Science.gov

Sample records for emotional disturbance diagnosis

  1. State Definitions of Emotional Disturbance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wery, Jessica J.; Cullinan, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    This article examines definitions state education agencies use to describe the federal education disability called "emotional disturbance." State definitions were collected so that various aspects of them could be analyzed and compared with results of similar studies completed in the 1970s and 1980s. Among results are that state definitions have…

  2. Burnout in Parents of Emotionally Disturbed Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Gary N.; Morrison, Merrie B.

    The paper addresses stressors facing parents of emotionally disturbed adolescents and suggests ways that parents can be helped to battle "burnout." Ten stressors are identified: problems innate with the handicap, lack of progress and development, negative public opinion, pressures from spouse or other family members, pressures from members of…

  3. Identification of Individuals with Serious Emotional Disturbance Using the Draw a Person: Screening Procedure for Emotional Disturbance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeish, Timothy J.; Naglieri, Jack A.

    1993-01-01

    Regular education students (n=81) and students with serious emotional disturbance (n=81,) were matched on age (7-13), gender, race, and intelligence. They completed drawings which were scored using the "Draw a Person: Screening Procedure for Emotional Disturbance." Students with emotional disturbance scored significantly higher than did the…

  4. It's About Time Emotional Disturbance Came Out In the Open!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gugerty, John J.

    Addressed to vocational educators, this booklet discusses topics relating to mental health and understanding emotional disturbance. The following topics are covered: definitions of mental health, normality, and mental illness; signs of possible development of serious emotional problems; the number of people considered emotionally disturbed;…

  5. Group Counseling With Emotionally Disturbed School Children in Taiwan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Peter

    The application of group counseling to emotionally disturbed school children in Chinese culture was examined. Two junior high schools located in Tao-Yuan Province were randomly selected with two eighth-grade classes randomly selected from each school. Ten emotionally disturbed students were chosen from each class and randomly assigned to two…

  6. Evaluating the Differential Treatment of Emotional Disturbance and Social Maladjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theodore, Lea A.; Akin-Little, Angeleque; Little, Steven G.

    2004-01-01

    The vague and incomplete federal definition of emotional disturbance has caused a great deal of controversy and debate since the inception of Public Law 94-142. The lack of resolution among professionals attempting to elucidate the distinction between emotional disturbance and social maladjustment has resulted in continued conflict. Included in…

  7. Emotional Disturbance. Can Emotionally Disturbed Students Be Integrated? An In-Depth Review of the Pertinent Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosiak, Patricia Page

    Intended for educators, researchers, and students, the document provides a survey of current reading on the education of emotionally disturbed (ED) children. The etiology of emotional disturbance is discussed, and an historical review of the role of education in the treatment of ED children is presented. Present psychoanalytic, learning, and…

  8. Sex education for emotionally disturbed adolescents.

    PubMed

    Schoenholtz, S W; Horowitz, H A; Shtarkshall, R

    1989-02-01

    Under investigation were effects of a course in sex education on a population of emotionally disturbed adolescents who were enrolled as day patients in a school program that is part of the Adolescent Treatment Program of the Institute of Pennsylvania Hospital. Subjects included 7 females, and 8 males, aged 15-18, with severe socio-emotional and educational problems. Pre-and posttesting were used to measure changes. Measures included a short form questionnaire assessing sexual knowledge and attitudes, the Draw-a-Person test, and behavioral observations by teachers, faculty, and Adolescent Treatment Program staff. The results of the study indicated that patients responded age appropriately and gained knowledge and an increased openness about sexuality issues. On the knowledge section of the questionnaire areas addressed in class, such as contraception, were the areas that students showed improvement in student response. The attitudes section revealed an increase in uncertainty about their own values, or conversely, an increase in establishing their values more firmly. In the Draw-a-Person test there was a greater degree of openness and less defensiveness in the posttest drawings. Most postcourse drawings also included more sexual signs and showed nudity. Behavioral changes were noted in the student's increased class contributions and participation, as well as in a more frequent focus of issues relating to sexuality and maturation. In addition, there was no regression or dysfunction as a result of the materials presented, and therapeutic and educational processes were not disrupted by the patient's involvement in the course. It was concluded that a sex education course is clinically and educationally useful on many levels within a therapeutic setting. PMID:12342338

  9. Helping Emotionally Disturbed Children Deal with the Separation Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreger, Robert D.; Kreger, Linda R.

    1989-01-01

    The article presents examples of emotionally disturbed children's reactions to separation from a teacher with whom they have become involved. Suggestions are offered for facilitating healthy separation from the teacher. (JDD)

  10. Characteristics of the Population of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students with Emotional Disturbance in Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinnott, C. L.; Jones, T. W.

    2005-01-01

    The study summarizes a database for the years 1994-1999 on deaf and hard of hearing students in Illinois with a diagnosis of emotional disturbance (N = 115). Data are reported on the group's demographic, domestic, etiologic, communication-related, and intervention-related characteristics. These dually diagnosed students differed from Illinois's…

  11. Ecological Perspectives on Emotional Disturbance. Journal within a Journal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrystal, Charles A., Ed.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The articles included in this special journal supplement represent a view of special education which is concerned with the adjustment of the emotionally disturbed learner within varied social-interactional frameworks or settings, as noted in the guest editorial by Charles Chrystal. "Beyond Therapy and Research: Helping Emotionally Troubled…

  12. Emotion Recognition in Disturbed and Normal Children: A Research Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Elaine

    1981-01-01

    The identification of facial expressions of emotion was studied in normal and psychiatrically disturbed children. Schizophrenic children were significantly less accurate than other children in emotion identification. Anxious-depressed children made more errors than unsocialized-aggressive and normal children. Normal and unsocialized-aggressive…

  13. Child Abuse and Aggression among Seriously Emotionally Disturbed Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Julian D.; Fraleigh, Lisa A.; Connor, Daniel F.

    2010-01-01

    Abused children may be at risk for problems with aggression. In a sample of 397 seriously emotionally disturbed children, reactive aggression was associated with documented history of physical abuse but not sexual abuse. Girls were equally likely to be classified as reactively aggressive regardless of physical abuse history, but boys with physical…

  14. Fluent Persuasive Writing with Counterarguments for Students with Emotional Disturbance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mastropieri, Margo A.; Scruggs, Thomas E.; Cerar, Nancy Irby; Allen-Bronaugh, Dannette; Thompson, Catherine; Guckert, Mary; Leins, Pat; Hauth, Clara; Cuenca-Sanchez, Yojanna

    2014-01-01

    Twelve seventh- and eighth-grade students with emotional disturbance participated in a multiple probe, multiple baseline design two-phase intervention study to improve persuasive writing skills. The first phase after baseline taught students to plan and write persuasive essays including counterarguments. In the second phase, students were taught…

  15. Identifying Students with Emotional Disturbance: School Psychologists' Practices and Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanchon, Timothy A.; Allen, Ryan A.

    2013-01-01

    From its inception as a disability category in the Education for All Handicapped Children Act, serving students under the special education category Emotional Disturbance (ED) has been a challenging task for school psychologists. In particular, the vague and ambiguous federal definition has created an environment in which inconsistent assessment…

  16. Comprehensive Assessment of Emotional Disturbance: A Cross-Validation Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Emily S.; Doyon, Katie E.; Saldana, Enrique; Allen, Megan Redding

    2007-01-01

    Assessing a student for emotional disturbance is a serious and complex task given the stigma of the label and the ambiguities of the federal definition. One way that school psychologists can be more confident in their assessment results is to cross validate data from different sources using the RIOT approach (Review, Interview, Observe, Test).…

  17. Emotional Disturbance. Fact Sheet = Problemas Emocionales. Hojas Informativas Sobre Discapacidades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet, written in both English and Spanish, provides a definition, information on incidence, typical characteristics, and educational implications of emotional disturbance. The definition is from the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and incidence in 1999-2000 is reported as about 470,000 children and youth. Educational…

  18. Serious Emotional Disturbance in Children and Adolescents: Multisystemic Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henggeler, Scott W.; Schoenwald, Sonja K.; Rowland, Melisa D.; Cunningham, Phillippe B.

    Originally developed to treat antisocial behavior, multisystemic therapy (MST) has emerged as a leading evidence-based treatment for serious emotional disturbance in children and adolescents. This manual presents the MST approach to working with this challenging population. Delineated are ways to develop and implement collaborative interventions…

  19. Therapeutic Interventions with Emotionally-Disturbed Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Carolyn; And Others

    This investigation consisted of two studies. In Experiment I, three methods of dealing with the identified emotionally disturbed child were compared, simultaneously testing the hypothesis that community personnel can be taught to work effectively with these children. Under the three treatments, the identified child was either: (1) removed from his…

  20. Progress or Change: Issues in Educating the Emotionally Disturbed. Volume 1: Identification and Program Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noel, Margaret M., Ed.; Haring, Norris G., Ed.

    Seven papers focus on issues in identification and educational program planning for children with emotional disturbances. "Social Policy Issues in Special Education and Related Services for Emotionally Disturbed Children and Youth" (J. Kauffman), touches on problems with the federal definition of and terminology about the emotionally disturbed and…

  1. Motor proficiency and emotional/behavioural disturbance in autism and Asperger's disorder: another piece of the neurological puzzle?

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Nicole; McGinley, Jennifer; Tonge, Bruce; Bradshaw, John; Saunders, Kerryn; Murphy, Anna; Rinehart, Nicole

    2012-11-01

    The relationship of motor proficiency with emotional/behavioural disturbance, autistic symptoms and communication disturbance was investigated in children diagnosed with autism and Asperger's disorder (AD). The Movement Assessment Battery for Children was used as a measure of motor impairment, and the Developmental Behavioural Checklist was used as a measure of emotional/behavioural disturbance in the following groups: AD (n = 22), high functioning autism (HFA) (n = 23), LFA (n = 8) and typically developing children (n = 20). The HFA group had more difficulty with motor items, such as ball skills and balance, than did the AD group. There were significant positive correlations between impairments in motor proficiency (in particular ball skills and balance) and emotional/behavioural disturbance, autistic symptoms and communication disturbance. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that there are qualitative and quantitative differences in the motor profile between autism and AD. In addition, the association between motor proficiency impairment and emotional/behavioural disturbance in autism and AD emphasizes the importance for screening of co-occurring emotional/behavioural symptoms in individuals with motor difficulties. These findings have implications for the potential use of adjunct motor measures in the diagnosis and definition of autism spectrum disorders. PMID:21949004

  2. Preventing Emotional Disturbance in Abused and Neglected Children and Their Families through Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeney, Tawn R.

    The paper examines the nature of child abuse and neglect, considers its effects on the emotional well being of the child, and describes treatment approaches. Emotional neglect is differentiated from emotional disturbance. Long-term effects of child maltreatment include irreversible physical damage to the central nervous system, emotional damage,…

  3. Differentiating Emotional Disturbance from Social Maladjustment: Assessing Psychopathy in Aggressive Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gacono, Carl B.; Hughes, Tammy L.

    2004-01-01

    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (1997) requires identification of emotional disturbance by special education criteria. It also requires that emotional disturbance be distinguished from social maladjustment. In some cases, a thorough evaluation of the child's character pathology can aid in this determination. While methods such as…

  4. A Study of Child Variance, Volume 1: Conceptual Models; Conceptual Project in Emotional Disturbance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, William C.; Tracy, Michael L.

    Presented are 11 papers discussing the following six models of emotional disturbance in children: biophysical, behavioral, psychodynamic, sociological, and ecological, models, and counter theory. Emotional disturbance is defined as a distinctive human state having multiple manifestations and involving disability, deviance, and alienation. All the…

  5. Educating Emotionally Disturbed Children--Promising Practices. Journal within a Journal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Robert, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Seven articles by educators with a variety of perspectives examine promising educational practices for use with children having emotional disturbances. Lee Bell offers strategies for using group activities in "All Together Now: Group Techniques for Teaching Students with Emotional Disturbances." Lyn Sarda and Rik Flynn discuss benefits and…

  6. Adapted Physical Education for Emotionally Disturbed Children and Learning Disabled Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Womack, Karen King; Womack, Sid T.

    A review of literature on learning disabled and emotionally disturbed children is presented, focusing upon the role of the physical education teacher as a part of the educational team responsible for implementing individualized education programs. The close relationship between learning disabilities and emotional disturbances is examined, and…

  7. Behavioural and Emotional Disturbances in People with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinhausen, H.-C.; Eiholzer, U.; Hauffa, B. P.; Malin, Z.

    2004-01-01

    The study of the behaviour profile in subjects with Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS). A total of fifty-eight 3- to 29-year-old subjects with PWS were studied using a standardized parent report of behavioural and emotional disturbances. There was an increase of behavioural and emotional disturbances for the adolescent and young adult age range, whereas…

  8. The Teaching-Learning Process in Educating Emotionally Disturbed Children, Proceedings of the Third Annual Conference on the Education of Emotionally Disturbed Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoblock, Peter, Ed.; Johnson, John L., Ed.

    The teaching-learning process for emotionally disturbed children is explored by nine conference participants at Syracuse University. The interaction analysis system developed by Flanders and its adaptability to classroom situations faced by teachers of disturbed children are discussed; and comments on the applicability of this system are included.…

  9. Emotions and coping of patients with head and neck cancers after diagnosis: A qualitative content analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jagannathan, A; Juvva, S

    2016-01-01

    Background and Rationale: Patients suffering with head and neck cancers are observed to have a relatively high risk of developing emotional disturbances after diagnosis and treatment. These emotional concerns can be best understood and explored through the method of content analysis or qualitative data. Though a number of qualitative studies have been conducted in the last few years in the field of psychosocial oncology, none have looked at the emotions experienced and the coping by head and neck cancer patients. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five new cases of postsurgery patients of head and neck cancers were qualitatively interviewed regarding the emotions experienced and coping strategies after diagnosis. Results: Qualitative content analysis of the in-depth interviews brought out that patients experienced varied emotions on realizing that they were suffering from cancer, the cause of which could be mainly attributed to three themes: 1) knowledge of their illness; 2) duration of untreated illness; and 3) object of blame. They coped with their emotions by either: 1) inculcating a positive attitude and faith in the doctor/treatment, 2) ventilating their emotions with family and friends, or 3) indulging in activities to divert attention. Conclusion: The results brought out a conceptual framework, which showed that an in-depth understanding of the emotions — Their root cause, coping strategies, and spiritual and cultural orientations of the cancer survivor — Is essential to develop any effective intervention program in India. PMID:27320951

  10. Reflection-Impulsivity and Locus of Conflict in Emotionally Disturbed Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, L. E.; Finch, A. J., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Investigated the hypothesis that emotionally disturbed children employing an impulsive cognitive style would exhibit externalization of conflict, while those employing a reflective cognitive style would exhibit internalization of conflict. (SDH)

  11. Constructing New Theory for Identifying Students with Emotional Disturbance: A Grounded Theory Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Dori A.

    2010-01-01

    The problem area explored by this study is the identification of students with emotional and behavioral difficulties for special education supports and services under the criteria for emotional disturbance (ED). A review of the literature indicated that the problem of identifying students with ED was compounded by subjectivity and ambiguity…

  12. Applied Behavior Analysis: Its Impact on the Treatment of Mentally Retarded Emotionally Disturbed People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Coe, David A.

    1992-01-01

    This article reviews applications of the applied behavior analysis ideas of B. F. Skinner and others to persons with both mental retardation and emotional disturbance. The review examines implications of behavior analysis for operant conditioning and radical behaviorism, schedules of reinforcement, and emotion and mental illness. (DB)

  13. Best Practices in the Multidisciplinary Assessment of Emotional Disturbances: A Primer for Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudy, Heidi L.; Levinson, Edward M.

    2008-01-01

    Emotional and behavioral difficulties often interfere with children's acquisition of academic, career, and social skills. Counselors assume an important role in the mandated multidisciplinary evaluation of children with emotional disturbance (ED), but the field lacks a standard battery of assessment procedures for working with children who have…

  14. PROJECT RE-ED, A DEMONSTRATION PROJECT FOR THE REEDUCATION OF EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Mental Health, Raleigh.

    THE PROJECT FOR THE REEDUCATION OF EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED CHILDREN (PROJECT RE-ED), A DEMONSTRATION PROJECT (1961-1968) TO DEVELOP AND EVALUATE THE EFFECTIVENESS OF RESIDENTIAL SCHOOLS (SUNDAY THROUGH FRIDAY) FOR DISTURBED CHILDREN, IS DESCRIBED. THE PROFESSIONAL TRAINING AT GEORGE PEABODY COLLEGE, TENNESSEE, AND USE OF CAREFULLY SELECTED…

  15. Disturbance of emotion processing in frontotemporal dementia: a synthesis of cognitive and neuroimaging findings.

    PubMed

    Kumfor, Fiona; Piguet, Olivier

    2012-09-01

    Accurate processing of emotional information is a critical component of appropriate social interactions and interpersonal relationships. Disturbance of emotion processing is present in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and is a clinical feature in two of the three subtypes: behavioural-variant FTD and semantic dementia. Emotion processing in progressive nonfluent aphasia, the third FTD subtype, is thought to be mostly preserved, although current evidence is scant. This paper reviews the literature on emotion recognition, reactivity and expression in FTD subtypes, although most studies focus on emotion recognition. The relationship between patterns of emotion processing deficits and patterns of neural atrophy are considered, by integrating evidence from recent neuroimaging studies. The review findings are discussed in the context of three contemporary theories of emotion processing: the limbic system model, the right hemisphere model and a multimodal system of emotion. Results across subtypes of FTD are most consistent with the multimodal system model, and support the presence of somewhat dissociable neural correlates for basic emotions, with strongest evidence for the emotions anger and sadness. Poor emotion processing is evident in all three subtypes, although deficits are more widespread than what would be predicted based on studies in healthy cohorts. Studies that include behavioural and imaging data are limited. Future investigations combining these approaches will help improve the understanding of the neural network underlying emotion processing. Presently, longitudinal investigations of emotion processing in FTD are lacking, and studies investigating emotion processing over time are critical to understand the clinical manifestations of disease progression in FTD. PMID:22577002

  16. Electrodermal responsivity to interrogation questions and its relation to self-reported emotional disturbance.

    PubMed

    Gudjonsson, G H

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between skin resistance responses (SRRs) and self-reported emotional disturbance was studied in 24 males and 24 females. SRRs to seven interrogation questions were recorded and subjects were requested to rate on visual analogue scales how disturbing they had found each question. The mean within subject correlations were significant for both groups, suggesting that electrodermal responses to interrogation questions are significantly related to the extent to which the subjects find such questions disturbing. A particular question may elicit disturbance for a number of reasons including embarrassment, conflict over how to answer the question, and fear of the consequences of possible detection. PMID:7126718

  17. Relation between differential emotions and depression in emotionally disturbed children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Carey, T C; Finch, A J; Carey, M P

    1991-08-01

    Differential emotions theory (Izard, 1972) provides a conceptual framework for the role of emotions in affective disorders. The present study investigated the relation of emotions to depression in a sample of child and adolescent psychiatric inpatients (N = 145). Findings indicate that shyness, anger, enjoyment, and shame explained 51.4% of the variance in depression scores. Furthermore, profiles of emotions experienced by youths with a depressive disorder differed significantly from emotion profiles of nondepressed youths on the following emotions: enjoyment, surprise, sadness, anger, shame, shyness, guilt, and self-directed hostility. Differential emotions also correctly classified 80.0% of depressed and nondepressed subjects into their respective groups. PMID:1918564

  18. Reducing Disruptive Behaviors in Students with Serious Emotional Disturbance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musser, Erinn H.; Bray, Melissa A.; Kehle, Thomas J.; Jenson, William R.

