Science.gov

Sample records for employing transport layer

  1. Scalar transport in plane mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanormelingen, J.; Van den Bulck, E.

    This paper describes the application of the Eulerian, single-point, single-time joint-scalar probability density function (PDF) equation for predicting the scalar transport in mixing layer with a high-speed and a low-speed stream. A finite-volume procedure is applied to obtain the velocity field with the k-ɛ closure being used to describe turbulent transport. The scalar field is represented through the modelled evolution equation for the scalar PDF and is solved using a Monte Carlo simulation. The PDF equation employs gradient transport modelling to represent the turbulent diffusion, and the molecular mixing term is modelled by the LMSE closure. There is no source term for chemical reaction as only an inert mixing layer is considered here. The experimental shear layer data published by Batt is used to validate the computational results despite the fact that comparisons between experiments and computational results are difficult because of the high sensitivity of the shear layer to initial conditions and free stream turbulence phenomena. However, the bimodal shape of the RMS scalar fluctuation as was measured by Batt can be reproduced with this model, whereas standard gradient diffusion calculations do not predict the dip in this profile. In this work for the first time an explanation is given for this phenomenon and the importance of a micromixing model is stressed. Also it is shown that the prediction of the PDF shape by the LMSE model is very satisfactory.

  2. Multilayer thin films employing electrostatic layer-by- layer self-assembly for optical device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soo-Hyoung

    2000-11-01

    This thesis research focuses on the fabrication of novel multilayer thin films with unique optical properties employing molecular level self-assembly. Two different classes of polymers, azo and fluorescent polymers, have been synthesized and used for fabrication of optical devices, specifically thin film nonlinear optical devices and optical chemical sensors by electrostatic layer-by- layer self-assembly. For thin film nonlinear optical devices, a poly(acrylic acid) based precursor anilino-functional polymer was first synthesized and used as a polyanion. This polymer was assembled into mono and multilayer thin films by electrostatic layer-by-layer self-assembly technique in conjunction with a polycation. The aniline group in the assembled polymer layer was subsequently converted to an azobenzene chromophore by post azo coupling reaction with appropriate diazonium salts. This method provides easy control of film thickness and well ordered chromophore structure in the multilayer. Second harmonic generation was observed in all multilayer films indicating acentric organization of the chromophores synthesized in the multilayered films. The second harmonic intensity and film thickness are dependent on the assembly conditions (pH etc.) of the polyions. The post functionalized azopolymer layers were further modulated by light driven mass transport. Thin film optical sensors for pH, metal ions (ferric and mercury) and 2,4-dinitro toluene detection were developed. To fabricate the pH sensor, a fluorescent molecule, 1-hydroxypyren-3,6,8-trisulfonate, was assembled with a polycation by electrostatic layer-by- layer self-assembly technique. The fluorescent indicator molecule exhibits distinct and well-defined emission peaks for protonated and deprotonated forms. The relative peak positions and intensity of fluorescence of the protonated and deprotonated forms change in response to pH variations. For metal ions (ferric and mercury) and 2,4-dinitro toluene sensing, the indicator

  3. Issues in designing transport layer multicast facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Bert J.; Weaver, Alfred C.

    1990-01-01

    Multicasting denotes a facility in a communications system for providing efficient delivery from a message's source to some well-defined set of locations using a single logical address. While modem network hardware supports multidestination delivery, first generation Transport Layer protocols (e.g., the DoD Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) (15) and ISO TP-4 (41)) did not anticipate the changes over the past decade in underlying network hardware, transmission speeds, and communication patterns that have enabled and driven the interest in reliable multicast. Much recent research has focused on integrating the underlying hardware multicast capability with the reliable services of Transport Layer protocols. Here, we explore the communication issues surrounding the design of such a reliable multicast mechanism. Approaches and solutions from the literature are discussed, and four experimental Transport Layer protocols that incorporate reliable multicast are examined.

  4. Guide to transportation-demand management plans for employers

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.M.; Gerwig, K.L.; Shirazi, E.

    1988-09-01

    This guide is designed to introduce employers, transportation agencies, consultants, government officials and others to the elements of transportation demand management (TDM) plans. TDM plans use a variety of strategies to orchestrate employees' commute-related activities, including use of carpools, vanpools, bicycles, and buses, use of variable work hours to spread or reduce peak hour congestion, and telecommuting (working from home or a satellite office). The guide contains a description of the typical elements in a TDM plan, including an assessment of the current employee transportation program, methods for measuring vehicle occupancy, strategies for program improvement, and implementing and monitoring the transportation program. The procedure is illustrated for a fictitious employer in the Los Angeles Central Business District.

  5. Tracer Transport in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, E. J.; Pfister, L.; Bergman, J. W.; Atlas, E. L.

    2013-12-01

    Trace species such as carbon monoxide, ozone, and very short-lived halocarbons in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) are important for chemistry and the radiation budget. Also, these species can be used to diagnose transport pathways into and through the TTL. TTL tracer concentrations are controlled primarily by input from extreme deep convective systems that rapidly transport air from the lower troposphere into the TTL, rapid horizontal transport, and slow vertical transport, with the rapid convective transport directly to the uppermost TTL being particularly important for species with short lifetimes. The extreme deep convection overshooting to near the tropical tropopause is poorly represented by convective parameterizations used in global models. Here, we investigate tracer transport using trajectories along with explicit calculations of convective influence. The times and locations of convective influence on the trajectory parcels are determined by tracing the trajectories through two-dimensional, three-hourly fields of convective cloud top height from geostationary satellite and TRMM. The tracer simulations are constrained by measurements from the Aura MLS and ACE-FTS satellites, as well as measurements from recent high-altitude aircraft campaigns. The model is used to evaluate the sensitivity of TTL tracer concentrations to diabatic heating rate (approximately in balance with vertical motion) and the occurrence frequency of extreme convection.

  6. New Horizons for Perovskite Solar Cells Employing DNA-CTMA as the Hole-Transporting Material.

    PubMed

    Yusoff, Abd Rashid Bin Mohd; Kim, Jeongmo; Jang, Jin; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2016-07-01

    We investigate solution-processed low-temperature lead-halide perovskite solar cells employing deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA)-hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (CTMA) as the hole-transport layer and (6,6)-phenyl C61 -butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) as electron-acceptor layer in an inverted p-i-n device configuration. The perovskite solar cells utilizing a bio-based charge-transport layer demonstrate power conversion efficiency values of 15.86 %, with short-circuit current density of 20.85 mA cm(-2) , open circuit voltage of 1.04 V, and fill factor of 73.15 %, and improved lifetime. DNA-based devices maintained above 85 % of the initial efficiency after 50 days in air. PMID:27167727

  7. 49 CFR 805.735-8 - Employment of family members in transportation and related enterprises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Employment of family members in transportation and related enterprises. 805.735-8 Section 805.735-8 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Employment of family members in transportation and related enterprises. (a) No individual will be employed...

  8. 49 CFR 805.735-8 - Employment of family members in transportation and related enterprises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Employment of family members in transportation and related enterprises. 805.735-8 Section 805.735-8 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Employment of family members in transportation and related enterprises. (a) No individual will be employed...

  9. Optoelectronic device with nanoparticle embedded hole injection/transport layer

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Qingwu; Li, Wenguang; Jiang, Hua

    2012-01-03

    An optoelectronic device is disclosed that can function as an emitter of optical radiation, such as a light-emitting diode (LED), or as a photovoltaic (PV) device that can be used to convert optical radiation into electrical current, such as a photovoltaic solar cell. The optoelectronic device comprises an anode, a hole injection/transport layer, an active layer, and a cathode, where the hole injection/transport layer includes transparent conductive nanoparticles in a hole transport material.

  10. Turbulent transport across shear layers in magnetically confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nold, B.; Ramisch, M.; Manz, P.; Birkenmeier, G.; Ribeiro, T. T.; Müller, H. W.; Scott, B. D.; Fuchert, G.; Stroth, U.

    2014-10-15

    Shear layers modify the turbulence in diverse ways and do not only suppress it. A spatial-temporal investigation of gyrofluid simulations in comparison with experiments allows to identify further details of the transport process across shear layers. Blobs in and outside a shear layer merge, thereby exchange particles and heat and subsequently break up. Via this mechanism particles and heat are transported radially across shear layers. Turbulence spreading is the immanent mechanism behind this process.

  11. Wave mediated angular momentum transport in astrophysical boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertfelder, Marius; Kley, Wilhelm

    2015-07-01

    Context. Disk accretion onto weakly magnetized stars leads to the formation of a boundary layer (BL) where the gas loses its excess kinetic energy and settles onto the star. There are still many open questions concerning the BL, for instance the transport of angular momentum (AM) or the vertical structure. Aims: It is the aim of this work to investigate the AM transport in the BL where the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) is not operating owing to the increasing angular velocity Ω(r) with radius. We will therefore search for an appropriate mechanism and examine its efficiency and implications. Methods: We perform 2D numerical hydrodynamical simulations in a cylindrical coordinate system (r,ϕ) for a thin, vertically integrated accretion disk around a young star. We employ a realistic equation of state and include both cooling from the disk surfaces and radiation transport in radial and azimuthal direction. The viscosity in the disk is treated by the α-model; in the BL there is no viscosity term included. Results: We find that our setup is unstable to the sonic instability which sets in shortly after the simulations have been started. Acoustic waves are generated and traverse the domain, developing weak shocks in the vicinity of the BL. Furthermore, the system undergoes recurrent outbursts where the activity in the disk increases strongly. The instability and the waves do not die out for over 2000 orbits. Conclusions: There is indeed a purely hydrodynamical mechanism that enables AM transport in the BL. It is efficient and wave mediated; however, this renders it a non-local transport method, which means that models of a effective local viscosity like the α-viscosity are probably not applicable in the BL. A variety of further implications of the non-local AM transport are discussed.

  12. 28 CFR 79.63 - Proof of employment as an ore transporter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of employment as an ore transporter... RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Ore Transporters § 79.63 Proof of employment as an ore transporter. (a) The Department will accept, as proof of employment for the time...

  13. 28 CFR 79.63 - Proof of employment as an ore transporter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of employment as an ore transporter... RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Ore Transporters § 79.63 Proof of employment as an ore transporter. (a) The Department will accept, as proof of employment for the time...

  14. 28 CFR 79.63 - Proof of employment as an ore transporter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of employment as an ore transporter... RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Ore Transporters § 79.63 Proof of employment as an ore transporter. (a) The Department will accept, as proof of employment for the time...

  15. 28 CFR 79.63 - Proof of employment as an ore transporter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of employment as an ore transporter... RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Ore Transporters § 79.63 Proof of employment as an ore transporter. (a) The Department will accept, as proof of employment for the time...

  16. 28 CFR 79.63 - Proof of employment as an ore transporter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of employment as an ore transporter... RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Ore Transporters § 79.63 Proof of employment as an ore transporter. (a) The Department will accept, as proof of employment for the time...

  17. Holographic recording medium employing a photoconductive layer and a low molecular weight microcrystalline polymeric layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gange, Robert Allen (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A holographic recording medium comprising a conductive substrate, a photoconductive layer and an electrically alterable layer of a linear, low molecular weight hydrocarbon polymer has improved fatigue resistance. An acrylic barrier layer can be interposed between the photoconductive and electrically alterable layers.

  18. Ambipolar charge transport in "traditional" organic hole transport layers.

    PubMed

    Khademi, S; Song, J Y; Wyatt, P B; Kreouzis, T; Gillin, W P

    2012-05-01

    Organic semiconductors are often labeled as electron or hole transport materials due to the primary role they perform in devices. However, despite these labels we have shown using time-of-flight that two of the traditional "hole transport materials" TPD and NPB are actually excellent electron transporters the electron transport properties of which are comparable to those for holes. PMID:22467553

  19. Nonlocal thermal transport across embedded few-layer graphene sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ying; Huxtable, Scott T.; Yang, Bao; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Qiao, Rui

    2014-11-13

    Thermal transport across the interfaces between few-layer graphene sheets and soft materials exhibits intriguing anomalies when interpreted using the classical Kapitza model, e.g., the conductance of the same interface differs greatly for different modes of interfacial thermal transport. Using atomistic simulations, we show that such thermal transport follows a nonlocal flux-temperature drop constitutive law and is characterized jointly by a quasi-local conductance and a nonlocal conductance instead of the classical Kapitza conductance. Lastly, the nonlocal model enables rationalization of many anomalies of the thermal transport across embedded few-layer graphene sheets and should be used in studies of interfacial thermal transport involving few-layer graphene sheets or other ultra-thin layered materials.

  20. Turbulence transport in spatially developing reacting shear layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Scott David

    2000-11-01

    The transport of turbulence in non-reacting and reacting shear layers is investigated using direct numerical simulations (DNS). The present DNS code solves non-dimensional transport equations for total mass, momentum, energy, and reactant mass fractions. The combustion is simulated by a single-step, second-order reaction with an Arrhenius reaction rate. The transport equations are solved using a low Mach number approximation where the effects of heat release are accounted for through variable density. The numerical formulation is characterized by a third-order Runge-Kutta time integration, eleventh-order finite-difference spatial derivatives, and a fully consistent fractional-step method for the solution of the momentum equation. Three-dimensional simulations of one non-reacting shear layer and one reacting shear layer were performed to generate databases for statistical analysis. Transverse budgets of turbulence kinetic energy reveal that the turbulent transport and pressure transport terms have a unique role in the energy balance in that they have different algebraic signs in different regions of the layer. In the non-reacting shear layer, the pressure transport term tends to balance the turbulent transport term. In the reacting shear layer, however, a flip in the pressure transport term is observed and the resulting behavior is similar to the turbulent transport. The pressure transport term for both cases is examined in detail and the flip is attributed to the heat release through correlations with the reaction rate. The DNS results are compared with the standard k-epsilon model for production and turbulent transport. When calculated with the standard eddy viscosity closure coefficient, the Boussinesq approximation accurately predicts the production for the non-reacting shear layer but overpredicts it for the reacting shear layer. The calculation of the Boussinesq approximation also shows that the dilatation dissipation is small compared to the solenoidal

  1. Nonlocal thermal transport across embedded few-layer graphene sheets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Ying; Huxtable, Scott T.; Yang, Bao; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Qiao, Rui

    2014-11-13

    Thermal transport across the interfaces between few-layer graphene sheets and soft materials exhibits intriguing anomalies when interpreted using the classical Kapitza model, e.g., the conductance of the same interface differs greatly for different modes of interfacial thermal transport. Using atomistic simulations, we show that such thermal transport follows a nonlocal flux-temperature drop constitutive law and is characterized jointly by a quasi-local conductance and a nonlocal conductance instead of the classical Kapitza conductance. Lastly, the nonlocal model enables rationalization of many anomalies of the thermal transport across embedded few-layer graphene sheets and should be used in studies of interfacial thermal transportmore » involving few-layer graphene sheets or other ultra-thin layered materials.« less

  2. Electron-Transport Properties of Few-Layer Black Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuehua; Dai, Jun; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2015-06-01

    We perform the first-principles computational study of the effect of number of stacking layers and stacking style of the few-layer black phosphorus (BPs) on the electronic properties, including transport gap, current-voltage (i-v) relation, and differential conductance. Our computation is based on the nonequilibrium Green's function approach combined with density functional theory calculations. Specifically, we compute electron-transport properties of monolayer BP, bilayer BP, and trilayer BP as well as bilayer BPs with AB-, AA-, or AC-stacking. We find that the stacking number has greater influence on the transport gap than the stacking type. Conversely, the stacking type has greater influence on i-v curve and differential conductance than on the transport gap. This study offers useful guidance for determining the number of stacking layers and the stacking style of few-layer BP sheets in future experimental measurements and for potential applications in nanoelectronic devices. PMID:26266491

  3. Ion transport through electrolyte/polyelectrolyte multi-layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Femmer, Robert; Mani, Ali; Wessling, Matthias

    2015-06-01

    Ion transport of multi-ionic solutions through layered electrolyte and polyelectrolyte structures are relevant in a large variety of technical systems such as micro and nanofluidic devices, sensors, batteries and large desalination process systems. We report a new direct numerical simulation model coined EnPEn: it allows to solve a set of first principle equations to predict for multiple ions their concentration and electrical potential profiles in electro-chemically complex architectures of n layered electrolytes E and n polyelectrolytes PE. EnPEn can robustly capture ion transport in sub-millimeter architectures with submicron polyelectrolyte layers. We proof the strength of EnPEn for three yet unsolved architectures: (a) selective Na over Ca transport in surface modified ion selective membranes, (b) ion transport and water splitting in bipolar membranes and (c) transport of weak electrolytes.

  4. Ion transport through electrolyte/polyelectrolyte multi-layers.

    PubMed

    Femmer, Robert; Mani, Ali; Wessling, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport of multi-ionic solutions through layered electrolyte and polyelectrolyte structures are relevant in a large variety of technical systems such as micro and nanofluidic devices, sensors, batteries and large desalination process systems. We report a new direct numerical simulation model coined EnPEn: it allows to solve a set of first principle equations to predict for multiple ions their concentration and electrical potential profiles in electro-chemically complex architectures of n layered electrolytes E and n polyelectrolytes PE. EnPEn can robustly capture ion transport in sub-millimeter architectures with submicron polyelectrolyte layers. We proof the strength of EnPEn for three yet unsolved architectures: (a) selective Na over Ca transport in surface modified ion selective membranes, (b) ion transport and water splitting in bipolar membranes and (c) transport of weak electrolytes. PMID:26111456

  5. Ion transport through electrolyte/polyelectrolyte multi-layers

    PubMed Central

    Femmer, Robert; Mani, Ali; Wessling, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport of multi-ionic solutions through layered electrolyte and polyelectrolyte structures are relevant in a large variety of technical systems such as micro and nanofluidic devices, sensors, batteries and large desalination process systems. We report a new direct numerical simulation model coined EnPEn: it allows to solve a set of first principle equations to predict for multiple ions their concentration and electrical potential profiles in electro-chemically complex architectures of n layered electrolytes E and n polyelectrolytes PE. EnPEn can robustly capture ion transport in sub-millimeter architectures with submicron polyelectrolyte layers. We proof the strength of EnPEn for three yet unsolved architectures: (a) selective Na over Ca transport in surface modified ion selective membranes, (b) ion transport and water splitting in bipolar membranes and (c) transport of weak electrolytes. PMID:26111456

  6. Interplane transport effects in layered organic conductors.

    SciTech Connect

    Symington, J. A.; Singleton, J.; Harrison, N.; Clayton, N.; Schlueter, J. A.; Kurmoo, M.; Day, P.

    2000-08-22

    Detailed studies of the magnetic field orientation on magnetic quantum oscillations in two charge transfer salts of the molecule ET have been carried out. .After all conventional mechanisms affecting quantum oscillations have been accounted for, we find that the amplitude of the oscillations has an underlying dependence exp({minus}{alpha} tan 0), where {theta} is the angle between the normal to the highly-conducting layers and the magnetic field, and a is a constant.

  7. Efficient zinc phthalocyanine/C60 heterojunction photovoltaic devices employing tetracene anode interfacial layers.

    PubMed

    Fleetham, Tyler B; Mudrick, John P; Cao, Weiran; Klimes, Kody; Xue, Jiangeng; Li, Jian

    2014-05-28

    We report the development of efficient small molecular organic photovoltaic devices incorporating tetracene anode interfacial layers. Planar heterojunction devices employing the tetracene anode interfacial layer achieved an EQE enhancement of 150% in the spectral region corresponding to ZnPc absorption. We demonstrate that this enhancement is due to the combined effect of the tetracene layer providing exciton-blocking at the anode/donor interface and potentially an increase in the exciton diffusion length in the ZnPc layer due to increased crystallinity and more preferred molecular stacking orientation. A power conversion efficiency of 4.7% was achieved for a planar heterojunction of a modified zinc phthalocyanine based material and C60 when employing the tetracene anode interfacial layer. By utilizing a planar-mixed heterojunction structure a peak EQE of nearly 70% and a power conversion efficiency of 5.8% was achieved. PMID:24708488

  8. Dimensional dependence of phonon transport in freestanding atomic layer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Duckjong; Hwangbo, Yun; Zhu, Lijing; Mag-Isa, Alexander E.; Kim, Kwang-Seop; Kim, Jae-Hyun

    2013-11-01

    Due to the fast development of nanotechnology, we have the capability of manipulating atomic layer systems such as graphene, hexagonal boron nitride and dichalcogenides. The major concern in the 2-dimensional nanostructures is how to preserve their exceptional single-layer properties in 3-dimensional bulk structures. In this study, we report that the extreme phonon transport in graphene is highly affected by the graphitic layer stacking based on experimental investigation of the thermal conduction in few-layer graphene, 1-7 layers thick, suspended over holes of various diameters. We fabricate freestanding axisymmetric graphene structures without any perturbing substrate, and measure the in-plane transport property in terms of thermal conduction by using Raman spectroscopy. From the difference in susceptibility to substrate effect, size effect on hot-spot temperature variation and layer number dependence of thermal conductivity, we show that the graphitic membranes with 2 or more layers have characteristics similar to 3-dimensional graphite, which are very different from those of 2-dimensional graphene membranes. This implies that the scattering of out-of-plane phonons by interlayer atomic coupling could be a key mechanism governing the intrinsic thermal property.Due to the fast development of nanotechnology, we have the capability of manipulating atomic layer systems such as graphene, hexagonal boron nitride and dichalcogenides. The major concern in the 2-dimensional nanostructures is how to preserve their exceptional single-layer properties in 3-dimensional bulk structures. In this study, we report that the extreme phonon transport in graphene is highly affected by the graphitic layer stacking based on experimental investigation of the thermal conduction in few-layer graphene, 1-7 layers thick, suspended over holes of various diameters. We fabricate freestanding axisymmetric graphene structures without any perturbing substrate, and measure the in-plane transport

  9. 49 CFR 40.409 - What does the issuance of a PIE mean to transportation employers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What does the issuance of a PIE mean to... What does the issuance of a PIE mean to transportation employers? (a) As an employer, you are deemed to... before September 1, and through November 30, are valid for all purposes under DOT drug and...

  10. 49 CFR 40.409 - What does the issuance of a PIE mean to transportation employers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What does the issuance of a PIE mean to... What does the issuance of a PIE mean to transportation employers? (a) As an employer, you are deemed to have notice of the issuance of a PIE when it appears on the List mentioned in § 40.401(a) or the...

  11. Location Management in a Transport Layer Mobility Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eddy, Wesley M.; Ishac, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Mobility architectures that place complexity in end nodes rather than in the network interior have many advantageous properties and are becoming popular research topics. Such architectures typically push mobility support into higher layers of the protocol stack than network layer approaches like Mobile IP. The literature is ripe with proposals to provide mobility services in the transport, session, and application layers. In this paper, we focus on a mobility architecture that makes the most significant changes to the transport layer. A common problem amongst all mobility protocols at various layers is location management, which entails translating some form of static identifier into a mobile node's dynamic location. Location management is required for mobile nodes to be able to provide globally-reachable services on-demand to other hosts. In this paper, we describe the challenges of location management in a transport layer mobility architecture, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various solutions proposed in the literature. Our conclusion is that, in principle, secure dynamic DNS is most desirable, although it may have current operational limitations. We note that this topic has room for further exploration, and we present this paper largely as a starting point for comparing possible solutions.

  12. Analysis of Charge Carrier Transport in Organic Photovoltaic Active Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2015-03-01

    We present a systematic analysis of charge carrier transport in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices based on phenomenological, deterministic charge carrier transport models. The models describe free electron and hole transport, trapping, and detrapping, as well as geminate charge-pair dissociation and geminate and bimolecular recombination, self-consistently with Poisson's equation for the electric field in the active layer. We predict photocurrent evolution in devices with active layers of P3HT, P3HT/PMMA, and P3HT/PS, as well as P3HT/PCBM blends, and photocurrent-voltage (I-V) relations in these devices at steady state. Charge generation propensity, zero-field charge mobilities, and trapping, detrapping, and recombination rate coefficients are determined by fitting the modeling predictions to experimental measurements. We have analyzed effects of the active layer morphology for layers consisting of both pristine drop-cast films and of nanoparticle (NP) assemblies, as well as effects on device performance of insulating NP doping in conducting polymers and of specially designed interlayers placed between an electrode and the active layer. The model predictions provide valuable input toward synthesis of active layers with prescribed morphology that optimize OPV device performance.

  13. Efficiency enhancement in small molecular organic photovoltaic devices employing dual anode interfacial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleetham, Tyler; O'Brien, Barry; Mudrick, John P.; Xue, Jiangeng; Li, Jian

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrated enhanced efficiency in small molecule organic photovoltaic devices using dual organic interfacial layers of PEDOT:PSS followed by tetracene between the ITO anode and the organic donor material. The use of a small molecular templating layer, such as tetracene, proved to increase the molecular stacking of the subsequent phthalocyanine (Pc) based donor materials. Upon application in planar heterojunction devices of ZnPc and C60, an enhancement of over 80 percent in the donor contribution to the external quantum efficiency was observed attributed to the combination of exciton blocking by the higher band gap tetracene layer and enhanced exciton diffusion and charge transport resulting from the increased crystallinity.

  14. Aircraft systems design studies employing advanced transport technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, B.; Pearce, C.; Quartero, C.; Taylor, A.

    1972-01-01

    System and design integration studies are presented to define and assess the application of the advanced technology most likely to result in a superior next generation, high subsonic/sonic conventional takeoff and landing transport aircraft system. It is concluded that the new technologies can be directed toward the achievement of improved economy and performance. These benefits may be used to compensate for the penalties associated with reduced noise requirements anticipated to make future aircraft ecologically acceptable.

  15. The Employment of Airships for the Transport of Passengers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nobile, Umberto

    1921-01-01

    It was a conclusion of this detailed study of the practicality of using airships for carrying passengers that, although slow, airships are capable of carrying useful loads over long distances. However, it is noted that there is a certain limit to the advantages of large cubature. Beyond a certain point, the maximum altitude of the airship goes on decreasing, in spite of the fact that the range of action in the horizontal plane and the useful load go on increasing. The possibility of rapid climb is an essential factor of security in aerial navigation in the case of storms, as is velocity. To rise above and run ahead of storms are ways of avoiding them. However, high altitude and high speed are antithetical. This investigation concluded that a maximum velocity of 120 km/h is as far as we ought to go. This figure can only be exceeded by excessive reduction of the altitude of ceiling, range of flight, and useful load. The essential requisites of a public transport service are discussed, as are flight security, regularity of service, competition with other forms of passenger transportation, and the choice between rigid and semi-rigid airships.

  16. Fully transparent nonvolatile memory employing amorphous oxides as charge trap and transistor's channel layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Huaxiang; Kim, Sunil; Kim, Chang Jung; Song, Ihun; Park, Jaechul; Kim, Sangwook; Park, Youngsoo

    2008-10-01

    A fully transparent nonvolatile memory with the conventional sandwich gate insulator structure was demonstrated. Wide band gap amorphous GaInZnO (a-GIZO) thin films were employed as both the charge trap layer and the transistor channel layer. An excellent program window of 3.5 V with a stressing time of 100 ms was achieved through the well-known Fowler-Nordheim tunneling method. Due to the similar energy levels extracted from the experimental data, the asymmetrical program/erase characteristics are believed to be the result of the strong trapping of the injected negative charges in the shallow donor levels of the GIZO film.

  17. Carbon transport in the bottom boundary layer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Y.C.

    1998-10-05

    This report summarizes the activities and findings from a field experiment devised to estimate the rates and mechanisms of transport of carbon across the continental shelves. The specific site chosen for the experiment was the mid-Atlantic Bight, a region off the North Carolina coast. The experiment involved a large contingent of scientists from many institutions. The specific component of the program was the transport of carbon in the bottom boundary layer. The postulate mechanisms of transport of carbon in the bottom boundary layer are: resuspension and advection, downward deposition, and accumulation. The high turbulence levels in the bottom boundary layer require the understanding of the coupling between turbulence and bottom sediments. The specific issues addressed in the work reported here were: (a) What is the sediment response to forcing by currents and waves? (b) What is the turbulence climate in the bottom boundary layer at this site? and (c) What is the rate at which settling leads to carbon sequestering in bottom sediments at offshore sites?

  18. Drift-wave transport in the velocity shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosalem, K. C.; Roberto, M.; Caldas, I. L.

    2016-07-01

    Particle drift driven by electrostatic wave fluctuations is numerically computed to describe the transport in a gradient velocity layer at the tokamak plasma edge. We consider an equilibrium plasma in large aspect ratio approximation with E × B flow and specified toroidal plasma velocity, electric field, and magnetic field profiles. A symplectic map, previously derived for infinite coherent time modes, is used to describe the transport dependence on the electric, magnetic, and plasma velocity shears. We also show that resonant perturbations and their correspondent islands in the Poincaré maps are much affected by the toroidal velocity profiles. Moreover, shearless transport barriers, identified by extremum values of the perturbed rotation number profiles of the invariant curves, allow chaotic trajectories trapped into the plasma. We investigate the influence of the toroidal plasma velocity profile on these shearless transport barriers.

  19. Transport of contaminants in the planetary boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, I. Y.; Swan, P. R.

    1978-01-01

    A planetary boundary layer model is described and used to simulate PBL phenomena including cloud formation and pollution transport in the San Francisco Bay Area. The effect of events in the PBL on air pollution is considered, and governing equations for the average momentum, potential temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and air contaminants are presented. These equations are derived by integrating the basic equations vertically through the mixed layer. Characteristics of the day selected for simulation are reported, and the results suggest that the diurnally cyclic features of the mesoscale motion, including clouds and air pollution, can be simulated in a readily interpretable way with the model.

  20. Anisotropic bias dependent transport property of defective phosphorene layer

    PubMed Central

    Umar Farooq, M.; Hashmi, Arqum; Hong, Jisang

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene is receiving great research interests because of its peculiar physical properties. Nonetheless, no systematic studies on the transport properties modified due to defects have been performed. Here, we present the electronic band structure, defect formation energy and bias dependent transport property of various defective systems. We found that the defect formation energy is much less than that in graphene. The defect configuration strongly affects the electronic structure. The band gap vanishes in single vacancy layers, but the band gap reappears in divacancy layers. Interestingly, a single vacancy defect behaves like a p-type impurity for transport property. Unlike the common belief, we observe that the vacancy defect can contribute to greatly increasing the current. Along the zigzag direction, the current in the most stable single vacancy structure was significantly increased as compared with that found in the pristine layer. In addition, the current along the armchair direction was always greater than along the zigzag direction and we observed a strong anisotropic current ratio of armchair to zigzag direction. PMID:26198318

  1. Near independence of OLED operating voltage on transport layer thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Swensen, James S.; Wang, Liang; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Rainbolt, James E.; Koech, Phillip K.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

    2013-01-01

    We report organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) with weak drive voltage dependence on the thickness of the hole transport layer (HTL) for thicknesses up to 1150 Å using the N,N′-Bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N′-bis(phenyl)-benzidine (α-NPD) and N,N'-bis(3-methyl phenyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4,4'diamine (TPD), both of which have hole mobilities in the range of 2 × 10-3 cm2V-1s-1. Lower mobility HTL materials show larger operating voltage dependence on thickness. The near independence of the operating voltage for high mobility transport material thickness was only observed when the energy barrier for charge injection into the transport material was minimized. To ensure low injection barriers, a thin film of 2-(3-(adamantan-1-yl)propyl)-3,5,6-trifluorotetracyanoquinodimethane (F3TCNQ-Adl) was cast from solution onto the ITO surface. These results indicate that thick transport layers can be integrated into OLED stacks without the need for bulk conductivity doping.

  2. Liquid water transport mechanism in the gas diffusion layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, P.; Wu, C. W.

    We developed an equivalent capillary model of a microscale fiber-fence structure to study the microscale evolution and transport of liquid in a porous media and to reveal the basic principles of water transport in gas diffusion layer (GDL). Analytical solutions using the model show that a positive hydraulic pressure is needed to drive the liquid water to penetrate through the porous GDL even consisting of the hydrophilic fibers. Several possible contributions for the water configuration, such as capillary pressure, gravity, vapor condensation, wettability and microstructures of the GDL, are discussed using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). It is found that the distribution manners of the fibers and the spatial mixed-wettability in the GDL also play an important role in the transport of liquid water.

