to make comparisons and determine differences. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern. The <span class="hlt">database</span> provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The complete documents are not included, though some may be added at a later date. The <span class="hlt">database</span> identifies sources of specific information on many refrigerants including propane, ammonia, water, carbon dioxide, propylene, ethers, and others as well as azeotropic and zeotropic blends of these fluids. It addresses lubricants including alkylbenzene, polyalkylene glycol, polyolester, and other synthetics as well as mineral oils. It also references documents addressing compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits. Incomplete citations or abstracts are provided for some documents. They are included to accelerate availability of the information and will be completed or replaced in future updates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10156499','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10156499"><span id="translatedtitle">ARTI Refrigerant <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Cain, J.M.</p> <p>1993-04-30</p> <p>The Refrigerant <span class="hlt">Database</span> consolidates and facilitates access to information to assist industry in developing equipment using alternative refrigerants. The underlying purpose is to accelerate phase out of chemical compounds of environmental concern. The <span class="hlt">database</span> provides bibliographic citations and abstracts for publications that may be useful in research and design of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment. The complete documents are not included. The <span class="hlt">database</span> identifies sources of specific information on R-32, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134, R-134a, R-141b, R-142b, R-143a, R-152a, R-245ca, R-290 (propane), R-717 (ammonia), ethers, and others as well as azeotropic and zeotropic blends of these fluids. It addresses lubricants including alkylbenzene, polyalkylene glycol, ester, and other synthetics as well as mineral oils. It also references documents addressing compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with metals, plastics, elastomers, motor insulation, and other materials used in refrigerant circuits. Incomplete citations or abstracts are provided for some documents to accelerate availability of the information and will be completed or replaced in future updates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Database+AND+Management+AND+System&pg=5&id=EJ274745','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Database+AND+Management+AND+System&pg=5&id=EJ274745"><span id="translatedtitle">Generalized <span class="hlt">Database</span> Management System Support for Numeric <span class="hlt">Database</span> Environments.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Dominick, Wayne D.; Weathers, Peggy G.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>This overview of potential for utilizing <span class="hlt">database</span> management systems (DBMS) within numeric <span class="hlt">database</span> environments highlights: (1) major features, functions, and characteristics of DBMS; (2) applicability to numeric <span class="hlt">database</span> environment needs and user needs; (3) current applications of DBMS technology; and (4) research-oriented and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=73882&keyword=biodiesel+AND+environment&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=49882924&CFTOKEN=40830715','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=73882&keyword=biodiesel+AND+environment&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=49882924&CFTOKEN=40830715"><span id="translatedtitle">A COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF BIODIESEL IMPACTS ON EXHAUST <span class="hlt">EMISSIONS</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Existing <span class="hlt">emissions</span> data from heavy-duty diesel engines was assembled into a <span class="hlt">database</span>. Statistical regression analysis was used to correlate biodiesel concentration with changes in <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of regulated and unregulated pollutants. The report concludes that biodiesel produces sm...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=43601&keyword=batteries&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=50419175&CFTOKEN=11882076','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=43601&keyword=batteries&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=50419175&CFTOKEN=11882076"><span id="translatedtitle">FINE PARTICLE <span class="hlt">EMISSIONS</span> INFORMATION SYSTEM: SUMMARY REPORT (SUMMER 1976)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The report summarizes the initial loading of data into the Fine Particle <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> Information System (FPEIS), a computerized <span class="hlt">database</span> on primary fine particle <span class="hlt">emissions</span> to the atmosphere from stationary sources, designed to assist engineers and scientists engaged in fine particl...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=104735&keyword=non+AND+cooperation+AND+evaluation&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=63735839&CFTOKEN=50734091','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=104735&keyword=non+AND+cooperation+AND+evaluation&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=63735839&CFTOKEN=50734091"><span id="translatedtitle">INNOVATIVE METHODS FOR <span class="hlt">EMISSION</span> INVENTORY DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION: WORKSHOP SYNTHESIS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Emission</span> inventories are key <span class="hlt">databases</span> for evaluating, managing, and regulating air pollutants. Refinements and innovations in instruments that measure air pollutants, models that calculate <span class="hlt">emissions</span>, and techniques for data management and uncertainty assessment are critical to ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dsld.nlm.nih.gov/dsld/','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://www.dsld.nlm.nih.gov/dsld/"><span id="translatedtitle">Dietary Supplement Label <span class="hlt">Database</span> (DSLD)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... Print Report Error T he Dietary Supplement Label <span class="hlt">Database</span> (DSLD) is a joint project of the National ... participants in the latest survey in the DSLD <span class="hlt">database</span> (NHANES): The search options: Quick Search, Browse Dietary ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ceramics.nist.gov/srd/hts/htsquery.htm','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://www.ceramics.nist.gov/srd/hts/htsquery.htm"><span id="translatedtitle">High Temperature Superconducting Materials <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>SRD 149 NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials <span class="hlt">Database</span> (Web, free access) The NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials <span class="hlt">Database</span> (WebHTS) provides evaluated thermal, mechanical, and superconducting property data for oxides and other nonconventional superconductors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://srdata.nist.gov/CeramicDataPortal/hit','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/CeramicDataPortal/hit"><span id="translatedtitle">High Temperature Superconducting Materials <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>SRD 149 NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials <span class="hlt">Database</span> (Web, free access)   The NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials <span class="hlt">Database</span> (WebHTS) provides evaluated thermal, mechanical, and superconducting property data for oxides and other nonconventional superconductors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.nist.gov/srd/nist103a.cfm','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://www.nist.gov/srd/nist103a.cfm"><span id="translatedtitle">ThermoData Engine <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>SRD 103 NIST ThermoData Engine <span class="hlt">Database</span> (PC <span class="hlt">database</span> for purchase)   ThermoData Engine is the first product fully implementing all major principles of the concept of dynamic data evaluation formulated at NIST/TRC.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/966228','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/966228"><span id="translatedtitle">A Case for <span class="hlt">Database</span> Filesystems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Adams, P A; Hax, J C</p> <p>2009-05-13</p> <p>Data intensive science is offering new challenges and opportunities for Information Technology and traditional relational <span class="hlt">databases</span> in particular. <span class="hlt">Database</span> filesystems offer the potential to store Level Zero data and analyze Level 1 and Level 3 data within the same <span class="hlt">database</span> system [2]. Scientific data is typically composed of both unstructured files and scalar data. Oracle SecureFiles is a new <span class="hlt">database</span> filesystem feature in Oracle <span class="hlt">Database</span> 11g that is specifically engineered to deliver high performance and scalability for storing unstructured or file data inside the Oracle <span class="hlt">database</span>. SecureFiles presents the best of both the filesystem and the <span class="hlt">database</span> worlds for unstructured content. Data stored inside SecureFiles can be queried or written at performance levels comparable to that of traditional filesystems while retaining the advantages of the Oracle <span class="hlt">database</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=16279&keyword=microsoft+AND+access+AND+laboratory+AND+database&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=45803857&CFTOKEN=44927674','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=16279&keyword=microsoft+AND+access+AND+laboratory+AND+database&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=45803857&CFTOKEN=44927674"><span id="translatedtitle">NEUSE RIVER WATER QUALITY <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The Neuse River water quality <span class="hlt">database</span> is a Microsoft Access application that includes multiple data tables and some associated queries. The <span class="hlt">database</span> was developed by Prof. Jim Bowen's research group.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996SGeo...17..575M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996SGeo...17..575M"><span id="translatedtitle">Iaga Paleomagnetic <span class="hlt">Databases</span> with access</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>McElhinny, Michael W.; Lock, Jo</p> <p>1996-09-01</p> <p>Since the release of the Global Paleomagnetic <span class="hlt">Database</span> (GPMDB) in 1991, there have been successive updates every two years, with the current version being 3.1. The authors have now constructed a set of four <span class="hlt">databases</span> that have been sponsored by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA). These include the GPMDB together with the Paleointensity <span class="hlt">Database</span> (PALIN), the Polarity Transitions <span class="hlt">Database</span> (TRANS) and the Secular Variation <span class="hlt">Database</span> (SECVR). Each of these <span class="hlt">databases</span> is now released to operate under Microsoft Access V2.0 and are specifically designed so as to operate independently of each other. The design and operation of these <span class="hlt">databases</span> with Access is described in this second supplement to the Global Paleomagnetic <span class="hlt">Databases</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160003304','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160003304"><span id="translatedtitle">SmallSat <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Petropulos, Dolores; Bittner, David; Murawski, Robert; Golden, Bert</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The SmallSat has an unrealized potential in both the private industry and in the federal government. Currently over 70 companies, 50 universities and 17 governmental agencies are involved in SmallSat research and development. In 1994, the U.S. Army Missile and Defense mapped the moon using smallSat imagery. Since then Smart Phones have introduced this imagery to the people of the world as diverse industries watched this trend. The deployment cost of smallSats is also greatly reduced compared to traditional satellites due to the fact that multiple units can be deployed in a single mission. Imaging payloads have become more sophisticated, smaller and lighter. In addition, the growth of small technology obtained from private industries has led to the more widespread use of smallSats. This includes greater revisit rates in imagery, significantly lower costs, the ability to update technology more frequently and the ability to decrease vulnerability of enemy attacks. The popularity of smallSats show a changing mentality in this fast paced world of tomorrow. What impact has this created on the NASA communication networks now and in future years? In this project, we are developing the SmallSat Relational <span class="hlt">Database</span> which can support a simulation of smallSats within the NASA SCaN Compatability Environment for Networks and Integrated Communications (SCENIC) Modeling and Simulation Lab. The NASA Space Communications and Networks (SCaN) Program can use this modeling to project required network support needs in the next 10 to 15 years. The SmallSat Rational <span class="hlt">Database</span> could model smallSats just as the other SCaN <span class="hlt">databases</span> model the more traditional larger satellites, with a few exceptions. One being that the smallSat <span class="hlt">Database</span> is designed to be built-to-order. The SmallSat <span class="hlt">database</span> holds various hardware configurations that can be used to model a smallSat. It will require significant effort to develop as the research material can only be populated by hand to obtain the unique data required. When completed it will interface with the SCENIC environment to allow modeling of smallSats. The SmallSat Relational <span class="hlt">Database</span> can also be integrated with the SCENIC Simulation modeling system that is currently in development. The SmallSat Relational <span class="hlt">Database</span> simulation will be of great significance in assisting the NASA SCaN group to understand the impact the smallSats have made which have populated the lower orbit around our mother earth. What I have created and worked on this summer session 2015, is the basis for a tool that will be of value to the NASA SCaN SCENIC Simulation Environment for years to come.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110010231','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110010231"><span id="translatedtitle">Hydrogen Leak Detection Sensor <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Baker, Barton D.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>This slide presentation reviews the characteristics of the Hydrogen Sensor <span class="hlt">database</span>. The <span class="hlt">database</span> is the result of NASA's continuing interest in and improvement of its ability to detect and assess gas leaks in space applications. The <span class="hlt">database</span> specifics and a snapshot of an entry in the <span class="hlt">database</span> are reviewed. Attempts were made to determine the applicability of each of the 65 sensors for ground and/or vehicle use.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.B42E..05R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFM.B42E..05R"><span id="translatedtitle">Global Seabird Ammonia <span class="hlt">Emissions</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Riddick, S. N.; Blackall, T. D.; Dragosits, U.; Daunt, F. H.; Braban, C. F.; Tang, Y. S.; Trathan, P.; Wanless, S.; Sutton, M. A.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>Seabird colonies represent a major source of atmospheric ammonia (NH3) in remote coastal and marine systems in temperate, tropical and polar regions. Previous studies have shown that NH3 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from Scottish seabird colonies were substantial - of similar magnitude to the most intensive agricultural point source <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. The UK data were used to model global seabird NH3 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> and suggested that penguins are a major source of <span class="hlt">emissions</span> on and around the Antarctic continent. The largest seabird colonies are in the order of millions of seabirds. Due to the isolation of these colonies from anthropogenic nitrogen sources, they may play a major role in the nitrogen cycle within these ecosystems. A global seabird <span class="hlt">database</span> was constructed and used in conjunction with a species-specific seabird bioenergetics model to map the locations of NH3 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from seabird colonies. The accuracy of the modelled <span class="hlt">emissions</span> was validated with field data of NH3 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> measured at key seabird colonies in different climatic regions of the world: temperate (Isle of May, Scotland), tropical (Ascension Island) and polar (Signy Island, South Georgia). The field data indicated good agreement between modelled and measured NH3 <span class="hlt">emissions</span>. The measured NH3 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> also showed the variability of <span class="hlt">emission</span> with climate. Climate dependence of seabird NH3 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> may have further implications under a changing global climate. Seabird colonies represent NH3 <span class="hlt">emission</span> hotspots, often far from anthropogenic sources, and are likely to be the major source of nitrogen input to these remote coastal ecosystems. The direct manuring by seabirds at colony locations may strongly influence species richness and biodiversity. The subsequent volatilisation and deposition of NH3 increases the spatial extent of seabird influence on nitrogen cycling in their local ecosystem. As many seabird populations are fluctuating due to changing food supply, climate change or anthropogenic pressures, these factors may have far reaching impact on the supply of nitrogen from seabird colonies to their current local ecosystems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=310639&keyword=estimated&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=55732751&CFTOKEN=52807263','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=310639&keyword=estimated&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=55732751&CFTOKEN=52807263"><span id="translatedtitle">Microbial Properties <span class="hlt">Database</span> Editor Tutorial</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>A Microbial Properties <span class="hlt">Database</span> Editor (MPDBE) has been developed to help consolidate microbial-relevant data to populate a microbial <span class="hlt">database</span> and support a <span class="hlt">database</span> editor by which an authorized user can modify physico-microbial properties related to microbial indicators and pat...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22433429','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22433429"><span id="translatedtitle">The ITS2 <span class="hlt">Database</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Merget, Benjamin; Koetschan, Christian; Hackl, Thomas; Frster, Frank; Dandekar, Thomas; Mller, Tobias; Schultz, Jrg; Wolf, Matthias</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) has been used as a phylogenetic marker for more than two decades. As ITS2 research mainly focused on the very variable ITS2 sequence, it confined this marker to low-level phylogenetics only. However, the combination of the ITS2 sequence and its highly conserved secondary structure improves the phylogenetic resolution(1) and allows phylogenetic inference at multiple taxonomic ranks, including species delimitation(2-8). The ITS2 <span class="hlt">Database</span>(9) presents an exhaustive dataset of internal transcribed spacer 2 sequences from NCBI GenBank(11) accurately reannotated(10). Following an annotation by profile Hidden Markov Models (HMMs), the secondary structure of each sequence is predicted. First, it is tested whether a minimum energy based fold(12) (direct fold) results in a correct, four helix conformation. If this is not the case, the structure is predicted by homology modeling(13). In homology modeling, an already known secondary structure is transferred to another ITS2 sequence, whose secondary structure was not able to fold correctly in a direct fold. The ITS2 <span class="hlt">Database</span> is not only a <span class="hlt">database</span> for storage and retrieval of ITS2 sequence-structures. It also provides several tools to process your own ITS2 sequences, including annotation, structural prediction, motif detection and BLAST(14) search on the combined sequence-structure information. Moreover, it integrates trimmed versions of 4SALE(15,16) and ProfDistS(17) for multiple sequence-structure alignment calculation and Neighbor Joining(18) tree reconstruction. Together they form a coherent analysis pipeline from an initial set of sequences to a phylogeny based on sequence and secondary structure. In a nutshell, this workbench simplifies first phylogenetic analyses to only a few mouse-clicks, while additionally providing tools and data for comprehensive large-scale analyses. PMID:22433429</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2924282','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2924282"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> management in autoradiography.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shivaramakrishnan, K; Tretiak, O J</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>Experiments in autoradiography involve the use of radiotracers to achieve a "functional mapping" between structures of the central nervous system and observed behavior in animals. A typical experiment produces 100-300 sections per animal. Computer systems such as DUMAS (Drexel's Unix based iMage Analysis System) are used to analyze these sections. Each section has two images associated with it--an autoradiographic image and a histological image. The latter is used to establish a correlation between anatomical structures and areas on the autoradiogram. User drawn outlines on the histological image are transferred to the autoradiographic image to obtain quantitative measures (such as average gray level). Existing systems do not take advantage of the fact that consecutive sections obtained from a brain are often similar. As a result, much of the effort involved with region outlining is repetitive. Also, the criteria for region selection varies not only across experiments, but also between users. This paper presents an approach to design an integrated <span class="hlt">database</span> management system to manage both pictorial and quantitative data in autoradiography. Briefly, such a system is used to (a) store sets of reference outlines and images for use during the analysis of sections, (b) provide a bank of information to the user from across experiments, (c) provide an on-line help facility to the novice, and a reference guide to the expert. Based on specific requirements, we chose the relational model for data management. We developed a preliminary version of the <span class="hlt">database</span> using INFORMIX-ESQL/C, which is a commercially available relational system. We also developed a graphics editor that is actively linked to the <span class="hlt">database</span>. The results of our efforts have established the feasibility of using a commercially available relational system for autoradiographic data management. PMID:2924282</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120003504','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120003504"><span id="translatedtitle">EMU Lessons Learned <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Matthews, Kevin M., Jr.; Crocker, Lori; Cupples, J. Scott</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>As manned space exploration takes on the task of traveling beyond low Earth orbit, many problems arise that must be solved in order to make the journey possible. One major task is protecting humans from the harsh space environment. The current method of protecting astronauts during Extravehicular Activity (EVA) is through use of the specially designed Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). As more rigorous EVA conditions need to be endured at new destinations, the suit will need to be tailored and improved in order to accommodate the astronaut. The Objective behind the EMU Lessons Learned <span class="hlt">Database</span>(LLD) is to be able to create a tool which will assist in the development of next-generation EMUs, along with maintenance and improvement of the current EMU, by compiling data from Failure Investigation and Analysis Reports (FIARs) which have information on past suit failures. FIARs use a system of codes that give more information on the aspects of the failure, but if one is unfamiliar with the EMU they will be unable to decipher the information. A goal of the EMU LLD is to not only compile the information, but to present it in a user-friendly, organized, searchable <span class="hlt">database</span> accessible to all familiarity levels with the EMU; both newcomers and veterans alike. The EMU LLD originally started as an Excel <span class="hlt">database</span>, which allowed easy navigation and analysis of the data through pivot charts. Creating an entry requires access to the Problem Reporting And Corrective Action <span class="hlt">database</span> (PRACA), which contains the original FIAR data for all hardware. FIAR data are then transferred to, defined, and formatted in the LLD. Work is being done to create a web-based version of the LLD in order to increase accessibility to all of Johnson Space Center (JSC), which includes converting entries from Excel to the HTML format. FIARs related to the EMU have been completed in the Excel version, and now focus has shifted to expanding FIAR data in the LLD to include EVA tools and support hardware such as the Pistol Grip Tool (PGT) and the Battery Charger Module (BCM), while adding any recently closed EMU-related FIARs.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AIPC.1545..223R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AIPC.1545..223R"><span id="translatedtitle">The HITRAN molecular <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rothman, Laurence S.; Gordon, Iouli E.</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>This presentation provides an overview of the updates and extensions of the HITRAN molecular spectroscopic absorption <span class="hlt">database</span>. The new significantly improved parameters for the major atmospheric absorbers (for instance H2O and O2) have been given particular attention. For most of the molecules, spectral parameters have been revised and updated. The new edition also features many new spectral bands and new isotopic species. The cross-section part of the <span class="hlt">database</span> has also been significantly extended by adding new species as well as more temperature-pressure sets for existing species. In addition, HITRAN now provides the collision-induced absorption parameters, including those relevant to the terrestrial atmosphere: N2-N2, N2-O2, O2-O2. The study of the spectroscopic signatures of planetary atmospheres is a powerful tool for extracting detailed information concerning their constituents and thermodynamic properties. The HITRAN molecular spectroscopic <span class="hlt">database</span> has traditionally served researchers involved with terrestrial atmospheric problems, such as remote sensing of constituents in the atmosphere, pollution monitoring at the surface, and numerous environmental issues. In collaboration with laboratories across the globe, an extensive effort is currently underway to extend the HITRAN <span class="hlt">database</span> to have capabilities for investigating a variety of planetary atmospheres. Spectroscopic parameters for gases and spectral bands of molecules that are germane to the studies of planetary atmospheres are being assembled. These parameters include the types of data that have already been considered for transmission and radiance algorithms, such as line position, intensity, broadening coefficients, lower-state energies, and temperature dependence values. A number of new molecules, including H2, CS, C4H2, HC3N, and C2N2, are being incorporated into HITRAN, while several other molecules are pending. For some of the molecules, additional parameters, beyond those currently considered for the terrestrial atmosphere, are being archived. Examples are collision-broadened half widths due to various foreign partners, collision-induced absorption, and temperature dependence factors. Collision-induced absorption data for H2-H2, H2-N2, H2-He, H2-CH4, CH4-CH4, O2-CO2 and N2-CH4 were recently released. Partition sums that are necessary for applications at a wide range of temperatures have also been calculated for a variety of molecules of planetary interest, and form an integral part of the HITRAN compilation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19830010289&hterms=admin&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dadmin','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19830010289&hterms=admin&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dadmin"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Databases</span> as an information service</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Vincent, D. A.</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>The relationship of <span class="hlt">databases</span> to information services, and the range of information services users and their needs for information is explored and discussed. It is argued that for <span class="hlt">database</span> information to be valuable to a broad range of users, it is essential that access methods be provided that are relatively unstructured and natural to information services users who are interested in the information contained in <span class="hlt">databases</span>, but who are not willing to learn and use traditional structured query languages. Unless this ease of use of <span class="hlt">databases</span> is considered in the design and application process, the potential benefits from using <span class="hlt">database</span> systems may not be realized.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=128586&keyword=acceleration&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=50440553&CFTOKEN=80630405','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=128586&keyword=acceleration&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=50440553&CFTOKEN=80630405"><span id="translatedtitle">CARBON MONOXIDE <span class="hlt">EMISSIONS</span> FROM ROAD DRIVING: EVIDENCE OF <span class="hlt">EMISSIONS</span> DUE TO POWER ENRICHMENT</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The paper examines one aspect of motor vehicle <span class="hlt">emissions</span> behavior; i.e. <span class="hlt">emissions</span> due to engine power enrichment, a factor not well represented in existing models. <span class="hlt">Database</span> reflecting 46 instrumented vehicles was used to analyze the importance of enrichment <span class="hlt">emissions</span> to overall v...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008APS..DNP.DA046J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008APS..DNP.DA046J"><span id="translatedtitle">PHENIX RPC Production <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jones, Timothy</p> <p>2008-10-01</p> <p>The Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment (PHENIX) is located on the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) ring at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A primary physics goal that can be studied by PHENIX is the origin of the proton spin. One of the types of rare events looked for in the moun arms at PHENIX are single high transverse momentum mouns, which tend to result from the decay of a W bozon. Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) will be used as a level 1 trigger to select these events from a large background of low transverse momentum muons. As these RPCs are assembled it is necessary to keep track of the individual parts of each RPC as well as data from various quality assurance tests in a way that will allow the information to be easily accessible years to come as the RPCs are being used. This is done through the use of a <span class="hlt">database</span> and web page interface that can be used to enter data about the RPCs or to look up information from tests. I will be presenting on how we keep track of the RPCs, their parts, and data from quality assurance tests as they are being assembled as well as how we can retrieve this data after it has been stored in the <span class="hlt">database</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2238911','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2238911"><span id="translatedtitle">The Molecule Pages <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Saunders, Brian; Lyon, Stephen; Day, Matthew; Riley, Brenda; Chenette, Emily; Subramaniam, Shankar</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The UCSD-Nature Signaling Gateway Molecule Pages (http://www.signaling-gateway.org/molecule) provides essential information on more than 3800 mammalian proteins involved in cellular signaling. The Molecule Pages contain expert-authored and peer-reviewed information based on the published literature, complemented by regularly updated information derived from public data source references and sequence analysis. The expert-authored data includes both a full-text review about the molecule, with citations, and highly structured data for bioinformatics interrogation, including information on protein interactions and states, transitions between states and protein function. The expert-authored pages are anonymously peer reviewed by the Nature Publishing Group. The Molecule Pages data is present in an object-relational <span class="hlt">database</span> format and is freely accessible to the authors, the reviewers and the public from a web browser that serves as a presentation layer. The Molecule Pages are supported by several applications that along with the <span class="hlt">database</span> and the interfaces form a multi-tier architecture. The Molecule Pages and the Signaling Gateway are routinely accessed by a very large research community. PMID:17965093</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015NucFu..55f3030E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015NucFu..55f3030E"><span id="translatedtitle">The ITPA disruption <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Eidietis, N. W.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Granetz, R. S.; Kawano, Y.; Lehnen, M.; Lister, J. B.; Pautasso, G.; Riccardo, V.; Tanna, R. L.; Thornton, A. J.; ITPA Disruption Database Participants, The</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>A multi-device <span class="hlt">database</span> of disruption characteristics has been developed under the auspices of the International Tokamak Physics Activity magneto-hydrodynamics topical group. The purpose of this ITPA disruption <span class="hlt">database</span> (IDDB) is to find the commonalities between the disruption and disruption mitigation characteristics in a wide variety of tokamaks in order to elucidate the physics underlying tokamak disruptions and to extrapolate toward much larger devices, such as ITER and future burning plasma devices. In contrast to previous smaller disruption data collation efforts, the IDDB aims to provide significant context for each shot provided, allowing exploration of a wide array of relationships between pre-disruption and disruption parameters. The IDDB presently includes contributions from nine tokamaks, including both conventional aspect ratio and spherical tokamaks. An initial parametric analysis of the available data is presented. This analysis includes current quench rates, halo current fraction and peaking, and the effectiveness of massive impurity injection. The IDDB is publicly available, with instruction for access provided herein.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFMIN41B..03L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFMIN41B..03L"><span id="translatedtitle">World Ocean <span class="hlt">Database</span> (Invited)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Levitus, S.</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>The World Ocean <span class="hlt">Database</span> (WOD) is the largest collection of ocean profile data available internationally without restriction. WOD is produced by the NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center and its co-located World Data Center for Oceanography. The <span class="hlt">database</span> contains data for temperature, salinity, oxygen, nutrients, tracers, among other variables. The WOD can be considered to be a collection of CDRs that are all in one common format, with systematic quality-control applied and with all available metadata and documentation made available online and DVD to make WOD useful to users. The amount of data in the WOD has grown substantially since WOD was started in 1994 for two reasons. One is the increase of data available from in situ remote-sensing systems such as moored buoys, from ship-of-opportunity programs collecting XBT data, from the Argo profiling float project, and other observing system projects. The second reason is due to the success of the Global Oceanographic Data Archaeology and Rescue (GODAR) project sponsored by the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission. For example this project located and rescued approximately 3 million temperature profiles for the pre-1991 period which have been added to WOD. The data in WOD have been used to make estimate of the interannual to interdecadal variability of temperature, salinity, and oxygen for the past 50 years. This talk will describe WOD and results from the GODAR project.