Science.gov

Sample records for employing transport layer

  1. Scalar transport in plane mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanormelingen, J.; Van den Bulck, E.

    This paper describes the application of the Eulerian, single-point, single-time joint-scalar probability density function (PDF) equation for predicting the scalar transport in mixing layer with a high-speed and a low-speed stream. A finite-volume procedure is applied to obtain the velocity field with the k-ɛ closure being used to describe turbulent transport. The scalar field is represented through the modelled evolution equation for the scalar PDF and is solved using a Monte Carlo simulation. The PDF equation employs gradient transport modelling to represent the turbulent diffusion, and the molecular mixing term is modelled by the LMSE closure. There is no source term for chemical reaction as only an inert mixing layer is considered here. The experimental shear layer data published by Batt is used to validate the computational results despite the fact that comparisons between experiments and computational results are difficult because of the high sensitivity of the shear layer to initial conditions and free stream turbulence phenomena. However, the bimodal shape of the RMS scalar fluctuation as was measured by Batt can be reproduced with this model, whereas standard gradient diffusion calculations do not predict the dip in this profile. In this work for the first time an explanation is given for this phenomenon and the importance of a micromixing model is stressed. Also it is shown that the prediction of the PDF shape by the LMSE model is very satisfactory.

  2. Multilayer thin films employing electrostatic layer-by- layer self-assembly for optical device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soo-Hyoung

    2000-11-01

    This thesis research focuses on the fabrication of novel multilayer thin films with unique optical properties employing molecular level self-assembly. Two different classes of polymers, azo and fluorescent polymers, have been synthesized and used for fabrication of optical devices, specifically thin film nonlinear optical devices and optical chemical sensors by electrostatic layer-by- layer self-assembly. For thin film nonlinear optical devices, a poly(acrylic acid) based precursor anilino-functional polymer was first synthesized and used as a polyanion. This polymer was assembled into mono and multilayer thin films by electrostatic layer-by-layer self-assembly technique in conjunction with a polycation. The aniline group in the assembled polymer layer was subsequently converted to an azobenzene chromophore by post azo coupling reaction with appropriate diazonium salts. This method provides easy control of film thickness and well ordered chromophore structure in the multilayer. Second harmonic generation was observed in all multilayer films indicating acentric organization of the chromophores synthesized in the multilayered films. The second harmonic intensity and film thickness are dependent on the assembly conditions (pH etc.) of the polyions. The post functionalized azopolymer layers were further modulated by light driven mass transport. Thin film optical sensors for pH, metal ions (ferric and mercury) and 2,4-dinitro toluene detection were developed. To fabricate the pH sensor, a fluorescent molecule, 1-hydroxypyren-3,6,8-trisulfonate, was assembled with a polycation by electrostatic layer-by- layer self-assembly technique. The fluorescent indicator molecule exhibits distinct and well-defined emission peaks for protonated and deprotonated forms. The relative peak positions and intensity of fluorescence of the protonated and deprotonated forms change in response to pH variations. For metal ions (ferric and mercury) and 2,4-dinitro toluene sensing, the indicator

  3. Issues in designing transport layer multicast facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Bert J.; Weaver, Alfred C.

    1990-01-01

    Multicasting denotes a facility in a communications system for providing efficient delivery from a message's source to some well-defined set of locations using a single logical address. While modem network hardware supports multidestination delivery, first generation Transport Layer protocols (e.g., the DoD Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) (15) and ISO TP-4 (41)) did not anticipate the changes over the past decade in underlying network hardware, transmission speeds, and communication patterns that have enabled and driven the interest in reliable multicast. Much recent research has focused on integrating the underlying hardware multicast capability with the reliable services of Transport Layer protocols. Here, we explore the communication issues surrounding the design of such a reliable multicast mechanism. Approaches and solutions from the literature are discussed, and four experimental Transport Layer protocols that incorporate reliable multicast are examined.

  4. Guide to transportation-demand management plans for employers

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.M.; Gerwig, K.L.; Shirazi, E.

    1988-09-01

    This guide is designed to introduce employers, transportation agencies, consultants, government officials and others to the elements of transportation demand management (TDM) plans. TDM plans use a variety of strategies to orchestrate employees' commute-related activities, including use of carpools, vanpools, bicycles, and buses, use of variable work hours to spread or reduce peak hour congestion, and telecommuting (working from home or a satellite office). The guide contains a description of the typical elements in a TDM plan, including an assessment of the current employee transportation program, methods for measuring vehicle occupancy, strategies for program improvement, and implementing and monitoring the transportation program. The procedure is illustrated for a fictitious employer in the Los Angeles Central Business District.

  5. Tracer Transport in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, E. J.; Pfister, L.; Bergman, J. W.; Atlas, E. L.

    2013-12-01

    Trace species such as carbon monoxide, ozone, and very short-lived halocarbons in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) are important for chemistry and the radiation budget. Also, these species can be used to diagnose transport pathways into and through the TTL. TTL tracer concentrations are controlled primarily by input from extreme deep convective systems that rapidly transport air from the lower troposphere into the TTL, rapid horizontal transport, and slow vertical transport, with the rapid convective transport directly to the uppermost TTL being particularly important for species with short lifetimes. The extreme deep convection overshooting to near the tropical tropopause is poorly represented by convective parameterizations used in global models. Here, we investigate tracer transport using trajectories along with explicit calculations of convective influence. The times and locations of convective influence on the trajectory parcels are determined by tracing the trajectories through two-dimensional, three-hourly fields of convective cloud top height from geostationary satellite and TRMM. The tracer simulations are constrained by measurements from the Aura MLS and ACE-FTS satellites, as well as measurements from recent high-altitude aircraft campaigns. The model is used to evaluate the sensitivity of TTL tracer concentrations to diabatic heating rate (approximately in balance with vertical motion) and the occurrence frequency of extreme convection.

  6. New Horizons for Perovskite Solar Cells Employing DNA-CTMA as the Hole-Transporting Material.

    PubMed

    Yusoff, Abd Rashid Bin Mohd; Kim, Jeongmo; Jang, Jin; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2016-07-01

    We investigate solution-processed low-temperature lead-halide perovskite solar cells employing deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA)-hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (CTMA) as the hole-transport layer and (6,6)-phenyl C61 -butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) as electron-acceptor layer in an inverted p-i-n device configuration. The perovskite solar cells utilizing a bio-based charge-transport layer demonstrate power conversion efficiency values of 15.86 %, with short-circuit current density of 20.85 mA cm(-2) , open circuit voltage of 1.04 V, and fill factor of 73.15 %, and improved lifetime. DNA-based devices maintained above 85 % of the initial efficiency after 50 days in air. PMID:27167727

  7. 49 CFR 805.735-8 - Employment of family members in transportation and related enterprises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Employment of family members in transportation and related enterprises. 805.735-8 Section 805.735-8 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Employment of family members in transportation and related enterprises. (a) No individual will be employed...

  8. 49 CFR 805.735-8 - Employment of family members in transportation and related enterprises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Employment of family members in transportation and related enterprises. 805.735-8 Section 805.735-8 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Employment of family members in transportation and related enterprises. (a) No individual will be employed...

  9. Optoelectronic device with nanoparticle embedded hole injection/transport layer

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Qingwu; Li, Wenguang; Jiang, Hua

    2012-01-03

    An optoelectronic device is disclosed that can function as an emitter of optical radiation, such as a light-emitting diode (LED), or as a photovoltaic (PV) device that can be used to convert optical radiation into electrical current, such as a photovoltaic solar cell. The optoelectronic device comprises an anode, a hole injection/transport layer, an active layer, and a cathode, where the hole injection/transport layer includes transparent conductive nanoparticles in a hole transport material.

  10. Turbulent transport across shear layers in magnetically confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nold, B.; Ramisch, M.; Manz, P.; Birkenmeier, G.; Ribeiro, T. T.; Müller, H. W.; Scott, B. D.; Fuchert, G.; Stroth, U.

    2014-10-15

    Shear layers modify the turbulence in diverse ways and do not only suppress it. A spatial-temporal investigation of gyrofluid simulations in comparison with experiments allows to identify further details of the transport process across shear layers. Blobs in and outside a shear layer merge, thereby exchange particles and heat and subsequently break up. Via this mechanism particles and heat are transported radially across shear layers. Turbulence spreading is the immanent mechanism behind this process.

  11. Wave mediated angular momentum transport in astrophysical boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertfelder, Marius; Kley, Wilhelm

    2015-07-01

    Context. Disk accretion onto weakly magnetized stars leads to the formation of a boundary layer (BL) where the gas loses its excess kinetic energy and settles onto the star. There are still many open questions concerning the BL, for instance the transport of angular momentum (AM) or the vertical structure. Aims: It is the aim of this work to investigate the AM transport in the BL where the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) is not operating owing to the increasing angular velocity Ω(r) with radius. We will therefore search for an appropriate mechanism and examine its efficiency and implications. Methods: We perform 2D numerical hydrodynamical simulations in a cylindrical coordinate system (r,ϕ) for a thin, vertically integrated accretion disk around a young star. We employ a realistic equation of state and include both cooling from the disk surfaces and radiation transport in radial and azimuthal direction. The viscosity in the disk is treated by the α-model; in the BL there is no viscosity term included. Results: We find that our setup is unstable to the sonic instability which sets in shortly after the simulations have been started. Acoustic waves are generated and traverse the domain, developing weak shocks in the vicinity of the BL. Furthermore, the system undergoes recurrent outbursts where the activity in the disk increases strongly. The instability and the waves do not die out for over 2000 orbits. Conclusions: There is indeed a purely hydrodynamical mechanism that enables AM transport in the BL. It is efficient and wave mediated; however, this renders it a non-local transport method, which means that models of a effective local viscosity like the α-viscosity are probably not applicable in the BL. A variety of further implications of the non-local AM transport are discussed.

  12. 28 CFR 79.63 - Proof of employment as an ore transporter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of employment as an ore transporter... RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Ore Transporters § 79.63 Proof of employment as an ore transporter. (a) The Department will accept, as proof of employment for the time...

  13. 28 CFR 79.63 - Proof of employment as an ore transporter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of employment as an ore transporter... RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Ore Transporters § 79.63 Proof of employment as an ore transporter. (a) The Department will accept, as proof of employment for the time...

  14. 28 CFR 79.63 - Proof of employment as an ore transporter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of employment as an ore transporter... RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Ore Transporters § 79.63 Proof of employment as an ore transporter. (a) The Department will accept, as proof of employment for the time...

  15. 28 CFR 79.63 - Proof of employment as an ore transporter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of employment as an ore transporter... RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Ore Transporters § 79.63 Proof of employment as an ore transporter. (a) The Department will accept, as proof of employment for the time...

  16. 28 CFR 79.63 - Proof of employment as an ore transporter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of employment as an ore transporter... RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Ore Transporters § 79.63 Proof of employment as an ore transporter. (a) The Department will accept, as proof of employment for the time...

  17. Holographic recording medium employing a photoconductive layer and a low molecular weight microcrystalline polymeric layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gange, Robert Allen (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A holographic recording medium comprising a conductive substrate, a photoconductive layer and an electrically alterable layer of a linear, low molecular weight hydrocarbon polymer has improved fatigue resistance. An acrylic barrier layer can be interposed between the photoconductive and electrically alterable layers.