  3. Micro-porous layer stochastic reconstruction and transport parameter determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hannach, Mohamed; Singh, Randhir; Djilali, Ned; Kjeang, Erik

    2015-05-01

    The Micro-Porous Layer (MPL) is a porous, thin layer commonly used in fuel cells at the interfaces between the catalyst layers and gas diffusion media. It is generally made from spherical carbon nanoparticles and PTFE acting as hydrophobic agent. The scale and brittle nature of the MPL structure makes it challenging to study experimentally. In the present work, a 3D stochastic model is developed to virtually reconstruct the MPL structure. The carbon nanoparticle and PTFE phases are fully distinguished by the algorithm. The model is shown to capture the actual structural morphology of the MPL and is validated by comparing the results to available experimental data. The model shows a good capability in generating a realistic MPL successfully using a set of parameters introduced to capture specific morphological features of the MPL. A numerical model that resolves diffusive transport at the pore scale is used to compute the effective transport properties of the reconstructed MPLs. A parametric study is conducted to illustrate the capability of the model as an MPL design tool that can be used to guide and optimize the functionality of the material.

  4. Modeling of particulate plumes transportation in boundary layers with obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karelsky, K. V.; Petrosyan, A. S.

    2012-04-01

    This presentation is aimed at creating and realization of new physical model of impurity transfer (solid particles and heavy gases) in areas with non-flat and/or nonstationary boundaries. The main idea of suggested method is to use non-viscous equations for solid particles transport modeling in the vicinity of complex boundary. In viscous atmosphere with as small as one likes coefficient of molecular viscosity, the non-slip boundary condition on solid surface must be observed. This postulates the reduction of velocity to zero at a solid surface. It is unconditionally in this case Prandtle hypothesis must be observed: for rather wide range of conditions in the surface neighboring layers energy dissipation of atmosphere flows is comparable by magnitude with manifestation of inertia forces. That is why according to Prandtle hypothesis in atmosphere movement characterizing by a high Reynolds number the boundary layer is forming near a planet surface, within which the required transition from zero velocities at the surface to magnitudes at the external boundary of the layer that are quite close to ones in ideal atmosphere flow. In that layer fast velocity gradients cause viscous effects to be comparable in magnitude with inertia forces influence. For conditions considered essential changes of hydrodynamic fields near solid boundary caused not only by nonslip condition but also by a various relief of surface: mountains, street canyons, individual buildings. Transport of solid particles, their ascent and precipitation also result in dramatic changes of meteorological fields. As dynamic processes of solid particles transfer accompanying the flow past of complex relief surface by wind flows is of our main interest we are to use equations of non-viscous hydrodynamic. We should put up with on the one hand idea of high wind gradients in the boundary layer and on the other hand disregard of molecular viscosity in two-phase atmosphere equations. We deal with describing high

  5. Transport of Particulates in Boundary Layer with Obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karelsky, Kirill; Petrosyan, Arakel

    2014-05-01

    This presentation is aimed at creating and realization of new physical model of impurity transfer (solid particles and heavy gases) in areas with non-flat and/or nonstationary boundaries. The main idea of suggested method is to use non-viscous equations for solid particles transport modeling in the vicinity of complex boundary. In viscous atmosphere with as small as one likes coefficient of molecular viscosity, the non-slip boundary condition on solid surface must be observed. This postulates the reduction of velocity to zero at a solid surface. It is unconditionally in this case Prandtle hypothesis must be observed: for rather wide range of conditions in the surface neighboring layers energy dissipation of atmosphere flows is comparable by magnitude with manifestation of inertia forces. That is why according to Prandtle hypothesis in atmosphere movement characterizing by a high Reynolds number the boundary layer is forming near a planet surface, within which the required transition from zero velocities at the surface to magnitudes at the external boundary of the layer that are quite close to ones in ideal atmosphere flow. In that layer fast velocity gradients cause viscous effects to be comparable in magnitude with inertia forces influence. For conditions considered essential changes of hydrodynamic fields near solid boundary caused not only by nonslip condition but also by a various relief of surface: mountains, street canyons, individual buildings. Transport of solid particles, their ascent and precipitation also result in dramatic changes of meteorological fields. As dynamic processes of solid particles transfer accompanying the flow past of complex relief surface by wind flows is of our main interest we are to use equations of non-viscous hydrodynamic. We should put up with on the one hand idea of high wind gradients in the boundary layer and on the other hand disregard of molecular viscosity in two-phase atmosphere equations. We deal with describing high

  6. Near Wall Bubble Transport in a Forced Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, David

    2005-11-01

    Transport of bubbles in turbulent boundary layers remains an area of active research. One of the areas of recent interest is the use of bubbles in skin friction drag reduction. However, for drag reduction to be effective, it seems that bubbles need to be kept in the near wall region, where wall shear stress derives from. Simulating the conditions meaningful to full scale vessels is very difficult in the laboratory due to scaling issues. Towards that end, we have used the idea of forced turbulence to simulate the near wall region. This allows us to inject bubbles into what is effectively the sub-layer, letting us explore bubble transport very close to the wall. We used the hydrogen wire technique to generate bubbles through electrolysis of water. The generating wire was placed at various heights above the wall to measure how transport is affected by injection location. Results indicate that injection at the wall may not be optimal with regards to keeping the bubbles near the wall. The authors would like to thank the Office of Naval Research for their support under Grant No. N00014-00-1-0110.

  7. SUPPRESSION OF ENERGETIC ELECTRON TRANSPORT IN FLARES BY DOUBLE LAYERS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T. C.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2012-09-20

    During flares and coronal mass ejections, energetic electrons from coronal sources typically have very long lifetimes compared to the transit times across the systems, suggesting confinement in the source region. Particle-in-cell simulations are carried out to explore the mechanisms of energetic electron transport from the corona to the chromosphere and possible confinement. We set up an initial system of pre-accelerated hot electrons in contact with ambient cold electrons along the local magnetic field and let it evolve over time. Suppression of transport by a nonlinear, highly localized electrostatic electric field (in the form of a double layer) is observed after a short phase of free-streaming by hot electrons. The double layer (DL) emerges at the contact of the two electron populations. It is driven by an ion-electron streaming instability due to the drift of the back-streaming return current electrons interacting with the ions. The DL grows over time and supports a significant drop in temperature and hence reduces heat flux between the two regions that is sustained for the duration of the simulation. This study shows that transport suppression begins when the energetic electrons start to propagate away from a coronal acceleration site. It also implies confinement of energetic electrons with kinetic energies less than the electrostatic energy of the DL for the DL lifetime, which is much longer than the electron transit time through the source region.

  8. The design and performance of axially symmetrical contoured wall diffusers employing suction boundary layer control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, C. D., Jr.; Hudson, W. G.; Yang, T.

    1974-01-01

    This paper presents a procedure for the design and the performance prediction of axially symmetrical contoured wall diffusers employing suction boundary layer control. An inverse problem approach was used in the potential flow design of the diffuser wall contours. The experimentally observed flow characteristics and the stability of flows within the diffuser are also described. Guidelines for the design of low suction (less than 10 percent of the inlet flow) and thus high effectiveness contoured wall diffusers are also provided based on the results of the experimental program.

  9. Effects of double-layer polarization on ion transport.

    PubMed

    Hainsworth, A H; Hladky, S B

    1987-01-01

    It has been proposed that changes in ionic strength will alter the shape of current-voltage relations for ion transport across a lipid membrane. To investigate this effect, we measured currents across glyceryl monooleate membranes at applied potentials between 10 and 300 mV using either gramicidin and 1 mM NaCl or valinomycin and 1 mM KCl. A bridge circuit with an integrator as null detector was used to separate the capacitative and ionic components of the current. The changes in the current-voltage relations when ionic strength is varied between 1 and 100 mM are compared with predictions of Gouy-Chapman theory for the effects of these variations on polarization of the electrical diffuse double-layer. Double-layer polarization accounts adequately for the changes observed using membranes made permeable by either gramicidin or valinomycin. PMID:2432953

  10. Transport measurements on monolayer and few-layer WSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomaki, Tauno; Zhao, Wenjin; Finney, Joe; Fei, Zaiyao; Nguyen, Paul; McKay, Frank; Cobden, David

    The behavior of the electrical contacts often dominates transport measurements in mono and few-layer transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) devices. Creating good contacts for some TMDs is particularly challenging since the fabrication procedure should prevent the TMD from oxidizing or chemically interacting with the contacts. In this talk, we discuss our progress on creating mono and few-layer WSe2 devices with both good electrical contacts and minimal effects from the substrate, polymer contamination, oxidation and other chemistry. For example, we have developed a technique for encapsulating metallic contacts and WSe2 flakes together in hexagonal boron nitride with multiple gates to separate and control the contributions from the channel and the Schottky barriers at the contacts. Research supported in part by Samsung GRO grant US 040814

  11. Inverted organic photovoltaic device with a new electron transport layer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that there is a new solution-processed electron transport layer, lithium-doped zinc oxide (LZO), with high-performance inverted organic photovoltaic device. The device exhibits a fill factor of 68.58%, an open circuit voltage of 0.86 V, a short-circuit current density of −9.35 cm/mA2 along with 5.49% power conversion efficiency. In addition, we studied the performance of blend ratio dependence on inverted organic photovoltaics. Our device also demonstrates a long stability shelf life over 4 weeks in air. PMID:24674457

  12. Single and Few Layer Silicene: Structural, Electronic and Transport Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, J. David; Roome, Nathanael

    Single layer silicene has weaker π bonding that graphene resulting in buckling of the Si atoms in different sub-lattices. Despite the loss of planarity, a linear bandstructure emerges where we find a Fermi velocity of about 5.3 x 105 m/s. Determination of the phonon dispersion characteristics reveals a Γ point optical phonon with an energy of 69 meV and a K point optical phonon with an energy of 62 meV. In graphene these phonons play important role in scattering electrons, and in Raman spectroscopy, but have larger energies of 194 and 166 meV, respectively. The lower phonon energies in silicene, arising from the higher atomic masses, would be expected to scatter carriers efficiently and limit carrier mobility. We have calculated, however, that the electron-optical phonon coupling matrix elements are about a factor of 25 times smaller than in graphene and this important result will help with the further development of silicene based devices due to reduced phonon scattering. The two stable stacking configurations of bilayer silicene, AA and AB, now have to account of the position of the atomic buckling in the two layers, leading to four possible atomic configurations with the buckling between the layers being in- or out-of-phase with each other. We find that in contrast to graphene, the two stable configurations are based on AA type stacking being about 70 meV per atom more stable than AB stacking. The potential for elemental layered materials beyond graphene for device applications will also be discussed. Single and Few Layer Silicene: Structural, Electronic and Transport Properties.

  13. Electron transport in molecular junctions with graphene as protecting layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüser, Falco; Solomon, Gemma C.

    2015-12-01

    We present ab initio transport calculations for molecular junctions that include graphene as a protecting layer between a single molecule and gold electrodes. This vertical setup has recently gained significant interest in experiment for the design of particularly stable and reproducible devices. We observe that the signals from the molecule in the electronic transmission are overlayed by the signatures of the graphene sheet, thus raising the need for a reinterpretation of the transmission. On the other hand, we see that our results are stable with respect to various defects in the graphene. For weakly physiosorbed molecules, no signs of interaction with the graphene are evident, so the transport properties are determined by offresonant tunnelling between the gold leads across an extended structure that includes the molecule itself and the additional graphene layer. Compared with pure gold electrodes, calculated conductances are about one order of magnitude lower due to the increased tunnelling distance. Relative differences upon changing the end group and the length of the molecule on the other hand, are similar.

  14. Electron transport in molecular junctions with graphene as protecting layer.

    PubMed

    Hüser, Falco; Solomon, Gemma C

    2015-12-01

    We present ab initio transport calculations for molecular junctions that include graphene as a protecting layer between a single molecule and gold electrodes. This vertical setup has recently gained significant interest in experiment for the design of particularly stable and reproducible devices. We observe that the signals from the molecule in the electronic transmission are overlayed by the signatures of the graphene sheet, thus raising the need for a reinterpretation of the transmission. On the other hand, we see that our results are stable with respect to various defects in the graphene. For weakly physiosorbed molecules, no signs of interaction with the graphene are evident, so the transport properties are determined by offresonant tunnelling between the gold leads across an extended structure that includes the molecule itself and the additional graphene layer. Compared with pure gold electrodes, calculated conductances are about one order of magnitude lower due to the increased tunnelling distance. Relative differences upon changing the end group and the length of the molecule on the other hand, are similar. PMID:26646877

  15. Electron transport in molecular junctions with graphene as protecting layer

    SciTech Connect

    Hüser, Falco; Solomon, Gemma C.

    2015-12-07

    We present ab initio transport calculations for molecular junctions that include graphene as a protecting layer between a single molecule and gold electrodes. This vertical setup has recently gained significant interest in experiment for the design of particularly stable and reproducible devices. We observe that the signals from the molecule in the electronic transmission are overlayed by the signatures of the graphene sheet, thus raising the need for a reinterpretation of the transmission. On the other hand, we see that our results are stable with respect to various defects in the graphene. For weakly physiosorbed molecules, no signs of interaction with the graphene are evident, so the transport properties are determined by offresonant tunnelling between the gold leads across an extended structure that includes the molecule itself and the additional graphene layer. Compared with pure gold electrodes, calculated conductances are about one order of magnitude lower due to the increased tunnelling distance. Relative differences upon changing the end group and the length of the molecule on the other hand, are similar.

  16. Carbon transport in the bottom boundary layer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lohrenz, S.E.; Asper, V.L.

    1997-09-01

    The authors objective was to characterize distributions of chloropigment fluorescence in relation to physical processes in the benthic boundary layer in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) Ocean Margins Program`s (OMP) goal of quantifying carbon transport across the continental shelf. Their approach involved participation in the Ocean Margins Program (OMP) field experiment on the continental shelf off Cape Hatteras by conducting multi-sensor fluorescence measurements of photosynthetic pigments. Specific tasks included (1) pre- and post-deployment calibration of multiple fluorescence sensors in conjunction with Woods Hole personnel; (2) collection and analysis of photosynthetic pigment concentrations and total particulate carbon in water column samples to aid in interpretation of the fluorescence time-series during the field experiment; (3) collaboration in the analysis and interpretation of 1994 and 1996 time-series data in support of efforts to quantify pigment and particulate organic carbon transport on the continental shelf off Cape Hatteras. This third component included analysis of data obtained with a multi-sensor fiber-optic fluorometer in the benthic boundary layer of the inner shelf off Cape Hatteras during summer 1994.

  17. Charge carrier transport properties in layer structured hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, T. C.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2014-10-01

    Due to its large in-plane thermal conductivity, high temperature and chemical stability, large energy band gap (˜ 6.4 eV), hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has emerged as an important material for applications in deep ultraviolet photonic devices. Among the members of the III-nitride material system, hBN is the least studied and understood. The study of the electrical transport properties of hBN is of utmost importance with a view to realizing practical device applications. Wafer-scale hBN epilayers have been successfully synthesized by metal organic chemical deposition and their electrical transport properties have been probed by variable temperature Hall effect measurements. The results demonstrate that undoped hBN is a semiconductor exhibiting weak p-type at high temperatures (> 700 °K). The measured acceptor energy level is about 0.68 eV above the valence band. In contrast to the electrical transport properties of traditional III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors, the temperature dependence of the hole mobility in hBN can be described by the form of μ ∝ (T/T0)-α with α = 3.02, satisfying the two-dimensional (2D) carrier transport limit dominated by the polar optical phonon scattering. This behavior is a direct consequence of the fact that hBN is a layer structured material. The optical phonon energy deduced from the temperature dependence of the hole mobility is ħω = 192 meV (or 1546 cm-1), which is consistent with values previously obtained using other techniques. The present results extend our understanding of the charge carrier transport properties beyond the traditional III-nitride semiconductors.

  18. Angular Momentum Transport in Accretion Disk Boundary Layers Around Weakly Magnetized Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessah, Martin E.; Chan, Chi-kwan

    2013-04-01

    The standard model for turbulent shear viscosity in accretion disks is based on the assumption that angular momentum transport is opposite to the radial angular frequency gradient of the disk. This implies that the turbulent stress must be negative and thus transport angular momentum inwards, in the boundary layer where the accretion disk meets the surface of a weakly magnetized star. However, this behavior is not supported by numerical simulations of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accretion disks, which show that angular momentum transport driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is inefficient in disk regions where, as expected in boundary layers, the angular frequency increases with radius. Motivated by the need of a deeper understanding of the behavior of an MHD fluid in a differentially rotating background that deviates from a Keplerian profile, we study the dynamics of MHD waves in configurations that are stable to the standard MRI. Employing the shearing-sheet framework, we show that transient amplification of shearing MHD waves can generate magnetic energy without leading to a substantial generation of hydromagnetic stresses. While these results are in agreement with numerical simulations, they emphasize the need to better understand the mechanism for angular momentum transport in the inner disk regions on more solid grounds.

  19. [Type of employment and occupational health in urban public transport in the city of Kinshasa].

    PubMed

    Shadi, Jemina Wangata; De Brouwer, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work was to highlight the impact of job type on the health of public transportation workers in the informal sector in Kinshasa. An exploratory cross-sectional study was conducted in a population of workers (n=390) with two types of jobs and employment status: permanent employment, the drivers (n=130) and precarious employment, receivers (n=130) and shippers (n=130). A health questionnaire was used for data collection. Odds ratios and confidence intervals at 95% were estimated by logistic regression. Adjusted odds ratios were higher respectively for receivers and shippers regarding complaints of weight loss, abnormal fatigue, headache and insomnia. These results suggest an association between the type of employment and the health of these workers. This differential impact could reflect the outcome associated with either the insecurity of the employment status or an increased level of harmful exposures. PMID:21491745

  20. Electronic spin transport and spin precession in single graphene layers at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Tombros, Nikolaos; Jozsa, Csaba; Popinciuc, Mihaita; Jonkman, Harry T; van Wees, Bart J

    2007-08-01

    Electronic transport in single or a few layers of graphene is the subject of intense interest at present. The specific band structure of graphene, with its unique valley structure and Dirac neutrality point separating hole states from electron states, has led to the observation of new electronic transport phenomena such as anomalously quantized Hall effects, absence of weak localization and the existence of a minimum conductivity. In addition to dissipative transport, supercurrent transport has also been observed. Graphene might also be a promising material for spintronics and related applications, such as the realization of spin qubits, owing to the low intrinsic spin orbit interaction, as well as the low hyperfine interaction of the electron spins with the carbon nuclei. Here we report the observation of spin transport, as well as Larmor spin precession, over micrometre-scale distances in single graphene layers. The 'non-local' spin valve geometry was used in these experiments, employing four-terminal contact geometries with ferromagnetic cobalt electrodes making contact with the graphene sheet through a thin oxide layer. We observe clear bipolar (changing from positive to negative sign) spin signals that reflect the magnetization direction of all four electrodes, indicating that spin coherence extends underneath all of the contacts. No significant changes in the spin signals occur between 4.2 K, 77 K and room temperature. We extract a spin relaxation length between 1.5 and 2 mum at room temperature, only weakly dependent on charge density. The spin polarization of the ferromagnetic contacts is calculated from the measurements to be around ten per cent. PMID:17632544

  1. Electronic spin transport and spin precession in single graphene layers at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombros, Nikolaos; Jozsa, Csaba; Popinciuc, Mihaita; Jonkman, Harry T.; van Wees, Bart J.

    2007-08-01

    Electronic transport in single or a few layers of graphene is the subject of intense interest at present. The specific band structure of graphene, with its unique valley structure and Dirac neutrality point separating hole states from electron states, has led to the observation of new electronic transport phenomena such as anomalously quantized Hall effects, absence of weak localization and the existence of a minimum conductivity. In addition to dissipative transport, supercurrent transport has also been observed. Graphene might also be a promising material for spintronics and related applications, such as the realization of spin qubits, owing to the low intrinsic spin orbit interaction, as well as the low hyperfine interaction of the electron spins with the carbon nuclei. Here we report the observation of spin transport, as well as Larmor spin precession, over micrometre-scale distances in single graphene layers. The `non-local' spin valve geometry was used in these experiments, employing four-terminal contact geometries with ferromagnetic cobalt electrodes making contact with the graphene sheet through a thin oxide layer. We observe clear bipolar (changing from positive to negative sign) spin signals that reflect the magnetization direction of all four electrodes, indicating that spin coherence extends underneath all of the contacts. No significant changes in the spin signals occur between 4.2K, 77K and room temperature. We extract a spin relaxation length between 1.5 and 2μm at room temperature, only weakly dependent on charge density. The spin polarization of the ferromagnetic contacts is calculated from the measurements to be around ten per cent.

  2. An Azaacene Derivative as Promising Electron-Transport Layer for Inverted Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Pei-Yang; Wang, Ning; Wu, Anyang; Wang, Zilong; Tian, Miaomiao; Fu, Zhisheng; Sun, Xiao Wei; Zhang, Qichun

    2016-08-01

    It is highly desirable to develop novel n-type organic small molecules as an efficient electron-transport layer (ETL) for the replacement of PCBM to obtain high-performance metal-oxide-free, solution-processed inverted perovskite solar cells (PSCs) because this type of solar cells with a low-temperature and solution-based process would make their fabrication more feasible and practical. In this research, the new azaacene QCAPZ has been synthesized and employed as non-fullerene ETL material for inverted PSCs through a solution-based process without the need for additional dopants or additives. The as-fabricated inverted PSCs show a power conversion efficiency up to 10.26 %. Our results clearly suggest that larger azaacenes could be promising electron-transport materials to achieve high-performance solution-processed inverted PSCs. PMID:27378599

  3. Computation of turbulent boundary layers employing the defect wall-function method. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Douglas L.

    1994-01-01

    In order to decrease overall computational time requirements of spatially-marching parabolized Navier-Stokes finite-difference computer code when applied to turbulent fluid flow, a wall-function methodology, originally proposed by R. Barnwell, was implemented. This numerical effort increases computational speed and calculates reasonably accurate wall shear stress spatial distributions and boundary-layer profiles. Since the wall shear stress is analytically determined from the wall-function model, the computational grid near the wall is not required to spatially resolve the laminar-viscous sublayer. Consequently, a substantially increased computational integration step size is achieved resulting in a considerable decrease in net computational time. This wall-function technique is demonstrated for adiabatic flat plate test cases from Mach 2 to Mach 8. These test cases are analytically verified employing: (1) Eckert reference method solutions, (2) experimental turbulent boundary-layer data of Mabey, and (3) finite-difference computational code solutions with fully resolved laminar-viscous sublayers. Additionally, results have been obtained for two pressure-gradient cases: (1) an adiabatic expansion corner and (2) an adiabatic compression corner.

  4. Deposition of durable thin silver layers onto polyamides employing a heterogeneous Tollens’ reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Textor, Torsten; Fouda, Moustafa M. G.; Mahltig, Boris

    2010-02-01

    Tollens' reaction is a well-known reaction employed in chemical analyses to detect reducing groups—basically aldehydes. If aldehydes are available in a solution these will reduce silver(I) ions to silver(0). The present paper describes an approach to use a heterogeneous Tollens' reaction to establish thin layers of silver on polyamide surfaces. The polyamide surface is modified with aldehyde functions in a first step employing glutaraldehyde. The resulting polymer material is therefore equipped with reducing groups necessary for the reduction of silver in a next step. The polymer is subsequently treated with Tollens' reagent yielding a yellow/brownish colour typical for the surface plasmon resonance of silver. The extend of the colouring - indicating the amount of silver deposited - varies with both the concentration of the Tollens' reagent and the concentration of the glutaraldehyde solution used for the pre-treatment. The as-prepared samples not only show an excellent antimicrobial activity but also an enormous durability. Polyamide textiles that were treated with the described approach showed unchanged efficiency even after 30 laundry cycles.

  5. Quantum transport simulation of exciton condensate transport physics in a double-layer graphene system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Xuehao; Register, Leonard F.; MacDonald, Allan H.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2015-12-01

    Spatially indirect electron-hole exciton condensates stabilized by interlayer Fock exchange interactions have been predicted in systems containing a pair of two-dimensional semiconductor or semimetal layers separated by a thin tunnel dielectric. The layer degree of freedom in these systems can be described as a pseudospin. Condensation is then analogous to ferromagnetism, and the interplay between collective and quasiparticle contributions to transport is analogous to phenomena that are heavily studied in spintronics. These phenomena are the basis for pseudospintronic device proposals based on possible low-voltage switching between high (nearly shorted) and low interlayer conductance states and on near-perfect Coulomb drag-counterflow current along the layers. In this work, a quantum transport simulator incorporating a nonlocal Fock exchange interaction is presented, and used to model the essential transport physics in, for specificity, a graphene-dielectric-graphene system. Finite-size effects, Coulomb drag-counterflow current, critical interlayer currents beyond which interlayer dc conductance collapses at subthermal voltages, nonlocal coupling between interlayer critical currents in multiple lead devices, and an Andreev-like reflection process are illustrated.

  6. Combined core/boundary layer transport simulations in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Prinja, A.K.; Schafer, R.F. Jr.; Conn, R.W.; Howe, H.C.

    1986-04-01

    Significant new numerical results are presented from self-consistent core and boundary or scrape-off layer plasma simulations with 3-D neutral transport calculations. For a symmetric belt limiter it is shown that, for plasma conditions considered here, the pump limiter collection efficiency increases from 11% to 18% of the core efflux as a result of local reionization of blade deflected neutrals. This hitherto unobserved effect causes a significant amplification of upstream ion flux entering the pump limiter. Results from coupling of an earlier developed two-zone edge plasma model ODESSA to the PROCTR core plasma simulation code indicates that intense recycling divertor operation may not be possible because of stagnation of upstream flow velocity. This results in a self-consistent reduction of density gradient in an intermediate region between the central plasma and separatrix, and a concomitant reduction of core-efflux. There is also evidence of increased recycling at the first wall.

  7. Electrical transport properties of single-layer WS2.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Allain, Adrien; Huang, Ying-Sheng; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Kis, Andras

    2014-08-26

    We report on the fabrication of field-effect transistors based on single layers and bilayers of the semiconductor WS2 and the investigation of their electronic transport properties. We find that the doping level strongly depends on the device environment and that long in situ annealing drastically improves the contact transparency, allowing four-terminal measurements to be performed and the pristine properties of the material to be recovered. Our devices show n-type behavior with a high room-temperature on/off current ratio of ∼10(6). They show clear metallic behavior at high charge carrier densities and mobilities as high as ∼140 cm(2)/(V s) at low temperatures (above 300 cm(2)/(V s) in the case of bilayers). In the insulating regime, the devices exhibit variable-range hopping, with a localization length of about 2 nm that starts to increase as the Fermi level enters the conduction band. The promising electronic properties of WS2, comparable to those of single-layer MoS2 and WSe2, together with its strong spin-orbit coupling, make it interesting for future applications in electronic, optical, and valleytronic devices. PMID:25069042

  8. Vertical transport of water in the Martian boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, Aaron P.; Haberle, R. M.; Houben, Howard C.

    1993-01-01

    We are continuing our examination of the transport of H2O through the martian boundary layer, and we have written a one-dimensional numerical model of the exchange of H2O between the atmosphere and subsurface of Mars through the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Our goal is to explore the mechanisms of H2O exchange, and to elucidate the role played by the regolith in the local H2O budget. The atmospheric model includes effects of Coriolis, pressure gradient, and frictional forces for momentum, as well as radiation, sensible heat flux, and advection for heat. The model differs from Flasar and Goody by use of appropriate Viking-based physical constants and inclusion of the radiative effects of atmospheric dust. We specify the pressure gradient force or compute it from a simple slope model. The subsurface model accounts for conduction of heat and diffusion of H2O through a porous adsorbing medium in response to diurnal forcing. The model is initialized with depth-independent H2O concentrations (2 kg M(exp -3)) in the regolith, and a dry atmosphere. The model terminates when the atmospheric H2O column abundance stabilizes at 0.1 percent per sol.

  9. Transition Metal-Oxide Free Perovskite Solar Cells Enabled by a New Organic Charge Transport Layer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sehoon; Han, Ggoch Ddeul; Weis, Jonathan G; Park, Hyoungwon; Hentz, Olivia; Zhao, Zhibo; Swager, Timothy M; Gradečak, Silvija

    2016-04-01

    Various electron and hole transport layers have been used to develop high-efficiency perovskite solar cells. To achieve low-temperature solution processing of perovskite solar cells, organic n-type materials are employed to replace the metal oxide electron transport layer (ETL). Although PCBM (phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester) has been widely used for this application, its morphological instability in films (i.e., aggregation) is detrimental. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of a new fullerene derivative (isobenzofulvene-C60-epoxide, IBF-Ep) that serves as an electron transporting material for methylammonium mixed lead halide-based perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3-xClx) solar cells, both in the normal and inverted device configurations. We demonstrate that IBF-Ep has superior morphological stability compared to the conventional acceptor, PCBM. IBF-Ep provides higher photovoltaic device performance as compared to PCBM (6.9% vs 2.5% in the normal and 9.0% vs 5.3% in the inverted device configuration). Moreover, IBF-Ep devices show superior tolerance to high humidity (90%) in air. By reaching power conversion efficiencies up to 9.0% for the inverted devices with IBF-Ep as the ETL, we demonstrate the potential of this new material as an alternative to metal oxides for perovskite solar cells processed in air. PMID:26947400

  10. Enhanced Electron Extraction Capability of Polymer Solar Cells via Employing Electrostatically Self-Assembled Molecule on Cathode Interfacial Layer.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiqi; Zhang, Xinyuan; Liu, Chunyu; Zhang, Zhihui; Li, Jinfeng; Shen, Liang; Guo, Wenbin; Ruan, Shengping

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, high-performance inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs) with a modified cathode buffer layer, titanium dioxide:polyethylenimine (TiO2:PEI), are demonstrated. The TiO2-O-PEI transport layer was fabricated by electrostatically self-assembled monolayers (ESAM) of PEI molecules. Protonated amine functional groups of PEI can combine protons (H(+)) hydrolyzing from its aqueous solution. Also, PEI could produce ESAM on the surface of hydroxylated TiO2 because of its cationic characteristics. The incorporation of the TiO2-O-PEI layer enhances the photocurrent and power conversion efficiency (PCE) due to the improved interfacial electron transport and extraction of the TiO2-O-PEI surface and the increased light absorption of the active layer. The enhanced PCE, low-cost materials, and solution process of TiO2-O-PEI buffer layers provide a promising method for highly efficient PSCs. PMID:26955888

  11. Highly Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells Employing an Easily Attainable Bifluorenylidene-Based Hole-Transporting Material.

    PubMed

    Rakstys, Kasparas; Saliba, Michael; Gao, Peng; Gratia, Paul; Kamarauskas, Egidijus; Paek, Sanghyun; Jankauskas, Vygintas; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2016-06-20

    The 4,4'-dimethoxydiphenylamine-substituted 9,9'-bifluorenylidene (KR216) hole transporting material has been synthesized using a straightforward two-step procedure from commercially available and inexpensive starting reagents, mimicking the synthetically challenging 9,9'-spirobifluorene moiety of the well-studied spiro-OMeTAD. A power conversion efficiency of 17.8 % has been reached employing a novel HTM in a perovskite solar cells. PMID:27158924

  12. Real-time dosimeter employed to evaluate the half-value layer in CT.

    PubMed

    McKenney, Sarah E; Seibert, J Anthony; Burkett, George W; Gelskey, Dale; Sunde, Paul B; Newman, James D; Boone, John M

    2014-01-20

    Half-value layer (HVL) measurements on commercial whole body computer tomography (CT) scanners require serial measurements and, in many institutions, the presence of a service engineer. An assembly of aluminum filters (AAF), designed to be used in conjunction with a real-time dosimeter, was developed to provide estimates of the HVL using clinical protocols. Two real-time dose probes, a solid-state and air ionization chamber, were examined. The AAF consisted of eight rectangular filters of high-purity aluminum (Type 1100), symmetrically positioned to form a cylindrical 'cage' around the probe's detective volume. The incident x-ray beam was attenuated by varying thicknesses of aluminum filters as the gantry completed a minimum of one rotation. Measurements employing real-time chambers were conducted both in service mode and with a routine abdomen/pelvis protocol for several combinations of x-ray tube potentials and bow tie filters. These measurements were validated against conventional serial HVL measurements. The average relative difference between the HVL measurements using the two methods was less than 5% when using a 122 mm diameter AAF; relative differences were reduced to 1.1% when the diameter was increased to 505 mm, possibly due to reduced scatter contamination. Use of a real-time dose probe and the AAF allowed for time-efficient measurements of beam quality on a clinical CT scanner using clinical protocols. PMID:24351935

  13. Real-time dosimeter employed to evaluate the half-value layer in CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenney, Sarah E.; Seibert, J. Anthony; Burkett, George W.; Gelskey, Dale; Sunde, Paul B.; Newman, James D.; Boone, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Half-value layer (HVL) measurements on commercial whole body computer tomography (CT) scanners require serial measurements and, in many institutions, the presence of a service engineer. An assembly of aluminum filters (AAF), designed to be used in conjunction with a real-time dosimeter, was developed to provide estimates of the HVL using clinical protocols. Two real-time dose probes, a solid-state and air ionization chamber, were examined. The AAF consisted of eight rectangular filters of high-purity aluminum (Type 1100), symmetrically positioned to form a cylindrical ‘cage’ around the probe's detective volume. The incident x-ray beam was attenuated by varying thicknesses of aluminum filters as the gantry completed a minimum of one rotation. Measurements employing real-time chambers were conducted both in service mode and with a routine abdomen/pelvis protocol for several combinations of x-ray tube potentials and bow tie filters. These measurements were validated against conventional serial HVL measurements. The average relative difference between the HVL measurements using the two methods was less than 5% when using a 122 mm diameter AAF; relative differences were reduced to 1.1% when the diameter was increased to 505 mm, possibly due to reduced scatter contamination. Use of a real-time dose probe and the AAF allowed for time-efficient measurements of beam quality on a clinical CT scanner using clinical protocols.