    2001-01-01

    A multicomponent intervention that included a precision request program, mystery motivators, token economy with response cost, and antecedent strategies was employed to reduce disruptive classroom behavior in 3 school-aged students with social and emotional disorders. The results suggested that the intervention was successful in reducing levels of…

  19. Behavior Management and Socialization Techniques for Severely Emotionally Disturbed Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Rebecca

    Described is a structured approach to managing behavior and increasing socialization skills of severely disturbed children in primary and adolescent classrooms. It is noted that manual signing accompanied by verbalization, gesture, and physical assisting is used to communicate behavioral expectations in the primary class; while in the adolescent…

  20. Emotional Disturbance and Its Treatment in a Nutshell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Albert

    1971-01-01

    The author suggests that human beings could eliminate their usual feelings of disturbance and upsetness and retain their appropriate feelings of disappointment and annoyance if they stop demanding and awfulizing" reality and dictating that it be other than it indubitably is. (Author/CG)

  1. Emotion dysregulation explains relations between sleep disturbance and smoking quit-related cognition and behavior.

    PubMed

    Fillo, Jennifer; Alfano, Candice A; Paulus, Daniel J; Smits, Jasper A J; Davis, Michelle L; Rosenfield, David; Marcus, Bess H; Church, Timothy S; Powers, Mark B; Otto, Michael W; Baird, Scarlett O; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Poor sleep quality and tobacco use are common and co-occurring problems, although the mechanisms underlying the relations between sleep disturbance and smoking are poorly understood. Sleep disturbance lowers odds of smoking cessation success and increases odds of relapse. One reason may be that sleep loss leads to emotion dysregulation, which in turn, leads to reductions in self-efficacy and quit-related problems. To address this gap, the current study examined the explanatory role of emotion dysregulation in the association between sleep disturbance and smoking in terms of (1) self-efficacy for remaining abstinent in relapse situations, (2) the presence of a prior quit attempt greater than 24h, and (3) the experience of quit-related problems among 128 adults (Mage=40.2; SD=11.0; 52.3% female) seeking treatment for smoking cessation. Results suggested that increased levels of sleep disturbance are related to emotion dysregulation which, in turn, may lead to lower levels of self-efficacy for remaining abstinent, more quit-related problems, and being less likely to have had a quit attempt of 24h or greater. Further, these indirect effects were present above and beyond variance accounted for by theoretically-relevant covariates (e.g., gender and educational attainment), suggesting that they may maintain practical significance. These findings suggest that this malleable emotional risk factor (emotion dysregulation) could serve as a target for intervention among those with poor sleep and tobacco use. PMID:26827153

  2. School-Based Programs for Children with Emotional Disturbance: Obstacles to Program Design and Implementation and Guidelines for School Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Linda A.; Newman, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Children classified as emotionally disturbed constitute a most challenging and expensive population in the public schools. This article presents a tri-part model of barriers to program design, implementation, and evaluation for children classified as emotionally disturbed in public school settings. An examination of the available school-based…

  3. Programs for the Emotionally Disturbed: A Handbook of Guidelines and Evaluative Data on Five Instructional Models. 1974-1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alachua County Schools, Gainesville, FL.

    Presented are guidelines and evaluative data on five instructional models implemented between 1972 and 1975 to educate emotionally disturbed students in Alachua County Schools (Florida). General information includes the philosphy of the program; a definition and list of characteristics of emotionally disturbed students; and an outline of…

  4. Oregon's Innovative Approaches for Students Who Are Seriously Emotionally Disturbed or Otherwise At-Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodsky, Meredith; Wilson, Darla

    This report briefly describes 40 exemplary special and regular education programs for students in Oregon with serious emotional disturbances (SED) or who are otherwise at risk. The program descriptions are grouped into 11 areas to highlight key program features. These are quality indicators, prevention, remediation, organization, coordination,…

  5. Neuropsychological Performance of Emotionally Disturbed Students on the LNNB and LNNB-C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Charles W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examined neuropsychological performance of 65 emotionally disturbed students on Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Battery: Form I (LNNB) and Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Battery: Children's Revision (LNNB-C). Results indicated that approximately 42 percent of younger group (99-154 months) and 38 percent of older group (156-226 months)…

  6. Test Reviews: Euler, B. L. (2007). "Emotional Disturbance Decision Tree". Lutz, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tansy, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Emotional Disturbance Decision Tree (EDDT) is a teacher-completed norm-referenced rating scale published by Psychological Assessment Resources, Inc., in Lutz, Florida. The 156-item EDDT was developed for use as part of a broader assessment process to screen and assist in the identification of 5- to 18-year-old children for the special…

  7. The Classroom: Insights into Educational Evaluation in School Programs for Emotionally Disturbed Children and Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Helen, Ed.

    Presented are conference proceedings on evaluation of educational programs for emotionally disturbed children. Raphael F. Simches highlights past and future educational trends in programs for handicapped children. Fritz Redl stresses various motivations that may cause violent behavior. A systematic approach to classroom analysis via taxonomy of…

  8. Profiles of Young Children Teacher-Identified as At Risk for Emotional Disturbance: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trout, Alexandra L.; Epstein, Michael H.; Nelson, J. Ron; Reid, Robert; Ohlund, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    As prevention and early intervention opportunities for young children at risk of emotional disturbance (ED) increase, questions regarding the effectiveness of these programs for specific subpopulations of children have emerged. To date, few investigators have examined young children entering early school prevention/intervention programs to…

  9. A Meta-Analysis of the Academic Status of Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disturbance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Robert; Gonzalez, Jorge E.; Nordness, Philip D.; Trout, Alexandra; Epstein, Michael H.

    2004-01-01

    Emotional/behavioral disturbance (EBD) is characterized by a range of behaviors that adversely affect a child's academic performance and cannot be explained by other sensory or health impairments. Although research has clearly demonstrated that children and youth with EBD tend to exhibit high rates of problem behavior, research on the…

  10. Effects of a Reading Intervention for Kindergarten Students At Risk for Emotional Disturbance and Reading Deficits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trout, Alexandra L.; Epstein, Michael H.; Mickelson, William T.; Nelson, J. Ron; Lewis, Linda M.

    2003-01-01

    Six kindergartners with or at risk for emotional disturbance and reading deficits received a supplementary reading intervention over seven months. After instruction, participants outperformed six control at-risk and six norm-referencing students without disabilities on curriculum-based measures assessing early phonemic awareness and basic reading…

  11. School Context and the Problem Behavior and Social Skills of Students with Emotional Disturbance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Andrew L.; Siperstein, Gary N.; Forness, Steven R.; Brigham, Frederick J.

    2010-01-01

    Variability in the social and behavioral characteristics of students with emotional disturbance (ED) in the public schools may impact special education effectiveness; yet very little evidence exists on how such variability may express itself from school to school. One place to begin such investigation involves school context as expressed by income…

  12. Music as the Least Restrictive Environment of the Severely Emotionally Disturbed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milner, Edward Willis

    The paper presents a method for teaching music to the severely emotionally disturbed high school learner, a typology for relating the learner to the type of method to be used, and three case studies illustrating use of music as a way to provide students with the least restrictive environment. The music program involves group singing and playing…

  13. Oral Reading Fluency Development for Children with Emotional Disturbance or Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanzek, Jeanne; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Petscher, Yaacov

    2014-01-01

    This study used a large statewide database to examine the oral reading fluency development of second- and third-grade students with emotional disturbance or learning disabilities and their general education peers. Oral reading fluency measures were administered to 185,367 students without disabilities (general education), 2,146 students identified…

  14. The Impact of Managed Care on Efforts To Prevent Serious Emotional Disturbance in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hocutt, Anne; McKinney, James; Montague, Marjorie

    This report explores the impact of managed care on providing preventative mental health services to young children at risk for serious emotional disturbances (SED). The study included a sample of kindergarten and 1st grade children (n=121) at-risk for SED that were identified in two public schools. Results of the study indicated that the move to…

  15. The CO-CEP Initiative: The Cooperative Career Employment Program for Seriously Emotionally Disturbed Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peach, Walter; And Others

    The document is based on a panel presentation describing the development, implementation, and evaluation of a Fairfax County (Virginia) program, the Cooperative Career Employment Program (CO-CEP) for Seriously Emotionally Disturbed Adolescents. The program is provided to students in a self-contained high school setting and involves the…

  16. Update: Improving Services for Emotionally Disturbed Children. Volumes 4-7, Winter 1988-Summer 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Elissa, Ed.; Algarin, Alissa, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    This compilation of four annual newsletter issues on services for children with emotional disturbances presents reports of activities, meetings, services, and programs around the country as well as various feature articles. Activities funded under the Child and Adolescent Service System Program are highlighted. In the Winter 1988-89 issue, an…

  17. Characteristics of Bullies and Victims among Students with Emotional Disturbance Attending Approved Private Special Education Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carran, Deborah T.; Kellner, Millicent H.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to describe rates and types of bullying and victimization among 407 students with emotional disturbance (ED) in grades 6 through 10 attending private approved special education schools in New Jersey. These students anonymously completed the Olweus Bullying Questionnaire. Results indicated that compared with a general…

  18. Evaluation of the Dade-Monroe Multiagency Network for Severely Emotionally Disturbed Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasman, Marcy

    The evaluation report examines the Dade-Monroe Multiagency Network for Severely Emotionally Disturbed (SED) Students, a 3-year regional (Florida) project to improve education, mental health treatment, and residential services for this population. The program's main components--a regional case management system, a computerized information system,…

  19. Effects of an Equine Assisted Activities Program on Youth with Emotional Disturbance: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stebbins, Tira

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of a 10-week Equine Assisted Activities (EAA) program on special education students (aged 9 to 15) identified as Emotionally Disturbed (ED) who were enrolled in an alternative school. A control group of special education students receiving treatment-as-usual was included. The Behavior Assessment Scale for Children,…

  20. Teaching Emotionally Disturbed Children to Discriminate Reality from Fantasy on Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprafkin, Joyce; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-one emotionally disturbed elementary grade children completed a television viewing skills curriculum. Results of the intervention found that the subjects made significantly more accurate reality-fantasy discriminations concerning television program content than a control group; however, the curriculum was not effective in increasing…

  1. Implicit and Explicit Attitudes of Educators toward the Emotional Disturbance Label

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, James Patrick

    2009-01-01

    This study examined implicit and explicit attitudes of teachers toward the Emotional Disturbance (ED) label, the strength of association between implicit and explicit ratings, and the variance in attitudes between different types of teachers or among teachers in different settings. Ninety-eight teachers (52 regular education and 46 special…

  2. A Descriptive Case Study of Stigma: Constructing Labels of Culturally Linguistically Diverse and Emotional Disturbance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Laura O.

    2012-01-01

    Stigma is a social construct and a process of social rejection, devaluation and discrimination (Brown et al., 2010, p.351). The stigmatization of students who carry multiple labels does occur. When those labels are Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CLD) and Emotional Disturbance (ED), the perceived process of stigmatization may be difficult…

  3. Quality of Mother-Infant Interactions in Maternal Emotional Disturbance: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singhal, Meghna; Sinha, U. K.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The present study aimed to examine the quality of mother-infant interactions in emotionally disturbed (ED) mothers. Method: 20 mothers with or without ED and their infants (12-24 months) participated in the study, which involved the mothers interacting with their infants with a toy in a structured play situation. These interactions were…

  4. Emotional Disturbance and Substance Abuse/Addiction Special Education Programming for the Dually-Diagnosed Adolescent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogdaniak, Roman C.

    Dually diagnosed adolescents suffering from both severe emotional disturbance and substance abuse/addiction constitute a special population which poses a challenge to health professionals in special education as well as clinical settings. The prevalence of substance use, abuse, and addiction has been shown to be significantly above the national…

  5. Psychopharmacological Intervention. I: Teacher Perceptions of Psychotropic Medication for Students with Serious Emotional Disturbance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Nirbhay N.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The study examined perceptions, knowledge, and opinions regarding medication of 146 teachers of students with serious emotional disturbances. Among findings were that global impressions were most often used to evaluate drug effects and that hyperactivity and delusions/hallucinations were most likely to lead to medication. (DB)

  6. The Education and Socialization of Institutionalized Emotionally Disturbed Children and Youth. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, Thomas E.; And Others

    Presented is the final report of a project designed to examine the nature of educational and socialization programs within 90 institutions serving emotionally disturbed (ED) children (primarily 6-18 years old). In an introductory section, study goals and objectives are noted to include determination of what educational programs are available to…

  7. Storying Moral Dimensions of Disordering: Teacher Inquiry into the Social Construction of Severe Emotional Disturbance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Terry Jo

    Stories can have powerful effects on others. An autobiographical account of a behavior specialist's supposed descent into a severe emotional disturbance (SED) is presented here. Written as a narrative, the story opens with a description of what it is like to think differently from everyone else. It is conjectured that either the years spent by the…

  8. A Study of Child Variance, Volume 3: The Future; Conceptual Project in Emotional Disturbance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, William C.; Head, Sabin

    The third volume of a series on child variance discusses delivery systems that service emotionally disturbed children, including educational, legal-correctional, mental health, social welfare, religious, and counter-cultural institutions. Each type of institution is described extensively in terms of the history of its delivery systems in the…

  9. Understanding Nonproductive System Responses to Emotionally Disturbed and Behaviorally Disordered Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubinstein, Maria Frudden; Rezmierski, Virginia

    1983-01-01

    The paper describes a model for understanding system level responses to the cognitive dissonance produced by working with emotionally disturbed/behavior disordered students. Responses to mild, moderate, and severe levels of dissonance are cited, and the dibilitating effects of increasing threats to a system's order are portrayed. (CL)

  10. National Adolescent and Child Treatment Study (NACTS): Outcomes for Children with Serious Emotional and Behavioral Disturbance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenbaum, Paul E.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This study compiled descriptive data over 7 years on 812 school-age children with serious emotional disturbance (SED), including demographic and family characteristics, level of psychological and adaptive functioning, services received in either residential mental health treatment facilities or community-based special education programs, and…

  11. Teaching Interaction Procedures: Effects upon the Learning of Social Skills by an Emotionally Disturbed Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Dennis; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of a behavioral teaching interaction strategy on greeting, departure, and telephone skills of a 10-year-old emotionally disturbed youngster in a residential setting. The interaction included instruction, modeling, rehearsal, and reinforcement components and was found effective in increasing and maintaining the…

  12. Children and Youth at Risk of Emotional Disturbance: Risk Factors and Symptoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Human Services, St. Paul.

    Designed to assist Minnesota educators and mental health professionals in developing comprehensive mental health services for children, this report summarizes research findings and issues in the area of primary and secondary prevention of emotional disturbances in children. It begins by reviewing factors found to contribute to emotional…

  13. Examining Gender and the Academic Achievement of Students with Emotional Disturbance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Elisabeth Hess; Yen, Cherng-Jyh

    2010-01-01

    Students with emotional disturbance (ED) have significant academic deficits (Trout, Nordness, Pierce, & Epstein, 2003; Lane, 2004). Even after identification and school intervention, students with ED continue to demonstrate limited academic achievement and high rates of drop out and school failure, with 80-90% scoring below grade level on tests of…

  14. Trends in Serious Emotional Disturbance among Youths Exposed to Hurricane Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Katie A.; Fairbank, John A.; Gruber, Michael J.; Jones, Russell T.; Osofsky, Joy D.; Pfefferbaum, Betty; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine patterns and predictors of trends in "DSM-IV" serious emotional disturbance (SED) among youths exposed to Hurricane Katrina. Method: A probability sample of adult pre-hurricane residents of the areas affected by Katrina completed baseline and follow-up telephone surveys 18 to 27 months post-hurricane and 12 to 18 months…

  15. Serious Emotional Disturbance among Youths Exposed to Hurricane Katrina 2 Years Postdisaster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Katie A.; Fairbank, John A.; Gruber, Michael J.; Jones, Russell T.; Lakoma, Matthew D.; Pfefferbaum, Betty; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the prevalence of serious emotional disturbance (SED) among children and adolescents exposed to Hurricane Katrina along with the associations of SED with hurricane-related stressors, sociodemographics, and family factors 18 to 27 months after the hurricane. Method: A probability sample of prehurricane residents of areas…

  16. Teacher Perceptions and Behavioral Strategies for Students with Emotional Disturbance across Educational Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Chan; Weiss, Stacy L.; Cullinan, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined problem characteristics of students with emotional disturbance in 3 educational environments, the behavior management and intervention strategies their teachers used, and what relation exists between problem characteristics and intervention strategies. Teachers completed a behavior problems rating scale and they…

  17. Clinical and Non-Clinical Characteristics Associated with Medication Use among Children with Serious Emotional Disturbance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavkov, Thomas W.; Walrath, Christine M.

    2008-01-01

    Our study explores the clinical and non-clinical characteristics associated with medication use among children with serious emotional disturbance who are referred into community-based family-driven system of care settings. Using data collected as part of the Comprehensive Community Mental Health Services for Children and Their Families Program…

  18. THE PILOT PROGRAM FOR THE EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED IN TEXAS. PROGRESS REPORT FOR 1965-1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LINKOUS, L.W.

    DURING THE 1965-66 SCHOOL YEAR, 20 CLASSES FOR THE EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED (IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS, MENTAL HEALTH CENTERS, AND HOSPITALS) ENROLLED 253 CHILDREN IN THIS PILOT PROGRAM. EVIDENCE OF NEUROLOGICAL DYSFUNCTION WAS FOUND IN 37 PERCENT OF THE STUDENTS. PSYCHIATRISTS CATEGORIZED THE STUDENTS AS HAVING TRANSIENT SITUATIONAL PERSONALITY DISORDERS…

  19. Effects of Quick Writing Instruction for High School Students with Emotional Disturbances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Linda H.; Kubina, Richard M., Jr.; Hoover, Theresa

    2013-01-01

    High school students with emotional disturbances (ED) often struggle with classroom writing tasks. In this study, the effectiveness of Self-Regulated Strategy Development (SRSD) instruction for 10 min timed persuasive quick writes with three high school students with ED was investigated. Results indicated improvement in the areas of quality,…

  20. A Study of Child Variance, Volume 2: Interventions; Conceptual Project in Emotional Disturbance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, William C.; Tracy, Michael L.

    Presented in the second volume of a series emanating from a conceptual project on emotional disturbance are six papers on general aspects of interventions as well as biophysical, behavioral, psychodynamic, environmental, and counter theoretical interventions. In an "Overview of Interventions", W. Rhodes discusses a framework for viewing…

  1. Home-School Partnerships for the Education of Severely Emotionally Disturbed Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slade, David L.

    Research has shown that parents can make significant contributions to the education of their severely emotionally disturbed children if given appropriate guidance by education professionals. To actively engage parents in educational processes, educators need to be skilled in effective communication strategies. Working with parents on one focused…

  2. Learning Disabilities in the Junior High School: Creating the Six-Hour Emotionally Disturbed Adolescent?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoff, Howard M.

    1983-01-01

    Reviews recent literature which has investigated the interaction between learning disabled adolescents' self-concept and academic, peer family, and community systems. A unique behavioral pattern of emotional disturbance may result from continuous, negative self-concept experiences. In the family and/or community, however, these students can be…

  3. How Passive-Aggressive Behavior in Emotionally Disturbed Children Affects Peer Interactions in a Classroom Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardt, Janet

    Passive-aggressive behavior in an emotionally disturbed child affects the child's progress and affects peer interactions in classroom settings. Passive-aggressive personalities are typically helpless, dependent, impulsive, overly anxious, poorly oriented to reality, and procrastinating. The characteristics of passive-aggressive children need to be…

  4. Vocational and Career-Oriented Secondary School Programs for the Emotionally Disturbed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinson, Edward M.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a model of vocational and career-oriented secondary school programs for the emotionally disturbed population. The model borrows principles and practices from various theoretical approaches, including the trait-factor, psychodynamic, behavioral, and developmental approaches. The methods and materials recommended are believed to be…

  5. Early Pregnancy among Adolescent Females with Serious Emotional Disturbances: Risk Factors and Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yampolskaya, Svetlana; Brown, Eric C.; Greenbaum, Paul E.