  18. Ambipolar charge transport in "traditional" organic hole transport layers.

    PubMed

    Khademi, S; Song, J Y; Wyatt, P B; Kreouzis, T; Gillin, W P

    2012-05-01

    Organic semiconductors are often labeled as electron or hole transport materials due to the primary role they perform in devices. However, despite these labels we have shown using time-of-flight that two of the traditional "hole transport materials" TPD and NPB are actually excellent electron transporters the electron transport properties of which are comparable to those for holes. PMID:22467553

  19. Nonlocal thermal transport across embedded few-layer graphene sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ying; Huxtable, Scott T.; Yang, Bao; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Qiao, Rui

    2014-11-13

    Thermal transport across the interfaces between few-layer graphene sheets and soft materials exhibits intriguing anomalies when interpreted using the classical Kapitza model, e.g., the conductance of the same interface differs greatly for different modes of interfacial thermal transport. Using atomistic simulations, we show that such thermal transport follows a nonlocal flux-temperature drop constitutive law and is characterized jointly by a quasi-local conductance and a nonlocal conductance instead of the classical Kapitza conductance. Lastly, the nonlocal model enables rationalization of many anomalies of the thermal transport across embedded few-layer graphene sheets and should be used in studies of interfacial thermal transport involving few-layer graphene sheets or other ultra-thin layered materials.

  20. Turbulence transport in spatially developing reacting shear layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Scott David

    2000-11-01

    The transport of turbulence in non-reacting and reacting shear layers is investigated using direct numerical simulations (DNS). The present DNS code solves non-dimensional transport equations for total mass, momentum, energy, and reactant mass fractions. The combustion is simulated by a single-step, second-order reaction with an Arrhenius reaction rate. The transport equations are solved using a low Mach number approximation where the effects of heat release are accounted for through variable density. The numerical formulation is characterized by a third-order Runge-Kutta time integration, eleventh-order finite-difference spatial derivatives, and a fully consistent fractional-step method for the solution of the momentum equation. Three-dimensional simulations of one non-reacting shear layer and one reacting shear layer were performed to generate databases for statistical analysis. Transverse budgets of turbulence kinetic energy reveal that the turbulent transport and pressure transport terms have a unique role in the energy balance in that they have different algebraic signs in different regions of the layer. In the non-reacting shear layer, the pressure transport term tends to balance the turbulent transport term. In the reacting shear layer, however, a flip in the pressure transport term is observed and the resulting behavior is similar to the turbulent transport. The pressure transport term for both cases is examined in detail and the flip is attributed to the heat release through correlations with the reaction rate. The DNS results are compared with the standard k-epsilon model for production and turbulent transport. When calculated with the standard eddy viscosity closure coefficient, the Boussinesq approximation accurately predicts the production for the non-reacting shear layer but overpredicts it for the reacting shear layer. The calculation of the Boussinesq approximation also shows that the dilatation dissipation is small compared to the solenoidal

  1. Electron-Transport Properties of Few-Layer Black Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuehua; Dai, Jun; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2015-06-01

    We perform the first-principles computational study of the effect of number of stacking layers and stacking style of the few-layer black phosphorus (BPs) on the electronic properties, including transport gap, current-voltage (i-v) relation, and differential conductance. Our computation is based on the nonequilibrium Green's function approach combined with density functional theory calculations. Specifically, we compute electron-transport properties of monolayer BP, bilayer BP, and trilayer BP as well as bilayer BPs with AB-, AA-, or AC-stacking. We find that the stacking number has greater influence on the transport gap than the stacking type. Conversely, the stacking type has greater influence on i-v curve and differential conductance than on the transport gap. This study offers useful guidance for determining the number of stacking layers and the stacking style of few-layer BP sheets in future experimental measurements and for potential applications in nanoelectronic devices. PMID:26266491

  2. Nonlocal thermal transport across embedded few-layer graphene sheets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Ying; Huxtable, Scott T.; Yang, Bao; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Qiao, Rui

    2014-11-13

    Thermal transport across the interfaces between few-layer graphene sheets and soft materials exhibits intriguing anomalies when interpreted using the classical Kapitza model, e.g., the conductance of the same interface differs greatly for different modes of interfacial thermal transport. Using atomistic simulations, we show that such thermal transport follows a nonlocal flux-temperature drop constitutive law and is characterized jointly by a quasi-local conductance and a nonlocal conductance instead of the classical Kapitza conductance. Lastly, the nonlocal model enables rationalization of many anomalies of the thermal transport across embedded few-layer graphene sheets and should be used in studies of interfacial thermal transportmore » involving few-layer graphene sheets or other ultra-thin layered materials.« less

  3. Ion transport through electrolyte/polyelectrolyte multi-layers.

    PubMed

    Femmer, Robert; Mani, Ali; Wessling, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport of multi-ionic solutions through layered electrolyte and polyelectrolyte structures are relevant in a large variety of technical systems such as micro and nanofluidic devices, sensors, batteries and large desalination process systems. We report a new direct numerical simulation model coined EnPEn: it allows to solve a set of first principle equations to predict for multiple ions their concentration and electrical potential profiles in electro-chemically complex architectures of n layered electrolytes E and n polyelectrolytes PE. EnPEn can robustly capture ion transport in sub-millimeter architectures with submicron polyelectrolyte layers. We proof the strength of EnPEn for three yet unsolved architectures: (a) selective Na over Ca transport in surface modified ion selective membranes, (b) ion transport and water splitting in bipolar membranes and (c) transport of weak electrolytes. PMID:26111456

  4. Ion transport through electrolyte/polyelectrolyte multi-layers

    PubMed Central

    Femmer, Robert; Mani, Ali; Wessling, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport of multi-ionic solutions through layered electrolyte and polyelectrolyte structures are relevant in a large variety of technical systems such as micro and nanofluidic devices, sensors, batteries and large desalination process systems. We report a new direct numerical simulation model coined EnPEn: it allows to solve a set of first principle equations to predict for multiple ions their concentration and electrical potential profiles in electro-chemically complex architectures of n layered electrolytes E and n polyelectrolytes PE. EnPEn can robustly capture ion transport in sub-millimeter architectures with submicron polyelectrolyte layers. We proof the strength of EnPEn for three yet unsolved architectures: (a) selective Na over Ca transport in surface modified ion selective membranes, (b) ion transport and water splitting in bipolar membranes and (c) transport of weak electrolytes. PMID:26111456

  5. Ion transport through electrolyte/polyelectrolyte multi-layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Femmer, Robert; Mani, Ali; Wessling, Matthias

    2015-06-01

    Ion transport of multi-ionic solutions through layered electrolyte and polyelectrolyte structures are relevant in a large variety of technical systems such as micro and nanofluidic devices, sensors, batteries and large desalination process systems. We report a new direct numerical simulation model coined EnPEn: it allows to solve a set of first principle equations to predict for multiple ions their concentration and electrical potential profiles in electro-chemically complex architectures of n layered electrolytes E and n polyelectrolytes PE. EnPEn can robustly capture ion transport in sub-millimeter architectures with submicron polyelectrolyte layers. We proof the strength of EnPEn for three yet unsolved architectures: (a) selective Na over Ca transport in surface modified ion selective membranes, (b) ion transport and water splitting in bipolar membranes and (c) transport of weak electrolytes.

  6. Interplane transport effects in layered organic conductors.

    SciTech Connect

    Symington, J. A.; Singleton, J.; Harrison, N.; Clayton, N.; Schlueter, J. A.; Kurmoo, M.; Day, P.

    2000-08-22

    Detailed studies of the magnetic field orientation on magnetic quantum oscillations in two charge transfer salts of the molecule ET have been carried out. .After all conventional mechanisms affecting quantum oscillations have been accounted for, we find that the amplitude of the oscillations has an underlying dependence exp({minus}{alpha} tan 0), where {theta} is the angle between the normal to the highly-conducting layers and the magnetic field, and a is a constant.

  7. Efficient zinc phthalocyanine/C60 heterojunction photovoltaic devices employing tetracene anode interfacial layers.

    PubMed

    Fleetham, Tyler B; Mudrick, John P; Cao, Weiran; Klimes, Kody; Xue, Jiangeng; Li, Jian

    2014-05-28

    We report the development of efficient small molecular organic photovoltaic devices incorporating tetracene anode interfacial layers. Planar heterojunction devices employing the tetracene anode interfacial layer achieved an EQE enhancement of 150% in the spectral region corresponding to ZnPc absorption. We demonstrate that this enhancement is due to the combined effect of the tetracene layer providing exciton-blocking at the anode/donor interface and potentially an increase in the exciton diffusion length in the ZnPc layer due to increased crystallinity and more preferred molecular stacking orientation. A power conversion efficiency of 4.7% was achieved for a planar heterojunction of a modified zinc phthalocyanine based material and C60 when employing the tetracene anode interfacial layer. By utilizing a planar-mixed heterojunction structure a peak EQE of nearly 70% and a power conversion efficiency of 5.8% was achieved. PMID:24708488

  8. Dimensional dependence of phonon transport in freestanding atomic layer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Duckjong; Hwangbo, Yun; Zhu, Lijing; Mag-Isa, Alexander E.; Kim, Kwang-Seop; Kim, Jae-Hyun

    2013-11-01

    Due to the fast development of nanotechnology, we have the capability of manipulating atomic layer systems such as graphene, hexagonal boron nitride and dichalcogenides. The major concern in the 2-dimensional nanostructures is how to preserve their exceptional single-layer properties in 3-dimensional bulk structures. In this study, we report that the extreme phonon transport in graphene is highly affected by the graphitic layer stacking based on experimental investigation of the thermal conduction in few-layer graphene, 1-7 layers thick, suspended over holes of various diameters. We fabricate freestanding axisymmetric graphene structures without any perturbing substrate, and measure the in-plane transport property in terms of thermal conduction by using Raman spectroscopy. From the difference in susceptibility to substrate effect, size effect on hot-spot temperature variation and layer number dependence of thermal conductivity, we show that the graphitic membranes with 2 or more layers have characteristics similar to 3-dimensional graphite, which are very different from those of 2-dimensional graphene membranes. This implies that the scattering of out-of-plane phonons by interlayer atomic coupling could be a key mechanism governing the intrinsic thermal property.Due to the fast development of nanotechnology, we have the capability of manipulating atomic layer systems such as graphene, hexagonal boron nitride and dichalcogenides. The major concern in the 2-dimensional nanostructures is how to preserve their exceptional single-layer properties in 3-dimensional bulk structures. In this study, we report that the extreme phonon transport in graphene is highly affected by the graphitic layer stacking based on experimental investigation of the thermal conduction in few-layer graphene, 1-7 layers thick, suspended over holes of various diameters. We fabricate freestanding axisymmetric graphene structures without any perturbing substrate, and measure the in-plane transport

  9. 49 CFR 40.409 - What does the issuance of a PIE mean to transportation employers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What does the issuance of a PIE mean to... What does the issuance of a PIE mean to transportation employers? (a) As an employer, you are deemed to have notice of the issuance of a PIE when it appears on the List mentioned in § 40.401(a) or the...

  10. 49 CFR 40.409 - What does the issuance of a PIE mean to transportation employers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What does the issuance of a PIE mean to... What does the issuance of a PIE mean to transportation employers? (a) As an employer, you are deemed to... before September 1, and through November 30, are valid for all purposes under DOT drug and...