  14. Real-time dosimeter employed to evaluate the half-value layer in CT

    PubMed Central

    McKenney, Sarah E.; Seibert, J. Anthony; Burkett, George W.; Gelskey, Dale; Sunde, Paul B.; Newman, James D.; Boone, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Half-value layer (HVL) measurements on commercial whole body CT scanners require serial measurements and, in many institutions, the presence of a service engineer. An assembly of aluminum filters (AAF), designed to be used in conjunction with a real-time dosimeter, was developed to provide estimates of the HVL using clinical protocols. Two real-time dose probes, a solid-state and air ionization chamber, were examined. The AAF consisted of eight rectangular filters of high purity aluminum (Type 1100), symmetrically positioned to form a cylindrical “cage” around the probe’s detective volume. The incident x-ray beam was attenuated by varying thicknesses of aluminum filters as the gantry completed a minimum of one rotation. Measurements employing real-time chambers were conducted both in service mode and with a routine abdomen/pelvis protocol for several combinations of x-ray tube potentials and bow tie filters. These measurements were validated against conventional serial HVL measurements. The average relative difference between the HVL measurements using the two methods was less than 5% when using a 122 mm diameter AAF; relative differences were reduced to 1.1% when the diameter was increased to 505 mm, possibly due to a reduced scatter contamination. Use of a real-time dose probe and the AAF allowed for time-efficient measurements of beam quality on a clinical CT scanner using clinical protocols. PMID:24351935

  15. Employing lidar to detail vegetation canopy architecture for prediction of aeolian transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sankey, Joel B.; Law, Darin J.; Breshears, David D.; Munson, Seth M.; Webb, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    The diverse and fundamental effects that aeolian processes have on the biosphere and geosphere are commonly generated by horizontal sediment transport at the land surface. However, predicting horizontal sediment transport depends on vegetation architecture, which is difficult to quantify in a rapid but accurate manner. We demonstrate an approach to measure vegetation canopy architecture at high resolution using lidar along a gradient of dryland sites ranging from 2% to 73% woody plant canopy cover. Lidar-derived canopy height, distance (gaps) between vegetation elements (e.g., trunks, limbs, leaves), and the distribution of gaps scaled by vegetation height were correlated with canopy cover and highlight potentially improved horizontal dust flux estimation than with cover alone. Employing lidar to estimate detailed vegetation canopy architecture offers promise for improved predictions of horizontal sediment transport across heterogeneous plant assemblages.

  16. [Highly Efficient Bilayer-Structure Yellow-Green OLED with MADN Hole-Transport Layer and the Impedance Spectroscopy Analysis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-wen; Mo, Bing-jie; Liu, Li-ming; Wang, Hong-hang; Chen, Er-wei; Xu, Ji-wen; Wang, Hua

    2015-12-01

    Abstract Highly efficient bilayer-structure yellow-green organic light-emitting device (OLED) has been demonstrated based on MADN as hole-transport layer (HTL) and host-guest coped system of [Alq₃: 0.7 Wt% rubrene] as emitting and electron-trans- port layer. The device gives yellow-green emission through incomplete energy transfer from the host of Alq₃ to the guest of ru- brene. An electroluminescent peak of 560 nm, 1931 CIE color coordinates of (0.46, 0.52) and a maximum current efficiency of 7.63 cd · A⁻¹ (which has been enhanced by 30% in comparison with the counterpart having conventional NPB HTL) are ob- served. The hole-transporting characteristics of MADN and NPB have been systematically investigated by constructing hole-only devices and employing impedance spectroscopy analysis. Our results indicate that MADN can be served as an effective hole-trans- port material and its hole-transporting ability is slightly inferior to NPB. This overcomes the shortcoming of hole transporting more quickly than electron in OLED and improves carrier balance in the emitting layer. Consequently, the device current efficien- cy is promoted. In addition, the current efficiency of bilayer-structure OLED with MADN as HTL is comparable to that of conv- entinol trilayer-structure device with MADN as HTL and Alq₃ as electron-transport layer. This indicates that the simplified bi- layer-structure device can be achieved without sacrificing current efficiency. The emitting layer of [Alq: 0.7 Wt% rubrene possesses superior elecron-transporting ability. PMID:26964197

  17. Particle Swarm Transport through Immiscible Fluid Layers in a Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teasdale, N. D.; Boomsma, E.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2011-12-01

    Immiscible fluids occur either naturally (e.g. oil & water) or from anthropogenic processes (e.g. liquid CO2 & water) in the subsurface and complicate the transport of natural or engineered micro- or nano-scale particles. In this study, we examined the effect of immiscible fluids on the formation and evolution of particle swarms in a fracture. A particle swarm is a collection of colloidal-size particles in a dilute suspension that exhibits cohesive behavior. Swarms fall under gravity with a velocity that is greater than the settling velocity of a single particle. Thus a particle swarm of colloidal contaminants can potentially travel farther and faster in a fracture than expected for a dispersion or emulsion of colloidal particles. We investigated the formation, evolution, and break-up of colloidal swarms under gravity in a uniform aperture fracture as hydrophobic/hydrophyllic particle swarms move across an oil-water interface. A uniform aperture fracture was fabricated from two transparent acrylic rectangular prisms (100 mm x 50 mm x 100 mm) that are separated by 1, 2.5, 5, 10 or 50 mm. The fracture was placed, vertically, inside a glass tank containing a layer of pure silicone oil (polydimethylsiloxane) on distilled water. Along the length of the fracture, 30 mm was filled with oil and 70 mm with water. Experiments were conducted using silicone oils with viscosities of 5, 10, 100, or 1000 cSt. Particle swarms (5 μl) were comprised of a 1% concentration (by mass) of 25 micron glass beads (hydrophilic) suspended in a water drop, or a 1% concentration (by mass) of 3 micron polystyrene fluorescent beads (hydrophobic) suspended in a water drop. The swarm behavior was imaged using an optical fluorescent imaging system composed of a CCD camera and by green (525 nm) LED arrays for illumination. Swarms were spherical and remained coherent as they fell through the oil because of the immiscibility of oil and water. However, as a swarm approached the oil-water interface, it

  18. 49 CFR 372.103 - Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... school children and teachers to or from school. 372.103 Section 372.103 Transportation Other Regulations... Exemptions § 372.103 Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from... motor vehicles being used at the time of operation in the transportation of schoolchildren and...

  19. 49 CFR 372.103 - Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... school children and teachers to or from school. 372.103 Section 372.103 Transportation Other Regulations... Exemptions § 372.103 Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from... motor vehicles being used at the time of operation in the transportation of schoolchildren and...

  20. 49 CFR 372.103 - Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... school children and teachers to or from school. 372.103 Section 372.103 Transportation Other Regulations... Exemptions § 372.103 Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from... motor vehicles being used at the time of operation in the transportation of schoolchildren and...

  1. Kinetics of Ion Transport in Perovskite Active Layers and Its Implications for Active Layer Stability.

    PubMed

    Bag, Monojit; Renna, Lawrence A; Adhikari, Ramesh Y; Karak, Supravat; Liu, Feng; Lahti, Paul M; Russell, Thomas P; Tuominen, Mark T; Venkataraman, D

    2015-10-14

    Solar cells fabricated using alkyl ammonium metal halides as light absorbers have the right combination of high power conversion efficiency and ease of fabrication to realize inexpensive but efficient thin film solar cells. However, they degrade under prolonged exposure to sunlight. Herein, we show that this degradation is quasi-reversible, and that it can be greatly lessened by simple modifications of the solar cell operating conditions. We studied perovskite devices using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) with methylammonium (MA)-, formamidinium (FA)-, and MA(x)FA(1-x) lead triiodide as active layers. From variable temperature EIS studies, we found that the diffusion coefficient using MA ions was greater than when using FA ions. Structural studies using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) show that for MAPbI3 a structural change and lattice expansion occurs at device operating temperatures. On the basis of EIS and PXRD studies, we postulate that in MAPbI3 the predominant mechanism of accelerated device degradation under sunlight involves thermally activated fast ion transport coupled with a lattice-expanding phase transition, both of which are facilitated by absorption of the infrared component of the solar spectrum. Using these findings, we show that the devices show greatly improved operation lifetimes and stability under white-light emitting diodes, or under a solar simulator with an infrared cutoff filter or with cooling. PMID:26414066

  2. A composite nanostructured electron-transport layer for stable hole-conductor free perovskite solar cells: design and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhenhua; Qi, Fei; Liu, Pei; You, Sujian; Kondamareddy, Kiran Kumar; Wang, Changlei; Cheng, Nian; Bai, Sihang; Liu, Wei; Guo, Shishang; Zhao, Xing-Zhong

    2016-03-01

    A novel composite nanostructured titanium dioxide (TiO2) based electron-transport layer (ETL) is designed by combining size blended nanoparticles (SBNP) and nanoarrays (NA) for efficient perovskite solar cell (PSC) applications. The composite nanostructured (SBNP + NA) ETL is successfully employed in hole-conductor free PSCs, there by achieving a stable device with a maximum efficiency of 13.5%. The improvement in the performance is attributed to the better charge transport and lower recombination in the SBNP + NA ETL. Despite the stable high efficiency, SBNP + NA ETL based PSCs are advantageous owing to their low cost, ease of all-solution fabrication process in an open environment and good reproducibility.A novel composite nanostructured titanium dioxide (TiO2) based electron-transport layer (ETL) is designed by combining size blended nanoparticles (SBNP) and nanoarrays (NA) for efficient perovskite solar cell (PSC) applications. The composite nanostructured (SBNP + NA) ETL is successfully employed in hole-conductor free PSCs, there by achieving a stable device with a maximum efficiency of 13.5%. The improvement in the performance is attributed to the better charge transport and lower recombination in the SBNP + NA ETL. Despite the stable high efficiency, SBNP + NA ETL based PSCs are advantageous owing to their low cost, ease of all-solution fabrication process in an open environment and good reproducibility. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the experimental section and ESI figures. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr09045h

  3. ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT BY ACOUSTIC MODES GENERATED IN THE BOUNDARY LAYER. I. HYDRODYNAMICAL THEORY AND SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Rafikov, Roman R.; Stone, James M.

    2013-06-10

    The nature of angular momentum transport in the boundary layers of accretion disks has been one of the central and long-standing issues of accretion disk theory. In this work we demonstrate that acoustic waves excited by supersonic shear in the boundary layer serve as an efficient mechanism of mass, momentum, and energy transport at the interface between the disk and the accreting object. We develop the theory of angular momentum transport by acoustic modes in the boundary layer, and support our findings with three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, using an isothermal equation of state. Our first major result is the identification of three types of global modes in the boundary layer. We derive dispersion relations for each of these modes that accurately capture the pattern speeds observed in simulations to within a few percent. Second, we show that angular momentum transport in the boundary layer is intrinsically nonlocal, and is driven by radiation of angular momentum away from the boundary layer into both the star and the disk. The picture of angular momentum transport in the boundary layer by waves that can travel large distances before dissipating and redistributing angular momentum and energy to the disk and star is incompatible with the conventional notion of local transport by turbulent stresses. Our results have important implications for semianalytical models that describe the spectral emission from boundary layers.

  4. Modeling of turbulent transport in the surface layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. L.

    1973-01-01

    The turbulence equations as written by Donaldson using the method of invariant modeling have been applied to the following limiting cases of the surface or constant flux layer of the planetary boundary layer: (1) Neutrally stable; (2) stable (above influence of surface roughness); (3) nearly neutrally stable; and (4) very unstable (free convection). For the neutrally stable case, the equations are shown to admit as a solution the familiar logarithmic profile. By use of this result, boundary conditions suitable for the surface layer are defined and are simple to apply to rough surfaces.

  5. Extreme detached dust layers near Martian volcanoes: Evidence for dust transport by mesoscale circulations forced by high topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heavens, N. G.; Cantor, B. A.; Hayne, P. O.; Kass, D. M.; Kleinböhl, A.; McCleese, D. J.; Piqueux, S.; Schofield, J. T.; Shirley, J. H.

    2015-05-01

    Modeling suggests that thermal circulations over Mars's highest volcanoes transport water vapor and dust from the surface into the middle atmosphere, forming detached layers in these constituents. Intense vertical mixing also takes place in regional and global dust storms, which can generate detached layers that are extreme in both altitude and magnitude. Here we employ observations by the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) on board Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, taking advantage of improved vertical coverage in MCS's aerosol retrievals, to discover a new class of extreme detached dust layers (EDDLs). Observed during minimal dust storm activity and furthermore distinguished by their potentially large and measurable horizontal extent (>1000 km), these EDDLs cluster near Olympus Mons and the Tharsis Montes, from which they likely originate. The existence of these EDDLs suggests that vertical mixing by topographic circulations can be much stronger than previously modeled and more frequent than previously observed.

  6. Reduced workfunction intermetallic seed layers allow growth of porous n-GaN and low resistivity, ohmic electron transport.

    PubMed

    Bilousov, Oleksandr V; Carvajal, Joan J; Drouin, Dominique; Mateos, Xavier; Díaz, Francesc; Aguiló, Magdalena; O'Dwyer, Colm

    2012-12-01

    Porous GaN crystals have been successfully grown and electrically contacted simultaneously on Pt- and Au-coated silicon substrates as porous crystals and as porous layers. By the direct reaction of metallic Ga and NH(3) gas through chemical vapor deposition, intermetallic metal-Ga alloys form at the GaN-metal interface, allowing vapor-solid-solid seeding and subsequent growth of porous GaN. Current-voltage and capacitance-voltage measurements confirm that the intermetallic seed layers prevent interface oxidation and give a high-quality reduced workfunction contact that allows exceptionally low contact resistivities. Additionally, the simultaneous formation of a lower workfunction intermetallic permits ohmic electron transport to n-type GaN grown using high workfunction metals that best catalyze the formation of porous GaN layers and may be employed to seed and ohmically contact a range of III-N compounds and alloys for broadband absorption and emission. PMID:23167596

  7. A nano-grid structure made of perovskite SrTiO3 nanowires for efficient electron transport layers in inverted polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Won; Suh, Yo-han; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Kim, Yong Seok; Kim, Won Bae

    2015-03-14

    A nano-grid structure of perovskite SrTiO3 NWs is developed for a novel electron transport layer in inverted polymer solar cells. Due to the excellent charge transporting properties of the SrTiO3 nano-grid structure, the device employing this nanostructure showed ∼32% enhanced photovoltaic performance, compared to the solar cell using a TiO2 thin film. PMID:25684116

  8. 49 CFR 372.103 - Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... school children and teachers to or from school. 372.103 Section 372.103 Transportation Other Regulations... Exemptions § 372.103 Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from school. The exemption set forth in 49 U.S.C. 13506(a)(1) shall not be construed as being inapplicable...

  9. 49 CFR 372.103 - Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... school children and teachers to or from school. 372.103 Section 372.103 Transportation Other Regulations... Exemptions § 372.103 Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from school. The exemption set forth in 49 U.S.C. 13506(a)(1) shall not be construed as being inapplicable...

  10. Color stable white phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with red emissive electron transport layer

    SciTech Connect

    Wook Kim, Jin; Yoo, Seung Il; Sung Kang, Jin; Eun Lee, Song; Kwan Kim, Young; Hwa Yu, Hyeong; Turak, Ayse; Young Kim, Woo

    2015-06-28

    We analyzed the performance of multi-emissive white phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) in relation to various red emitting sites of hole and electron transport layers (HTL and ETL). The shift of the recombination zone producing stable white emission in PHOLEDs was utilized as luminance was increased with red emission in its electron transport layer. Multi-emissive white PHOLEDs including the red light emitting electron transport layer yielded maximum external quantum efficiency of 17.4% with CIE color coordinates (−0.030, +0.001) shifting only from 1000 to 10 000 cd/m{sup 2}. Additionally, we observed a reduction of energy loss in the white PHOLED via Ir(piq){sub 3} as phosphorescent red dopant in electron transport layer.

  11. A simple theoretical model of heat and moisture transport in multi-layer garments in cool ambient air.

    PubMed

    Wissler, Eugene H; Havenith, George

    2009-03-01

    Overall resistances for heat and vapor transport in a multilayer garment depend on the properties of individual layers and the thickness of any air space between layers. Under uncomplicated, steady-state conditions, thermal and mass fluxes are uniform within the garment, and the rate of transport is simply computed as the overall temperature or water concentration difference divided by the appropriate resistance. However, that simple computation is not valid under cool ambient conditions when the vapor permeability of the garment is low, and condensation occurs within the garment. Several recent studies have measured heat and vapor transport when condensation occurs within the garment (Richards et al. in Report on Project ThermProject, Contract No. G6RD-CT-2002-00846, 2002; Havenith et al. in J Appl Physiol 104:142-149, 2008). In addition to measuring cooling rates for ensembles when the skin was either wet or dry, both studies employed a flat-plate apparatus to measure resistances of individual layers. Those data provide information required to define the properties of an ensemble in terms of its individual layers. We have extended the work of previous investigators by developing a rather simple technique for analyzing heat and water vapor transport when condensation occurs within a garment. Computed results agree well with experimental results reported by Richards et al. (Report on Project ThermProject, Contract No. G6RD-CT-2002-00846, 2002) and Havenith et al. (J Appl Physiol 104:142-149, 2008). We discuss application of the method to human subjects for whom the rate of sweat secretion, instead of the partial pressure of water on the skin, is specified. Analysis of a more complicated five-layer system studied by Yoo and Kim (Text Res J 78:189-197, 2008) required an iterative computation based on principles defined in this paper. PMID:19125281

  12. Thermal transport across graphene and single layer hexagonal boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingchao E-mail: yyue@whu.edu.cn; Hong, Yang; Yue, Yanan E-mail: yyue@whu.edu.cn

    2015-04-07

    As the dimensions of nanocircuits and nanoelectronics shrink, thermal energies are being generated in more confined spaces, making it extremely important and urgent to explore for efficient heat dissipation pathways. In this work, the phonon energy transport across graphene and hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) interface is studied using classic molecular dynamics simulations. Effects of temperature, interatomic bond strength, heat flux direction, and functionalization on interfacial thermal transport are investigated. It is found out that by hydrogenating graphene in the hybrid structure, the interfacial thermal resistance (R) between graphene and h-BN can be reduced by 76.3%, indicating an effective approach to manipulate the interfacial thermal transport. Improved in-plane/out-of-plane phonon couplings and broadened phonon channels are observed in the hydrogenated graphene system by analyzing its phonon power spectra. The reported R results monotonically decrease with temperature and interatomic bond strengths. No thermal rectification phenomenon is observed in this interfacial thermal transport. Results reported in this work give the fundamental knowledge on graphene and h-BN thermal transport and provide rational guidelines for next generation thermal interface material designs.

  13. The Benthic Boundary Layer: Transport Processes and Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Duren, Luca A.; Middelburg, Jack J.

    Interdisciplinary research is certainly one of the current buzzwords that needs to be incorporated in virtually every grant proposal. The idea that integration of different scientific fields is a prerequisite for progress in Earth sciences is now well recognized. The benthic boundary layer (BBL) is one area of research in which physicists, chemists, biologists, geologists, and engineers have worked in close and fruitful cooperation for several decades. The BBL comprises the near-bottom layer of water, the sediment-water interface, and the top layer of sediment that is directly influenced by the overlying water. In 1974, a BBL conference in France resulted in a book titled The Benthic Boundary Layer edited by I.N. McCave. This publication contained contributions from scientists from a wide range of disciplines and gave an overview of the state-of-the-art of BBL research. However, science has moved on in the past 25 years. Significant conceptual and technological progress has been made, and it is definitely time for an update.

  14. Highly efficient tandem organic light-emitting devices utilizing the connecting structure based on n-doped electron-transport layer/HATCN/hole-transport layer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Lin; Chen, Chien-Yu; Huang, Yi-Hsiang; Lu, Yin-Jui; Chou, Cheng-Hsu; Wu, Chung-Chih

    2014-08-01

    In this work, we conducted studies of tandem organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) based on the connecting structure consisting of n-doped electron-transport layer (n-ETL)/1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene hexacarbonitrile (HATCN)/hole-transport layer. We investigated effects of different n-ETL materials and different HATCN thicknesses on characteristics of tandem OLEDs. Results show that the tandem OLEDs with n-BPhen and a 20 nm layer of HATCN in the connecting structure exhibited the best performance. With these, highly efficient and bright green phosphorescent two-emitting-unit tandem OLEDs, with drive voltages significantly lower than twice that of the single-unit benchmark device and current efficiencies higher than twice that of the single-unit benchmark device, were demonstrated. PMID:25090347

  15. Water Transport in the Micro Porous Layer and Gas Diffusion Layer of a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, C.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, a recently developed dynamic pore-network model is presented [1]. The model explicitly solves for both water pressure and capillary pressure. A semi-implicit scheme is used in updating water saturation in each pore body, which considerably increases the numerical stability at low capillary number values. Furthermore, a multiple-time-step algorithm is introduced to reduce the computational effort. A number of case studies of water transport in the micro porous layer (MPL) and gas diffusion layer (GDL) are conducted. We illustrate the role of MPL in reducing water flooding in the GDL. Also, the dynamic water transport through the MPL-GDL interface is explored in detail. This information is essential to the reduced continua model (RCM), which was developed for multiphase flow through thin porous layers [2, 3]. C.Z. Qin, Water transport in the gas diffusion layer of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell: dynamic pore-network modeling, J Electrochimical. Soci., 162, F1036-F1046, 2015. C.Z. Qin and S.M. Hassanizadeh, Multiphase flow through multilayers of thin porous media: general balance equations and constitutive relationships for a solid-gas-liquid three-phase system, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 70, 693-708, 2014. C.Z. Qin and S.M. Hassanizadeh, A new approach to modeling water flooding in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell, Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, 40, 3348-3358, 2015.

  16. Performance evaluation of transport layer protocols for transmitting real-time data over DiffServ networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Yoko; Sakai, Tatsuhiko; Shigeno, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Yutaka

    2001-07-01

    In this paper, we discuss transport layer protocols to support real-time data transmission overnetworks using Differentiated Services (Diffserv) where bandwidth is guaranteed. Assuming that an application transmits streaming video data over a Diffserv network, we have performed simulation experiments to evaluate performance of real-time transmission using standard internet protocols, UDP and TCP as a transport layer protocol. The application is designed to buffer a portion of the data on the receiver before starting the playback and to operate in a streaming mode. Consequently, when packets are lost over Diffserv networks, TCP shows better performance than UDP. Simulation results show that employment of SACK option for TCP can recover lost packets efficiently and improve performance of real-time transmission. Currently, a growing number of real-time media applications over Internet are being implemented using UDP, because reliable delivery mechanism of TCP can obstruct real-time data transmission that is timing critical. However, in our experimental environment, retransmission and congestion control mechanism of TCP make use of bandwidth guaranteed by Diffserv, and help to provide more reliable delivery of real-time data than UDP without serious impacts on time-sensitive delivery. Therefore, despite of the general belief that TCP is not suitable for time-sensitive delivery, in our experiment, we show that TCP is a transport layer protocol suitable for real-time data transmission over Diffserv networks.

  17. Fabrication of Nano-Composite Surface Layers on Aluminium Employing Friction Stir Processing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozorg, S. F. K.; Zarghani, A. S.; Zarei-Hanzaki, A.

    2010-03-01

    Al/Al2O3 nano-composite surface layer was fabricated via friction stir processing technique. Commercial AA6082 aluminium alloy extruded bar and nanometric Al2O3 powder were subjected to friction stir processing at a substrate travel speed of 80 mm/min and a tool rotation speed of 1000 rpm using a hardened H-13 tool steel. The grain structure and reinforcement particles were investigated by using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Results show that Al2O3 particles can be more uniformly dispread in aluminium substrate by increasing the number of processing passes. Also, hardness enhancement of the nano-composite surface layer was found. This is attributed to uniform dispersion of Al2O3 particles.

  18. Fabrication of Nano-Composite Surface Layers on Aluminium Employing Friction Stir Processing Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Bozorg, S. F. K.; Zarghani, A. S.; Zarei-Hanzaki, A.

    2010-03-11

    Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-composite surface layer was fabricated via friction stir processing technique. Commercial AA6082 aluminium alloy extruded bar and nanometric Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder were subjected to friction stir processing at a substrate travel speed of 80 mm/min and a tool rotation speed of 1000 rpm using a hardened H-13 tool steel. The grain structure and reinforcement particles were investigated by using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Results show that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles can be more uniformly dispread in aluminium substrate by increasing the number of processing passes. Also, hardness enhancement of the nano-composite surface layer was found. This is attributed to uniform dispersion of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles.

  19. High Efficiency Alternating Current Driven Organic Light Emitting Devices Employing Active Semiconducting Gate Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Gregory; Xu, Junwei; Carroll, David

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we describe the role of semiconductor-polymer interfaces in alternating current (AC) driven organic electroluminescent (EL) devices. We implement inorganic semiconducting materials between the external contact and the active layers in organic light EL devices. Precise control of capacitance and charge injection is required to realize bright and efficient large area AC driven devices. We show how this architecture results in active gating to the polymer layers, resulting in the novel ability to control the capacitance and charge injection characteristics. We propose a model based on band bending at the semiconductor-polymer interface. Furthermore, we elucidate the influence of the semiconductor-polymer interface on the internally coupled magnetic field generated in an alternating current driven organic light emitting device configuration. Magnetic fields can alter the ratios of singlet and triplet populations, and we show that internal generation of a magnetic field can dramatically alter the efficiency of light emission in organic EL devices.

  20. Surface immobilization of a tetra-ruthenium substituted polyoxometalate water oxidation catalyst through the employment of conducting polypyrrole and the layer-by-layer (LBL) technique.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Nargis; Sartorel, Andrea; Yaqub, Mustansara; Wearen, Kevin; Laffir, Fathima; Armstrong, Gordon; Dickinson, Calum; Bonchio, Marcella; McCormac, Timothy

    2014-06-11

    A tetra Ru-substituted polyoxometalate Na10[{Ru4O4(OH)2(H2O)4}(γ-SiW10O36)2] (Ru4POM) has been successfully immobilised onto glassy carbon electrodes and indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass slides through the employment of a conducting polypyrrole matrix and the layer-by-layer (LBL) technique. The resulting Ru4POM doped polypyrrole films showed stable redox behavior associated with the Ru centres within the Ru4POM, whereas, the POM's tungsten-oxo redox centres were not accessible. The films showed pH dependent redox behavior within the pH range 2-5 whilst exhibiting excellent stability towards redox cycling. The layer-by-layer assembly was constructed onto poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) modified carbon electrodes by alternate depositions of Ru4POM and a Ru(II) metallodendrimer. The resulting Ru4POM assemblies showed stable redox behavior for the redox processes associated with Ru4POM in the pH range 2-5. The charge transfer resistance of the LBL films was calculated through AC-Impedance. Surface characterization of both the polymer and LBL Ru4POM films was carried out using atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Initial investigations into the ability of the Ru4POM LBL films to electrocatalytically oxidise water at pH 7 have also been conducted. PMID:24758586

  1. Carrier Transport in Epitaxial Multi-layer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Ming; Dimitrakopoulos, Christos; Farmer, Damon; Han, Shu-Jen; Wu, Yanqing; Zhu, Wenjuan; Gaskill, D. Kurt; Tedesco, Joseph; Myers-Ward, Rachael; Eddy, Charles, Jr.; Grill, Alfred; Avouris, Phaedon; Ibm Team; Nrl Team

    2011-03-01

    Significant attention has been focused recently on the electrical properties of graphene grown epitaxially on SiC substrates, because it offers an ideal platform for carbon-based electronics using conventional top-down lithography techniques. The transport properties of graphene are usually studied via Hall effect measurements, which provide information on the carrier mobility and density. Hall measurements performed at a single magnetic field yield a weighted average of carrier mobility and density, and are strictly applicable to homogeneous samples. In this study, we performed variable-field Hall and resistivity measurements on epitaxial graphene, and the results were analyzed with a multi-carrier model. Good agreements were obtained between experimental data and the model, providing further evidence of multi-carrier transport in the C-face grown MLG. This work is supported by DARPA under contract FA8650-08-C-7838 through the CERA program and by the Office of Naval Research.

  2. First principles calculations of solid-state thermionic transport in layered van der Waals heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zebarjadi, Mona; Esfarjani, Keivan

    2016-08-21

    This work aims at understanding solid-state energy conversion and transport in layered (van der Waals) heterostructures in contact with metallic electrodes via a first-principles approach. As an illustration, a graphene/phosphorene/graphene heterostructure in contact with gold electrodes is studied by using density functional theory (DFT)-based first principles calculations combined with real space Green's function (GF) formalism. We show that for a monolayer phosphorene, quantum tunneling dominates the transport. By adding more phosphorene layers, one can switch from tunneling-dominated transport to thermionic-dominated transport, resulting in transporting more heat per charge carrier, thus, enhancing the cooling coefficient of performance. The use of layered van der Waals heterostructures has two advantages: (a) thermionic transport barriers can be tuned by changing the number of layers, and (b) thermal conductance across these non-covalent structures is very weak. The phonon thermal conductance of the present van der Waals heterostructure is found to be 4.1 MW m(-2) K(-1) which is one order of magnitude lower than the lowest value for that of covalently-bonded interfaces. The thermionic coefficient of performance for the proposed device is 18.5 at 600 K corresponding to an equivalent ZT of 0.13, which is significant for nanoscale devices. This study shows that layered van der Waals structures have great potential to be used as solid-state energy-conversion devices. PMID:27314610

  3. Influence of geologic layering on heat transport and storage in an aquifer thermal energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridger, D. W.; Allen, D. M.

    2013-09-01

    A modeling study was carried out to evaluate the influence of aquifer heterogeneity, as represented by geologic layering, on heat transport and storage in an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system in Agassiz, British Columbia, Canada. Two 3D heat transport models were developed and calibrated using the flow and heat transport code FEFLOW including: a "non-layered" model domain with homogeneous hydraulic and thermal properties; and, a "layered" model domain with variable hydraulic and thermal properties assigned to discrete geological units to represent aquifer heterogeneity. The base model (non-layered) shows limited sensitivity for the ranges of all thermal and hydraulic properties expected at the site; the model is most sensitive to vertical anisotropy and hydraulic gradient. Simulated and observed temperatures within the wells reflect a combination of screen placement and layering, with inconsistencies largely explained by the lateral continuity of high permeability layers represented in the model. Simulation of heat injection, storage and recovery show preferential transport along high permeability layers, resulting in longitudinal plume distortion, and overall higher short-term storage efficiencies.