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100028295','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100028295"><span id="translatedtitle">Asbestos Exposure Assessment <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Arcot, Divya K.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Exposure to particular hazardous materials in a work environment is dangerous to the employees who work directly with or around the materials as well as those who come in contact with them indirectly. In order to maintain a national standard for safe working environments and protect worker health, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has set forth numerous precautionary regulations. NASA has been proactive in adhering to these regulations by implementing standards which are often stricter than regulation limits and administering frequent health risk assessments. The primary objective of this project is to create the infrastructure for an Asbestos Exposure Assessment <span class="hlt">Database</span> specific to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) which will compile all of the exposure assessment data into a well-organized, navigable format. The data includes Sample Types, Samples Durations, Crafts of those from whom samples were collected, Job Performance Requirements (JPR) numbers, Phased Contrast Microscopy (PCM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) results and qualifiers, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), and names of industrial hygienists who performed the monitoring. This <span class="hlt">database</span> will allow NASA to provide OSHA with specific information demonstrating that JSC s work procedures are protective enough to minimize the risk of future disease from the exposures. The data has been collected by the NASA contractors Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) and Wyle Laboratories. The personal exposure samples were collected from devices worn by laborers working at JSC and by building occupants located in asbestos-containing buildings.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/961540','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/961540"><span id="translatedtitle">UGTA Photograph <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>NSTec Environmental Restoration</p> <p>2009-04-20</p> <p>One of the advantages of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is that most of the geologic and hydrologic features such as hydrogeologic units (HGUs), hydrostratigraphic units (HSUs), and faults, which are important aspects of flow and transport modeling, are exposed at the surface somewhere in the vicinity of the NTS and thus are available for direct observation. However, due to access restrictions and the remote locations of many of the features, most Underground Test Area (UGTA) participants cannot observe these features directly in the field. Fortunately, National Security Technologies, LLC, geologists and their predecessors have photographed many of these features through the years. During fiscal year 2009, work was done to develop an online photograph <span class="hlt">database</span> for use by the UGTA community. Photographs were organized, compiled, and imported into Adobe® Photoshop® Elements 7. The photographs were then assigned keyword tags such as alteration type, HGU, HSU, location, rock feature, rock type, and stratigraphic unit. Some fully tagged photographs were then selected and uploaded to the UGTA website. This online photograph <span class="hlt">database</span> provides easy access for all UGTA participants and can help “ground truth” their analytical and modeling tasks. It also provides new participants a resource to more quickly learn the geology and hydrogeology of the NTS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26220923','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26220923"><span id="translatedtitle">Curcumin Resource <span class="hlt">Database</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kumar, Anil; Chetia, Hasnahana; Sharma, Swagata; Kabiraj, Debajyoti; Talukdar, Narayan Chandra; Bora, Utpal</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Curcumin is one of the most intensively studied diarylheptanoid, Curcuma longa being its principal producer. This apart, a class of promising curcumin analogs has been generated in laboratories, aptly named as Curcuminoids which are showing huge potential in the fields of medicine, food technology, etc. The lack of a universal source of data on curcumin as well as curcuminoids has been felt by the curcumin research community for long. Hence, in an attempt to address this stumbling block, we have developed Curcumin Resource <span class="hlt">Database</span> (CRDB) that aims to perform as a gateway-cum-repository to access all relevant data and related information on curcumin and its analogs. Currently, this <span class="hlt">database</span> encompasses 1186 curcumin analogs, 195 molecular targets, 9075 peer reviewed publications, 489 patents and 176 varieties of C. longa obtained by extensive data mining and careful curation from numerous sources. Each data entry is identified by a unique CRDB ID (identifier). Furnished with a user-friendly web interface and in-built search engine, CRDB provides well-curated and cross-referenced information that are hyperlinked with external sources. CRDB is expected to be highly useful to the researchers working on structure as well as ligand-based molecular design of curcumin analogs. PMID:26220923</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21364711','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21364711"><span id="translatedtitle">Using non-local <span class="hlt">databases</span> for the environmental assessment of industrial activities: The case of Latin America</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Osses de Eicker, Margarita; Hischier, Roland; Hurni, Hans; Zah, Rainer</p> <p>2010-04-15</p> <p>Nine non-local <span class="hlt">databases</span> were evaluated with respect to their suitability for the environmental assessment of industrial activities in Latin America. Three assessment methods were considered, namely Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) and air <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventories. The analysis focused on data availability in the <span class="hlt">databases</span> and the applicability of their international data to Latin American industry. The study showed that the European EMEP/EEA Guidebook and the U.S. EPA AP-42 <span class="hlt">database</span> are the most suitable ones for air <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventories, whereas the LCI <span class="hlt">database</span> Ecoinvent is the most suitable one for LCA and EIA. Due to the data coverage in the <span class="hlt">databases</span>, air <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventories are easier to develop than LCA or EIA, which require more comprehensive information. One strategy to overcome the limitations of non-local <span class="hlt">databases</span> for Latin American industry is the combination of validated data from international <span class="hlt">databases</span> with newly developed local datasets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JAfES.106...17R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JAfES.106...17R"><span id="translatedtitle">Petrophysical <span class="hlt">database</span> of Uganda</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ruotoistenmäki, Tapio; Birungi, Nelson R.</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>The petrophysical <span class="hlt">database</span> of Uganda contains data on ca. 5800 rock samples collected and analyzed during 2009-2012 in international geological and geophysical projects covering the main part of the land area of Uganda. The parameters included are the susceptibilities and densities of all available field samples. Susceptibilities were measured from the samples from three directions. Using these parameters, we also calculated the ratios of susceptibility maxima/minima reflecting direction homogeneity of magnetic minerals, and estimated the iron content of paramagnetic samples and the magnetite content of ferrimagnetic samples. Statistical and visual analysis of the petrophysical data of Uganda demonstrated their wide variation, thus emphasizing their importance in analyzing the bedrock variations in three dimensions. Using the density-susceptibility diagram, the data can be classified into six main groups: 1. A low density and susceptibility group, consisting of sedimentary and altered rocks. 2. Low-susceptibility, felsic rocks (e.g. quartzites and metasandstones). 3. Paramagnetic, felsic rocks (e.g. granites). 4. Ferrimagnetic, magnetite-containing felsic rocks (e.g. granites). 5. Paramagnetic mafic rocks (e.g. amphibolites and dolerites). 6. Ferrimagnetic, mafic rocks containing magnetite and high-density mafic minerals (mainly dolerites). Moreover, analysis revealed that the parameter distributions of even a single rock type (e.g. granites) can be very variable, forming separate clusters. This demonstrates that the simple calculation of density or susceptibility averages of rock types can be highly erratic. For example, the average can lie between two groups, where only few, if any, samples exist. Therefore, estimation of the representative density and susceptibility must be visually verified from these diagrams. The areal distribution of parameters and their calculated derivatives generally correlate well with the regional distribution of lithological and geophysical blocks. However, there are also several areas where, for instance, the low susceptibility of samples correlates poorly with high magnetic airborne anomaly data. This refers to high remanence, or the anomalies may be due to sources covered by a less magnetic sedimentary cover. The petrophysical <span class="hlt">database</span> will be a necessity when modeling the bedrock of Uganda in three dimensions at any scale. The lithological and petrophysical <span class="hlt">databases</span>, as well as the samples collected, will further serve as a very valuable and important basis of and provide tools for future studies on the bedrock cover of Uganda. They can be used, for example, for bedrock mapping, prospecting of valuable mineralizations, dimension stones and for environmental studies. The samples could also serve as basis for establishing a lithogeochemical <span class="hlt">database</span> of Uganda. It is clear that the data and samples are already commercially valuable for numerous prospecting companies working in Uganda. Thus, it is important that the samples and <span class="hlt">databases</span> are carefully, safely and permanently archived and stored for future use.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.7915F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.7915F"><span id="translatedtitle">The ChArMEx <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ferré, Hélène; Belmahfoud, Nizar; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Cloché, Sophie; Descloitres, Jacques; Fleury, Laurence; Focsa, Loredana; Henriot, Nicolas; Mière, Arnaud; Ramage, Karim; Vermeulen, Anne; Boulanger, Damien</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) aims at a scientific assessment of the present and future state of the atmospheric environment in the Mediterranean Basin, and of its impacts on the regional climate, air quality, and marine biogeochemistry. The project includes long term monitoring of environmental parameters , intensive field campaigns, use of satellite data and modelling studies. Therefore ChARMEx scientists produce and need to access a wide diversity of data. In this context, the objective of the <span class="hlt">database</span> task is to organize data management, distribution system and services, such as facilitating the exchange of information and stimulating the collaboration between researchers within the ChArMEx community, and beyond. The <span class="hlt">database</span> relies on a strong collaboration between ICARE, IPSL and OMP data centers and has been set up in the framework of the Mediterranean Integrated Studies at Regional And Locals Scales (MISTRALS) program data portal. ChArMEx data, either produced or used by the project, are documented and accessible through the <span class="hlt">database</span> website: http://mistrals.sedoo.fr/ChArMEx. The website offers the usual but user-friendly functionalities: data catalog, user registration procedure, search tool to select and access data... The metadata (data description) are standardized, and comply with international standards (ISO 19115-19139; INSPIRE European Directive; Global Change Master Directory Thesaurus). A Digital Object Identifier (DOI) assignement procedure allows to automatically register the datasets, in order to make them easier to access, cite, reuse and verify. At present, the ChArMEx <span class="hlt">database</span> contains about 120 datasets, including more than 80 in situ datasets (2012, 2013 and 2014 summer campaigns, background monitoring station of Ersa...), 25 model output sets (dust model intercomparison, MEDCORDEX scenarios...), a high resolution <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventory over the Mediterranean... Many in situ datasets have been inserted in a relational <span class="hlt">database</span>, in order to enable more accurate selection and download of different datasets in a shared format. Many dedicated satellite products (SEVIRI, TRIMM, PARASOL...) are processed and will soon be accessible through the <span class="hlt">database</span> website. In order to meet the operational needs of the airborne and ground based observational teams during the ChArMEx campaigns, a day-to-day chart display website has been developed and operated: http://choc.sedoo.org. It offers a convenient way to browse weather conditions and chemical composition during the campaign periods. Every scientist is invited to visit the ChArMEx websites, to register and to request data. Feel free to contact charmex-<span class="hlt">database</span>@sedoo.fr for any question.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2003/0236/','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2003/0236/"><span id="translatedtitle">National Geochronological <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Revised by Sloan, Jan; Henry, Christopher D.; Hopkins, Melanie; Ludington, Steve; Original database by Zartman, Robert E.; Bush, Charles A.; Abston, Carl</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>The National Geochronological Data Base (NGDB) was established by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) to collect and organize published isotopic (also known as radiometric) ages of rocks in the United States. The NGDB (originally known as the Radioactive Age Data Base, RADB) was started in 1974. A committee appointed by the Director of the USGS was given the mission to investigate the feasibility of compiling the published radiometric ages for the United States into a computerized data bank for ready access by the user community. A successful pilot program, which was conducted in 1975 and 1976 for the State of Wyoming, led to a decision to proceed with the compilation of the entire United States. For each dated rock sample reported in published literature, a record containing information on sample location, rock description, analytical data, age, interpretation, and literature citation was constructed and included in the NGDB. The NGDB was originally constructed and maintained on a mainframe computer, and later converted to a Helix Express relational <span class="hlt">database</span> maintained on an Apple Macintosh desktop computer. The NGDB and a program to search the data files were published and distributed on Compact Disc-Read Only Memory (CD-ROM) in standard ISO 9660 format as USGS Digital Data Series DDS-14 (Zartman and others, 1995). As of May 1994, the NGDB consisted of more than 18,000 records containing over 30,000 individual ages, which is believed to represent approximately one-half the number of ages published for the United States through 1991. Because the organizational unit responsible for maintaining the <span class="hlt">database</span> was abolished in 1996, and because we wanted to provide the data in more usable formats, we have reformatted the data, checked and edited the information in some records, and provided this online version of the NGDB. This report describes the changes made to the data and formats, and provides instructions for the use of the <span class="hlt">database</span> in geographic information system (GIS) applications. The data are provided in .mdb (Microsoft Access), .xls (Microsoft Excel), and .txt (tab-separated value) formats. We also provide a single non-relational file that contains a subset of the data for ease of use.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1077409','SCIGOV-DOEDE'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1077409"><span id="translatedtitle">Ribosomal <span class="hlt">Database</span> Project II</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/dataexplorer">DOE Data Explorer</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The Ribosomal <span class="hlt">Database</span> Project (RDP) provides ribosome related data and services to the scientific community, including online data analysis and aligned and annotated Bacterial small-subunit 16S rRNA sequences. As of March 2008, RDP Release 10 is available and currently (August 2009) contains 1,074,075 aligned 16S rRNA sequences. Data that can be downloaded include zipped GenBank and FASTA alignment files, a histogram (in Excel) of the number of RDP sequences spanning each base position, data in the Functional Gene Pipeline Repository, and various user submitted data. The RDP-II website also provides numerous analysis tools.[From the RDP-II home page at http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940008643','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940008643"><span id="translatedtitle">View generated <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Downward, James G.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>This document represents the final report for the View Generated <span class="hlt">Database</span> (VGD) project, NAS7-1066. It documents the work done on the project up to the point at which all project work was terminated due to lack of project funds. The VGD was to provide the capability to accurately represent any real-world object or scene as a computer model. Such models include both an accurate spatial/geometric representation of surfaces of the object or scene, as well as any surface detail present on the object. Applications of such models are numerous, including acquisition and maintenance of work models for tele-autonomous systems, generation of accurate 3-D geometric/photometric models for various 3-D vision systems, and graphical models for realistic rendering of 3-D scenes via computer graphics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3965087','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3965087"><span id="translatedtitle">Mouse Phenome <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Grubb, Stephen C.; Bult, Carol J.; Bogue, Molly A.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The Mouse Phenome <span class="hlt">Database</span> (MPD; phenome.jax.org) was launched in 2001 as the data coordination center for the international Mouse Phenome Project. MPD integrates quantitative phenotype, gene expression and genotype data into a common annotated framework to facilitate query and analysis. MPD contains >3500 phenotype measurements or traits relevant to human health, including cancer, aging, cardiovascular disorders, obesity, infectious disease susceptibility, blood disorders, neurosensory disorders, drug addiction and toxicity. Since our 2012 NAR report, we have added >70 new data sets, including data from Collaborative Cross lines and Diversity Outbred mice. During this time we have completely revamped our homepage, improved search and navigational aspects of the MPD application, developed several web-enabled data analysis and visualization tools, annotated phenotype data to public ontologies, developed an ontology browser and released new single nucleotide polymorphism query functionality with much higher density coverage than before. Here, we summarize recent data acquisitions and describe our latest improvements. PMID:24243846</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004sf2a.conf..581V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004sf2a.conf..581V"><span id="translatedtitle">Large extragalactic <span class="hlt">databases</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vollmer, B.</p> <p>2004-12-01</p> <p>The two major extragalactic data bases in the world are NED and the 3 services SIMBAD/VIZIER/ALADIN at the CDS. Whereas NED is exclusively extragalctic, the CDS services also include galactic objects except for objects of the solar system. Both data bases allow to find astronomical objects via their names or positions. They provide positions, radial velocities, bibliographic references, and images (jpeg or FITS) for these objects. There is the possibility to search objects on a defined region on the sky by using constraints on their radial velocities or luminosities at a given wavelength. NED is a very rich data base. It contains many links towards external archives and provides compiled flux measurements over the whole wavelength range from which an SED is derived. Whereas NED has a rather static architecture, the CDS services are more flexible. The SIMBAD astronomical <span class="hlt">database</span> provides basic data, cross-identifications and bibliography for astronomical objects outside the solar system. VIZIER provides access to the most complete library of published astronomical catalogues and data tables available on line, organized in a self-documented <span class="hlt">database</span>. ALADIN is an interactive software sky atlas allowing the user to visualize digitized images of any part of the sky, to superimpose entries from astronomical catalogs or personal user data files. The great advantage of the CDS services is their interoperability, i.e. the three services communicate with each other. For example, one can search for an object in SIMBAD, visualize its position and make an overlay with a DSS image within ALADIN. VIZIER catalogues can be queried using various constraints on the entry columns. The results can be directly displayed on the sky and superimposed on an astronomical image within ALADIN. ALADIN has its own image data base, but it has also access to NED and many major archives and image data bases. This interoperability gives the CDS services a great flexibility, which will allow them to respond efficiently to the requirements of the virtual observatory.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.nist.gov/srd/nist84.cfm','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://www.nist.gov/srd/nist84.cfm"><span id="translatedtitle">Inorganic Crystal Structure <span class="hlt">Database</span> (ICSD)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>SRD 84 FIZ/NIST Inorganic Crystal Structure <span class="hlt">Database</span> (ICSD) (PC <span class="hlt">database</span> for purchase)   The Inorganic Crystal Structure <span class="hlt">Database</span> (ICSD) is produced cooperatively by the Fachinformationszentrum Karlsruhe(FIZ) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The ICSD is a comprehensive collection of crystal structure data of inorganic compounds containing more than 140,000 entries and covering the literature from 1915 to the present.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19970031078&hterms=model+database&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dmodel%2Bdatabase','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19970031078&hterms=model+database&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dmodel%2Bdatabase"><span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">Database</span> for Propagation Models</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kantak, Anil V.; Rucker, James</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>The Propagation Models <span class="hlt">Database</span> is designed to allow the scientists and experimenters in the propagation field to process their data through many known and accepted propagation models. The <span class="hlt">database</span> is an Excel 5.0 based software that houses user-callable propagation models of propagation phenomena. It does not contain a <span class="hlt">database</span> of propagation data generated out of the experiments. The <span class="hlt">database</span> not only provides a powerful software tool to process the data generated by the experiments, but is also a time- and energy-saving tool for plotting results, generating tables and producing impressive and crisp hard copy for presentation and filing.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4222244','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4222244"><span id="translatedtitle">Biological <span class="hlt">Databases</span> for Behavioral Neurobiology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Baker, Erich J.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Databases</span> are, at their core, abstractions of data and their intentionally derived relationships. They serve as a central organizing metaphor and repository, supporting or augmenting nearly all bioinformatics. Behavioral domains provide a unique stage for contemporary <span class="hlt">databases</span>, as research in this area spans diverse data types, locations, and data relationships. This chapter provides foundational information on the diversity and prevalence of <span class="hlt">databases</span>, how data structures support the various needs of behavioral neuroscience analysis and interpretation. The focus is on the classes of <span class="hlt">databases</span>, data curation, and advanced applications in bioinformatics using examples largely drawn from research efforts in behavioral neuroscience. PMID:23195119</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015QuIP...14.1443S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015QuIP...14.1443S"><span id="translatedtitle">Relativistic quantum private <span class="hlt">database</span> queries</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sun, Si-Jia; Yang, Yu-Guang; Zhang, Ming-Ou</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Recently, Jakobi et al. (Phys Rev A 83, 022301, 2011) suggested the first practical private <span class="hlt">database</span> query protocol (J-protocol) based on the Scarani et al. (Phys Rev Lett 92, 057901, 2004) quantum key distribution protocol. Unfortunately, the J-protocol is just a cheat-sensitive private <span class="hlt">database</span> query protocol. In this paper, we present an idealized relativistic quantum private <span class="hlt">database</span> query protocol based on Minkowski causality and the properties of quantum information. Also, we prove that the protocol is secure in terms of the user security and the <span class="hlt">database</span> security.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFM.B31D..06K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUFM.B31D..06K"><span id="translatedtitle">Methane <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> From Rice Fields</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Khalil, A. K.; Shearer, M. J.; Rasmussen, R. A.; Butenhoff, C. L.; Xiong, Z.; Xu, L.; Xing, G.</p> <p>2006-12-01</p> <p>Methane <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from rice fields contributed significantly to the increased methane levels in the atmosphere compared to a century earlier. There is now evidence that in recent years <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of methane from rice fields have declined, and <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of nitrous oxide may have increased. The major factors that control methane <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are the application of organic fertilizers and the water management regimes. Many other factors also affect <span class="hlt">emissions</span>, but these two appear to be the most important on the global scale. The trends in the area of rice harvested has slowed down world wide and has fallen in China, the major producer of rice in the world. Moreover, in China and possibly elsewhere, the <span class="hlt">emission</span> factor which is the average <span class="hlt">emission</span> of methane during the growing seasons per unit area, has also been falling because of changes in agricultural practices and economic conditions. A composite <span class="hlt">database</span> of observations from rice fields in China has been compiled and will be reviewed in this paper taking into account the changes of <span class="hlt">emissions</span> mentioned earlier. This <span class="hlt">database</span> will be a part of the NCEAS assessment undertaken to evaluate the global sources of methane. This research was supported by the Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02- 04ER63913, and the resources of the Andarz Co.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3867654','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3867654"><span id="translatedtitle">MAPS <span class="hlt">Database</span>: Medicinal plant Activities, Phytochemical and Structural <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ashfaq, Usman Ali; Mumtaz, Arooj; Qamar, Tahir ul; Fatima, Tabeer</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Drug development from natural sources is an important and fast developing area. Natural sources (plants) have been used to cure a range of diseases for Thousands of years. Different online medicinal plant <span class="hlt">databases</span> provide information about classifications, activities, phytochemicals and structure of phytochemicals in different formats. These <span class="hlt">databases</span> do not cover all aspects of medicinal plants. MAPS (Medicinal plant Activities, Phytochemicals & structural <span class="hlt">database</span>) has been constructed with uniqueness that it combines all information in one web resource and additionally provides test targets on which particular plant found to be effective with reference to the original paper as well. MAPS <span class="hlt">database</span> is user friendly information resource, including the data of > 500 medicinal plants. This <span class="hlt">database</span> includes phytochemical constituents, their structure in mol format, different activities possessed by the medicinal plant with the targets reported in literature. Availability http://www.mapsdatabase.com PMID:24391364</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5970248','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5970248"><span id="translatedtitle">Toxic release inventory <span class="hlt">database</span>. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic <span class="hlt">database</span>). Published Search</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>1993-09-01</p> <p>The bibliography contains citations concerning the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) <span class="hlt">database</span> issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The TRI <span class="hlt">database</span> was begun by EPA in response to Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986, which required EPA to establish an inventory by states of routine toxic chemical <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from certain facilities. There are over 300 chemicals and categories on these lists. The reporting requirement applies to owners and operators of manufacturing facilities that employ 10 or more full-time employees and that manufacture, process, or otherwise use a tested toxic chemical in excess of specified threshold quantities. The data file is contained on diskettes in dBASE III format or LOTUS 1-2-3 format available from the National Technical Information Service (NTIS). (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26387108','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26387108"><span id="translatedtitle">The Protein Ensemble <span class="hlt">Database</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Varadi, Mihaly; Tompa, Peter</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The scientific community's major conceptual notion of structural biology has recently shifted in emphasis from the classical structure-function paradigm due to the emergence of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). As opposed to their folded cousins, these proteins are defined by the lack of a stable 3D fold and a high degree of inherent structural heterogeneity that is closely tied to their function. Due to their flexible nature, solution techniques such as small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) are particularly well-suited for characterizing their biophysical properties. Computationally derived structural ensembles based on such experimental measurements provide models of the conformational sampling displayed by these proteins, and they may offer valuable insights into the functional consequences of inherent flexibility. The Protein Ensemble <span class="hlt">Database</span> (http://pedb.vib.be) is the first openly accessible, manually curated online resource storing the ensemble models, protocols used during the calculation procedure, and underlying primary experimental data derived from SAXS and/or NMR measurements. By making this previously inaccessible data freely available to researchers, this novel resource is expected to promote the development of more advanced modelling methodologies, facilitate the design of standardized calculation protocols, and consequently lead to a better understanding of how function arises from the disordered state. PMID:26387108</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19890008918','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19890008918"><span id="translatedtitle">The Mars Observer <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Albee, Arden L.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Mars Observer will study the surface, atmosphere, and climate of Mars in a systematic way over an entire Martian year. The observations of the surface will provide a <span class="hlt">database</span> that will be invaluable to the planning of a future Mars sample return mission. Mars Observer is planned for a September 1992 launch from the Space Shuttle, using an upper-stage. After the one year transit the spacecraft is injected into orbit about Mars and the orbit adjusted to a near-circular, sun-synchronous low-altitude, polar orbit. During the Martian year in this mapping orbit the instruments gather both geoscience data and climatological data by repetitive global mapping. The scientific objectives of the mission are to: (1) determine the global elemental and mineralogical character of the surface material; (2) define globally the topography and gravitational field; (3) establish the nature of the magnetic field; (4) determine the time and space distribution, abundance, sources, and sinks of volatile material and dust over a seasonal cycle; and (5) explore the structure and aspects of the circulation of the atmosphere. The science investigations and instruments for Mars Observer have been chosen with these objectives in mind. These instruments, the principal investigator or team leader and the objectives are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=34976&keyword=MRI&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=50005521&CFTOKEN=18393686','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=34976&keyword=MRI&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=50005521&CFTOKEN=18393686"><span id="translatedtitle">FINE PARTICLE <span class="hlt">EMISSIONS</span> INFORMATION SYSTEM REFERENCE MANUAL</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The report is a basic reference manual on the Fine Particle <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> Information System (FPEIS), a computerized <span class="hlt">database</span> on primary fine particle <span class="hlt">emissions</span> to the atmosphere from stationary point sources. The FPEIS is a component of the Environmental Assessment Data Systems (EAD...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=132470&keyword=spinal+AND+cord+AND+injury&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=55689631&CFTOKEN=67752598','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=132470&keyword=spinal+AND+cord+AND+injury&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=55689631&CFTOKEN=67752598"><span id="translatedtitle">SPINAL CORD INJURY (SCI) <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The National Spinal Cord Injury <span class="hlt">Database</span> has been in existence since 1973 and captures data from SCI cases in the United States. Since its inception, 24 federally funded Model SCI Care Systems have contributed data to the National SCI <span class="hlt">Database</span>. Statistics are derived from this da...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=greek+AND+math&pg=2&id=EJ413605','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=greek+AND+math&pg=2&id=EJ413605"><span id="translatedtitle">Mathematical Notation in Bibliographic <span class="hlt">Databases</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Pasterczyk, Catherine E.