  11. Analysis of Charge Carrier Transport in Organic Photovoltaic Active Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2015-03-01

    We present a systematic analysis of charge carrier transport in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices based on phenomenological, deterministic charge carrier transport models. The models describe free electron and hole transport, trapping, and detrapping, as well as geminate charge-pair dissociation and geminate and bimolecular recombination, self-consistently with Poisson's equation for the electric field in the active layer. We predict photocurrent evolution in devices with active layers of P3HT, P3HT/PMMA, and P3HT/PS, as well as P3HT/PCBM blends, and photocurrent-voltage (I-V) relations in these devices at steady state. Charge generation propensity, zero-field charge mobilities, and trapping, detrapping, and recombination rate coefficients are determined by fitting the modeling predictions to experimental measurements. We have analyzed effects of the active layer morphology for layers consisting of both pristine drop-cast films and of nanoparticle (NP) assemblies, as well as effects on device performance of insulating NP doping in conducting polymers and of specially designed interlayers placed between an electrode and the active layer. The model predictions provide valuable input toward synthesis of active layers with prescribed morphology that optimize OPV device performance.

  12. Location Management in a Transport Layer Mobility Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eddy, Wesley M.; Ishac, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Mobility architectures that place complexity in end nodes rather than in the network interior have many advantageous properties and are becoming popular research topics. Such architectures typically push mobility support into higher layers of the protocol stack than network layer approaches like Mobile IP. The literature is ripe with proposals to provide mobility services in the transport, session, and application layers. In this paper, we focus on a mobility architecture that makes the most significant changes to the transport layer. A common problem amongst all mobility protocols at various layers is location management, which entails translating some form of static identifier into a mobile node's dynamic location. Location management is required for mobile nodes to be able to provide globally-reachable services on-demand to other hosts. In this paper, we describe the challenges of location management in a transport layer mobility architecture, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various solutions proposed in the literature. Our conclusion is that, in principle, secure dynamic DNS is most desirable, although it may have current operational limitations. We note that this topic has room for further exploration, and we present this paper largely as a starting point for comparing possible solutions.

  13. Efficiency enhancement in small molecular organic photovoltaic devices employing dual anode interfacial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleetham, Tyler; O'Brien, Barry; Mudrick, John P.; Xue, Jiangeng; Li, Jian

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrated enhanced efficiency in small molecule organic photovoltaic devices using dual organic interfacial layers of PEDOT:PSS followed by tetracene between the ITO anode and the organic donor material. The use of a small molecular templating layer, such as tetracene, proved to increase the molecular stacking of the subsequent phthalocyanine (Pc) based donor materials. Upon application in planar heterojunction devices of ZnPc and C60, an enhancement of over 80 percent in the donor contribution to the external quantum efficiency was observed attributed to the combination of exciton blocking by the higher band gap tetracene layer and enhanced exciton diffusion and charge transport resulting from the increased crystallinity.

  14. Aircraft systems design studies employing advanced transport technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, B.; Pearce, C.; Quartero, C.; Taylor, A.

    1972-01-01

    System and design integration studies are presented to define and assess the application of the advanced technology most likely to result in a superior next generation, high subsonic/sonic conventional takeoff and landing transport aircraft system. It is concluded that the new technologies can be directed toward the achievement of improved economy and performance. These benefits may be used to compensate for the penalties associated with reduced noise requirements anticipated to make future aircraft ecologically acceptable.

  15. The Employment of Airships for the Transport of Passengers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nobile, Umberto

    1921-01-01

    It was a conclusion of this detailed study of the practicality of using airships for carrying passengers that, although slow, airships are capable of carrying useful loads over long distances. However, it is noted that there is a certain limit to the advantages of large cubature. Beyond a certain point, the maximum altitude of the airship goes on decreasing, in spite of the fact that the range of action in the horizontal plane and the useful load go on increasing. The possibility of rapid climb is an essential factor of security in aerial navigation in the case of storms, as is velocity. To rise above and run ahead of storms are ways of avoiding them. However, high altitude and high speed are antithetical. This investigation concluded that a maximum velocity of 120 km/h is as far as we ought to go. This figure can only be exceeded by excessive reduction of the altitude of ceiling, range of flight, and useful load. The essential requisites of a public transport service are discussed, as are flight security, regularity of service, competition with other forms of passenger transportation, and the choice between rigid and semi-rigid airships.

  16. Fully transparent nonvolatile memory employing amorphous oxides as charge trap and transistor's channel layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Huaxiang; Kim, Sunil; Kim, Chang Jung; Song, Ihun; Park, Jaechul; Kim, Sangwook; Park, Youngsoo

    2008-10-01

    A fully transparent nonvolatile memory with the conventional sandwich gate insulator structure was demonstrated. Wide band gap amorphous GaInZnO (a-GIZO) thin films were employed as both the charge trap layer and the transistor channel layer. An excellent program window of 3.5 V with a stressing time of 100 ms was achieved through the well-known Fowler-Nordheim tunneling method. Due to the similar energy levels extracted from the experimental data, the asymmetrical program/erase characteristics are believed to be the result of the strong trapping of the injected negative charges in the shallow donor levels of the GIZO film.

  17. Carbon transport in the bottom boundary layer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Y.C.

    1998-10-05

    This report summarizes the activities and findings from a field experiment devised to estimate the rates and mechanisms of transport of carbon across the continental shelves. The specific site chosen for the experiment was the mid-Atlantic Bight, a region off the North Carolina coast. The experiment involved a large contingent of scientists from many institutions. The specific component of the program was the transport of carbon in the bottom boundary layer. The postulate mechanisms of transport of carbon in the bottom boundary layer are: resuspension and advection, downward deposition, and accumulation. The high turbulence levels in the bottom boundary layer require the understanding of the coupling between turbulence and bottom sediments. The specific issues addressed in the work reported here were: (a) What is the sediment response to forcing by currents and waves? (b) What is the turbulence climate in the bottom boundary layer at this site? and (c) What is the rate at which settling leads to carbon sequestering in bottom sediments at offshore sites?

  18. Drift-wave transport in the velocity shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosalem, K. C.; Roberto, M.; Caldas, I. L.

    2016-07-01

    Particle drift driven by electrostatic wave fluctuations is numerically computed to describe the transport in a gradient velocity layer at the tokamak plasma edge. We consider an equilibrium plasma in large aspect ratio approximation with E × B flow and specified toroidal plasma velocity, electric field, and magnetic field profiles. A symplectic map, previously derived for infinite coherent time modes, is used to describe the transport dependence on the electric, magnetic, and plasma velocity shears. We also show that resonant perturbations and their correspondent islands in the Poincaré maps are much affected by the toroidal velocity profiles. Moreover, shearless transport barriers, identified by extremum values of the perturbed rotation number profiles of the invariant curves, allow chaotic trajectories trapped into the plasma. We investigate the influence of the toroidal plasma velocity profile on these shearless transport barriers.

  19. Transport of contaminants in the planetary boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, I. Y.; Swan, P. R.

    1978-01-01

    A planetary boundary layer model is described and used to simulate PBL phenomena including cloud formation and pollution transport in the San Francisco Bay Area. The effect of events in the PBL on air pollution is considered, and governing equations for the average momentum, potential temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and air contaminants are presented. These equations are derived by integrating the basic equations vertically through the mixed layer. Characteristics of the day selected for simulation are reported, and the results suggest that the diurnally cyclic features of the mesoscale motion, including clouds and air pollution, can be simulated in a readily interpretable way with the model.

  20. Anisotropic bias dependent transport property of defective phosphorene layer

    PubMed Central

    Umar Farooq, M.; Hashmi, Arqum; Hong, Jisang

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene is receiving great research interests because of its peculiar physical properties. Nonetheless, no systematic studies on the transport properties modified due to defects have been performed. Here, we present the electronic band structure, defect formation energy and bias dependent transport property of various defective systems. We found that the defect formation energy is much less than that in graphene. The defect configuration strongly affects the electronic structure. The band gap vanishes in single vacancy layers, but the band gap reappears in divacancy layers. Interestingly, a single vacancy defect behaves like a p-type impurity for transport property. Unlike the common belief, we observe that the vacancy defect can contribute to greatly increasing the current. Along the zigzag direction, the current in the most stable single vacancy structure was significantly increased as compared with that found in the pristine layer. In addition, the current along the armchair direction was always greater than along the zigzag direction and we observed a strong anisotropic current ratio of armchair to zigzag direction. PMID:26198318

  1. Near independence of OLED operating voltage on transport layer thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Swensen, James S.; Wang, Liang; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Rainbolt, James E.; Koech, Phillip K.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

    2013-01-01

    We report organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) with weak drive voltage dependence on the thickness of the hole transport layer (HTL) for thicknesses up to 1150 Å using the N,N′-Bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N′-bis(phenyl)-benzidine (α-NPD) and N,N'-bis(3-methyl phenyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4,4'diamine (TPD), both of which have hole mobilities in the range of 2 × 10-3 cm2V-1s-1. Lower mobility HTL materials show larger operating voltage dependence on thickness. The near independence of the operating voltage for high mobility transport material thickness was only observed when the energy barrier for charge injection into the transport material was minimized. To ensure low injection barriers, a thin film of 2-(3-(adamantan-1-yl)propyl)-3,5,6-trifluorotetracyanoquinodimethane (F3TCNQ-Adl) was cast from solution onto the ITO surface. These results indicate that thick transport layers can be integrated into OLED stacks without the need for bulk conductivity doping.

  2. Liquid water transport mechanism in the gas diffusion layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, P.; Wu, C. W.

    We developed an equivalent capillary model of a microscale fiber-fence structure to study the microscale evolution and transport of liquid in a porous media and to reveal the basic principles of water transport in gas diffusion layer (GDL). Analytical solutions using the model show that a positive hydraulic pressure is needed to drive the liquid water to penetrate through the porous GDL even consisting of the hydrophilic fibers. Several possible contributions for the water configuration, such as capillary pressure, gravity, vapor condensation, wettability and microstructures of the GDL, are discussed using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). It is found that the distribution manners of the fibers and the spatial mixed-wettability in the GDL also play an important role in the transport of liquid water.

  3. Micro-porous layer stochastic reconstruction and transport parameter determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hannach, Mohamed; Singh, Randhir; Djilali, Ned; Kjeang, Erik

    2015-05-01

    The Micro-Porous Layer (MPL) is a porous, thin layer commonly used in fuel cells at the interfaces between the catalyst layers and gas diffusion media. It is generally made from spherical carbon nanoparticles and PTFE acting as hydrophobic agent. The scale and brittle nature of the MPL structure makes it challenging to study experimentally. In the present work, a 3D stochastic model is developed to virtually reconstruct the MPL structure. The carbon nanoparticle and PTFE phases are fully distinguished by the algorithm. The model is shown to capture the actual structural morphology of the MPL and is validated by comparing the results to available experimental data. The model shows a good capability in generating a realistic MPL successfully using a set of parameters introduced to capture specific morphological features of the MPL. A numerical model that resolves diffusive transport at the pore scale is used to compute the effective transport properties of the reconstructed MPLs. A parametric study is conducted to illustrate the capability of the model as an MPL design tool that can be used to guide and optimize the functionality of the material.