  4. Structural design of a double-layered porous hydrogel for effective mass transport

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyejeong; Kim, Hyeon Jeong; Huh, Hyung Kyu; Hwang, Hyung Ju; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-01-01

    Mass transport in porous materials is universal in nature, and its worth attracts great attention in many engineering applications. Plant leaves, which work as natural hydraulic pumps for water uptake, have evolved to have the morphological structure for fast water transport to compensate large water loss by leaf transpiration. In this study, we tried to deduce the advantageous structural features of plant leaves for practical applications. Inspired by the tissue organization of the hydraulic pathways in plant leaves, analogous double-layered porous models were fabricated using agarose hydrogel. Solute transport through the hydrogel models with different thickness ratios of the two layers was experimentally observed. In addition, numerical simulation and theoretical analysis were carried out with varying porosity and thickness ratio to investigate the effect of structural factors on mass transport ability. A simple parametric study was also conducted to examine unveiled relations between structural factors. As a result, the porosity and thickness ratio of the two layers are found to govern the mass transport ability in double-layered porous materials. The hydrogel models with widely dispersed pores at a fixed porosity, i.e., close to a homogeneously porous structure, are mostly turned out to exhibit fast mass transport. The present results would provide a new framework for fundamental design of various porous structures for effective mass transport. PMID:25825619

  5. A charge carrier transport model for donor-acceptor blend layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Janine; Widmer, Johannes; Kleemann, Hans; Tress, Wolfgang; Koerner, Christian; Riede, Moritz; Vandewal, Koen; Leo, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Highly efficient organic solar cells typically comprise donor-acceptor blend layers facilitating effective splitting of excitons. However, the charge carrier mobility in the blends can be substantially smaller than in neat materials, hampering the device performance. Currently, available mobility models do not describe the transport in blend layers entirely. Here, we investigate hole transport in a model blend system consisting of the small molecule donor zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and the acceptor fullerene C60 in different mixing ratios. The blend layer is sandwiched between p-doped organic injection layers, which prevent minority charge carrier injection and enable exploiting diffusion currents for the characterization of exponential tail states from a thickness variation of the blend layer using numerical drift-diffusion simulations. Trap-assisted recombination must be considered to correctly model the conductivity behavior of the devices, which are influenced by local electron currents in the active layer, even though the active layer is sandwiched in between p-doped contacts. We find that the density of deep tail states is largest in the devices with 1:1 mixing ratio (Et = 0.14 eV, Nt = 1.2 × 1018 cm-3) directing towards lattice disorder as the transport limiting process. A combined field and charge carrier density dependent mobility model are developed for this blend layer.

  6. A charge carrier transport model for donor-acceptor blend layers

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Janine Widmer, Johannes; Koerner, Christian; Vandewal, Koen; Leo, Karl; Kleemann, Hans; Tress, Wolfgang; Riede, Moritz

    2015-01-28

    Highly efficient organic solar cells typically comprise donor-acceptor blend layers facilitating effective splitting of excitons. However, the charge carrier mobility in the blends can be substantially smaller than in neat materials, hampering the device performance. Currently, available mobility models do not describe the transport in blend layers entirely. Here, we investigate hole transport in a model blend system consisting of the small molecule donor zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and the acceptor fullerene C{sub 60} in different mixing ratios. The blend layer is sandwiched between p-doped organic injection layers, which prevent minority charge carrier injection and enable exploiting diffusion currents for the characterization of exponential tail states from a thickness variation of the blend layer using numerical drift-diffusion simulations. Trap-assisted recombination must be considered to correctly model the conductivity behavior of the devices, which are influenced by local electron currents in the active layer, even though the active layer is sandwiched in between p-doped contacts. We find that the density of deep tail states is largest in the devices with 1:1 mixing ratio (E{sub t} = 0.14 eV, N{sub t} = 1.2 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}) directing towards lattice disorder as the transport limiting process. A combined field and charge carrier density dependent mobility model are developed for this blend layer.

  7. Layer-by-layer synthesis of metal-containing conducting polymers: caged metal centers for interlayer charge transport.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjun; Huang, Weijie; Pink, Maren; Lee, Dongwhan

    2010-09-01

    Metal-templated [2 + 3]-type cocondensation of a pi-extended boronic acid and nioxime furnished a series of cage molecules, which were electropolymerized to prepare metal-containing conducting polymers (MCPs). Despite sharing essentially isostructural organic scaffolds, these materials display metal-dependent electrochemical properties as evidenced by different redox windows observed for M = Co, Fe, Ru. Consecutive electropolymerization using two different monomers furnished bilayer MCPs having different metals in each layer. In addition to functioning as heavy atom markers in cross-sectional analysis by FIB and EDX, redox-active metal centers participate in voltage-dependent interlayer electron transport to give rise to cyclic voltammograms that are distinctively different from those of each layer alone or random copolymers. A simple electrochemical technique can thus be used as a straightforward diagnostic tool to investigate the structural ordering of electrically conductive layered materials. PMID:20690667

  8. Semianalytical Solutions of Radioactive or Reactive Tracer Transport in Layered Fractured Media

    SciTech Connect

    G.J. Moridis; G. S. Bodvarsson

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, semianalytical solutions are developed for the problem of transport of radioactive or reactive tracers (solutes or colloids) through a layered system of heterogeneous fractured media with misaligned fractures. The tracer transport equations in the matrix account for (a) diffusion, (b) surface diffusion (for solutes only), (c) mass transfer between the mobile and immobile water fractions, (d) linear kinetic or equilibrium physical, chemical, or combined solute sorption or colloid filtration, and (e) radioactive decay or first order chemical reactions. Any number of radioactive decay daughter products (or products of a linear, first-order reaction chain) can be tracked. The tracer-transport equations in the fractures account for the same processes, in addition to advection and hydrodynamic dispersion. Additionally, the colloid transport equations account for straining and velocity adjustments related to the colloidal size. The solutions, which are analytical in the Laplace space, are numerically inverted to provide the solution in time and can accommodate any number of fractured and/or porous layers. The solutions are verified using analytical solutions for limiting cases of solute and colloid transport through fractured and porous media. The effect of important parameters on the transport of {sup 3}H, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu (and its daughters) is investigated in several test problems involving layered geological systems of varying complexity. {sup 239}Pu colloid transport problems in multilayered systems indicate significant colloid accumulations at straining interfaces but much faster transport of the colloid than the corresponding strongly sorbing solute species.

  9. Semianalytical solutions of radioactive or reactive tracer transport in layered fractured media

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2001-10-10

    In this paper, semianalytical solutions are developed for the problem of transport of radioactive or reactive tracers (solutes or colloids) through a layered system of heterogeneous fractured media with misaligned fractures. The tracer transport equations in the matrix account for (a) diffusion, (b) surface diffusion (for solutes only), (c) mass transfer between the mobile and immobile water fractions, (d) linear kinetic or equilibrium physical, chemical, or combined solute sorption or colloid filtration, and (e) radioactive decay or first order chemical reactions. Any number of radioactive decay daughter products (or products of a linear, first-order reaction chain) can be tracked. The tracer-transport equations in the fractures account for the same processes, in addition to advection and hydrodynamic dispersion. Additionally, the colloid transport equations account for straining and velocity adjustments related to the colloidal size. The solutions, which are analytical in the Laplace space, are numerically inverted to provide the solution in time and can accommodate any number of fractured and/or porous layers. The solutions are verified using analytical solutions for limiting cases of solute and colloid transport through fractured and porous media. The effect of important parameters on the transport of {sup 3}H, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu (and its daughters) is investigated in several test problems involving layered geological systems of varying complexity. {sup 239}Pu colloid transport problems in multilayered systems indicate significant colloid accumulations at straining interfaces but much faster transport of the colloid than the corresponding strongly sorbing solute species.

  10. A composite nanostructured electron-transport layer for stable hole-conductor free perovskite solar cells: design and characterization.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhenhua; Qi, Fei; Liu, Pei; You, Sujian; Kondamareddy, Kiran Kumar; Wang, Changlei; Cheng, Nian; Bai, Sihang; Liu, Wei; Guo, Shishang; Zhao, Xing-zhong

    2016-03-21

    A novel composite nanostructured titanium dioxide (TiO2) based electron-transport layer (ETL) is designed by combining size blended nanoparticles (SBNP) and nanoarrays (NA) for efficient perovskite solar cell (PSC) applications. The composite nanostructured (SBNP + NA) ETL is successfully employed in hole-conductor free PSCs, there by achieving a stable device with a maximum efficiency of 13.5%. The improvement in the performance is attributed to the better charge transport and lower recombination in the SBNP + NA ETL. Despite the stable high efficiency, SBNP + NA ETL based PSCs are advantageous owing to their low cost, ease of all-solution fabrication process in an open environment and good reproducibility. PMID:26932777

  11. Small particle transport across turbulent nonisothermal boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.; Fernandez De La Mora, J.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction between turbulent diffusion, Brownian diffusion, and particle thermophoresis in the limit of vanishing particle inertial effects is quantitatively modeled for applications in gas turbines. The model is initiated with consideration of the particle phase mass conservation equation for a two-dimensional boundary layer, including the thermophoretic flux term directed toward the cold wall. A formalism of a turbulent flow near a flat plate in a heat transfer problem is adopted, and variable property effects are neglected. Attention is given to the limit of very large Schmidt numbers and the particle concentration depletion outside of the Brownian sublayer. It is concluded that, in the parameter range of interest, thermophoresis augments the high Schmidt number mass-transfer coefficient by a factor equal to the product of the outer sink and the thermophoretic suction.

  12. Improved air stability of perovskite solar cells via solution-processed metal oxide transport layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Jingbi; Meng, Lei; Song, Tze-Bin; Guo, Tzung-Fang; Yang, Yang (Michael); Chang, Wei-Hsuan; Hong, Ziruo; Chen, Huajun; Zhou, Huanping; Chen, Qi; Liu, Yongsheng; De Marco, Nicholas; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Lead halide perovskite solar cells have recently attracted tremendous attention because of their excellent photovoltaic efficiencies. However, the poor stability of both the perovskite material and the charge transport layers has so far prevented the fabrication of devices that can withstand sustained operation under normal conditions. Here, we report a solution-processed lead halide perovskite solar cell that has p-type NiOx and n-type ZnO nanoparticles as hole and electron transport layers, respectively, and shows improved stability against water and oxygen degradation when compared with devices with organic charge transport layers. Our cells have a p-i-n structure (glass/indium tin oxide/NiOx/perovskite/ZnO/Al), in which the ZnO layer isolates the perovskite and Al layers, thus preventing degradation. After 60 days storage in air at room temperature, our all-metal-oxide devices retain about 90% of their original efficiency, unlike control devices made with organic transport layers, which undergo a complete degradation after just 5 days. The initial power conversion efficiency of our devices is 14.6 ± 1.5%, with an uncertified maximum value of 16.1%.

  13. Improved air stability of perovskite solar cells via solution-processed metal oxide transport layers.

    PubMed

    You, Jingbi; Meng, Lei; Song, Tze-Bin; Guo, Tzung-Fang; Yang, Yang Michael; Chang, Wei-Hsuan; Hong, Ziruo; Chen, Huajun; Zhou, Huanping; Chen, Qi; Liu, Yongsheng; De Marco, Nicholas; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Lead halide perovskite solar cells have recently attracted tremendous attention because of their excellent photovoltaic efficiencies. However, the poor stability of both the perovskite material and the charge transport layers has so far prevented the fabrication of devices that can withstand sustained operation under normal conditions. Here, we report a solution-processed lead halide perovskite solar cell that has p-type NiO(x) and n-type ZnO nanoparticles as hole and electron transport layers, respectively, and shows improved stability against water and oxygen degradation when compared with devices with organic charge transport layers. Our cells have a p-i-n structure (glass/indium tin oxide/NiO(x)/perovskite/ZnO/Al), in which the ZnO layer isolates the perovskite and Al layers, thus preventing degradation. After 60 days storage in air at room temperature, our all-metal-oxide devices retain about 90% of their original efficiency, unlike control devices made with organic transport layers, which undergo a complete degradation after just 5 days. The initial power conversion efficiency of our devices is 14.6 ± 1.5%, with an uncertified maximum value of 16.1%. PMID:26457966

  14. Electroosmosis in Membranes: Effects of Unstirred Layers and Transport Numbers

    PubMed Central

    Barry, P. H.; Hope, A. B.

    1969-01-01

    When a current is passed through a membrane system, differences in transport numbers between the membrane and the adjacent solutions will, in general, result in depletion and enhancement of concentrations at the membrane-solution interfaces. This will be balanced by diffusion back into the bulk solution, diffusion of solute back across the membrane itself, and osmosis resulting from these local concentration gradients. The two main results of such a phenomenon are (1) that there is a current-induced volume flow, which may be mistaken for electroosmosis, and (2) that there will generally develop transient changes in potential difference (PD) across membranes during and after the passage of current through them. PMID:5786317

  15. 41 CFR 102-34.210 - May I use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities? 102-34.210... of employment and mass transit facilities? Yes, you may use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities under the following conditions: (a)...

  16. 41 CFR 102-34.210 - May I use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities? 102-34.210... of employment and mass transit facilities? Yes, you may use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities under the following conditions: (a)...

  17. 41 CFR 102-34.210 - May I use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities? 102-34.210... of employment and mass transit facilities? Yes, you may use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities under the following conditions: (a)...

  18. 41 CFR 102-34.210 - May I use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities? 102-34.210... of employment and mass transit facilities? Yes, you may use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities under the following conditions: (a)...

  19. 41 CFR 102-34.210 - May I use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities? 102-34.210... of employment and mass transit facilities? Yes, you may use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities under the following conditions: (a)...

  20. Ion transport in complex layered graphene-based membranes with tuneable interlayer spacing

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi; Jiang, Gengping; Garvey, Christopher J.; Wang, Yuanyuan; Simon, George P.; Liu, Jefferson Z.; Li, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of the transport properties of ions confined in nanoporous carbon is generally difficult because of the stochastic nature and distribution of multiscale complex and imperfect pore structures within the bulk material. We demonstrate a combined approach of experiment and simulation to describe the structure of complex layered graphene-based membranes, which allows their use as a unique porous platform to gain unprecedented insights into nanoconfined transport phenomena across the entire sub–10-nm scales. By correlation of experimental results with simulation of concentration-driven ion diffusion through the cascading layered graphene structure with sub–10-nm tuneable interlayer spacing, we are able to construct a robust, representative structural model that allows the establishment of a quantitative relationship among the nanoconfined ion transport properties in relation to the complex nanoporous structure of the layered membrane. This correlation reveals the remarkable effect of the structural imperfections of the membranes on ion transport and particularly the scaling behaviors of both diffusive and electrokinetic ion transport in graphene-based cascading nanochannels as a function of channel size from 10 nm down to subnanometer. Our analysis shows that the range of ion transport effects previously observed in simple one-dimensional nanofluidic systems will translate themselves into bulk, complex nanoslit porous systems in a very different manner, and the complex cascading porous circuities can enable new transport phenomena that are unattainable in simple fluidic systems. PMID:26933689

  1. Transportation & Work: Exploring Car Usage and Employment Outcomes in the LSAL Data. NCSALL Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Kerri

    2003-01-01

    This analysis addresses the role of car usage in employment outcomes such as employment status, average weekly wages, and weeks worked per year. It postulates that car ownership is an important employment tool for adults of low educational attainment in Portland, even in the context of other factors such as social networks/resources (social…

  2. Effects of hole-transporting layers of perovskite-based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Atsushi; Kida, Tomoyasu; Takagi, Tatsuru; Oku, Takeo

    2016-02-01

    Fabrication and characterization of the photovoltaic and optical properties, and microstructure of perovskite-based solar cells with lead phthalocyanine (PbPc), zinc phthalocyanine, poly[bis(4-phenyl)(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)amine], and copper(I) thiocyanate as hole-transporting layers were investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to identify surface morphologies of the crystal structure and the elemental composition. Introducing PbPc into perovskite solar cells extended the retaining period of photovoltaic activity and performance. The effects of the hole-transporting layer on incident photon-to-current efficiency were investigated. The energy diagram and photovoltaic mechanism of the perovskite solar cells with the hole-transporting layer are discussed.

  3. Highly stable perovskite solar cells with an all-carbon hole transport layer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feijiu; Endo, Masaru; Mouri, Shinichiro; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Ohno, Yutaka; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Murata, Yasujiro; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2016-06-01

    Nano-carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide) have potential application for photovoltaics because of their excellent optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate that a single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer greatly improves the photovoltaic performance of organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer works as an efficient hole transport/electron blocking layer. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.3% was achieved in the organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cell due to the complementary properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. Furthermore, the great improvement of photovoltaic performance stability in the perovskite solar cells using carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide/polymethyl methacrylate was demonstrated in comparison with that using a typical organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene. PMID:27232674

  4. Laminarization model for turbulent eddy transport in highly accelerated nozzle turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, J. F.; Boldman, D. R.; Todd, C.

    1972-01-01

    A laminarization model which consists of a completely laminar sublayer region near the wall and a turbulent wake region is developed for the turbulent eddy transport in accelerated turbulent boundary layers. This laminarization model is used in a differential boundary layer calculation which was applied to nozzle flows. The resulting theoretical velocity profiles are in good agreement with the experimental nozzle data in the convergent region.

  5. Highly stable perovskite solar cells with an all-carbon hole transport layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feijiu; Endo, Masaru; Mouri, Shinichiro; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Ohno, Yutaka; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Murata, Yasujiro; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2016-06-01

    Nano-carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide) have potential application for photovoltaics because of their excellent optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate that a single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer greatly improves the photovoltaic performance of organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer works as an efficient hole transport/electron blocking layer. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.3% was achieved in the organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cell due to the complementary properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. Furthermore, the great improvement of photovoltaic performance stability in the perovskite solar cells using carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide/polymethyl methacrylate was demonstrated in comparison with that using a typical organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene.Nano-carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide) have potential application for photovoltaics because of their excellent optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate that a single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer greatly improves the photovoltaic performance of organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer works as an efficient hole transport/electron blocking layer. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.3% was achieved in the organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cell due to the complementary properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. Furthermore, the great improvement of photovoltaic performance stability in the perovskite solar cells using carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide/polymethyl methacrylate was demonstrated in comparison with that using a typical organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  6. Magneto-transport properties of a random distribution of few-layer graphene patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovella, Fabrice; Trinsoutrot, Pierre; Mitioglu, Anatolie; Conédéra, Véronique; Pierre, Mathieu; Raquet, Bertrand; Goiran, Michel; Vergnes, Hugues; Caussat, Brigitte; Plochocka, Paulina; Escoffier, Walter

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we address the electronic properties of conducting films constituted of an array of randomly distributed few layer graphene patches and investigate on their most salient galvanometric features in the moderate and extreme disordered limit. We demonstrate that, in annealed devices, the ambipolar behaviour and the onset of Landau level quantization in high magnetic field constitute robust hallmarks of few-layer graphene films. In the strong disorder limit, however, the magneto-transport properties are best described by a variable-range hopping behaviour. A large negative magneto-conductance is observed at the charge neutrality point, in consistency with localized transport regime.

  7. An Evaluation of Open MPI's Matching Transport Layer on the Cray XT

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Richard L; Brightwell, Ron; Barrett, Brian; Bosilca, George; Pjesivac-Grbovic, Jelena

    2007-01-01

    Open MPI was initially designed to support a wide variety of high-performance networks and network programming interfaces. Recently, Open MPI was enhanced to support networks that have full support for MPI matching semantics. Previous Open MPI efforts focused on networks that require the MPI library to manage message matching, which is sub-optimal for some networks that inherently support matching. We describes a new matching transport layer in Open MPI, present results of micro-benchmarks and several applications on the Cray XT platform, and compare performance of the new and the existing transport layers, as well as the vendor-supplied implementation of MPI.

  8. Magneto-transport properties of a random distribution of few-layer graphene patches

    SciTech Connect

    Iacovella, Fabrice; Mitioglu, Anatolie; Pierre, Mathieu; Raquet, Bertrand; Goiran, Michel; Plochocka, Paulina; Escoffier, Walter; Trinsoutrot, Pierre; Vergnes, Hugues; Caussat, Brigitte

    2014-11-21

    In this study, we address the electronic properties of conducting films constituted of an array of randomly distributed few layer graphene patches and investigate on their most salient galvanometric features in the moderate and extreme disordered limit. We demonstrate that, in annealed devices, the ambipolar behaviour and the onset of Landau level quantization in high magnetic field constitute robust hallmarks of few-layer graphene films. In the strong disorder limit, however, the magneto-transport properties are best described by a variable-range hopping behaviour. A large negative magneto-conductance is observed at the charge neutrality point, in consistency with localized transport regime.

  9. Exclusion of metal oxide by an RF sputtered Ti layer in flexible perovskite solar cells: energetic interface between a Ti layer and an organic charge transporting layer.

    PubMed

    Ameen, Sadia; Akhtar, M Shaheer; Seo, Hyung-Kee; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja; Shin, Hyung-Shik

    2015-04-14

    In this work, the effects of a titanium (Ti) layer on the charge transport and recombination rates of flexible perovskite solar cells were studied. Ti as an efficient barrier layer was deposited directly on PET-ITO flexible substrates through RF magnetic sputtering using a Ti-source and a pressure of ∼5 mTorr. A Ti coated PET-ITO was used for the fabrication of a flexible perovskite solar cell without using any metal oxide layer. The fabricated flexible perovskite solar cell was composed of a PET-ITO/Ti/perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3)/organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis [N,N'-di-p-methoxyphenylamine]-9,9'-spirobifluorene (spiro-OMeTAD)-Li-TFSI/Ag. A high conversion efficiency of ∼8.39% along with a high short circuit current (JSC) of ∼15.24 mA cm(-2), an open circuit voltage (VOC) of ∼0.830 V and a high fill factor (FF) of ∼0.66 was accomplished by the fabricated flexible perovskite solar cell under a light illumination of ∼100 mW cm(-2) (1.5 AM). Intensity-modulated photocurrent (IMPS)/photovoltage spectroscopy (IMVS) studies demonstrated that the fabricated flexible perovskite solar cell considerably reduced the recombination rate. PMID:25747794

  10. Temperature Dependence of Electric Transport in Few-layer Graphene under Large Charge Doping Induced by Electrochemical Gating

    PubMed Central

    Gonnelli, R. S.; Paolucci, F.; Piatti, E.; Sharda, Kanudha; Sola, A.; Tortello, M.; Nair, Jijeesh R.; Gerbaldi, C.; Bruna, M.; Borini, S.

    2015-01-01

    The temperature dependence of electric transport properties of single-layer and few-layer graphene at large charge doping is of great interest both for the study of the scattering processes dominating the conductivity at different temperatures and in view of the theoretically predicted possibility to reach the superconducting state in such extreme conditions. Here we present the results obtained in 3-, 4- and 5-layer graphene devices down to 3.5 K, where a large surface charge density up to about 6.8·1014 cm−2 has been reached by employing a novel polymer electrolyte solution for the electrochemical gating. In contrast with recent results obtained in single-layer graphene, the temperature dependence of the sheet resistance between 20 K and 280 K shows a low-temperature dominance of a T2 component – that can be associated with electron-electron scattering – and, at about 100 K, a crossover to the classic electron-phonon regime. Unexpectedly, this crossover does not show any dependence on the induced charge density, i.e. on the large tuning of the Fermi energy. PMID:25906088

  11. The effect of interfacial layers on charge transport in organic solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbuyise, Xolani G.; Tonui, Patrick; Mola, Genene Tessema

    2016-09-01

    The effect of interfacial buffer layers in organic photovoltaic cell (OPV) whose active layer is composed of poly(3 hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend was studied. The electrical properties of OPV devices produced with and without interfacial layers are compared and discussed in terms of measured parameters of the cells. The charge transport properties showed significant difference on the mobility and activation factor between the two types of device structures. The life time measurements in the unprotected conditions are also presented and discussed.

  12. First principles calculations of solid-state thermionic transport in layered van der Waals heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zebarjadi, Mona; Esfarjani, Keivan

    2016-08-01

    This work aims at understanding solid-state energy conversion and transport in layered (van der Waals) heterostructures in contact with metallic electrodes via a first-principles approach. As an illustration, a graphene/phosphorene/graphene heterostructure in contact with gold electrodes is studied by using density functional theory (DFT)-based first principles calculations combined with real space Green's function (GF) formalism. We show that for a monolayer phosphorene, quantum tunneling dominates the transport. By adding more phosphorene layers, one can switch from tunneling-dominated transport to thermionic-dominated transport, resulting in transporting more heat per charge carrier, thus, enhancing the cooling coefficient of performance. The use of layered van der Waals heterostructures has two advantages: (a) thermionic transport barriers can be tuned by changing the number of layers, and (b) thermal conductance across these non-covalent structures is very weak. The phonon thermal conductance of the present van der Waals heterostructure is found to be 4.1 MW m-2 K-1 which is one order of magnitude lower than the lowest value for that of covalently-bonded interfaces. The thermionic coefficient of performance for the proposed device is 18.5 at 600 K corresponding to an equivalent ZT of 0.13, which is significant for nanoscale devices. This study shows that layered van der Waals structures have great potential to be used as solid-state energy-conversion devices.This work aims at understanding solid-state energy conversion and transport in layered (van der Waals) heterostructures in contact with metallic electrodes via a first-principles approach. As an illustration, a graphene/phosphorene/graphene heterostructure in contact with gold electrodes is studied by using density functional theory (DFT)-based first principles calculations combined with real space Green's function (GF) formalism. We show that for a monolayer phosphorene, quantum tunneling dominates the

  13. Assessing the performance of reactant transport layers and flow fields towards oxygen transport: A new imaging method based on chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Thiago; Ho, Matthew; Kakati, Biraj K.; Kucernak, Anthony R. J.

    2015-01-01

    A new, simple and precise ex-situ optical imaging method is developed which allows indirect measurement of the partial pressure of oxygen (as ozone) within fuel cell components. Images of oxygen distribution are recorded with higher spatial (∼20 μm) and time (40 ms) resolutions. This approach is applied to assess oxygen concentration across the face of a pseudo polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC), with a serpentine design flow field. We show that the amount of light produced is directly proportional to the partial pressure of ozone, in the same way as the local current density in a PEFC is proportional to the partial pressure of bimolecular oxygen. Hence the simulated system provides information relevant to a PEFC with the same geometry operating at the same stoichiometric ratio. This new approach allows direct imaging of flow under lands due to pressure gradients between the adjacent channels and non-laminar flow effects due to secondary flow around U-turns. These are major discoveries of fundamental importance in guiding materials development and in validating modelling studies. We find that contrary to many simulation papers, advection is an important mechanism in both the gas diffusion layer (more properly "reactant transport layer") and the microporous layer. Models which do not include these effects may underestimate reactant transport to the catalyst layer.

  14. Phase Conjugated and Transparent Wavelength Conversions of Nyquist 16-QAM Signals Employing a Single-Layer Graphene Coated Fiber Device.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao; Zeng, Mengqi; Long, Yun; Liu, Jun; Zhu, Yixiao; Zou, Kaiheng; Zhang, Fan; Fu, Lei; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    We fabricate a nonlinear optical device based on a fiber pigtail cross-section coated with a single-layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Using the fabricated graphene-assisted nonlinear optical device and employing Nyquist 16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16-QAM) signal, we experimentally demonstrate phase conjugated wavelength conversion by degenerate four-wave mixing (FWM) and transparent wavelength conversion by non-degenerate FWM in graphene. We study the conversion efficiency as functions of the pump power and pump wavelength and evaluate the bit-error rate (BER) performance. We also compare the time-varying symbol sequence for graphene-assisted phase conjugated and transparent wavelength conversions of Nyquist 16-QAM signal. PMID:26932470

  15. Phase Conjugated and Transparent Wavelength Conversions of Nyquist 16-QAM Signals Employing a Single-Layer Graphene Coated Fiber Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao; Zeng, Mengqi; Long, Yun; Liu, Jun; Zhu, Yixiao; Zou, Kaiheng; Zhang, Fan; Fu, Lei; Wang, Jian

    2016-03-01

    We fabricate a nonlinear optical device based on a fiber pigtail cross-section coated with a single-layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Using the fabricated graphene-assisted nonlinear optical device and employing Nyquist 16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16-QAM) signal, we experimentally demonstrate phase conjugated wavelength conversion by degenerate four-wave mixing (FWM) and transparent wavelength conversion by non-degenerate FWM in graphene. We study the conversion efficiency as functions of the pump power and pump wavelength and evaluate the bit-error rate (BER) performance. We also compare the time-varying symbol sequence for graphene-assisted phase conjugated and transparent wavelength conversions of Nyquist 16-QAM signal.

  16. Phase Conjugated and Transparent Wavelength Conversions of Nyquist 16-QAM Signals Employing a Single-Layer Graphene Coated Fiber Device

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao; Zeng, Mengqi; Long, Yun; Liu, Jun; Zhu, Yixiao; Zou, Kaiheng; Zhang, Fan; Fu, Lei; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    We fabricate a nonlinear optical device based on a fiber pigtail cross-section coated with a single-layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Using the fabricated graphene-assisted nonlinear optical device and employing Nyquist 16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16-QAM) signal, we experimentally demonstrate phase conjugated wavelength conversion by degenerate four-wave mixing (FWM) and transparent wavelength conversion by non-degenerate FWM in graphene. We study the conversion efficiency as functions of the pump power and pump wavelength and evaluate the bit-error rate (BER) performance. We also compare the time-varying symbol sequence for graphene-assisted phase conjugated and transparent wavelength conversions of Nyquist 16-QAM signal. PMID:26932470

  17. Multi-color colloidal quantum dot based light emitting diodes micropatterned on silicon hole transporting layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Ashwini; Hoshino, Kazunori; Kim, Sunmin; Zhang, Xiaojing

    2009-06-01

    We present a colloidal quantum dot based light emitting diode (QD-LED) which utilizes the p-type silicon substrate as the hole transporting layer. A microcontact printing technique was introduced to pattern self-assembled CdSe/ZnS QD films, which allowed creation of an LED with well-defined geometry suitable for monolithic integration on silicon substrates. Our QD-LED consists of multi-layers of inorganic materials: a combination of Au (thickness: 5 nm) and Ag (12 nm) as the cathode, a ZnO:SnO2 mixture (ratio 3:1, 40 nm) as the electron transporting layer, CdSe/ZnS QDs as the light emission layer, 1 nm SiO2 as an energy barrier layer, and p-type silicon as the hole transporting layer. These printed QD-LEDs are capable of multi-color emission peaked at wavelengths of 576 nm, 598 nm, and 622 nm, corresponding to sizes of the embedded QDs with the diameters of 8.4 nm, 9.0 nm, and 9.8 nm respectively. The optimal thickness of the quantum dot layers needed for light emission is characterized using atomic force microscopy: for 8.4 nm QDs, the value is 33 nm (± 5 nm) or ~4 ML (monolayers). Larger turn on voltages were measured (2, 4 and 5 V) for the smaller average particle diameters (9.8 nm, 9.0 nm and 8.4 nm, respectively). The mixture ratio of Zn and Sn was optimized (40% Zn and 25% Sn) to maintain proper hole-electron recombination at the QD layer and avoid the yellowish-white emission from ZnO/SnO2.

  18. Charge transport and device physics of layered-crystalline organic semiconductors (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Tatsuo

    2015-10-01

    Here we present and discuss our recent investigations into the understanding of microscopic charge transport, novel film processing technologies, and a development of layered-crystalline organic semiconductors for high performance OTFTs. We first discuss the microscopic charge transport in the OTFTs, as investigated by field-induced electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The technique can detect signals due to tiny amount of field-induced carriers, accumulated at the semiconductor-insulator interfaces. Following aspects are presented and discussed; 1) Carrier motion within the crystalline domains can be understood in terms of the trap-and-release transport, 2) charge trap states are spatially extended over several sites depending on the trap levels, and 3) the intra- and inter-domain transport can be discriminated by anisotropic electron spin resonance measurements. Next we discuss novel print production technologies for organic semiconductors showing high layered crystallinity. The concept of "printed electronics" is now regarded as a realistic paradigm to manufacture light-weight, thin, and impact-resistant electronics devices, although production of highly crystalline semiconductor films may be incompatible with conventional printing process. We here present printing techniques for manufacturing high performance OTFTs; 1) double-shot inkjet printing for small-molecule-based semiconductors, and 2) push-coating for semiconducting polymers. We demonstrate that both processes are useful to manufacture high quality semiconductor layers with the high layered crystallinity.

  19. Quantitative characterization of water transport and flooding in the diffusion layers of polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalegno, A.; Colombo, L.; Galbiati, S.; Marchesi, R.

    Optimization of water management in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) and in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) is a very important factor for the achievement of high performances and long lifetime. A good hydration of the electrolyte membrane is essential for high proton conductivity; on the contrary water in excess may lead to electrode flooding and severe reduction in performances. Many studies on water transport across the gas diffusion layer (GDL) have been carried out to improve these components; anyway efforts in this field are affected by lack of effective experimental methods. The present work reports an experimental investigation with the purpose to determine the global coefficient of water transport across different diffusion layers under real operating conditions. An appropriate and accurate experimental apparatus has been designed and built to test the single GDL under a wide range of operating conditions. Data analysis has allowed quantification of both the water vapor transport across different diffusion layers, and the effects of micro-porous layers; furthermore flooding onset and its consequences on the mass transport coefficient have been characterized by means of suitably defined parameters.