    2002-01-01

    A study involving 109 female adolescents with serious emotional disturbances (ages 9-18) found the following risk factors for early pregnancy: being African American, low family income, dropping out of school, conduct disorder, and substance use disorder. However, according to multivariate analysis, only dropping out of school was a significant…

  6. DAY-CARE REHABILITATION CENTER FOR EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED ADOLESCENTS. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CRAWFORD, HUGH A.; VAN DUYNE, WILLIAM V.

    IN THIS FIVE YEAR DEMONSTRATION PROJECT, EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED ADULTS AND ADOLESCENTS RECEIVED TREATMENT AT A DAY CARE REHABILITATION CENTER SPONSORED BY THE RHODE ISLAND DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION (DVR) LOCATED IN A PRIVATE PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL (BUTLER HOSPITAL). THE MAJOR TREATMENT GOALS WERE PRESERVATION AND RESTORATION OF…

  7. Perceptions of General and Special Educators and Paraprofessionals on Educational Setting for Students with Emotional Disturbance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahlgren, Katherine Leigh

    2010-01-01

    Educational placement decisions for students with emotional disturbance (ED) are to be made in settings which least restrict their interactions with typically developing peers, per the Individuals with Disabilities Improvement Act of 2004 (20 U.S.C. 1400 (c)(5)(D)(F)). High levels of restrictive settings compared to students with other disability…

  8. Longitudinal Effects of ADHD in Children with Learning Disabilities or Emotional Disturbances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Xin; Yu, Jennifer W.; Shaver, Debra

    2014-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of comorbidity between attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and learning disabilities (LD) or emotional disturbances (ED), few studies have examined the long-term effects of these comorbid relationships on student outcomes. We estimated the longitudinal academic, social, and behavioral outcomes in children…

  9. Pregnancy in Adolescent Females with Serious Emotional Disturbance: Risk Factors and Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yampolskaya, Svetlana; Brown, Eric C.; Greenbaum, Paul E.

    This 7-year study examined the consequences of early pregnancy and parenting for girls with serious emotional disturbances (SED) and risk factors identified with teenage pregnancy. Risk factors that were examined included sociodemographic characteristics, psychological characteristics, and psychopathology. The 109 participants in the study were…

  10. Double Whammy? Rural Youth with Serious Emotional Disturbance and the Transition to Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heflinger, Craig Anne; Hoffman, Cheri

    2009-01-01

    Context: All youth, especially those with serious emotional disturbances (SED), face challenges as they transition to adulthood. Little is known about rural youth at risk for transition problems. Purpose: To examine transition-age youth who use publicly funded services in rural and urban/suburban locations in Tennessee in order to describe youth…

  11. Evaluating Wraparound Services for Seriously Emotionally Disturbed Youth: Pilot Study Outcomes in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copp, Hilary L.; Bordnick, Patrick S.; Traylor, Amy C.; Thyer, Bruce A.

    2007-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, intervention strategies designed to preserve the family system while serving children diagnosed with severe emotional disturbances (SED) have been on the rise. Many of these strategies sought to provide families with comprehensive approaches that link various agencies and services, thus providing a complete system of care.…

  12. Emotionally Disturbed--Counseling and Therapy. A Selective Bibliography. Exceptional Child Bibliography Series No. 629.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Handicapped and Gifted Children, Reston, VA.

    The annotated bibliography on Emotionally Disturbed--Counseling and Therapy contains approximately 145 abstracts and associated indexing information for documents or journal articles published from 1950 to 1975 and selected from the computer files of the Council for Exceptional Children's Information Services and the Education Resources…

  13. Effects of the Psychoactive Drug: Methylphenidate (Ritalin) on Classroom Disorders: Hyperactivity, Emotional Disturbance and Learning Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Irene

    Reviewed were several research studies using varying dosages of methylphenidate (Ritalin) in contrast with thioridazine and amphetamine under various behavioral conditions and situations with hyperactive, emotionally disturbed, and learning disabled children. Results from the studies with hyperactive children indicated that drug treatment was…

  14. Accessing Services for Youth with Emotional Disturbances in and after High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Mary M.; Wei, Xin; Thornton, S. Patrick; Valdes, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    This study uses data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 to examine the rates at which youth with emotional disturbances received services during and up to 8 years after high school. Parents' efforts to obtain services, information sources accessed, problems encountered, and the perceived sufficiency of services to meet youths' needs…

  15. Advanced Respite Care for Emotionally Disturbed. Teacher Edition. Respite Care Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This unit is designed to help teachers/trainers provide training for respite care providers who may be working with emotionally disturbed persons. The format of the guide includes basic components that form a unit of instruction: objective sheet, instructor's guide, instructor's supplements, information sheet, student supplements, activity sheets,…

  16. Factors Considered in Determining Educational Setting for Students with Emotional Disturbance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoge, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    The present study identified factors influencing determination of educational setting for students with Emotional Disturbance (ED). Determination of most appropriate educational setting, a key provision of students' individualized education programs (IEP) continues to be one the most contentious issues in special education. Focus group interviews…

  17. Profiles of Residential and Day Treatment Programs for Seriously Emotionally Disturbed Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaacs, Mareasa R.; Goldman, Sybil K.

    This monograph presents descriptions of 11 residential and day treatment programs serving seriously emotionally disturbed youth. Each program's description includes information about the program's origins, type of children served, guiding philosophy and treatment approach, services offered, work with families, linkages with other child-serving…

  18. Maltreatment, Conscience Functioning and Dopamine Beta Hydroxylase in Emotionally Disturbed Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galvin, Matthew R.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Nineteen hospitalized, emotionally disturbed boys screened for maltreatment either before or after age 3 were compared with a normal control group for enzyme activity and conscience functions in moral valuation. Subjects who experienced early maltreatment had more developmental delays and more interferences with conscience functions than other…

  19. Narrative quality and disturbance pre- and post-emotion-focused therapy for child abuse trauma.

    PubMed

    Mundorf, Elisabeth S; Paivio, Sandra C

    2011-12-01

    This study predicted that the quality of trauma narratives written before and following emotion-focused therapy for child abuse trauma would be positively associated with psychological disturbance before and following therapy. Narratives for 37 clients were coded for emotion words, temporal orientation, incoherence, and depth of experiencing. At pretreatment, negative emotion words and experiencing were correlated with abuse resolution, r(35) = -.36, and r(35) = -.34, respectively. At posttreatment, narrative incoherence was correlated with trauma symptoms, r(35) = .33, whereas present-future orientation and experiencing were correlated with abuse resolution, r(35) = -.37, and r(35) = -.31, respectively. Pretreatment incoherence was associated with posttreatment trauma symptoms, r(35) = .42, and pretreatment depth of experiencing was associated with posttreatment abuse resolution, r(35) = -.37. Results support narrative quality as an index of trauma disturbance. PMID:22144230

  20. [The prevalence of cognitive and emotional disturbances in epilepsy and its consequences for therapy].

    PubMed

    Mojs, Ewa; Gajewska, Ewa; Głowacka, Maria Danuta; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2007-01-01

    In the course of epilepsy psychic disturbances appear. They concern cognitive as well as emotional dysfunctions. Cognitive and emotional dysfunctions are defined as poliaetiological - "organic" connected with brain pathology and "environmental". Cognitive dysfunctions concern global intelligence and chosen cognitive dysfunctions as well. There are about 30% people with cognitive dysfunctions connected to epilepsy. Primary and secondary emotional dysfunctions are distinguished in traditional approach. Primary emotional and cognitive dysfunctions might be caused by the same factor which cause epilepsy or develop due to the damage of the central nervous system in the course of epilepsy or are related to the pharmacological treatment. Secondary emotional deficits are connected with negative social actions and negative social attitudes toward ill persons with epilepsy. It concerns overprotective attitudes or social isolation. The prevalence of emotional disturbances is estimated at 5-50% in population of patients with epilepsy. The study shows the necessity of conducting psychotherapy and neuropsychological rehabilitation in the course of epilepsy as a part of schema of treatment. The aim of these activities is the improvement of the quality of life and the avoidance of progressive intellectual impairment as well. PMID:18595489

  1. Validity of the Draw-a-Person: Screening Procedure for Emotional Disturbance (DAP:SPED) in Strengths-Based Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matto, Holly C.; Naglieri, Jack A.; Clausen, Cinny

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This is the first validity study to date to examine the relationship between the Draw-A-Person: Screening Procedure for Emotional Disturbance (DAP:SPED) and strengths-based emotional and behavioral measures. The incremental predictive validity of the DAP:SPED relative to the Behavioral and Emotional Rating Scale was examined. Method:…

  2. Attachment Based Therapeutic Preschool Curriculum: Program for Emotionally Handicapped and Severely Emotionally Disturbed Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meckel, Stephen A.; And Others

    The Therapeutic Preschool Program serves 3- and 4-year-old children of average intelligence who are diagnosed as having emotional and/or behavioral problems. The primary goal of the program is to provide a framework for teaching the social, emotional, and cognitive skills necessary for eventually mainstreaming the children into a regular education…

  3. The Association between Sleep Disturbances and Depression among Firefighters: Emotion Dysregulation as an Explanatory Factor

    PubMed Central

    Hom, Melanie A.; Stanley, Ian H.; Rogers, Megan L.; Tzoneva, Mirela; Bernert, Rebecca A.; Joiner, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate emotion regulation difficulties in association with self-reported insomnia symptoms, nightmares, and depression symptoms in a sample of current and retired firefighters. Methods: A total of 880 current and retired United States firefighters completed a web-based survey of firefighter behavioral health. Self-report measures included the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, Insomnia Severity Index, PTSD Checklist, and Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale. Results: A notable portion of participants reported clinically significant depression symptoms (39.6%) and insomnia symptoms (52.7%), as well as nightmare problems (19.2%), each of which demonstrated a strong association with emotion regulation difficulties (rs = 0.56–0.80). Bootstrapped mediation analyses revealed that the indirect effects of overall emotion regulation difficulties were significant both for the relationship between insomnia and depression (95% CI: 0.385–0.566) and nightmares and depression (95% CI: 1.445–2.365). Limited access to emotion regulation strategies emerged as the strongest, significant indirect effect for both relationships (insomnia 95% CI: 0.136–0.335; nightmares 95% CI: 0.887–1.931). Conclusions: Findings extend previous affective neuroscience research by providing evidence that insomnia and nightmares may influence depression symptoms specifically through the pathway of explicit emotion regulation difficulties. Sleep disturbances may impair the ability to access and leverage emotion regulation strategies effectively, thus conferring risk for negative affect and depression. Citation: Hom MA, Stanley IH, Rogers ML, Tzoneva M, Bernert RA, Joiner TE. The association between sleep disturbances and depression among firefighters: emotion dysregulation as an explanatory factor. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(2):235–245. PMID:26350604

  4. Using Experiential Learning Through Science Experiments to Increase the Motivation of Students Classified as Emotionally Disturbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crozier, Marisa

    When learning is an adventure rather than an exercise in memorization, students can enjoy the process and be motivated to participate in classroom activities (Clem, Mennicke, & Beasley, 2014). Students classified as emotionally disturbed are prone to disruptive behaviors and struggle learning in a traditional science classroom consisting of lecture and demonstrations. They cannot maintain the necessary level of attention nor have the strong reading, writing or memory skills needed to succeed. Therefore, this study examined whether the use of experiential learning would increase on-task behavior and improve the motivation of emotionally disturbed, middle school students in science. Students completed four hands-on experiments aligned with the science curriculum. The data collection methods implemented were an observation checklist with corresponding journal entries, a summative assessment in the form of lab sheets, and student interviews. Through triangulation and analysis, data revealed that the students had more on-task behaviors, were engaged in the lessons, and improved grades in science.

  5. Oral Reading Fluency Development for Children with Emotional Disturbance or Learning Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Wanzek, Jeanne; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Petscher, Yaacov

    2013-01-01

    This study used a large state-wide database to examine the oral reading fluency development of second and third grade students with emotional disturbance or learning disabilities and their general education peers. Oral reading fluency measures were administered to 185,367 students without disabilities (general education), 2,146 students identified with an emotional disturbance, and 10,339 students with a learning disability. Student status and growth trends were examined in a piecewise model at each grade level for the full sample as well as for a subsample with reading difficulties. Data suggested students with disabilities performed significantly below students without disabilities in initial status and growth. Gender was also examined as a moderator of outcomes for each of the study groups. PMID:24532848

  6. Do Race of Student and Race of Teacher Influence Ratings of Emotional and Behavioral Problem Characteristics of Students with Emotional Disturbance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullinan, Douglas; Kauffman, James M.

    2005-01-01

    African American students are disproportionately likely to be identified with the emotional disturbance (ED) education disability. To investigate how teachers' perceptions of students might vary by race, we analyzed Black and White teachers' ratings of 769 students with ED, subdivided by race and grade level, on six emotional and behavior problem…

  7. Emotional Disturbance

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe mental disorders that cause abnormal thinking and perceptions. Two of the main symptoms are delusions and ... someone is plotting against you. Hallucinations are false perceptions, such as hearing, seeing, or feeling something that ...

  8. Playtherapy Gives Evidence of Curative Power of Mother-Child Holding as Treatment for Autistic and Emotionally Disturbed Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stades-Veth, Jo

    The paper offers a play therapist's evidence for the curative power of intensive mother-child holding of children with emotional problems resulting from separation from the parent and emotional disturbances including autism. Dramatic improvements were observed in the play behaviors of autistic children after enforced cuddling--and these were…

  9. A Study of How Teachers of Seriously Emotionally Disturbed Children Can Derive Benefit from a Psychoeducational Evaluation by a Psychologist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weepie, Agatha A.

    The study involving 130 teachers investigated the elements of psychoeducational evaluation seen by teachers as most helpful in working with emotionally disturbed children. Ss responded to questionnaires which delved into physical, psychological, social-emotional, moral-ethical, and mental development of the child. Results revealed that the…

  10. Patterns of Emotional and Behavioural Disturbance Associated with Autistic Traits in Young People with Severe Intellectual Disabilities and Challenging Behaviours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jennie; Furniss, Frederick

    2006-01-01

    Emotional and behavioural disturbance was assessed in 82 individuals with severe intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour using the Diagnostic Assessment for the Severely Handicapped-II (DASH-II). Levels of disturbance were compared firstly in individuals with and without features of autism as assessed by the DASH-II, and secondly in…

  11. Motor Proficiency and Emotional/Behavioural Disturbance in Autism and Asperger's Disorder: Another Piece of the Neurological Puzzle?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadopoulos, Nicole; McGinley, Jennifer; Tonge, Bruce; Bradshaw, John; Saunders, Kerryn; Murphy, Anna; Rinehart, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    The relationship of motor proficiency with emotional/behavioural disturbance, autistic symptoms and communication disturbance was investigated in children diagnosed with autism and Asperger's disorder (AD). The Movement Assessment Battery for Children was used as a measure of motor impairment, and the Developmental Behavioural Checklist was used…

  12. Dissociation in borderline personality disorder: Disturbed cognitive and emotional inhibition and its neural correlates.

    PubMed

    Winter, Dorina; Krause-Utz, Annegret; Lis, Stefanie; Chiu, Chui-De; Lanius, Ruth A; Schriner, Friederike; Bohus, Martin; Schmahl, Christian

    2015-09-30

    Evidence is heterogeneous regarding whether patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) display disturbed emotional inhibition in the emotional Stroop task. Previous findings suggest that state dissociation may influence cognitive inhibition of task-irrelevant material, particularly with negative content. Our aim was to examine performance in an emotional Stroop task including negative, neutral, and positive words in BPD patients and healthy controls during functional magnetic resonance imaging. In advance, half of the BPD patients underwent a dissociation induction using script-driven imagery. BPD patients without dissociation induction showed behavioural performance comparable to that of healthy controls but displayed stronger neural responses, especially to positive stimuli, in the superior temporal gyrus, dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex. BPD patients with dissociation induction showed overall slower and less accurate responses as well as increased reaction times for negative versus neutral words compared with BPD patients without dissociation induction. Moreover, they showed comparatively decreased neuronal activity in the fusiform gyrus and parietal cortices independent of valence, but elevated activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus in response to negative versus neutral words. In conclusion, experimentally induced dissociation in BPD was associated with inefficient cognitive inhibition, particularly of negative stimuli, in the emotional Stroop task. PMID:26254542

  13. Sleep disturbance and emotion dysregulation as transdiagnostic processes in a comorbid sample.

    PubMed

    Fairholme, Christopher P; Nosen, Elizabeth L; Nillni, Yael I; Schumacher, Julie A; Tull, Matthew T; Coffey, Scott F

    2013-09-01

    Sleep disturbance and emotion dysregulation have been identified as etiologic and maintaining factors for a range of psychopathology and separate literatures support their relationships to anxiety, depression, PTSD, and alcohol dependence (AD) symptom severity. Previous studies have examined these relationships in isolation, failing to account for the high rates of comorbidity among disorders. It is not yet known whether these processes uniquely predict symptom severity in each of these domains. Participants were 220 patients in residential substance abuse treatment, who had experienced a potentially traumatic event and exceeded screening cutoffs for probable PTSD and problematic alcohol use. Controlling for emotion dysregulation and the interrelationships among the outcome variables, insomnia was uniquely associated with anxiety (B = .27, p < .001), depression (B = .25, p < .001), PTSD (B = .22, p < .001), and AD (B = .17, p = .01) symptom severity. Similarly, controlling for insomnia, emotion dysregulation was uniquely associated with anxiety (B = .40, p < .001), depression (B = .47, p < .001), PTSD (B = .38, p < .001), and AD (B = .26, p < .001) symptom severity. Insomnia and emotion dysregulation appear to be transdiagnostic processes uniquely associated with symptom severity across a number of different domains and might be important treatment targets for individuals with PTSD and AD. PMID:23831496

  14. Disturbing Information and Denial in the Classroom and Beyond: Climate Change, Emotions and Everyday Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norgaard, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Global warming is the most significant environmental issue of our time, yet public response in Western nations has been meager. Why have so few taken any action? Most studies of public response to climate change have focused on information deficit approaches. Many in the general public and environmental community have presumed that the public's failure to engage is a function of lack of concern about climate change. Instead, using interviews and ethnographic research on how knowledge of climate change is experienced in everyday life I describe "the social organization of climate denial" and discuss how it impacts classroom learning and the broader social understanding of climate change. Disturbing emotions of guilt, helplessness and fear of the future arose when people were confronted with the idea of climate change. People then normalized these disturbing emotions by changing the subject of conversations, shifting their attention elsewhere, telling jokes, and drawing on stock social discourses that deflected responsibility to others. The difficulty people have in making sense of climate change is in direct relation to the social world around them. This research suggests that educational strategies in the classroom and for the general public that consider and target the social, cultural and political aspects of the meaning of climate change will be most effective (in addition to factors that affect individual cognition).

  15. Factors that influence emotional disturbance in adults living in extreme poverty.

    PubMed

    Palomar-Lever, Joaquina; Victorio-Estrada, Amparo

    2012-04-01

    Living in poverty conditions implies exposure to severe circumstances of social disadvantage, associated with greater propensity to contract illnesses. A negative correlation has consistently been observed between health and poverty. The chronic exposure to stress affects people's well-being through the development of symptoms of anxiety and depression. The suffering of these symptoms for a long time period may be considered as part of a more general syndrome of emotional disturbance, in detriment to a person's mental health. The objective of this study is to identify psychological factors that influence emotional disturbance, measured as symptoms of anxiety and depression, in adults living in poverty conditions in Mexico's central region. A total of 913 adults, 65.2% female, were surveyed. The mean age of the participants was 43.71 (±12.58) years and the mean number of years of schooling was 4.04 (±3.36). Variables corresponding to personal characteristics were measured. The results indicate that the most important risk factor for depression is anxiety and vice versa. Additionally, gender, negative self-esteem, lack of adequate strategies for confronting and resolving difficulties, and lack of self-regulation predicted depression, whereas stress, lack of self-regulation, and coping style predicted anxiety. These variables were better predictors than optimism, locus of control, sense of humor or religiosity. PMID:22023014

  16. INFANT EMOTIONAL WITHDRAWAL: A PRECURSOR OF AFFECTIVE AND COGNITIVE DISTURBANCE IN FETAL ALCOHOL SPECTRUM DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Molteno, Christopher D.; Jacobson, Joseph L.; Carter, R. Colin; Dodge, Neil C.; Jacobson, Sandra W.