  4. Modeling of particulate plumes transportation in boundary layers with obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karelsky, K. V.; Petrosyan, A. S.

    2012-04-01

    This presentation is aimed at creating and realization of new physical model of impurity transfer (solid particles and heavy gases) in areas with non-flat and/or nonstationary boundaries. The main idea of suggested method is to use non-viscous equations for solid particles transport modeling in the vicinity of complex boundary. In viscous atmosphere with as small as one likes coefficient of molecular viscosity, the non-slip boundary condition on solid surface must be observed. This postulates the reduction of velocity to zero at a solid surface. It is unconditionally in this case Prandtle hypothesis must be observed: for rather wide range of conditions in the surface neighboring layers energy dissipation of atmosphere flows is comparable by magnitude with manifestation of inertia forces. That is why according to Prandtle hypothesis in atmosphere movement characterizing by a high Reynolds number the boundary layer is forming near a planet surface, within which the required transition from zero velocities at the surface to magnitudes at the external boundary of the layer that are quite close to ones in ideal atmosphere flow. In that layer fast velocity gradients cause viscous effects to be comparable in magnitude with inertia forces influence. For conditions considered essential changes of hydrodynamic fields near solid boundary caused not only by nonslip condition but also by a various relief of surface: mountains, street canyons, individual buildings. Transport of solid particles, their ascent and precipitation also result in dramatic changes of meteorological fields. As dynamic processes of solid particles transfer accompanying the flow past of complex relief surface by wind flows is of our main interest we are to use equations of non-viscous hydrodynamic. We should put up with on the one hand idea of high wind gradients in the boundary layer and on the other hand disregard of molecular viscosity in two-phase atmosphere equations. We deal with describing high

  5. Transport of Particulates in Boundary Layer with Obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karelsky, Kirill; Petrosyan, Arakel

    2014-05-01

    This presentation is aimed at creating and realization of new physical model of impurity transfer (solid particles and heavy gases) in areas with non-flat and/or nonstationary boundaries. The main idea of suggested method is to use non-viscous equations for solid particles transport modeling in the vicinity of complex boundary. In viscous atmosphere with as small as one likes coefficient of molecular viscosity, the non-slip boundary condition on solid surface must be observed. This postulates the reduction of velocity to zero at a solid surface. It is unconditionally in this case Prandtle hypothesis must be observed: for rather wide range of conditions in the surface neighboring layers energy dissipation of atmosphere flows is comparable by magnitude with manifestation of inertia forces. That is why according to Prandtle hypothesis in atmosphere movement characterizing by a high Reynolds number the boundary layer is forming near a planet surface, within which the required transition from zero velocities at the surface to magnitudes at the external boundary of the layer that are quite close to ones in ideal atmosphere flow. In that layer fast velocity gradients cause viscous effects to be comparable in magnitude with inertia forces influence. For conditions considered essential changes of hydrodynamic fields near solid boundary caused not only by nonslip condition but also by a various relief of surface: mountains, street canyons, individual buildings. Transport of solid particles, their ascent and precipitation also result in dramatic changes of meteorological fields. As dynamic processes of solid particles transfer accompanying the flow past of complex relief surface by wind flows is of our main interest we are to use equations of non-viscous hydrodynamic. We should put up with on the one hand idea of high wind gradients in the boundary layer and on the other hand disregard of molecular viscosity in two-phase atmosphere equations. We deal with describing high

  6. Near Wall Bubble Transport in a Forced Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, David

    2005-11-01

    Transport of bubbles in turbulent boundary layers remains an area of active research. One of the areas of recent interest is the use of bubbles in skin friction drag reduction. However, for drag reduction to be effective, it seems that bubbles need to be kept in the near wall region, where wall shear stress derives from. Simulating the conditions meaningful to full scale vessels is very difficult in the laboratory due to scaling issues. Towards that end, we have used the idea of forced turbulence to simulate the near wall region. This allows us to inject bubbles into what is effectively the sub-layer, letting us explore bubble transport very close to the wall. We used the hydrogen wire technique to generate bubbles through electrolysis of water. The generating wire was placed at various heights above the wall to measure how transport is affected by injection location. Results indicate that injection at the wall may not be optimal with regards to keeping the bubbles near the wall. The authors would like to thank the Office of Naval Research for their support under Grant No. N00014-00-1-0110.

  7. SUPPRESSION OF ENERGETIC ELECTRON TRANSPORT IN FLARES BY DOUBLE LAYERS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T. C.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2012-09-20

    During flares and coronal mass ejections, energetic electrons from coronal sources typically have very long lifetimes compared to the transit times across the systems, suggesting confinement in the source region. Particle-in-cell simulations are carried out to explore the mechanisms of energetic electron transport from the corona to the chromosphere and possible confinement. We set up an initial system of pre-accelerated hot electrons in contact with ambient cold electrons along the local magnetic field and let it evolve over time. Suppression of transport by a nonlinear, highly localized electrostatic electric field (in the form of a double layer) is observed after a short phase of free-streaming by hot electrons. The double layer (DL) emerges at the contact of the two electron populations. It is driven by an ion-electron streaming instability due to the drift of the back-streaming return current electrons interacting with the ions. The DL grows over time and supports a significant drop in temperature and hence reduces heat flux between the two regions that is sustained for the duration of the simulation. This study shows that transport suppression begins when the energetic electrons start to propagate away from a coronal acceleration site. It also implies confinement of energetic electrons with kinetic energies less than the electrostatic energy of the DL for the DL lifetime, which is much longer than the electron transit time through the source region.

  8. The design and performance of axially symmetrical contoured wall diffusers employing suction boundary layer control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, C. D., Jr.; Hudson, W. G.; Yang, T.

    1974-01-01

    This paper presents a procedure for the design and the performance prediction of axially symmetrical contoured wall diffusers employing suction boundary layer control. An inverse problem approach was used in the potential flow design of the diffuser wall contours. The experimentally observed flow characteristics and the stability of flows within the diffuser are also described. Guidelines for the design of low suction (less than 10 percent of the inlet flow) and thus high effectiveness contoured wall diffusers are also provided based on the results of the experimental program.

  9. Effects of double-layer polarization on ion transport.

    PubMed

    Hainsworth, A H; Hladky, S B

    1987-01-01

    It has been proposed that changes in ionic strength will alter the shape of current-voltage relations for ion transport across a lipid membrane. To investigate this effect, we measured currents across glyceryl monooleate membranes at applied potentials between 10 and 300 mV using either gramicidin and 1 mM NaCl or valinomycin and 1 mM KCl. A bridge circuit with an integrator as null detector was used to separate the capacitative and ionic components of the current. The changes in the current-voltage relations when ionic strength is varied between 1 and 100 mM are compared with predictions of Gouy-Chapman theory for the effects of these variations on polarization of the electrical diffuse double-layer. Double-layer polarization accounts adequately for the changes observed using membranes made permeable by either gramicidin or valinomycin. PMID:2432953

  10. Transport measurements on monolayer and few-layer WSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomaki, Tauno; Zhao, Wenjin; Finney, Joe; Fei, Zaiyao; Nguyen, Paul; McKay, Frank; Cobden, David

    The behavior of the electrical contacts often dominates transport measurements in mono and few-layer transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) devices. Creating good contacts for some TMDs is particularly challenging since the fabrication procedure should prevent the TMD from oxidizing or chemically interacting with the contacts. In this talk, we discuss our progress on creating mono and few-layer WSe2 devices with both good electrical contacts and minimal effects from the substrate, polymer contamination, oxidation and other chemistry. For example, we have developed a technique for encapsulating metallic contacts and WSe2 flakes together in hexagonal boron nitride with multiple gates to separate and control the contributions from the channel and the Schottky barriers at the contacts. Research supported in part by Samsung GRO grant US 040814

  11. Inverted organic photovoltaic device with a new electron transport layer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that there is a new solution-processed electron transport layer, lithium-doped zinc oxide (LZO), with high-performance inverted organic photovoltaic device. The device exhibits a fill factor of 68.58%, an open circuit voltage of 0.86 V, a short-circuit current density of −9.35 cm/mA2 along with 5.49% power conversion efficiency. In addition, we studied the performance of blend ratio dependence on inverted organic photovoltaics. Our device also demonstrates a long stability shelf life over 4 weeks in air. PMID:24674457

  12. Single and Few Layer Silicene: Structural, Electronic and Transport Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, J. David; Roome, Nathanael

    Single layer silicene has weaker π bonding that graphene resulting in buckling of the Si atoms in different sub-lattices. Despite the loss of planarity, a linear bandstructure emerges where we find a Fermi velocity of about 5.3 x 105 m/s. Determination of the phonon dispersion characteristics reveals a Γ point optical phonon with an energy of 69 meV and a K point optical phonon with an energy of 62 meV. In graphene these phonons play important role in scattering electrons, and in Raman spectroscopy, but have larger energies of 194 and 166 meV, respectively. The lower phonon energies in silicene, arising from the higher atomic masses, would be expected to scatter carriers efficiently and limit carrier mobility. We have calculated, however, that the electron-optical phonon coupling matrix elements are about a factor of 25 times smaller than in graphene and this important result will help with the further development of silicene based devices due to reduced phonon scattering. The two stable stacking configurations of bilayer silicene, AA and AB, now have to account of the position of the atomic buckling in the two layers, leading to four possible atomic configurations with the buckling between the layers being in- or out-of-phase with each other. We find that in contrast to graphene, the two stable configurations are based on AA type stacking being about 70 meV per atom more stable than AB stacking. The potential for elemental layered materials beyond graphene for device applications will also be discussed. Single and Few Layer Silicene: Structural, Electronic and Transport Properties.

  13. Electron transport in molecular junctions with graphene as protecting layer

    SciTech Connect

    Hüser, Falco; Solomon, Gemma C.

    2015-12-07

    We present ab initio transport calculations for molecular junctions that include graphene as a protecting layer between a single molecule and gold electrodes. This vertical setup has recently gained significant interest in experiment for the design of particularly stable and reproducible devices. We observe that the signals from the molecule in the electronic transmission are overlayed by the signatures of the graphene sheet, thus raising the need for a reinterpretation of the transmission. On the other hand, we see that our results are stable with respect to various defects in the graphene. For weakly physiosorbed molecules, no signs of interaction with the graphene are evident, so the transport properties are determined by offresonant tunnelling between the gold leads across an extended structure that includes the molecule itself and the additional graphene layer. Compared with pure gold electrodes, calculated conductances are about one order of magnitude lower due to the increased tunnelling distance. Relative differences upon changing the end group and the length of the molecule on the other hand, are similar.

  14. Carbon transport in the bottom boundary layer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lohrenz, S.E.; Asper, V.L.

    1997-09-01

    The authors objective was to characterize distributions of chloropigment fluorescence in relation to physical processes in the benthic boundary layer in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) Ocean Margins Program`s (OMP) goal of quantifying carbon transport across the continental shelf. Their approach involved participation in the Ocean Margins Program (OMP) field experiment on the continental shelf off Cape Hatteras by conducting multi-sensor fluorescence measurements of photosynthetic pigments. Specific tasks included (1) pre- and post-deployment calibration of multiple fluorescence sensors in conjunction with Woods Hole personnel; (2) collection and analysis of photosynthetic pigment concentrations and total particulate carbon in water column samples to aid in interpretation of the fluorescence time-series during the field experiment; (3) collaboration in the analysis and interpretation of 1994 and 1996 time-series data in support of efforts to quantify pigment and particulate organic carbon transport on the continental shelf off Cape Hatteras. This third component included analysis of data obtained with a multi-sensor fiber-optic fluorometer in the benthic boundary layer of the inner shelf off Cape Hatteras during summer 1994.