  20. Interrelated structures of the transport shock and collisional relaxation layer in a multitemperature, multilevel ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinolo, A. R.; Clarke, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    The gas dynamic structures of the transport shock and the downstream collisional relaxation layer are evaluated for partially ionized monatomic gases. Elastic and inelastic collisional nonequilibrium effects are taken into consideration. In the microscopic model of the atom, three electronic levels are accounted for. By using an asymptotic technique, the shock morphology is found on a continuum flow basis. This procedure gives two distinct layers in which the nonequilibrium effects to be considered are different. A transport shock appears as the inner solution to an outer collisional relaxation layer. The results show four main interesting points: (1) on structuring the transport shock, ionization and excitation rates must be included in the formulation, since the flow is not frozen with respect to the population of the different electronic levels; (2) an electron temperature precursor appears at the beginning of the transport shock; (3) the collisional layer is rationally reduced to quadrature for special initial conditions, which (4) are obtained from new Rankine-Hugoniot relations for the inner shock.

  1. Water Transport Characteristics of Gas Diffusion Layer in a PEM Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Damle, Ashok S; Cole, J Vernon

    2008-11-01

    A presentation addressing the following: Water transport in PEM Fuel Cells - a DoE Project 1. Gas Diffusion Layer--Role and Characteristics 2. Capillary Pressure Determinations of GDL Media 3. Gas Permeability Measurements of GDL Media 4. Conclusions and Future Activities

  2. Analytical solution for the advection-dispersion transport equation in layered media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The advection-dispersion transport equation with first-order decay was solved analytically for multi-layered media using the classic integral transform technique (CITT). The solution procedure used an associated non-self-adjoint advection-diffusion eigenvalue problem that had the same form and coef...

  3. Semianalytical Solutions of Radioactive or Reactive Transport in Variably-Fractured Layered Media: 1. Solutes

    SciTech Connect

    George J. Moridis

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, semianalytical solutions are developed for the problem of transport of radioactive or reactive solute tracers through a layered system of heterogeneous fractured media with misaligned fractures. The tracer transport equations in the non-flowing matrix account for (a) diffusion, (b) surface diffusion, (c) mass transfer between the mobile and immobile water fractions, (d) linear kinetic or equilibrium physical, chemical, or combined solute sorption or colloid filtration, and (e) radioactive decay or first-order chemical reactions. The tracer-transport equations in the fractures account for the same processes, in addition to advection and hydrodynamic dispersion. Any number of radioactive decay daughter products (or products of a linear, first-order reaction chain) can be tracked. The solutions, which are analytical in the Laplace space, are numerically inverted to provide the solution in time and can accommodate any number of fractured and/or porous layers. The solutions are verified using analytical solutions for limiting cases of solute and colloid transport through fractured and porous media. The effect of important parameters on the transport of {sup 3}H, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu (and its daughters) is investigated in several test problems involving layered geological systems of varying complexity.

  4. Semianalytical solutions of radioactive or reactive transport invariably-fractured layered media: 1. Solutes

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George J.

    2001-10-10

    In this paper, semianalytical solutions are developed for the problem of transport of radioactive or reactive solute tracers through a layered system of heterogeneous fractured media with misaligned fractures. The tracer transport equations in the non-flowing matrix account for (a) diffusion, (b) surface diffusion, (c) mass transfer between the mobile and immobile water fractions, (d) linear kinetic or equilibrium physical, chemical, or combined solute sorption or colloid filtration, and (e) radioactive decay or first-order chemical reactions. The tracer-transport equations in the fractures account for the same processes, in addition to advection and hydrodynamic dispersion. Any number of radioactive decay daughter products (or products of a linear, first-order reaction chain) can be tracked. The solutions, which are analytical in the Laplace space, are numerically inverted to provide the solution in time and can accommodate any number of fractured and/or porous layers. The solutions are verified using analytical solutions for limiting cases of solute and colloid transport through fractured and porous media. The effect of important parameters on the transport of {sup 3}H, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu (and its daughters) is investigated in several test problems involving layered geological systems of varying complexity.

  5. High performance of inverted polymer solar cells with cobalt oxide as hole-transporting layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangdong; Peng, Qing; Zhu, Weiguo; Lei, Gangtie

    2015-05-01

    Cobalt oxide (II, III) (CoOx) was inserted as efficient hole-transporting interlayer between the active layer and top electrode in inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs) with titanium (diisopropoxide) bis(2, 4-pentanedionate) (TIPD) as an electron selective layer. The work function of CoOx was measured by Kelvin probe and the device performances with different thicknesses of cobalt oxide were studied. The device with CoOx exhibited a remarkable improvement in power conversion efficiency compared with that without CoOx, which indicated that CoOx efficiently prevented the recombination of charge carriers at the organic/top electrode interface. The performance improvement was attributed to the fact that the CoOx thin film can module the Schottky barrier and form an ohmic contact at the organic/metal interface, which makes it a promising hole-transporting layer.

  6. Interrelated structures of the transport shock and collisional relaxation layer in a multitemperature, multilevel ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinolo, A. R.; Clarke, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    The gas dynamic structures of the transport shock and the downstream collisional relaxation layer are evaluated for partially ionized monatomic gases. Elastic and inelastic collisional nonequilibrium effects are taken into consideration. Three electronic levels are accounted for in the microscopic model of the atom. Nonequilibrium processes with respect to population of levels and species plus temperature are considered. By using an asymptotic technique the shock morphology is found on a continuum flow basis. The asymptotic procedure gives two distinct layers in which the nonequilibrium effects to be considered are different. A transport shock appears as the inner solution to an outer collisional relaxation layer in which the gas reaches local equilibrium. A family of numerical examples is displayed for different flow regimes. Argon and helium models are used in these examples.

  7. The boundary layers as the primary transport regions of the earth's magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, T. E.; Frank, L. A.; Huang, C. Y.

    1985-01-01

    A comprehensive survey of ISEE and IMP LEPEDEA plasma measurements in the earth's magnetotail reveals that the magnetospheric boundary layer and the plasma sheet boundary layer are the primary transport regions there. These plasma measurements also reveal various components of the plasma sheet, including the central plasma sheet and plasma sheet boundary layer. A significant new result reported here is that of cold- and hot-plasma components that are spatially co-present within the central plasma sheet. Such plasma components cannot be explained merely by temporal variations in spectra involving the entire plasma sheet. Contributions to a low temperature component of the plasma sheet enter directly from the boundary layer located along the magnetotail flanks. Field-aligned flows predominate within the plasma sheet boundary layer which is almost always present and is located near the high- and low-latitude border of the plasma sheet. The plasma sheet boundary layer comprises highly anisotropic ion distributions, including counter-streaming ion beams, that evolve into the hot, isotropic component of the plasma sheet. Tailward acceleration regions generate these ion beams with plasma input from the magnetospheric boundary layer. Antisunward-flowing ion beams, at E/q less than 1 kV and of ionospheric composition, are frequently observed in the plasma sheet boundary layer and in tail lobes. These ion beams are likely accelerated at low altitude over the polar cap and especially along auroral field lines.

  8. Charge Transport in Field-Effect Transistors based on Layered Materials and their Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jatinder

    In the quest for energy efficiency and device miniaturization, the research in using atomically thin materials for device applications is gaining momentum. The electronic network in layered materials is different from 3D counterparts. It is due to the interlayer couplings and density of states because of their 2D nature. Therefore, understanding the charge transport in layered materials is fundamental to explore the vast opportunities these ultra-thin materials offer. Hence, the challenges targeted in the thesis are: (1) understanding the charge transport in layered materials based on electronic network of quantum and oxide capacitances, (2) studying thickness dependence, ranging from monolayer to bulk, of full range-characteristics of field-effect transistor (FET) based on layered materials, (3) investigating the total interface trap charges to achieve the ultimate subthreshold slope (SS) theoretically possible in FETs, (4) understanding the effect of the channel length on the performance of layered materials, (5) understanding the effect of substrate on performance of the TMDC FETs and studying if the interface of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs)/hexagonalboron nitride (h-BN) can have less enough trap charges to observe ambipolar behavior, (6) Exploring optoelectronic properties in 2D heterostructures that includes understanding graphene/WS2 heterostructure and its optoelectronic applications by creating a p-n junction at the interface. The quality of materials and the interface are the issues for observing and extracting clean physics out of these layered materials and heterostructures. In this dissertation, we realized the use of quantum capacitance in layered materials, substrate effects and carrier transport in heterostructure.

  9. Comparative study of hole transport in polyspirobifluorene polymers measured by the charge-generation layer time-of-flight technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laquai, Frédéric; Wegner, Gerhard; Im, Chan; Bässler, Heinz; Heun, Susanne

    2006-01-01

    Hole transport in a polyspirobifluorene homopolymer and a statistical polyspirobifluorene-triarylamine copolymer has been studied in detail employing the charge-generation layer time-of-flight (TOF) technique over a wide range of electric fields and temperatures. Both materials exhibit nondispersive TOF signals after injection of a sheet of charge carriers from a thin (10 nm) perylene-diimide charge-carrier generation layer into a relatively thick (d>1 μm) polymer film. Results were analyzed within the framework of the Gaussian disorder model and the charge transport parameters were extracted for both polymers. The zero-field hole mobility of the spirohomopolymer was found to be on the order of 10-6 cm2/V s, whereas the copolymer showed a considerably lower hole mobility of 6×10-8 cm2/V s. The width of the density of states σ was determined to be 86 meV for the homopolymer and 107 meV for the copolymer. The latter polymer also showed an increased positional disorder due to the statistically incorporated triarylamine units.

  10. Thermal transport across few-layer boron nitride encased by silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yuxiang; Jiang, Jiechao; Meletis, Efstathios; Dumitric, Traian

    2015-07-01

    Two dimensional hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) attracted attention for use in applications. Using equilibrium molecular dynamics, we examine the phonon transport in few-layer h-BN encased by silica (SiO2). We report large interfacial thermal resistances, of about 2.2 × 10-8 m2 K W-1, which are not sensitive to the number of h-BN layers or the SiO2 crystallinity. The h-BN/SiO2 superlattices exhibit ultra-low thermal conductivities across layers, as low as 0.3 W/m K. They are structurally stable up to 2000 K while retaining the low-thermal conductivity attributes. Our simulations indicate that incorporation of h-BN layers and nanoparticles in silica could establish thermal barriers and heat spreading paths, useful for high performance coatings and electronic device applications.

  11. Design and application of carbon nanomaterials for photoactive and charge transport layers in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Sunghwan; Jun, Gwang Hoon; Jeon, Seokwoo; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2016-04-01

    Commercialization of organic solar cell (OSC) has faltered due to their low power conversion efficiency (PCE) compared to inorganic solar cell. Low electrical conductivity, low charge mobility, and short-range light absorption of most organic materials limit the PCE of OSCs. Carbon nanomaterials, especially carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphenes, are of great interest for use in OSC applications due to their high electrical conductivity, mobility, and unique optical properties for enhancing the performance of OSCs. In this review, recent progress toward the integration of carbon nanomaterials into OSCs is described. The role of carbon nanomaterials and strategies for their integration into various layers of OSCs, including the photoactive layer and charge transport layer, are discussed. Based on these, we also discuss the prospects of carbon nanomaterials for specific OSC layers to maximize the PCE.

  12. All-solution-processed inverted organic solar cell with a stacked hole-transporting layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wen-Kai; Su, Shui-Hsiang; Liu, Che-Chun; Yokoyama, Meiso

    2014-11-01

    In this study, inverted organic solar cells (IOSCs) have been fabricated and characterized. A sol-gel zinc oxide (ZnO) film is used as a hole-blocking layer (HBL). Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) are used as a hole-transporting layer (HTL). The HBL, active layer, and HTL films are fabricated by spin-coating technique. The anode is fabricated from Ag nanoparticles by drop titration using a Pasteur burette. Experimental results show that the PEDOT:PSS/CuPc stacked HTL provides a stepwise hole-transporting energy diagram configuration, which subsequently increases the charge carrier transporting capability and extracts holes from the active layer to the anode. The characteristics of the IOSCs were optimized and exhibited an open-circuit voltage (Voc), short-circuit current density (Jsc), fill factor (FF), and power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.53 V, 6.13 mA/cm2, 37.53%, and 1.24%, respectively, under simulated AM1.5G illumination of 100 mW/cm2. Hence, a solution process is feasible for fabricating low-cost and large-area solar energy devices.

  13. Development of Layered Sediment Structure and its Effects on Pore Water Transport and Hyporheic Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Packman, Aaron I.; Marion, Andrea; Zaramella, Mattia; Chen, Cheng; Gaillard, Jean-François; Keane, Denis T.

    2008-04-15

    Hyporheic exchange is known to provide an important control on nutrient and contaminant fluxes across the stream-subsurface interface. Similar processes also mediate interfacial transport in other permeable sediments. Recent research has focused on understanding the mechanics of these exchange processes and improving estimation of exchange rates in natural systems. While the structure of sediment beds obviously influences pore water flow rates and patterns, little is known about the interplay of typical sedimentary structures, hyporheic exchange, and other transport processes in fluvial/alluvial sediments. Here we discuss several processes that contribute to local-scale sediment heterogeneity and present results that illustrate the interaction of overlying flow conditions, the development of sediment structure, pore water transport, and stream-subsurface exchange. Layered structures are shown to develop at several scales within sediment beds. Surface sampling is used to analyze the development of an armor layer in a sand-and-gravel bed, while innovative synchrotron-based X-ray microtomography is used to observe patterns of grain sorting within sand bedforms. We show that layered bed structures involving coarsening of the bed surface increase interfacial solute flux but produce an effective anisotropy that favors horizontal pore water transport while limiting vertical penetration.

  14. Epitaxial 1D electron transport layers for high-performance perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Gill Sang; Chung, Hyun Suk; Kim, Dong Hoe; Kim, Byeong Jo; Lee, Jin-Wook; Park, Nam-Gyu; Cho, In Sun; Lee, Jung-Kun; Lee, Sangwook; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate high-performance perovskite solar cells with excellent electron transport properties using a one-dimensional (1D) electron transport layer (ETL). The 1D array-based ETL is comprised of 1D SnO2 nanowires (NWs) array grown on a F:SnO2 transparent conducting oxide substrate and rutile TiO2 nanoshells epitaxially grown on the surface of the 1D SnO2 NWs. The optimized devices show more than 95% internal quantum yield at 750 nm, and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 14.2%. The high quantum yield is attributed to dramatically enhanced electron transport in the epitaxial TiO2 layer, compared to that in conventional nanoparticle-based mesoporous TiO2 (mp-TiO2) layers. In addition, the open space in the 1D array-based ETL increases the prevalence of uniform TiO2/perovskite junctions, leading to reproducible device performance with a high fill factor. This work offers a method to achieve reproducible, high-efficiency perovskite solar cells with high-speed electron transport. PMID:26324759

  15. Charge transport studies of polymeric photovoltaic thin films with an electron blocking and trapping layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Harrison K. H.; Chan, Kevin K. H.; So, S. K.

    2012-06-01

    The transport properties of two photovoltaic polymers, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and poly(2,7-carbazole) derivative (PCDTBT), and their polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) are studied by space-charge-limited current (SCLC), dark-injection space-charge-limited current (DI-SCLC), and admittance spectroscopy(AS). For a nominally hole-only device, electrons leakage occurs. This results in a current larger than the theoretical SCLC and ill-defined DI-SCLC and AS signals. In order to prevent electron leakage, a hole-transporting but electron blocking/trapping thin layer is added between active layer and Au. The layer composed of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) doped into an amine-based small molecule. Using this interlayer, well-defined carrier transit time can be obtained for mobility extraction. With a suitable interlayer to suppress undesirable carrier injection and transport, these techniques should find broad applications in the transport characterization of narrow gap photovoltaic polymers and BHJ blends.

  16. Implementation of a convective atmospheric boundary layer scheme in a tropospheric chemistry transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.-Y.; Pyle, J. A.; Sanderson, M. G.; Bridgeman, C.

    1999-10-01

    A convective atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) scheme for the transport of trace gases in the lower troposphere has been implemented from the Community Climate Model, Version 2 [Hack et al., 1993] into a tropospheric chemistry transport model [Wang, 1998]. The atmospheric boundary layer scheme includes the calculation of atmospheric radiative transfer, surface energy balance, and land surface temperature and has a specified annual variation of sea surface temperature. The calculated diurnal variation of the height of the boundary layer is similar to the results of Troen and Mahrt [1986] and is in a good agreement with Holtslag and Boville [1993]. The modeled height of the boundary layer shows a seasonal shift between land and sea in the Northern Hemisphere. In summer (June-July-August), the height of the boundary layer is deeper over land (850-2250 m) and shallower over sea (50-850 m); while in winter (December-January-February), it is shallower over land (50-850 m) and deeper over sea (850-2850 m). The coupled ABL-chemical transport model is verified against measurements of radon 222 and methane. Comparison of the coupled model with a non-ABL model indicates significant differences between these model simulations and a better agreement between the coupled model and measurements. There is a significant effect on the trace gas distribution when the ABL model is compared with the non-ABL schemes. For example, the ABL scheme shows more O3 transported from the middle troposphere down to the surface, while more CO is pumped up from the surface into the middle troposphere. The seasonal cycle of modeled CH4 is significantly improved with the inclusion of the new ABL scheme, especially in regions which are not remote from methane sources.

  17. Effect of benthic boundary layer transport on the productivity of Mono Lake, California

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Louise C; Jellison, Robert; Imberger, Jörg; Melack, John M

    2008-01-01

    The significance of the transport of nutrient-rich hypolimnetic water via the benthic boundary layer (BBL) to the productivity of Mono Lake was studied using a coupled hydrodynamic and ecological model validated against field data. The coupled model enabled us to differentiate between the role of biotic components and hydrodynamic forcing on the internal recycling of nutrients necessary to sustain primary productivity. A 4-year period (1991–1994) was simulated in which recycled nutrients from zooplankton excretion and bacterially-mediated mineralization exceeded sediment fluxes as the dominant source for primary productivity. Model outputs indicated that BBL transport was responsible for a 53% increase in the flux of hypolimnetic ammonium to the photic zone during stratification with an increase in primary production of 6% and secondary production of 5%. Although the estimated impact of BBL transport on the productivity of Mono Lake was not large, significant nutrient fluxes were simulated during periods when BBL transport was most active. PMID:18710583

  18. Quantum transport measurement of few-layer WTe2 field effect devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianhao; Liu, Xin; Tian, Shibing; Zhang, Chenglong; Jia, Shuang

    2015-03-01

    We have performed systematic quantum transport measurement on field effect devices fabricated from few-layer WTe2 single crystals. We found that the magnetoresistance of few-layer WTe2 could be very different from that of bulk samples, which may arise from the imbalance of electron and hole carriers in the samples. We shall discuss our findings in more details in light of recent progress in our experiment. This work is supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11374021 and 11327406); by China Ministry of Science and Technology under Contract # 2014CB920900 and 2013CB921900; and by the Young 1000-Talent Program of China.

  19. Parameterizations for convective transport in various cloud-topped boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikma, M.; Ouwersloot, H. G.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the representation of convective transport of atmospheric compounds by boundary layer clouds. We focus on three key parameterizations that, when combined, express this transport: the area fraction of transporting clouds, the upward velocity in the cloud cores and the chemical concentrations at cloud base. The first two parameterizations combined represent the kinematic mass flux by clouds. To investigate the key parameterizations under a wide range of conditions, we use large-eddy simulation model data for 10 meteorological situations, characterized by either shallow cumulus or stratocumulus clouds. The parameterizations have not been previously tested with such large data sets. In the analysis, we show that the parameterization of the area fraction of clouds currently used in mixed-layer models is affected by boundary layer dynamics. Therefore, we (i) simplify the independent variable used for this parameterization, Q1, by considering the variability in moisture rather than in the saturation deficit and update the parameters in the parameterization to account for this simplification. We (ii) next demonstrate that the independent variable has to be evaluated locally to capture cloud presence. Furthermore, we (iii) show that the area fraction of transporting clouds is not represented by the parameterization for the total cloud area fraction, as is currently assumed in literature. To capture cloud transport, a novel active cloud area fraction parameterization is proposed. Subsequently, the scaling of the upward velocity in cloud cores by the Deardorff convective velocity scale and the parameterization for the concentration of atmospheric reactants at cloud base from literature are verified and improved by analysing six shallow cumulus cases. For the latter, we additionally discuss how the parameterization is affected by wind conditions. This study contributes to a more accurate estimation of convective transport, which occurs at sub-grid scales.

  20. A way for studying the impact of PEDOT:PSS interface layer on carrier transport in PCDTBT:PC71BM bulk hetero junction solar cells by electric field induced optical second harmonic generation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Zubair; Abdullah, Shahino Mah; Taguchi, Dai; Sulaiman, Khaulah; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2015-04-01

    Electric-field-induced optical second-harmonic generation (EFISHG) measurement was employed to study the impact of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) interface layer on the carrier transport mechanism of the PCDTBT:PC71BM bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells (OSCs). We revealed that the electric fields in the PCDTBT and PC71BM were allowed to be measured individually by choosing fundamental laser wavelengths of 1000 nm and 1060 nm, respectively, in dark and under illumination. The results showed that the direction of the internal electric fields in the PCDTBT:PC71BM BHJ layer is reversed by introducing the PEDOT:PSS layer, and this results in longer electron transport time in the BHJ layer. We conclude that TR-EFISHG can be used as a novel way for studying the impact of interfacial layer on the transport of electrons and holes in the bulk-heterojunction OSCs.

  1. Sky-Blue Phosphorescent OLEDs with 34.1% External Quantum Efficiency Using a Low Refractive Index Electron Transporting Layer.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Moon, Chang-Ki; Huh, Jin-Suk; Sim, Bomi; Kim, Jang-Joo

    2016-06-01

    Blue-phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with 34.1% external quantum efficiency (EQE) and 79.6 lm W(-1) are demonstrated using a hole-transporting layer and electron-transporting layer with low refractive index values. Using optical simulations, it is predicted that outcoupling efficiencies with EQEs > 60% can be achieved if organic layers with a refractive index of 1.5 are used for OLEDs. PMID:27060851

  2. Doped hole transport layer for efficiency enhancement in planar heterojunction organolead trihalide perovskite solar cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Qi; Bi, Cheng; Huang, Jinsong

    2015-05-06

    We demonstrated the efficiency of a solution-processed planar heterojunction organometallic trihalide perovskite solar cell can be increased to 17.5% through doping the hole transporting layer for reducing the resistivity. Doped Poly(triaryl amine) (PTAA) by 2,3,5,6-Tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-Tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4-TCNQ) reduced device series resistance by three-folds, increasing the device fill factor to 74%, open circuit voltage to 1.09 V without sacrificing the short circuit current. As a result, this study reveals that the high resistivity of currently broadly applied polymer hole transport layer limits the device efficiency, and points a new direction to improve the device efficiency.

  3. Effects of impurity transport and melt layer motion to the tungsten wall erosion during anomaly events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibano, K.; Tsutsui, T.; Lang, T. L.; Togo, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Developing designs of future fusion devices, safety and soundness of the rector at anomaly events must be ensured. A computational approach is being taken by developing a homegrown integrated reactor simulation code and analyzing a loss-of-cooling-gas-puff accident (LCGA). This code currently includes simple plasma, edge, and wall models. In this study, models for the tungsten transport and melt layer motion was added and used for the analysis. It was found that this accident results significant erosion of the wall while impurities from the wall would contribute the radiation cooling for the intense heat flux. However, these effects strongly depend on an uncertain parameter of the tungsten transport as well as the tungsten melt layer motion. Thus, parametric survey for these uncertain quantities were taken and discussed.

  4. Efficient organic solar cells using copper(I) iodide (CuI) hole transport layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ying; Yaacobi-Gross, Nir; Perumal, Ajay K.; Faber, Hendrik A.; Vourlias, George; Patsalas, Panos A.; Bradley, Donal D. C.; He, Zhiqun; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.

    2015-06-01

    We report the fabrication of high power conversion efficiency (PCE) polymer/fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) photovoltaic cells using solution-processed Copper (I) Iodide (CuI) as hole transport layer (HTL). Our devices exhibit a PCE value of ˜5.5% which is equivalent to that obtained for control devices based on the commonly used conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): polystyrenesulfonate as HTL. Inverted cells with PCE >3% were also demonstrated using solution-processed metal oxide electron transport layers, with a CuI HTL evaporated on top of the BHJ. The high optical transparency and suitable energetics of CuI make it attractive for application in a range of inexpensive large-area optoelectronic devices.

  5. Efficient organic solar cells using copper(I) iodide (CuI) hole transport layers

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Ying; Yaacobi-Gross, Nir; Perumal, Ajay K.; Faber, Hendrik A.; Bradley, Donal D. C.; Anthopoulos, Thomas D. E-mail: t.anthopoulos@imperial.ac.uk; Vourlias, George; Patsalas, Panos A.; He, Zhiqun E-mail: t.anthopoulos@imperial.ac.uk

    2015-06-15

    We report the fabrication of high power conversion efficiency (PCE) polymer/fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) photovoltaic cells using solution-processed Copper (I) Iodide (CuI) as hole transport layer (HTL). Our devices exhibit a PCE value of ∼5.5% which is equivalent to that obtained for control devices based on the commonly used conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): polystyrenesulfonate as HTL. Inverted cells with PCE >3% were also demonstrated using solution-processed metal oxide electron transport layers, with a CuI HTL evaporated on top of the BHJ. The high optical transparency and suitable energetics of CuI make it attractive for application in a range of inexpensive large-area optoelectronic devices.

  6. Electronic band gaps and transport properties in periodically alternating mono- and bi-layer graphene superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiong; Huang, Wenjun; Ma, Tianxing; Wang, Li-Gang; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the electronic band structure and transport properties of periodically alternating mono- and bi-layer graphene superlattices (MBLG SLs). In such MBLG SLs, there exists a zero-averaged wave vector (zero-\\overline{k} ) gap that is insensitive to the lattice constant. This zero-\\overline{k} gap can be controlled by changing both the ratio of the potential widths and the interlayer coupling coefficient of the bilayer graphene. We also show that there exist extra Dirac points; the conditions for these extra Dirac points are presented analytically. Lastly, we demonstrate that the electronic transport properties and the energy gap of the first two bands in MBLG SLs are tunable through adjustment of the interlayer coupling and the width ratio of the periodic mono- and bi-layer graphene.

  7. Electronic band gaps and transport properties in periodically alternating mono- and bi-layer graphene superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiong; Huang, Wenjun; Ma, Tianxing; Wang, Li-Gang; Lin, Hai-Qing

    We investigated electronic band structure and transport properties of periodically alternating mono- and bi-layer graphene superlattices (MBLG SLs). In such MBLG SLs, there exists the zero-averaged wave vector (zero- k) gap, which is insensitive to the lattice constant, and this zero- k gap can be controlled via changing both the ratio of potentials' widths and the interlayer coupling coefficient of bilayer graphene. It is also found that there exist the extra Dirac points and their conditions are analytically presented. Lastly, it shows that the electronic transport properties and the energy gap (Eg) of the first two bands in MBLG SLs are tunable by the interlayer coupling and the widths' ratio of the periodic mono- and bi-layer graphene.

  8. The impacts of moisture transport on drifting snow sublimation in the saltation layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ning; Dai, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Drifting snow sublimation (DSS) is an important physical process related to moisture and heat transfer that happens in the atmospheric boundary layer, which is of glaciological and hydrological importance. It is also essential in order to understand the mass balance of the Antarctic ice sheets and the global climate system. Previous studies mainly focused on the DSS of suspended snow and ignored that in the saltation layer. Here, a drifting snow model combined with balance equations for heat and moisture is established to simulate the physical DSS process in the saltation layer. The simulated results show that DSS can strongly increase humidity and cooling effects, which in turn can significantly reduce DSS in the saltation layer. However, effective moisture transport can dramatically weaken the feedback effects. Due to moisture advection, DSS rate in the saltation layer can be several orders of magnitude greater than that of the suspended particles. Thus, DSS in the saltation layer has an important influence on the distribution and mass-energy balance of snow cover.

  9. Transport of Water Vapor and Ozone to the Northern Sacramento Valley Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conley, S. A.; Faloona, I. C.; Cooper, O. R.

    2011-12-01

    Ground based studies of atmospheric composition typically suffer from incomplete constraints on the influence of vertical transport on the surface air. While horizontal transport can be explored by multiple surface stations, and chemical processing by the judicious addition of surface measurements, vertical transport is often controlled by the entrainment flux of compounds at the opposite interface: between the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and the lower free troposphere (FT.) This entrainment flux is most significantly determined by the difference in concentration between the two layers, a gradient that is nearly always out of reach of traditional measurement techniques, or subject to very sporadic investigation by aircraft. In this work we examine the extent to which surface layer air in the Sacramento valley originated from higher altitudes. Given a strong vertical gradient of ozone and water vapor, the extent to which free tropospheric air is mixed down into the PBL will impact the surface layer mixing ratios of both compounds. Here we use sonde, surface, and radar wind profiler data from several Calnex sites in the Northern Sacramento Valley to estimate the advection and temporal change of water vapor and ozone in the ABL. Performing an ABL water budget analysis with estimates of evapotranspiration from the CIMIS (California Irrigation Management Information System) network, provides the vertical flux of water vapor at the top of the boundary layer and yields an average entrainment velocity for the region. Using the entrainment velocity so derived with the ozone vertical gradient measured during Calnex, we are able to solve for the net photochemical production in a region that frequently exceeds EPA standards. We work towards combining continuous measurements of ozone from an upwind mountain site in Mendocino County (Cahto Peak) along with periodic sampling of ozone profiles in the valley and offshore by aircraft to build a comprehensive picture of the

  10. Buoyancy-driven flow in a peat moss layer as a mechanism for solute transport

    PubMed Central

    Rappoldt, Cornelis; Pieters, Gert-Jan J. M.; Adema, Erwin B.; Baaijens, Gerrit J.; Grootjans, Ab P.; van Duijn, Cornelis J.

    2003-01-01

    Transport of nutrients, CO2, methane, and oxygen plays an important ecological role at the surface of wetland ecosystems. A possibly important transport mechanism in a water-saturated peat moss layer (usually Sphagnum cuspidatum) is nocturnal buoyancy flow, the downward flow of relatively cold surface water, and the upward flow of warm water induced by nocturnal cooling. Mathematical stability analysis showed that buoyancy flow occurs in a cooling porous layer if the system's Rayleigh number (Ra) exceeds 25. For a temperature difference of 10 K between day and night, a typical Ra value for a peat moss layer is 80, which leads to quickly developing buoyancy cells. Numerical simulation demonstrated that fluid flow leads to a considerable mixing of water. Temperature measurements in a cylindrical peat sample of 50-cm height and 35-cm diameter were in agreement with the theoretical results. The nocturnal flow and the associated mixing of the water represent a mechanism for solute transport in water-saturated parts of peat land and in other types of terrestrializing vegetation. This mechanism may be particularly important in continental wetlands, where Ra values in summer are often much larger than the threshold for fluid flow. PMID:14657381

  11. Diagnosis of energy transport in iron buried layer targets using an extreme ultraviolet laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shahzad, M.; Culfa, O.; Rossall, A. K.; Tallents, G. J.; Wilson, L. A.; Guilbaud, O.; Kazamias, S.; Delmas, O.; Demailly, J.; Maitrallain, A.; Pittman, M.; Baynard, E.; Farjardo, M.

    2015-02-15

    We demonstrate the use of extreme ultra-violet (EUV) laboratory lasers in probing energy transport in laser irradiated solid targets. EUV transmission through targets containing a thin layer of iron (50 nm) encased in plastic (CH) after irradiation by a short pulse (35 fs) laser focussed to irradiances 3 × 10{sup 16} Wcm{sup −2} is measured. Heating of the iron layer gives rise to a rapid decrease in EUV opacity and an increase in the transmission of the 13.9 nm laser radiation as the iron ionizes to Fe{sup 5+} and above where the ion ionisation energy is greater than the EUV probe photon energy (89 eV). A one dimensional hydrodynamic fluid code HYADES has been used to simulate the temporal variation in EUV transmission (wavelength 13.9 nm) using IMP opacity values for the iron layer and the simulated transmissions are compared to measured transmission values. When a deliberate pre-pulse is used to preform an expanding plastic plasma, it is found that radiation is important in the heating of the iron layer while for pre-pulse free irradiation, radiation transport is not significant.

  12. Nickel Oxide as an Inorganic Hole Transport Layer in Organic Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Brian; Widjonarko, N. Edwin; Berry, Joseph J.; Shaheen, Sean E.; Ginley, David S.; Olson, Dana C.