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Discusses ways in which using mathematical symbols to search online bibliographic <span class="hlt">databases</span> in scientific and technical areas can improve search results. The representations used for Greek letters, relations, binary operators, arrows, and miscellaneous special symbols in the MathSci, Inspec, Compendex, and Chemical Abstracts <span class="hlt">databases</span> are</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://physics.nist.gov/xcom','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://physics.nist.gov/xcom"><span id="translatedtitle">XCOM: Photon Cross Sections <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>SRD 8 XCOM: Photon Cross Sections <span class="hlt">Database</span> (Web, free access)   A web <span class="hlt">database</span> is provided which can be used to calculate photon cross sections for scattering, photoelectric absorption and pair production, as well as total attenuation coefficients, for any element, compound or mixture (Z <= 100) at energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=data+AND+broker&pg=5&id=EJ281400','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=data+AND+broker&pg=5&id=EJ281400"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> Proliferation: Implications for Librarians.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Nichol, Kathleen M.</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>Discusses problems of increasing numbers of <span class="hlt">databases</span> (standardization, vendor contracts, training, restricted access, duplicate citations), noting implications for change in librarian's role as supplier of decision making data (education, users groups, search aids, information brokers, collection evaluation, reference and source <span class="hlt">databases</span>,</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=relational+AND+database&pg=7&id=EJ382537','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=relational+AND+database&pg=7&id=EJ382537"><span id="translatedtitle">Authority Files for Microcomputer <span class="hlt">Databases</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Brandt, Scott</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Examines the function of an authority file and the application of authority control to microcomputer-based library <span class="hlt">databases</span>. Capabilities of relational <span class="hlt">database</span> management systems which allow for an authority control system on the microcomputer level are noted. (10 references) (MES)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/657991','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/657991"><span id="translatedtitle">Hanford Site technical baseline <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Porter, P.E., Westinghouse Hanford</p> <p>1996-05-10</p> <p>This document includes a cassette tape that contains the Hanford specific files that make up the Hanford Site Technical Baseline <span class="hlt">Database</span> as of May 10, 1996. The cassette tape also includes the delta files that delineate the differences between this revision and revision 3 (April 10, 1996) of the Hanford Site Technical Baseline <span class="hlt">Database</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/325669','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/325669"><span id="translatedtitle">Hanford Site technical baseline <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Porter, P.E.</p> <p>1996-09-30</p> <p>This document includes a cassette tape that contains the Hanford specific files that make up the Hanford Site Technical Baseline <span class="hlt">Database</span> as of September 30, 1996. The cassette tape also includes the delta files that dellinate the differences between this revision and revision 4 (May 10, 1996) of the Hanford Site Technical Baseline <span class="hlt">Database</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Database+AND+Management+AND+System&pg=2&id=EJ633240','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Database+AND+Management+AND+System&pg=2&id=EJ633240"><span id="translatedtitle">Content Independence in Multimedia <span class="hlt">Databases</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>de Vries, Arjen P.</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Investigates the role of data management in multimedia digital libraries, and its implications for the design of <span class="hlt">database</span> management systems. Introduces the notions of content abstraction and content independence. Proposes a blueprint of a new class of <span class="hlt">database</span> technology, which supports the basic functionality for the management of both content</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=higbee&pg=5&id=EJ757896','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=higbee&pg=5&id=EJ757896"><span id="translatedtitle">Instructional Strategies Online <span class="hlt">Database</span> (ISOD)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hodges, Dodi; Mandlebaum, Linda Higbee; Boff, Colleen; Miller, Mitch</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>This article describes an online <span class="hlt">database</span> of evidence-based learning strategies for students. The <span class="hlt">database</span> is a quick resource written in user-friendly language for teachers of all students but may be especially useful for teachers of students with disabilities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=apple+AND+benefits&pg=3&id=EJ366424','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=apple+AND+benefits&pg=3&id=EJ366424"><span id="translatedtitle">The Student-Designed <span class="hlt">Database</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Thomas, Rick</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>This discussion of the design of data files for <span class="hlt">databases</span> to be created by secondary school students uses AppleWorks software as an example. Steps needed to create and use a <span class="hlt">database</span> are explained, the benefits of group activity are described, and other possible projects are listed. (LRW)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/983696','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/983696"><span id="translatedtitle">Wind turbine reliability <span class="hlt">database</span> update.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Peters, Valerie A.; Hill, Roger Ray; Stinebaugh, Jennifer A.; Veers, Paul S.</p> <p>2009-03-01</p> <p>This report documents the status of the Sandia National Laboratories' Wind Plant Reliability <span class="hlt">Database</span>. Included in this report are updates on the form and contents of the <span class="hlt">Database</span>, which stems from a fivestep process of data partnerships, data definition and transfer, data formatting and normalization, analysis, and reporting. Selected observations are also reported.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=132487&keyword=substance+AND+abuse&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=57410815&CFTOKEN=52176949','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=132487&keyword=substance+AND+abuse&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=57410815&CFTOKEN=52176949"><span id="translatedtitle">DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION REGISTRATION <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), as part of its efforts to control the abuse and misuse of controlled substances and chemicals used in producing some over-the-counter drugs, maintains <span class="hlt">databases</span> of individuals registered to handle these substances. These <span class="hlt">databases</span> are av...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930017283','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930017283"><span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">database</span> for propagation models</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kantak, Anil V.; Suwitra, Krisjani S.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>In June 1991, a paper at the fifteenth NASA Propagation Experimenters Meeting (NAPEX 15) was presented outlining the development of a <span class="hlt">database</span> for propagation models. The <span class="hlt">database</span> is designed to allow the scientists and experimenters in the propagation field to process their data through any known and accepted propagation model. The architecture of the <span class="hlt">database</span> also incorporates the possibility of changing the standard models in the <span class="hlt">database</span> to fit the scientist's or the experimenter's needs. The <span class="hlt">database</span> not only provides powerful software to process the data generated by the experiments, but is also a time- and energy-saving tool for plotting results, generating tables, and producing impressive and crisp hard copy for presentation and filing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/7139440','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/7139440"><span id="translatedtitle">The magnet components <span class="hlt">database</span> system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Baggett, M.J. ); Leedy, R.; Saltmarsh, C.; Tompkins, J.C. )</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>The philosophy, structure, and usage MagCom, the SSC magnet components <span class="hlt">database</span>, are described. The <span class="hlt">database</span> has been implemented in Sybase (a powerful relational <span class="hlt">database</span> management system) on a UNIX-based workstation at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL); magnet project collaborators can access the <span class="hlt">database</span> via network connections. The <span class="hlt">database</span> was designed to contain the specifications and measured values of important properties for major materials, plus configuration information (specifying which individual items were used in each cable, coil, and magnet) and the test results on completed magnets. These data will facilitate the tracking and control of the production process as well as the correlation of magnet performance with the properties of its constituents. 3 refs., 10 figs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1232298-gottcha-database-version','SCIGOV-ESTSC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1232298-gottcha-database-version"><span id="translatedtitle">GOTTCHA <span class="hlt">Database</span>, Version 1</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/">Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2015-08-03</p> <p>One major challenge in the field of shotgun metagenomics is the accurate identification of the organisms present within the community, based on classification of short sequence reads. Though microbial community profiling methods have emerged to attempt to rapidly classify the millions of reads output from contemporary sequencers, the combination of incomplete <span class="hlt">databases</span>, similarity among otherwise divergent genomes, and the large volumes of sequencing data required for metagenome sequencing has led to unacceptably high false discoverymore » rates (FDR). Here we present the application of a novel, gene-independent and signature-based metagenomic taxonomic profiling tool with significantly smaller FDR, which is also capable of classifying never-before seen genomes into the appropriate parent taxa.The algorithm is based upon three primary computational phases: (I) genomic decomposition into bit vectors, (II) bit vector intersections to identify shared regions, and (III) bit vector subtractions to remove shared regions and reveal unique, signature regions.In the Decomposition phase, genomic data is first masked to highlight only the valid (non-ambiguous) regions and then decomposed into overlapping 24-mers. The k-mers are sorted along with their start positions, de-replicated, and then prefixed, to minimize data duplication. The prefixes are indexed and an identical data structure is created for the start positions to mimic that of the k-mer data structure.During the Intersection phase -- which is the most computationally intensive phase -- as an all-vs-all comparison is made, the number of comparisons is first reduced by four methods: (a) Prefix restriction, (b) Overlap detection, (c) Overlap restriction, and (d) Result recording. In Prefix restriction, only k-mers of the same prefix are compared. Within that group, potential overlap of k-mer suffixes that would result in a non-empty set intersection are screened for. If such an overlap exists, the region which intersects is first reduced by performing a binary search of the boundary suffixes of the smaller set into the larger set, which defines the limits of the zipper-based intersection process. Rather than recording the actual k-mers of the intersection, another data structure of identical "shape" is created which consists of only bit vectors so that only a 1 or 0 will be stored in the location of the k-mer suffix that was found in the intersection. This reduces the amount of data generated and stored considerably.During the Subtraction phase, relevant intersection bitmasks are first unionized together to form a single bitmask which is then applied over the original genome to reveal only those regions of the genome that are unique. These regions are then exported to disk in FASTA format and used in the application of determining the constituents of an unknown metagenomic community.The <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span> provided is the result of the algorithm described.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1232298','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1232298"><span id="translatedtitle">GOTTCHA <span class="hlt">Database</span>, Version 1</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p></p> <p>2015-08-03</p> <p>One major challenge in the field of shotgun metagenomics is the accurate identification of the organisms present within the community, based on classification of short sequence reads. Though microbial community profiling methods have emerged to attempt to rapidly classify the millions of reads output from contemporary sequencers, the combination of incomplete <span class="hlt">databases</span>, similarity among otherwise divergent genomes, and the large volumes of sequencing data required for metagenome sequencing has led to unacceptably high false discovery rates (FDR). Here we present the application of a novel, gene-independent and signature-based metagenomic taxonomic profiling tool with significantly smaller FDR, which is also capable of classifying never-before seen genomes into the appropriate parent taxa.The algorithm is based upon three primary computational phases: (I) genomic decomposition into bit vectors, (II) bit vector intersections to identify shared regions, and (III) bit vector subtractions to remove shared regions and reveal unique, signature regions.In the Decomposition phase, genomic data is first masked to highlight only the valid (non-ambiguous) regions and then decomposed into overlapping 24-mers. The k-mers are sorted along with their start positions, de-replicated, and then prefixed, to minimize data duplication. The prefixes are indexed and an identical data structure is created for the start positions to mimic that of the k-mer data structure.During the Intersection phase -- which is the most computationally intensive phase -- as an all-vs-all comparison is made, the number of comparisons is first reduced by four methods: (a) Prefix restriction, (b) Overlap detection, (c) Overlap restriction, and (d) Result recording. In Prefix restriction, only k-mers of the same prefix are compared. Within that group, potential overlap of k-mer suffixes that would result in a non-empty set intersection are screened for. If such an overlap exists, the region which intersects is first reduced by performing a binary search of the boundary suffixes of the smaller set into the larger set, which defines the limits of the zipper-based intersection process. Rather than recording the actual k-mers of the intersection, another data structure of identical "shape" is created which consists of only bit vectors so that only a 1 or 0 will be stored in the location of the k-mer suffix that was found in the intersection. This reduces the amount of data generated and stored considerably.During the Subtraction phase, relevant intersection bitmasks are first unionized together to form a single bitmask which is then applied over the original genome to reveal only those regions of the genome that are unique. These regions are then exported to disk in FASTA format and used in the application of determining the constituents of an unknown metagenomic community.The <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span> provided is the result of the algorithm described.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=286660','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=286660"><span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of cotton gin particulate matter <span class="hlt">emissions-database</span> development</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>In 2006, EPA implemented a more rigorous standard for PM2.5 in 2006 and all the cotton gins are or will be impacted by this standard. The primary issues associated with implementing this standard are: 1) very limited cotton gin PM2.5 data are available; 2) sampler errors, recent research indicates t...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=148904&keyword=relational+AND+database&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=58822387&CFTOKEN=12639444','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=148904&keyword=relational+AND+database&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=58822387&CFTOKEN=12639444"><span id="translatedtitle">SPECIATE--EPA'S <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span> OF SPECIATED <span class="hlt">EMISSION</span> PROFILES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>SPECIATE is EPA's repository of Total Organic Compound and Particulate Matter speciated profiles for a wide variety of sources. The profiles in this system are provided for air quality dispersion modeling and as a library for source-receptor and source apportionment type models. ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110013114','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110013114"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> of Properties of Meteors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Suggs, Rob; Anthea, Coster</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">database</span> of properties of meteors, and software that provides access to the <span class="hlt">database</span>, are being developed as a contribution to continuing efforts to model the characteristics of meteors with increasing accuracy. Such modeling is necessary for evaluation of the risk of penetration of spacecraft by meteors. For each meteor in the <span class="hlt">database</span>, the record will include an identification, date and time, radiant properties, ballistic coefficient, radar cross section, size, density, and orbital elements. The property of primary interest in the present case is density, and one of the primary goals in this case is to derive densities of meteors from their atmospheric decelerations. The <span class="hlt">database</span> and software are expected to be valid anywhere in the solar system. The <span class="hlt">database</span> will incorporate new data plus results of meteoroid analyses that, heretofore, have not been readily available to the aerospace community. Taken together, the <span class="hlt">database</span> and software constitute a model that is expected to provide improved estimates of densities and to result in improved risk analyses for interplanetary spacecraft. It is planned to distribute the <span class="hlt">database</span> and software on a compact disk.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940027936','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940027936"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> tomography for commercial application</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kostoff, Ronald N.; Eberhart, Henry J.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Database</span> tomography is a method for extracting themes and their relationships from text. The algorithms, employed begin with word frequency and word proximity analysis and build upon these results. When the word '<span class="hlt">database</span>' is used, think of medical or police records, patents, journals, or papers, etc. (any text information that can be computer stored). <span class="hlt">Database</span> tomography features a full text, user interactive technique enabling the user to identify areas of interest, establish relationships, and map trends for a deeper understanding of an area of interest. <span class="hlt">Database</span> tomography concepts and applications have been reported in journals and presented at conferences. One important feature of the <span class="hlt">database</span> tomography algorithm is that it can be used on a <span class="hlt">database</span> of any size, and will facilitate the users ability to understand the volume of content therein. While employing the process to identify research opportunities it became obvious that this promising technology has potential applications for business, science, engineering, law, and academe. Examples include evaluating marketing trends, strategies, relationships and associations. Also, the <span class="hlt">database</span> tomography process would be a powerful component in the area of competitive intelligence, national security intelligence and patent analysis. User interests and involvement cannot be overemphasized.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15458163','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15458163"><span id="translatedtitle">Draft secure medical <span class="hlt">database</span> standard.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pangalos, George</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Medical <span class="hlt">database</span> security is a particularly important issue for all Healthcare establishments. Medical information systems are intended to support a wide range of pertinent health issues today, for example: assure the quality of care, support effective management of the health services institutions, monitor and contain the cost of care, implement technology into care without violating social values, ensure the equity and availability of care, preserve humanity despite the proliferation of technology etc.. In this context, medical <span class="hlt">database</span> security aims primarily to support: high availability, accuracy and consistency of the stored data, the medical professional secrecy and confidentiality, and the protection of the privacy of the patient. These properties, though of technical nature, basically require that the system is actually helpful for medical care and not harmful to patients. These later properties require in turn not only that fundamental ethical principles are not violated by employing <span class="hlt">database</span> systems, but instead, are effectively enforced by technical means. This document reviews the existing and emerging work on the security of medical <span class="hlt">database</span> systems. It presents in detail the related problems and requirements related to medical <span class="hlt">database</span> security. It addresses the problems of medical <span class="hlt">database</span> security policies, secure design methodologies and implementation techniques. It also describes the current legal framework and regulatory requirements for medical <span class="hlt">database</span> security. The issue of medical <span class="hlt">database</span> security guidelines is also examined in detailed. The current national and international efforts in the area are studied. It also gives an overview of the research work in the area. The document also presents in detail the most complete to our knowledge set of security guidelines for the development and operation of medical <span class="hlt">database</span> systems. PMID:15458163</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26518717','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26518717"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Databases</span> of the marine metagenomics.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mineta, Katsuhiko; Gojobori, Takashi</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>The metagenomic data obtained from marine environments is significantly useful for understanding marine microbial communities. In comparison with the conventional amplicon-based approach of metagenomics, the recent shotgun sequencing-based approach has become a powerful tool that provides an efficient way of grasping a diversity of the entire microbial community at a sampling point in the sea. However, this approach accelerates accumulation of the metagenome data as well as increase of data complexity. Moreover, when metagenomic approach is used for monitoring a time change of marine environments at multiple locations of the seawater, accumulation of metagenomics data will become tremendous with an enormous speed. Because this kind of situation has started becoming of reality at many marine research institutions and stations all over the world, it looks obvious that the data management and analysis will be confronted by the so-called Big Data issues such as how the <span class="hlt">database</span> can be constructed in an efficient way and how useful knowledge should be extracted from a vast amount of the data. In this review, we summarize the outline of all the major <span class="hlt">databases</span> of marine metagenome that are currently publically available, noting that <span class="hlt">database</span> exclusively on marine metagenome is none but the number of metagenome <span class="hlt">databases</span> including marine metagenome data are six, unexpectedly still small. We also extend our explanation to the <span class="hlt">databases</span>, as reference <span class="hlt">database</span> we call, that will be useful for constructing a marine metagenome <span class="hlt">database</span> as well as complementing important information with the <span class="hlt">database</span>. Then, we would point out a number of challenges to be conquered in constructing the marine metagenome <span class="hlt">database</span>. PMID:26518717</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PhDT.......103T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010PhDT.......103T"><span id="translatedtitle">Cloudsat tropical cyclone <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tourville, Natalie D.</p> <p></p> <p>CloudSat (CS), the first 94 GHz spaceborne cloud profiling radar (CPR), launched in 2006 to study the vertical distribution of clouds. Not only are CS observations revealing inner vertical cloud details of water and ice globally but CS overpasses of tropical cyclones (TC's) are providing a new and exciting opportunity to study the vertical structure of these storm systems. CS TC observations are providing first time vertical views of TC's and demonstrate a unique way to observe TC structure remotely from space. Since December 2009, CS has intersected every globally named TC (within 1000 km of storm center) for a total of 5,278 unique overpasses of tropical systems (disturbance, tropical depression, tropical storm and hurricane/typhoon/cyclone (HTC)). In conjunction with the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), each CS TC overpass is processed into a data file containing observational data from the afternoon constellation of satellites (A-TRAIN), Navy's Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System Model (NOGAPS), European Center for Medium range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) model and best track storm data. This study will describe the components and statistics of the CS TC <span class="hlt">database</span>, present case studies of CS TC overpasses with complementary A-TRAIN observations and compare average reflectivity stratifications of TC's across different atmospheric regimes (wind shear, SST, latitude, maximum wind speed and basin). Average reflectivity stratifications reveal that characteristics in each basin vary from year to year and are dependent upon eye overpasses of HTC strength storms and ENSO phase. West Pacific (WPAC) basin storms are generally larger in size (horizontally and vertically) and have greater values of reflectivity at a predefined height than all other basins. Storm structure at higher latitudes expands horizontally. Higher vertical wind shear (≥ 9.5 m/s) reduces cloud top height (CTH) and the intensity of precipitation cores, especially in HTC strength storms. Average zero and ten dBZ height thresholds confirm WPAC storms loft precipitation sized particles higher into the atmosphere than in other basins. Two CS eye overpasses (32 hours apart) of a weakening Typhoon Nida in 2009 reveal the collapse of precipitation cores, warm core anomaly and upper tropospheric ice water content (IWC) under steady moderate shear conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2010/1172/','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2010/1172/"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> of recent tsunami deposits</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Peters, Robert; Jaffe, Bruce E.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>This report describes a <span class="hlt">database</span> of sedimentary characteristics of tsunami deposits derived from published accounts of tsunami deposit investigations conducted shortly after the occurrence of a tsunami. The <span class="hlt">database</span> contains 228 entries, each entry containing data from up to 71 categories. It includes data from 51 publications covering 15 tsunamis distributed between 16 countries. The <span class="hlt">database</span> encompasses a wide range of depositional settings including tropical islands, beaches, coastal plains, river banks, agricultural fields, and urban environments. It includes data from both local tsunamis and teletsunamis. The data are valuable for interpreting prehistorical, historical, and modern tsunami deposits, and for the development of criteria to identify tsunami deposits in the geologic record.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/884638','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/884638"><span id="translatedtitle">NUCLEAR <span class="hlt">DATABASES</span> FOR REACTOR APPLICATIONS.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>PRITYCHENKO, B.; ARCILLA, R.; BURROWS, T.; HERMAN, M.W.; MUGHABGHAB, S.; OBLOZINSKY, P.; ROCHMAN, D.; SONZOGNI, A.A.; TULI, J.; WINCHELL, D.F.</p> <p>2006-06-05</p> <p>The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC): An overview of nuclear <span class="hlt">databases</span>, related products, nuclear data Web services and publications. The NNDC collects, evaluates, and disseminates nuclear physics data for basic research and applied nuclear technologies. The NNDC maintains and contributes to the nuclear reaction (ENDF, CSISRS) and nuclear structure <span class="hlt">databases</span> along with several others <span class="hlt">databases</span> (CapGam, MIRD, IRDF-2002) and provides coordination for the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) and the US Nuclear Data Program (USNDP). The Center produces several publications and codes such as Atlas of Neutron Resonances, Nuclear Wallet Cards booklets and develops codes, such as nuclear reaction model code Empire.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JPhCS.396e2060P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JPhCS.396e2060P"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> characterisation of HEP applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Piorkowski, Mariusz; Grancher, Eric; Topurov, Anton</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Oracle-based <span class="hlt">database</span> applications underpin many key aspects of operations for both the LHC accelerator and the LHC experiments. In addition to the overall performance, the predictability of the response is a key requirement to ensure smooth operations and delivering predictability requires understanding the applications from the ground up. Fortunately, <span class="hlt">database</span> management systems provide several tools to check, measure, analyse and gather useful information. We present our experiences characterising the performance of several typical HEP <span class="hlt">database</span> applications performance characterisations that were used to deliver improved predictability and scalability as well as for optimising the hardware platform choice as we migrated to new hardware and Oracle 11g.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70017471','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70017471"><span id="translatedtitle">New geothermal <span class="hlt">database</span> for Utah</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Blackett, Robert E.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>The Utah Geological Survey complied a preliminary <span class="hlt">database</span> consisting of over 800 records on thermal wells and springs in Utah with temperatures of 20??C or greater. Each record consists of 35 fields, including location of the well or spring, temperature, depth, flow-rate, and chemical analyses of water samples. Developed for applications on personal computers, the <span class="hlt">database</span> will be useful for geochemical, statistical, and other geothermal related studies. A preliminary map of thermal wells and springs in Utah, which accompanies the <span class="hlt">database</span>, could eventually incorporate heat-flow information, bottom-hole temperatures from oil and gas wells, traces of Quaternary faults, and locations of young volcanic centers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4411498','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4411498"><span id="translatedtitle">Biological <span class="hlt">Databases</span> for Human Research</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Zou, Dong; Ma, Lina; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Zhang</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The completion of the Human Genome Project lays a foundation for systematically studying the human genome from evolutionary history to precision medicine against diseases. With the explosive growth of biological data, there is an increasing number of biological <span class="hlt">databases</span> that have been developed in aid of human-related research. Here we present a collection of human-related biological <span class="hlt">databases</span> and provide a mini-review by classifying them into different categories according to their data types. As human-related <span class="hlt">databases</span> continue to grow not only in count but also in volume, challenges are ahead in big data storage, processing, exchange and curation. PMID:25712261</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.5298F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.5298F"><span id="translatedtitle">The ChArMEx <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ferré, Helene; Belmahfoud, Nizar; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Descloitres, Jacques; Fleury, Laurence; Focsa, Loredana; Henriot, Nicolas; Mastrorillo, Laurence; Mière, Arnaud; Vermeulen, Anne</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) aims at a scientific assessment of the present and future state of the atmospheric environment in the Mediterranean Basin, and of its impacts on the regional climate, air quality, and marine biogeochemistry. The project includes long term monitoring of environmental parameters, intensive field campaigns, use of satellite data and modelling studies. Therefore ChARMEx scientists produce and need to access a wide diversity of data. In this context, the objective of the <span class="hlt">database</span> task is to organize data management, distribution system and services, such as facilitating the exchange of information and stimulating the collaboration between researchers within the ChArMEx community, and beyond. The <span class="hlt">database</span> relies on a strong collaboration between OMP and ICARE data centres and has been set up in the framework of the Mediterranean Integrated Studies at Regional And Locals Scales (MISTRALS) program data portal. All the data produced by or of interest for the ChArMEx community will be documented in the data catalogue and accessible through the <span class="hlt">database</span> website: http://mistrals.sedoo.fr/ChArMEx. At present, the ChArMEx <span class="hlt">database</span> contains about 75 datasets, including 50 in situ datasets (2012 and 2013 campaigns, Ersa background monitoring station), 25 model outputs (dust model intercomparison, MEDCORDEX scenarios), and a high resolution <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventory over the Mediterranean. Many in situ datasets have been inserted in a relational <span class="hlt">database</span>, in order to enable more accurate data selection and download of different datasets in a shared format. The <span class="hlt">database</span> website offers different tools: - A registration procedure which enables any scientist to accept the data policy and apply for a user <span class="hlt">database</span> account. - A data catalogue that complies with metadata international standards (ISO 19115-19139; INSPIRE European Directive; Global Change Master Directory Thesaurus). - Metadata forms to document observations or products that will be provided to the <span class="hlt">database</span>. - A search tool to browse the catalogue using thematic, geographic and/or temporal criteria. - A shopping-cart web interface to order in situ data files. - A web interface to select and access to homogenized datasets. Interoperability between the two data centres is being set up using the OPEnDAP protocol. The data portal will soon propose a user-friendly access to satellite products managed by the ICARE data centre (SEVIRI, TRIMM, PARASOL...). In order to meet the operational needs of the airborne and ground based observational teams during the ChArMEx 2012 and 2013 campaigns, a day-to-day chart and report display website has been developed too: http://choc.sedoo.org. It offers a convenient way to browse weather conditions and chemical composition during the campaign periods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/dataexplorer/servlets/purl/1077548','SCIGOV-DOEDE'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/dataexplorer/servlets/purl/1077548"><span id="translatedtitle">Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/dataexplorer">DOE Data Explorer</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>DOEs Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology <span class="hlt">Database</span> provides up-to-date information on marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, both in the U.S. and around the world. The <span class="hlt">database</span> includes wave, tidal, current, and ocean thermal energy, and contains information on the various energy conversion technologies, companies active in the field, and development of projects in the water. Depending on the needs of the user, the <span class="hlt">database</span> can present a snapshot of projects in a given region, assess the progress of a certain technology type, or provide a comprehensive view of the entire marine and hydrokinetic energy industry. Results are displayed as a list of technologies, companies, or projects. Data can be filtered by a number of criteria, including country/region, technology type, generation capacity, and technology or project stage. The <span class="hlt">database</span> was updated in 2009 to include ocean thermal energy technologies, companies, and projects.