  15. Electron transport in molecular junctions with graphene as protecting layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüser, Falco; Solomon, Gemma C.

    2015-12-01

    We present ab initio transport calculations for molecular junctions that include graphene as a protecting layer between a single molecule and gold electrodes. This vertical setup has recently gained significant interest in experiment for the design of particularly stable and reproducible devices. We observe that the signals from the molecule in the electronic transmission are overlayed by the signatures of the graphene sheet, thus raising the need for a reinterpretation of the transmission. On the other hand, we see that our results are stable with respect to various defects in the graphene. For weakly physiosorbed molecules, no signs of interaction with the graphene are evident, so the transport properties are determined by offresonant tunnelling between the gold leads across an extended structure that includes the molecule itself and the additional graphene layer. Compared with pure gold electrodes, calculated conductances are about one order of magnitude lower due to the increased tunnelling distance. Relative differences upon changing the end group and the length of the molecule on the other hand, are similar.

  16. Electron transport in molecular junctions with graphene as protecting layer.

    PubMed

    Hüser, Falco; Solomon, Gemma C

    2015-12-01

    We present ab initio transport calculations for molecular junctions that include graphene as a protecting layer between a single molecule and gold electrodes. This vertical setup has recently gained significant interest in experiment for the design of particularly stable and reproducible devices. We observe that the signals from the molecule in the electronic transmission are overlayed by the signatures of the graphene sheet, thus raising the need for a reinterpretation of the transmission. On the other hand, we see that our results are stable with respect to various defects in the graphene. For weakly physiosorbed molecules, no signs of interaction with the graphene are evident, so the transport properties are determined by offresonant tunnelling between the gold leads across an extended structure that includes the molecule itself and the additional graphene layer. Compared with pure gold electrodes, calculated conductances are about one order of magnitude lower due to the increased tunnelling distance. Relative differences upon changing the end group and the length of the molecule on the other hand, are similar. PMID:26646877

  17. Charge carrier transport properties in layer structured hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, T. C.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2014-10-01

    Due to its large in-plane thermal conductivity, high temperature and chemical stability, large energy band gap (˜ 6.4 eV), hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has emerged as an important material for applications in deep ultraviolet photonic devices. Among the members of the III-nitride material system, hBN is the least studied and understood. The study of the electrical transport properties of hBN is of utmost importance with a view to realizing practical device applications. Wafer-scale hBN epilayers have been successfully synthesized by metal organic chemical deposition and their electrical transport properties have been probed by variable temperature Hall effect measurements. The results demonstrate that undoped hBN is a semiconductor exhibiting weak p-type at high temperatures (> 700 °K). The measured acceptor energy level is about 0.68 eV above the valence band. In contrast to the electrical transport properties of traditional III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors, the temperature dependence of the hole mobility in hBN can be described by the form of μ ∝ (T/T0)-α with α = 3.02, satisfying the two-dimensional (2D) carrier transport limit dominated by the polar optical phonon scattering. This behavior is a direct consequence of the fact that hBN is a layer structured material. The optical phonon energy deduced from the temperature dependence of the hole mobility is ħω = 192 meV (or 1546 cm-1), which is consistent with values previously obtained using other techniques. The present results extend our understanding of the charge carrier transport properties beyond the traditional III-nitride semiconductors.

  18. [Type of employment and occupational health in urban public transport in the city of Kinshasa].

    PubMed

    Shadi, Jemina Wangata; De Brouwer, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work was to highlight the impact of job type on the health of public transportation workers in the informal sector in Kinshasa. An exploratory cross-sectional study was conducted in a population of workers (n=390) with two types of jobs and employment status: permanent employment, the drivers (n=130) and precarious employment, receivers (n=130) and shippers (n=130). A health questionnaire was used for data collection. Odds ratios and confidence intervals at 95% were estimated by logistic regression. Adjusted odds ratios were higher respectively for receivers and shippers regarding complaints of weight loss, abnormal fatigue, headache and insomnia. These results suggest an association between the type of employment and the health of these workers. This differential impact could reflect the outcome associated with either the insecurity of the employment status or an increased level of harmful exposures. PMID:21491745

  19. Angular Momentum Transport in Accretion Disk Boundary Layers Around Weakly Magnetized Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessah, Martin E.; Chan, Chi-kwan

    2013-04-01

    The standard model for turbulent shear viscosity in accretion disks is based on the assumption that angular momentum transport is opposite to the radial angular frequency gradient of the disk. This implies that the turbulent stress must be negative and thus transport angular momentum inwards, in the boundary layer where the accretion disk meets the surface of a weakly magnetized star. However, this behavior is not supported by numerical simulations of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accretion disks, which show that angular momentum transport driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is inefficient in disk regions where, as expected in boundary layers, the angular frequency increases with radius. Motivated by the need of a deeper understanding of the behavior of an MHD fluid in a differentially rotating background that deviates from a Keplerian profile, we study the dynamics of MHD waves in configurations that are stable to the standard MRI. Employing the shearing-sheet framework, we show that transient amplification of shearing MHD waves can generate magnetic energy without leading to a substantial generation of hydromagnetic stresses. While these results are in agreement with numerical simulations, they emphasize the need to better understand the mechanism for angular momentum transport in the inner disk regions on more solid grounds.

  20. Electronic spin transport and spin precession in single graphene layers at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Tombros, Nikolaos; Jozsa, Csaba; Popinciuc, Mihaita; Jonkman, Harry T; van Wees, Bart J

    2007-08-01

    Electronic transport in single or a few layers of graphene is the subject of intense interest at present. The specific band structure of graphene, with its unique valley structure and Dirac neutrality point separating hole states from electron states, has led to the observation of new electronic transport phenomena such as anomalously quantized Hall effects, absence of weak localization and the existence of a minimum conductivity. In addition to dissipative transport, supercurrent transport has also been observed. Graphene might also be a promising material for spintronics and related applications, such as the realization of spin qubits, owing to the low intrinsic spin orbit interaction, as well as the low hyperfine interaction of the electron spins with the carbon nuclei. Here we report the observation of spin transport, as well as Larmor spin precession, over micrometre-scale distances in single graphene layers. The 'non-local' spin valve geometry was used in these experiments, employing four-terminal contact geometries with ferromagnetic cobalt electrodes making contact with the graphene sheet through a thin oxide layer. We observe clear bipolar (changing from positive to negative sign) spin signals that reflect the magnetization direction of all four electrodes, indicating that spin coherence extends underneath all of the contacts. No significant changes in the spin signals occur between 4.2 K, 77 K and room temperature. We extract a spin relaxation length between 1.5 and 2 mum at room temperature, only weakly dependent on charge density. The spin polarization of the ferromagnetic contacts is calculated from the measurements to be around ten per cent. PMID:17632544

  1. Electronic spin transport and spin precession in single graphene layers at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombros, Nikolaos; Jozsa, Csaba; Popinciuc, Mihaita; Jonkman, Harry T.; van Wees, Bart J.

    2007-08-01

    Electronic transport in single or a few layers of graphene is the subject of intense interest at present. The specific band structure of graphene, with its unique valley structure and Dirac neutrality point separating hole states from electron states, has led to the observation of new electronic transport phenomena such as anomalously quantized Hall effects, absence of weak localization and the existence of a minimum conductivity. In addition to dissipative transport, supercurrent transport has also been observed. Graphene might also be a promising material for spintronics and related applications, such as the realization of spin qubits, owing to the low intrinsic spin orbit interaction, as well as the low hyperfine interaction of the electron spins with the carbon nuclei. Here we report the observation of spin transport, as well as Larmor spin precession, over micrometre-scale distances in single graphene layers. The `non-local' spin valve geometry was used in these experiments, employing four-terminal contact geometries with ferromagnetic cobalt electrodes making contact with the graphene sheet through a thin oxide layer. We observe clear bipolar (changing from positive to negative sign) spin signals that reflect the magnetization direction of all four electrodes, indicating that spin coherence extends underneath all of the contacts. No significant changes in the spin signals occur between 4.2K, 77K and room temperature. We extract a spin relaxation length between 1.5 and 2μm at room temperature, only weakly dependent on charge density. The spin polarization of the ferromagnetic contacts is calculated from the measurements to be around ten per cent.

  2. An Azaacene Derivative as Promising Electron-Transport Layer for Inverted Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Pei-Yang; Wang, Ning; Wu, Anyang; Wang, Zilong; Tian, Miaomiao; Fu, Zhisheng; Sun, Xiao Wei; Zhang, Qichun

    2016-08-01

    It is highly desirable to develop novel n-type organic small molecules as an efficient electron-transport layer (ETL) for the replacement of PCBM to obtain high-performance metal-oxide-free, solution-processed inverted perovskite solar cells (PSCs) because this type of solar cells with a low-temperature and solution-based process would make their fabrication more feasible and practical. In this research, the new azaacene QCAPZ has been synthesized and employed as non-fullerene ETL material for inverted PSCs through a solution-based process without the need for additional dopants or additives. The as-fabricated inverted PSCs show a power conversion efficiency up to 10.26 %. Our results clearly suggest that larger azaacenes could be promising electron-transport materials to achieve high-performance solution-processed inverted PSCs. PMID:27378599

  3. Computation of turbulent boundary layers employing the defect wall-function method. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Douglas L.

    1994-01-01

    In order to decrease overall computational time requirements of spatially-marching parabolized Navier-Stokes finite-difference computer code when applied to turbulent fluid flow, a wall-function methodology, originally proposed by R. Barnwell, was implemented. This numerical effort increases computational speed and calculates reasonably accurate wall shear stress spatial distributions and boundary-layer profiles. Since the wall shear stress is analytically determined from the wall-function model, the computational grid near the wall is not required to spatially resolve the laminar-viscous sublayer. Consequently, a substantially increased computational integration step size is achieved resulting in a considerable decrease in net computational time. This wall-function technique is demonstrated for adiabatic flat plate test cases from Mach 2 to Mach 8. These test cases are analytically verified employing: (1) Eckert reference method solutions, (2) experimental turbulent boundary-layer data of Mabey, and (3) finite-difference computational code solutions with fully resolved laminar-viscous sublayers. Additionally, results have been obtained for two pressure-gradient cases: (1) an adiabatic expansion corner and (2) an adiabatic compression corner.