    2009-10-01

    This work explores the use of nickel oxide as a hole transport layer in organic photovoltaics (OPV). The purpose of the hole transport layer (HTL) is to provide an energetic barrier to electrons at the anode of the OPV device, while facilitating extraction of holes. At present, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) is commonly used in this layer of the device, but it suffers from inherent problems in phase separation of the PEDOT and PSS components leading to non-uniform conductivity, incompatibility with various transparent conducting oxides due to its acidity, and high rate of water uptake that can accelerate degradation of interfaces and surrounding layers. Inorganic metal oxides such as nickel oxide present a potential solution to these problems. Using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to deposit nickel oxide films, we show OPV device performance to be tunable by varying deposition parameters. Parameters explored include oxygen partial pressure during PLD, substrate temperature, film thickness, and post PLD surface treatments. These tune physical properties of the film such as work function and conductivity, which were measured directly, and in device performance.

  13. Remote monitoring of aerosol layers over Sofia during Sahara dust transport episode (April, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, Dimitar; Grigorov, Ivan; Deleva, Atanaska; Kolev, Nikolay; Peshev, Zahari; Kolarov, Georgi; Donev, Evgeni; Ivanov, Danko

    2013-03-01

    In this work we present results of lidar remote sensing of aerosol layers in the atmosphere above Sofia during an episode of Sahara dust transport, 02-07 April, 2012. The investigations were made using two lidar systems, one equipped with a CuBr-vapor laser, emitting at wavelength 510.6 nm, and a second one - with Nd:YAG laser, at wavelengths 1064 nm and 532 nm. The results of lidar measurements are presented in terms of vertical atmospheric backscatter coefficient profiles and color maps of the aerosol stratification evolution. The involved into discussions ceilometer data (CHM 15k ceilometer) and satellite data from CALIPSO lidar, enhance the synergy of observations. Conclusion about atmospheric aerosol's origin was made upon analyses of the information of weather-forecast maps provided by the Forecast system of Barcelona Supercomputing Centre, which are accessible via Internet. Additional information was provided by calculations of the backward air mass trajectories, using online software of NOAA about HYSPLIT model. The comparison between the data from the two lidars and the ceilometer showed similar behavior of aerosol layers development in the atmosphere above Sofia. All information about aerosol layers origin, their altitude above ground, persistence during lidar observations, confirmed the conclusion of observation of a long-distance Sahara dust transport beyond Balkans and Sofia. An interesting completion of CALIPSO lidar and ground based lidars results of measurement is presented in case of thick opaque cloud layer in the atmosphere, which slices the path of lidar sensing in both directions.

  14. A nano-grid structure made of perovskite SrTiO3 nanowires for efficient electron transport layers in inverted polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong Won; Suh, Yo-Han; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Kim, Yong Seok; Kim, Won Bae

    2015-02-01

    A nano-grid structure of perovskite SrTiO3 NWs is developed for a novel electron transport layer in inverted polymer solar cells. Due to the excellent charge transporting properties of the SrTiO3 nano-grid structure, the device employing this nanostructure showed ~32% enhanced photovoltaic performance, compared to the solar cell using a TiO2 thin film.A nano-grid structure of perovskite SrTiO3 NWs is developed for a novel electron transport layer in inverted polymer solar cells. Due to the excellent charge transporting properties of the SrTiO3 nano-grid structure, the device employing this nanostructure showed ~32% enhanced photovoltaic performance, compared to the solar cell using a TiO2 thin film. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, HR-TEM images with EDX atomic ratio analysis, FE-SEM images, transmittance spectra and light absorbance spectra. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06720g

  15. Electron transport mechanism of bathocuproine exciton blocking layer in organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeihyun; Park, Soohyung; Lee, Younjoo; Kim, Hyein; Shin, Dongguen; Jeong, Junkyeong; Jeong, Kwangho; Cho, Sang Wan; Lee, Hyunbok; Yi, Yeonjin

    2016-02-21

    Efficient exciton management is a key issue to improve the power conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaics (OPVs). It is well known that the insertion of an exciton blocking layer (ExBL) having a large band gap promotes the efficient dissociation of photogenerated excitons at the donor-acceptor interface. However, the large band gap induces an energy barrier which disrupts the charge transport. Therefore, building an adequate strategy based on the knowledge of the true charge transport mechanism is necessary. In this study, the true electron transport mechanism of a bathocuproine (BCP) ExBL in OPVs is comprehensively investigated by in situ ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, inverse photoemission spectroscopy, density functional theory calculation, and impedance spectroscopy. The chemical interaction between deposited Al and BCP induces new states within the band gap of BCP, so that electrons can transport through these new energy levels. Localized trap states are also formed upon the Al-BCP interaction. The activation energy of these traps is estimated with temperature-dependent conductance measurements to be 0.20 eV. The Al-BCP interaction induces both transport and trap levels in the energy gap of BCP and their interplay results in the electron transport observed. PMID:26821701

  16. Perovskite Solar Cells Employing Dopant-Free Organic Hole Transport Materials with Tunable Energy Levels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongsheng; Hong, Ziruo; Chen, Qi; Chen, Huajun; Chang, Wei-Hsuan; Yang, Yang Michael; Song, Tze-Bin; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-20

    Conjugated small-molecule hole-transport materials (HTMs) with tunable energy levels are designed and synthesized for efficient perovskite solar cells. A champion device with efficiency of 16.2% is demonstrated using a dopant-free DERDTS-TBDT HTM, while the DORDTS-DFBT-HTM-based device shows an inferior performance of 6.2% due to its low hole mobility and unmatched HOMO level with the valence band of perovskite film. PMID:26588665

  17. Interface modified thermally stable hole transporting layer for efficient organic light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, Rakhi; Srivastava, Ritu Dagar, Janardan; Kamalasanan, M. N.; Mehta, D. S.

    2014-08-14

    Electrical transport in thermally stable 2, 7-bis [N, N-bis (4-methoxy-phenyl) amino]-9, 9-spirobifluorene (MeO-Spiro-TPD) thin films has been investigated as a function of temperature and organic layer thickness. ITO/MeO-Spiro-TPD interface was found to be injection limited and has been studied in detail to find barrier height for hole injection. The thickness of tetra-fluoro-tetracyano-quinodimethane thin films were optimized to be used as hole injection buffer layer which resulted in switching of charge transport mechanism from injection limited to space charge limited conduction above a critical thickness of 3 nm. Hole mobility has been measured using transient space charge limited conduction (SCLC), field dependent SCLC, and top contact transistor characteristics. The charge carrier transport in interface modified hole only devices was analysed using Gaussian disorder model. The thermal stability of MeO-Spiro-TPD has been investigated by atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction studies. The study indicates a thermally stable and highly efficient hole transport material for application in organic semiconductor based devices.

  18. Charge-transport anisotropy in black phosphorus: critical dependence on the number of layers.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Swastika; Pati, Swapan K

    2016-06-28

    Phosphorene is a promising candidate for modern electronics because of the anisotropy associated with high electron-hole mobility. Additionally, superior mechanical flexibility allows the strain-engineering of various properties including the transport of charge carriers in phosphorene. In this work, we have shown the criticality of the number of layers to dictate the transport properties of black phosphorus. Trilayer black phosphorus (TBP) has been proposed as an excellent anisotropic material, based on the transport parameters using Boltzmann transport formalisms coupled with density functional theory. The mobilities of both the electron and the hole are found to be higher along the zigzag direction (∼10(4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at 300 K) compared to the armchair direction (∼10(2) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)), resulting in the intrinsic directional anisotropy. Application of strain leads to additional electron-hole anisotropy with 10(3) fold higher mobility for the electron compared to the hole. Critical strain for maximum anisotropic response has also been determined. Whether the transport anisotropy is due to the spatial or charge-carrier has been determined through analyses of the scattering process of electrons and holes, and their recombination as well as relaxation dynamics. In this context, we have derived two descriptors (S and F(k)), which are general enough for any 2D or quasi-2D systems. Information on the scattering involving purely the carrier states also helps to understand the layer-dependent photoluminescence and electron (hole) relaxation in black phosphorus. Finally, we justify trilayer black phosphorus (TBP) as the material of interest with excellent transport properties. PMID:27257640

  19. Insight from ozone and water vapour on transport in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploeger, F.; Fueglistaler, S.; Grooß, J.-U.; Günther, G.; Konopka, P.; Liu, Y. S.; Müller, R.; Ravegnani, F.; Schiller, C.; Ulanovski, A.; Riese, M.

    2011-01-01

    We explore the potential of ozone observations to constrain transport processes in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), and contrast it with insights that can be obtained from water vapour. Global fields from Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) and in-situ observations are predicted using a backtrajectory approach that captures advection, instantaneous freeze-drying and photolytical ozone production. Two different representations of transport (kinematic and diabatic 3-month backtrajectories based on ERA-Interim data) are used to evaluate the sensitivity to differences in transport. Results show that mean profiles and seasonality of both tracers can be reasonably reconstructed. Water vapour predictions are similar for both transport representations, but predictions for ozone are systematically higher for kinematic transport. Compared to global HALOE observations, the diabatic model prediction underestimates the vertical ozone gradient. Comparison of the kinematic prediction with observations obtained during the tropical SCOUT-O3 campaign shows a large high bias above 390 K potential temperature. We show that ozone predictions and vertical dispersion of the trajectories are highly correlated, rendering ozone an interesting tracer for aspects of transport to which water vapour is not sensitive. We show that dispersion and mean upwelling have similar effects on ozone profiles, with slower upwelling and larger dispersion both leading to higher ozone concentrations. Analyses of tropical upwelling based on mean transport characteristics, and model validation have to take into account this ambiguity between tropical ozone production and in-mixing from the stratosphere. In turn, ozone provides constraints on transport in the TTL and lower stratosphere that cannot be obtained from water vapour.

  20. Epitaxial 1D electron transport layers for high-performance perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Gill Sang; Chung, Hyun Suk; Kim, Dong Hoe; Kim, Byeong Jo; Lee, Jin-Wook; Park, Nam-Gyu; Cho, In Sun; Lee, Jung-Kun; Lee, Sangwook; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate high-performance perovskite solar cells with excellent electron transport properties using a one-dimensional (1D) electron transport layer (ETL). The 1D array-based ETL is comprised of 1D SnO2 nanowires (NWs) array grown on a F:SnO2 transparent conducting oxide substrate and rutile TiO2 nanoshells epitaxially grown on the surface of the 1D SnO2 NWs. The optimized devices show more than 95% internal quantum yield at 750 nm, and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 14.2%. The high quantum yield is attributed to dramatically enhanced electron transport in the epitaxial TiO2 layer, compared to that in conventional nanoparticle-based mesoporous TiO2 (mp-TiO2) layers. In addition, the open space in the 1D array-based ETL increases the prevalence of uniform TiO2/perovskite junctions, leading to reproducible device performance with a high fill factor. This work offers a method to achieve reproducible, high-efficiency perovskite solar cells with high-speed electron transport.We demonstrate high-performance perovskite solar cells with excellent electron transport properties using a one-dimensional (1D) electron transport layer (ETL). The 1D array-based ETL is comprised of 1D SnO2 nanowires (NWs) array grown on a F:SnO2 transparent conducting oxide substrate and rutile TiO2 nanoshells epitaxially grown on the surface of the 1D SnO2 NWs. The optimized devices show more than 95% internal quantum yield at 750 nm, and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 14.2%. The high quantum yield is attributed to dramatically enhanced electron transport in the epitaxial TiO2 layer, compared to that in conventional nanoparticle-based mesoporous TiO2 (mp-TiO2) layers. In addition, the open space in the 1D array-based ETL increases the prevalence of uniform TiO2/perovskite junctions, leading to reproducible device performance with a high fill factor. This work offers a method to achieve reproducible, high-efficiency perovskite solar cells with high-speed electron transport

  1. Mesoscale imperfections in MoS2 atomic layers grown by a vapor transport technique.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingnan; Ghosh, Rudresh; Wu, Di; Ismach, Ariel; Ruoff, Rodney; Lai, Keji

    2014-08-13

    The success of isolating small flakes of atomically thin layers through mechanical exfoliation has triggered enormous research interest in graphene and other two-dimensional materials. For device applications, however, controlled large-area synthesis of highly crystalline monolayers with a low density of electronically active defects is imperative. Here, we demonstrate the electrical imaging of dendritic ad-layers and grain boundaries in monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) grown by a vapor transport technique using microwave impedance microscopy. The micrometer-sized precipitates in our films, which appear as a second layer of MoS2 in conventional height and optical measurements, show ∼ 2 orders of magnitude higher conductivity than that of the single layer. The zigzag grain boundaries, on the other hand, are shown to be more resistive than the crystalline grains, consistent with previous studies. Our ability to map the local electrical properties in a rapid and nondestructive manner is highly desirable for optimizing the growth process of large-scale MoS2 atomic layers. PMID:25019334

  2. Measurements and theory for transport layer structure in intense bed-load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraccarollo, L.; Capart, H.

    2012-04-01

    We focus on sediment laden flows driven by turbulent open-channel flows where the bed surface is fully mobilized and nonetheless the thickness of the bedload layer is conveniently smaller than the flow depth. This regime presents dynamic and kinematic features which persist in the range of applied Shields stress between about 0.3 and 3. Below the lower limit the moving grains do not develop significant stresses compared to the applied ones; above the upper limit, debris-flow type frictional contacts develop in a non negligible portion of the bedload layer. We report laboratory experiments in which, using high-speed cameras and a laser light sheet, detailed profiles of granular velocity and concentration have been measured. We checked that the transversal bed profile is flat and that the sidewall measurements are representative of the interior domain. The profiles provide new information on transport layer structure and its relation to the applied Shields stress. Contrary to expectations, we find that intense bed-load layers respond to changes in flow conditions by adjusting their granular concentration at the base. Two mechanisms account for the resulting behavior: stresses generated by immersed granular collisions, and equilibration by density stratification. Without parameter adjustment, the deduced constitutive relations capture the responses of velocity, concentration, and layer thickness in the above reported ten-fold increase Shields-stress range. Away from this intermediate range, in both directions, we show how the flow features rapidly change and the theoretical inferences decay.

  3. The essential role of the poly(3-hexylthiophene) hole transport layer in perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Liu, Wenqiang; Tan, Furui; Gu, Yuzong

    2015-01-01

    The compact and oriented TiO2 films are prepared by a solvothermal method, and used as electron transporting layers in perovskite CH3NH3PbI3-xClx based solar cells incorporating poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) as the hole transporting material layer. The devices with P3HT exhibit a substantial increase in power conversion efficiency, open circuit voltage, and fill factor, compared with the reference device without P3HT. Impedance spectroscopy measurements demonstrate that the present P3HT layer decreases the internal resistance in solar cells and allows the interface between oriented TiO2 and CH3NH3PbI3-xClx to form more perfect in electronics. It is also found that the electron lifetime in the devices with P3HT is much longer than that of the device without P3HT. Thus, the charge collection efficiency of the device with P3HT is markedly enhanced, compared with the devices without P3HT. Analysis of the energy levels of the involved materials indicates that the P3HT film between the CH3NH3PbI3-xClx layer and the Au electrode provides a better energy level matching for efficient transporting holes to the anode. Meanwhile, the stability of such P3HT solar cells is enhanced because of the compact and oriented TiO2 film preventing the possible interaction between TiO2 and perovskite as time went on.

  4. Effect of the endothelial glycocalyx layer on arterial LDL transport under normal and high pressure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Fan, Yubo; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2011-08-21

    To quantitatively investigate the role of the endothelial glycocalyx layer (EGL) in protecting the artery from excessive infiltration of atherogenic lipids such as low density lipoproteins (LDLs), a multilayer model with the EGL of an arterial segment was developed to numerically simulate the flow and the transport of LDLs under normal and high pressure. The transport parameters of the layers of the model were obtained from the hydrodynamic theory, the stochastic theory, and from the literature. The results showed that the increase in the thickness of the EGL could lead to a sharp drop in LDL accumulation in the intima. A partial damage to the EGL could compromise its barrier function, hence leading to enhanced infiltration/accumulation of LDLs within the wall of the arterial model. Without the EGL, hypertension could lead to a significantly enhanced LDL transport into the wall of the model. However, the intact EGL could protect the arterial wall from hypertension so that the LDL concentration in the intima layer was almost the same as that under normal pressure conditions. The results also showed that LDL concentration within the arterial wall increased with Φ (the fraction of leaky junctions) on the intima layer. The increase in LDL concentration with Φ was much more dramatic for the model without the EGL. For instance, without the EGL, a Φ of 0.0005 could lead LDL concentration within the arterial wall to be even higher than that predicted for the EGL intact model with a Φ of 0.002. In conclusion, an intact EGL with a sufficient thickness may act as a barrier to LDL infiltration into the arterial wall and has the potential to suppress the hypertension-driven hike of LDL infiltration/accumulation in the arterial wall. PMID:21645523

  5. Charge transport in organic multi-layer devices under electric and optical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, June Hyoung

    2007-12-01

    Charge transport in small organic molecules and conjugated conducting polymers under electric or optical fields is studied by using field effect transistors and photo-voltaic cells with multiple thin layers. With these devices, current under electric field, photo-current under optical field, and luminescence of optical materials are measured to characterize organic and polymeric materials. For electric transport studies, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped by polystyrenesulfonic acid is used, which is conductive with conductivity of approximately 25 S/cm. Despite their high conductance, field effect transistors based on the films are successfully built and characterized by monitoring modulations of drain current by gate voltage and IV characteristic curves. Due to very thin insulating layers of poly(vinylphenol), the transistors are relative fast under small gate voltage variation although heavy ions are involved in charge transport. In IV characteristic curves, saturation effects can be observed. Analysis using conventional field effect transistor model indicates high mobility of charge carriers, 10 cm2/V·sec, which is not consistent with the mobility of the conducting polymer. It is proposed that the effect of a small density of ions injected via polymer dielectric upon application of gate voltage and the ion compensation of key hopping sites accounts for the operation of the field effect transistors. For the studies of transport under optical field, photovoltaic cells with 3 different dendrons, which are efficient to harvest photo-excited electrons, are used. These dendrons consist of two electron-donors (tetraphenylporphyrin) and one electron-accepter (naphthalenediimide). Steady-state fluorescence measurements show that inter-molecular interaction is dominant in solid dendron film, although intra-molecular interaction is still present. Intra-molecular interaction is suggested by different fluorescence lifetimes between solutions of donor and dendrons. This

  6. Synthesis and characterization of polymer layers for control of fluid transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatansever, Fehime

    The level of wetting of fiber surface with liquids is an important characteristic of fibrous materials. It is related to fiber surface energy and the structure of the material. Surface energy can be changed by surface modification via the grafting methodologies that have been reported for introducing new and stable functionality to fibrous substrates without changing bulk properties. Present work is dedicated to synthesis and characterization of macromolecular layers grafted to fiber surface in order to achieve directional liquid transport for the modified fabric. Modification technique used here is based on formation of stable polymer layer on fabric surface using "grafting to" technique. Specifically, modification of fabric with wettability gradient for facilitated one way-liquid transport, and pointed modification of yarn-based channels on textile microfluidic device for directional liquid transport are reported here. First, fabric was activated with alkali (NaOH) solution. Second, poly (glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) was deposited on fabric as an anchoring layer. Finally, polymers of interest were grafted to surface through the epoxy functionality of PGMA. Effect of polymer grafting on the wicking property of the fabric has been evaluated by vertical wicking technique at the each step of surface modification. The results shows that wicking performance of fabric can be altered by grafting of a thin nanoscale polymeric film. For the facilitated liquid transport, the gradient polymer coating was created using "grafting to" technique and its dependence on the grafting temperature. Wettability gradient from hydrophilic to hydrophobic (change in water contact angle from 0 to 140 degrees on fabric) was achieved by grafting of polystyrene (PS) and polyacrylic acid (PAA) sequentially with concentration gradient. This study proposes that fabric with wettability gradient property can be used to transfer sweat from skin and support moisture management when it is used in a

  7. Transport and Evolution of Aerosol Above/Below the Boundary Layer in the Western Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, G. C.; Corrigan, C.; Ritchie, J.; Pont, V.; Claeys, M.; Sciare, J.; Mallet, M.; Dulac, F.

    2014-12-01

    The Mediterranean Region has been identified as sensitive to changes in the hydrological cycle, which could affect the water resources for millions of people by the turn of the century. However, prior to recent observations, most climate models have not accounted for the impacts of aerosol in this region. Past airborne studies have shown that aerosol sources from Europe and Africa are often transported throughout the lower troposphere; yet, because of their complex vertical distribution, it is a challenge to capture the variability and quantify the contribution of these sources to the radiative budget and precipitation processes. The PAEROS ChArMEx Mountain Experiment (PACMEx) complemented the regional activities of the ChArMEx/ADRIMED summer 2013 campaign by collecting aerosol data from atop a mountain on the island of Corsica, France in order to assess boundary layer / free troposphere atmospheric processes. In June/July 2013, PACMEx instruments were deployed at 2000 m.asl near the center of Corsica to complement ground-based aerosol observations at 550 m.asl on the northern peninsula, as well as airborne measurements. Comparisons between the peninsula site and the mountain site show similar general trends in aerosol properties; yet, differences in aerosol properties reveal the myriad transport mechanisms over the Mediterranean Basin. Using aerosol physicochemical data coupled with back trajectory analysis, different sources have been identified including Saharan dust transport, residual dust mixed with sea salt, anthropogenic emissions from Western Europe, and a period of biomass burning from Eastern Europe. Each period exhibits distinct signatures in the aerosol related to transport processes above and below the boundary layer. In addition, the total aerosol concentrations at the mountain site revealed a strong diurnal cycling between the atmospheric boundary layer and the free troposphere, which is typical of mountain-top observations. PACMEx was funded by the

  8. Sources and Transport of Aerosol above the Boundary Layer over the Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Greg; Corrigan, Craig; Ritchie, John; Pont, Veronique; Claeys, Marine; Sciare, Jean; Mallet, Marc; Dulac, François; Mihalopoulos, Nikos

    2015-04-01

    The Mediterranean Region has been identified as sensitive to changes in the hydrological cycle, which could affect the water resources for millions of people by the turn of the century. However, prior to recent observations, most climate models have not accounted for the impacts of aerosol in this region. Past airborne studies have shown that aerosol sources from Europe and Africa are often transported throughout the lower troposphere; yet, because of their complex vertical distribution, it is a challenge to capture the variability and quantify the contribution of these sources to the radiative budget and precipitation processes. The PAEROS ChArMEx Mountain Experiment (PACMEx) complemented the regional activities by collecting aerosol data from atop a mountain on the island of Corsica, France in order to assess boundary layer / free troposphere atmospheric processes. In June/July 2013, PACMEx instruments were deployed at 2000 m.asl near the center of Corsica, France to complement ground-based aerosol observations at 550 m.asl on the northern peninsula, as well as airborne measurements. Comparisons between the peninsula site and the mountain site show similar general trends in aerosol properties; yet, differences in aerosol properties reveal the myriad transport mechanisms over the Mediterranean Basin. Using aerosol physicochemical data coupled with back trajectory analysis, different sources have been identified including Saharan dust transport, residual dust mixed with sea salt, anthropogenic emissions from Western Europe, and a period of biomass burning from Eastern Europe. Each period exhibits distinct signatures in the aerosol related to transport processes above and below the boundary layer. In addition, the total aerosol concentrations at the mountain site revealed a strong diurnal cycling the between the atmospheric boundary layer and the free troposphere, which is typical of mountain-top observations. PACMEx was funded by the National Science Foundation

  9. Glassy Metal Alloy Nanofiber Anodes Employing Graphene Wrapping Layer: Toward Ultralong-Cycle-Life Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji-Won; Ryu, Won-Hee; Shin, Jungwoo; Park, Kyusung; Kim, Il-Doo

    2015-07-28

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) has been intensively explored as one of the most attractive candidates for high-capacity and long-cycle-life anode in Li-ion batteries (LIBs) primarily because of its reduced volume expansion characteristic (∼280%) compared to crystalline Si anodes (∼400%) after full Li(+) insertion. Here, we report one-dimensional (1-D) electrospun Si-based metallic glass alloy nanofibers (NFs) with an optimized composition of Si60Sn12Ce18Fe5Al3Ti2. On the basis of careful compositional tailoring of Si alloy NFs, we found that Ce plays the most important role as a glass former in the formation of the metallic glass alloy. Moreover, Si-based metallic glass alloy NFs were wrapped by reduced graphene oxide sheets (specifically Si60Sn12Ce18Fe5Al3Ti2 NFs@rGO), which can prevent the direct exposure of a-Si alloy NFs to the liquid electrolyte and stabilize the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layers on the surfaces of rGO sheets while facilitating electron transport. The metallic glass nanofibers exhibited superior electrochemical cell performance as an anode: (i) Si60Sn12Ce18Fe5Al3Ti2 NFs show a high specific capacity of 1017 mAh g(-1) up to 400 cycles at 0.05C with negligible capacity loss as well as superior cycling performance (nearly 99.9% capacity retention even after 2000 cycles at 0.5C); (ii) Si60Sn12Ce18Fe5Al3Ti2 NFs@rGO reveals outstanding rate behavior (569.77 mAh g(-1) after 2000 cycles at 0.5C and a reversible capacity of around 370 mAh g(-1) at 4C). We demonstrate the potential suitability of multicomponent a-Si alloy NFs as a long-cycling anode material. PMID:26028125

  10. ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT BY ACOUSTIC MODES GENERATED IN THE BOUNDARY LAYER. II. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Rafikov, Roman R.; Stone, James M.

    2013-06-10

    We perform global unstratified three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of an astrophysical boundary layer (BL)-an interface region between an accretion disk and a weakly magnetized accreting object such as a white dwarf-with the goal of understanding the effects of magnetic field on the BL. We use cylindrical coordinates with an isothermal equation of state and investigate a number of initial field geometries including toroidal, vertical, and vertical with zero net flux. Our initial setup consists of a Keplerian disk attached to a non-rotating star. In a previous work, we found that in hydrodynamical simulations, sound waves excited by shear in the BL were able to efficiently transport angular momentum and drive mass accretion onto the star. Here we confirm that in MHD simulations, waves serve as an efficient means of angular momentum transport in the vicinity of the BL, despite the magnetorotational instability (MRI) operating in the disk. In particular, the angular momentum current due to waves is at times larger than the angular momentum current due to MRI. Our results suggest that angular momentum transport in the BL and its vicinity is a global phenomenon occurring through dissipation of waves and shocks. This point of view is quite different from the standard picture of transport by a local anomalous turbulent viscosity. In addition to angular momentum transport, we also study magnetic field amplification within the BL. We find that the field is indeed amplified in the BL, but only by a factor of a few, and remains subthermal.

  11. Thermal transport in bismuth telluride quintuple layer: mode-resolved phonon properties and substrate effects

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Cheng; Bao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The successful exfoliation of atomically-thin bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) quintuple layer (QL) attracts tremendous research interest in this strongly anharmonic quasi-two-dimensional material. The thermal transport properties of this material are not well understood, especially the mode-wise properties and when it is coupled with a substrate. In this work, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations and normal mode analysis to study the mode-resolved thermal transport in freestanding and supported Bi2Te3 QL. The detailed mode-wise phonon properties are calculated and the accumulated thermal conductivities with respect to phonon mean free path (MFP) are constructed. It is shown that 60% of the thermal transport is contributed by phonons with MFP longer than 20 nm. Coupling with a-SiO2 substrate leads to about 60% reduction of thermal conductivity. Through varying the interfacial coupling strength and the atomic mass of substrate, we also find that phonon in Bi2Te3 QL is more strongly scattered by interfacial potential and its transport process is less affected by the dynamics of substrate. Our study provides an in-depth understanding of heat transport in Bi2Te3 QL and is helpful in further tailoring its thermal property through nanostructuring. PMID:27263656

  12. Thermal transport in bismuth telluride quintuple layer: mode-resolved phonon properties and substrate effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Cheng; Bao, Hua

    2016-06-01

    The successful exfoliation of atomically-thin bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) quintuple layer (QL) attracts tremendous research interest in this strongly anharmonic quasi-two-dimensional material. The thermal transport properties of this material are not well understood, especially the mode-wise properties and when it is coupled with a substrate. In this work, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations and normal mode analysis to study the mode-resolved thermal transport in freestanding and supported Bi2Te3 QL. The detailed mode-wise phonon properties are calculated and the accumulated thermal conductivities with respect to phonon mean free path (MFP) are constructed. It is shown that 60% of the thermal transport is contributed by phonons with MFP longer than 20 nm. Coupling with a-SiO2 substrate leads to about 60% reduction of thermal conductivity. Through varying the interfacial coupling strength and the atomic mass of substrate, we also find that phonon in Bi2Te3 QL is more strongly scattered by interfacial potential and its transport process is less affected by the dynamics of substrate. Our study provides an in-depth understanding of heat transport in Bi2Te3 QL and is helpful in further tailoring its thermal property through nanostructuring.

  13. Turbulent transport in the atmospheric boundary layer with application to wind farm dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waggy, Scott B.

    With the recent push for renewable energy sources, wind energy has emerged as a candidate to replace some of the power produced by traditional fossil fuels. Recent studies, however, have indicated that wind farms may have a direct effect on local meteorology by transporting water vapor away from the Earth's surface. Such turbulent transport could result in an increased drying of soil, and, in turn, negatively affect the productivity of land in the wind farm's immediate vicinity. This numerical study will analyze four scenarios with the goal of understanding turbulence transport in the wake of a turbine: the neutrally-stratified boundary layer with system rotation, the unstably-stratified atmospheric boundary layer, and wind turbine simulations of these previous two cases. For this work, the Ekman layer is used as an approximation of the atmospheric boundary layer and the governing equations are solved using a fully-parallelized direct numerical simulation (DNS). The in-depth studies of the neutrally and unstably-stratified boundary layers without introducing wind farm effects will act to provide a concrete background for the final study concerning turbulent transport due to turbine wakes. Although neutral stratification rarely occurs in the atmospheric boundary layer, it is useful to study the turbulent Ekman layer under such conditions as it provides a limiting case when unstable or stable stratification are weak. In this work, a thorough analysis was completed including turbulent statistics, velocity and pressure autocorrelations, and a calculation of the full turbulent energy budget. The unstably-stratified atmospheric boundary layer was studied under two levels of heating: moderate and vigorous. Under moderate stratification, both buoyancy and shearing contribute significantly to the turbulent dynamics. As the level of stratification increases, the role of shearing is shown to diminish and is confined to the near-wall region only. A recent, multi

  14. Vertical electron transport in van der Waals heterostructures with graphene layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhii, V.; Otsuji, T.; Ryzhii, M.; Aleshkin, V. Ya.; Dubinov, A. A.; Mitin, V.; Shur, M. S.

    2015-04-01

    We propose and analyze an analytical model for the self-consistent description of the vertical electron transport in van der Waals graphene-layer (GL) heterostructures with the GLs separated by the barriers layers. The top and bottom GLs serve as the structure emitter and collector. The vertical electron transport in such structures is associated with the propagation of the electrons thermionically emitted from GLs above the inter-GL barriers. The model under consideration describes the processes of the electron thermionic emission from and the electron capture to GLs. It accounts for the nonuniformity of the self-consistent electric field governed by the Poisson equation which accounts for the variation of the electron population in GLs. The model takes also under consideration the cooling of electrons in the emitter layer due to the Peltier effect. We find the spatial distributions of the electric field and potential with the high-electric-field domain near the emitter GL in the GL heterostructures with different numbers of GLs. Using the obtained spatial distributions of the electric field, we calculate the current-voltage characteristics. We demonstrate that the Peltier cooling of the two-dimensional electron gas in the emitter GL can strongly affect the current-voltage characteristics resulting in their saturation. The obtained results can be important for the optimization of the hot-electron bolometric terahertz detectors and different devices based on GL heterostructures.

  15. Vertical electron transport in van der Waals heterostructures with graphene layers

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhii, V.; Otsuji, T.; Ryzhii, M.; Aleshkin, V. Ya.; Dubinov, A. A.; Mitin, V.; Shur, M. S.

    2015-04-21

    We propose and analyze an analytical model for the self-consistent description of the vertical electron transport in van der Waals graphene-layer (GL) heterostructures with the GLs separated by the barriers layers. The top and bottom GLs serve as the structure emitter and collector. The vertical electron transport in such structures is associated with the propagation of the electrons thermionically emitted from GLs above the inter-GL barriers. The model under consideration describes the processes of the electron thermionic emission from and the electron capture to GLs. It accounts for the nonuniformity of the self-consistent electric field governed by the Poisson equation which accounts for the variation of the electron population in GLs. The model takes also under consideration the cooling of electrons in the emitter layer due to the Peltier effect. We find the spatial distributions of the electric field and potential with the high-electric-field domain near the emitter GL in the GL heterostructures with different numbers of GLs. Using the obtained spatial distributions of the electric field, we calculate the current-voltage characteristics. We demonstrate that the Peltier cooling of the two-dimensional electron gas in the emitter GL can strongly affect the current-voltage characteristics resulting in their saturation. The obtained results can be important for the optimization of the hot-electron bolometric terahertz detectors and different devices based on GL heterostructures.