    2013-01-01

    . These data link prenatal alcohol to a specific aspect of infant affective function not attributable to mother-infant interaction, infant temperament, or other socioemotional aspects of the infant’s environment and identify infant emotional withdrawal as an early indicator of affective disturbance, particularly in children later diagnosed with FAS and PFAS. PMID:24033350

  17. Persistent pain and neurosensory disturbance after dental implant surgery: pathophysiology, etiology, and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad; Okeson, Jeffrey P; Khalaf, Mohd W; Bhavsar, Ishita

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have documented the successful outcomes of dental implants, but have also reported the association of sensory disturbances with the surgical implant procedure. Postsurgical pain is a normal response to tissue injury, and usually resolves after the tissue heals. However, some patients who receive dental implants experience persistent pain even after normal healing. This article describes the basic anatomy and pathophysiology associated with nerve injury. The incidence and diagnosis of these problems, in addition to factors that result in the development of chronic persistent neuropathic pain and sensory disturbances associated with surgical implant placement, are discussed. PMID:25434562

  18. Residential Treatment and the Invention of the Emotionally Disturbed Child in Twentieth-Century America.

    PubMed

    Doroshow, Deborah Blythe

    2016-01-01

    In the 1930s, children who were violent, depressed, psychotic, or suicidal would likely have been labeled delinquent and sent to a custodial training school for punitive treatment. But starting in the 1940s, a new group of institutions embarked on a new experiment to salvage and treat severely deviant children. In the process, psychiatrists, psychologists, and social workers at these residential treatment centers (RTCs) made visible, and indeed invented, a new patient population. This article uses medical literature, popular media, and archival sources from several RTCs to argue that staff members created what they called the "emotionally disturbed" child. While historians have described the identification of the mildly "troublesome" child in child guidance clinics, I demonstrate how a much more severely ill child was identified and defined in the process of creating residential treatment and child mental health as a professional enterprise. PMID:27040027

  19. EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS—California State Department of Mental Hygiene Programs

    PubMed Central

    Beach, William B.

    1961-01-01

    Through programs that are directly operated by the state and through subsidy programs using state funds and federal funds, the Department of Mental Hygiene in California provides services for children and adolescents who are emotionally disturbed. Private institutions for these purposes, in the form of residential centers and day care centers, are licensed by the Department of Mental Hygiene. Direct services provided by the Department of Mental Hygiene include residential treatment programs and outpatient clinic services. There have been increased demands for more residential treatment programs and for services for rural areas. Indications have been noted of increased need for research on questions dealing with services of this kind and increased training programs to provide adequate numbers of trained personnel. PMID:13688187

  20. Contribution of amygdala pathology to comorbid emotional disturbances in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Yilmazer-Hanke, Deniz; O'Loughlin, Elaine; McDermott, Kieran

    2016-06-01

    The amygdala contributes to the generation and propagation of epileptiform activity in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Ictal symptoms such as fear, dreamy states (déjà vu, memory flashbacks, experiential hallucinations), epigastric auras, or sympathetic outflow with cardiovascular changes are often linked to a seizure focus in the amygdala. However, the amygdala may also play a role in comorbid anxiety, depression, and other psychiatric symptoms experienced in the interictal phase, especially in pharmacoresistant TLE. The few studies available on TLE-related alterations in surgical amygdala specimens indicate loss of both excitatory spiny projection neurons as well as interneurons in nuclei with a cortex-like architecture, which may influence mechanisms of feedforward and feedback inhibition. Studies of the human amygdala indicate global alterations in the density of AMPA/kainate, metabotropic glutamate, γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA ), muscarinic M2 and M3, serotonergic 5-HT1A, and adrenergic α1 receptors. Also, amygdala GABAergic and neuropeptide Y (NPY) systems affected in human TLE are both involved in antiepileptic and anxiolytic effects. Experimental and human positron emission tomography studies indicate changes in amygdala serotonergic, NPY Y1 receptor, neurokinin, and opioid systems in emotional disturbances in TLE. Of particular interest is the reduction in amygdala volume in conjunction with ictal fear, seizure focus in the amygdala, and amygdala and hippocampal sclerosis in TLE patients. In contrast, patients with interictal depression often have an intact or even enlarged amygdala and a negative MRI associated with amygdala hypometabolism, which can be associated with limbic autoimmune encephalitis. These findings suggest a differential role of TLE-related amygdala changes in ictal and interictal emotional disturbances. PMID:26525920

  1. Chronic Light Exposure in the Middle of the Night Disturbs the Circadian System and Emotional Regulation.

    PubMed

    Ikeno, Tomoko; Yan, Lily

    2016-08-01

    In mammals, the circadian system is composed of a principal circadian oscillator located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and a number of subordinate oscillators in extra-SCN brain regions and peripheral tissues/organs. However, how the time-keeping functions of this multiple oscillator circuit are affected by aberrant lighting environments remains largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effects of chronic light exposure in the middle of the night on the circadian system by comparing the mice housed in a 12:4:4:4-h L:DLD condition with the controls in 12:12-h L:D condition. Daily rhythms in locomotor activity were analyzed and the expression patterns of protein products of clock genes Period1 and Period2 (PER1 and PER2) were examined in the SCN and extra-SCN brain regions, including the dorsal striatum, hippocampus, paraventricular nucleus (PVN), and basolateral amygdala (BLA). Following 2 weeks of housing in the L:DLD condition, animals showed disturbed daily rhythms in locomotor activity and lacked daily rhythms of PER1 and PER2 in the SCN. In the extra-SCN brain regions, the PER1 and PER2 rhythms were affected in a region-specific pattern, such that they were relatively undisturbed in the striatum and hippocampus, phase-shifted in the BLA, and abolished in the PVN. In addition, mice in the L:DLD condition showed increased anxiety-like behaviors and reduced brain-derived neurotropic factor messenger RNA expression in the hippocampus, amygdala, and medial prefrontal cortex, which are brain regions that are involved in emotional regulation. These results indicate that nighttime light exposure leads to circadian disturbances not only by abolishing the circadian rhythms in the SCN but also by inducing misalignment among brain oscillators and negatively affects emotional processing. These observations serve to identify risks associated with decisions regarding lifestyle in our modern society. PMID:27075857

  2. Course, Co-Occurrence, and Longitudinal Associations of Emotional Disturbance and Delinquency from Adolescence to Young Adulthood: A Six-Year Three-Wave Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overbeek, Geertjan; Vollebergh, Wilma; Meeus, Wim; Engels, Rutger; Luijpers, Eric

    2001-01-01

    Data from a national sample of 1,302 adolescents and young adults in the Netherlands who participated in a 6-year,3-wave longitudinal study show an increase in emotional disturbance and delinquency from early to middle adolescence, with emotional disturbance stabilizing and delinquency declining into young adulthood. (SLD)

  3. WISC-R Discrimination of Learning-Disabled and Emotionally Disturbed Children: An Intragroup and Intergroup Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coolidge, Frederick L.

    1983-01-01

    Reanalyzed the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised subtest scores in Dean's 1978 study of learning disabled and emotionally disturbed children. Analysis revealed a marked similarity between the groups. Results support Sattler's contention that Dean's data do not present evidence of a perceptual organization deficit in learning…

  4. A Vocational Program and Skill Assessment for Severe/Profound Mentally Retarded and Emotionally Disturbed Retarded Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Setbacken, S. K.

    A prevocational/vocational training program for mentally retarded adults who also have emotional disturbances expanded its curriculum to incorporate self-help, social/affective, communication, community life, and vocational skills. Residents are trained in a variety of work options: bench work task, horticultural tasks, janitorial skills, basic…

  5. Using Direct Observation to Assist in Eligibility Decisions and Intervention Planning: The Scales for Assessing Emotional Disturbance-2 Observation Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordness, Philip D.; Epstein, Michael H.; Cullinan, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    A key issue in using the federal definition of emotional disturbance (ED) is the challenge of measuring five characteristics of ED (Epstein, Nordness, Cullinan, & Hertzog, 2002). Stated briefly, these five characteristics include: (1) an inability to learn; (2) relationship problems; (3) inappropriate behavior; (4) unhappiness or depression;…

  6. Elementary School Children with Persistent Emotional Disturbances: A Summary Report of a Study in Onondaga County, N.Y.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Dept. of Mental Hygiene, Albany.

    Each of 7,056 children (3,607 boys and 3,449 girls) attending regular elementary school classes were rated by their fourth grade teacher and again by their sixth grade teacher to determine the prevalence of persistent emotional disturbances within the student population of 17 public school districts. Based on teachers' ratings of the student's…

  7. A Comparative Analysis of Language, Suspension, and Academic Performance of Students with Emotional Disturbance and Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goran, Lisa G.; Gage, Nicholas A.

    2011-01-01

    This study focused on the relationship among language, behavior, cognitive ability, and academic performance constructs for school-aged students identified with educational disabilities. The authors provide a review of research findings in regard to the language and academic deficits of students with emotional disturbance (ED) and specific…

  8. An Investigation of the Effects of Music on Two Emotionally Disturbed Students' Writing Motivations and Writing Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kariuki, Patrick; Honeycutt, Cindy

    This study investigated whether music could be used as a tool to motivate students with emotional disturbances to develop positive attitudes toward writing and whether these attitudes would result in a higher volume of writing output and improved writing skills. The research focused on two fourth-grade male students. The data collection instrument…

  9. What Can We Learn from School-Based Emotional Disturbance Assessment Practices? Implications for Practice and Preparation In School Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Ryan A.; Hanchon, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    The federal definition of emotional disturbance (ED) provides limited guidance to educational professionals charged with making Individuals with Disabilities in Education Improvement Act eligibility determinations. Despite calls to revise the definition, the ED category remains largely unchanged nearly four decades after being codified into…

  10. The Effects of Baker-Miller Pink on Physiological and Cognitive Behavior of Emotionally Disturbed and Regular Education Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliam, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Fourteen emotionally disturbed junior high students and 16 regular education students were exposed to 2 experimental conditions with white and Baker-Miller pink visual stimuli. Analysis revealed significant differences on systolic and diastolic blood pressure but not on pulse, grip strength, nor the Digit-Symbol test of the Wechsler Adult…

  11. Developing a New System to Measure Outcomes in a Service Coordination Program for Youth with Severe Emotional Disturbance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Lisa M.; Walker, Robert; Blevins, Michele

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents information on re-developing an outcome evaluation for a state-funded program providing service coordination utilizing wraparound to youth with severe emotional disturbance (SED) and their families. Originally funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Kentucky IMPACT program has existed statewide since 1990. Changing…

  12. An Examination of Factors that Affect Occupational Therapists' Self Efficacy Related to Working with Students Who Have Emotional Disturbance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Barbara Ellen

    2008-01-01

    This research examined factors that affect occupational therapists' self efficacy related to working with students who have emotional disturbance. Social cognition (Bandura, 1986, 1997a), of which self efficacy is an integral part, is the theoretical perspective for this study. The research used the Professional and Practice Profile to examine…

  13. Correlated and Coupled Within-Person Change in Emotional and Behavioral Disturbance in Individuals with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofer, Scott M.; Gray, Kylie M.; Piccinin, Andrea M.; Mackinnon, Andrew; Bontempo, Daniel E.; Einfeld, Stewart L.; Hoffman, Lesa; Parmenter, Trevor; Tonge, Bruce J.

    2009-01-01

    Individual change and variation in emotional/behavioral disturbance in children and adolescents with intellectual disability has received little empirical investigation. Based on 11 years of longitudinal data from the Australian Child to Adult Development Study, we report associations among individual differences in level, rate of change, and…

  14. Innovative Treatment for Children With Serious Emotional Disturbance: Preliminary Outcomes for a School-Based Intensive Mental Health Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernberg, Eric M.; Jacobs, Anne K.; Nyre, Joseph E.; Puddy, Richard W.; Roberts, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the development, implementation, and preliminary evaluation of a school-based Intensive Mental Health Program (IMHP) for 50 children (42 boys, 8 girls) with severe, early-onset, serious emotional disturbances (SED). Eighty-four percent of the children showed clinically significant improvement in overall functioning as…

  15. Girls with Emotional Disturbance and a History of Arrest: Characteristics and School-Based Predictors of Arrest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Nicholas A.; Josephs, Nikki L.; Lunde, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Research suggests that girls receiving special education services for Emotional Disturbance (ED) may have unique characteristics and needs. Similarly, juvenile justice research has identified unique characteristics of court-involved girls. This study examined characteristics of girls with ED and a history of arrest. Additionally, classroom-based…

  16. Effectiveness of School-Based Prevention and Intervention Programs for Children and Adolescents with Emotional Disturbance: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Linda A.; Newman, Erik; De Thomas, Courtney Anne; Chun, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of school-based prevention and intervention programs for children and adolescents at-risk for and with emotional disturbance. Published outcome studies (k = 29) from December, 1988, to March, 2006, including 1405 children and adolescents were reviewed. Each investigation was coded on several variables…

  17. Seeing Red, Feeling Blue: The Impact of State Political Leaning on State Identification Rates for Emotional Disturbance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Andrew; Siperstein, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Investigations of why students with emotional disturbance (ED) are underidentified in special education have often focused on economic factors and problems with the definition of ED. The present study focuses on variation in underidentification across states and its relationship to political ideology. State-level political, economic, and…

  18. A Grounded Theory for Identifying Students with Emotional Disturbance: Promising Practices for Assessment, Intervention, and Service Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Dori

    2012-01-01

    A qualitative grounded theory study examined how practicing professionals involved in the ED identification process reconstructed the category of "emotional disturbance" as it applied to students in an alternative educational setting. A grounded theory integrates six emergent themes and essentially reframes the existing ED criteria in contemporary…

  19. The Alternative School: Alachua County (Florida) Public Schools. Descriptive Materials Covering the Secondary Center for Emotionally Disturbed Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alachua County Schools, Gainesville, FL.

    Compiled are materials which describe the Alternative School of the Alachua County, Florida, Public School District, which serves a severely emotionally disturbed population of about 75-85 adolescents. The following materials are included: an introductory letter, which includes information on staff operations and the curriculum framework, given…

  20. Effectiveness of Contracted Services in Individualizing and Tailoring Mentor Programming for Children with Severe Emotional Disturbance in a Public System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owley, Gordon T.; Sternweis, Joan

    This conference paper discusses the results of a study that investigated the effects of a mentor service on 30 children with severe emotional disturbances and considered to be at extreme risk for out-of-home placement. The mentors provided regular, consistent, face-to-face and telephone contact with each child for five hours per week. The mentors…

  1. Shifting from Categories to Services: Comprehensive School-Based Mental Health for Children with Emotional Disturbance and Social Maladjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heathfield, Lora Tuesday; Clark, Elaine

    2004-01-01

    To meet the present and future educational and mental health needs of our nation's youth, current models of mental health service delivery need to be reformed. Any more time spent arguing the differences between categories such as Emotional Disturbance (ED) and Social Maladjustment (SM) will only delay much needed services and deplete our already…

  2. Do Adolescents with Emotional and Behavioral Disturbances Attending Schools for Special Education Have Lower Expectations Regarding the Transition to Adulthood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margraf, Hannah; Pinquart, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with emotional and behavioral disturbances (EBD) and those attending special schools tend to have poorer adult outcomes than adolescents without EBD and peers from regular schools. Using a four-group comparison (students with or without EBD from special schools and students with or without EBD from regular schools), the present study…

  3. Dose-Effect of Children's Psychosocial Rehabilitation on the Daily Functioning of Youth with Serious Emotional Disturbance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Nathaniel J.

    2009-01-01

    Children's psychosocial rehabilitation (CPSR) is a promising but under-evaluated home- and community-based treatment for children with serious emotional disturbance (SED). CPSR addresses the functional impairments of children with SED through an asset-based, skill-building approach that involves multiple systems in the child's life. The present…

  4. Affective disturbance associated with premenstrual dysphoric disorder does not disrupt emotional modulation of pain and spinal nociception.

    PubMed

    Rhudy, Jamie L; Bartley, Emily J; Palit, Shreela; Kuhn, Bethany L; Kerr, Kara L; Martin, Satin L; DelVentura, Jennifer L; Terry, Ellen L

    2014-10-01

    In healthy individuals, emotions modulate pain and spinal nociception according to a valence linear trend (ie, pain/nociception is highest during negative emotions and lowest during positive emotions). However, emerging evidence suggests that emotional modulation of pain (but not spinal nociception) is disrupted in fibromyalgia and disorders associated with chronic pain risk (eg, major depression, insomnia). The present study attempted to extend this work and to examine whether women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), a cyclical syndrome associated with debilitating affective symptoms during the late-luteal (premenstrual) phase of the menstrual cycle, is also associated with disrupted emotional modulation of pain. To do so, an affective picture-viewing procedure was used to study emotional modulation of pain and spinal nociception in 14 women with PMDD and 14 control women during mid-follicular, ovulatory, and late-luteal phases of the menstrual cycle (verified by salivary hormone levels and luteinizing hormone tests). At each phase, mutilation, neutral, and erotic pictures were presented to manipulate emotion. During picture viewing, suprathreshold electrocutaneous stimuli were presented to evoke pain and the nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR; a physiological measure of spinal nociception). Statistically powerful linear mixed model analyses confirmed that pictures evoked the intended emotional states in both groups across all menstrual phases. Furthermore, emotion modulated pain and NFR according to a valence linear trend in both groups and across all menstrual phases. Thus, PMDD-related affective disturbance is not associated with a failure to emotionally modulate pain, suggesting that PMDD does not share this pain phenotype with major depression, insomnia, and fibromyalgia. PMID:25139588

  5. Understanding how police officers think about mental/emotional disturbance calls.

    PubMed

    Watson, Amy C; Swartz, James; Bohrman, Casey; Kriegel, Liat S; Draine, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Police officers frequently respond to calls involving persons with mental illnesses and in doing so, they are key gatekeepers of access to mental health treatment as well as entry into the criminal justice system. Programs such as Crisis Intervention Teams (CIT) are being implemented across the United States and elsewhere to train officers to respond more effectively and facilitate access to mental health services when appropriate. These programs would benefit from a thorough understanding of these encounters from the perspective of police officers. We take as a premise that officers develop frames of reference or "schema" for understanding and responding to these encounters that are shaped by socialization, training, and their experience as police officers. In this study, we examine police officer schema of mental/emotional disturbance (M/EDP) calls. Qualitative interviews provided the foundation to develop the Needs on the Street Interview (NOSI) to tap officer schema of four types of M/EDP scenarios. The NOSI was administered to 147 officers in Chicago and Philadelphia. Latent Class Analysis (LCA) was conducted separately for each scenario to examine groups of officers with different schema as well as predictors of schema group. For three of the four scenarios, officers were classified into a two category or schema model, for the fourth (crime reported) a three category model was supported. Schema groups tended to be differentiated by ratings of level of resistance/threat and substance use. Contrary to our expectations, CIT and law enforcement experience did not predict officer schema group. While the CIT model emphasizes de-escalation skills to reduce resistance and the need for officers to use force, CIT and other training programs may want to consider increasing content related to factors such as co-occurring substance use and managing resistance. PMID:24656216

  6. Understanding how police officers think about mental/emotional disturbance calls

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Amy C; Swartz, James; Bohrman, Casey; Kriegel, Liat S.; Draine, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Police officers frequently respond to calls involving persons with mental illnesses and in doing so, they are key gatekeepers of access to mental health treatment as well as entry into the criminal justice system. Programs such as Crisis Intervention Teams (CIT) are being implemented across the United States and elsewhere to train officers to respond more effectively and facilitate access to mental health services when appropriate. These programs would benefit from a thorough understanding of these encounters from the perspective of police officers. We take as a premise that officers develop frames of reference or “schema” for understanding and responding to these encounters that are shaped by socialization, training, and their experience as police officers. In this study, we examine police officer schema of mental/emotional disturbance (M/EDP) calls. Qualitative interviews provided the foundation to develop the Needs on the Street Interview (NOSI) to tap officer schema of four types of M/EDP scenarios. The NOSI was administered to 147 officers in Chicago and Philadelphia. Latent Class Analysis (LCA) was conducted separately for each scenario to examine groups of officers with different schema as well as predictors of schema group. For three of the four scenarios, officers were classified into a two category or schema model, for the fourth (crime reported) a three category model was supported. Schema groups tended to be differentiated by ratings of level of resistance/threat and substance use. Contrary to our expectations, CIT and law enforcement experience did not predict officer schema group. While the CIT model emphasizes de-escalation skills to reduce resistance and the need for officers to use force, CIT and other training programs may want to consider increasing content related to factors such as co-occurring substance use and managing resistance. PMID:24656216

  7. Disaster severity and emotional disturbance: implications for primary mental health care in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Lima, B R; Chavez, H; Samaniego, N; Pompei, M S; Pai, S; Santacruz, H; Lozano, J

    1989-01-01

    Two months following the 1987 earthquakes in Ecuador, 150 patients in the primary health care clinics of the area were screened for emotional problems; 40% of them were emotionally distressed. Risk factors included not being married, reporting poor physical or emotional health, and having ill-defined physical complaints. The findings from this research are discussed in relation to a disaster of much greater intensity, whose victims were studied by the authors, utilizing the same instrument and research design. The comparison between these 2 groups of disaster victims revealed that: 1) the prevalence of emotional distress was smaller among the Ecuador victims, but the frequency of symptoms among the distressed was similar for both groups; 2) the symptom profiles were remarkably similar; and 3) the most frequent symptoms and the strongest predictors of emotional distress were very similar. These findings support a focused training of health care workers on selected emotional problems that are regularly present among victims of different disasters. PMID:2929384

  8. Differential diagnosis of emotional disorders that cause weight loss.

    PubMed Central

    Garfinkel, P. E.; Garner, D. M.; Kaplan, A. S.; Rodin, G.; Kennedy, S.