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9016504','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9016504"><span id="translatedtitle">The NRSub <span class="hlt">database</span>: update 1997.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Perrire, G; Moszer, I; Gojobori, T</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>In the context of the international project aiming at sequencing the whole genome of Bacillus subtilis we have developed NRSub, a non-redundant <span class="hlt">database</span> of sequences from this organism. Starting from the B.subtilis sequences available in the repository collections we have removed all encountered duplications, then we have added extra annotations to the sequences (e.g. accession numbers for the genes, locations on the genetic map, codon usage index). We have also added cross-references with EMBL/GenBank/DDBJ, MEDLINE, SWISS-PROT and ENZYME <span class="hlt">databases</span>. NRSub is distributed through anonymous FTP as a text file in EMBL format and as an ACNUC <span class="hlt">database</span>. It is also possible to access the <span class="hlt">database</span> through two dedicated World Wide Web servers located in France (http://acnuc.univ-lyon1.fr/nrsub/nrsub.++ +html ) and in Japan (http://ddbjs4h.genes.nig.ac.jp/ ). PMID:9016504</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=137445&keyword=international+AND+communication&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=58957486&CFTOKEN=75744692','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=137445&keyword=international+AND+communication&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=58957486&CFTOKEN=75744692"><span id="translatedtitle">SUPERSITES INTEGRATED RELATIONAL <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span> (SIRD)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>As part of EPA's Particulate Matter (PM) Supersites Program (Program), the University of Maryland designed and developed the Supersites Integrated Relational <span class="hlt">Database</span> (SIRD). Measurement data in SIRD include comprehensive air quality data from the 7 Supersite program locations f...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8445E..3HR','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8445E..3HR"><span id="translatedtitle">Navy precision optical interferometer <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ryan, K. K.; Jorgensen, A. M.; Hall, T.; Armstrong, J. T.; Hutter, D.; Mozurkewich, D.</p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>The Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI) has now been recording astronomical observations for the better part of two decades. During that time period hundreds of thousands of observations have been obtained, with a total data volume of multiple terabytes. Additionally, in the next few years the data rate from the NPOI is expected to increase significantly. To make it easier for NPOI users to search the NPOI observations and to make it easier for them to obtain data, we have constructed a easily accessible and searchable <span class="hlt">database</span> of observations. The <span class="hlt">database</span> is based on a MySQL server and uses standard query language (SQL). In this paper we will describe the <span class="hlt">database</span> table layout and show examples of possible <span class="hlt">database</span> queries.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://epi.grants.cancer.gov/pharm/pharmacoepi_db/interaction.html','NCI'); return false;" href="http://epi.grants.cancer.gov/pharm/pharmacoepi_db/interaction.html"><span id="translatedtitle">InterAction <span class="hlt">Database</span> (IADB)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.cancer.gov">Cancer.gov</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The InterAction <span class="hlt">Database</span> includes demographic and prescription information for more than 500,000 patients in the northern and middle Netherlands and has been integrated with other systems to enhance data collection and analysis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ocg.cancer.gov/print/239','NCI'); return false;" href="https://ocg.cancer.gov/print/239"><span id="translatedtitle">Public <span class="hlt">database</span> aids drug researchers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.cancer.gov">Cancer.gov</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Researchers at the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT have released ChemBank 2.0, a major upgrade to ChemBank, a publicly available <span class="hlt">database</span> poised to enhance scientists' capabilities in drug discovery.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1077548','SCIGOV-DOEDE'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1077548"><span id="translatedtitle">Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/dataexplorer">DOE Data Explorer</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>DOE’s Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology <span class="hlt">Database</span> provides up-to-date information on marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, both in the U.S. and around the world. The <span class="hlt">database</span> includes wave, tidal, current, and ocean thermal energy, and contains information on the various energy conversion technologies, companies active in the field, and development of projects in the water. Depending on the needs of the user, the <span class="hlt">database</span> can present a snapshot of projects in a given region, assess the progress of a certain technology type, or provide a comprehensive view of the entire marine and hydrokinetic energy industry. Results are displayed as a list of technologies, companies, or projects. Data can be filtered by a number of criteria, including country/region, technology type, generation capacity, and technology or project stage. The <span class="hlt">database</span> was updated in 2009 to include ocean thermal energy technologies, companies, and projects.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009ASPC..411..442M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009ASPC..411..442M"><span id="translatedtitle">The Binary Star <span class="hlt">Database</span> -- BDB</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Malkov, O.; Oblak, E.; Debray, B.</p> <p>2009-09-01</p> <p>The Binary Star <span class="hlt">Database</span> (http://bdb.obs-besancon.fr) (BDB) provides astronomers with data for binary and multiple stars from all observational categories. We present the current structure of the <span class="hlt">database</span> and the form and content of the data. We also discuss the implementation issues that arise in integrating heterogeneous data sources, the object identification problems,and our future work to extend the capabilities of BDB.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2245743','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2245743"><span id="translatedtitle">Query: The Language of <span class="hlt">Databases</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hammond, W. Ed; Straube, M.J.; Blunden, P.B.; Stead, W.W.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>Query languages have become increasingly important as comprehensive medical <span class="hlt">databases</span> have become a part of the available knowledge base for patient care. As the user community expands and the need for bedside query arises, the requirement for a fast, easy-to-use, interactive query system must be met. This paper describes the evolution of a query language for the TMR <span class="hlt">database</span>, discusses problems and limitations of the system, and proposes new approaches to the problem.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020083219','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020083219"><span id="translatedtitle">Small Business Innovations (Integrated <span class="hlt">Database</span>)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Because of the diversity of NASA's information systems, it was necessary to develop DAVID as a central <span class="hlt">database</span> management system. Under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant, Ken Wanderman and Associates, Inc. designed software tools enabling scientists to interface with DAVID and commercial <span class="hlt">database</span> management systems, as well as artificial intelligence programs. The software has been installed at a number of data centers and is commercially available.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.nist.gov/srd/nist71.cfm','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://www.nist.gov/srd/nist71.cfm"><span id="translatedtitle">Electron Inelastic-Mean-Free-Path <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>SRD 71 NIST Electron Inelastic-Mean-Free-Path <span class="hlt">Database</span> (PC <span class="hlt">database</span>, no charge)   This <span class="hlt">database</span> provides values of electron inelastic mean free paths (IMFPs) for use in quantitative surface analyses by AES and XPS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1077568','SCIGOV-DOEDE'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1077568"><span id="translatedtitle">Rice Glycosyltransferase (GT) Phylogenomic <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/dataexplorer">DOE Data Explorer</a></p> <p>Ronald, Pamela</p> <p></p> <p>The Ronald Laboratory staff at the University of California-Davis has a primary research focus on the genes of the rice plant. They study the role that genetics plays in the way rice plants respond to their environment. They created the Rice GT <span class="hlt">Database</span> in order to integrate functional genomic information for putative rice Glycosyltransferases (GTs). This <span class="hlt">database</span> contains information on nearly 800 putative rice GTs (gene models) identified by sequence similarity searches based on the Carbohydrate Active enZymes (CAZy) <span class="hlt">database</span>. The Rice GT <span class="hlt">Database</span> provides a platform to display user-selected functional genomic data on a phylogenetic tree. This includes sequence information, mutant line information, expression data, etc. An interactive chromosomal map shows the position of all rice GTs, and links to rice annotation <span class="hlt">databases</span> are included. The format is intended to "facilitate the comparison of closely related GTs within different families, as well as perform global comparisons between sets of related families." [From http://ricephylogenomics.ucdavis.edu/cellwalls/gt/genInfo.shtml] See also the primary paper discussing this work: Peijian Cao, Laura E. Bartley, Ki-Hong Jung and Pamela C. Ronalda. Construction of a Rice Glycosyltransferase Phylogenomic <span class="hlt">Database</span> and Identification of Rice-Diverged Glycosyltransferases. Molecular Plant, 2008, 1(5): 858-877.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020068835&hterms=internet&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dinternet','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020068835&hterms=internet&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dinternet"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> Reports Over the Internet</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Smith, Dean Lance</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Most of the summer was spent developing software that would permit existing test report forms to be printed over the web on a printer that is supported by Adobe Acrobat Reader. The data is stored in a DBMS (Data Base Management System). The client asks for the information from the <span class="hlt">database</span> using an HTML (Hyper Text Markup Language) form in a web browser. JavaScript is used with the forms to assist the user and verify the integrity of the entered data. Queries to a <span class="hlt">database</span> are made in SQL (Sequential Query Language), a widely supported standard for making queries to <span class="hlt">databases</span>. Java servlets, programs written in the Java programming language running under the control of network server software, interrogate the <span class="hlt">database</span> and complete a PDF form template kept in a file. The completed report is sent to the browser requesting the report. Some errors are sent to the browser in an HTML web page, others are reported to the server. Access to the <span class="hlt">databases</span> was restricted since the data are being transported to new DBMS software that will run on new hardware. However, the SQL queries were made to Microsoft Access, a DBMS that is available on most PCs (Personal Computers). Access does support the SQL commands that were used, and a <span class="hlt">database</span> was created with Access that contained typical data for the report forms. Some of the problems and features are discussed below.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21301166','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21301166"><span id="translatedtitle">SPECTRAFACTORY.NET: A <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span> OF MOLECULAR MODEL SPECTRA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Cami, J.; Van Malderen, R.; Markwick, A. J. E-mail: Andrew.Markwick@manchester.ac.uk</p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>We present a homogeneous <span class="hlt">database</span> of synthetic molecular absorption and <span class="hlt">emission</span> spectra from the optical to mm wavelengths for a large range of temperatures and column densities relevant for various astrophysical purposes, but in particular for the analysis, identification, and first-order analysis of molecular bands in spectroscopic observations. All spectra are calculated in the LTE limit from several molecular line lists, and are presented at various spectral resolving powers corresponding to several specific instrument simulations. The <span class="hlt">database</span> is available online at http://www.spectrafactory.net, where users can freely browse, search, display, and download the spectra. We describe how additional model spectra can be requested for (automatic) calculation and inclusion. The <span class="hlt">database</span> already contains over half a million model spectra for 39 molecules (96 different isotopologues) over the wavelength range 350 nm-3 mm ({approx}3-30000 cm{sup -1})</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120015966','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120015966"><span id="translatedtitle">Atomic Data for the CHIANTI <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Bhatia, Anand K.; Landi, E.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The CHIANTI spectral code consists of an atomic <span class="hlt">database</span> and a suite of computer programs to calculate the optically thin spectrum of astrophysical objects and to carry out spectroscopic plasma diagnostics. The <span class="hlt">database</span> includes atomic energy levels, wavelengths, radiative transition rates, collisional excitation, ionization and recombination rate coefficients, as well as data to calculate free-free, free-bound and two-photon continuum <span class="hlt">emission</span>. In recent years, we have been pursuing a program to calculate atomic data for ions whose lines have been observed in astrophysical spectra but have been neglected in the literature, and to provide CHIANTI with all the data necessary to predict line intensities. There are two types of such ions: those for which calculations are available for low-energy configurations but not for high-energy configurations (i.e., C-like, N-like, O-like systems), and ions that have never or only seldom been studied. This poster will summarize the current status of this project and indicate the future activities .</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/7199113','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/7199113"><span id="translatedtitle">Utilization of <span class="hlt">databases</span> to manage resources</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sheridan, T.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>This paper describes how <span class="hlt">databases</span> are used by the Advanced Photon Source (APS) Project at Argonne National Laboratory to help manage the project and its resources. It documents our experiences in implementing <span class="hlt">database</span> technology in a large scientific project. Some of the topics that will be discussed include: The APS <span class="hlt">database</span> environment; decentralizing <span class="hlt">databases</span>; extending the <span class="hlt">database</span> environment (graphical, spreadsheet and barcode interfaces);choosing a <span class="hlt">database</span>; and software development issues.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10172612','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10172612"><span id="translatedtitle">Utilization of <span class="hlt">databases</span> to manage resources</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sheridan, T.</p> <p>1992-09-01</p> <p>This paper describes how <span class="hlt">databases</span> are used by the Advanced Photon Source (APS) Project at Argonne National Laboratory to help manage the project and its resources. It documents our experiences in implementing <span class="hlt">database</span> technology in a large scientific project. Some of the topics that will be discussed include: The APS <span class="hlt">database</span> environment; decentralizing <span class="hlt">databases</span>; extending the <span class="hlt">database</span> environment (graphical, spreadsheet and barcode interfaces);choosing a <span class="hlt">database</span>; and software development issues.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3259264','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3259264"><span id="translatedtitle">Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent <span class="hlt">Database</span> (MICAD): Evolution and Progress</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chopra, Arvind; Shan, Liang; Eckelman, W. C.; Leung, Kam; Latterner, Martin; Bryant, Stephen H.; Menkens, Anne</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of writing this review is to showcase the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent <span class="hlt">Database</span> (MICAD; www.micad.nlm.nih.gov) to students, researchers and clinical investigators interested in the different aspects of molecular imaging. This <span class="hlt">database</span> provides freely accessible, current, online scientific information regarding molecular imaging (MI) probes and contrast agents (CA) used for positron <span class="hlt">emission</span> tomography, single-photon <span class="hlt">emission</span> computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray/computed tomography, optical imaging and ultrasound imaging. Detailed information on >1000 agents in MICAD is provided in a chapter format and can be accessed through PubMed. Lists containing >4250 unique MI probes and CAs published in peer-reviewed journals and agents approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as well as a CSV file summarizing all chapters in the <span class="hlt">database</span> can be downloaded from the MICAD homepage. Users can search for agents in MICAD on the basis of imaging modality, source of signal/contrast, agent or target category, preclinical or clinical studies, and text words. Chapters in MICAD describe the chemical characteristics (structures linked to PubChem), the in vitro and in vivo activities and other relevant information regarding an imaging agent. All references in the chapters have links to PubMed. A Supplemental Information Section in each chapter is available to share unpublished information regarding an agent. A Guest Author Program is available to facilitate rapid expansion of the <span class="hlt">database</span>. Members of the imaging community registered with MICAD periodically receive an e-mail announcement (eAnnouncement) that lists new chapters uploaded to the <span class="hlt">database</span>. Users of MICAD are encouraged to provide feedback, comments or suggestions for further improvement of the <span class="hlt">database</span> by writing to the editors at: micad@nlm.nih.gov PMID:21989943</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4383959','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4383959"><span id="translatedtitle">The IPD and IMGT/HLA <span class="hlt">database</span>: allele variant <span class="hlt">databases</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Robinson, James; Halliwell, Jason A.; Hayhurst, James D.; Flicek, Paul; Parham, Peter; Marsh, StevenG.E.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The Immuno Polymorphism <span class="hlt">Database</span> (IPD) was developed to provide a centralized system for the study of polymorphism in genes of the immune system. Through the IPD project we have established a central platform for the curation and publication of locus-specific <span class="hlt">databases</span> involved either directly or related to the function of the Major Histocompatibility Complex in a number of different species. We have collaborated with specialist groups or nomenclature committees that curate the individual sections before they are submitted to IPD for online publication. IPD consists of five core <span class="hlt">databases</span>, with the IMGT/HLA <span class="hlt">Database</span> as the primary <span class="hlt">database</span>. Through the work of the various nomenclature committees, the HLA Informatics Group and in collaboration with the European Bioinformatics Institute we are able to provide public access to this data through the website http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd/. The IPD project continues to develop with new tools being added to address scientific developments, such as Next Generation Sequencing, and to address user feedback and requests. Regular updates to the website ensure that new and confirmatory sequences are dispersed to the immunogenetics community, and the wider research and clinical communities. PMID:25414341</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/ofr20121259','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/ofr20121259"><span id="translatedtitle">Mars global digital dune <span class="hlt">database</span>: MC-30</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Hayward, R.K.; Fenton, L.K.; Titus, T.N.; Colaprete, A.; Christensen, P.R.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The Mars Global Digital Dune <span class="hlt">Database</span> (MGD3) provides data and describes the methodology used in creating the global <span class="hlt">database</span> of moderate- to large-size dune fields on Mars. The <span class="hlt">database</span> is being released in a series of U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Reports. The first report (Hayward and others, 2007) included dune fields from lat 65° N. to 65° S. (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1158/). The second report (Hayward and others, 2010) included dune fields from lat 60° N. to 90° N. (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2010/1170/). This report encompasses ~75,000 km2 of mapped dune fields from lat 60° to 90° S. The dune fields included in this global <span class="hlt">database</span> were initially located using Mars Odyssey Thermal <span class="hlt">Emission</span> Imaging System (THEMIS) Infrared (IR) images. In the previous two reports, some dune fields may have been unintentionally excluded for two reasons: (1) incomplete THEMIS IR (daytime) coverage may have caused us to exclude some moderate- to large-size dune fields or (2) resolution of THEMIS IR coverage (100 m/pixel) certainly caused us to exclude smaller dune fields. In this report, mapping is more complete. The Arizona State University THEMIS daytime IR mosaic provided complete IR coverage, and it is unlikely that we missed any large dune fields in the South Pole (SP) region. In addition, the increased availability of higher resolution images resulted in the inclusion of more small (~1 km2) sand dune fields and sand patches. To maintain consistency with the previous releases, we have identified the sand features that would not have been included in earlier releases. While the moderate to large dune fields in MGD3 are likely to constitute the largest compilation of sediment on the planet, we acknowledge that our <span class="hlt">database</span> excludes numerous small dune fields and some moderate to large dune fields as well. Please note that the absence of mapped dune fields does not mean that dune fields do not exist and is not intended to imply a lack of saltating sand in other areas. Where availability and quality of THEMIS visible (VIS), Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) narrow angle, Mars Express High Resolution Stereo Camera, or Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Context Camera and High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment images allowed, we classified dunes and included some dune slipface measurements, which were derived from gross dune morphology and represent the approximate prevailing wind direction at the last time of significant dune modification. It was beyond the scope of this report to look at the detail needed to discern subtle dune modification. It was also beyond the scope of this report to measure all slipfaces. We attempted to include enough slipface measurements to represent the general circulation (as implied by gross dune morphology) and to give a sense of the complex nature of aeolian activity on Mars. The absence of slipface measurements in a given direction should not be taken as evidence that winds in that direction did not occur. When a dune field was located within a crater, the azimuth from crater centroid to dune field centroid was calculated, as another possible indicator of wind direction. Output from a general circulation model is also included. In addition to polygons locating dune fields, the <span class="hlt">database</span> includes ~700 of the THEMIS VIS and MOC images that were used to build the <span class="hlt">database</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=147832','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=147832"><span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">database</span> of macromolecular motions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Gerstein, M; Krebs, W</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>We describe a <span class="hlt">database</span> of macromolecular motions meant to be of general use to the structural community. The <span class="hlt">database</span>, which is accessible on the World Wide Web with an entry point at http://bioinfo.mbb.yale.edu/MolMovDB , attempts to systematize all instances of protein and nucleic acid movement for which there is at least some structural information. At present it contains >120 motions, most of which are of proteins. Protein motions are further classified hierarchically into a limited number of categories, first on the basis of size (distinguishing between fragment, domain and subunit motions) and then on the basis of packing. Our packing classification divides motions into various categories (shear, hinge, other) depending on whether or not they involve sliding over a continuously maintained and tightly packed interface. In addition, the <span class="hlt">database</span> provides some indication about the evidence behind each motion (i.e. the type of experimental information or whether the motion is inferred based on structural similarity) and attempts to describe many aspects of a motion in terms of a standardized nomenclature (e.g. the maximum rotation, the residue selection of a fixed core, etc.). Currently, we use a standard relational design to implement the <span class="hlt">database</span>. However, the complexity and heterogeneity of the information kept in the <span class="hlt">database</span> makes it an ideal application for an object-relational approach, and we are moving it in this direction. Specifically, in terms of storing complex information, the <span class="hlt">database</span> contains plausible representations for motion pathways, derived from restrained 3D interpolation between known endpoint conformations. These pathways can be viewed in a variety of movie formats, and the <span class="hlt">database</span> is associated with a server that can automatically generate these movies from submitted coordinates. PMID:9722650</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20863589','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20863589"><span id="translatedtitle">EPILEPSIAE - a European epilepsy <span class="hlt">database</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ihle, Matthias; Feldwisch-Drentrup, Hinnerk; Teixeira, Csar A; Witon, Adrien; Schelter, Bjrn; Timmer, Jens; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas</p> <p>2012-06-01</p> <p>With a worldwide prevalence of about 1%, epilepsy is one of the most common serious brain diseases with profound physical, psychological and, social consequences. Characteristic symptoms are seizures caused by abnormally synchronized neuronal activity that can lead to temporary impairments of motor functions, perception, speech, memory or, consciousness. The possibility to predict the occurrence of epileptic seizures by monitoring the electroencephalographic activity (EEG) is considered one of the most promising options to establish new therapeutic strategies for the considerable fraction of patients with currently insufficiently controlled seizures. Here, a <span class="hlt">database</span> is presented which is part of an EU-funded project "EPILEPSIAE" aiming at the development of seizure prediction algorithms which can monitor the EEG for seizure precursors. High-quality, long-term continuous EEG data, enriched with clinical metadata, which so far have not been available, are managed in this <span class="hlt">database</span> as a joint effort of epilepsy centers in Portugal (Coimbra), France (Paris) and Germany (Freiburg). The architecture and the underlying schema are here reported for this <span class="hlt">database</span>. It was designed for an efficient organization, access and search of the data of 300 epilepsy patients, including high quality long-term EEG recordings, obtained with scalp and intracranial electrodes, as well as derived features and supplementary clinical and imaging data. The organization of this European <span class="hlt">database</span> will allow for accessibility by a wide spectrum of research groups and may serve as a model for similar <span class="hlt">databases</span> planned for the future. PMID:20863589</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23172286','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23172286"><span id="translatedtitle">WDDD: Worm Developmental Dynamics <span class="hlt">Database</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kyoda, Koji; Adachi, Eru; Masuda, Eriko; Nagai, Yoko; Suzuki, Yoko; Oguro, Taeko; Urai, Mitsuru; Arai, Ryoko; Furukawa, Mari; Shimada, Kumiko; Kuramochi, Junko; Nagai, Eriko; Onami, Shuichi</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>During animal development, cells undergo dynamic changes in position and gene expression. A collection of quantitative information about morphological dynamics under a wide variety of gene perturbations would provide a rich resource for understanding the molecular mechanisms of development. Here, we created a <span class="hlt">database</span>, the Worm Developmental Dynamics <span class="hlt">Database</span> (http://so.qbic.riken.jp/wddd/), which stores a collection of quantitative information about cell division dynamics in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos with single genes silenced by RNA-mediated interference. The information contains the three-dimensional coordinate values of the outlines of nuclear regions and the dynamics of the outlines over time. The <span class="hlt">database</span> provides free access to 50 sets of quantitative data for wild-type embryos and 136 sets of quantitative data for RNA-mediated interference embryos corresponding to 72 of the 97 essential embryonic genes on chromosome III. The <span class="hlt">database</span> also provides sets of four-dimensional differential interference contrast microscopy images on which the quantitative data were based. The <span class="hlt">database</span> will provide a novel opportunity for the development of computational methods to obtain fresh insights into the mechanisms of development. The quantitative information and microscopy images can be synchronously viewed through a web browser, which is designed for easy access by experimental biologists. PMID:23172286</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993AAS...182.0303C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993AAS...182.0303C"><span id="translatedtitle">The EUVE Satellite Survey <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Craig, N.; Chen, T.; Hawkins, I.; Fruscione, A.</p> <p>1993-05-01</p> <p>One of the primary scientific goals of the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) mission is to carry out an all-sky survey of astronomical sources of extreme ultraviolet radiation in four bandpasses covering the 70 to 760 Angstroms region of the spectrum. The survey phase, lasting six months, was completed January 22, 1993. The EUVE survey <span class="hlt">database</span> (EUVECATDB) was designed and implemented to store and maintain all fundamental science data of EUVE sources from the survey. Source position and flux information in each filter bandpass are calculated using the EUVE End-to-End System software and stored in EUVECATDB, which is updated as new sources are detected. Currently, there are more than 7000 sources in EUVECATDB. The <span class="hlt">database</span> is implemented by a combination of a Sybase Transact SQL (sequential query language) script and Unix shell scripts. Some of the <span class="hlt">database</span>'s built-in algorithms were designed to carry out computations automatically and also to categorize all entries based on a comparison with ROSAT's Wide Field Camera sources. We will present diagrams with details of the seven major tables and their relations within the <span class="hlt">database</span>. EUVECATDB is also installed in NASA's Astrophysics Data System (XADS) with the purpose of making the <span class="hlt">database</span> available to the scientific community via a variety of methods, including an X-window user interface. We will provide examples of commands used to extract the most commonly queried scientific information from astronomical source catalogs. This work has been supported by NASA contract NAS5-30180.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/dataexplorer/servlets/purl/1134061','SCIGOV-DOEDE'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/dataexplorer/servlets/purl/1134061"><span id="translatedtitle">DOE Global Energy Storage <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/dataexplorer">DOE Data Explorer</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The DOE International Energy Storage <span class="hlt">Database</span> has more than 400 documented energy storage projects from 34 countries around the world. The <span class="hlt">database</span> provides free, up-to-date information on grid-connected energy storage projects and relevant state and federal policies. More than 50 energy storage technologies are represented worldwide, including multiple battery technologies, compressed air energy storage, flywheels, gravel energy storage, hydrogen energy storage, pumped hydroelectric, superconducting magnetic energy storage, and thermal energy storage. The policy section of the <span class="hlt">database</span> shows 18 federal and state policies addressing grid-connected energy storage, from rules and regulations to tariffs and other financial incentives. It is funded through DOEs Sandia National Laboratories, and has been operating since January 2012.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21633942','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21633942"><span id="translatedtitle">Searching NCBI <span class="hlt">databases</span> using Entrez.