  16. Spin transport in tantalum studied using magnetic single and double layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Eric; Omelchenko, Pavlo; Coutts, Chris; Lee-Hone, Nicholas R.; Hübner, René; Broun, David; Heinrich, Bret; Girt, Erol

    2016-08-01

    We report on spin transport in sputter-grown Ta films measured by ferromagnetic resonance. Spin diffusion length and spin mixing conductance are determined from magnetic damping measurements for a varying thickness of Ta layer 0 ≤dTa≤10 nm. The different boundary conditions of single- and double-magnetic-layer heterostructures Py |Ta and Py |Ta | [Py |Fe ] allow us to significantly narrow down the parameter space and test various models. We show that a common approach of using bulk resistivity value in the analysis yields inconsistent spin diffusion length and spin mixing conductance values for magnetic single- and double-layer structures. X-ray diffraction shows that bulk Ta is a combination of β -Ta and bcc-Ta . However, in the region of significant spin transport, ≲2 nm, there is an intermediate region of growth where the Ta lacks long-range structural order, as observed by transmission electron microscopy. Thickness-dependent resistivity measurements confirm that the bulk and intermediate regions have significantly different resistivity values. We find that the data can be well represented if the intermediate region resistivity value is used in the analysis. Additionally, the data can be fit if resistivity has the measured thickness dependence and spin diffusion length is restricted to be inversely proportional to resistivity. Finally, we rule out a model in which spin diffusion length is a constant, while the resistivity has the measured thickness dependence.

  17. Vertical structure of aeolian turbulence in a boundary layer with sand transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Zoe S.; Baas, Andreas C. W.

    2016-04-01

    Recently we have found that Reynolds shear stress shows a significant variability with measurement height (Lee and Baas, 2016), and so an alternative parameter for boundary layer turbulence may help to explain the relationship between wind forcing and sediment transport. We present data that were collected during a field study of boundary layer turbulence conducted on a North Atlantic beach. High-frequency (50 Hz) 3D wind velocity measurements were collected using ultrasonic anemometry at thirteen different measurement heights in a tight vertical array between 0.11 and 1.62 metres above the surface. Thanks to the high density installation of sensors a detailed analysis of the boundary layer flow can be conducted using methods more typically used in studies where data is only available from one or just a few measurement heights. We use quadrant analysis to explore the vertical structure of turbulence and track the changes in quadrant signatures with measurement elevation and over time. Results of quadrant analysis, at the 'raw' 50 Hz timescale, demonstrates the tendency for event clustering across all four quadrants, which implies that at-a-point quadrant events are part of larger-scale turbulent structures. Using an HSV colour model, applied to the quadrant analysis data and plotted in series, we create colour maps of turbulence, which can provide a clear visualisation of the clustering of event activity at each height and illustrate the shape of the larger coherent flow structures that are present within the boundary layer. By including a saturation component to the colour model, the most significant stress producing sections of the data are emphasised. This results in a 'banded' colour map, which relates to clustering of quadrant I (Outward Interaction) and quadrant IV (Sweep) activity, separate from clustering of quadrant II (Burst) and quadrant III (Inward Interaction). Both 'sweep-type' and 'burst-type' sequences are shown to have a diagonal structure

  18. Thre-dimensiana model for transportation of particulate plumes in boundary layer with obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, Arakel; Karelsky, Kirill

    2015-04-01

    This presentation is aimed at creating and realization of new physical model of impurity transfer (solid particles and heavy gases) in areas with non-flat and/or nonstationary boundaries. The main idea of suggested method is to use non-viscous equations for solid particles transport modeling in the vicinity of complex boundary. In viscous atmosphere with as small as one likes coefficient of molecular viscosity, the non-slip boundary condition on solid surface must be observed. This postulates the reduction of velocity to zero at a solid surface. It is unconditionally in this case Prandtle hypothesis must be observed: for rather wide range of conditions in the surface neighboring layers energy dissipation of atmosphere flows is comparable by magnitude with manifestation of inertia forces. That is why according to Prandtle hypothesis in atmosphere movement characterizing by a high Reynolds number the boundary layer is forming near a planet surface, within which the required transition from zero velocities at the surface to magnitudes at the external boundary of the layer that are quite close to ones in ideal atmosphere flow. In that layer fast velocity gradients cause viscous effects to be comparable in magnitude with inertia forces influence. For conditions considered essential changes of hydrodynamic fields near solid boundary caused not only by nonslip condition but also by a various relief of surface: mountains, street canyons, individual buildings. Transport of solid particles, their ascent and precipitation also result in dramatic changes of meteorological fields. As dynamic processes of solid particles transfer accompanying the flow past of complex relief surface by wind flows is of our main interest we are to use equations of non-viscous hydrodynamic. We should put up with on the one hand idea of high wind gradients in the boundary layer and on the other hand disregard of molecular viscosity in two-phase atmosphere equations. We deal with describing high

  19. Dispersed solar thermal generation employing parabolic dish-electric transport with field modulated generator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramakumar, R.; Bahrami, K.

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of field modulated generator systems (FMGS) to dispersed solar-thermal-electric generation from a parabolic dish field with electric transport. Each solar generation unit is rated at 15 kWe and the power generated by an array of such units is electrically collected for insertion into an existing utility grid. Such an approach appears to be most suitable when the heat engine rotational speeds are high (greater than 6000 r/min) and, in particular, if they are operated in the variable speed mode and if utility-grade a.c. is required for direct insertion into the grid without an intermediate electric energy storage and reconversion system. Predictions of overall efficiencies based on conservative efficiency figures for the FMGS are in the range of 25 per cent and should be encouraging to those involved in the development of cost-effective dispersed solar thermal power systems.

  20. Multi-dimensional Simulations of Core Collapse Supernovae employing Ray-by-Ray Neutrino Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hix, W. R.; Mezzacappa, A.; Liebendoerfer, M.; Messer, O. E. B.; Blondin, J. M.; Bruenn, S. W.

    2001-12-01

    Decades of research on the mechanism which causes core collapse supernovae has evolved a paradigm wherein the shock that results from the formation of the proto-neutron star stalls, failing to produce an explosion. Only when the shock is re-energized by the tremendous neutrino flux that is carrying off the binding energy of this proto-neutron star can it drive off the star's envelope, creating a supernova. Work in recent years has demonstrated the importance of multi-dimensional hydrodynamic effects like convection to successful simulation of an explosion. Further work has established the necessity of accurately characterizing the distribution of neutrinos in energy and direction. This requires discretizing the neutrino distribution into multiple groups, adding greatly to the computational cost. However, no supernova simulations to date have combined self-consistent multi-group neutrino transport with multi-dimensional hydrodynamics. We present preliminary results of our efforts to combine these important facets of the supernova mechanism by coupling self-consistent ray-by-ray multi-group Boltzmann and flux-limited diffusion neutrino transport schemes to multi-dimensional hydrodynamics. This research is supported by NASA under contract NAG5-8405, by the NSF under contract AST-9877130, and under a SciDAC grant from the DoE Office of Science High Energy and Nuclear Physics Program. Work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  1. Band offset of vanadium-doped molybdenum oxide hole transport layer in organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Feng-Kuei; Huang, Yi-Chi; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chen, Jen-Sue

    2016-08-01

    Solution-processed vanadium-doped molybdenum oxide films (V)MoOx films with mole ratios of Mo:V = 1:0, 1:0.05, 1:0.2, 1:0.5, 0:1, are fabricated as hole transport layer (HTL) in organic photovoltaics with active layer blend comprising poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). The device structure is ITO/(V)MoOx/P3HT:PCBM/ZnO NP/Al, and the working area is 0.16 cm2. The result shows that the device using V0.05MoOx HTL has the best performance, including power conversion efficiency of 2.16%, Voc of 0.6 V, Jsc of 6.93 mA/cm2, and FF of 51.9%. Using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), we can define the energy levels of valence band edge and Fermi level of (V)MoOx films. UPS analysis indicates that V0.05MoOx has the smallest energy band offset between its valence band edge to the HOMO of P3HT, which is advantageous for hole transporting from P3HT to ITO anode via the V0.05MoOx HTL. In addition, V0.05MoOx film shows the lowest electrical resistivity among all (V)MoOx films, which is further beneficial for hole transportation.

  2. The design and optimization of two low frequency energy harvesters employing 3C-SiC/AlN/Mo composite layers

    SciTech Connect

    Iqbal, Abid Mohd-Yasin, Faisal Dimitrijev, Sima

    2014-10-24

    This paper presents the design and simulation of twocantilever-based energy harvesters that employs cubic silicon carbide on silicon (3C-SiC-on-Si) wafer as the base material and bottom electrode. Aluminum Nitride (AlN) is employed as the piezoelectric/middle layer due to its excellent material properties and high stability in varying temperature and harsh environment. Molybdenum (Mo) serves as the top layer/electrode. The thickness of the structural layers are optimized through MATLAB and also analyzed via Finite Element Analysis using Intellisuite. Two designs are proposed at low resonant frequency, one with conventional cantilever beam, the other being a T-shaped cantilever beam. Both structures are simulated and their performances are compared.

  3. The design and optimization of two low frequency energy harvesters employing 3C-SiC/AlN/Mo composite layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Abid; Mohd-Yasin, Faisal; Dimitrijev, Sima

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents the design and simulation of twocantilever-based energy harvesters that employs cubic silicon carbide on silicon (3C-SiC-on-Si) wafer as the base material and bottom electrode. Aluminum Nitride (AlN) is employed as the piezoelectric/middle layer due to its excellent material properties and high stability in varying temperature and harsh environment. Molybdenum (Mo) serves as the top layer/electrode. The thickness of the structural layers are optimized through MATLAB and also analyzed via Finite Element Analysis using Intellisuite. Two designs are proposed at low resonant frequency, one with conventional cantilever beam, the other being a T-shaped cantilever beam. Both structures are simulated and their performances are compared.

  4. Design of an Advanced Membrane Electrode Assembly Employing a Double-Layered Cathode for a PEM Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Kim, GyeongHee; Eom, KwangSup; Kim, MinJoong; Yoo, Sung Jong; Jang, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyoung-Juhn; Cho, EunAe

    2015-12-23

    The membrane electrolyte assembly (MEA) designed in this study utilizes a double-layered cathode: an inner catalyst layer prepared by a conventional decal transfer method and an outer catalyst layer directly coated on a gas diffusion layer. The double-layered structure was used to improve the interfacial contact between the catalyst layer and membrane, to increase catalyst utilization and to modify the removal of product water from the cathode. Based on a series of MEAs with double-layered cathodes with an overall Pt loading fixed at 0.4 mg cm(-2) and different ratios of inner-to-outer Pt loading, the MEA with an inner layer of 0.3 mg Pt cm(-2) and an outer layer of 0.1 mg Pt cm(-2) exhibited the best performance. This performance was better than that of the conventional single-layered electrode by 13.5% at a current density of 1.4 A cm(-2). PMID:26630367

  5. Thermal Transport Phenomena in the Quasi-laminarization Process of Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Luciano; Araya, Guillermo; Hussain, Fazle

    2014-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulation of a spatially evolving turbulent boundary layer subject to strong favorable pressure gradient (SFPG) with eventual quasi-laminarization has been performed to include the thermal field. In this talk, the following questions will be addressed: i) to which extend the Reynolds analogy is satisfied during flow laminarization? ii) can the thermal boundary layer under quasi-laminarization be described as two quasi-independent inner/outer regions? To the best of our knowledge, documented investigation regarding heat transfer phenomena associated with quasi-laminarization process of spatially developing boundary layers is rather scarce. In order to introduce realistic thermal inlet fluctuations in a SFPG we employed the multi-scale technique for thermal boundary layers devised by Araya and Castillo PoF (2013). Such methodology enable us to more effective capture the pressure gradient and thermal field than using a single scaling approach. It is shown that the Reynolds normal stresses for the streamwise component remains frozen in space while the wall-normal and spanwise components continue to decrease as the flow moves downstream and never becomes laminar due to the survival of the upstream turbulence during dissipation on viscous time scales.

  6. Effective Transport Properties Accounting for Electrochemical Reactions of Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Catalyst Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Pharoah, Jon; Choi, Hae-Won; Chueh, Chih-Che; Harvey, David

    2011-07-01

    There has been a rapidly growing interest in three-dimensional micro-structural reconstruction of fuel cell electrodes so as to derive more accurate descriptors of the pertinent geometric and effective transport properties. Due to the limited accessibility of experiments based reconstruction techniques, such as dual-beam focused ion beam-scanning electro microscopy or micro X-Ray computed tomography, within sample micro-structures of the catalyst layers in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), a particle based numerical model is used in this study to reconstruct sample microstructure of the catalyst layers in PEMFCs. Then the reconstructed sample structure is converted into the computational grid using body-fitted/cut-cell based unstructured meshing technique. Finally, finite volume methods (FVM) are applied to calculate effective properties on computational sample domains.

  7. A simple stochastic quadrant model for the transport and deposition of particles in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeks, Michael; Jin, Chunyu; Potts, Ian

    2015-11-01

    We present a simple stochastic quadrant model for calculating the transport and deposition of heavy particles in a fully developed turbulent boundary layer based on the statistics of wall-normal fluid velocity fluctuations obtained from a fully developed channel flow. Individual particles are tracked through the boundary layer via their interactions with a succession of random eddies found in each of the quadrants of the fluid Reynolds shear stress domain in a homogeneous Markov chain process. Deposition rates for a range of heavy particles predicted by the model compare well with benchmark experimental measurements. In addition deposition rates are compared with those obtained continuous random walk (CRW) models including those based on the Langevin equation for the turbulent fluctuations. In addition, various statistics related to the particle near wall behavior are also presented.

  8. ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT AND VARIABILITY IN BOUNDARY LAYERS OF ACCRETION DISKS DRIVEN BY GLOBAL ACOUSTIC MODES

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Stone, James M.; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2012-11-20

    Disk accretion onto a weakly magnetized central object, e.g., a star, is inevitably accompanied by the formation of a boundary layer near the surface, in which matter slows down from the highly supersonic orbital velocity of the disk to the rotational velocity of the star. We perform high-resolution two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations in the equatorial plane of an astrophysical boundary layer with the goal of exploring the dynamics of non-axisymmetric structures that form there. We generically find that the supersonic shear in the boundary layer excites non-axisymmetric quasi-stationary acoustic modes that are trapped between the surface of the star and a Lindblad resonance in the disk. These modes rotate in a prograde fashion, are stable for hundreds of orbital periods, and have a pattern speed that is less than and of the order of the rotational velocity at the inner edge of the disk. The origin of these intrinsically global modes is intimately related to the operation of a corotation amplifier in the system. Dissipation of acoustic modes in weak shocks provides a universal mechanism for angular momentum and mass transport even in purely hydrodynamic (i.e., non-magnetized) boundary layers. We discuss the possible implications of these trapped modes for explaining the variability seen in accreting compact objects.

  9. Cross-layer restoration with software defined networking based on IP over optical transport networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Cheng, Lei; Deng, Junni; Zhao, Yongli; Zhang, Jie; Lee, Young

    2015-10-01

    The IP over optical transport network is a very promising networking architecture applied to the interconnection of geographically distributed data centers due to the performance guarantee of low delay, huge bandwidth and high reliability at a low cost. It can enable efficient resource utilization and support heterogeneous bandwidth demands in highly-available, cost-effective and energy-effective manner. In case of cross-layer link failure, to ensure a high-level quality of service (QoS) for user request after the failure becomes a research focus. In this paper, we propose a novel cross-layer restoration scheme for data center services with software defined networking based on IP over optical network. The cross-layer restoration scheme can enable joint optimization of IP network and optical network resources, and enhance the data center service restoration responsiveness to the dynamic end-to-end service demands. We quantitatively evaluate the feasibility and performances through the simulation under heavy traffic load scenario in terms of path blocking probability and path restoration latency. Numeric results show that the cross-layer restoration scheme improves the recovery success rate and minimizes the overall recovery time.

  10. Thermal transport across few-layer boron nitride encased by silica

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Yuxiang; Dumitricǎ, Traian; Jiang, Jiechao; Meletis, Efstathios

    2015-07-20

    Two dimensional hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) attracted attention for use in applications. Using equilibrium molecular dynamics, we examine the phonon transport in few-layer h-BN encased by silica (SiO{sub 2}). We report large interfacial thermal resistances, of about 2.2 × 10{sup −8} m{sup 2} K W{sup −1}, which are not sensitive to the number of h-BN layers or the SiO{sub 2} crystallinity. The h-BN/SiO{sub 2} superlattices exhibit ultra-low thermal conductivities across layers, as low as 0.3 W/m K. They are structurally stable up to 2000 K while retaining the low-thermal conductivity attributes. Our simulations indicate that incorporation of h-BN layers and nanoparticles in silica could establish thermal barriers and heat spreading paths, useful for high performance coatings and electronic device applications.

  11. Technique for studying ablation-products transport in supersonic boundary layers by using PLIF of naphthalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combs, C. S.; Lochman, B. J.; Clemens, N. T.

    2016-05-01

    A technique is developed that uses planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of sublimated gas-phase naphthalene to visualize the transport of ablation products in a high-speed turbulent boundary layer. The naphthalene is molded into a rectangular insert that is mounted flush with the floor of a Mach 5 wind tunnel, where the test gas is air. The naphthalene fluorescence is excited with 266 nm laser light, and broadband detection of the emitted light is used. Using spectroscopic data from a previous study and a first-order approximation for the mean temperature profile across the boundary layer, naphthalene PLIF images collected in a Mach 5 turbulent boundary layer are converted into two-dimensional fields of naphthalene mole fraction with an instantaneous uncertainty of ±20 %. These quantitative naphthalene PLIF images in the Mach 5 boundary layer reveal large-scale naphthalene vapor structures that are regularly ejected out to wall distances of approximately y/ δ = 0.6 for a field of view that spans 3 δ-5 δ downstream of the trailing edge of the naphthalene insert. The magnitude of the calculated naphthalene mole fraction in these structures at y/ δ = 0.2 ranges from approximately 1 to 6 % of the saturation mole fraction at the wind tunnel recovery temperature and static pressure. Mean mole fraction profiles taken at different streamwise locations collapse into one "universal" mole fraction profile when properly normalized and are in agreement with previous scalar dispersion measurements. The results indicate that PLIF of sublimating naphthalene can be an effective tool for studying scalar transport in supersonic and hypersonic flows.

  12. The design, fabrication and maintenance of semi-trailers employed in the highway transport of weight-concentrated radioactive loads

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, D.S.

    1991-12-31

    Transportation of weight-concentrated radioactive loads by truck is an essential part of a safe and economical nuclear industry. This proposed standard presents guidance and performance criteria for the safe transport of these weight-concentrated radioactive loads. ANSI N14.30 will detail specific requirements for the design, fabrication, testing, in-service inspections, maintenance and certification of the semi-trailers to be employed in said service. Furthermore, guidelines for a quality assurance program are also enumerated. This standard would apply to any semi-trailer that may or may not be specifically designed to carry weight-concentrated loads. Equipment not suitable per the criteria established in the standard would be removed from service. The nature of the nuclear industry and the need for a positive public perception of the various processes and players, mandates that the highway transportation of weight-concentrated radioactive loads be standardized and made inherently safe. This proposed standard takes a giant step in that direction.

  13. Conductive conjugated polyelectrolyte as hole-transporting layer for organic bulk heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huiqiong; Zhang, Yuan; Mai, Cheng-Kang; Collins, Samuel D; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen; Bazan, Guillermo C; Heeger, Alan J

    2014-02-01

    Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) has been extensively used as the hole-transporting layer (HTL) in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells, however, its anisotropic electrical conduction and intrinsic acidic nature generally limit the device performance. Here we demonstrate the application of a water/alcohol soluble CPE (CPE-K) as HTLs in BHJ solar cells, achieving a PCE up to 8.2%. The more superior and uniform vertical electrical conductivity found in CPE-K reduces the series resistance and provides efficient hole extraction. PMID:24170587

  14. Evaluating the transport layer of the ALFA framework for the Intel® Xeon Phi™ Coprocessor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santogidis, Aram; Hirstius, Andreas; Lalis, Spyros

    2015-12-01

    The ALFA framework supports the software development of major High Energy Physics experiments. As part of our research effort to optimize the transport layer of ALFA, we focus on profiling its data transfer performance for inter-node communication on the Intel Xeon Phi Coprocessor. In this article we present the collected performance measurements with the related analysis of the results. The optimization opportunities that are discovered, help us to formulate the future plans of enabling high performance data transfer for ALFA on the Intel Xeon Phi architecture.

  15. Towards intrinsic phonon transport in single-layer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Bo; Zhang, Hao; Shao, Hezhu; Xu, Yuanfeng; Zhang, Xiangchao; Zhu, Heyuan

    2016-06-01

    The intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity of MoS$_2$ is an important aspect in the design of MoS$_2$-based nanoelectronic devices. We investigate the lattice dynamics properties of MoS$_2$ by first principles calculations. The intrinsic thermal conductivity of single-layer MoS$_2$ is calculated using the Boltzmann transport equation for phonons. The obtained thermal conductivity agrees well with the measurements. The contributions of acoustic and optical phonons to the lattice thermal conductivity are evaluated. The size dependence of thermal conductivity is investigated as well.

  16. Imprinted nonoxidized graphene sheets as an efficient hole transport layer in polymer light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chun-Yuan; Peter Chen, I.-Wen; Chen, Chih-Jung; Chiang, Ray-Kuang; Vu, Hoang-Tuan

    2014-02-01

    Nonoxidized graphene sheets (NGSs) with single- and multilayered structures were generated by direct exfoliation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite in a water-ethanol mixture with the assistances of pyridinium salt (Py+Br3-) and sonication. Raman spectrum exhibited a low intensity ratio (0.055) of D and G bands, indicating that the NGSs were nearly defect-free. Their application for the fabrication of polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) was also demonstrated. The PLEDs that used an imprinted NGS film as a hole transport layer show a luminance exceeding 13000 cd/m2, which was comparable to that of devices using the typical hole transport material: poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-polystyrenesulfonic acid.

  17. Ultraviolet Electroluminescence and Blue-Green Phosphorescence using an Organic Diphosphine Oxide Charge Transporting Layer.

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, Paul E.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Sapochak, Linda S.; Djurovich, Peter I.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2006-05-01

    We report electroluminescence with a peak wavelength at 338 nm from a simple bilayer organic light emitting device (OLED) made using 4,4’-bis(diphenylphosphine oxide) biphenyl (PO1). In an OLED geometry, the material is preferentially electron transporting. Doping the PO1 layer with iridium(III)bis(4,6-(di-fluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N, C2’)picolinate (FIrpic) gives rise to electrophosphorescence with a peak external quantum efficiency of 7.8% at 0.09 mA/cm2 and 5.8% at 13 mA/cm2. The latter current density is obtained at 6.3 V applied forward bias. This represents a new class of wide-bandgap charge transporting organic materials which may prove useful as host materials for blue electrophosphoresent OLEDs.

  18. Three-dimensional scrape off layer transport in the helically symmetric experiment HSX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerson, A. R.; Bader, A.; Hegna, C. C.; Schmitz, O.; Stephey, L. A.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Likin, K. M.

    2016-08-01

    The edge topology of helically symmetric experiment (HSX) in the quasi-helically symmetric configuration is characterized by an 8/7 magnetic island remnant embedded in a short connection length scrape-off layer (SOL) domain. A 2D mapping of edge plasma profiles within this heterogeneous SOL has been constructed using a movable, multi-pin Langmuir probe. Comparisons of these measurements to edge simulations using the EMC3-EIRENE 3D plasma fluid and kinetic neutral gas transport model have been performed. The measurements provide strong evidence that particle transport is diffusive within the island region and dominantly convective in the SOL region. Measurements indicate that phenomenological cross-field diffusion coefficients are low in the SOL region between the last closed flux surface and edge island (i.e. {{D}\\bot}≈ 0.03 m2 s‑1). This level of transport was found to increase by a factor of two when a limiter is inserted almost completely into the magnetic island. A reduction in gradients of the edge electrostatic plasma potential was also measured in this configuration, suggesting that the reduced electric field may be linked to the increased cross-field transport observed.

  19. Highly efficient polymer-based optoelectronic devices using PEDOT:PSS and a GO composite layer as a hole transport layer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jae Choul; Jang, Jeong In; Lee, Bo Ram; Lee, Geon-Woong; Han, Joong Tark; Song, Myoung Hoon

    2014-02-12

    We demonstrate highly efficient polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs), as well as polymer solar cells (PSCs), using a solution-processable poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS):graphene oxide (GO) (PEDOT:GO) composite layer as hole transport layers (HTLs). The PEDOT:GO composite HTL layer shows enhanced charge carrier transport due to improved conductivity by benzoid-quinoid transitions with a well-matched work function between GO (4.89 eV) and PEDOT:PSS (4.95 eV). Moreover, it reduces remarkably exciton quenching and suppresses recombinations that bring higher charge extraction in PSCs and increases the recombinations of holes and electrons within the active layer by the blocking behavior of the electrons from a fluorescent semiconductor due to the existence of GO with large bandgap (∼3.6 eV) in the PEDOT:GO composite layer, therefore leading to an enhancement of device efficiency in PLEDs and PSCs. The optimized PLEDs and PSCs with a PEDOT:GO composite HTL layer shows the maximum luminous efficiency of 21.74 cd/A (at 6.4 V) for PLEDs, as well as the power conversion efficiency of 8.21% for PSCs, which were improved by ∼220 and 12%, respectively, compared to reference PLEDs and PSCs with a PEDOT:PSS layer. PMID:24433032

  20. Non-Newtonian effects of blood on LDL transport inside the arterial lumen and across multi-layered arterial wall with and without stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyranlou, Amin; Niazmand, Hamid; Sadeghi, Mahmood-Reza; Mesri, Yaser

    2016-06-01

    Blood non-Newtonian behavior on low-density lipoproteins (LDL) accumulation is analyzed numerically, while fluid-multilayered arteries are adopted for nonstenotic and 30%-60% symmetrical stenosed models. Present model considers non-Newtonian effects inside the lumen and within arterial layers simultaneously, which has not been examined in previous studies. Navier-Stokes equations are solved along with the mass transport convection-diffusion equations and Darcy’s model for species transport inside the luminal flow and across wall layers, respectively. Carreau model for the luminal flow and the modified Darcy equation for the power-law fluid within arterial layers are employed to model blood rheological characteristics, appropriately. Results indicate that in large arteries with relatively high Reynolds number Newtonian model estimates LDL concentration patterns well enough, however, this model seriously incompetent for regions with low WSS. Moreover, Newtonian model for plasma underestimates LDL concentration especially on luminal surface and across arterial wall. Therefore, applying non-Newtonian model seems essential for reaching to a more accurate estimation of LDL distribution in the artery. Finally, blood flow inside constricted arteries demonstrates that LDL concentration patterns along the stenoses inside the luminal flow and across arterial layers are strongly influenced as compared to the nonstenotic arteries. Additionally, among four stenosis severity grades, 40% stenosis is prone to more LDL accumulation along the post-stenotic regions.

  1. Thermal Transport across Surfactant Layers on Gold Nanorods in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuewang; Ni, Yuxiang; Zhu, Jie; Burrows, Nathan D; Murphy, Catherine J; Dumitrica, Traian; Wang, Xiaojia

    2016-04-27

    Ultrafast transient absorption experiments and molecular dynamics simulations are utilized to investigate the thermal transport between aqueous solutions and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)- or polyethylene glycol (PEG)-functionalized gold nanorods (GNRs). The transient absorption measurement data are interpreted with a multiscale heat diffusion model, which incorporates the interfacial thermal conductances predicted by molecular dynamics. According to our observations, the effective thermal conductance of the GNR/PEG/water system is higher than that of the GNR/CTAB/water system with a surfactant layer of the same length. We attribute the enhancement of thermal transport to the larger thermal conductance at the GNR/PEG interface as compared with that at the GNR/CTAB interface, in addition to the water penetration into the hydrophilic PEG layer. Our results highlight the role of the GNR/polymer thermal interfaces in designing biological and composite-based heat transfer applications of GNRs, and the importance of multiscale analysis in interpreting transient absorption data in systems consisting of low interfacial thermal conductances. PMID:26938771

  2. What Supergranule Flow Models Tell Us About the Sun's Surface Shear Layer and Magnetic Flux Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David

    2011-01-01

    Models of the photospheric flows due to supergranulation are generated using an evolving spectrum of vector spherical harmonics up to spherical harmonic wavenumber l1500. Doppler velocity data generated from these models are compared to direct Doppler observations from SOHO/MDI and SDO/HMI. The models are adjusted to match the observed spatial power spectrum as well as the wavenumber dependence of the cell lifetimes, differential rotation velocities, meridional flow velocities, and relative strength of radial vs. horizontal flows. The equatorial rotation rate as a function of wavelength matches the rotation rate as a function of depth as determined by global helioseismology. This leads to the conclusions that the cellular structures are anchored at depths equal to their widths, that the surface shear layer extends to at least 70 degrees latitude, and that the poleward meridional flow decreases in amplitude and reverses direction at the base of the surface shear layer (approx.35 Mm below the surface). Using the modeled flows to passively transport magnetic flux indicates that the observed differential rotation and meridional flow of the magnetic elements are directly related to the differential rotation and meridional flow of the convective pattern itself. The magnetic elements are transported by the evolving boundaries of the supergranule pattern (where the convective flows converge) and are unaffected by the weaker flows associated with the differential rotation or meridional flow of the photospheric plasma.

  3. Unusual isotope effect on thermal transport of single layer molybdenum disulphide

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xufei; Yang, Nuo; Luo, Tengfei

    2015-11-09

    Thermal transport in single layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) is critical to advancing its applications. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics simulations with first-principles force constants to study the isotope effect on the thermal transport of single layer MoS{sub 2}. Through phonon modal analysis, we found that isotopes can strongly scatter phonons with intermediate frequencies, and the scattering behavior can be radically different from that predicted by conventional scattering model based on perturbation theory, where Tamura's formula is combined with Matthiessen's rule to include isotope effects. Such a discrepancy becomes smaller for low isotope concentrations. Natural isotopes can lead to a 30% reduction in thermal conductivity for large size samples. However, for small samples where boundary scattering becomes significant, the isotope effect can be greatly suppressed. It was also found that the Mo isotopes, which contribute more to the phonon eigenvectors in the intermediate frequency range, have stronger impact on thermal conductivity than S isotopes.

  4. Current transport mechanisms in plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposited AlN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Altuntas, Halit E-mail: biyikli@unam.bilkent.edu.tr; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Donmez, Inci; Biyikli, Necmi E-mail: biyikli@unam.bilkent.edu.tr

    2015-04-21

    Here, we report on the current transport mechanisms in AlN thin films deposited at a low temperature (i.e., 200 °C) on p-type Si substrates by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition. Structural characterization of the deposited AlN was carried out using grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction, revealing polycrystalline films with a wurtzite (hexagonal) structure. Al/AlN/ p-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitor structures were fabricated and investigated under negative bias by performing current-voltage measurements. As a function of the applied electric field, different types of current transport mechanisms were observed; i.e., ohmic conduction (15.2–21.5 MV/m), Schottky emission (23.6–39.5 MV/m), Frenkel-Poole emission (63.8–211.8 MV/m), trap-assisted tunneling (226–280 MV/m), and Fowler-Nordheim tunneling (290–447 MV/m). Electrical properties of the insulating AlN layer and the fabricated Al/AlN/p-Si MIS capacitor structure such as dielectric constant, flat-band voltage, effective charge density, and threshold voltage were also determined from the capacitance-voltage measurements.

  5. Isochronal Ice Sheet Model: a New Approach to Tracer Transport by Explicitly Tracing Accumulation Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Born, A.; Stocker, T. F.