    1983-01-01

    Recently, anorexia nervosa has received much attention in the scientific and lay press. As a result there is a danger that the other emotional disorders that can present with weight loss and vomiting will be overlooked. Case examples are presented for anorexia nervosa, conversion disorder, schizophrenia and depression. The presentation and treatment of these four disorders are compared. PMID:6367916

  9. Key processes, ingredients and components of successful systems collaboration: working with severely emotionally or behaviorally disturbed children and their families.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mo Yee; Teater, Barbra; Greene, Gilbert J; Solovey, Andrew D; Grove, David; Fraser, J Scott; Washburn, Phil; Hsu, Kai Shyang

    2012-09-01

    Systems collaboration has repeatedly been cited as a component of successful social service delivery. Through qualitative data, this study explored the process involved in inter-agency collaboration when providing Integrative Family and Systems Treatment (I-FAST) for families with severely emotionally or behaviorally disturbed children. Data were collected through a series of eight focus groups with 26 agency collaborators across 11 counties in Ohio. Data analysis revealed two emergent phenomena: the process of developing collaboration, consisting of making initial contact, a trial period and developing trust; and the key ingredients of collaboration, focusing on interpersonal and professional qualities. Implications of each theme are discussed. PMID:21559951

  10. Should psychomotor disturbance be an essential criterion for a DSM-5 diagnosis of melancholia?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The CORE measure has proved useful in rating observed psychomotor disturbance (PMD), which has been held to be a key feature of melancholic depression. However, studies have shown a substantial percentage of subjects fulfilling DSM criteria for melancholia do not have observable PMD. Methods A semi-structured interview schedule was used in assessing and diagnosing depressed older patients. DSM-IV diagnoses were made, and the CORE measure was used to rate PMD. Comparisons were made between melancholia inpatients who scored low and those scoring high on the CORE in relation to presentation and pattern of symptoms. Results Of 32 inpatients with melancholia, 10 scored 0–7, 8 scored 8–10, and 14 scored 15 or more on the CORE. Thirty-two inpatients with psychotic depression scored 13 or more. High-CORE participants manifested unvarying depression more often than did low-CORE participants, and were less likely to state that stress precipitated their depressive episode. Conclusions High-CORE melancholia cases appear to have more in common with psychotic depression than do low-CORE cases. Designation of observable PMD as an essential criterion in making a diagnosis of melancholia could increase the utility of the DSM classification in relation to treatment planning. PMID:23724792

  11. The Effects of Video Self-Modeling on High School Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disturbances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Szu-Yin; Baker, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Video self-modeling has been proven to be effective with other populations with challenging behaviors, but only a few studies of video self-modeling have been conducted with high school students with emotional and behavioral disorders. This study aimed to focus on analyzing the effects of video self-modeling on four high school students with…

  12. Mechanisms of disturbed emotion processing and social interaction in borderline personality disorder: state of knowledge and research agenda of the German Clinical Research Unit.

    PubMed

    Schmahl, Christian; Herpertz, Sabine C; Bertsch, Katja; Ende, Gabriele; Flor, Herta; Kirsch, Peter; Lis, Stefanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Rietschel, Marcella; Schneider, Miriam; Spanagel, Rainer; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Bohus, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The last two decades have seen a strong rise in empirical research in the mechanisms of emotion dysregulation in borderline personality disorder. Major findings comprise structural as well as functional alterations of brain regions involved in emotion processing, such as amygdala, insula, and prefrontal regions. In addition, more specific mechanisms of disturbed emotion regulation, e.g. related to pain and dissociation, have been identified. Most recently, social interaction problems and their underlying neurobiological mechanisms, e.g. disturbed trust or hypersensitivity to social rejection, have become a major focus of BPD research. This article covers the current state of knowledge and related relevant research goals. The first part presents a review of the literature. The second part delineates important open questions to be addressed in future studies. The third part describes the research agenda for a large German center grant focusing on mechanisms of emotion dysregulation in BPD. PMID:26401296

  13. The Impact of Cardiac Coherence on Executive Functioning in Children With Emotional Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We used archival data originally collected using a quasi-experimental design to analyze inhibition, emotional regulation, working memory, and cognitive flexibility before and after an intervention of a coherence training program incorporating heart rate variability biofeedback. Method: Sixty-three participants, ages 7 to 14 years, were involved in the study: 30 in the treatment group and 33 in the control group. Split-plot analysis of variance (SPANOVA) was used to assess the impact of the intervention for the 4 dependent variables. Results: SPANOVA yielded no significant differences among inhibition, emotional regulation, working memory, and cognitive flexibility in response to the coherence training intervention. Conclusions: Future research in this area would benefit from the use of more objective measures of executive functioning. Qualitative assessment of child-reported symptomatology and treatment acceptability on the part of students and staff would also be an area for future research. PMID:25984403

  14. Applied behavior analysis: its impact on the treatment of mentally retarded emotionally disturbed people.

    PubMed

    Matson, J L; Coe, D A

    1992-01-01

    Laboratory research on behavior analysis proved to be useful in establishing principles of learning with many relevant applications for people. Early efforts in the applied behavior analysis area proved to be particularly successful with mentally retarded persons. Self-help skills received much of the earliest attention, but another area that became quite fruitful for study was dual diagnosis--mental health problems of mentally retarded individuals. This paper reviews some of the early works of Skinner and his colleagues and the implications of this work on the rapidly developing subdiscipline of dual diagnosis. Current status and future trends are discussed. PMID:1574625

  15. An Investigation of Reading Correlates of Emotionally Disturbed and Socially Maladjusted Children: The Relevance of a Classification Scheme to Educational Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graubard, Paul S.

    To ascertain whether subjects with similar behavior profiles also showed similar psychoeducational problems, 108 emotionally disturbed boys (aged 9 to 14 years) were studied. Teachers rated the behavior of children in their classes using the Quay Behavior Problem Checklist; subjects were also given achievement and intelligence tests. Seven…

  16. Changes in Use of Alcohol, Marijuana, and Services by Adolescents with Serious Emotional Disturbance: A Parallel-Process Growth Mixture Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenbaum, Paul E.; Dedrick, Robert F.

    2007-01-01

    For the study reported here, the authors used growth mixture modeling to analyze changes in alcohol and marijuana use and the use of drug and alcohol treatment services for a sample of 180 adolescents with serious emotional disturbance (ages 12-14 years at the beginning of the 7-year longitudinal study). Three latent classes of substance users…

  17. Punishment and Aversive Stimulation in Special Education: Legal, Theoretical and Practical Issues in Their Use with Emotionally Disturbed Children and Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Frank H., Ed.; Lakin, K. Charlie, Ed.

    Seven papers from a 1978 conference focus on the use of punishment in special education programs for emotionally disturbed students. In "The Legal Status of the Use of Corporal Punishment and Other Aversive Procedures in Schools," F. Wood and K. Lakin review laws, regulations, and court decisions that bear on the legality of the use of corporal…

  18. Outcomes for Youth with Severe Emotional Disturbance: A Repeated Measures Longitudinal Study of a Wraparound Approach of Service Delivery in Systems of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Painter, Kirstin

    2012-01-01

    Background: Systems of care is a family centered, strengths-based service delivery model for treating youth experiencing a serious emotional disturbance. Wraparound is the most common method of service delivery adopted by states and communities as a way to adhere to systems of care philosophy. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate…

  19. The Impact of Special Education Transition Services on the Post-Secondary Education Preparedness of Students with Emotional Disturbance: A Study of Student Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill-Shavers, Cyrhonda Denise

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the post-secondary special education transition planning experiences of currently enrolled college students with emotional disturbance (ED). In addition to exploring students' perceptions of their experiences, understanding, through the narrative analysis of semi-structured interviews, the role special…

  20. Midwest School District Transition Academy: A Qualitative, Process Evaluation of a Program for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders or Emotional Disturbances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the implementation of a special education program designed to support students with autism and social/emotional disturbances in a large, suburban school district. The study examined how services are delivered to students, staffing/personnel aspects, and budgetary considerations relative to programming.…

  1. THE THERAPEUTIC EFFECT OF ENVIRONMENT ON EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED AND MENTALLY SUBNORMAL CHILDREN. A KAUFMANN INTERNATIONAL DESIGN AWARD STUDY, 1964-66.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAYES, KENNETH

    CURRENT RESEARCH AND THOUGHT ON THE EFFECTS OF ARCHITECTURAL FORM AND COLOR IN THE TREATMENT OF EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED AND RETARDED CHILDREN ARE SURVEYED IN THIS PUBLICATION. TO A LESSER EXTENT, IT COVERS THE RELATIONSHIP OF THERAPY TO BEHAVIOR, NORMAL CHILDREN TO HANDICAPPED CHILDREN, NORMAL ADULTS TO MENTAL PATIENTS, AND CHILDREN TO ADULTS.…

  2. Lessons Learned from the Intensive Mental Health Program: A School-Based, Community Oriented Program for Children with Serious Emotional Disturbances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Michael C.; Vernberg, Eric M.; Biggs, Bridget K.; Randall, Camille J.; Jacobs, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The Intensive Mental Health Program meets the needs for services in school systems for children with serious emotional disturbances and for training graduate students in clinical applications with a difficult-to-serve population. We address the range of challenges and rewards experienced in the development of the comprehensive intervention…

  3. The Ima Hogg Therapeutic School Individualized Education, Behavioral Management in the Classroom and Psychotherapy for the Emotionally Disturbed and Behaviorally Disordered Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Constance D.; And Others

    Three papers discuss aspects of The Ima Hogg Therapeutic School for emotionally disturbed children. The first paper addresses the school's behavior development and management system, which rewards self management with freedom in physical activity and uses individualized target behaviors designed to increase the child's acceptable social…

  4. Meeting Their Needs: Provision of Services to the Severely Emotionally Disturbed and Autistic. Conference Proceedings (Memphis, Tennessee, April 27-28, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Memphis State Univ., TN. Coll. of Education.

    The document contains the proceedings of a 1983 Tennessee conference on "Provision of Services to the Severely and Emotionally Disturbed and Austistic." Areas covered were identified as priority needs by Tennessee educators and emphasize the practical rather than the theoretical aspects of providing services. After the text of the keynote speech,…

  5. The Development and Implementation of a Public School Prevocational Training Program for Trainable Retarded and Severely Emotionally Disturbed Children. Progress Report. Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lou, Ed.; And Others

    Reported are instructional programs generated in the first year (1970-71) of a Madison, Wisconsin public school project to develop a prevocational training program for trainable retarded and severely emotionally disturbed students. Programs are based on a behavioristic task analysis teaching model and are designed to teach functional vocational,…

  6. School-Wide Positive Behavior Support: Can It Help Address the Problem of Disproportionate Minority Representation in the Emotional Disturbance Disability Category?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Jodi Abraham

    2012-01-01

    This research project investigated the possibility of School-Wide Positive Behavior Support (SWPBS) as a way to address racial/ethnic disproportionality in the Emotional Disturbance (ED) category. The sample consisted of 114 elementary schools from a suburban school district in the Mid-Atlantic region. There were 57 SWPBS schools and 57 non-SWPBS…

  7. Self-Monitoring of Attention versus Self-Monitoring of Performance: Examining the Differential Effects among Students with Emotional Disturbance Engaged in Independent Math Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafferty, Lisa A.; Raimondi, Sharon L.

    2009-01-01

    Although students with emotional disturbance are commonly known for their social behavior deficits, they often have academic deficits as well. Unfortunately, most of the intervention research and many of the practices used with this population focus upon their social behavior deficits and fail to recognize the need to improve their academic…

  8. A Case Study of the Identity Development of an Adolescent Male with Emotional Disturbance and 48, XYYY Karyotype in an Institutional Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rausch, John L.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to utilize a phenomenological case study design to investigate the individual and social identity development of an adolescent male who had been placed in a high-security group home setting. The participant had been identified with emotional disturbance (ED), and 48, XYYY karyotype. The participant described his social…

  9. An Evaluation of Transfer of Stimulus Control and of Comprehension in Sight Word Reading for Children with Mental Retardation and Emotional Disturbance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browder, Diane M.; D'Huyvetters, Karol K.

    1988-01-01

    In a classroom setting, five children (aged 5 or 10 years) classified as severely emotionally disturbed and mildly mentally retarded received sight word instruction that included time delay to transfer stimulus control from a verbal prompt to the printed word. Four students mastered the words without direct instruction. (TJH)

  10. U.S.O.E. Fellowship Students' Practicum Handbook for the Cooperative Psycho-Educational Training Program for Teachers of the Emotionally Disturbed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pontiac State Hospital, MI.

    The handbook is written for graduate students participating in the Wayne State University Fairlawn Center Cooperative Psycho-Educational Training Program for Teachers of the Emotionally Disturbed. The material is intended as an orientation to the scope of the total program of Fairlawn Center (Pontiac State Hospital, Child Psychiatry Division),…

  11. The Role of Quality Service Systems in Involving Families in Mental Health Treatment for Children with Severe Emotional Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Mayberry, Lindsay Satterwhite; Heflinger, Craig Anne

    2016-01-01

    Family involvement in the planning and execution of mental health treatment has been shown to positively influence child outcomes; however, there is wide variability in the levels of involvement by families. The current study investigated the influence of child, family caregiver, service system, and community factors on the level of family involvement in the mental health treatment of children with severe emotional disturbances (SED). While prior work in this area has primarily focused on family and child characteristics, the current study adds to the knowledge base by also exploring factors associated with the quality of service delivery that may influence levels of family involvement. The current study is a secondary analysis of existing data from the Impact Study of Medicaid in Mississippi and Tennessee (Brannan & Heflinger, 2006) that used in-depth interviews with parents and case review ratings. One hundred thirty-six children and adolescents who received Medicaid coverage for mental health treatment in Mississippi and Tennessee were the focus of this study that assessed child and caregiver characteristics at the beginning of the study and rated service system factors six-month after the study began. Results of the multiple regression analysis revealed the quality of the service delivery system had the most influence on level of family involvement. Results suggest that levels of family involvement may have less to do with caregiver health, or other family characteristics, and more to do with the quality of the service delivery system. PMID:27307690

  12. Co-Occurrence of Parental Substance Abuse and Child Serious Emotional Disturbance: Understanding Multiple Pathways to Improve Child and Family Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Becci, A Akin; Brook, Jody; Lloyd, Margaret H

    2015-01-01

    This study is a mixed-methods examination of the prevalence and impact of parental substance abuse among families involved in foster care who have a child with a serious emotional disturbance. Data utilized for this study were both administrative and assessment data collected by case managers and parents as part of a federally funded demonstration project in a Midwestern state. At baseline, parent self-report and case manager ratings of family functioning found that parents affected by substance abuse fared worse in domains related to socioeconomics, parental trauma, parental mental health, and social supports when compared to families without parental substance abuse. Case managers and independent raters scored parents affected by substance abuse higher on effective parenting than parents not affected by substance abuse. While all children in the sample have a serious emotional disturbance, parents and case managers rated children's functioning higher among children whose families were characterized by parental substance abuse. These results suggest that, among families who have children with a serious emotional disturbance and are in foster care, those with and without substance abuse may represent two distinct service groups, each with a unique set of needs and contextual factors. For families with parental substance abuse, findings suggest that an appropriate child welfare response should attend to both children's and parent's behavioral health needs and include strategies that are well matched to the families' socioeconomic and social support needs. PMID:26827477

  13. Vaclav Vojta's neurokinesiological concept for the diagnosis and therapy of children with disturbances of motor development.