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gibney, Gretchen; Baxevanis, Andreas D</p> <p>2011-06-01</p> <p>One of the most widely used interfaces for the retrieval of information from biological <span class="hlt">databases</span> is the NCBI Entrez system. Entrez capitalizes on the fact that there are pre-existing, logical relationships between the individual entries found in numerous public <span class="hlt">databases</span>. The existence of such natural connections, mostly biological in nature, argued for the development of a method through which all the information about a particular biological entity could be found without having to sequentially visit and query disparate <span class="hlt">databases</span>. Two basic protocols describe simple, text-based searches, illustrating the types of information that can be retrieved through the Entrez system. An alternate protocol builds upon the first basic protocol, using additional, built-in features of the Entrez system, and providing alternative ways to issue the initial query. The support protocol reviews how to save frequently issued queries. Finally, Cn3D, a structure visualization tool, is also discussed. PMID:21633942</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21975942','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21975942"><span id="translatedtitle">Searching NCBI <span class="hlt">Databases</span> Using Entrez.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gibney, Gretchen; Baxevanis, Andreas D</p> <p>2011-10-01</p> <p>One of the most widely used interfaces for the retrieval of information from biological <span class="hlt">databases</span> is the NCBI Entrez system. Entrez capitalizes on the fact that there are pre-existing, logical relationships between the individual entries found in numerous public <span class="hlt">databases</span>. The existence of such natural connections, mostly biological in nature, argued for the development of a method through which all the information about a particular biological entity could be found without having to sequentially visit and query disparate <span class="hlt">databases</span>. Two basic protocols describe simple, text-based searches, illustrating the types of information that can be retrieved through the Entrez system. An alternate protocol builds upon the first basic protocol, using additional, built-in features of the Entrez system, and providing alternative ways to issue the initial query. The support protocol reviews how to save frequently issued queries. Finally, Cn3D, a structure visualization tool, is also discussed. PMID:21975942</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19085978','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19085978"><span id="translatedtitle">Searching NCBI <span class="hlt">databases</span> using Entrez.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Baxevanis, Andreas D</p> <p>2008-12-01</p> <p>One of the most widely used interfaces for the retrieval of information from biological <span class="hlt">databases</span> is the NCBI Entrez system. Entrez capitalizes on the fact that there are pre-existing, logical relationships between the individual entries found in numerous public <span class="hlt">databases</span>. The existence of such natural connections, mostly biological in nature, argued for the development of a method through which all the information about a particular biological entity could be found without having to sequentially visit and query disparate <span class="hlt">databases</span>. Two Basic Protocols describe simple, text-based searches, illustrating the types of information that can be retrieved through the Entrez system. An Alternate Protocol builds upon the first Basic Protocol, using additional, built-in features of the Entrez system, and providing alternative ways to issue the initial query. The Support Protocol reviews how to save frequently issued queries. Finally, Cn3D, a structure visualization tool, is also discussed. PMID:19085978</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1134061','SCIGOV-DOEDE'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1134061"><span id="translatedtitle">DOE Global Energy Storage <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/dataexplorer">DOE Data Explorer</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The DOE International Energy Storage <span class="hlt">Database</span> has more than 400 documented energy storage projects from 34 countries around the world. The <span class="hlt">database</span> provides free, up-to-date information on grid-connected energy storage projects and relevant state and federal policies. More than 50 energy storage technologies are represented worldwide, including multiple battery technologies, compressed air energy storage, flywheels, gravel energy storage, hydrogen energy storage, pumped hydroelectric, superconducting magnetic energy storage, and thermal energy storage. The policy section of the <span class="hlt">database</span> shows 18 federal and state policies addressing grid-connected energy storage, from rules and regulations to tariffs and other financial incentives. It is funded through DOE’s Sandia National Laboratories, and has been operating since January 2012.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001ASPC..238..241B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001ASPC..238..241B"><span id="translatedtitle">ADASS Web <span class="hlt">Database</span> XML Project</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Barg, M. I.; Stobie, E. B.; Ferro, A. J.; O'Neil, E. J.</p> <p></p> <p>In the spring of 2000, at the request of the ADASS Program Organizing Committee (POC), we began organizing information from previous ADASS conferences in an effort to create a centralized <span class="hlt">database</span>. The beginnings of this <span class="hlt">database</span> originated from data (invited speakers, participants, papers, etc.) extracted from HyperText Markup Language (HTML) documents from past ADASS host sites. Unfortunately, not all HTML documents are well formed and parsing them proved to be an iterative process. It was evident at the beginning that if these Web documents were organized in a standardized way, such as XML (Extensible Markup Language), the processing of this information across the Web could be automated, more efficient, and less error prone. This paper will briefly review the many programming tools available for processing XML, including Java, Perl and Python, and will explore the mapping of relational data from our MySQL <span class="hlt">database</span> to XML.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1077788','SCIGOV-DOEDE'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1077788"><span id="translatedtitle">National Residential Efficiency Measures <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/dataexplorer">DOE Data Explorer</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The National Residential Efficiency Measures <span class="hlt">Database</span> is a publicly available, centralized resource of residential building retrofit measures and costs for the U.S. building industry. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy, NREL developed this tool to help users determine the most cost-effective retrofit measures for improving energy efficiency of existing homes. Software developers who require residential retrofit performance and cost data for applications that evaluate residential efficiency measures are the primary audience for this <span class="hlt">database</span>. In addition, home performance contractors and manufacturers of residential materials and equipment may find this information useful. The <span class="hlt">database</span> offers the following types of retrofit measures: 1) Appliances, 2) Domestic Hot Water, 3) Enclosure, 4) Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC), 5) Lighting, 6) Miscellaneous.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011NHESS..11.2235D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011NHESS..11.2235D"><span id="translatedtitle">The CATDAT damaging earthquakes <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Daniell, J. E.; Khazai, B.; Wenzel, F.; Vervaeck, A.</p> <p>2011-08-01</p> <p>The global CATDAT damaging earthquakes and secondary effects (tsunami, fire, landslides, liquefaction and fault rupture) <span class="hlt">database</span> was developed to validate, remove discrepancies, and expand greatly upon existing global <span class="hlt">databases</span>; and to better understand the trends in vulnerability, exposure, and possible future impacts of such historic earthquakes. Lack of consistency and errors in other earthquake loss <span class="hlt">databases</span> frequently cited and used in analyses was a major shortcoming in the view of the authors which needed to be improved upon. Over 17 000 sources of information have been utilised, primarily in the last few years, to present data from over 12 200 damaging earthquakes historically, with over 7000 earthquakes since 1900 examined and validated before insertion into the <span class="hlt">database</span>. Each validated earthquake includes seismological information, building damage, ranges of social losses to account for varying sources (deaths, injuries, homeless, and affected), and economic losses (direct, indirect, aid, and insured). Globally, a slightly increasing trend in economic damage due to earthquakes is not consistent with the greatly increasing exposure. The 1923 Great Kanto (214 billion USD damage; 2011 HNDECI-adjusted dollars) compared to the 2011 Tohoku (>300 billion USD at time of writing), 2008 Sichuan and 1995 Kobe earthquakes show the increasing concern for economic loss in urban areas as the trend should be expected to increase. Many economic and social loss values not reported in existing <span class="hlt">databases</span> have been collected. Historical GDP (Gross Domestic Product), exchange rate, wage information, population, HDI (Human Development Index), and insurance information have been collected globally to form comparisons. This catalogue is the largest known cross-checked global historic damaging earthquake <span class="hlt">database</span> and should have far-reaching consequences for earthquake loss estimation, socio-economic analysis, and the global reinsurance field.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S41B2446G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AGUFM.S41B2446G"><span id="translatedtitle">Seismic <span class="hlt">databases</span> of The Caucasus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gunia, I.; Sokhadze, G.; Mikava, D.; Tvaradze, N.; Godoladze, T.</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>The Caucasus is one of the active segments of the Alpine-Himalayan collision belt. The region needs continues seismic monitoring systems for better understanding of tectonic processes going in the region. Seismic Monitoring Center of Georgia (Ilia State University) is operating the digital seismic network of the country and is also collecting and exchanging data with neighboring countries. The main focus of our study was to create seismic <span class="hlt">database</span> which is well organized, easily reachable and is convenient for scientists to use. The seismological <span class="hlt">database</span> includes the information about more than 100 000 earthquakes from the whole Caucasus. We have to mention that it includes data from analog and digital seismic networks. The first analog seismic station in Georgia was installed in 1899 in the Caucasus in Tbilisi city. The number of analog seismic stations was increasing during next decades and in 1980s about 100 analog stations were operated all over the region. From 1992 due to political and economical situation the number of stations has been decreased and in 2002 just two analog equipments was operated. New digital seismic network was developed in Georgia since 2003. The number of digital seismic stations was increasing and in current days there are more than 25 digital stations operating in the country. The <span class="hlt">database</span> includes the detailed information about all equipments installed on seismic stations. <span class="hlt">Database</span> is available online. That will make convenient interface for seismic data exchange data between Caucasus neighboring countries. It also makes easier both the seismic data processing and transferring them to the <span class="hlt">database</span> and decreases the operator's mistakes during the routine work. The <span class="hlt">database</span> was created using the followings: php, MySql, Javascript, Ajax, GMT, Gmap, Hypoinverse.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3245085','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3245085"><span id="translatedtitle">YMDB: the Yeast Metabolome <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Jewison, Timothy; Knox, Craig; Neveu, Vanessa; Djoumbou, Yannick; Guo, An Chi; Lee, Jacqueline; Liu, Philip; Mandal, Rupasri; Krishnamurthy, Ram; Sinelnikov, Igor; Wilson, Michael; Wishart, David S.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The Yeast Metabolome <span class="hlt">Database</span> (YMDB, http://www.ymdb.ca) is a richly annotated metabolomic <span class="hlt">database</span> containing detailed information about the metabolome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Modeled closely after the Human Metabolome <span class="hlt">Database</span>, the YMDB contains >2000 metabolites with links to 995 different genes/proteins, including enzymes and transporters. The information in YMDB has been gathered from hundreds of books, journal articles and electronic <span class="hlt">databases</span>. In addition to its comprehensive literature-derived data, the YMDB also contains an extensive collection of experimental intracellular and extracellular metabolite concentration data compiled from detailed Mass Spectrometry (MS) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) metabolomic analyses performed in our lab. This is further supplemented with thousands of NMR and MS spectra collected on pure, reference yeast metabolites. Each metabolite entry in the YMDB contains an average of 80 separate data fields including comprehensive compound description, names and synonyms, structural information, physico-chemical data, reference NMR and MS spectra, intracellular/extracellular concentrations, growth conditions and substrates, pathway information, enzyme data, gene/protein sequence data, as well as numerous hyperlinks to images, references and other public <span class="hlt">databases</span>. Extensive searching, relational querying and data browsing tools are also provided that support text, chemical structure, spectral, molecular weight and gene/protein sequence queries. Because of S. cervesiae's importance as a model organism for biologists and as a biofactory for industry, we believe this kind of <span class="hlt">database</span> could have considerable appeal not only to metabolomics researchers, but also to yeast biologists, systems biologists, the industrial fermentation industry, as well as the beer, wine and spirit industry. PMID:22064855</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=petroleum&pg=7&id=ED232647','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=petroleum&pg=7&id=ED232647"><span id="translatedtitle">Online Petroleum Industry Bibliographic <span class="hlt">Databases</span>: A Review.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Anderson, Margaret B.</p> <p></p> <p>This paper discusses the present status of the bibliographic <span class="hlt">database</span> industry, reviews the development of online <span class="hlt">databases</span> of interest to the petroleum industry, and considers future developments in online searching and their effect on libraries and information centers. Three groups of <span class="hlt">databases</span> are described: (1) <span class="hlt">databases</span> developed by the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1225279','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1225279"><span id="translatedtitle">WMC <span class="hlt">Database</span> Evaluation. Case Study Report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Palounek, Andrea P. T</p> <p>2015-10-29</p> <p>The WMC <span class="hlt">Database</span> is ultimately envisioned to hold a collection of experimental data, design information, and information from computational models. This project was a first attempt at using the <span class="hlt">Database</span> to access experimental data and extract information from it. This evaluation shows that the <span class="hlt">Database</span> concept is sound and robust, and that the <span class="hlt">Database</span>, once fully populated, should remain eminently usable for future researchers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Petroleum&pg=7&id=ED232647','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Petroleum&pg=7&id=ED232647"><span id="translatedtitle">Online Petroleum Industry Bibliographic <span class="hlt">Databases</span>: A Review.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Anderson, Margaret B.</p> <p></p> <p>This paper discusses the present status of the bibliographic <span class="hlt">database</span> industry, reviews the development of online <span class="hlt">databases</span> of interest to the petroleum industry, and considers future developments in online searching and their effect on libraries and information centers. Three groups of <span class="hlt">databases</span> are described: (1) <span class="hlt">databases</span> developed by the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=relational+AND+database&pg=5&id=EJ264823','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=relational+AND+database&pg=5&id=EJ264823"><span id="translatedtitle">A Relational <span class="hlt">Database</span> System for Student Use.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fertuck, Len</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>Describes an APL implementation of a relational <span class="hlt">database</span> system suitable for use in a teaching environment in which <span class="hlt">database</span> development and <span class="hlt">database</span> administration are studied, and discusses the functions of the user and the <span class="hlt">database</span> administrator. An appendix illustrating system operation and an eight-item reference list are attached. (Author/JL)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.nist.gov/srd/nistsd25.cfm','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://www.nist.gov/srd/nistsd25.cfm"><span id="translatedtitle">Federal Register Document Image <span class="hlt">Database</span>, Volume 1</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>NIST Federal Register Document Image <span class="hlt">Database</span>, Volume 1 (PC <span class="hlt">database</span> for purchase)   NIST has produced a new document image <span class="hlt">database</span> for evaluating document analysis and recognition technologies and information retrieval systems. NIST Special <span class="hlt">Database</span> 25 contains page images from the 1994 Federal Register and much more.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23666785','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23666785"><span id="translatedtitle">Brede tools and federating online neuroinformatics <span class="hlt">databases</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nielsen, Finn rup</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>As open science neuroinformatics <span class="hlt">databases</span> the Brede <span class="hlt">Database</span> and Brede Wiki seek to make distribution and federation of their content as easy and transparent as possible. The <span class="hlt">databases</span> rely on simple formats and allow other online tools to reuse their content. This paper describes the possible interconnections on different levels between the Brede tools and other <span class="hlt">databases</span>. PMID:23666785</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=234484&keyword=Maine&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=55579064&CFTOKEN=91685023','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=234484&keyword=Maine&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=55579064&CFTOKEN=91685023"><span id="translatedtitle">Freshwater Biological Traits <span class="hlt">Database</span> (External Review Draft)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This draft report discusses the development of a <span class="hlt">database</span> of freshwater biological traits. The <span class="hlt">database</span> combines several existing traits <span class="hlt">databases</span> into an online format. The <span class="hlt">database</span> is also augmented with additional traits that are relevant to detecting climate change-related ef...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2245609','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2245609"><span id="translatedtitle">BioSYNTHESIS: Integrating Multiple <span class="hlt">Databases</span> into a Virtual <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Broering, Naomi C.; Bagdoyan, Helen; Hylton, Jeffrey; Strickler, John</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>BioSYNTHESIS is a front-end retrieval system under development as part of the IAIMS project at Georgetown University. It is designed to achieve system integration of multiple IAIMS <span class="hlt">databases</span> maintained at Georgetown so they appear as a virtual <span class="hlt">database</span> to users. The aim is to create an integrated system that enables users to easily retrieve information from various <span class="hlt">databases</span> residing on disparate computers. The project work has been divided in two phases: BioSYNTHESIS I, development of a single menu to access various <span class="hlt">databases</span> which reside on different computers; and BioSYNTHESIS II, development of a search component that facilitates complex searching for the user. BioSYNTHESIS I is currently available to users, and BioSYNTHESIS II is in an early stage of development. The design work will continue as a multiyear technical research effort of the Georgetown IAIMS Implementation Project. Plans are to release portions of BioSYNTHESIS II during the project period as components become available.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=150883&keyword=demand+AND+control+AND+model&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=58822230&CFTOKEN=86175773','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=150883&keyword=demand+AND+control+AND+model&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=58822230&CFTOKEN=86175773"><span id="translatedtitle">EPA U.S. NATIONAL MARKAL <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span>: <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span> DOCUMENTATION</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This document describes in detail the U.S. Energy System <span class="hlt">database</span> developed by EPA's Integrated Strategic Assessment Work Group for use with the MARKAL model. The group is part of the Office of Research and Development and is located in the National Risk Management Research Labor...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5215712','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5215712"><span id="translatedtitle">A Sandia telephone <span class="hlt">database</span> system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Nelson, S.D.; Tolendino, L.F.</p> <p>1991-08-01</p> <p>Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, may soon have more responsibility for the operation of its own telephone system. The processes that constitute providing telephone service can all be improved through the use of a central data information system. We studied these processes, determined the requirements for a <span class="hlt">database</span> system, then designed the first stages of a system that meets our needs for work order handling, trouble reporting, and ISDN hardware assignments. The design was based on an extensive set of applications that have been used for five years to manage the Sandia secure data network. The system utilizes an Ingres <span class="hlt">database</span> management system and is programmed using the Application-By-Forms tools.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19920014131','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19920014131"><span id="translatedtitle">Data exploration systems for <span class="hlt">databases</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Greene, Richard J.; Hield, Christopher</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Data exploration systems apply machine learning techniques, multivariate statistical methods, information theory, and <span class="hlt">database</span> theory to <span class="hlt">databases</span> to identify significant relationships among the data and summarize information. The result of applying data exploration systems should be a better understanding of the structure of the data and a perspective of the data enabling an analyst to form hypotheses for interpreting the data. This paper argues that data exploration systems need a minimum amount of domain knowledge to guide both the statistical strategy and the interpretation of the resulting patterns discovered by these systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ASPC..485..247D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ASPC..485..247D"><span id="translatedtitle">BDB: The Binary Star <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dluzhnevskaya, O.; Kaygorodov, P.; Kovaleva, D.; Malkov, O.</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Description of the Binary star <span class="hlt">DataBase</span> (BDB, http://bdb.inasan.ru), the world's principal <span class="hlt">database</span> of binary and multiple systems of all observational types, is presented in the paper. BDB contains data on physical and positional parameters of 100,000 components of 40,000 systems of multiplicity 2 to 20, belonging to various observational types: visual, spectroscopic, eclipsing, etc. Information on these types of binaries is obtained from heterogeneous sources of data - astronomical and. Organization of the information is based on the careful cross-identification of the objects. BDB can be queried by star identifier, coordinates, and other parameters.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20013500','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20013500"><span id="translatedtitle">Coal quality <span class="hlt">databases</span>: Practical applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Finkelman, R.B.; Gross, P.M.K.</p> <p>1999-07-01</p> <p>Domestic and worldwide coal use will be influenced by concerns about the effects of coal combustion on the local, regional and global environment. Reliable coal quality data can help decision-makers to better assess risks and determine impacts of coal constituents on technological behavior, economic byproduct recovery, and environmental and human health issues. The US Geological Survey (USGS) maintains an existing coal quality <span class="hlt">database</span> (COALQUAL) that contains analyses of approximately 14,000 col samples from every major coal-producing basin in the US. For each sample, the <span class="hlt">database</span> contains results of proximate and ultimate analyses; sulfur form data; and major, minor, and trace element concentrations for approximately 70 elements</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JIPM...30..149M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JIPM...30..149M"><span id="translatedtitle">CD-ROM-aided <span class="hlt">Databases</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Masuyama, Keiichi</p> <p></p> <p>CD-ROM has rapidly evolved as a new information medium with large capacity, In the U.S. it is predicted that it will become two hundred billion yen market in three years, and thus CD-ROM is strategic target of <span class="hlt">database</span> industry. Here in Japan the movement toward its commercialization has been active since this year. Shall CD-ROM bussiness ever conquer information market as an on-disk <span class="hlt">database</span> or electronic publication? Referring to some cases of the applications in the U.S. the author views marketability and the future trend of this new optical disk medium.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940018017','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940018017"><span id="translatedtitle">Quality control of EUVE <span class="hlt">databases</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>John, L. M.; Drake, J.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>The publicly accessible <span class="hlt">databases</span> for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer include: the EUVE Archive mailserver; the CEA ftp site; the EUVE Guest Observer Mailserver; and the Astronomical Data System node. The EUVE Performance Assurance team is responsible for verifying that these public EUVE <span class="hlt">databases</span> are working properly, and that the public availability of EUVE data contained therein does not infringe any data rights which may have been assigned. In this poster, we describe the Quality Assurance (QA) procedures we have developed from the approach of QA as a service organization, thus reflecting the overall EUVE philosophy of Quality Assurance integrated into normal operating procedures, rather than imposed as an external, post facto, control mechanism.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ACPD...14.3099K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ACPD...14.3099K"><span id="translatedtitle">Constraining CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from open biomass burning by satellite observations of co-emitted species: a method and its application to wildfires in Siberia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Konovalov, I. B.; Berezin, E. V.; Ciais, P.; Broquet, G.; Beekmann, M.; Hadji-Lazaro, J.; Clerbaux, C.; Andreae, M. O.; Kaiser, J. W.; Schulze, E.-D.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>A method to constrain carbon dioxide (CO2) <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from open biomass burning by using satellite observations of co-emitted species and a chemistry-transport model (CTM) is proposed and applied to the case of wildfires in Siberia. CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are assessed by means of an <span class="hlt">emission</span> model assuming a direct relationship between the biomass burning rate (BBR) and the Fire Radiative Power (FRP) derived from the MODIS measurements. The key features of the method are (1) estimating the FRP-to-BBR conversion factors (?) for different vegetative land cover types by assimilating the satellite observations of co-emitted species into the CTM, (2) optimal combination of the estimates of ? derived independently from satellite observations of different species (CO and aerosol in this study), and (3) estimation of the diurnal cycle of the fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> directly from the FRP measurements. Values of ? for forest and grassland fires in Siberia and their uncertainties are estimated by using the IASI carbon monoxide (CO) retrievals and the MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements combined with outputs from the CHIMERE mesoscale chemistry transport model. The constrained CO <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are validated through comparison of the respective simulations with the independent data of ground based CO measurements at the ZOTTO site. Using our optimal regional-scale estimates of the conversion factors (which are found to be in agreement with the earlier published estimates obtained from local measurements of experimental fires), the total CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from wildfires in Siberia in 2012 are estimated to be in the range from 262 to 477 Tg C, with the optimal (maximum likelihood) value of 354 Tg C. Sensitivity test cases featuring different assumptions regarding the injection height and diurnal variations of <span class="hlt">emissions</span> indicate that the derived estimates of the total CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in Siberia are robust with respect to the modelling options (the different estimates vary within less than 10% of their magnitude). The obtained CO2 <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates for several years are compared with the independent estimates provided by the <span class="hlt">GFED</span>3.1 and GFASv1.0 global <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventories. It is found that our "top-down" estimates for the total annual biomass burning CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in the period from 2007 to 2011 in Siberia are by factors of 2.3 and 1.7 larger than the respective bottom-up estimates; these discrepancies cannot be fully explained by uncertainties in our estimates. There are also considerable differences in the spatial distribution of the different <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates; some of those differences have a systematic character and require further analysis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ACP....1410383K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ACP....1410383K"><span id="translatedtitle">Constraining CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from open biomass burning by satellite observations of co-emitted species: a method and its application to wildfires in Siberia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Konovalov, I. B.; Berezin, E. V.; Ciais, P.; Broquet, G.; Beekmann, M.; Hadji-Lazaro, J.; Clerbaux, C.; Andreae, M. O.; Kaiser, J. W.; Schulze, E.-D.</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>A method to constrain carbon dioxide (CO2) <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from open biomass burning by using satellite observations of co-emitted species and a chemistry-transport model (CTM) is proposed and applied to the case of wildfires in Siberia. CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are assessed by means of an <span class="hlt">emission</span> model assuming a direct relationship between the biomass burning rate (BBR) and the fire radiative power (FRP) derived from MODIS measurements. The key features of the method are (1) estimating the FRP-to-BBR conversion factors (?) for different vegetative land cover types by assimilating the satellite observations of co-emitted species into the CTM, (2) optimal combination of the estimates of ? derived independently from satellite observations of different species (CO and aerosol in this study), and (3) estimation of the diurnal cycle of the fire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> directly from the FRP measurements. Values of ? for forest and grassland fires in Siberia and their uncertainties are estimated using the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) carbon monoxide (CO) retrievals and MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements combined with outputs from the CHIMERE mesoscale chemistry-transport model. The constrained CO <span class="hlt">emissions</span> are validated through comparison of the respective simulations with independent data of ground-based CO measurements at the ZOTTO site. Using our optimal regional-scale estimates of the conversion factors (which are found to be in agreement with earlier published estimates obtained from local measurements of experimental fires), the total CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from wildfires in Siberia in 2012 are estimated to be in the range from 280 to 550 Tg C, with the optimal (maximum likelihood) value of 392 Tg C. Sensitivity test cases featuring different assumptions regarding the injection height and diurnal variations of <span class="hlt">emissions</span> indicate that the derived estimates of the total CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in Siberia are robust with respect to the modeling options (the different estimates vary within less than 15% of their magnitude). The CO2 <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates obtained for several years are compared with independent estimates provided by the <span class="hlt">GFED</span>3.1 and GFASv1.0 global <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventories. It is found that our "top-down" estimates for the total annual biomass burning CO2 <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in the period from 2007 to 2011 in Siberia are by factors of 2.5 and 1.8 larger than the respective bottom-up estimates; these discrepancies cannot be fully explained by uncertainties in our estimates. There are also considerable differences in the spatial distribution of the different <span class="hlt">emission</span> estimates; some of those differences have a systematic character and require further analysis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009RMxAA..45..261F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009RMxAA..45..261F"><span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of the diffuse ionized gas <span class="hlt">database</span>: DIGEDA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Flores-Fajardo, N.; Morisset, C.; Binette, L.</p> <p>2009-10-01</p> <p>Studies of the Diffuse Ionized Gas (DIG) have progressed without providing so far any strict criterion to distinguish DIGs from H II regions. In this work, we compile the <span class="hlt">emission</span> line measurements of 29 galaxies that are available in the scientific literature, thereby setting up the first DIG <span class="hlt">database</span> (DIGEDA). Making use of this <span class="hlt">database</span>, we proceed to analyze the global properties of the DIG using the [NII]?6583/H?, [O I]?6300/H?, [O III]?5007/H? and [SII]?6716/H? lines ratios, including the H ? <span class="hlt">emission</span> measure. This analysis leads us to conclude that the [N II]/H? ratio provides an objective criterion for distinguishing whether an <span class="hlt">emission</span> region is a DIG or an H II region, while the EM(H?) is a useful quantity only when the galaxies are considered individually. Finally, we find that the <span class="hlt">emission</span> regions of Irr galaxies classified as DIG in the literature appear in fact to be much more similar to H II regions than to the DIGs of spiral galaxies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=145020','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=145020"><span id="translatedtitle">CROP GENOME <span class="hlt">DATABASES</span> -- CRITICAL ISSUES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Crop genome <span class="hlt">databases</span>, see www.agron.missouri.edu/bioservers.html of the past decade have had designed and implemented (1) models and schema for the genome and related domains; (2) methodologies for input of data by expert biologists and high-throughput projects; and (3) various text, graphical, and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED274314.