    2014-12-01

    The long, high-resolution and largely undisturbed depositional record of polar ice sheets is one of the greatest resources in paleoclimate research. The vertical profile of isotopic and other geochemical tracers provides a full history of depositional and dynamical variations. Numerical simulations of this archive could afford great advances both in the interpretation of these tracers as well as to help improve ice sheet models themselves, as show successful implementations in oceanography and atmospheric dynamics. However, due to the slow advection velocities, tracer modeling in ice sheets is particularly prone to numerical diffusion, thwarting efforts that employ straightforward solutions. Previous attemps to circumvent this issue follow conceptually and computationally extensive approaches that augment traditional Eulerian models of ice flow with a semi-Lagrangian tracer scheme (e.g. Clarke et al., QSR, 2005). Here, we propose a new vertical discretization for ice sheet models that eliminates numerical diffusion entirely. Vertical motion through the model mesh is avoided by mimicking the real-world ice flow as a thinning of underlying layers (see figure). A new layer is added to the surface at equidistant time intervals (isochronally). Therefore, each layer is uniquely identified with an age. Horizontal motion follows the shallow ice approximation using an implicit numerical scheme. Vertical diffusion of heat which is physically desirable is also solved implicitly. A simulation of a two-dimensional section through the Greenland ice sheet will be discussed.

  6. Analysis of subgrid-scale vertical transport in convective boundary layers at gray-zone resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyeyum Hailey; Hong, Song-You

    2013-04-01

    The gray zone of a physics process in numerical models is defined as the range of model resolution in which the process is partly resolved by model dynamics and partly parameterized. In this study, we examine the effects of grid size on resolved and parameterized vertical transport for horizontal grid scales including the gray zone. To assess how stability alters the dependency on grid size, four convective boundary layer (CBL)s with different surface heating and geostrophic winds are considered. For this purpose, reference data for grid-scale (GS) and subgrid-scale (SGS) fields are constructed for 50-4000 mesh sizes by filtering 25-m large-eddy simulations (LES) data. As wind shear becomes stronger, turbulent kinetic energy and the vertical transport of potential temperature and momentum are more resolved for a given grid spacing. A passive scalar with bottom-up diffusion behaves in a similar fashion. For a top-down diffusion scalar, the cospectral peak scale of the scalar flux is larger than the horizontal size of the thermals and increases in time. For the scalar, the entrainment ratio, in conjunction with the shear, influences the mesh-size dependency of GS and SGS transport. The total vertical transport of heat and the bottom-up scalar is decomposed into a non-local mixing owing to the coherent structures and remaining local mixing. The contribution of the resolved parts is larger when roll-like structures are present than when only thermals exist, for both non-local and local fluxes. The grid-size dependency of the non-local flux and its sensitivity to stability predominantly determines the dependency of total (non-local plus local) transport.

  7. High-efficiency fluorescent white organic light-emitting diodes using double hole-transporting-layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, Jwo-Huei; Shen, Shih-Ming; Chen, Cheng-Chung; Chung, Yu-Chiao; Wang, Chun-Jan; Hsu, Mao-Feng; Wang, Wei-Ben; Wu, Ming-Hsuan; Yang, Chih-Jie; Liu, Chi-Ping

    2008-04-01

    High-efficiency fluorescent white organic light-emitting diodes (OLED) were fabricated by using double holetransporting- layers (HTLs), poly(3,4-ethylene- dioxythiophene)-poly-(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT) and N,N'-bis-(1- naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-1,10-biphenyl-4-4'-diamine (NPB). The diodes were composed of a single emissive-layer (EML), with 0.5 wt% red 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-tbutyl-6-(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl)-4H-pyran doped in a mixed-host of 25% trans-1,2-bis(6-(N,N-di-p-tolylamino)-Naphthalene-2-yl)ethene and 75% 1-butyl-9,10-naphthaleneanthracene. The device structure comprised a 125 nm anode layer of indium tin oxide, a 25 nm first HTL of PEDOT, a 0 to 10 nm second HTL of NPB, a 30 nm EML, a 40 nm electron-transporting-layer of 2,2',2"-(1,3,5-benzenetriyl)-tris(1- phenyl-1-H-benzimidazole), a 1 nm electron-injection-layer of lithium fluoride and a 150 nm cathode layer of aluminum. With the addition of a 7.5 nm second HTL (NPB), the resultant power-efficiency at 100 cd/m2, for example, was increased from 11.9 to 18.9 lm/W, an improvement of 59%. The improvement was even more marked at 1,000 cd/m2, i.e. that the power-efficiency was increased from 9.1 to 16.5 lm/W, an improvement of 81%. The marked efficiency improvement may be attributed to a better balance of carrier-injection in the desired emissive zone since the addition of the NPB layer in between the first HTL and the EML may have effectively reduced the injection of excessive holes into the EML due to the relatively high energy-barrier to hole, which was 0.5 eV, at the interface of the two HTLs. The resultant hole-blocking function was plausibly more effective at higher voltage so that comparatively much less holes would be injected into the EML, leading to a much better balanced carrier-injection and consequently a higher efficiency-improvement at the higher brightness.

  8. Modeling contaminant transport and biodegradation in a layered porous media system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Brian D.; Dawson, Clint N.; Szecsody, Jim E.; Streile, Gary P.

    1994-06-01

    The transport and biodegradation of an organic compound (quinoline) were studied in a meter-scale system of layered porous media. A two-dimensional laboratory experiment was conducted in a saturated system with two hydraulic layers with a ratio of conductivities of 1:13. A solution containing dissolved quinoline was injected as a front at one end of the system, and the aqueous-phase concentrations of quinoline, its first degradation product (2-hydroxyquinoline), and oxygen were monitored over time at several spatial locations. Results from a set of ancillary batch and small-column experiments were used to generate a mathematical model for the microbial kinetics; these kinetics described the time rate of change of the concentrations of the two organic compounds (quinoline and 2-hydroxyquinoline), the electron acceptor (oxygen), and microbial biomass. This independently developed kinetic model was incorporated into a two-dimensional numerical model for flow and transport, so that simulations of the laboratory system could be conducted and the results compared with observed data. An analysis of the applicability of single-phase and multiple-phase models for the description of the microbial kinetics was conducted. The results of this analysis indicated that for some cases, it is not necessary to explicitly model the mass transfer between the aqueous phase and the biomass phase. A single-phase model was used for simulating the laboratory system described here. Favorable comparisons between the laboratory and simulation data suggested that a single-phase model was appropriate for describing the microbially mediated reactions in this system. A method for incorporating the effects of metabolic lag into microbial kinetics is described. Metabolic lag was explicitly accounted for in the degradation kinetics for this system; the inclusion of metabolic lag proved to be important for describing transient concentration pulses that were observed in the low-conductivity layer.

  9. Layered Chalcogenides beyond Graphene: from Electronic Structure Evolution to the Spin Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hongtao

    2014-03-01

    Recent efforts on graphene-like atomic layer materials, aiming at novel electronic properties and quantum phenomena beyond graphene, have attracted much attention for potential electronics/spintronics applications. Compared to the weak spin-orbit-interaction (SOI) in graphene, metal chalcogenides MX2 have heavy 4d/5d elements with strong atomic SOI, providing a unique way for generating spin polarization based on valleytronics physics. Indeed, such a spin-polarized band structure has been demonstrated theoretically and supported by optical investigations. However, despite these exciting progresses, following two important issues in MX2 community remain elusive: 1. the quantitative band structure of MX2 compounds (where are the valleys -band maxima/minima- locating in the BZ) have not been experimentally confirmed. Especially for those cleaved ultrathin mono- and bi-layer flakes hosting most of recently-reported exotic phenomena at the 2D limit, the direct detection for band dispersion becomes of great importance for valleytronics. 2. Spin transports have seldom been reported even though such a strong SOI system can serve as an ideal platform for the spin polarization and spin transport. In this work, we started from the basic electronic structures of representative MX2, obtained by ARPES, and investigated both the band variation between these compounds and their band evolution from bulk to the monolayer limit. After having a systematic understanding on band structures, we reported a giant Zeeman-type spin-polarization generated and modulated by an external electric field in WSe2 electric-double-layer transistors. The non-magnetic approach for realizing such an intriguing spin splitting not only keeps the system time-reversally invariant but also suggests a new paradigm for manipulating the spin-degrees of freedom of electrons. Acknowledge the support from DoE, BES, Division of MSE under contract DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  10. Charge transport in thick SiO 2-based dielectric layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanitz, Sven

    1997-12-01

    Charge transport in thick (≥ 1 μm) SiO 2-based dielectric layers was investigated by means of I( U) measurements. Investigations were carried out on thermally grown field oxide (FOX) as well as on TEOS and BPSG. Gate oxide layers (GOX) were measured as reference. C( U) measurements were performed for the determination of charges in the oxide. To determine the electrical parameters of the layers, the model from Chen and Wu[1] was developed further. The model takes into account tunnelling, capture and emission processes, impact ionization, recombination, interface states and ohmic currents. The I( U) characteristics for all dielectrics examined can be described with the aid of the model. The FOX parameters correspond to those of GOX. The parameters of TEOS and BPSG fluctuate strongly with the process parameters. After high-temperature annealing and from measurement of the examined parameters, the insulation properties of TEOS and BPSG were found to be at least as good as those of FOX.

  11. Low band gap polymeric solar cells using solution-processable copper iodide as hole transporting layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Neeraj; Kesari, J. P.; Chaudhary, Rajiv; Patra, Asit

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, we have shown the performance of solution-processable copper iodide (CuI) as an alternative hole transporting layer (HTL) for polymeric solar cells. Optical spectra of the CuI thin film reveal highly transparent and practically no absorption in the range vis-NIR region (450-1110 nm). X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of CuI exhibits as a p-type semiconductor as well as crystalline nature. The photovoltaic devices were fabricated using PCDTBT and PTB7 as donor materials blended with PC71BM as an acceptor material. The power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) based on CuI as an HTL have been achieved to up to 3.04% and 4.48% for PCDTBT and PTB7 based donor materials respectively with a configuration based on ITO/CuI(40 nm)/active layer (60 nm)/Al (120 nm). This study clearly indicated that the devices made with CuI as an HTL showed superior performance than the device fabricated from PEDOT:PSS layer as an HTL. Morphological characterization of the HTL using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) were carried for better understanding.

  12. An Alkane-Soluble Dendrimer as Electron-Transport Layer in Polymer Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhiming; Zhao, Sen; Pei, Jian; Wang, Jian; Ying, Lei; Peng, Junbiao; Cao, Yong

    2016-08-10

    Polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) have attracted broad interest due to their solution-processable properties. It is well-known that to achieve better performance, organic light-emitting diodes require multilayer device structures. However, it is difficult to realize multilayer device structures by solution processing for PLEDs. Because most semiconducting polymers have similar solubility in common organic solvents, such as toluene, xylene, chloroform, and chlorobenzene, the deposition of multilayers can cause layers to mix together and damage each layer. Herein, a novel semiorthogonal solubility relationship was developed and demonstrated. For the first time, an alkane-soluble dendrimer is utilized as the electron-transport layer (ETL) in PLEDs via a solution-based process. With the dendrimer ETL, the external quantum efficiency increases more than threefold. This improvement in the device performance is attributed to better exciton confinement, improved exciton energy transfer, and better charge carrier balance. The semiorthogonal solubility provided by alkane offers another process dimension in PLEDs. By combining them with water/alcohol-soluble polyelectrolytes, more exquisite multilayer devices can be fabricated to achieve high device performance, and new device structures can be designed and realized. PMID:27435357

  13. Anomalous transport in discrete arcs and simulation of double layers in a model auroral circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The evolution and long-time stability of a double layer in a discrete auroral arc requires that the parallel current in the arc, which may be considered uniform at the source, be diverted within the arc to charge the flanks of the U-shaped double-layer potential structure. A simple model is presented in which this current re-distribution is effected by anomalous transport based on electrostatic lower hybrid waves driven by the flank structure itself. This process provides the limiting constraint on the double-layer potential. The flank charging may be represented as that of a nonlinear transmission. A simplified model circuit, in which the transmission line is represented by a nonlinear impedance in parallel with a variable resistor, is incorporated in a 1-d simulation model to give the current density at the DL boundaries. Results are presented for the scaling of the DL potential as a function of the width of the arc and the saturation efficiency of the lower hybrid instability mechanism.

  14. Anomalous transport in discrete arcs and simulation of double layers in a model auroral circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The evolution and long-time stability of a double layer (DL) in a discrete auroral arc requires that the parallel current in the arc, which may be considered uniform at the source, be diverted within the arc to charge the flanks of the U-shaped double layer potential structure. A simple model is presented in which this current redistribution is effected by anomalous transport based on electrostatic lower hybrid waves driven by the flank structure itself. This process provides the limiting constraint on the double layer potential. The flank charging may be represented as that of a nonlinear transmission line. A simplified model circuit, in which the transmission line is represented by a nonlinear impedance in parallel with a variable resistor, is incorporated in a one-dimensional simulation model to give the current density at the DL boundaries. Results are presented for the scaling of the DL potential as a function of the width of the arc and the saturation efficiency of the lower hybrid instability mechanism.

  15. Amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide as electron transport layer in organic photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, H.; Malinowski, P. E. Chasin, A.; Cheyns, D.; Steudel, S.; Schols, S.; Heremans, P.

    2015-04-06

    Amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) is demonstrated as an electron transport layer (ETL) in a high-performance organic photodetector (OPD). Dark current in the range of 10 nA/cm{sup 2} at a bias voltage of −2 V and a high photoresponse in the visible spectrum were obtained in inverted OPDs with poly(3-hexylthiophene) and phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester active layer. The best results were obtained for the optimum a-IGZO thickness of 7.5 nm with specific detectivity of 3 × 10{sup 12} Jones at the wavelength of 550 nm. The performance of the best OPD devices using a-IGZO was shown to be comparable to state-of-the-art devices based on TiO{sub x} as ETL, with higher rectification achieved in reverse bias. Yield and reproducibility were also enhanced with a-IGZO, facilitating fabrication of large area OPDs. Furthermore, easier integration with IGZO-based readout backplanes can be envisioned, where the channel material can be used as photodiode buffer layer after additional treatment.

  16. Evaluation of water transport in PEMFC gas diffusion layers using image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daino, Michael Mario

    Liquid water transport through the gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was investigated through three interrelated studies utilizing the tools of image processing. First, a new framework and model for the digital generation and characterization of the microstructure of GDL materials with localized binder and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) distributions were developed using 3D morphological imaging processing. The new generation technique closely mimics manufacturing processes and produces realistic 3D phase-differentiated digital microstructures in a cost- and time- effective manner. The generated distributions of hydrophobic (PTFE) and hydrophilic (carbon) regions representative of commercial GDL materials provides water transport modeling efforts with more accurate geometries to improve PEMFC water management. Second, through-plane transport in an operating PEMFC was investigated by developing and testing a transparent (visible and infrared) fuel cell. Visible observations and subsequent video processing revealed condensation of microdroplets on the GDL and implied the existence of condensation within the GDL. Temperature gradients across the cathode GDL under realistic operating conditions were obtained in a noninvasive manner using infrared imaging and subsequent image analysis. Recommendations for improving accuracy of PEMFC temperature measurements using infrared imaging were made. The final contribution of this work was the measurement and analysis of water breakthrough dynamics across GDL materials with and without microporous layers (MPLs). Dynamic breakthrough events, or recurrent breakthroughs, were observed for all GDL material investigated indicating the breakdown and re-build of water paths through the GDL caused by an intermittent water drainage process from the GDL surface. GDL materials without an MPL exhibited a dynamic breakthrough location phenomenon and significantly elevated water saturations. The results

  17. Thickness-dependent charge transport in few-layer MoS2 field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ming-Wei; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Fowlkes, Jason; Li, Xufan; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Geohegan, David B.; Xiao, Kai

    2016-04-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is currently under intensive study because of its exceptional optical and electrical properties in few-layer form. However, how charge transport mechanisms vary with the number of layers in MoS2 flakes remains unclear. Here, exfoliated flakes of MoS2 with various thicknesses were successfully fabricated into field-effect transistors (FETs) to measure the thickness and temperature dependences of electrical mobility. For these MoS2 FETs, measurements at both 295 K and 77 K revealed the maximum mobility for layer thicknesses between 5 layers (˜3.6 nm) and 10 layers (˜7 nm), with ˜70 cm2 V-1 s-1 measured for 5 layer devices at 295 K. Temperature-dependent mobility measurements revealed that the mobility rises with increasing temperature to a maximum. This maximum occurs at increasing temperature with increasing layer thickness, possibly due to strong Coulomb scattering from charge impurities or weakened electron-phonon interactions for thicker devices. Temperature-dependent conductivity measurements for different gate voltages revealed a metal-to-insulator transition for devices thinner than 10 layers, which may enable new memory and switching applications. This study advances the understanding of fundamental charge transport mechanisms in few-layer MoS2, and indicates the promise of few-layer transition metal dichalcogenides as candidates for potential optoelectronic applications.

  18. Thickness-dependent charge transport in few-layer MoS2 field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Wei; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Fowlkes, Jason; Li, Xufan; Puretzky, Alexander A; Rouleau, Christopher M; Geohegan, David B; Xiao, Kai

    2016-04-22

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is currently under intensive study because of its exceptional optical and electrical properties in few-layer form. However, how charge transport mechanisms vary with the number of layers in MoS2 flakes remains unclear. Here, exfoliated flakes of MoS2 with various thicknesses were successfully fabricated into field-effect transistors (FETs) to measure the thickness and temperature dependences of electrical mobility. For these MoS2 FETs, measurements at both 295 K and 77 K revealed the maximum mobility for layer thicknesses between 5 layers (∼3.6 nm) and 10 layers (∼7 nm), with ∼70 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) measured for 5 layer devices at 295 K. Temperature-dependent mobility measurements revealed that the mobility rises with increasing temperature to a maximum. This maximum occurs at increasing temperature with increasing layer thickness, possibly due to strong Coulomb scattering from charge impurities or weakened electron-phonon interactions for thicker devices. Temperature-dependent conductivity measurements for different gate voltages revealed a metal-to-insulator transition for devices thinner than 10 layers, which may enable new memory and switching applications. This study advances the understanding of fundamental charge transport mechanisms in few-layer MoS2, and indicates the promise of few-layer transition metal dichalcogenides as candidates for potential optoelectronic applications. PMID:26963583

  19. Settling and compaction of chromite cumulates employing a centrifuging piston cylinder and application to layered mafic intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoochehri, Shahrzad; Schmidt, Max W.

    2014-12-01

    The time scales and mechanics of gravitationally driven crystal settling and compaction is investigated through high temperature (1,280-1,500 °C) centrifuge-assisted experiments on a chromite-basalt melt system at 100-1,500 g (0.5 GPa). Subsequently, the feasibility of this process for the formation of dense chromite cumulate layers in large layered mafic intrusions (LMIs) is assessed. Centrifugation leads to a single cumulate layer formed at the gravitational bottom of the capsule. The experimentally observed mechanical settling velocity of a suspension of ~24 vol% chromite is calculated to be about half (~0.53) of the Stokes settling velocity, with a sedimentation exponent n of 2.35 (3). Gravitational settling leads to an orthocumulate layer with a porosity of 0.52 (all porosities as fraction). Formation times for such a layer from a magma with initial chromite contents of 0.1-1 vol% are 140-3.5 days, equal to a growth rate of 0.007-0.3 m/day for grain sizes of 1-2 mm. More compacted chromite layers form with increasing centrifugation time and acceleration through chemical compaction: An increase of grain contact areas and grain sizes together with a decrease in porosity is best explained by pressure dissolution at grain contacts, reprecipitation and grain growth into the intergranular space and a concomitant expulsion of intergranular melt. The relation between the porosity in the cumulate pile and effective pressure integrated over time (Δ ρ · h · a · t) is best fit with a logarithmic function, in fact confirming that a (pressure) dissolution-reprecipitation process is the dominant mechanism of compaction. The experimentally derived equation allows calculating compaction times: 70-80 % chromite at the bottom of a 1-m-thick chromite layer are reached after 9-250 years, whereas equivalent compaction times are 0.2-0.9 years for olivine (both for 2 mm grain size). The experiments allow to determine the bulk viscosities of chromite and olivine cumulates to be

  20. Transport of polluted boundary layer air from the Po Valley to high-alpine sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibert, Petra; Kromp-kolb, Helga; Kasper, Anne; Kalina, Michael; Puxbaum, Hans; Jost, Dieter T.; Schwikowski, Margit; Baltensperger, Urs

    Within the EUROTRAC subproject ALPTRAC the occurrence of reactive trace species at high-alpine sites was investigated. As a part of these studies, the transport of boundary layer air from the Po Valley, which is one potential major source region for air pollution in the Alps, to the high-mountain sites Sonnblick (3106 m) in Austria and Jungfraujoch (3579 m) in Switzerland was studied. A case study based on isentropic trajectories derived from a fine-mesh analysis showed the potential of such transports to cause substantial peaks in the aerosol concentration at Sonnblick. However, on a climatological basis the Po Valley does not seem to cause higher-than-average concentrations of species such as SO 2, SO 2-4, NH +4 and NO -3. Its contribution was estimated to be about 15% in summer and much less in winter. Indications of orographically induced, subgrid vertical transports were found which are important for the interpretation of data from pollution monitoring programmes at high-alpine sites.

  1. Thermal transport in low-dimensional systems: the case of Graphene and single layer Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Luiz Felipe; Donadio, Davide

    2013-03-01

    Low-dimensional systems present unusual transport properties in comparison to bulk materials. In contrast with the three-dimensional case, in one- and two-dimensions heat transport models predict a divergence of the thermal conductivity with system size. In reality, in a low-dimensional system the mean-free-path of heat carriers (phonons) becomes comparable to the micrometer size of experimental samples. Recent developments in nanostructure fabrication allow a direct comparison between theory and experiments for such low-dimensional systems. We perform extensive molecular dynamics simulations of heat transport in graphene and single layer BN, in order to clarify the behavior of the thermal conductivity in realistic low-dimensional systems. In particular, we address the influence of system size on the simulation results. Equilibrium molecular dynamics predicts a convergence of the thermal conductivity with system size, even for systems with less than one hundred nanometers and thousands of atoms. Meanwhile, large scale non-equilibrium molecular dynamics shows a divergence of the thermal conductivity with system size up to the micrometer scale. We analyse the discrepancy between methods in terms of perturbations in phonon populations induced by the non-equilibrium regime.

  2. Ion transport through a charged cylindrical membrane pore contacting stagnant diffusion layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Mathias B.; Biesheuvel, P. M.; Bazant, Martin Z.; Mani, Ali

    2012-11-01

    Fundamental understanding of the ion transport in membrane systems by diffusion, electromigration and advection is important in widespread processes such as de-ionization by reverse osmosis and electrodialysis and electro-osmotic micropumps. Here we revisit the classical analysis of a single cylindrical pore, see e.g. Gross and Osterle [J Chem Phys 49, 228 (1968)]. We extend the analysis by including the well-established concept of contacting stagnant diffusion layers on either side of the pore; thus, the pore is not in direct equilibrium with the reservoirs. Inside the pore the ions are assumed to be in quasi-equilibrium in the radial direction with the surface charge on the pore wall and we obtain a 1D model by area-averaging. We demonstrate that in some extreme limits this model reduces to simpler models studied in the literature; see e.g. Yaroshchuk [J Membrane Sci 396, 43 (2012)]. Using our model we present predictions of important transport effects such as variation of transport numbers inside the membrane, onset of limiting current, and transient dynamics described by the method of characteristics.

  3. Fukushima-derived fission nuclides monitored around Taiwan: Free tropospheric versus boundary layer transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Chih-An; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Lin, Chuan-Yao

    2012-02-01

    The 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan was the worst nuclear disaster following the 1986 Chernobyl accident. Fission products (nuclides) released from the Fukushima plant site since March 12, 2011 had been detected around the northern hemisphere in about two weeks and also in the southern hemisphere about one month later. We report here detailed time series of radioiodine and radiocesium isotopes monitored in a regional network around Taiwan, including one high-mountain and three ground-level sites. Our results show several pulses of emission from a sequence of accidents in the Fukushima facility, with the more volatile 131I released preferentially over 134Cs and 137Cs at the beginning. In the middle of the time series, there was a pronounced peak of radiocesium observed in northern Taiwan, with activity concentrations of 134Cs and 137Cs far exceeding that of 131I during that episode. From the first arrival time of these fission nuclides and their spatial and temporal variations at our sampling sites and elsewhere, we suggest that Fukushima-derived radioactive nuclides were transported to Taiwan and its vicinity via two pathways at different altitudes. One was transported in the free troposphere by the prevailing westerly winds around the globe; the other was transported in the planetary boundary layer by the northeast monsoon wind directly toward Taiwan.

  4. Scrape-Off Layer Transport and Deposition Studies in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Groth, M; Allen, S; Boedo, J; Brooks, N; Elder, J; Fenstermacher, M; Groebner, R; Lasnier, C; McLean, A; Leonard, A; Lisgo, S; Porter, G; Rensink, M; Rognlien, T; Rudakov, D; Stangeby, P; Wampler, W; Watkins, J

    2006-10-27

    Trace {sup 13}CH{sub 4} injection experiments into the main scrape-off layer of low density L-mode and high-density H-mode plasmas have been performed in the DIII-D tokamak [Luxon{_}NF02] to mimic the transport and deposition of carbon arising from a main chamber sputtering source. These experiments indicated entrainment of the injected carbon in plasma flow in the main SOL, and transport toward the inner divertor. Ex-situ surface analysis showed enhanced {sup 13}C surface concentration at the corner formed by the divertor floor and the angled target plate of the inner divertor in L-mode; in H-mode, both at the corner and along the surface bounding the private flux region inboard of the outer strike point. Interpretative modeling was made consistent with these experimental results by imposing a parallel carbon ion flow in the main SOL toward the inner target, and a radial pinch toward the separatrix. Predictive modeling carried out to better understand the underlying plasma transport processes suggests that the deuterium flow in the main SOL is related to the degree of detachment of the inner divertor leg. These simulations show that carbon ions are entrained with the deuteron flow in the main SOL via frictional coupling, but higher charge state carbon ions may be suspended upstream of the inner divertor X-point region due to balance of the friction force and the ion temperature gradient.

  5. Nondestructive detection of gangliosides with lipophilic fluorochromes and their employment for preparative high-performance thin-layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Müthing, J; Heitmann, D

    1993-01-01

    A simple and effective procedure for the isolation and purification of gangliosides by preparative thin-layer chromatography is described. The method is based on nondestructive visualization of gangliosides on silica gel-precoated thin-layer chromatography plates by staining with uncharged lipophilic fluorochromes. Fluorescent dyes were added in low concentrations into the mobile phase (0.002%, w/v) without any interference of the ganglioside separation. After uv localization, the fluorescent zones were scraped off the plate and the silica gel was extracted with chloroform/methanol/water (30/60/8). In the following step fluorochromes were removed from gangliosides containing crude extracts by anion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose. After desalting, impurities were removed by Iatrobeads chromatography. The method described offers an easy to handle and successful preparative thin-layer chromatography strategy to obtain pure gangliosides in microgram and miligram quantities. PMID:8434781

  6. High-performance hole transport layers for polymer light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, He

    One key component in more advanced multilayer polymer light-emitting diode (PLED) structures is the hole transport layer (HTL). Conventional PLED conductive polymer HTLs exhibit serious drawbacks such as corrosion of anodes, significant absorption in visible region, and mediating oxidative doping of polyfluorene emissive layers (EMLs). In addition, the question still remains as to whether conventional PLED HTLs have the electron-blocking capacity required to achieve high-performance PLEDs. If not, the question arises as to how a PLED structure can be modified to afford greater electron-blocking at the HTL/EML interface. In the present thesis work, three generations of PLED HTLs were developed based on a siloxane-derivatized, crosslinkable, hole-transporting material, 4,4'-bis[(p-trichlorosilylpropylphenyl)phenylamino]biphenyl, TPDSi2. The first generation is the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of TPDSi2, which can increase the work function of indium tin oxide (ITO) anode, enhance ITO anode hole injection, and hence improve PLED performance. The second generation is the spin-coated blend of TPDSi2 and a hole transporting polymer TFB on ITO, which forms an insoluble crosslinked network that can be used as a PLED HTL. The third generation is a double-layer HTL with the TPDSi2 + TFB on top of a conventional PLED HTL, which combines the hole injection capacity of conventional PLED HTLs and the electron-blocking capacity of the TPDSi2 + TFB blend. PLED devices based on these new HTLs exhibit comparable or superior performance compared to those based on conventional HTLs; high current efficiencies of ˜17 cd/A and maximum luminance of ˜140,000 cd/m2 have been achieved. These siloxane-based HTLs not only enhance PLED anode hole-injection by chemically bonding the HTL to the ITO anode, they also exhibit great electron-blocking capacity. The present organosiloxane HTL approach offers many other attractions such as convenience of fabrication, flexibility in choosing HTL

  7. Synthesis of transport layers with controlled anisotropy and application thereof to study proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Devin; Mérida, Walter

    2016-04-01

    We report on a novel method for the synthesis of fibre-based proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell porous transport layers (PTLs) with controllable fibre alignment. We also report the first application of such layers as diagnostics tools to probe the effect of within-plane PTL anisotropy upon PEM fuel cell performance. These structures are realized via adaptation of electrospinning technology. Electrospun layers with progressive anisotropy magnitude are produced and evaluated. This novel approach is distinguished from the state-of-the-art because an equivalent study using commercially available materials is impossible due to lack of structurally similar substrates with different anisotropies. The anisotropy is visualized via scanning electron microscopy, and quantified using electrical resistivity. The capacity is demonstrated to achieve fibre alignment, and the associated impact on transport properties. A framework is presented for assessing the in-situ performance, whereby transport layer orientation versus bipolar plate flow-field geometry is manipulated. While an effect upon the commercial baseline cannot be discerned, electrospun transport layers with greater anisotropy magnitude suggest greater sensitivity to orientation; where greater performance is obtained with fibres cross-aligned to flow-field channels. Our approach of electrospun transport enables deterministic structures by which fuel cell performance can be explained and optimized.

  8. Measurement of a new parameter representing the gas transport properties of the catalyst layers of polymer electrolyte fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Iden, Hiroshi; Ohma, Atsushi; Tokunaga, Tomomi; Yokoyama, Kouji; Shinohara, Kazuhiko

    2016-05-14

    The optimization of the catalyst layers is necessary for obtaining a better fuel cell performance and reducing fuel cell cost. Although the ionomer coverage of the Pt catalyst is said to be a key parameter in this regard, the proportion of Pt either directly or indirectly covered by the ionomer is thought to be an important parameter with regard to gas transport (indirectly covered Pt: its gas transport paths are completely blocked by the ionomer even if it does not directly cover Pt). In this study, a new technique has been developed for evaluating the proportion of Pt covered indirectly or directly by the ionomer, which is defined as the "capped proportion", based on the carbon monoxide (CO) adsorption properties at different temperatures. The validity of the method was thoroughly examined by identifying the CO adsorption properties of the components of the catalyst layers. The capped proportion and oxygen transport resistance in the catalyst layers showed a good correlation, indicating that the capped proportion is a dominant factor of oxygen transport resistance. This technique thus enables the evaluation of the dominant factor of the gas transport properties of the catalyst layers. The method has another significant advantage in that it does not require a membrane electrode assembly, let alone electrochemical measurement, which should be helpful for catalyst layer optimization. PMID:27113681

  9. Ultraviolet-enhanced light emitting diode employing individual ZnO microwire with SiO{sub 2} barrier layers

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yingtian; Xu, Li; Dai, Jun; Ma, Yan; Chu, Xianwei; Zhang, Yuantao; Du, Guotong; Zhang, Baolin; Yin, Jingzhi

    2015-05-25

    This paper details the fabrication of n-ZnO single microwire (SMW)-based high-purity ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) with an added SiO{sub 2} barrier layer on the p-Si substrate. However, the current-voltage (I-V) curve exhibited non-ideal rectifying characteristics. Under forward bias, both UV and visible emissions could be detected by electroluminescence (EL) measurement. When bias voltage reached 60 V at room temperature, a UV emission spike occurred at 390 nm originating from the n-ZnO SMW. Compared with the EL spectrum of the n-ZnO SMW/p-Si heterojunction device without the SiO{sub 2} barrier layer, we saw improved UV light extraction efficiency from the current-blocking effect of the SiO{sub 2} layer. The intense UV emission in the n-ZnO SMW/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si heterojunction indicated that the SiO{sub 2} barrier layer can restrict the movement of electrons as expected and result in effective electron-hole recombination in ZnO SMW.

  10. Layering Networked and Symphonic Selves: A Critical Role for e-Portfolios in Employability through Integrative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cambridge, Darren

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: E-portfolios, which document and facilitate learning and performance, have recently attracted interest in the USA, UK, and Europe as means to increase employability and support lifelong learning. This article aims to critically examine these objectives in order to guide the future e-portfolio practice. Design/methodology/approach: Social…