    PubMed

    Sadowska, L

    2001-01-01

    The concept known as neurokinesiological diagnostics and therapy was developed in the 1950s by Vaclav Vojta for children with disturbances of motor development originating in the central nervous system. This concept was founded on earlier observations small children. The study of motor behavior enabled Vojta to make a through evaluation and comparison of motor functioning in CP patients and in healthy newborns and infants, which led him to the discovery of the similarity between motor patterns and primitive reflexes in children with immature brains and in those with brain damage. PMID:17984908

  14. Breast cancer diagnosis: biographical disruption, emotional experiences and strategic management in Thai women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liamputtong, Pranee; Suwankhong, Dusanee

    2015-09-01

    In this article we draw on Bury's theory of biographical disruption to discuss the meanings of, and emotional experiences related to, being diagnosed with breast cancer among southern Thai women. Qualitative methods, including in-depth interviewing and drawing methods, were used to collect data from 20 women with breast cancer. The women perceived breast cancer to be a rhok raai; an evil or dread disease. They believed that breast cancer would lead to death. The disruption in their biography occurred when they detected abnormalities indicating breast cancer. The women's narratives revealed their chaotic lives upon this diagnosis and the news precipitated in them shock, fear, anxiety and loss of hope. Although they experienced chaos and disruption, the women cultivated strategies that helped them cope with their experiences by accepting their fate and adhering to Buddhist beliefs and practices. Through their narratives of biographical disruption, the women in our study offer healthcare providers knowledge that could lead to an appreciation of their needs and concerns. This knowledge is crucial for health professionals who wish to provide emotional support to women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer in Thailand and elsewhere. PMID:25922881

  15. Quantitative genetic research on sleep: a review of normal sleep, sleep disturbances and associated emotional, behavioural, and health-related difficulties.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Nicola L; Gregory, Alice M

    2013-02-01

    Over the past 50 years, well over 100 twin studies have focussed on understanding factors contributing to variability in normal sleep-wake characteristics and sleep disturbances. Whilst we have gained a great deal from these studies, there is still much to be learnt. Twin studies can be used in multiple ways to answer questions beyond simply estimating heritability. This paper provides a comprehensive review of some of the most important findings from twin studies relating to sleep to date, with a focus on studies investigating genetic and environmental influences contributing to i) objective and subjective measures of normal sleep characteristics (e.g., sleep stage organisation, sleep quality); as well as sleep disturbances and disorders such as dyssomnias (e.g., insomnia, narcolepsy) and parasomnias (e.g., sleepwalking, bruxism); ii) the persistence of sleep problems from childhood to adulthood, and the possibility that the aetiological influences on sleep change with age; iii) the associations between sleep disturbances, emotional, behavioural and health-related problems; and iv) processes of gene-environment correlation and interaction. We highlight avenues for further research, emphasising the need to further consider the aetiology of longitudinal associations between sleep disturbances and psychopathology; the genetic and environmental overlap between sleep and numerous phenotypes; and processes of gene-environment interplay and epigenetics. PMID:22560641

  16. Is the desire for amputation related to disturbed emotion processing? A multiple case study analysis in BIID.

    PubMed

    Bottini, Gabriella; Brugger, Peter; Sedda, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Body integrity identity disorder (BIID) is characterized by the overwhelming desire to amputate one or more healthy limbs or to be paraplegic. Recently, a neurological explanation of this condition has been proposed, in part on the basis of findings that the insular cortex might present structural anomalies in these individuals. While these studies focused on body representation, much less is known about emotional processing. Importantly, emotional impairments have been found in psychiatric disorders, and a psychiatric etiology is still a valid alternative to purely neurological accounts of BIID. In this study, we explored, by means of a computerized experiment, facial emotion recognition and emotional responses to disgusting images in seven individuals with BIID, taking into account their clinical features and investigating in detail disgust processing, strongly linked to insular functioning. We demonstrate that BIID is not characterized by a general emotional impairment; rather, there is a selectively reduced disgust response to violations of the body envelope. Taken together, our results support the need to explore this condition under an interdisciplinary perspective, taking into account also emotional connotations and the social modulation of body representation. PMID:24679146

  17. Emotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sukwoo

    It was widely accepted that emotion such as fear, anger and pleasure could not be studied using a modern scientific tools. During the very early periods of emotion researches, psychologists, but not biologist, dominated in studying emotion and its disorders. Intuitively, one may think that emotion arises from brain first and then bodily responses follow. For example, we are sad first, and then cry. However, groups of psychologists suggested a proposal that our feeling follows bodily responses; that is, we feel sad because we cry! This proposal seems counterintuitive but became a popular hypothesis for emotion. Another example for this hypothesis is as follows. When you accidentally confront a large bear in a mountain, what would be your responses?; you may feel terrified first, and then run, or you may run first, and then feel terrified later on. In fact, the latter explanation is correct! You feel fear after you run (even because you run?). Or, you can imagine that you date with your girl friend who you love so much. Your heart must be beating fast and your body temperature must be elevated! In this situation, if you take a very cold bath, what would you expect? Your hot feeling is usually calmed down after this cold bath; that is, you feel hot because your heart and bodily temperature change. While some evidence supported this hypothesis, others do not. In the case of patients whose cervical vertebrae were severed with an accident, they still retained significant amount of emotion (feelings!) in some cases (but other patients lost most of emotional experience). In addition, one can imagine that there would be a specific set of physical responses for specific emotion if the original hypothesis is correct (e.g. fasten heart beating and redden face for anger etc.). However, some psychologists failed to find any specific set of physical responses for specific emotion, though others insisted that there existed such specific responses. Based on these controversial

  18. The Longitudinal Relationship between Behavior and Emotional Disturbance in Young People with Intellectual Disability and Maternal Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Kylie M.; Piccinin, Andrea M.; Hofer, Scott M.; Mackinnon, Andrew; Bontempo, Daniel E.; Einfeld, Stewart L.; Parmenter, Trevor; Tonge, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    Although elevated rates of parent psychosocial distress have been associated with child behavior and emotional problems, little is known about the nature of this relationship over time. This study followed an epidemiological cohort of children and adolescents over 11 years with 4 waves of data collection. Within this cohort, complete data were…

  19. The Intensive Mental Health Program: Development and Structure of the Model of Intervention for Children with Serious Emotional Disturbances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernberg, Eric M.; Roberts, Michael C.; Nyre, Joseph E.

    2008-01-01

    In order to meet the challenging needs and behaviors of children with Serious Emotional Disorders (SED), a school and community based Intensive Mental Health Program (IMHP) was developed and evaluated. We describe the conceptual framework, treatment principles, and model for service delivery for psychological and educational interventions under…

  20. Triple X syndrome: characteristics of 42 Italian girls and parental emotional response to prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lalatta, Faustina; Quagliarini, Donatella; Folliero, Emanuela; Cavallari, Ugo; Gentilin, Barbara; Castorina, Pierangela; Forzano, Francesca; Forzano, Serena; Grosso, Enrico; Viassolo, Valeria; Naretto, Valeria Giorgia; Gattone, Stefania; Ceriani, Florinda; Faravelli, Francesca; Gargantini, Luigi

    2010-10-01

    We report clinical and behavioural evaluation data in 42 Italian girls with triple X syndrome whose diagnosis was made prenatally between 1998 and 2006 in three Italian centres. At initial evaluation, reproductive and medical histories were collected. Clinical assessment of the child was performed by a clinical geneticist and included a detailed personal history, physical evaluation and auxological measurements. To analyse how parents coped with specific events in the prenatal and postnatal periods, we conducted an interview that included 35 specific questions designed to elicit retrospective judgements on prenatal communication, present and future worries, needs and expectations. In a subset of probands, we also administered the formal Italian Temperament Questionnaire assessment test that investigates adaptation, general environment and socialisation. This test also assesses the emotional component of temperament. Clinical results in the affected children are similar to those previously reported with evidence of increased growth in the pre-puberal age and an average incidence of congenital malformation and health needs. Median age for the time first words were pronounced was 12 months, showing a slight delay in language skills, which tended to improve by the time they reached school age. Parental responses to the interview demonstrated residual anxiety but with a satisfactory adaptation to and a positive recall of the prenatal counselling session. Parental adaptation of the 47,XXX girls require indeed a proper educational support. This support seems to be available in Italy. An integrated approach to prenatal counselling is the best way to manage the anxiety and falsely imagined consequences that parents feel after being told that their foetus bears such a genetic abnormality. PMID:20473517

  1. National Needs Assessment of Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped. Volume 2, Section I: Media and Materials Priority Needs--3. Educable Mentally Retarded, Learning Disabled, Emotionally Disturbed, Behavior Disordered.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vale, Carol A.; And Others

    Volume 3 of a nine volume report on a national survey (33 states) of the media and materials needs of special education teachers and students presents a statistical analysis of the media and materials development needs of teachers of the educable mentally retarded, learning disabled, or emotionally disturbed/behavior disordered. A demographic…

  2. Promising Practices: Training Strategies for Serving Children with Serious Emotional Disturbance and Their Families in a System of Care. Systems of Care: Promising Practices in Children's Mental Health 1998 Series. Volume V.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Judith; Kaufman, Martha; Goldman, Sybil

    This is the fifth volume in a series of monographs from the Comprehensive Community Mental Health Service for Children and Their Families Program, which currently supports 41 comprehensive system of care sites to meet the needs of children with serious emotional disturbances (SED). This volume examines theories of adult learning, core values, and…

  3. The International Research Training Group on "Brain-Behavior Relationship of Normal and Disturbed Emotions in Schizophrenia and Autism" as an Example of German-American Cooperation in Doctoral Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Frank; Gur, Ruben C.

    2008-01-01

    The International Research Training Group "Brain-Behavior Relationship of Normal and Disturbed Emotions in Schizophrenia and Autism" (IRTG 1328), funded by the German Research Council (DFG), is a German-American cooperation. Its major aims are interdisciplinary and international scientific cooperation and the support of young scientists with…

  4. Exploratory Study to Determine the Feasibility of a Comprehensive Program for the Development of Special Education Services for Emotionally Disturbed Children in Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmberg, Gerald R.

    Group conferences, individual study groups, personal visitations, and communication by the principal investigator were utilized to determine the availability and suitability of services for emotionally disturbed children in the four-state area o f Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, and Nevada which has a low incidence of population in vast territorial…

  5. Comorbid Diagnosis and Concomitant Medical Treatment for Children with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Kristina M.; Bowman, Krista A.; Ley, Katie; Frankenberger, William

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the types of psychiatric disorders and the corresponding medications prescribed to children enrolled in elementary Emotional Behavioral Disability (EBD) programs. The project employed a questionnaire that was distributed to elementary level teachers (EBD) to: (a) determine the proportion of …

  6. [Rheumatoid factor activity as a disturbing factor in the serological diagnosis of specific IgM antibodies].

    PubMed

    Lindenschmidt, E G

    1984-04-01

    Rheumatoid factors (RF) are autoantibodies mainly directed against autologous IgG. They belong at most to the IgM class antibodies. It is demonstrated at groups with unsolved hepatitis B, rubella, syphilis and toxoplasmose infection that RF do occur not rarely at these patients even without rheumatoid arthritis. This is probably due to stimulation by antigen-IgG-complexes. During serologic detection of specific IgM antibodies they present an antigen independent mu-specificity. So the test for specific IgM might even loose its diagnostic and possibly therapy indicating value. It is shown how the disturbance by RF can be calculated after adsorption with aggregated IgG. Also RF can be titrated by an enzyme immunoassay (ELISA). With IgG coated latex particles RF can be eliminated prior to the IgM-test. Solid phase techniques which are applied with enzyme-coupled antigen instead of marked anti-IgM cannot be disturbed by RF significantly. PMID:6398795

  7. Impact of a breast cancer diagnosis on adult children's cognitive and emotional coherence.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, John P; Soliday, Elizabeth; Cole, Brenda; Dawson, Erica; Henderson, Brent N

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined whether adult children of recently diagnosed breast cancer patients experience heightened general and major stressor-related distress, and identified a potential mediator between these two forms of distress. Unique from other stress studies, the current study proposed a novel intrapsychic construct, the extent to which one understands and recognizes his or her thoughts and feelings related to a major stressor, for which we coined the term cognitive and emotional coherence. Albeit preliminary, findings supported study hypotheses and argue that this construct may represent an important mediator of distress as well as a pivotal target for psychosocial intervention. PMID:19197677

  8. Tailoring the delivery of cancer diagnosis to adolescent and young adult patients displaying strong emotions: An observational study of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Korsvold, Live; Lie, Hanne Cathrine; Mellblom, Anneli Viktoria; Ruud, Ellen; Loge, Jon Håvard; Finset, Arnstein

    2016-01-01

    Delivering the bad news of a cancer diagnosis to adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients who display strong emotions is particularly challenging not the least because AYAs are at a vulnerable developmental stage. Due to the lack of research on how to personalize the delivery of bad news to AYA patients’ emotions we report a case study of the communicative behavior of oncologists in two such consultations to describe the complexity of the phenomena at study. We audio-recorded and transcribed consultations where oncologists delivered cancer diagnoses to nine AYAs aged 12–25 years. Two of these patients displayed particularly strong emotional behavior (anger, fear, and sadness) and were chosen as cases. An interpretative analysis in three steps was applied to investigate the oncologists’ communicative behavior when delivering bad news. The focus was on how the oncologists responded to the strong but different emotional behaviors of the AYAs. We also related the oncologists’ communicative behavior to elements from a widely used protocol for delivering bad news. We found that the oncologists applied five communication strategies: elicit patient perspective, provide information, respond to patient's expression of emotion (acknowledging and containing emotions), encourage commitment to treatment, and provide hope. The findings illustrate how oncologists’ communicative behavior may be tailored to individual expressions of emotions in AYA cancer patients. PMID:27125477

  9. Tailoring the delivery of cancer diagnosis to adolescent and young adult patients displaying strong emotions: An observational study of two cases.

    PubMed

    Korsvold, Live; Lie, Hanne Cathrine; Mellblom, Anneli Viktoria; Ruud, Ellen; Loge, Jon Håvard; Finset, Arnstein

    2016-01-01

    Delivering the bad news of a cancer diagnosis to adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients who display strong emotions is particularly challenging not the least because AYAs are at a vulnerable developmental stage. Due to the lack of research on how to personalize the delivery of bad news to AYA patients' emotions we report a case study of the communicative behavior of oncologists in two such consultations to describe the complexity of the phenomena at study. We audio-recorded and transcribed consultations where oncologists delivered cancer diagnoses to nine AYAs aged 12-25 years. Two of these patients displayed particularly strong emotional behavior (anger, fear, and sadness) and were chosen as cases. An interpretative analysis in three steps was applied to investigate the oncologists' communicative behavior when delivering bad news. The focus was on how the oncologists responded to the strong but different emotional behaviors of the AYAs. We also related the oncologists' communicative behavior to elements from a widely used protocol for delivering bad news. We found that the oncologists applied five communication strategies: elicit patient perspective, provide information, respond to patient's expression of emotion (acknowledging and containing emotions), encourage commitment to treatment, and provide hope. The findings illustrate how oncologists' communicative behavior may be tailored to individual expressions of emotions in AYA cancer patients. PMID:27125477

  10. Sleep Disturbances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

    PubMed

    Robinson-Shelton, Althea; Malow, Beth A

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are extremely prevalent in children with neurodevelopmental disorders compared to typically developing children. The diagnostic criteria for many neurodevelopmental disorders include sleep disturbances. Sleep disturbance in this population is often multifactorial and caused by the interplay of genetic, neurobiological and environmental overlap. These disturbances often present either as insomnia or hypersomnia. Different sleep disorders present with these complaints and based on the clinical history and findings from diagnostic tests, an appropriate diagnosis can be made. This review aims to provide an overview of causes, diagnosis, and treatment of sleep disturbances in neurodevelopmental disorders that present primarily with symptoms of hypersomnia and/or insomnia. PMID:26719309

  11. A RESEARCH DEMONSTRATION TO ASSESS THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A SPECIAL LIVING UNIT WITHIN A UNIVERSITY DORMITORY SETTING FOR THE REHABILITATION OF STUDENTS DISABLED BY EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SINNETT, E. ROBERT

    USE OF A RESIDENCE HALL AS A THERAPEUTIC MILIEU FOR DISTURBED COLLEGE STUDENTS IS DESCRIBED IN THIS REPORT OF A RESEARCH AND DEMONSTRATION STUDY. THE EXPERIMENTAL GROUP CONSISTED OF TEN DISTURBED STUDENTS, AND A CONTROL GROUP WAS COMPOSED OF 10 VOLUNTEER STUDENTS. ALL STUDENTS PARTICIPATED IN THE REGULAR RESIDENCE HALL PROGRAMS (ORGANIZATIONAL…

  12. Morphing technique reveals intact perception of object motion and disturbed perception of emotional expressions by low-functioning adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Han, Bora; Tijus, Charles; Le Barillier, Florence; Nadel, Jacqueline

    2015-12-01

    A morphing procedure has been designed to compare directly the perception of emotional expressions and of moving objects. Morphing tasks were presented to 12 low-functioning teenagers with Autism Spectrum Disorder (LF ASD) compared to 12 developmental age-matched typical children and a group presenting ceiling performance. In a first study, when presented with morphed stimuli of objects and emotional faces, LF ASD showed an intact perception of object change of state together with an impaired perception of emotional facial change of state. In a second study, an eye-tracker recorded visual exploration of morphed emotional stimuli displayed by a human face and a robotic set-up. Facing the morphed robotic stimuli, LF ASD displayed equal duration of fixations toward emotional regions and toward mechanical sources of motion, while the typical groups tracked the emotional regions only. Altogether the findings of the two studies suggest that individuals with ASD process motion rather than emotional signals when facing facial expressions. PMID:26513740

  13. Depressive Symptoms, Emotion Dysregulation, and Bulimic Symptoms in Youth With Type 1 Diabetes: Varying Interactions at Diagnosis and During Transition to Insulin Pump Therapy.

    PubMed

    Young-Hyman, Deborah L; Peterson, Claire M; Fischer, Sarah; Markowitz, Jessica T; Muir, Andrew B; Laffel, Lori M

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the associations between depressive symptoms, emotion dysregulation and bulimic symptoms in youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the context of the diagnosis and treatment of T1D. Study participants were 103 youth in 2 distinct groups: newly diagnosed (New) or transitioning to pump therapy (continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion [CSII]; "Pump"), who completed questionnaires regarding symptoms of depression, emotion dysregulation, and bulimia. Glycemic control (A1c), height, weight, and questionnaires were evaluated within 10 days of diagnosis (n = 58) or at education/clinic visit before starting insulin utilizing CSII (n = 45). In the newly diagnosed group, only depression accounted for significant variance in bulimia scores (β = .47, P < .01). For the group with disease treatment experience (Pump), but not for the newly diagnosed group (New), greater depressive symptoms and emotion dysregulation were associated with greater bulimic symptoms. Depressive symptoms and emotion dysregulation, an indicator of poor coping/behavioral control, could help explain adoption of disordered eating behaviors in youth with T1D who are transitioning to pump therapy. PMID:27137457

  14. Risk for mania and positive emotional responding: too much of a good thing?

    PubMed

    Gruber, June; Johnson, Sheri L; Oveis, Christopher; Keltner, Dacher

    2008-02-01

    Although positive emotion research has begun to flourish, the extremes of positive emotion remain understudied. The present research used a multimethod approach to examine positive emotional disturbance by comparing participants at high and low risk for episodes of mania, which involves elevations in positive emotionality. Ninety participants were recruited into a high or low mania risk group according to responses on the Hypomanic Personality Scale. Participants' subjective, expressive, and physiological emotional responses were gathered while they watched two positive, two negative, and one neutral film clip. Results suggested that participants at high risk for mania reported elevated positive emotion and irritability and also exhibited elevated cardiac vagal tone across positive, negative, and neutral films. Discussion focuses on the implications these findings have for the diagnosis and prevention of bipolar disorder, as well as for the general study of positive emotion. PMID:18266513

  15. Risk for Mania and Positive Emotional Responding: Too Much of a Good Thing?

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, June; Oveis, Christopher; Keltner, Dacher; Johnson, Sheri L.