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED274314.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Guide on Logical <span class="hlt">Database</span> Design.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fong, Elizabeth N.; And Others</p> <p></p> <p>This report discusses an iterative methodology for logical <span class="hlt">database</span> design (LDD). The methodology includes four phases: local information-flow modeling, global information-flow modeling, conceptual schema design, and external schema modeling. These phases are intended to make maximum use of available information and user expertise, including the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://imaging.cancer.gov/programsandresources/informationsystems/lidc','NCI'); return false;" href="http://imaging.cancer.gov/programsandresources/informationsystems/lidc"><span id="translatedtitle">Lung Image <span class="hlt">Database</span> Consortium (LIDC)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.cancer.gov">Cancer.gov</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The mission of the Lung Image <span class="hlt">Database</span> Consortium (LIDC) is sharing of lung images, especially low-dose helical CT scans of adults screened for lung cancer, and related technical and clinical data for development and testing of computer-aided cancer screening and diagnosis technology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://emice.nci.nih.gov/news-archive/pathway-interaction-database-pid','NCI'); return false;" href="http://emice.nci.nih.gov/news-archive/pathway-interaction-database-pid"><span id="translatedtitle">Pathway Interaction <span class="hlt">Database</span> (PID) —</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.cancer.gov">Cancer.gov</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The National Cancer Institute (NCI) in collaboration with Nature Publishing Group has established the Pathway Interaction <span class="hlt">Database</span> (PID) in order to provide a highly structured, curated collection of information about known biomolecular interactions and key cellular processes assembled into signaling pathways.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPhCS.664d2024D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPhCS.664d2024D"><span id="translatedtitle">The CMS Condition <span class="hlt">Database</span> System</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Di Guida, S.; Govi, G.; Ojeda, M.; Pfeiffer, A.; Sipos, R.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>The Condition <span class="hlt">Database</span> plays a key role in the CMS computing infrastructure. The complexity of the detector and the variety of the sub-systems involved are setting tight requirements for handling the Conditions. In the last two years the collaboration has put a substantial effort in the re-design of the Condition <span class="hlt">Database</span> system, with the aim at improving the scalability and the operability for the data taking starting in 2015. The re-design has focused on simplifying the architecture, using the lessons learned during the operation of the Run I data-taking period (20092013). In the new system the relational features of the <span class="hlt">database</span> schema are mainly exploited to handle the metadata (Tag and Interval of Validity), allowing for a limited and controlled set of queries. The bulk condition data (Payloads) are stored as unstructured binary data, allowing the storage in a single table with a common layout for all of the condition data types. In this paper, we describe the full architecture of the system, including the services implemented for uploading payloads and the tools for browsing the <span class="hlt">database</span>. Furthermore, the implementation choices for the core software will be discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=51531&keyword=glossary&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=57852667&CFTOKEN=30137338','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=51531&keyword=glossary&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=57852667&CFTOKEN=30137338"><span id="translatedtitle">REFEREE: BIBLIOGRAPHIC <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span> MANAGER, DOCUMENTATION</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The publication is the user's manual for 3.xx releases of REFEREE, a general-purpose bibliographic <span class="hlt">database</span> management program for IBM-compatible microcomputers. The REFEREE software also is available from NTIS. The manual has two main sections--Quick Tour and References Guide--a...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110015747','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20110015747"><span id="translatedtitle">The NASA Fireball Network <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Moser, Danielle E.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The NASA Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) has been operating an automated video fireball network since late-2008. Since that time, over 1,700 multi-station fireballs have been observed. A <span class="hlt">database</span> containing orbital data and trajectory information on all these events has recently been compiled and is currently being mined for information. Preliminary results are presented here.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=quarries&id=EJ341572','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=quarries&id=EJ341572"><span id="translatedtitle">Using <span class="hlt">Databases</span> in History Teaching.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Knight, P.; Timmins, G.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Discusses advantages and limitations of <span class="hlt">database</span> software in meeting the educational objectives of history instruction; reviews five currently available computer programs (FACTFILE, QUEST, QUARRY BANK 1851, Census Analysis, and Beta Base); highlights major considerations that arise in designing such programs; and describes their classroom use.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=relational+AND+database&pg=5&id=EJ364066','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=relational+AND+database&pg=5&id=EJ364066"><span id="translatedtitle">Relational <span class="hlt">Database</span> Technology: An Overview.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Melander, Nicole</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>Describes the development of relational <span class="hlt">database</span> technology as it applies to educational settings. Discusses some of the new tools and models being implemented in an effort to provide educators with technologically advanced ways of answering questions about education programs and data. (TW)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=light+AND+house&pg=6&id=ED247952','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=light+AND+house&pg=6&id=ED247952"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Databases</span> in the United Kingdom.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Chadwyck-Healey, Charles</p> <p></p> <p>This overview of the status of online <span class="hlt">databases</span> in the United Kingdom describes online users' attitudes and practices in light of two surveys conducted in the past two years. The Online Information Centre at ASLIB sampled 325 users, and Chadwyck-Healey, Ltd., conducted a face-to-face survey of librarians in a broad cross-section of 76 libraries.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22database+security%22&id=EJ518484','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22database+security%22&id=EJ518484"><span id="translatedtitle">Safeguarding <span class="hlt">Databases</span> Basic Concepts Revisited.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Cardinali, Richard</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Discusses issues of <span class="hlt">database</span> security and integrity, including computer crime and vandalism, human error, computer viruses, employee and user access, and personnel policies. Suggests some precautions to minimize system vulnerability such as careful personnel screening, audit systems, passwords, and building and software security systems. (JKP)</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=23833&keyword=yes+any+any&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=60051059&CFTOKEN=10645628','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=23833&keyword=yes+any+any&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=60051059&CFTOKEN=10645628"><span id="translatedtitle">LANDFILLS EFFLUENT LIMITATIONS GUIDELINES <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><B>Resource Purpose:</B>This resource served as the main information source for national characteristics of landfills for the landfills effluent guidelines. The <span class="hlt">database</span> was developed based on responses to the "1994 Waste Treatment Industry Questionnaire: Phase II Landfills" and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED388240.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED388240.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">HOED: Hypermedia Online Educational <span class="hlt">Database</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Duval, E.; Olivie, H.</p> <p></p> <p>This paper presents HOED, a distributed hypermedia client-server system for educational resources. The aim of HOED is to provide a library facility for hyperdocuments that is accessible via the world wide web. Its main application domain is education. The HOED <span class="hlt">database</span> not only holds the educational resources themselves, but also data describing</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cost+AND+abc&pg=2&id=ED187331','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cost+AND+abc&pg=2&id=ED187331"><span id="translatedtitle">The Bibliographic <span class="hlt">Databases</span> in History.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Falk, Joyce Duncan</p> <p></p> <p>This examination of abstracting-indexing services for the field of history focuses on Historical Abstracts (HA) and America--History and Life (AHL), and their relationship to the American Bibliographical Center's Subject Profile Index (ABC-SPIndex). The history, scope, selection criteria, and classification arrangements of the two <span class="hlt">databases</span> are</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/833832','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/833832"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> Transformations for Biological Applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Overton, C.; Davidson, S. B.; Buneman, P.; Tannen, V.</p> <p>2001-04-11</p> <p>The goal of this project was to develop tools to facilitate data transformations between heterogeneous data sources found throughout biomedical applications. Such transformations are necessary when sharing data between different groups working on related problems as well as when querying data spread over different <span class="hlt">databases</span>, files and software analysis packages.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=219822','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=219822"><span id="translatedtitle">Maize Genetics and Genomics <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The 2007 report for MaizeGDB lists the new hires who will focus on curation/outreach and the genome sequence, respectively. Currently all sequence in the <span class="hlt">database</span> comes from a PlantGDB pipeline and is presented with deep links to external resources such as PlantGDB, Dana Farber, GenBank, the Arizona...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=SAN+AND+LUIS&pg=2&id=EJ421723','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=SAN+AND+LUIS&pg=2&id=EJ421723"><span id="translatedtitle">Technostress: Surviving a <span class="hlt">Database</span> Crash.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Dobb, Linda S.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Discussion of technostress in libraries focuses on a <span class="hlt">database</span> crash at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. Steps taken to restore the data are explained, strategies for handling technological accidents are suggested, the impact on library staff is discussed, and a 10-item annotated bibliography on technostress is provided.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002SPIE.4421..967C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002SPIE.4421..967C"><span id="translatedtitle">Interactive bibliographical <span class="hlt">database</span> on color</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Caivano, Jose L.</p> <p>2002-06-01</p> <p>The paper describes the methodology and results of a project under development, aimed at the elaboration of an interactive bibliographical <span class="hlt">database</span> on color in all fields of application: philosophy, psychology, semiotics, education, anthropology, physical and natural sciences, biology, medicine, technology, industry, architecture and design, arts, linguistics, geography, history. The project is initially based upon an already developed bibliography, published in different journals, updated in various opportunities, and now available at the Internet, with more than 2,000 entries. The interactive <span class="hlt">database</span> will amplify that bibliography, incorporating hyperlinks and contents (indexes, abstracts, keywords, introductions, or eventually the complete document), and devising mechanisms for information retrieval. The sources to be included are: books, doctoral dissertations, multimedia publications, reference works. The main arrangement will be chronological, but the design of the <span class="hlt">database</span> will allow rearrangements or selections by different fields: subject, Decimal Classification System, author, language, country, publisher, etc. A further project is to develop another <span class="hlt">database</span>, including color-specialized journals or newsletters, and articles on color published in international journals, arranged in this case by journal name and date of publication, but allowing also rearrangements or selections by author, subject and keywords.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=227851','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=227851"><span id="translatedtitle">Continuously measured annual ammonia <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from Southern High Plains beef cattle feedyards</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The magnitude of ammonia <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from beef cattle feedyards varies with season during the year, but studies of continuous measurement of ammonia <span class="hlt">emissions</span> throughout the year are rare. The quantification of annual ammonia <span class="hlt">emissions</span> will improve <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors, provide <span class="hlt">databases</span> that can be used ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1613519R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1613519R"><span id="translatedtitle">Toward An Unstructured Mesh <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rezaei Mahdiraji, Alireza; Baumann, Peter Peter</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Unstructured meshes are used in several application domains such as earth sciences (e.g., seismology), medicine, oceanography, cli- mate modeling, GIS as approximate representations of physical objects. Meshes subdivide a domain into smaller geometric elements (called cells) which are glued together by incidence relationships. The subdivision of a domain allows computational manipulation of complicated physical structures. For instance, seismologists model earthquakes using elastic wave propagation solvers on hexahedral meshes. The hexahedral con- tains several hundred millions of grid points and millions of hexahedral cells. Each vertex node in the hexahedrals stores a multitude of data fields. To run simulation on such meshes, one needs to iterate over all the cells, iterate over incident cells to a given cell, retrieve coordinates of cells, assign data values to cells, etc. Although meshes are used in many application domains, to the best of our knowledge there is no <span class="hlt">database</span> vendor that support unstructured mesh features. Currently, the main tool for querying and manipulating unstructured meshes are mesh libraries, e.g., CGAL and GRAL. Mesh li- braries are dedicated libraries which includes mesh algorithms and can be run on mesh representations. The libraries do not scale with dataset size, do not have declarative query language, and need deep C++ knowledge for query implementations. Furthermore, due to high coupling between the implementations and input file structure, the implementations are less reusable and costly to maintain. A dedicated mesh <span class="hlt">database</span> offers the following advantages: 1) declarative querying, 2) ease of maintenance, 3) hiding mesh storage structure from applications, and 4) transparent query optimization. To design a mesh <span class="hlt">database</span>, the first challenge is to define a suitable generic data model for unstructured meshes. We proposed ImG-Complexes data model as a generic topological mesh data model which extends incidence graph model to multi-incidence relationships. We instrument ImG model with sets of optional and application-specific constraints which can be used to check validity of meshes for a specific class of object such as manifold, pseudo-manifold, and simplicial manifold. We conducted experiments to measure the performance of the graph <span class="hlt">database</span> solution in processing mesh queries and compare it with GrAL mesh library and PostgreSQL <span class="hlt">database</span> on synthetic and real mesh datasets. The experiments show that each system perform well on specific types of mesh queries, e.g., graph <span class="hlt">databases</span> perform well on global path-intensive queries. In the future, we investigate <span class="hlt">database</span> operations for the ImG model and design a mesh query language.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3898997','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3898997"><span id="translatedtitle">Open access intrapartum CTG <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Background Cardiotocography (CTG) is a monitoring of fetal heart rate and uterine contractions. Since 1960 it is routinely used by obstetricians to assess fetal well-being. Many attempts to introduce methods of automatic signal processing and evaluation have appeared during the last 20 years, however still no significant progress similar to that in the domain of adult heart rate variability, where open access <span class="hlt">databases</span> are available (e.g. MIT-BIH), is visible. Based on a thorough review of the relevant publications, presented in this paper, the shortcomings of the current state are obvious. A lack of common ground for clinicians and technicians in the field hinders clinically usable progress. Our open access <span class="hlt">database</span> of digital intrapartum cardiotocographic recordings aims to change that. Description The intrapartum CTG <span class="hlt">database</span> consists in total of 552 intrapartum recordings, which were acquired between April 2010 and August 2012 at the obstetrics ward of the University Hospital in Brno, Czech Republic. All recordings were stored in electronic form in the OB TraceVue®;system. The recordings were selected from 9164 intrapartum recordings with clinical as well as technical considerations in mind. All recordings are at most 90 minutes long and start a maximum of 90 minutes before delivery. The time relation of CTG to delivery is known as well as the length of the second stage of labor which does not exceed 30 minutes. The majority of recordings (all but 46 cesarean sections) is – on purpose – from vaginal deliveries. All recordings have available biochemical markers as well as some more general clinical features. Full description of the <span class="hlt">database</span> and reasoning behind selection of the parameters is presented in the paper. Conclusion A new open-access CTG <span class="hlt">database</span> is introduced which should give the research community common ground for comparison of results on reasonably large <span class="hlt">database</span>. We anticipate that after reading the paper, the reader will understand the context of the field from clinical and technical perspectives which will enable him/her to use the <span class="hlt">database</span> and also understand its limitations. PMID:24418387</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3689437','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3689437"><span id="translatedtitle">The CARLSBAD <span class="hlt">Database</span>: A Confederated <span class="hlt">Database</span> of Chemical Bioactivities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mathias, Stephen L.; Hines-Kay, Jarrett; Yang, Jeremy J.; Zahoransky-Kohalmi, Gergely; Bologa, Cristian G.; Ursu, Oleg; Oprea, Tudor I.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Many bioactivity <span class="hlt">databases</span> offer information regarding the biological activity of small molecules on protein targets. Information in these <span class="hlt">databases</span> is often hard to resolve with certainty because of subsetting different data in a variety of formats; use of different bioactivity metrics; use of different identifiers for chemicals and proteins; and having to access different query interfaces, respectively. Given the multitude of data sources, interfaces and standards, it is challenging to gather relevant facts and make appropriate connections and decisions regarding chemical–protein associations. The CARLSBAD <span class="hlt">database</span> has been developed as an integrated resource, focused on high-quality subsets from several bioactivity <span class="hlt">databases</span>, which are aggregated and presented in a uniform manner, suitable for the study of the relationships between small molecules and targets. In contrast to data collection resources, CARLSBAD provides a single normalized activity value of a given type for each unique chemical–protein target pair. Two types of scaffold perception methods have been implemented and are available for datamining: HierS (hierarchical scaffolds) and MCES (maximum common edge subgraph). The 2012 release of CARLSBAD contains 439 985 unique chemical structures, mapped onto 1,420 889 unique bioactivities, and annotated with 277 140 HierS scaffolds and 54 135 MCES chemical patterns, respectively. Of the 890 323 unique structure–target pairs curated in CARLSBAD, 13.95% are aggregated from multiple structure–target values: 94 975 are aggregated from two bioactivities, 14 544 from three, 7 930 from four and 2214 have five bioactivities, respectively. CARLSBAD captures bioactivities and tags for 1435 unique chemical structures of active pharmaceutical ingredients (i.e. ‘drugs’). CARLSBAD processing resulted in a net 17.3% data reduction for chemicals, 34.3% reduction for bioactivities, 23% reduction for HierS and 25% reduction for MCES, respectively. The CARLSBAD <span class="hlt">database</span> supports a knowledge mining system that provides non-specialists with novel integrative ways of exploring chemical biology space to facilitate knowledge mining in drug discovery and repurposing. <span class="hlt">Database</span> URL: http://carlsbad.health.unm.edu/carlsbad/. PMID:23794735</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23794735','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23794735"><span id="translatedtitle">The CARLSBAD <span class="hlt">database</span>: a confederated <span class="hlt">database</span> of chemical bioactivities.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mathias, Stephen L; Hines-Kay, Jarrett; Yang, Jeremy J; Zahoransky-Kohalmi, Gergely; Bologa, Cristian G; Ursu, Oleg; Oprea, Tudor I</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Many bioactivity <span class="hlt">databases</span> offer information regarding the biological activity of small molecules on protein targets. Information in these <span class="hlt">databases</span> is often hard to resolve with certainty because of subsetting different data in a variety of formats; use of different bioactivity metrics; use of different identifiers for chemicals and proteins; and having to access different query interfaces, respectively. Given the multitude of data sources, interfaces and standards, it is challenging to gather relevant facts and make appropriate connections and decisions regarding chemical-protein associations. The CARLSBAD <span class="hlt">database</span> has been developed as an integrated resource, focused on high-quality subsets from several bioactivity <span class="hlt">databases</span>, which are aggregated and presented in a uniform manner, suitable for the study of the relationships between small molecules and targets. In contrast to data collection resources, CARLSBAD provides a single normalized activity value of a given type for each unique chemical-protein target pair. Two types of scaffold perception methods have been implemented and are available for datamining: HierS (hierarchical scaffolds) and MCES (maximum common edge subgraph). The 2012 release of CARLSBAD contains 439 985 unique chemical structures, mapped onto 1,420 889 unique bioactivities, and annotated with 277 140 HierS scaffolds and 54 135 MCES chemical patterns, respectively. Of the 890 323 unique structure-target pairs curated in CARLSBAD, 13.95% are aggregated from multiple structure-target values: 94 975 are aggregated from two bioactivities, 14 544 from three, 7 930 from four and 2214 have five bioactivities, respectively. CARLSBAD captures bioactivities and tags for 1435 unique chemical structures of active pharmaceutical ingredients (i.e. 'drugs'). CARLSBAD processing resulted in a net 17.3% data reduction for chemicals, 34.3% reduction for bioactivities, 23% reduction for HierS and 25% reduction for MCES, respectively. The CARLSBAD <span class="hlt">database</span> supports a knowledge mining system that provides non-specialists with novel integrative ways of exploring chemical biology space to facilitate knowledge mining in drug discovery and repurposing. <span class="hlt">Database</span> URL: http://carlsbad.health.unm.edu/carlsbad/. PMID:23794735</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940018048','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940018048"><span id="translatedtitle">The EXOSAT <span class="hlt">database</span> and archive</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Reynolds, A. P.; Parmar, A. N.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>The EXOSAT <span class="hlt">database</span> provides on-line access to the results and data products (spectra, images, and lightcurves) from the EXOSAT mission as well as access to data and logs from a number of other missions (such as EINSTEIN, COS-B, ROSAT, and IRAS). In addition, a number of familiar optical, infrared, and x ray catalogs, including the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) guide star catalog are available. The complete <span class="hlt">database</span> is located at the EXOSAT observatory at ESTEC in the Netherlands and is accessible remotely via a captive account. The <span class="hlt">database</span> management system was specifically developed to efficiently access the <span class="hlt">database</span> and to allow the user to perform statistical studies on large samples of astronomical objects as well as to retrieve scientific and bibliographic information on single sources. The system was designed to be mission independent and includes timing, image processing, and spectral analysis packages as well as software to allow the easy transfer of analysis results and products to the user's own institute. The archive at ESTEC comprises a subset of the EXOSAT observations, stored on magnetic tape. Observations of particular interest were copied in compressed format to an optical jukebox, allowing users to retrieve and analyze selected raw data entirely from their terminals. Such analysis may be necessary if the user's needs are not accommodated by the products contained in the <span class="hlt">database</span> (in terms of time resolution, spectral range, and the finesse of the background subtraction, for instance). Long-term archiving of the full final observation data is taking place at ESRIN in Italy as part of the ESIS program, again using optical media, and ESRIN have now assumed responsibility for distributing the data to the community. Tests showed that raw observational data (typically several tens of megabytes for a single target) can be transferred via the existing networks in reasonable time.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860018460','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19860018460"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> interfaces on NASA's heterogeneous distributed <span class="hlt">database</span> system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Huang, S. H. S.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of the ORACLE interface is to enable the DAVID program to submit queries and transactions to <span class="hlt">databases</span> running under the ORACLE DBMS. The interface package is made up of several modules. The progress of these modules is described below. The two approaches used in implementing the interface are also discussed. Detailed discussion of the design of the templates is shown and concluding remarks are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950011237','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950011237"><span id="translatedtitle">An incremental <span class="hlt">database</span> access method for autonomous interoperable <span class="hlt">databases</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Roussopoulos, Nicholas; Sellis, Timos</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>We investigated a number of design and performance issues of interoperable <span class="hlt">database</span> management systems (DBMS's). The major results of our investigation were obtained in the areas of client-server <span class="hlt">database</span> architectures for heterogeneous DBMS's, incremental computation models, buffer management techniques, and query optimization. We finished a prototype of an advanced client-server workstation-based DBMS which allows access to multiple heterogeneous commercial DBMS's. Experiments and simulations were then run to compare its performance with the standard client-server architectures. The focus of this research was on adaptive optimization methods of heterogeneous <span class="hlt">database</span> systems. Adaptive buffer management accounts for the random and object-oriented access methods for which no known characterization of the access patterns exists. Adaptive query optimization means that value distributions and selectives, which play the most significant role in query plan evaluation, are continuously refined to reflect the actual values as opposed to static ones that are computed off-line. Query feedback is a concept that was first introduced to the literature by our group. We employed query feedback for both adaptive buffer management and for computing value distributions and selectivities. For adaptive buffer management, we use the page faults of prior executions to achieve more 'informed' management decisions. For the estimation of the distributions of the selectivities, we use curve-fitting techniques, such as least squares and splines, for regressing on these values.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AAS...21924605O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AAS...21924605O"><span id="translatedtitle">Publicly Available <span class="hlt">Database</span> : Improved Spectral Line Measurements In SDSS DR7 Galaxies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Oh, Kyuseok; Sarzi, M.; Schawinski, K.; Yi, S. K.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>We present a new <span class="hlt">database</span> of absorption and <span class="hlt">emission</span> line measurements based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey 7th data release for the galaxies within a redshift of 0.2. Our work makes use of the publicly available penalized pixel-fitting(pPXF) and GANDALF codes, aiming to improve the existing measurements for stellar kinematics, the strength of various absorption-line features, and the flux and width of the <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from different species of ionized gas. The absorption line strengths measured by SDSS pipeline are seriously contaminated by <span class="hlt">emission</span> fill-in. We effectively separate <span class="hlt">emission</span> lines from absorption lines. For instance, this work successfully extract [NI] doublet from Mgb and it leads to more realistic result of alpha enhancement on late-type galaxies compared to the previous <span class="hlt">database</span>. Besides accurately measuring line strengths, the <span class="hlt">database</span> provides new parameters that are indicative of line strength measurement quality. Users can build a subset of <span class="hlt">database</span> optimal for their studies using specific cuts in the fitting quality parameters as well as empirical signal-to-noise. Applying these parameters, we found `hidden’ broad-line-region galaxies and they turned out to be Seyfert I nuclei that were not picked up as AGN by SDSS. The <span class="hlt">database</span> is publicly available at http://gem.yonsei.ac.kr/ossy</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AIPC.1497..387D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AIPC.1497..387D"><span id="translatedtitle">Ontology building by dictionary <span class="hlt">database</span> mining</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Deliyska, B.; Rozeva, A.; Malamov, D.</p> <p>2012-11-01</p> <p>The paper examines the problem of building ontologies in automatic and semi-automatic way by means of mining a dictionary <span class="hlt">database</span>. An overview of data mining tools and methods is presented. On this basis an extended and improved approach is proposed which involves operations for pre-processing the dictionary <span class="hlt">database</span>, clustering and associating <span class="hlt">database</span> entries for extracting hierarchical and nonhierarchical relations. The approach is applied on sample dictionary <span class="hlt">database</span> in the environment of the Rapid Miner mining tool. As a result the dictionary <span class="hlt">database</span> is complemented to thesaurus <span class="hlt">database</span> which can be further on easily converted to reusable formal ontology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910040255&hterms=model+driven+database&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dmodel%2Bdriven%2Bdatabase','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910040255&hterms=model+driven+database&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dmodel%2Bdriven%2Bdatabase"><span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">database</span> for solid-state laser, optical, and nonlinear materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Cross, P. L.; Filer, E. D.; Barnes, N. P.; Skolaut, M. W., Jr.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">database</span> contains the physical properties of laser, optical, and nonlinear materials used by the laser models of a laser-modeling software system. The <span class="hlt">database</span> is subdivided into two parts: spectra and tabulated data. The spectra are ASCII files of laser-material's absorption and <span class="hlt">emission</span> spectra, and laser-diode's <span class="hlt">emission</span> spectra. The tabulated data contains physical properties of laser, optical, and nonlinear materials, including crystalline, thermal, and mechanical properties. A menu-driven interface allows the execution from a personal directory where the user can store files containing input parameters for a specific model or the results of model's calculations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2012/3020/','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2012/3020/"><span id="translatedtitle">The National Land Cover <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Homer, Collin H.; Fry, Joyce A.; Barnes, Christopher A.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The National Land Cover <span class="hlt">Database</span> (NLCD) serves as the definitive Landsat-based, 30-meter resolution, land cover <span class="hlt">database</span> for the Nation. NLCD provides spatial reference and descriptive data for characteristics of the land surface such as thematic class (for example, urban, agriculture, and forest), percent impervious surface, and percent tree canopy cover. NLCD supports a wide variety of Federal, State, local, and nongovernmental applications that seek to assess ecosystem status and health, understand the spatial patterns of biodiversity, predict effects of climate change, and develop land management policy. NLCD products are created by the Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics (MRLC) Consortium, a partnership of Federal agencies led by the U.S. Geological Survey. All NLCD data products are available for download at no charge to the public from the MRLC Web site: http://www.mrlc.gov.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9016515','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9016515"><span id="translatedtitle">The RDP (Ribosomal <span class="hlt">Database</span> Project).