  4. Quantum transport simulation of exciton condensate transport physics in a double-layer graphene system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Xuehao; Register, Leonard F.; MacDonald, Allan H.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2015-12-01

    Spatially indirect electron-hole exciton condensates stabilized by interlayer Fock exchange interactions have been predicted in systems containing a pair of two-dimensional semiconductor or semimetal layers separated by a thin tunnel dielectric. The layer degree of freedom in these systems can be described as a pseudospin. Condensation is then analogous to ferromagnetism, and the interplay between collective and quasiparticle contributions to transport is analogous to phenomena that are heavily studied in spintronics. These phenomena are the basis for pseudospintronic device proposals based on possible low-voltage switching between high (nearly shorted) and low interlayer conductance states and on near-perfect Coulomb drag-counterflow current along the layers. In this work, a quantum transport simulator incorporating a nonlocal Fock exchange interaction is presented, and used to model the essential transport physics in, for specificity, a graphene-dielectric-graphene system. Finite-size effects, Coulomb drag-counterflow current, critical interlayer currents beyond which interlayer dc conductance collapses at subthermal voltages, nonlocal coupling between interlayer critical currents in multiple lead devices, and an Andreev-like reflection process are illustrated.

  5. Deposition of durable thin silver layers onto polyamides employing a heterogeneous Tollens’ reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Textor, Torsten; Fouda, Moustafa M. G.; Mahltig, Boris

    2010-02-01

    Tollens' reaction is a well-known reaction employed in chemical analyses to detect reducing groups—basically aldehydes. If aldehydes are available in a solution these will reduce silver(I) ions to silver(0). The present paper describes an approach to use a heterogeneous Tollens' reaction to establish thin layers of silver on polyamide surfaces. The polyamide surface is modified with aldehyde functions in a first step employing glutaraldehyde. The resulting polymer material is therefore equipped with reducing groups necessary for the reduction of silver in a next step. The polymer is subsequently treated with Tollens' reagent yielding a yellow/brownish colour typical for the surface plasmon resonance of silver. The extend of the colouring - indicating the amount of silver deposited - varies with both the concentration of the Tollens' reagent and the concentration of the glutaraldehyde solution used for the pre-treatment. The as-prepared samples not only show an excellent antimicrobial activity but also an enormous durability. Polyamide textiles that were treated with the described approach showed unchanged efficiency even after 30 laundry cycles.

  6. Combined core/boundary layer transport simulations in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Prinja, A.K.; Schafer, R.F. Jr.; Conn, R.W.; Howe, H.C.

    1986-04-01

    Significant new numerical results are presented from self-consistent core and boundary or scrape-off layer plasma simulations with 3-D neutral transport calculations. For a symmetric belt limiter it is shown that, for plasma conditions considered here, the pump limiter collection efficiency increases from 11% to 18% of the core efflux as a result of local reionization of blade deflected neutrals. This hitherto unobserved effect causes a significant amplification of upstream ion flux entering the pump limiter. Results from coupling of an earlier developed two-zone edge plasma model ODESSA to the PROCTR core plasma simulation code indicates that intense recycling divertor operation may not be possible because of stagnation of upstream flow velocity. This results in a self-consistent reduction of density gradient in an intermediate region between the central plasma and separatrix, and a concomitant reduction of core-efflux. There is also evidence of increased recycling at the first wall.

  7. Electrical transport properties of single-layer WS2.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Allain, Adrien; Huang, Ying-Sheng; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Kis, Andras

    2014-08-26

    We report on the fabrication of field-effect transistors based on single layers and bilayers of the semiconductor WS2 and the investigation of their electronic transport properties. We find that the doping level strongly depends on the device environment and that long in situ annealing drastically improves the contact transparency, allowing four-terminal measurements to be performed and the pristine properties of the material to be recovered. Our devices show n-type behavior with a high room-temperature on/off current ratio of ∼10(6). They show clear metallic behavior at high charge carrier densities and mobilities as high as ∼140 cm(2)/(V s) at low temperatures (above 300 cm(2)/(V s) in the case of bilayers). In the insulating regime, the devices exhibit variable-range hopping, with a localization length of about 2 nm that starts to increase as the Fermi level enters the conduction band. The promising electronic properties of WS2, comparable to those of single-layer MoS2 and WSe2, together with its strong spin-orbit coupling, make it interesting for future applications in electronic, optical, and valleytronic devices. PMID:25069042

  8. Vertical transport of water in the Martian boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, Aaron P.; Haberle, R. M.; Houben, Howard C.

    1993-01-01

    We are continuing our examination of the transport of H2O through the martian boundary layer, and we have written a one-dimensional numerical model of the exchange of H2O between the atmosphere and subsurface of Mars through the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Our goal is to explore the mechanisms of H2O exchange, and to elucidate the role played by the regolith in the local H2O budget. The atmospheric model includes effects of Coriolis, pressure gradient, and frictional forces for momentum, as well as radiation, sensible heat flux, and advection for heat. The model differs from Flasar and Goody by use of appropriate Viking-based physical constants and inclusion of the radiative effects of atmospheric dust. We specify the pressure gradient force or compute it from a simple slope model. The subsurface model accounts for conduction of heat and diffusion of H2O through a porous adsorbing medium in response to diurnal forcing. The model is initialized with depth-independent H2O concentrations (2 kg M(exp -3)) in the regolith, and a dry atmosphere. The model terminates when the atmospheric H2O column abundance stabilizes at 0.1 percent per sol.

  9. Transition Metal-Oxide Free Perovskite Solar Cells Enabled by a New Organic Charge Transport Layer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sehoon; Han, Ggoch Ddeul; Weis, Jonathan G; Park, Hyoungwon; Hentz, Olivia; Zhao, Zhibo; Swager, Timothy M; Gradečak, Silvija

    2016-04-01

    Various electron and hole transport layers have been used to develop high-efficiency perovskite solar cells. To achieve low-temperature solution processing of perovskite solar cells, organic n-type materials are employed to replace the metal oxide electron transport layer (ETL). Although PCBM (phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester) has been widely used for this application, its morphological instability in films (i.e., aggregation) is detrimental. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of a new fullerene derivative (isobenzofulvene-C60-epoxide, IBF-Ep) that serves as an electron transporting material for methylammonium mixed lead halide-based perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3-xClx) solar cells, both in the normal and inverted device configurations. We demonstrate that IBF-Ep has superior morphological stability compared to the conventional acceptor, PCBM. IBF-Ep provides higher photovoltaic device performance as compared to PCBM (6.9% vs 2.5% in the normal and 9.0% vs 5.3% in the inverted device configuration). Moreover, IBF-Ep devices show superior tolerance to high humidity (90%) in air. By reaching power conversion efficiencies up to 9.0% for the inverted devices with IBF-Ep as the ETL, we demonstrate the potential of this new material as an alternative to metal oxides for perovskite solar cells processed in air. PMID:26947400

  10. Enhanced Electron Extraction Capability of Polymer Solar Cells via Employing Electrostatically Self-Assembled Molecule on Cathode Interfacial Layer.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiqi; Zhang, Xinyuan; Liu, Chunyu; Zhang, Zhihui; Li, Jinfeng; Shen, Liang; Guo, Wenbin; Ruan, Shengping

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, high-performance inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs) with a modified cathode buffer layer, titanium dioxide:polyethylenimine (TiO2:PEI), are demonstrated. The TiO2-O-PEI transport layer was fabricated by electrostatically self-assembled monolayers (ESAM) of PEI molecules. Protonated amine functional groups of PEI can combine protons (H(+)) hydrolyzing from its aqueous solution. Also, PEI could produce ESAM on the surface of hydroxylated TiO2 because of its cationic characteristics. The incorporation of the TiO2-O-PEI layer enhances the photocurrent and power conversion efficiency (PCE) due to the improved interfacial electron transport and extraction of the TiO2-O-PEI surface and the increased light absorption of the active layer. The enhanced PCE, low-cost materials, and solution process of TiO2-O-PEI buffer layers provide a promising method for highly efficient PSCs. PMID:26955888

  11. Highly Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells Employing an Easily Attainable Bifluorenylidene-Based Hole-Transporting Material.

    PubMed

    Rakstys, Kasparas; Saliba, Michael; Gao, Peng; Gratia, Paul; Kamarauskas, Egidijus; Paek, Sanghyun; Jankauskas, Vygintas; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2016-06-20

    The 4,4'-dimethoxydiphenylamine-substituted 9,9'-bifluorenylidene (KR216) hole transporting material has been synthesized using a straightforward two-step procedure from commercially available and inexpensive starting reagents, mimicking the synthetically challenging 9,9'-spirobifluorene moiety of the well-studied spiro-OMeTAD. A power conversion efficiency of 17.8 % has been reached employing a novel HTM in a perovskite solar cells. PMID:27158924

  12. Real-time dosimeter employed to evaluate the half-value layer in CT.

    PubMed

    McKenney, Sarah E; Seibert, J Anthony; Burkett, George W; Gelskey, Dale; Sunde, Paul B; Newman, James D; Boone, John M

    2014-01-20

    Half-value layer (HVL) measurements on commercial whole body computer tomography (CT) scanners require serial measurements and, in many institutions, the presence of a service engineer. An assembly of aluminum filters (AAF), designed to be used in conjunction with a real-time dosimeter, was developed to provide estimates of the HVL using clinical protocols. Two real-time dose probes, a solid-state and air ionization chamber, were examined. The AAF consisted of eight rectangular filters of high-purity aluminum (Type 1100), symmetrically positioned to form a cylindrical 'cage' around the probe's detective volume. The incident x-ray beam was attenuated by varying thicknesses of aluminum filters as the gantry completed a minimum of one rotation. Measurements employing real-time chambers were conducted both in service mode and with a routine abdomen/pelvis protocol for several combinations of x-ray tube potentials and bow tie filters. These measurements were validated against conventional serial HVL measurements. The average relative difference between the HVL measurements using the two methods was less than 5% when using a 122 mm diameter AAF; relative differences were reduced to 1.1% when the diameter was increased to 505 mm, possibly due to reduced scatter contamination. Use of a real-time dose probe and the AAF allowed for time-efficient measurements of beam quality on a clinical CT scanner using clinical protocols. PMID:24351935

  13. Real-time dosimeter employed to evaluate the half-value layer in CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenney, Sarah E.; Seibert, J. Anthony; Burkett, George W.; Gelskey, Dale; Sunde, Paul B.; Newman, James D.; Boone, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Half-value layer (HVL) measurements on commercial whole body computer tomography (CT) scanners require serial measurements and, in many institutions, the presence of a service engineer. An assembly of aluminum filters (AAF), designed to be used in conjunction with a real-time dosimeter, was developed to provide estimates of the HVL using clinical protocols. Two real-time dose probes, a solid-state and air ionization chamber, were examined. The AAF consisted of eight rectangular filters of high-purity aluminum (Type 1100), symmetrically positioned to form a cylindrical ‘cage’ around the probe's detective volume. The incident x-ray beam was attenuated by varying thicknesses of aluminum filters as the gantry completed a minimum of one rotation. Measurements employing real-time chambers were conducted both in service mode and with a routine abdomen/pelvis protocol for several combinations of x-ray tube potentials and bow tie filters. These measurements were validated against conventional serial HVL measurements. The average relative difference between the HVL measurements using the two methods was less than 5% when using a 122 mm diameter AAF; relative differences were reduced to 1.1% when the diameter was increased to 505 mm, possibly due to reduced scatter contamination. Use of a real-time dose probe and the AAF allowed for time-efficient measurements of beam quality on a clinical CT scanner using clinical protocols.