    2010-01-01

    Although positive emotion research has begun to flourish, the extremes of positive emotion remain understudied. The present research used a multimethod approach to examine positive emotional disturbance by comparing participants at high and low risk for episodes of mania, which involves elevations in positive emotionality. Ninety participants were recruited into a high or low mania risk group according to responses on the Hypomanic Personality Scale. Participants’ subjective, expressive, and physiological emotional responses were gathered while they watched two positive, two negative, and one neutral film clip. Results suggested that participants at high risk for mania reported elevated positive emotion and irritability and also exhibited elevated cardiac vagal tone across positive, negative, and neutral films. Discussion focuses on the implications these findings have for the diagnosis and prevention of bipolar disorder, as well as for the general study of positive emotion. PMID:18266513

  16. Parents of children with cancer: a longitudinal study of emotional distress, coping style, and marital adjustment two and twenty months after diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Dahlquist, L M; Czyzewski, D I; Jones, C L

    1996-08-01

    Evaluated emotional distress, coping style, and marital adjustment in 84 parents (42 couples) of children with cancer 2 months after diagnosis and again about 20 months after diagnosis. As expected, mothers' mean state anxiety and trait anxiety scores decreased to near normal levels over time. Fathers' scores were lower initially and did not change. Neither mothers' nor fathers' mean marital adjustment scores changed over time. Marital adjustment at treatment follow-up was predicted by depression and the spouse's marital satisfaction in mothers, and depression, child health status, and spouse's marital satisfaction in fathers. In contrast to findings obtained 2 months after diagnosis, coping style was not related to marital adjustment at follow-up. Results are discussed in terms of possible gender differences in the role of social support in marital adjustment and the stability versus situational specificity of coping styles. PMID:8863463

  17. Alternate Explanations for Learning Disabled, Emotionally Disturbed, and Educable Mentally Retarded Students' Reading Achievement. Research Report No. 10. Instructional Alternatives Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ysseldyke, James E.; And Others

    The study investigated alternative explanations for differences in reading achievement between pairs of handicapped students exhibiting comparable amounts of academic engaged time. Forty-six students in grades 2-4 from urban and suburban districts participated; 16 were classified as learning disabled (LD), 14 as emotionally/behaviorally disturbed…

  18. Alternate Explanations for Learning Disabled, Emotionally Disturbed, and Educable Mentally Retarded Students' Math Achievement. Research Report No. 11. Instructional Alternatives Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ysseldyke, James E.; And Others

    The study investigated alternative explanations for differences in mathematics achievement between pairs of handicapped students exhibiting comparable amounts of academic engaged time. Forty-two students in grades 2-4 from urban and suburban districts participated; 14 students were classified as learning disabled, 14 as emotionally or behaviorally…

  19. The Multnomah County CAPS Project: An Effort To Coordinate Service Delivery for Children and Youth Considered Seriously Emotionally Disturbed. A Process Evaluation. Therapeutic Case Advocacy Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, James L.; And Others

    This report is a case study on the process of developing interagency collaboration on behalf of emotionally handicapped children and their families. Based on a process evaluation conducted for the Multnomah (Portland, Oregon) Board of County Commissioners, the case study examines a therapeutic case advocacy project which sought to promote greater…

  20. Designing and Implementing a Comprehensive System of Education and Support for Children and Youth with Serious Emotional Disturbance. Fiscal Year 1994. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linn-Benton Education Services District, Albany, OR.

    This report describes achievements of a Linn County (Oregon) project to design, implement, and evaluate a county-wide comprehensive interagency model for achieving improved outcomes for children with or at risk of developing emotional/behavioral disabilities. The project stressed systems change, driven by full parent participation and interagency…

  1. An Innovative Graduate Teacher Training Program in the Area of Emotionally Disturbed Pupils (The American University - District of Columbia Community Mental Health Program).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Mental Health Administration, Washington, DC.

    This program represents a combined effort of American University's Department of Education and the District of Columbia's Department of Human Resources and Department of Special Education. The program seeks to re-educate 40 seriously disturbed inner-city pupils, train graduate students as resource teachers in special education, and provide…

  2. Changes in Mothers' Experiences of Receiving an Autism Diagnosis: A Contextualized Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornstein, Shana

    2011-01-01

    Autism has a unique history. The definition has broadened and changed over time, from an emotional disturbance with psychogenic origins to a neurodevelopmental disability with suspected environmental and genetic origins. Diagnosis occurs later than children born with obvious disabilities such as cerebral palsy or Down syndrome, but earlier than…

  3. Neurophysiologic Correlates of Post-stroke Mood and Emotional Control

    PubMed Central

    Doruk, Deniz; Simis, Marcel; Imamura, Marta; Brunoni, André R.; Morales-Quezada, Leon; Anghinah, Renato; Fregni, Felipe; Battistella, Linamara R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Emotional disturbance is a common complication of stroke significantly affecting functional recovery and quality of life. Identifying relevant neurophysiologic markers associated with post-stroke emotional disturbance may lead to a better understanding of this disabling condition, guiding the diagnosis, development of new interventions and the assessments of treatment response. Methods: Thirty-five subjects with chronic stroke were enrolled in this study. The emotion sub-domain of Stroke Impact Scale (SIS-Emotion) was used to assess post-stroke mood and emotional control. The relation between SIS-Emotion and neurophysiologic measures was assessed by using covariance mapping and univariate linear regression. Multivariate analyses were conducted to identify and adjust for potential confounders. Neurophysiologic measures included power asymmetry and coherence assessed by electroencephalography (EEG); and motor threshold, intracortical inhibition (ICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) measured by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Results: Lower scores on SIS-Emotion was associated with (1) frontal EEG power asymmetry in alpha and beta bands, (2) central EEG power asymmetry in alpha and theta bands, and (3) lower inter-hemispheric coherence over frontal and central areas in alpha band. SIS-Emotion also correlated with higher ICF and MT in the unlesioned hemisphere as measured by TMS. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study using EEG and TMS to index neurophysiologic changes associated with post-stroke mood and emotional control. Our results suggest that inter-hemispheric imbalance measured by EEG power and coherence, as well as an increased ICF in the unlesioned hemisphere measured by TMS might be relevant markers associated with post-stroke mood and emotional control which can guide future studies investigating new diagnostic and treatment modalities in stroke rehabilitation. PMID:27625600

  4. The Disturbing Child: A Validation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algozzine, Bob

    Two versions of the Disturbing Behavior Checklist (DBC), an indicator of the relative disturbingness of behaviors characteristic of mildly handicapped (emotionally disturbed and learning disabled) students were field tested with 250 and 150 university students, teachers, supervisors, and school psychologists. Both checklists were relatively…

  5. Emotional dysfunctions in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Leonie A K; Radke, Sina; Morawetz, Carmen; Derntl, Birgit

    2016-06-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized primarily by motor signs but are also accompanied by emotional disturbances. Because of the limited knowledge about these dysfunctions, this Review provides an overview of emotional competencies in Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and multiple sclerosis (MS), with a focus on emotion recognition, emotion regulation, and depression. Most studies indicate facial emotion recognition deficits in HD and PD, whereas data for MS are inconsistent. On a neural level, dysfunctions of amygdala and striatum, among others, have been linked to these impairments. These dysfunctions also tap brain regions that are part of the emotion regulation network, suggesting problems in this competency, too. Research points to dysfunctional emotion regulation in MS, whereas findings for PD and HD are missing. The high prevalence of depression in all three disorders emphasizes the need for effective therapies. Research on emotional disturbances might improve treatment, thereby increasing patients' and caregivers' well-being. PMID:26011035

  6. Children and Youth in Behavioural and Emotional Difficulties, Skyrocketing Diagnosis and Inclusion/Exclusion Processes in School Tendencies in Denmark

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langager, Søren

    2014-01-01

    In parallel with a national school policy on an inclusive school with a marked reduction in the number of pupils who, due to their disruptive behaviour, are referred to educational provisions outside of the ordinary school environment, a sharp rise has been seen in the number of children and teenagers who are given a clinical diagnosis, first and…

  7. Identification of Youngsters with Emotional Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carl R.

    A clarification of the identification process for emotionally disturbed children is presented. Traditional definitions of emotional disturbance (ED) are explored and four behavioral clusters within traditional definitions are presented. The four are withdrawal from social interaction (autism), unsatisfactory interpersonal relationships,…

  8. Altered Brain Activation during Emotional Face Processing in Relation to Both Diagnosis and Polygenic Risk of Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tesli, Martin; Kauppi, Karolina; Bettella, Francesco; Brandt, Christine Lycke; Kaufmann, Tobias; Espeseth, Thomas; Mattingsdal, Morten; Agartz, Ingrid; Melle, Ingrid; Djurovic, Srdjan; Westlye, Lars T.; Andreassen, Ole A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Bipolar disorder (BD) is a highly heritable disorder with polygenic inheritance. Among the most consistent findings from functional magnetic imaging (fMRI) studies are limbic hyperactivation and dorsal hypoactivation. However, the relation between reported brain functional abnormalities and underlying genetic risk remains elusive. This is the first cross-sectional study applying a whole-brain explorative approach to investigate potential influence of BD case-control status and polygenic risk on brain activation. Methods A BD polygenic risk score (PGRS) was estimated from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium BD case-control study, and assigned to each individual in our independent sample (N=85 BD cases and 121 healthy controls (HC)), all of whom participated in an fMRI emotional faces matching paradigm. Potential differences in BOLD response across diagnostic groups were explored at whole-brain level in addition to amygdala as a region of interest. Putative effects of BD PGRS on brain activation were also investigated. Results At whole-brain level, BD cases presented with significantly lower cuneus/precuneus activation than HC during negative face processing (Z-threshold=2.3 as cluster-level correction). The PGRS was associated positively with increased right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG) activation during negative face processing. For amygdala activation, there were no correlations with diagnostic status or PGRS. Conclusions These findings are in line with previous reports of reduced precuneus and altered rIFG activation in BD. While these results demonstrate the ability of PGRS to reveal underlying genetic risk of altered brain activation in BD, the lack of convergence of effects at diagnostic and PGRS level suggests that this relation is a complex one. PMID:26222050

  9. Association between Genetic Variation in the Oxytocin Receptor Gene and Emotional Withdrawal, but not between Oxytocin Pathway Genes and Diagnosis in Psychotic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Haram, Marit; Tesli, Martin; Bettella, Francesco; Djurovic, Srdjan; Andreassen, Ole Andreas; Melle, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Social dysfunction is common in patients with psychotic disorders. Oxytocin is a neuropeptide with a central role in social behavior. This study aims to explore the relationship between oxytocin pathway genes and symptoms related to social dysfunction in patients with psychotic disorders. We performed association analyses between four oxytocin pathway genes (OXT, OXTR, AVP, and CD38) and four areas of social behavior-related psychopathology as measured by Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. For this purpose, we used both a polygenic risk score (PGRS) and single OXTR candidate single nucleotide polymorphism previously reported in the literature (rs53576, rs237902, and rs2254298). A total of 734 subjects with DSM-IV psychotic spectrum disorders and 420 healthy controls were included. Oxytocin pathway PGRSs were calculated based on the independent Psychiatric Genomics Consortium study sample. There was a significant association between symptom of Emotional Withdrawal and the previously reported OXTR risk allele A in rs53576. No significant associations between oxytocin pathway gene variants and a diagnosis of psychotic disorder were found. Our findings indicate that while oxytocin pathway genes do not appear to contribute to the susceptibility to psychotic disorders, variations in the OXTR gene might play a role in the development of impaired social behavior. PMID:25667571

  10. Disturbed Sleep and Postpartum Depression.

    PubMed

    Okun, Michele L

    2016-07-01

    The perinatal period introduces a myriad of changes. One important but often overlooked change is an increased reporting of sleep disturbance. Although casually regarded as a consequence of pregnancy or postpartum, there is emerging evidence implicating significant sleep disturbance, characterized by insomnia symptoms and/or poor sleep quality, with adverse outcomes, such as an increase in depressive symptomatology or the development postpartum depression (PPD). Significant consequences may arise as a result including issues with maternal-infant bonding, effective care for the infant, and behavioral or emotional difficulties in the infant. This review discusses the relevant literature as to how disturbed sleep during pregnancy as well as in the postpartum may increase the risk for PPD. PMID:27222140

  11. Emotional Disturbance and Chronic Low Back Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCreary, Charles P.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Patients high in alientation and distrust may be poor compliers. Because only the somatic concern dimension predicted outcome, a single scale that measures this characteristic may be sufficient for effective identification of the potential good v poor responders to conservative treatment of low back pain. (Author)

  12. Rational-Emotive Assessment of School-Aged Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiGiuseppe, Raymond

    1990-01-01

    Focuses on assessment of emotions and irrational beliefs in Rational-Emotive Therapy with school-aged children. Argues that, for children to understand and agree to process of disputing irrational beliefs, practitioner first assesses individual child's emotional vocabulary, his/her understanding of relationship between disturbed emotion and…

  13. Psychopharmacology with the Behaviorally Disturbed: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClain, William A.; Jerman, George

    Reviewed on a layman's level was research on psychopharmacology with the emotionally and behaviorally disturbed. General conclusions drawn from the man y studies were that the effect of drugs on intellectual functioning had not been determined and that there was little evidence to indicate that the learning process was consistently and reliably…

  14. Service Needs of Severely Disturbed Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trupin, Eric W.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Investigates the service needs of severely emotionally disturbed children. Primary case workers of 3,398 children and adolescents under state care were surveyed regarding the children's treatment history and social and clinical conditions. Nontraditional home- and school-based services were the needs most frequently reported. (CJS)

  15. Psychosomatic disturbances and cosmetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Harth, Wolfgang; Hermes, Barbara

    2007-09-01

    Medical activity in recent years has experienced a marked expansion of possibilities for aesthetic surgery, usually requested by patients. Especially in dermatology, an increasing demand for and use of doctor/medical services by healthy individuals has resulted in a drastic change to cosmetic dermatology. The request for cosmetic surgery is emotionally or psychosocially motivated. Patients with psychological disturbances sometimes push aside possible risks and complications or deny side effects and interactions of the procedures. Subjective impairments of appearance, feelings of inferiority and social pho-bias may be in the background of somatizing disorders. These emotional disorders, such as body dysmorphic disorder, personality disorder or polysurgical addiction, often remain undiscovered but should be excluded in any patient receiving cosmetic procedures. PMID:17760893

  16. Assessing and Managing Sleep Disturbance in Patients with Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Cheatle, Martin D; Foster, Simmie; Pinkett, Aaron; Lesneski, Matthew; Qu, David; Dhingra, Lara

    2016-06-01

    Chronic pain is associated with symptoms that may impair a patient's quality of life, including emotional distress, fatigue, and sleep disturbance. There is a high prevalence of concomitant pain and sleep disturbance. Studies support the hypothesis that sleep and pain have a bidirectional and reciprocal relationship. Clinicians who manage patients with chronic pain often focus on interventions that relieve pain, and assessing and treating sleep disturbance are secondary or not addressed. This article reviews the literature on pain and co-occurring sleep disturbance, describes the assessment of sleep disturbance, and outlines nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatment strategies to improve sleep in patients with chronic pain. PMID:27208716

  17. Evolution, Emotions, and Emotional Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesse, Randolph M.; Ellsworth, Phoebe C.

    2009-01-01

    Emotions research is now routinely grounded in evolution, but explicit evolutionary analyses of emotions remain rare. This article considers the implications of natural selection for several classic questions about emotions and emotional disorders. Emotions are special modes of operation shaped by natural selection. They adjust multiple response…

  18. [Climacteric disturbances. 2. Therapy of climacteric disturbances].

    PubMed

    Döring, G K

    1976-07-01

    After defining the terms climacterium and menopause the causes of climacteric disturbances are explained. During the premenopausal stage disturbances of the cycle are prevailing, caused by an insufficiency of the corpus luteum. Of climacteric disturbances should be spoken only after menopause. They are divided into: vegetative disturbances, troubles of metabolism, cardiovascular dysregulation, psychic deviations, sexual troubles and changes of the skin. The therapy of disturbances during the premenopausal stage mainly consists of the substitution of progesterone or in a cycle-like estrogen-progesterone-therapy. In the premenopausal stage estrogens are the therapy of choice. Among orally efficient estrogens the conjugated estrogen and the estradiol-valerianat are preferred. Side-effects and contraindications are discussed in detail. Among gynecologists there exists no disagreement about the necessity of therapy of serious climacteric disturbances, the opinions about prophylactic estrogen-therapy in women differ. PMID:184019

  19. Developing Art Experiences for the Emotionally Handicapped Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Div. for Handicapped Children.

    Presented are the proceedings of a special study institute for educators on the development of art experiences with emotionally disturbed children. The planning committee, institute faculty, program agenda, and participants are listed. Puppet presentations by emotionally disturbed children are reported to have opened the institute. Institute…

  20. Positive Peer Culture -- An Alternative Treatment for the Disturbed and/or Disturbing Adolescent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lybarger, William A.

    Reviewed are literature and research on the use of the positive peer culture (PPC) approach with socially maladjusted and/or emotionally disturbed adolescents. Studies presented focus on the effects of PPC on inappropriate behavior and parole performance. Findings are noted to be inconclusive. (SB)

  1. [What is an emotion? An introduction to the study of emotions].

    PubMed

    Derouesné, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Human emotions are hypothetic constructs based on psychological and physiological data. According to the psychoevolutionnist theories, all emotions derive from a set of discrete basic emotions, common to human and animals, genetically determined. Basic emotions are thus considered as physiological processes based on specific neuronal circuits. On the contrary, for appraisal and social theories, emotions are psychological processes resulting from the cognitive appraisal of the stimulus-event for the well-being and objectives of the subject, and are of social origin. They develop during life, especially in childhood, from interactions between the individual and his environement. According to the appraisal or constructivist theories, no sharp distinction is to be made between emotions and other manifestations of the affective life. Emotions require the global functioning of the brain, even if more specialized regions are involved. They play a fundamental role in the development of the child's psychological and social life. They mediate the subject's response to the stimulus-event, allowing more appropriate reactions than fixed instinctive ones. Nevertheless, the adaptative function of every emotion or their every component can be questioned. Emotional disturbances are major consequences of psychiatric or neurological disorders. The link between the results of neuropsychological studies of emotions based on the recognition of emotional facal expression according to the basic emotion theory, and the emotional disturbances experienced in daily life is highly questionable on account of the high complexity of human affective life. PMID:21586380

  2. Identification of Emotionally Disabled Pupils: Data and Decision Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carl R.; Grimes, Jeff

    Designed as a resource for professionals involved in the identification of children with emotional disabilities, the document is a compilation of 10 papers presented at a workshop on the topic. "Identification of Emotionally Disabled Pupils--An Overview" by C. Smith provides a definition of emotionally disturbed students. "Setting Analysis Data in…

  3. Alleviating Communication Apprehension through Rational Emotive Therapy: A Comparative Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Arden K.; Dodd, Carley H.

    Albert Ellis's Rational Emotive Therapy (RET), which assumes that a person can change an emotional disturbance by discovering and disputing the irrational ideas giving rise to that emotion, has been used effectively in treating public speaking anxiety. To compare RET with other treatments for communication apprehension, 52 high communication…

  4. Emotion Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiberg, Daniel; Elenius, Kjell; Burger, Susanne

    Studies of expressive speech have shown that discrete emotions such as anger, fear, joy, and sadness can be accurately communicated, also cross-culturally, and that each emotion is associated with reasonably specific acoustic characteristics [8]. However, most previous research has been conducted on acted emotions. These certainly have something in common with naturally occurring emotions but may also be more intense and prototypical than authentic, everyday expressions [6, 13]. Authentic emotions are, on the other hand, often a combination of different affective states and occur rather infrequently in everyday life.

  5. Sleep and Emotional Memory Processing

    PubMed Central

    van der Helm, Els; Walker, Matthew P.