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Maidak, B L; Olsen, G J; Larsen, N; Overbeek, R; McCaughey, M J; Woese, C R</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>The Ribosomal <span class="hlt">Database</span> Project (RDP) is a curated <span class="hlt">database</span> that offers ribosome-related data, analysis services and associated computer programs. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams, and various software for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous FTP (rdp.life.uiuc.edu), electronic mail (server@rdp.life.uiuc.edu), gopher (rdpgopher.life.uiuc.edu) and WWW (http://rdpwww.life.uiuc.edu/ ). The electronic mail and WWW servers provide ribosomal probe checking, approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences, screening for possible chimeric rRNA sequences, automated alignment, and a suggested placement of an unknown sequence on an existing phylogenetic tree. PMID:9016515</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8594608','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8594608"><span id="translatedtitle">The Ribosomal <span class="hlt">Database</span> Project (RDP).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Maidak, B L; Olsen, G J; Larsen, N; Overbeek, R; McCaughey, M J; Woese, C R</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>The Ribosomal <span class="hlt">Database</span> Project (RDP) is a curated <span class="hlt">database</span> that offers ribosome-related data, analysis services and associated computer programs. The offerings include phylogenetically ordered alignments of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams and various software for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous ftp (rdp.life.uiuc.edu), electronic mail (server@rdp.life.uiuc.edu), gopher (rdpgopher.life.uiuc.edu) and World Wide Web (WWW)(http://rdpwww.life.uiuc.edu/). The electronic mail and WWW servers provide ribosomal probe checking, screening for possible chimeric rRNA sequences, automated alignment and approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences on an existing phylogenetic tree. PMID:8594608</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/2005/170/downloads/','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/2005/170/downloads/"><span id="translatedtitle">Geologic Map <span class="hlt">Database</span> of Texas</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Stoeser, Douglas B.; Shock, Nancy; Green, Gregory N.; Dumonceaux, Gayle M.; Heran, William D.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this report is to release a digital geologic map <span class="hlt">database</span> for the State of Texas. This <span class="hlt">database</span> was compiled for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Program, National Surveys and Analysis Project, whose goal is a nationwide assemblage of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and other data. This release makes the geologic data from the Geologic Map of Texas available in digital format. Original clear film positives provided by the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology were photographically enlarged onto Mylar film. These films were scanned, georeferenced, digitized, and attributed by Geologic Data Systems (GDS), Inc., Denver, Colorado. Project oversight and quality control was the responsibility of the U.S. Geological Survey. ESRI ArcInfo coverages, AMLs, and shapefiles are provided.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002SPIE.4848..455B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002SPIE.4848..455B"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> applicaton for absolute spectrophotometry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bochkov, Valery V.; Shumko, Sergiy</p> <p>2002-12-01</p> <p>32-bit <span class="hlt">database</span> application with multidocument interface for Windows has been developed to calculate absolute energy distributions of observed spectra. The original <span class="hlt">database</span> contains wavelength calibrated observed spectra which had been already passed through apparatus reductions such as flatfielding, background and apparatus noise subtracting. Absolute energy distributions of observed spectra are defined in unique scale by means of registering them simultaneously with artificial intensity standard. Observations of sequence of spectrophotometric standards are used to define absolute energy of the artificial standard. Observations of spectrophotometric standards are used to define optical extinction in selected moments. FFT algorithm implemented in the application allows performing convolution (deconvolution) spectra with user-defined PSF. The object-oriented interface has been created using facilities of C++ libraries. Client/server model with Windows Socket functionality based on TCP/IP protocol is used to develop the application. It supports Dynamic Data Exchange conversation in server mode and uses Microsoft Exchange communication facilities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/70707','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/70707"><span id="translatedtitle">The NMT-5 criticality <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Cort, B.; Perkins, B.; Cort, G.</p> <p>1995-05-01</p> <p>The NMT-5 Criticality <span class="hlt">Database</span> maintains criticality-related data and documentation to ensure the safety of workers handling special nuclear materials at the Plutonium Facility (TA-55) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The <span class="hlt">database</span> contains pertinent criticality safety limit information for more than 150 separate locations at which special nuclear materials are handled. Written in 4th Dimension for the Macintosh, it facilitates the production of signs for posting at these areas, tracks the history of postings and related authorizing documentation, and generates in Microsoft Word a current, comprehensive representation of all signs and supporting documentation, such as standard operating procedures and signature approvals. It facilitates the auditing process and is crucial to full and effective compliance with Department of Energy regulations. It has been recommended for installation throughout the Nuclear Materials Technology Division at Los Alamos.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19910022539','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19910022539"><span id="translatedtitle">Aero/fluids <span class="hlt">database</span> system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Reardon, John E.; Violett, Duane L., Jr.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>The AFAS <span class="hlt">Database</span> System was developed to provide the basic structure of a comprehensive <span class="hlt">database</span> system for the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Structures and Dynamics Laboratory Aerophysics Division. The system is intended to handle all of the Aerophysics Division Test Facilities as well as data from other sources. The system was written for the DEC VAX family of computers in FORTRAN-77 and utilizes the VMS indexed file system and screen management routines. Various aspects of the system are covered, including a description of the user interface, lists of all code structure elements, descriptions of the file structures, a description of the security system operation, a detailed description of the data retrieval tasks, a description of the session log, and a description of the archival system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015NIMPA.779...52A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015NIMPA.779...52A"><span id="translatedtitle">The MAJORANA Parts Tracking <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y.-D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Combs, D. C.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yu.; Egorov, V.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Esterline, J.; Fast, J. E.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, F. M.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Gusev, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Hegai, A.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, O.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J. Diaz; Leviner, L. E.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S. J.; Mertens, S.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, L.; Nomachi, M.; Orrell, J. L.; O`Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Petersburg, R.; Phillips, D. G.; Poon, A. W. P.; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Shanks, B.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, K. J.; Snyder, N.; Soin, A.; Suriano, A. M.; Tedeschi, D.; Thompson, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A. R.; Yu, C.-H.; Yumatov, V.; Zhitnikov, I.</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is an ultra-low background physics experiment searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge. The MAJORANA Parts Tracking <span class="hlt">Database</span> is used to record the history of components used in the construction of the DEMONSTRATOR. The tracking implementation takes a novel approach based on the schema-free <span class="hlt">database</span> technology CouchDB. Transportation, storage, and processes undergone by parts such as machining or cleaning are linked to part records. Tracking parts provide a great logistics benefit and an important quality assurance reference during construction. In addition, the location history of parts provides an estimate of their exposure to cosmic radiation. A web application for data entry and a radiation exposure calculator have been developed as tools for achieving the extreme radio-purity required for this rare decay search.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011nlaw.confI..16B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011nlaw.confI..16B"><span id="translatedtitle">Spectroscopic <span class="hlt">Databases</span> for Astronomical Applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Brown, L. R.</p> <p>2011-05-01</p> <p>Astronomers detect new species (atoms, molecules, ions, radicals present in gas, liquid and solid phase) and determine their abundances, temperatures, pressures, velocities etc. through spectroscopic remote sensing. Nearly every physical phenomenon that in uences the radiative transfer of an astronomical body can be detected and quantified using specific spectral features, provided sufficient spectroscopic knowledge is available. Collections of spectroscopic information are formed and then revised as new objectives and techniques evolve. The resulting spectroscopic <span class="hlt">databases</span> should be complete, accurate and organized in convenient forms. Much is accessible for far- and mid-IR applications, but the available compilations are often deficient at shorter wavelengths. In this presentation, the current status of these molecular spectroscopic <span class="hlt">databases</span> will be reviewed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1611200M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1611200M"><span id="translatedtitle">Central Asia Active Fault <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mohadjer, Solmaz; Ehlers, Todd A.; Kakar, Najibullah</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>The ongoing collision of the Indian subcontinent with Asia controls active tectonics and seismicity in Central Asia. This motion is accommodated by faults that have historically caused devastating earthquakes and continue to pose serious threats to the population at risk. Despite international and regional efforts to assess seismic hazards in Central Asia, little attention has been given to development of a comprehensive <span class="hlt">database</span> for active faults in the region. To address this issue and to better understand the distribution and level of seismic hazard in Central Asia, we are developing a publically available <span class="hlt">database</span> for active faults of Central Asia (including but not limited to Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, northern Pakistan and western China) using ArcGIS. The <span class="hlt">database</span> is designed to allow users to store, map and query important fault parameters such as fault location, displacement history, rate of movement, and other data relevant to seismic hazard studies including fault trench locations, geochronology constraints, and seismic studies. Data sources integrated into the <span class="hlt">database</span> include previously published maps and scientific investigations as well as strain rate measurements and historic and recent seismicity. In addition, high resolution Quickbird, Spot, and Aster imagery are used for selected features to locate and measure offset of landforms associated with Quaternary faulting. These features are individually digitized and linked to attribute tables that provide a description for each feature. Preliminary observations include inconsistent and sometimes inaccurate information for faults documented in different studies. For example, the Darvaz-Karakul fault which roughly defines the western margin of the Pamir, has been mapped with differences in location of up to 12 kilometers. The sense of motion for this fault ranges from unknown to thrust and strike-slip in three different studies despite documented left-lateral displacements of Holocene and late Pleistocene landforms observed near the fault trace.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950008261','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950008261"><span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">database</span> for propagation models</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kantak, Anil V.; Suwitra, Krisjani; Le, Choung</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">database</span> of various propagation phenomena models that can be used by telecommunications systems engineers to obtain parameter values for systems design is presented. This is an easy-to-use tool and is currently available for either a PC using Excel software under Windows environment or a Macintosh using Excel software for Macintosh. All the steps necessary to use the software are easy and many times self-explanatory; however, a sample run of the CCIR rain attenuation model is presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19960000460','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19960000460"><span id="translatedtitle">A <span class="hlt">database</span> for propagation models</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kantak, Anil V.; Suwitra, Krisjani; Le, Chuong</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">database</span> of various propagation phenomena models that can be used by telecommunications systems engineers to obtain parameter values for systems design is presented. This is an easy-to-use tool and is currently available for either a PC using Excel software under Windows environment or a Macintosh using Excel software for Macintosh. All the steps necessary to use the software are easy and many times self explanatory.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10106466','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10106466"><span id="translatedtitle">Stockpile Dismantlement <span class="hlt">Database</span> Training Materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Not Available</p> <p>1993-11-01</p> <p>This document, the Stockpile Dismantlement <span class="hlt">Database</span> (SDDB) training materials is designed to familiarize the user with the SDDB windowing system and the data entry steps for Component Characterization for Disposition. The foundation of information required for every part is depicted by using numbered graphic and text steps. The individual entering data is lead step by step through generic and specific examples. These training materials are intended to be supplements to individual on-the-job training.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ascl.soft09003J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ascl.soft09003J"><span id="translatedtitle">LSD: Large Survey <span class="hlt">Database</span> framework</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Juric, Mario</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p>The Large Survey <span class="hlt">Database</span> (LSD) is a Python framework and DBMS for distributed storage, cross-matching and querying of large survey catalogs (>10^9 rows, >1 TB). The primary driver behind its development is the analysis of Pan-STARRS PS1 data. It is specifically optimized for fast queries and parallel sweeps of positionally and temporally indexed datasets. It transparently scales to more than >10^2 nodes, and can be made to function in "shared nothing" architectures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1077405','SCIGOV-DOEDE'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1077405"><span id="translatedtitle">GOLD: The Genomes Online <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/dataexplorer">DOE Data Explorer</a></p> <p>Kyrpides, Nikos; Liolios, Dinos; Chen, Amy; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Hugenholtz, Philip; Markowitz, Victor; Bernal, Alex</p> <p></p> <p>Since its inception in 1997, GOLD has continuously monitored genome sequencing projects worldwide and has provided the community with a unique centralized resource that integrates diverse information related to Archaea, Bacteria, Eukaryotic and more recently Metagenomic sequencing projects. As of September 2007, GOLD recorded 639 completed genome projects. These projects have their complete sequence deposited into the public archival sequence <span class="hlt">databases</span> such as GenBank EMBL,and DDBJ. From the total of 639 complete and published genome projects as of 9/2007, 527 were bacterial, 47 were archaeal and 65 were eukaryotic. In addition to the complete projects, there were 2158 ongoing sequencing projects. 1328 of those were bacterial, 59 archaeal and 771 eukaryotic projects. Two types of metadata are provided by GOLD: (i) project metadata and (ii) organism/environment metadata. GOLD CARD pages for every project are available from the link of every GOLD_STAMP ID. The information in every one of these pages is organized into three tables: (a) Organism information, (b) Genome project information and (c) External links. [The Genomes On Line <span class="hlt">Database</span> (GOLD) in 2007: Status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata, Konstantinos Liolios, Konstantinos Mavromatis, Nektarios Tavernarakis and Nikos C. Kyrpides, Nucleic Acids Research Advance Access published online on November 2, 2007, Nucleic Acids Research, doi:10.1093/nar/gkm884]</p><p>The basic tables in the GOLD <span class="hlt">database</span> that can be browsed or searched include the following information:<ul><li>Gold Stamp ID</li><li>Organism name</li><li>Domain</li><li>Links to information sources</li><li>Size and link to a map, when available</li><li>Chromosome number, Plas number, and GC content</li><li>A link for downloading the actual genome data</li><li>Institution that did the sequencing</li><li>Funding source</li><li><span class="hlt">Database</span> where information resides</li><li>Publication status and information</li></ul><p>(Specialized Interface)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26442933','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26442933"><span id="translatedtitle">The EcoCyc <span class="hlt">Database</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Karp, Peter D; Weaver, Daniel; Paley, Suzanne; Fulcher, Carol; Kubo, Aya; Kothari, Anamika; Krummenacker, Markus; Subhraveti, Pallavi; Weerasinghe, Deepika; Gama-Castro, Socorro; Huerta, Araceli M; Muiz-Rascado, Luis; Bonavides-Martinez, Csar; Weiss, Verena; Peralta-Gil, Martin; Santos-Zavaleta, Alberto; Schrder, Imke; Mackie, Amanda; Gunsalus, Robert; Collado-Vides, Julio; Keseler, Ingrid M; Paulsen, Ian</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>EcoCyc is a bioinformatics <span class="hlt">database</span> available at EcoCyc.org that describes the genome and the biochemical machinery of Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. The long-term goal of the project is to describe the complete molecular catalog of the E. coli cell, as well as the functions of each of its molecular parts, to facilitate a system-level understanding of E. coli. EcoCyc is an electronic reference source for E. coli biologists and for biologists who work with related microorganisms. The <span class="hlt">database</span> includes information pages on each E. coli gene, metabolite, reaction, operon, and metabolic pathway. The <span class="hlt">database</span> also includes information on E. coli gene essentiality and on nutrient conditions that do or do not support the growth of E. coli. The website and downloadable software contain tools for analysis of high-throughput data sets. In addition, a steady-state metabolic flux model is generated from each new version of EcoCyc. The model can predict metabolic flux rates, nutrient uptake rates, and growth rates for different gene knockouts and nutrient conditions. This review provides a detailed description of the data content of EcoCyc and of the procedures by which this content is generated. PMID:26442933</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2238845','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2238845"><span id="translatedtitle">IDBD: Infectious Disease Biomarker <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Yang, In Seok; Ryu, Chunsun; Cho, Ki Joon; Kim, Jin Kwang; Ong, Swee Hoe; Mitchell, Wayne P.; Kim, Bong Su; Kim, Kyung Hyun</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Biomarkers enable early diagnosis, guide molecularly targeted therapy and monitor the activity and therapeutic responses across a variety of diseases. Despite intensified interest and research, however, the overall rate of development of novel biomarkers has been falling. Moreover, no solution is yet available that efficiently retrieves and processes biomarker information pertaining to infectious diseases. Infectious Disease Biomarker <span class="hlt">Database</span> (IDBD) is one of the first efforts to build an easily accessible and comprehensive literature-derived <span class="hlt">database</span> covering known infectious disease biomarkers. IDBD is a community annotation <span class="hlt">database</span>, utilizing collaborative Web 2.0 features, providing a convenient user interface to input and revise data online. It allows users to link infectious diseases or pathogens to protein, gene or carbohydrate biomarkers through the use of search tools. It supports various types of data searches and application tools to analyze sequence and structure features of potential and validated biomarkers. Currently, IDBD integrates 611 biomarkers for 66 infectious diseases and 70 pathogens. It is publicly accessible at http://biomarker.cdc.go.kr and http://biomarker.korea.ac.kr. PMID:17982173</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15718594','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15718594"><span id="translatedtitle">Telemedical <span class="hlt">database</span> of Hodgkin's disease.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Walecki, Piotr; Sarapata, Krzysztof; Laso?, Wojciech; Pyrczak, Wies?aw; Roterman-Konieczna, Irena; Balwierz, Walentyna</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>The creation of a complex telemedical system oriented towards childhood Hodgkin's disease has been undertaken at the Department of Bioinformatics and Telemedicine of the Jagiellonian University Medical College in cooperation with the Department of Oncology and Pediatric Hematology of the Polish-American Institute of Pediatrics, JU MC. Data collecting, data processing and data transmission is aimed to aid and/or supervise surgical and drug treatment. The Tele-<span class="hlt">Database</span> of Childhood Hodgkin's Disease (TDCHD) is not a simple Internet <span class="hlt">database</span> project. A few hundred data items are presented in each patient's record, covering the complete medical treatment period. Efficient management and proper data protection are necessary for a medical <span class="hlt">database</span>. Therefore, the interface for entering data has been divided into several parts. Each part is subjected to separate editing and transfer. A double-layer debugging system has been applied in the program: the first pass occurs on the client side (programmed in JavaScript and XML), the second - on the server side (programmed in PHP). Strict authorization is requested for all participants. Clinical data collected according to management standards and information governance (data quality, security and confidentiality) is organized in a way that facilitates practical and scientific use. PMID:15718594</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14681475','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14681475"><span id="translatedtitle">ERGDB: Estrogen Responsive Genes <span class="hlt">Database</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tang, Suisheng; Han, Hao; Bajic, Vladimir B</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>ERGDB is an integrated knowledge <span class="hlt">database</span> dedicated to genes responsive to estrogen. Genes included in ERGDB are those whose expression levels are experimentally proven to be either up-regulated or down-regulated by estrogen. Genes included are identified based on publications from the PubMed <span class="hlt">database</span> and each record has been manually examined, evaluated and selected for inclusion by biologists. ERGDB aims to be a unified gateway to store, search, retrieve and update information about estrogen responsive genes. Each record contains links to relevant <span class="hlt">databases</span>, such as GenBank, LocusLink, Refseq, PubMed and ATCC. The unique feature of ERGDB is that it contains information on the dependence of gene reactions on experimental conditions. In addition to basic information about the genes, information for each record includes gene functional description, experimental methods used, tissue or cell type, gene reaction, estrogen exposure time and the summary of putative estrogen response elements if the gene's promoter sequence was available. Through a web interface at http://sdmc.i2r.a-star.edu.sg/ergdb/ cgi-bin/explore.pl users can either browse or query ERGDB. Access is free for academic and non-profit users. PMID:14681475</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4243172','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4243172"><span id="translatedtitle">The EcoCyc <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Karp, Peter D.; Weaver, Daniel; Paley, Suzanne; Fulcher, Carol; Kubo, Aya; Kothari, Anamika; Krummenacker, Markus; Subhraveti, Pallavi; Weerasinghe, Deepika; Gama-Castro, Socorro; Huerta, Araceli M.; Muiz-Rascado, Luis; Bonavides-Martinez, Csar; Weiss, Verena; Peralta-Gil, Martin; Santos-Zavaleta, Alberto; Schrder, Imke; Mackie, Amanda; Gunsalus, Robert; Collado-Vides, Julio; Keseler, Ingrid M.; Paulsen, Ian</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>EcoCyc is a bioinformatics <span class="hlt">database</span> available at EcoCyc.org that describes the genome and the biochemical machinery of Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. The long-term goal of the project is to describe the complete molecular catalog of the E. coli cell, as well as the functions of each of its molecular parts, to facilitate a system-level understanding of E. coli. EcoCyc is an electronic reference source for E. coli biologists, and for biologists who work with related microorganisms. The <span class="hlt">database</span> includes information pages on each E. coli gene, metabolite, reaction, operon, and metabolic pathway. The <span class="hlt">database</span> also includes information on E. coli gene essentiality, and on nutrient conditions that do or do not support the growth of E. coli. The web site and downloadable software contain tools for analysis of high-throughput datasets. In addition, a steady-state metabolic flux model is generated from each new version of EcoCyc. The model can predict metabolic flux rates, nutrient uptake rates, and growth rates for different gene knockouts and nutrient conditions. This chapter provides a detailed description of the data content of EcoCyc, and of the procedures by which this content is generated. PMID:26442933</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11911893','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11911893"><span id="translatedtitle">MINT: a Molecular INTeraction <span class="hlt">database</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zanzoni, Andreas; Montecchi-Palazzi, Luisa; Quondam, Michele; Ausiello, Gabriele; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Cesareni, Gianni</p> <p>2002-02-20</p> <p>Protein interaction <span class="hlt">databases</span> represent unique tools to store, in a computer readable form, the protein interaction information disseminated in the scientific literature. Well organized and easily accessible <span class="hlt">databases</span> permit the easy retrieval and analysis of large interaction data sets. Here we present MINT, a <span class="hlt">database</span> (http://cbm.bio.uniroma2.it/mint/index.html) designed to store data on functional interactions between proteins. Beyond cataloguing binary complexes, MINT was conceived to store other types of functional interactions, including enzymatic modifications of one of the partners. Release 1.0 of MINT focuses on experimentally verified protein-protein interactions. Both direct and indirect relationships are considered. Furthermore, MINT aims at being exhaustive in the description of the interaction and, whenever available, information about kinetic and binding constants and about the domains participating in the interaction is included in the entry. MINT consists of entries extracted from the scientific literature by expert curators assisted by 'MINT Assistant', a software that targets abstracts containing interaction information and presents them to the curator in a user-friendly format. The interaction data can be easily extracted and viewed graphically through 'MINT Viewer'. Presently MINT contains 4568 interactions, 782 of which are indirect or genetic interactions. PMID:11911893</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001AGUFMOS11B0375C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001AGUFMOS11B0375C"><span id="translatedtitle">Open Clients for Distributed <span class="hlt">Databases</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chayes, D. N.; Arko, R. A.</p> <p>2001-12-01</p> <p>We are actively developing a collection of open source example clients that demonstrate use of our "back end" data management infrastructure. The data management system is reported elsewhere at this meeting (Arko and Chayes: A Scaleable <span class="hlt">Database</span> Infrastructure). In addition to their primary goal of being examples for others to build upon, some of these clients may have limited utility in them selves. More information about the clients and the data infrastructure is available on line at http://data.ldeo.columbia.edu. The available examples to be demonstrated include several web-based clients including those developed for the Community Review System of the Digital Library for Earth System Education, a real-time watch standers log book, an offline interface to use log book entries, a simple client to search on multibeam metadata and others are Internet enabled and generally web-based front ends that support searches against one or more relational <span class="hlt">databases</span> using industry standard SQL queries. In addition to the web based clients, simple SQL searches from within Excel and similar applications will be demonstrated. By defining, documenting and publishing a clear interface to the fully searchable <span class="hlt">databases</span>, it becomes relatively easy to construct client interfaces that are optimized for specific applications in comparison to building a monolithic data and user interface system.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SPIE.7513E..2YT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SPIE.7513E..2YT"><span id="translatedtitle">Common hyperspectral image <span class="hlt">database</span> design</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Tian, Lixun; Liao, Ningfang; Chai, Ali</p> <p>2009-11-01</p> <p>This paper is to introduce Common hyperspectral image <span class="hlt">database</span> with a demand-oriented <span class="hlt">Database</span> design method (CHIDB), which comprehensively set ground-based spectra, standardized hyperspectral cube, spectral analysis together to meet some applications. The paper presents an integrated approach to retrieving spectral and spatial patterns from remotely sensed imagery using state-of-the-art data mining and advanced <span class="hlt">database</span> technologies, some data mining ideas and functions were associated into CHIDB to make it more suitable to serve in agriculture, geological and environmental areas. A broad range of data from multiple regions of the electromagnetic spectrum is supported, including ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared, thermal infrared, and fluorescence. CHIDB is based on dotnet framework and designed by MVC architecture including five main functional modules: Data importer/exporter, Image/spectrum Viewer, Data Processor, Parameter Extractor, and On-line Analyzer. The original data were all stored in SQL server2008 for efficient search, query and update, and some advance Spectral image data Processing technology are used such as Parallel processing in C#; Finally an application case is presented in agricultural disease detecting area.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3418167','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3418167"><span id="translatedtitle">The Chordate Proteome History <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Levasseur, Anthony; Paganini, Julien; Dainat, Jacques; Thompson, Julie D.; Poch, Olivier; Pontarotti, Pierre; Gouret, Philippe</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The chordate proteome history <span class="hlt">database</span> (http://ioda.univ-provence.fr) comprises some 20,000 evolutionary analyses of proteins from chordate species. Our main objective was to characterize and study the evolutionary histories of the chordate proteome, and in particular to detect genomic events and automatic functional searches. Firstly, phylogenetic analyses based on high quality multiple sequence alignments and a robust phylogenetic pipeline were performed for the whole protein and for each individual domain. Novel approaches were developed to identify orthologs/paralogs, and predict gene duplication/gain/loss events and the occurrence of new protein architectures (domain gains, losses and shuffling). These important genetic events were localized on the phylogenetic trees and on the genomic sequence. Secondly, the phylogenetic trees were enhanced by the creation of phylogroups, whereby groups of orthologous sequences created using OrthoMCL were corrected based on the phylogenetic trees; gene family size and gene gain/loss in a given lineage could be deduced from the phylogroups. For each ortholog group obtained from the phylogenetic or the phylogroup analysis, functional information and expression data can be retrieved. <span class="hlt">Database</span> searches can be performed easily using biological objects: protein identifier, keyword or domain, but can also be based on events, eg, domain exchange events can be retrieved. To our knowledge, this is the first <span class="hlt">database</span> that links group clustering, phylogeny and automatic functional searches along with the detection of important events occurring during genome evolution, such as the appearance of a new domain architecture. PMID:22904610</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMNH21B1406S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMNH21B1406S"><span id="translatedtitle">Development a GIS Snowstorm <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Squires, M. F.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>This paper describes the development of a GIS Snowstorm <span class="hlt">Database</span> (GSDB) at NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center. The snowstorm <span class="hlt">database</span> is a collection of GIS layers and tabular information for 471 snowstorms between 1900 and 2010. Each snowstorm has undergone automated and manual quality control. The beginning and ending date of each snowstorm is specified. The original purpose of this data was to serve as input for NCDC’s new Regional Snowfall Impact Scale (ReSIS). However, this data is being preserved and used to investigate the impacts of snowstorms on society. GSDB is used to summarize the impact of snowstorms on transportation (interstates) and various classes of facilities (roads, schools, hospitals, etc.). GSDB can also be linked to other sources of impacts such as insurance loss information and Storm Data. Thus the snowstorm <span class="hlt">database</span> is suited for many different types of users including the general public, decision makers, and researchers. This paper summarizes quality control issues associated with using snowfall data, methods used to identify the starting and ending dates of a storm, and examples of the tables that combine snowfall and societal data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://epi.grants.cancer.gov/DHQ/database/dbchanges.html','NCI'); return false;" href="http://epi.grants.cancer.gov/DHQ/database/dbchanges.html"><span id="translatedtitle">Diet History Questionnaire: <span class="hlt">Database</span> Revision History</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.cancer.gov">Cancer.gov</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The following details all additions and revisions made to the DHQ nutrient and food <span class="hlt">database</span>. This revision history is provided as a reference for investigators who may have performed analyses with a previous release of the <span class="hlt">database</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=evolution+AND+biodiversity&pg=3&id=EJ630181','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=evolution+AND+biodiversity&pg=3&id=EJ630181"><span id="translatedtitle">Investigating Evolutionary Questions Using Online Molecular <span class="hlt">Databases</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Puterbaugh, Mary N.; Burleigh, J. Gordon</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Recommends using online molecular <span class="hlt">databases</span> as teaching tools to illustrate evolutionary questions and concepts while introducing students to public molecular <span class="hlt">databases</span>. Provides activities in which students make molecular comparisons between species. (YDS)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19727614','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19727614"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> systems for knowledge-based discovery.