  14. Real-time dosimeter employed to evaluate the half-value layer in CT

    PubMed Central

    McKenney, Sarah E.; Seibert, J. Anthony; Burkett, George W.; Gelskey, Dale; Sunde, Paul B.; Newman, James D.; Boone, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Half-value layer (HVL) measurements on commercial whole body CT scanners require serial measurements and, in many institutions, the presence of a service engineer. An assembly of aluminum filters (AAF), designed to be used in conjunction with a real-time dosimeter, was developed to provide estimates of the HVL using clinical protocols. Two real-time dose probes, a solid-state and air ionization chamber, were examined. The AAF consisted of eight rectangular filters of high purity aluminum (Type 1100), symmetrically positioned to form a cylindrical “cage” around the probe’s detective volume. The incident x-ray beam was attenuated by varying thicknesses of aluminum filters as the gantry completed a minimum of one rotation. Measurements employing real-time chambers were conducted both in service mode and with a routine abdomen/pelvis protocol for several combinations of x-ray tube potentials and bow tie filters. These measurements were validated against conventional serial HVL measurements. The average relative difference between the HVL measurements using the two methods was less than 5% when using a 122 mm diameter AAF; relative differences were reduced to 1.1% when the diameter was increased to 505 mm, possibly due to a reduced scatter contamination. Use of a real-time dose probe and the AAF allowed for time-efficient measurements of beam quality on a clinical CT scanner using clinical protocols. PMID:24351935

  15. Employing lidar to detail vegetation canopy architecture for prediction of aeolian transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sankey, Joel B.; Law, Darin J.; Breshears, David D.; Munson, Seth M.; Webb, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    The diverse and fundamental effects that aeolian processes have on the biosphere and geosphere are commonly generated by horizontal sediment transport at the land surface. However, predicting horizontal sediment transport depends on vegetation architecture, which is difficult to quantify in a rapid but accurate manner. We demonstrate an approach to measure vegetation canopy architecture at high resolution using lidar along a gradient of dryland sites ranging from 2% to 73% woody plant canopy cover. Lidar-derived canopy height, distance (gaps) between vegetation elements (e.g., trunks, limbs, leaves), and the distribution of gaps scaled by vegetation height were correlated with canopy cover and highlight potentially improved horizontal dust flux estimation than with cover alone. Employing lidar to estimate detailed vegetation canopy architecture offers promise for improved predictions of horizontal sediment transport across heterogeneous plant assemblages.

  16. [Highly Efficient Bilayer-Structure Yellow-Green OLED with MADN Hole-Transport Layer and the Impedance Spectroscopy Analysis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-wen; Mo, Bing-jie; Liu, Li-ming; Wang, Hong-hang; Chen, Er-wei; Xu, Ji-wen; Wang, Hua

    2015-12-01

    Abstract Highly efficient bilayer-structure yellow-green organic light-emitting device (OLED) has been demonstrated based on MADN as hole-transport layer (HTL) and host-guest coped system of [Alq₃: 0.7 Wt% rubrene] as emitting and electron-trans- port layer. The device gives yellow-green emission through incomplete energy transfer from the host of Alq₃ to the guest of ru- brene. An electroluminescent peak of 560 nm, 1931 CIE color coordinates of (0.46, 0.52) and a maximum current efficiency of 7.63 cd · A⁻¹ (which has been enhanced by 30% in comparison with the counterpart having conventional NPB HTL) are ob- served. The hole-transporting characteristics of MADN and NPB have been systematically investigated by constructing hole-only devices and employing impedance spectroscopy analysis. Our results indicate that MADN can be served as an effective hole-trans- port material and its hole-transporting ability is slightly inferior to NPB. This overcomes the shortcoming of hole transporting more quickly than electron in OLED and improves carrier balance in the emitting layer. Consequently, the device current efficien- cy is promoted. In addition, the current efficiency of bilayer-structure OLED with MADN as HTL is comparable to that of conv- entinol trilayer-structure device with MADN as HTL and Alq₃ as electron-transport layer. This indicates that the simplified bi- layer-structure device can be achieved without sacrificing current efficiency. The emitting layer of [Alq: 0.7 Wt% rubrene possesses superior elecron-transporting ability. PMID:26964197

  17. Particle Swarm Transport through Immiscible Fluid Layers in a Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teasdale, N. D.; Boomsma, E.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2011-12-01

    Immiscible fluids occur either naturally (e.g. oil & water) or from anthropogenic processes (e.g. liquid CO2 & water) in the subsurface and complicate the transport of natural or engineered micro- or nano-scale particles. In this study, we examined the effect of immiscible fluids on the formation and evolution of particle swarms in a fracture. A particle swarm is a collection of colloidal-size particles in a dilute suspension that exhibits cohesive behavior. Swarms fall under gravity with a velocity that is greater than the settling velocity of a single particle. Thus a particle swarm of colloidal contaminants can potentially travel farther and faster in a fracture than expected for a dispersion or emulsion of colloidal particles. We investigated the formation, evolution, and break-up of colloidal swarms under gravity in a uniform aperture fracture as hydrophobic/hydrophyllic particle swarms move across an oil-water interface. A uniform aperture fracture was fabricated from two transparent acrylic rectangular prisms (100 mm x 50 mm x 100 mm) that are separated by 1, 2.5, 5, 10 or 50 mm. The fracture was placed, vertically, inside a glass tank containing a layer of pure silicone oil (polydimethylsiloxane) on distilled water. Along the length of the fracture, 30 mm was filled with oil and 70 mm with water. Experiments were conducted using silicone oils with viscosities of 5, 10, 100, or 1000 cSt. Particle swarms (5 μl) were comprised of a 1% concentration (by mass) of 25 micron glass beads (hydrophilic) suspended in a water drop, or a 1% concentration (by mass) of 3 micron polystyrene fluorescent beads (hydrophobic) suspended in a water drop. The swarm behavior was imaged using an optical fluorescent imaging system composed of a CCD camera and by green (525 nm) LED arrays for illumination. Swarms were spherical and remained coherent as they fell through the oil because of the immiscibility of oil and water. However, as a swarm approached the oil-water interface, it

  18. 49 CFR 372.103 - Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... school children and teachers to or from school. 372.103 Section 372.103 Transportation Other Regulations... Exemptions § 372.103 Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from... motor vehicles being used at the time of operation in the transportation of schoolchildren and...

  19. 49 CFR 372.103 - Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... school children and teachers to or from school. 372.103 Section 372.103 Transportation Other Regulations... Exemptions § 372.103 Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from... motor vehicles being used at the time of operation in the transportation of schoolchildren and...

  20. 49 CFR 372.103 - Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... school children and teachers to or from school. 372.103 Section 372.103 Transportation Other Regulations... Exemptions § 372.103 Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from... motor vehicles being used at the time of operation in the transportation of schoolchildren and...

  1. Kinetics of Ion Transport in Perovskite Active Layers and Its Implications for Active Layer Stability.

    PubMed

    Bag, Monojit; Renna, Lawrence A; Adhikari, Ramesh Y; Karak, Supravat; Liu, Feng; Lahti, Paul M; Russell, Thomas P; Tuominen, Mark T; Venkataraman, D

    2015-10-14

    Solar cells fabricated using alkyl ammonium metal halides as light absorbers have the right combination of high power conversion efficiency and ease of fabrication to realize inexpensive but efficient thin film solar cells. However, they degrade under prolonged exposure to sunlight. Herein, we show that this degradation is quasi-reversible, and that it can be greatly lessened by simple modifications of the solar cell operating conditions. We studied perovskite devices using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) with methylammonium (MA)-, formamidinium (FA)-, and MA(x)FA(1-x) lead triiodide as active layers. From variable temperature EIS studies, we found that the diffusion coefficient using MA ions was greater than when using FA ions. Structural studies using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) show that for MAPbI3 a structural change and lattice expansion occurs at device operating temperatures. On the basis of EIS and PXRD studies, we postulate that in MAPbI3 the predominant mechanism of accelerated device degradation under sunlight involves thermally activated fast ion transport coupled with a lattice-expanding phase transition, both of which are facilitated by absorption of the infrared component of the solar spectrum. Using these findings, we show that the devices show greatly improved operation lifetimes and stability under white-light emitting diodes, or under a solar simulator with an infrared cutoff filter or with cooling. PMID:26414066

  2. A composite nanostructured electron-transport layer for stable hole-conductor free perovskite solar cells: design and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhenhua; Qi, Fei; Liu, Pei; You, Sujian; Kondamareddy, Kiran Kumar; Wang, Changlei; Cheng, Nian; Bai, Sihang; Liu, Wei; Guo, Shishang; Zhao, Xing-Zhong

    2016-03-01

    A novel composite nanostructured titanium dioxide (TiO2) based electron-transport layer (ETL) is designed by combining size blended nanoparticles (SBNP) and nanoarrays (NA) for efficient perovskite solar cell (PSC) applications. The composite nanostructured (SBNP + NA) ETL is successfully employed in hole-conductor free PSCs, there by achieving a stable device with a maximum efficiency of 13.5%. The improvement in the performance is attributed to the better charge transport and lower recombination in the SBNP + NA ETL. Despite the stable high efficiency, SBNP + NA ETL based PSCs are advantageous owing to their low cost, ease of all-solution fabrication process in an open environment and good reproducibility.A novel composite nanostructured titanium dioxide (TiO2) based electron-transport layer (ETL) is designed by combining size blended nanoparticles (SBNP) and nanoarrays (NA) for efficient perovskite solar cell (PSC) applications. The composite nanostructured (SBNP + NA) ETL is successfully employed in hole-conductor free PSCs, there by achieving a stable device with a maximum efficiency of 13.5%. The improvement in the performance is attributed to the better charge transport and lower recombination in the SBNP + NA ETL. Despite the stable high efficiency, SBNP + NA ETL based PSCs are advantageous owing to their low cost, ease of all-solution fabrication process in an open environment and good reproducibility. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the experimental section and ESI figures. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr09045h

  3. ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT BY ACOUSTIC MODES GENERATED IN THE BOUNDARY LAYER. I. HYDRODYNAMICAL THEORY AND SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Rafikov, Roman R.; Stone, James M.

    2013-06-10

    The nature of angular momentum transport in the boundary layers of accretion disks has been one of the central and long-standing issues of accretion disk theory. In this work we demonstrate that acoustic waves excited by supersonic shear in the boundary layer serve as an efficient mechanism of mass, momentum, and energy transport at the interface between the disk and the accreting object. We develop the theory of angular momentum transport by acoustic modes in the boundary layer, and support our findings with three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, using an isothermal equation of state. Our first major result is the identification of three types of global modes in the boundary layer. We derive dispersion relations for each of these modes that accurately capture the pattern speeds observed in simulations to within a few percent. Second, we show that angular momentum transport in the boundary layer is intrinsically nonlocal, and is driven by radiation of angular momentum away from the boundary layer into both the star and the disk. The picture of angular momentum transport in the boundary layer by waves that can travel large distances before dissipating and redistributing angular momentum and energy to the disk and star is incompatible with the conventional notion of local transport by turbulent stresses. Our results have important implications for semianalytical models that describe the spectral emission from boundary layers.

  4. Modeling of turbulent transport in the surface layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. L.

    1973-01-01

    The turbulence equations as written by Donaldson using the method of invariant modeling have been applied to the following limiting cases of the surface or constant flux layer of the planetary boundary layer: (1) Neutrally stable; (2) stable (above influence of surface roughness); (3) nearly neutrally stable; and (4) very unstable (free convection). For the neutrally stable case, the equations are shown to admit as a solution the familiar logarithmic profile. By use of this result, boundary conditions suitable for the surface layer are defined and are simple to apply to rough surfaces.