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive neuroscience continues to build meaningful connections between affective behavior and human brain function. Within the biological sciences, a similar renaissance has taken place, focusing on the role of sleep in various neurocognitive processes, and most recently, the interaction between sleep and emotional regulation. In this article, we survey an array of diverse findings across basic and clinical research domains, resulting in a convergent view of sleep-dependent emotional brain processing. Based on the unique neurobiology of sleep, we outline a model describing the overnight modulation of affective neural systems and the (re)processing of recent emotional experiences, both of which appear to redress the appropriate next-day reactivity of limbic and associated autonomic networks. Furthermore, a REM sleep hypothesis of emotional-memory processing is proposed, the implications of which may provide brain-based insights into the association between sleep abnormalities and the initiation and maintenance of mood disturbances. PMID:25285060

  6. Sleep disturbance in Mowat-Wilson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Evans, Elizabeth; Mowat, David; Wilson, Meredith; Einfeld, Stewart

    2016-03-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS) is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome caused by a heterozygous mutation or deletion of the ZEB2 gene. It is characterized by a distinctive facial appearance in association with intellectual disability (ID) and variable other features including agenesis of the corpus callosum, seizures, congenital heart defects, microcephaly, short stature, hypotonia, and Hirschsprung disease. The current study investigated sleep disturbance in people with MWS. In a series of unstructured interviews focused on development and behaviors in MWS, family members frequently reported sleep disturbance, particularly early-morning waking and frequent night waking. The Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children (SDSC) was therefore administered to a sample of 35 individuals with MWS, along with the Developmental Behaviour Checklist (DBC) to measure behavioral and emotional disturbance. A high level of sleep disturbance was found in the MWS sample, with 53% scoring in the borderline range and 44% in the clinical disorder range for at least one subscale of the SDSC. Scores were highest for the Sleep-wake transition disorders subscale, with 91% of participants reaching at least the borderline disorder range. A significant positive association was found between total scores on the SDSC and the DBC Total Behaviour Problem Score. These results suggest that sleep disorders should be screened for in people with MWS, and where appropriate, referrals to sleep specialists made for management of sleep problems. PMID:26686679

  7. Plasma Levels of Folates, Riboflavin, Vitamin B6, and Ascorbate in Severely Disturbed Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sankar, D. V. Siva

    1979-01-01

    The plasma levels of folic acid, ascorbic acid, pyridoxine, and riboflavin were studied in 125 severely emotionally disturbed children (ages 5-16 years) to determine whether they had overt vitamin deficiencies. (Author/DLS)

  8. Stonewalling Emotion.

    PubMed

    Liao, Lih-Mei

    2015-01-01

    This commentary is an exploration of emotion by a therapist. It focuses on how emotion is managed in the stories of growing up and living with atypical sex anatomies--how (much) is emotion (not) discussed, and what are the effects of forestalling emotive dialogue. Emotion care in the narratives is often sidelined in favor of medical doings. Rather than creating a haven to keep normative pressures at bay, so as to enable the affected parents, adolecents and adults to process their situations, some of the storytellers reveal how medicine has concentrated its efforts on the erasure and silencing of their bodily differences. The most frequently mentioned emotion management strategy is 'stonewalling', as some of the affected children and adults were silently left to take in what was reflected in the eyes of the large number of people inspecting their naked bodies. Emotional suffering continued for many years for some individuals. An apology might ease suffering but is rarely bestowed. Learning to become more comfortable with emotion may open up more possibilities for helpful conversations between care users and providers and within families. Feelings of joy became more available to the storytellers who as adults learned to embrace their differences and connected with like-minded people. PMID:26300147

  9. Acute Symptomatic Seizures Caused by Electrolyte Disturbances.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    In this narrative review we focus on acute symptomatic seizures occurring in subjects with electrolyte disturbances. Quite surprisingly, despite its clinical relevance, this issue has received very little attention in the scientific literature. Electrolyte abnormalities are commonly encountered in clinical daily practice, and their diagnosis relies on routine laboratory findings. Acute and severe electrolyte imbalances can manifest with seizures, which may be the sole presenting symptom. Seizures are more frequently observed in patients with sodium disorders (especially hyponatremia), hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia. They do not entail a diagnosis of epilepsy, but are classified as acute symptomatic seizures. EEG has little specificity in differentiating between various electrolyte disturbances. The prominent EEG feature is slowing of the normal background activity, although other EEG findings, including various epileptiform abnormalities may occur. An accurate and prompt diagnosis should be established for a successful management of seizures, as rapid identification and correction of the underlying electrolyte disturbance (rather than an antiepileptic treatment) are of crucial importance in the control of seizures and prevention of permanent brain damage. PMID:26754778

  10. Acute Symptomatic Seizures Caused by Electrolyte Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Nardone, Raffaele; Brigo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In this narrative review we focus on acute symptomatic seizures occurring in subjects with electrolyte disturbances. Quite surprisingly, despite its clinical relevance, this issue has received very little attention in the scientific literature. Electrolyte abnormalities are commonly encountered in clinical daily practice, and their diagnosis relies on routine laboratory findings. Acute and severe electrolyte imbalances can manifest with seizures, which may be the sole presenting symptom. Seizures are more frequently observed in patients with sodium disorders (especially hyponatremia), hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia. They do not entail a diagnosis of epilepsy, but are classified as acute symptomatic seizures. EEG has little specificity in differentiating between various electrolyte disturbances. The prominent EEG feature is slowing of the normal background activity, although other EEG findings, including various epileptiform abnormalities may occur. An accurate and prompt diagnosis should be established for a successful management of seizures, as rapid identification and correction of the underlying electrolyte disturbance (rather than an antiepileptic treatment) are of crucial importance in the control of seizures and prevention of permanent brain damage. PMID:26754778

  11. Identity disturbance in distant patients.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Irwin

    2013-04-01

    Chronically distant, emotionally isolated patients often present with identity disturbance. Identity, it is argued, develops as a thematic pattern of narcissism, shaped by the nature of the mother's early libidinal influences on the child's sense of self. Identity provides a form of self-definition that addresses the question, Who am I? In the treatment of these patients, resistances to narcissistic vulnerabilities (narcissistic resistances) provide an illusory sense of security and induce the analyst to avoid attention to a central pathological problem: primitive and frightening needs for, and unconscious fantasies of, dependence on, and functionality for, another. Patients' avoidance of material and therapeutic interactions that deal with their dependencies are aspects of a tacit contract with the analyst to foreclose examination of their considerable problems with inner stability. Among these problems are anxieties regarding intrusion and loss of separateness. As analysis proceeds, elements of such a patient's identity become clarified and are used to understand and organize the material for both analyst and patient. This can allow the patient to articulate a more embodied and vital experience of individuality. A case is presented to illustrate the analysis of a patient using this approach. PMID:23526544

  12. Experiencing Emotions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    1996-01-01

    Suggests activities for elementary school students that focus on their emotions. Provides a list of picture books that deal with the following: general feelings, anger, embarrassment, fear/anxiety, happiness, hate, jealousy, loneliness, love, pride, and sadness. (AEF)

  13. Physiological and self-assessed emotional responses to emotion-eliciting films in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Elices, Matilde; Soler, Joaquim; Fernández, Cristina; Martín-Blanco, Ana; Jesús Portella, María; Pérez, Víctor; Alvarez, Enrique; Carlos Pascual, Juan

    2012-12-30

    According to Linehan's biosocial model, the core characteristic of borderline personality disorder (BPD) is emotional dysregulation. In the present study, we investigated two components of this model: baseline emotional intensity and emotional reactivity. A total of 60 women, 30 with BPD diagnosis and 30 age and sex-matched healthy subjects (HCs), participated in two experiments. In the first experiment, we evaluated emotional responses to six films designed to elicit discrete emotions (anger, fear, sadness, disgust, amusement and neutral). The second experiment evaluated emotional reactions to three emotion-eliciting films containing BPD-specific content (sexual abuse, emotional dependence and abandonment/separation). Skin conductance level, heart rate, and subjective emotional response were recorded for each film. Although self-reported data indicated that negative emotions at baseline were stronger in the BPD group, physiological measures showed no differences between the groups. Physiological results should be interpreted with caution since most BPD participants were under pharmacological treatment. BPD subjects presented no subjective heightened reactivity to most of the discrete emotion-eliciting films. Subjective responses to amusement and "BPD-specific content" films revealed significant between-group differences. These findings suggest that the main characteristic of BPD might be negative emotional intensity rather than heightened emotional reactivity. PMID:22884218

  14. Preparation of Teachers of Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders. Retrospective Series on Critical Issues in Emotional/Behavioral Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Lyndal M., Ed.; Gable, Robert A., Ed.; Rutherford, Robert B., Jr., Ed.

    The third in a series, this collection of previously published monographs examines the challenges of preparing teachers to work with students who have emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). Monographs include: (1) "Issues in Training Teachers for the Seriously Emotionally Disturbed" (Frank H. Wood), which discusses preparing regular and special…

  15. On Chu's disturbance energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph George, K.; Sujith, R. I.

    2011-10-01

    Chu [On the energy transfer to small disturbances in fluid flow (part I), Acta Mechanica 1 (1965) 215-234] proposed a positive definite energy norm for characterizing the level of fluctuation in a disturbance. In the absence of heat transfer at the boundaries, work done by boundary or body forces, heat and material sources of energy, this norm is a monotone, non-increasing function of time. In this paper, we show that Chu's disturbance energy defines an inner product, with respect to which the conservation equations of fluid motion linearized about a uniform base flow are self-adjoint. This ensures that the eigenvectors of the linearized operator are orthogonal to each other, and the property that the energy norm is a non-increasing function of time in the absence of physical sources of energy follows as an immediate consequence. Examples from numerical simulations of Euler equations are presented to highlight the importance of choosing an energy norm that is consistent with the underlying physics. We demonstrate that the disturbance energy as measured by Chu's norm does not exhibit spurious transient growth in the absence of physical sources of energy and hence is suitable for analyzing thermoacoustic instability.

  16. Facial, vocal and musical emotion recognition is altered in paranoid schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Weisgerber, Anne; Vermeulen, Nicolas; Peretz, Isabelle; Samson, Séverine; Philippot, Pierre; Maurage, Pierre; De Graeuwe D'Aoust, Catherine; De Jaegere, Aline; Delatte, Benoît; Gillain, Benoît; De Longueville, Xavier; Constant, Eric

    2015-09-30

    Disturbed processing of emotional faces and voices is typically observed in schizophrenia. This deficit leads to impaired social cognition and interactions. In this study, we investigated whether impaired processing of emotions also affects musical stimuli, which are widely present in daily life and known for their emotional impact. Thirty schizophrenic patients and 30 matched healthy controls evaluated the emotional content of musical, vocal and facial stimuli. Schizophrenic patients are less accurate than healthy controls in recognizing emotion in music, voices and faces. Our results confirm impaired recognition of emotion in voice and face stimuli in schizophrenic patients and extend this observation to the recognition of emotion in musical stimuli. PMID:26210647

  17. Development, Reliability, and Construct Validity of the Emotional and Behavioral Screener

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullinan, Douglas; Epstein, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the Emotional and Behavioral Screener, a brief universal screening procedure designed to help identify students whose emotional and behavioral functioning puts them at risk for future serious problems, including identification in the emotional disturbance category. Development of the screener drew on items and normative…

  18. English Language Learners and Emotional Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers-Adkinson, Diana L.; Ochoa, Theresa A.; Weiss, Stacy L.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter provides the reader with a framework for understanding the needs of students that have concurrent needs as English Language Learners and Emotionally Behavioral Disturbed. Issues related to effective assessment practices, service delivery, and appropriate intervention are discussed. (Contains 1 table.) [For complete volume, see…

  19. Waveguide disturbance detection method

    DOEpatents

    Korneev, Valeri A.; Nihei, Kurt T.; Myer, Larry R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for detection of a disturbance in a waveguide comprising transmitting a wavefield having symmetric and antisymmetric components from a horizontally and/or vertically polarized source and/or pressure source disposed symmetrically with respect to the longitudinal central axis of the waveguide at one end of the waveguide, recording the horizontal and/or vertical component or a pressure of the wavefield with a vertical array of receivers disposed at the opposite end of the waveguide, separating the wavenumber transform of the wavefield into the symmetric and antisymmetric components, integrating the symmetric and antisymmetric components over a broad frequency range, and comparing the magnitude of the symmetric components and the antisymmetric components to an expected magnitude for the symmetric components and the antisymmetric components for a waveguide of uniform thickness and properties thereby determining whether or not a disturbance is present inside the waveguide.

  20. 300 Area Disturbance Report

    SciTech Connect

    LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

    1999-01-07

    The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic black

  1. Approach to the elderly patient with gait disturbance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary The prevalence of gait disturbances and falls increases dramatically with age, but these problems are not universal in the elderly. They should trigger a systematic search for underlying disease states, many of which can be treated medically or surgically, or significantly ameliorated through provision of physical therapy focused on gait training and aids to ambulation, removal of safety hazards in the environment, and the elimination of polypharmacy. While cardiovascular, orthopedic, and rheumatologic diseases account for the majority of gait disturbances in the elderly, the aim here is to outline an approach to the diagnosis and treatment of a broad array of neurologic conditions causing gait disturbance in the elderly. PMID:23634361

  2. Adaptation to (non)valent task disturbance.

    PubMed

    Kunde, Wilfried; Augst, Susanne; Kleinsorge, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    The cognitive system adapts to disturbances caused by task-irrelevant information. For example, interference due to irrelevant spatial stimulation (e.g., the spatial Simon effect) typically diminishes right after a spatially incongruent event. These adaptation effects reflect processes that help to overcome the impact of task-irrelevant information. Interference with (or interruption of) task processing can also result from valent (i.e., positive or negative) stimuli, such as in the "affective Simon" task. In the present study, we tested whether the resolution of valence-based task disturbances generalizes to the resolution of other cognitive (spatial) types of interference, and vice versa. Experiments 1 and 2 explored the interplay of adaptation effects triggered by spatial and affective interference. Incongruent spatial information modified the spatial Simon effect but not affective interference effects, whereas incongruent affective information modified affective interference effects to some extent, but not spatial Simon effects. In Experiment 3, we investigated the interplay of adaptation effects triggered by spatial interference and by the interruption of task processing from valent information that did not overlap with the main task ("emotional Stroop" effect). Again we observed domain-specific adaptation for the spatial Simon effect but found no evidence for cross-domain modulations. We assume that the processes used to resolve task disturbance from irrelevant affective and spatial information operate in largely independent manners. PMID:22936069

  3. Transformations of emotional experience.

    PubMed

    de Cortiñas, Lia Pistiner

    2013-06-01

    In this paper the author approaches mental pain and the problems in a psychoanalytic treatment of patients with difficulties in the psychic transformation of their emotional experiences. The author is interested in the symbolic failure related to the obstruction of development of phantasies, dreams, dream-thoughts, etc. She differentiates symbolization disturbances related to hypertrophic projective identification from a detention of these primitive communications and emotional isolation. She puts forward the conjecture that one factor in the arrest of this development is the detention of projective identifications and that, when this primitive means of communication is re-established in a container-contained relationship of mutual benefit, this initiates the development of a symbolization process that can replace the pathological 'protection'. Another hypothesis she develops is that of inaccessible caesuras that, associated with the detention of projective identification, obstruct any integrative or interactive movement. This caesura and the detention of projective identifications affect mental functions needed for dealing with mental pain. The personality is left with precarious mental equipment for transforming emotional experiences. How can a psychoanalytical process stimulate the development of creative symbolization, transforming the emotional experiences and leading towards mental growth? The author approaches the clinical problem with the metaphor of the psychic birth of emotional experience. The modulation of mental pain in a container-contained relationship is a central problem for the development of the human mind. For discovering and giving a meaning to emotional experience, the infant depends on reverie, a function necessary in order to develop an evolved consciousness capable of being aware, which is different from the rudimentary consciousness that perceives but does not understand. The development of mature mental equipment is associated with the

  4. Atmospheric Disturbance Environment Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tank, William G.

    1994-01-01

    Traditionally, the application of atmospheric disturbance data to airplane design problems has been the domain of the structures engineer. The primary concern in this case is the design of structural components sufficient to handle transient loads induced by the most severe atmospheric "gusts" that might be encountered. The concern has resulted in a considerable body of high altitude gust acceleration data obtained with VGH recorders (airplane velocity, V, vertical acceleration, G, altitude, H) on high-flying airplanes like the U-2 (Ehernberger and Love, 1975). However, the propulsion system designer is less concerned with the accelerations of the airplane than he is with the airflow entering the system's inlet. When the airplane encounters atmospheric turbulence it responds with transient fluctuations in pitch, yaw, and roll angles. These transients, together with fluctuations in the free-stream temperature and pressure will disrupt the total pressure, temperature, Mach number and angularity of the inlet flow. For the mixed compression inlet, the result is a disturbed throat Mach number and/or shock position, and in extreme cases an inlet unstart can occur (cf. Section 2.1). Interest in the effects of inlet unstart on the vehicle dynamics of large, supersonic airplanes is not new. Results published by NASA in 1962 of wind tunnel studies of the problem were used in support of the United States Supersonic Transport program (SST) (White, at aI, 1963). Such studies continued into the late 1970's. However, in spite of such interest, there never was developed an atmospheric disturbance database for inlet unstart analysis to compare with that available for the structures load analysis. Missing were data for the free-stream temperature and pressure disturbances that also contribute to the unStart problem.

  5. Emotion Talk: Helping Caregivers Facilitate Emotion Understanding and Emotion Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinton, Bonnie; Fujiki, Martin

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on two aspects of emotional intelligence, emotion understanding and emotion regulation. These abilities are important because of their impact on social communication and the way in which they influence a child's access to knowledge. Caregivers who engage their children in emotion talk may strengthen the ability of their…

  6. Parkinson's disease and sleep/wake disturbances.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-03-01

    Sleep disturbances are a common non-motor feature in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Early diagnosis and appropriate management are imperative for enhancing patient quality of life. Sleep disturbances can be caused by multiple factors in addition to age-related changes in sleep, such as nocturnal motor symptoms (rigidity, resting tremor, akinesia, tardive dyskinesia, and the "wearing off" phenomenon), non-motor symptoms (pain, hallucination, and psychosis), nocturia, and medication. Disease-related pathology involving the brainstem and changes in the neurotransmitter systems (norepinephrine, serotonin, and acetylcholine) responsible for regulating sleep structure and the sleep/wake cycle play a role in emerging excessive daytime sleepiness and sleep disturbances. Additionally, screening for sleep apnea syndrome, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, and restless legs syndrome is clinically important. Questionnaire-based assessment utilizing the PD Sleep Scale-2 is useful for screening PD-related nocturnal symptoms. In this review, we focus on the current understanding and management of sleep disturbances in PD. PMID:25687697

  7. Vehicle Disturbance Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, Brian

    2001-07-01

    The Vehicle Disturbance Test {VDT} is used to characterize uncompensated environmental disturbances acting upon the HST during normal operation. The VDT is a passive test {not a forced-response test} used to obtain signatures for both externally induced {e.g. SA-3} and internally induced {e.g. NCC and ACS mechanisms} disturbances for comparison with past VDT results. The disturbances observed will be used as the nominal on-orbit disturbances in pointing control simulations until the next VDT is run. The test occurs after release, and most of the VDT can be run during the BEA period. The -V1 sunpoint portion of the VDT occurs after the BEA period is complete. The VDT shall consist of five separate tests that need not occur consecutively. The overall duration of the VDT tests is at least 17 orbits of spacecraft time including {1} at least 1 full orbit at +V3 sunpoint prior to NCS CPL turn-on while performing ACS mechanism motions simulating routine flight operations, {2} at least 5 full orbits at +V3 sunpoint prior to NCS CPL turn-on, {3} at least 1 full orbit at +V3 sunpoint during NCC startup, {4} at least 5 full orbits at +V3 sunpoint while NCC is operating at steady-state, and {5} at least 5 full orbits at -V1 sunpoint with the NCC operating at steady-state. Each test is initiated via SMS execution of stored program macros in the HST flight computer to switch the attitude control law gains to low-bandwidth maneuver gains, command the gyros into low mode, terminate Velocity aberration and parallax {VAP} processing, and modify flight computer diagnostic mnemonics to display the roll component of DVTHEP. The nominal attitude control law configuration will be restored at the end of each test via SMS execution of stored program macros. The stored program command macros are developed specifically for the VDT by the Flight Software and Pointing Control System groups.

  8. Reaching Emotionally Disturbed Children: 'Judo' Principles in Remedial Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandel, Harvey P.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The importance of the interpersonal meanings of adolescent symptomatology, especially as they relate to issues of control in therapy, is explored across a wide variety of treatment approaches; and three cases of children (14- or 16-years-old in a remedial education program are discussed. (Author/SB)

  9. Dance/Movement Therapy with Emotionally Disturbed Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bannon, Veronica

    This outline profiles two programs that use dance/movement therapy to help students with low self-esteem, poor body image, poor self-control, lack of trust in others, difficulty identifying and expressing feelings, and poor interpersonal relating skills. Students referred for dance/movement therapy services are assessed for appropriateness, and…

  10. Emotionally Disturbed Children: A Program of Alternatives to Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedford, Linda; Hybertson, Larry D.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the Treatment Alternatives Project (TAP) which provides caseworker aid and supportive services that allow problem children to undergo treatment while remaining in their own homes or foster homes. (SDH)