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jagarlapudi, Sarma A R P; Kishan, K V Radha</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Several <span class="hlt">database</span> systems have been developed to provide valuable information from the bench chemist to biologist, medical practitioner to pharmaceutical scientist in a structured format. The advent of information technology and computational power enhanced the ability to access large volumes of data in the form of a <span class="hlt">database</span> where one could do compilation, searching, archiving, analysis, and finally knowledge derivation. Although, data are of variable types the tools used for <span class="hlt">database</span> creation, searching and retrieval are similar. GVK BIO has been developing <span class="hlt">databases</span> from publicly available scientific literature in specific areas like medicinal chemistry, clinical research, and mechanism-based toxicity so that the structured <span class="hlt">databases</span> containing vast data could be used in several areas of research. These <span class="hlt">databases</span> were classified as reference centric or compound centric depending on the way the <span class="hlt">database</span> systems were designed. Integration of these <span class="hlt">databases</span> with knowledge derivation tools would enhance the value of these systems toward better drug design and discovery. PMID:19727614</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mergers+AND+acquisitions&pg=7&id=EJ451892','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mergers+AND+acquisitions&pg=7&id=EJ451892"><span id="translatedtitle">Annual Review of <span class="hlt">Database</span> Development: 1992.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Basch, Reva</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Reviews recent trends in <span class="hlt">databases</span> and online systems. Topics discussed include new access points for established <span class="hlt">databases</span>; acquisitions, consolidations, and competition between vendors; European coverage; international services; online reference materials, including telephone directories; political and legal materials and public records;</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=132632&keyword=cp&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=49786477&CFTOKEN=82500173','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=132632&keyword=cp&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=49786477&CFTOKEN=82500173"><span id="translatedtitle">CANCER PREVENTION AND CONTROL (CP) <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This <span class="hlt">database</span> focuses on breast, cervical, skin, and colorectal cancer emphasizing the application of early detection and control program activities and risk reduction efforts. The <span class="hlt">database</span> provides bibliographic citations and abstracts of various types of materials including jou...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EPJP..131...38B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016EPJP..131...38B"><span id="translatedtitle">Quantum search of a real unstructured <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Broda, Bogusław</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>A simple circuit implementation of the oracle for Grover's quantum search of a real unstructured classical <span class="hlt">database</span> is proposed. The oracle contains a kind of quantumly accessible classical memory, which stores the <span class="hlt">database</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/htmlgen?LACT','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/htmlgen?LACT"><span id="translatedtitle">LactMed: Drugs and Lactation <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>TOXNET Home > LactMed LactMed A TOXNET <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span> Drugs and Lactation <span class="hlt">Database</span> (LactMed) SEARCH LACTMED BROWSE LACTMED ADVANCED SEARCH Search Search Term Records with Include Synonyms and CAS Numbers in ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://epi.grants.cancer.gov/pharm/pharmacoepi_db/ipci.html','NCI'); return false;" href="http://epi.grants.cancer.gov/pharm/pharmacoepi_db/ipci.html"><span id="translatedtitle">Integrated Primary Care Information <span class="hlt">Database</span> (IPCI)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.cancer.gov">Cancer.gov</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The Integrated Primary Care Information <span class="hlt">Database</span> is a longitudinal observational <span class="hlt">database</span> that was created specifically for pharmacoepidemiological and pharmacoeconomic studies, inlcuding data from computer-based patient records supplied voluntarily by general practitioners.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=76712&keyword=statistic+AND+methods+AND+ecology&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=50048482&CFTOKEN=72439011','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=76712&keyword=statistic+AND+methods+AND+ecology&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=50048482&CFTOKEN=72439011"><span id="translatedtitle">DESIGNING ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING <span class="hlt">DATABASES</span> FOR STATISTIC ASSESSMENT</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Databases</span> designed for statistical analyses have characteristics that distinguish them from <span class="hlt">databases</span> intended for general use. EMAP uses a probabilistic sampling design to collect data to produce statistical assessments of environmental conditions. In addition to supporting the ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=242306&keyword=Johnson&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=55713786&CFTOKEN=83070646','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=242306&keyword=Johnson&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=55713786&CFTOKEN=83070646"><span id="translatedtitle">Reef Ecosystem Services and Decision Support <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This scientific and management information <span class="hlt">database</span> utilizes systems thinking to describe the linkages between decisions, human activities, and provisioning of reef ecosystem goods and services. This <span class="hlt">database</span> provides: (1) Hierarchy of related topics - Click on topics to navigat...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=132650&keyword=food+AND+nutrition&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=56754642&CFTOKEN=87753982','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=132650&keyword=food+AND+nutrition&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=56754642&CFTOKEN=87753982"><span id="translatedtitle">USDA NATIONAL NUTRIENT <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span> FOR STANDARD REFERENCE</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The USDA Nutrient <span class="hlt">Database</span> for Standard Reference (SR) is the major source of food composition data in the United States. It provides the foundation for most food composition <span class="hlt">databases</span> in the public and private sectors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.A31C0088P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.A31C0088P"><span id="translatedtitle">Wildfire <span class="hlt">Emission</span>, injection height: Development, Optimization, and Large Scale Impact</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Paugam, R.; Wooster, M.; Atherton, J.; Beevers, S.; Kitwiroon, N.; Kaiser, J. W.; Remy, S.; Freitas, S. R.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Evaluation of wildfire <span class="hlt">emissions</span> in global chemistry transport model is still a subject of debate in the atmospheric community, though some inventory like GFAS and <span class="hlt">GFED</span> are already available. In particular none of those approaches are currently dealing with height induced by buoyant plumes. In this work we aim to set-up a 3-dimensional wildfire <span class="hlt">emission</span> inventory. Our approach is based on the Fire Radiative Power product (FRP) evaluated at a cluster level coupled with the plume rise model (PRM) originally developed by Saulo Freitas. PRM was developed to take into account effects of atmospheric stability and latent heat in plume updraft. Here, the original version is modified: (i) the input data of convective heat flux and Active Fire area are directly force from FRP data derived from a modified version of the Dozier algorithm applied to the MOD12 product, (ii) and the dynamical core of the plume model is modified with a new entrainment scheme inspired from latest results in shallow convection parametrization. The new parameters introduced are then defined via an optimization procedure based on (i) fire plume characteristics of single fire events extracted from the official MISR plume height project and (ii) atmospheric profile derived from the ECMWF analysis. Calibration of the new version of PRM is made for Europe and North America. For each geographic zone, fire events are selected out of the MISR data set. In particular, it is shown that the only information extracted from Terra overpass is not enough to guaranty that the injection height of the plume is linked to the FRP measured at the same time. The plume is a dynamical system, and a time delay (related to the atmospheric state) is necessary to adjust change in FRP to the plume behaviour. Therefore, multiple overpasses of the same fire from Terra and Aqua are used here to determine fire and plume behaviours and system in a steady state at the time of MISR (central scan of Terra) overpass are selected for the optimization procedure. Results show that in the case of some fire event, the PRM is able to predict the formation of a pyroconvective cloud where observation from Aqua overpass show massive change in plume behaviour. Once PRM is set-up, the parametrization is then run for some dedicated year of the MODIS archive. The conversion form FRP to gas <span class="hlt">emission</span> is done using the same conversion and <span class="hlt">emission</span> factors as in GFAS and then gridded on a 0.1 degree mesh. Though no proper data assimilation scheme are used to grid the data (unlike in GFAS), it is shown that the fire model (ie extrapolation of the sparse information from the MODIS overpasses to the diurnal cycle) used to grid the data has an important impact on the daily total mass burnt estimation. The last section of this work presents a sensitivity study on the impact of injection height in wildfire inventory. Using <span class="hlt">emission</span> with and without injection height, the WRF-CMAQ system is run for a dedicated case in Europe.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990aant.meet...22S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990aant.meet...22S"><span id="translatedtitle">Acoustic <span class="hlt">emission</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Straus, A.; Lopezpumarega, M. I.; Digaetano, J. O.; Datellis, C. E.; Ruzzante, J. E.</p> <p></p> <p>This paper is related to our activities on acoustic <span class="hlt">emission</span> (AE). At present, acoustic <span class="hlt">emission</span> transducers are being developed for low and high temperature. A test to detect electrical discharges in electrical transformers was performed. Our experience in industrial tests in detecting cracks or failures in tanks or tubes is also described. The use of AE for leak detection is considered. Works on pattern recognition of AE signals are also being performed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.nist.gov/srd/nist82.cfm','NISTDBS'); return false;" href="http://www.nist.gov/srd/nist82.cfm"><span id="translatedtitle">Electron Effective-Attenuation-Length <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://srdata.nist.gov/gateway/gateway?search=keyword">National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>SRD 82 NIST Electron Effective-Attenuation-Length <span class="hlt">Database</span> (PC <span class="hlt">database</span>, no charge) This <span class="hlt">database</span> provides values of electron effective attenuation lengths (EALs) in solid elements and compounds at selected electron energies between 50 eV and 2,000 eV. The <span class="hlt">database</span> was designed mainly to provide EALs (to account for effects of elastic-eletron scattering) for applications in surface analysis by Auger-electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10179532','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10179532"><span id="translatedtitle">Implementing security on a prototype hospital <span class="hlt">database</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Khair, M; Pangalos, G; Andria, F; Bozios, L</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>This paper describes the methodology used and the experience gained from the application of a new secure <span class="hlt">database</span> design approach and <span class="hlt">database</span> security policy in a real life hospital environment. The applicability of the proposed <span class="hlt">database</span> security policy in a major Greek general hospital is demonstrated. Moreover, the security and quality assurance of the developed prototype secure <span class="hlt">database</span> is examined, taking into consideration the results from the study of the user acceptance. PMID:10179532</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23917137','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23917137"><span id="translatedtitle">[Quality management and participation into clinical <span class="hlt">database</span>].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Okubo, Suguru; Miyata, Hiroaki; Tomotaki, Ai; Motomura, Noboru; Murakami, Arata; Ono, Minoru; Iwanaka, Tadashi</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>Quality management is necessary for establishing useful clinical <span class="hlt">database</span> in cooperation with healthcare professionals and facilities. The ways of management are 1) progress management of data entry, 2) liaison with <span class="hlt">database</span> participants (healthcare professionals), and 3) modification of data collection form. In addition, healthcare facilities are supposed to consider ethical issues and information security for joining clinical <span class="hlt">databases</span>. <span class="hlt">Database</span> participants should check ethical review boards and consultation service for patients. PMID:23917137</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20100037773&hterms=astrophysics&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dastrophysics','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20100037773&hterms=astrophysics&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dastrophysics"><span id="translatedtitle">THz Spectroscopy and Spectroscopic <span class="hlt">Database</span> for Astrophysics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Pearson, John C.; Drouin, Brian J.</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Molecule specific astronomical observations rely on precisely determined laboratory molecular data for interpretation. The Herschel Heterodyne Instrument for Far Infrared, a suite of SOFIA instruments, and ALMA are each well placed to expose the limitations of available molecular physics data and spectral line catalogs. Herschel and SOFIA will observe in high spectral resolution over the entire far infrared range. Accurate data to previously unimagined frequencies including infrared ro-vibrational and ro-torsional bands will be required for interpretation of the observations. Planned ALMA observations with a very small beam will reveal weaker <span class="hlt">emission</span> features requiring accurate knowledge of higher quantum numbers and additional vibrational states. Historically, laboratory spectroscopy has been at the front of submillimeter technology development, but now astronomical receivers have an enormous capability advantage. Additionally, rotational spectroscopy is a relatively mature field attracting little interest from students and funding agencies. Molecular <span class="hlt">database</span> maintenance is tedious and difficult to justify as research. This severely limits funding opportunities even though data bases require the same level of expertise as research. We report the application of some relatively new receiver technology into a simple solid state THz spectrometer that has the performance required to collect the laboratory data required by astronomical observations. Further detail on the lack of preparation for upcoming missions by the JPL spectral line catalog is given.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED299426.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED299426.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> Systems. Course Three. Information Systems Curriculum.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>O'Neil, Sharon Lund; Everett, Donna R.</p> <p></p> <p>This course is the third of seven in the Information Systems curriculum. The purpose of the course is to familiarize students with <span class="hlt">database</span> management concepts and standard <span class="hlt">database</span> management software. <span class="hlt">Databases</span> and their roles, advantages, and limitations are explained. An overview of the course sets forth the condition and performance standard</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title6-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title6-vol1-sec37-33.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title6-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title6-vol1-sec37-33.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">6 CFR 37.33 - DMV <span class="hlt">databases</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... 6 Domestic Security 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false DMV <span class="hlt">databases</span>. 37.33 Section 37.33 Domestic... IDENTIFICATION CARDS Other Requirements § 37.33 DMV <span class="hlt">databases</span>. (a) States must maintain a State motor vehicle <span class="hlt">database</span> that contains, at a minimum— (1) All data fields printed on driver's licenses and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title6-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title6-vol1-sec37-33.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title6-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title6-vol1-sec37-33.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">6 CFR 37.33 - DMV <span class="hlt">databases</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>... 6 Domestic Security 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false DMV <span class="hlt">databases</span>. 37.33 Section 37.33 Domestic... IDENTIFICATION CARDS Other Requirements § 37.33 DMV <span class="hlt">databases</span>. (a) States must maintain a State motor vehicle <span class="hlt">database</span> that contains, at a minimum— (1) All data fields printed on driver's licenses and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title6-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title6-vol1-sec37-33.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title6-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title6-vol1-sec37-33.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">6 CFR 37.33 - DMV <span class="hlt">databases</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>... 6 Domestic Security 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false DMV <span class="hlt">databases</span>. 37.33 Section 37.33 Domestic... IDENTIFICATION CARDS Other Requirements § 37.33 DMV <span class="hlt">databases</span>. (a) States must maintain a State motor vehicle <span class="hlt">database</span> that contains, at a minimum— (1) All data fields printed on driver's licenses and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title6-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title6-vol1-sec37-33.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title6-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title6-vol1-sec37-33.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">6 CFR 37.33 - DMV <span class="hlt">databases</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>... 6 Domestic Security 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false DMV <span class="hlt">databases</span>. 37.33 Section 37.33 Domestic... IDENTIFICATION CARDS Other Requirements § 37.33 DMV <span class="hlt">databases</span>. (a) States must maintain a State motor vehicle <span class="hlt">database</span> that contains, at a minimum— (1) All data fields printed on driver's licenses and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED533405.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED533405.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Information Literacy Skills: Comparing and Evaluating <span class="hlt">Databases</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Grismore, Brian A.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this <span class="hlt">database</span> comparison is to express the importance of teaching information literacy skills and to apply those skills to commonly used Internet-based research tools. This paper includes a comparison and evaluation of three <span class="hlt">databases</span> (ProQuest, ERIC, and Google Scholar). It includes strengths and weaknesses of each <span class="hlt">database</span> based…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=23872&keyword=oracle&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=57982578&CFTOKEN=52387540','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=23872&keyword=oracle&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=57982578&CFTOKEN=52387540"><span id="translatedtitle">CLEAN WATER NEEDS SURVEY (CWNS) <span class="hlt">DATABASE</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><B>Resource Purpose:</B>The CWNS <span class="hlt">Database</span> is a completely new <span class="hlt">database</span> system that is currently loaded on a UNIX server at RTP, NC. It is absolutely imperative for the states and territories to have access to the CWNS <span class="hlt">Database</span> to input their updated CWNS 2000 data into the databa...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=206274','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=206274"><span id="translatedtitle">Development of soybean gene expression <span class="hlt">database</span> (SGED)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Large volumes of microarray expression data is a challenge for analysis. To address this problem a web-based <span class="hlt">database</span>, Soybean Expression <span class="hlt">Database</span> (SGED) was built, using PERL/CGI, C and an ORACLE <span class="hlt">database</span> management system. SGED contains three components. The Data Mining component serves as a repos...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=reintroductions&pg=6&id=ED290670','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=reintroductions&pg=6&id=ED290670"><span id="translatedtitle">Developing Thinking Using <span class="hlt">Databases</span>: What's Really Involved?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Rooze, Gene E.</p> <p></p> <p>The goal of this paper is to examine some erroneous ideas about teaching thinking skills and the use of computer tools, especially <span class="hlt">databases</span>. The paper reviews: (1) the importance of <span class="hlt">databases</span> to the teaching of social studies; (2) the teacher's role in aiding students to develop and use <span class="hlt">databases</span>; (3) the reintroduction of effective teaching</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=relational+AND+database&pg=4&id=EJ439841','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=relational+AND+database&pg=4&id=EJ439841"><span id="translatedtitle">Automating Relational <span class="hlt">Database</span> Design for Microcomputer Users.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Pu, Hao-Che</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>Discusses issues involved in automating the relational <span class="hlt">database</span> design process for microcomputer users and presents a prototype of a microcomputer-based system (RA, Relation Assistant) that is based on expert systems technology and helps avoid <span class="hlt">database</span> maintenance problems. Relational <span class="hlt">database</span> design is explained and the importance of easy input</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=journal+AND+international+AND+business&pg=4&id=EJ985536','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=journal+AND+international+AND+business&pg=4&id=EJ985536"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Database</span> Support for Research in Public Administration</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Tucker, James Cory</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>This study examines the extent to which <span class="hlt">databases</span> support student and faculty research in the area of public administration. A list of journals in public administration, public policy, political science, public budgeting and finance, and other related areas was compared to the journal content list of six business <span class="hlt">databases</span>. These <span class="hlt">databases</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4748022','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4748022"><span id="translatedtitle">Mammalian Mitochondrial ncRNA <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Anandakumar, Shanmugam; Vijayakumar, Saravanan; Arumugam, Nagarajan; Gromiha, M Michael</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Mammalian Mitochondrial ncRNA is a web-based <span class="hlt">database</span>, which provides specific information on non-coding RNA in mammals. This <span class="hlt">database</span> includes easy searching, comparing with BLAST and retrieving information on predicted structure and its function about mammalian ncRNAs. Availability The <span class="hlt">database</span> is available for free at http://www.iitm.ac.in/bioinfo/mmndb/</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=precision+AND+medicine&id=EJ515108','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=precision+AND+medicine&id=EJ515108"><span id="translatedtitle">Full-Text <span class="hlt">Databases</span> in Medicine.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sievert, MaryEllen C.; And Others</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Describes types of full-text <span class="hlt">databases</span> in medicine; discusses features for searching full-text journal <span class="hlt">databases</span> available through online vendors; reviews research on full-text <span class="hlt">databases</span> in medicine; and describes the MEDLINE/Full-Text Research Project at the University of Missouri (Columbia) which investigated precision, recall, and relevancy.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=online+AND+journalism&pg=4&id=EJ410023','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=online+AND+journalism&pg=4&id=EJ410023"><span id="translatedtitle">Administrators Say Funding Inhibits Use of <span class="hlt">Databases</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Gerhard, Michael E.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Surveys journalism and mass communication department heads to address questions related to the use of online <span class="hlt">databases</span> in journalism higher education, <span class="hlt">database</span> policy, resources used in providing online services, and satisfaction with <span class="hlt">database</span> service. Reports that electronic information retrieval is just beginning to penetrate journalism at the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Toxic+AND+Waste&pg=3&id=EJ433263','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Toxic+AND+Waste&pg=3&id=EJ433263"><span id="translatedtitle">Annual Review of <span class="hlt">Database</span> Developments 1991.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Basch, Reva</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>Review of developments in <span class="hlt">databases</span> highlights a new emphasis on accessibility. Topics discussed include the internationalization of <span class="hlt">databases</span>; <span class="hlt">databases</span> that deal with finance, drugs, and toxic waste; access to public records, both personal and corporate; media online; reducing large files of data to smaller, more manageable files; and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040191356','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040191356"><span id="translatedtitle">Aviation Particle <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> Workshop</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Wey, Chowen C. (Editor)</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>The Aviation Particle <span class="hlt">Emissions</span> Workshop was held on November 18 19, 2003, in Cleveland, Ohio. It was sponsored by the National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) under the Vehicle Systems Program (VSP) and the Ultra- Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Project. The objectives were to build a sound foundation for a comprehensive particulate research roadmap and to provide a forum for discussion among U.S. stakeholders and researchers. Presentations included perspectives from the Federal Aviation Administration, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, NASA, and United States airports. There were five interactive technical sessions: sampling methodology, measurement methodology, particle modeling, <span class="hlt">database</span>, inventory and test venue, and air quality. Each group presented technical issues which generated excellent discussion. The five session leads collaborated with their members to present summaries and conclusions to each content area.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/541839','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/541839"><span id="translatedtitle">Mitigating greenhouse gas <span class="hlt">emissions</span>: Voluntary reporting</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p></p> <p>1997-10-01</p> <p>The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report on their <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of greenhouse gases, and on actions taken that have reduced or avoided <span class="hlt">emissions</span> or sequestered carbon, to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This, the second annual report of the Voluntary Reporting Program, describes information provided by the participating organizations on their aggregate <span class="hlt">emissions</span> and <span class="hlt">emissions</span> reductions, as well as their <span class="hlt">emissions</span> reduction or avoidance projects, through 1995. This information has been compiled into a <span class="hlt">database</span> that includes reports from 142 organizations and descriptions of 967 projects that either reduced greenhouse gas <span class="hlt">emissions</span> or sequestered carbon. Fifty-one reporters also provided estimates of <span class="hlt">emissions</span>, and <span class="hlt">emissions</span> reductions achieved, for their entire organizations. The projects described actions taken to reduce <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of carbon dioxide from energy production and use; to reduce methane and nitrous oxide <span class="hlt">emissions</span> from energy use, waste management, and agricultural processes; to reduce <span class="hlt">emissions</span> of halocarbons, such as CFCs and their replacements; and to increase carbon sequestration.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/923783','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/923783"><span id="translatedtitle">Enhancing the DNA Patent <span class="hlt">Database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Walters, LeRoy B.</p> <p>2008-02-18</p> <p>Final Report on Award No. DE-FG0201ER63171 Principal Investigator: LeRoy B. Walters February 18, 2008 This project successfully completed its goal of surveying and reporting on the DNA patenting and licensing policies at 30 major U.S. academic institutions. The report of survey results was published in the January 2006 issue of Nature Biotechnology under the title “The Licensing of DNA Patents by US Academic Institutions: An Empirical Survey.” Lori Pressman was the lead author on this feature article. A PDF reprint of the article will be submitted to our Program Officer under separate cover. The project team has continued to update the DNA Patent <span class="hlt">Database</span> on a weekly basis since the conclusion of the project. The <span class="hlt">database</span> can be accessed at dnapatents.georgetown.edu. This <span class="hlt">database</span> provides a valuable research tool for academic researchers, policymakers, and citizens. A report entitled Reaping the Benefits of Genomic and Proteomic Research: Intellectual Property Rights, Innovation, and Public Health was published in 2006 by the Committee on Intellectual Property Rights in Genomic and Protein Research and Innovation, Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy at the National Academies. The report was edited by Stephen A. Merrill and Anne-Marie Mazza. This report employed and then adapted the methodology developed by our research project and quoted our findings at several points. (The full report can be viewed online at the following URL: http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=11487&page=R1). My colleagues and I are grateful for the research support of the ELSI program at the U.S. Department of Energy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4239834','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4239834"><span id="translatedtitle">The PRO-ACT <span class="hlt">database</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Berry, James; Shui, Amy; Zach, Neta; Sherman, Alexander; Sinani, Ervin; Walker, Jason; Katsovskiy, Igor; Schoenfeld, David; Cudkowicz, Merit; Leitner, Melanie</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Objective: To pool data from completed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) clinical trials and create an open-access resource that enables greater understanding of the phenotype and biology of ALS. Methods: Clinical trials data were pooled from 16 completed phase II/III ALS clinical trials and one observational study. Over 8 million de-identified longitudinally collected data points from over 8,600 individuals with ALS were standardized across trials and merged to create the Pooled Resource Open-Access ALS Clinical Trials (PRO-ACT) <span class="hlt">database</span>. This <span class="hlt">database</span> includes demographics, family histories, and longitudinal clinical and laboratory data. Mixed effects models were used to describe the rate of disease progression measured by the Revised ALS Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R) and vital capacity (VC). Cox regression models were used to describe survival data. Implementing Bonferroni correction, the critical p value for 15 different tests was p = 0.003. Results: The ALSFRS-R rate of decline was 1.02 (2.3) points per month and the VC rate of decline was 2.24% of predicted (6.9) per month. Higher levels of uric acid at trial entry were predictive of a slower drop in ALSFRS-R (p = 0.01) and VC (p < 0.0001), and longer survival (p = 0.02). Higher levels of creatinine at baseline were predictive of a slower drop in ALSFRS-R (p = 0.01) and VC (p < 0.0001), and longer survival (p = 0.01). Finally, higher body mass index (BMI) at baseline was associated with longer survival (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The PRO-ACT <span class="hlt">database</span> is the largest publicly available repository of merged ALS clinical trials data. We report that baseline levels of creatinine and uric acid, as well as baseline BMI, are strong predictors of disease progression and survival. PMID:25298304</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995SPIE.2420..268H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995SPIE.2420..268H"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Databases</span> for video information sharing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hjelsvold, Rune; Midtstraum, Roger</p> <p>1995-03-01</p> <p>This paper describes the VideoSTAR experimental <span class="hlt">database</span> system that is being designed to support video applications in sharing and reusing video data and meta-data. VideoSTAR provides four different repositories: for media files, virtual documents, video structures, and video annotations/user indexes. It also provides a generic video data model relating data in the different repositories to each other, and it offers a powerful application interface. VideoSTAR concepts have been evaluated by developing a number of experimental video tools, such as a video player, a video annotator, a video authoring tool, a video structure and contents browser, and a video query tool.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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