  5. Extreme detached dust layers near Martian volcanoes: Evidence for dust transport by mesoscale circulations forced by high topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heavens, N. G.; Cantor, B. A.; Hayne, P. O.; Kass, D. M.; Kleinböhl, A.; McCleese, D. J.; Piqueux, S.; Schofield, J. T.; Shirley, J. H.

    2015-05-01

    Modeling suggests that thermal circulations over Mars's highest volcanoes transport water vapor and dust from the surface into the middle atmosphere, forming detached layers in these constituents. Intense vertical mixing also takes place in regional and global dust storms, which can generate detached layers that are extreme in both altitude and magnitude. Here we employ observations by the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) on board Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, taking advantage of improved vertical coverage in MCS's aerosol retrievals, to discover a new class of extreme detached dust layers (EDDLs). Observed during minimal dust storm activity and furthermore distinguished by their potentially large and measurable horizontal extent (>1000 km), these EDDLs cluster near Olympus Mons and the Tharsis Montes, from which they likely originate. The existence of these EDDLs suggests that vertical mixing by topographic circulations can be much stronger than previously modeled and more frequent than previously observed.

  6. Reduced workfunction intermetallic seed layers allow growth of porous n-GaN and low resistivity, ohmic electron transport.

    PubMed

    Bilousov, Oleksandr V; Carvajal, Joan J; Drouin, Dominique; Mateos, Xavier; Díaz, Francesc; Aguiló, Magdalena; O'Dwyer, Colm

    2012-12-01

    Porous GaN crystals have been successfully grown and electrically contacted simultaneously on Pt- and Au-coated silicon substrates as porous crystals and as porous layers. By the direct reaction of metallic Ga and NH(3) gas through chemical vapor deposition, intermetallic metal-Ga alloys form at the GaN-metal interface, allowing vapor-solid-solid seeding and subsequent growth of porous GaN. Current-voltage and capacitance-voltage measurements confirm that the intermetallic seed layers prevent interface oxidation and give a high-quality reduced workfunction contact that allows exceptionally low contact resistivities. Additionally, the simultaneous formation of a lower workfunction intermetallic permits ohmic electron transport to n-type GaN grown using high workfunction metals that best catalyze the formation of porous GaN layers and may be employed to seed and ohmically contact a range of III-N compounds and alloys for broadband absorption and emission. PMID:23167596

  7. A nano-grid structure made of perovskite SrTiO3 nanowires for efficient electron transport layers in inverted polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Won; Suh, Yo-han; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Kim, Yong Seok; Kim, Won Bae

    2015-03-14

    A nano-grid structure of perovskite SrTiO3 NWs is developed for a novel electron transport layer in inverted polymer solar cells. Due to the excellent charge transporting properties of the SrTiO3 nano-grid structure, the device employing this nanostructure showed ∼32% enhanced photovoltaic performance, compared to the solar cell using a TiO2 thin film. PMID:25684116

  8. 49 CFR 372.103 - Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... school children and teachers to or from school. 372.103 Section 372.103 Transportation Other Regulations... Exemptions § 372.103 Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from school. The exemption set forth in 49 U.S.C. 13506(a)(1) shall not be construed as being inapplicable...

  9. 49 CFR 372.103 - Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... school children and teachers to or from school. 372.103 Section 372.103 Transportation Other Regulations... Exemptions § 372.103 Motor vehicles employed solely in transporting school children and teachers to or from school. The exemption set forth in 49 U.S.C. 13506(a)(1) shall not be construed as being inapplicable...

  10. Color stable white phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with red emissive electron transport layer

    SciTech Connect

    Wook Kim, Jin; Yoo, Seung Il; Sung Kang, Jin; Eun Lee, Song; Kwan Kim, Young; Hwa Yu, Hyeong; Turak, Ayse; Young Kim, Woo

    2015-06-28

    We analyzed the performance of multi-emissive white phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) in relation to various red emitting sites of hole and electron transport layers (HTL and ETL). The shift of the recombination zone producing stable white emission in PHOLEDs was utilized as luminance was increased with red emission in its electron transport layer. Multi-emissive white PHOLEDs including the red light emitting electron transport layer yielded maximum external quantum efficiency of 17.4% with CIE color coordinates (−0.030, +0.001) shifting only from 1000 to 10 000 cd/m{sup 2}. Additionally, we observed a reduction of energy loss in the white PHOLED via Ir(piq){sub 3} as phosphorescent red dopant in electron transport layer.

  11. A simple theoretical model of heat and moisture transport in multi-layer garments in cool ambient air.

    PubMed

    Wissler, Eugene H; Havenith, George

    2009-03-01

    Overall resistances for heat and vapor transport in a multilayer garment depend on the properties of individual layers and the thickness of any air space between layers. Under uncomplicated, steady-state conditions, thermal and mass fluxes are uniform within the garment, and the rate of transport is simply computed as the overall temperature or water concentration difference divided by the appropriate resistance. However, that simple computation is not valid under cool ambient conditions when the vapor permeability of the garment is low, and condensation occurs within the garment. Several recent studies have measured heat and vapor transport when condensation occurs within the garment (Richards et al. in Report on Project ThermProject, Contract No. G6RD-CT-2002-00846, 2002; Havenith et al. in J Appl Physiol 104:142-149, 2008). In addition to measuring cooling rates for ensembles when the skin was either wet or dry, both studies employed a flat-plate apparatus to measure resistances of individual layers. Those data provide information required to define the properties of an ensemble in terms of its individual layers. We have extended the work of previous investigators by developing a rather simple technique for analyzing heat and water vapor transport when condensation occurs within a garment. Computed results agree well with experimental results reported by Richards et al. (Report on Project ThermProject, Contract No. G6RD-CT-2002-00846, 2002) and Havenith et al. (J Appl Physiol 104:142-149, 2008). We discuss application of the method to human subjects for whom the rate of sweat secretion, instead of the partial pressure of water on the skin, is specified. Analysis of a more complicated five-layer system studied by Yoo and Kim (Text Res J 78:189-197, 2008) required an iterative computation based on principles defined in this paper. PMID:19125281

  12. Thermal transport across graphene and single layer hexagonal boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingchao E-mail: yyue@whu.edu.cn; Hong, Yang; Yue, Yanan E-mail: yyue@whu.edu.cn

    2015-04-07

    As the dimensions of nanocircuits and nanoelectronics shrink, thermal energies are being generated in more confined spaces, making it extremely important and urgent to explore for efficient heat dissipation pathways. In this work, the phonon energy transport across graphene and hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) interface is studied using classic molecular dynamics simulations. Effects of temperature, interatomic bond strength, heat flux direction, and functionalization on interfacial thermal transport are investigated. It is found out that by hydrogenating graphene in the hybrid structure, the interfacial thermal resistance (R) between graphene and h-BN can be reduced by 76.3%, indicating an effective approach to manipulate the interfacial thermal transport. Improved in-plane/out-of-plane phonon couplings and broadened phonon channels are observed in the hydrogenated graphene system by analyzing its phonon power spectra. The reported R results monotonically decrease with temperature and interatomic bond strengths. No thermal rectification phenomenon is observed in this interfacial thermal transport. Results reported in this work give the fundamental knowledge on graphene and h-BN thermal transport and provide rational guidelines for next generation thermal interface material designs.

  13. The Benthic Boundary Layer: Transport Processes and Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Duren, Luca A.; Middelburg, Jack J.

    Interdisciplinary research is certainly one of the current buzzwords that needs to be incorporated in virtually every grant proposal. The idea that integration of different scientific fields is a prerequisite for progress in Earth sciences is now well recognized. The benthic boundary layer (BBL) is one area of research in which physicists, chemists, biologists, geologists, and engineers have worked in close and fruitful cooperation for several decades. The BBL comprises the near-bottom layer of water, the sediment-water interface, and the top layer of sediment that is directly influenced by the overlying water. In 1974, a BBL conference in France resulted in a book titled The Benthic Boundary Layer edited by I.N. McCave. This publication contained contributions from scientists from a wide range of disciplines and gave an overview of the state-of-the-art of BBL research. However, science has moved on in the past 25 years. Significant conceptual and technological progress has been made, and it is definitely time for an update.

  14. Highly efficient tandem organic light-emitting devices utilizing the connecting structure based on n-doped electron-transport layer/HATCN/hole-transport layer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Lin; Chen, Chien-Yu; Huang, Yi-Hsiang; Lu, Yin-Jui; Chou, Cheng-Hsu; Wu, Chung-Chih

    2014-08-01

    In this work, we conducted studies of tandem organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) based on the connecting structure consisting of n-doped electron-transport layer (n-ETL)/1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene hexacarbonitrile (HATCN)/hole-transport layer. We investigated effects of different n-ETL materials and different HATCN thicknesses on characteristics of tandem OLEDs. Results show that the tandem OLEDs with n-BPhen and a 20 nm layer of HATCN in the connecting structure exhibited the best performance. With these, highly efficient and bright green phosphorescent two-emitting-unit tandem OLEDs, with drive voltages significantly lower than twice that of the single-unit benchmark device and current efficiencies higher than twice that of the single-unit benchmark device, were demonstrated. PMID:25090347

  15. Water Transport in the Micro Porous Layer and Gas Diffusion Layer of a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, C.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, a recently developed dynamic pore-network model is presented [1]. The model explicitly solves for both water pressure and capillary pressure. A semi-implicit scheme is used in updating water saturation in each pore body, which considerably increases the numerical stability at low capillary number values. Furthermore, a multiple-time-step algorithm is introduced to reduce the computational effort. A number of case studies of water transport in the micro porous layer (MPL) and gas diffusion layer (GDL) are conducted. We illustrate the role of MPL in reducing water flooding in the GDL. Also, the dynamic water transport through the MPL-GDL interface is explored in detail. This information is essential to the reduced continua model (RCM), which was developed for multiphase flow through thin porous layers [2, 3]. C.Z. Qin, Water transport in the gas diffusion layer of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell: dynamic pore-network modeling, J Electrochimical. Soci., 162, F1036-F1046, 2015. C.Z. Qin and S.M. Hassanizadeh, Multiphase flow through multilayers of thin porous media: general balance equations and constitutive relationships for a solid-gas-liquid three-phase system, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 70, 693-708, 2014. C.Z. Qin and S.M. Hassanizadeh, A new approach to modeling water flooding in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell, Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, 40, 3348-3358, 2015.

  16. Performance evaluation of transport layer protocols for transmitting real-time data over DiffServ networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Yoko; Sakai, Tatsuhiko; Shigeno, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Yutaka

    2001-07-01

    In this paper, we discuss transport layer protocols to support real-time data transmission overnetworks using Differentiated Services (Diffserv) where bandwidth is guaranteed. Assuming that an application transmits streaming video data over a Diffserv network, we have performed simulation experiments to evaluate performance of real-time transmission using standard internet protocols, UDP and TCP as a transport layer protocol. The application is designed to buffer a portion of the data on the receiver before starting the playback and to operate in a streaming mode. Consequently, when packets are lost over Diffserv networks, TCP shows better performance than UDP. Simulation results show that employment of SACK option for TCP can recover lost packets efficiently and improve performance of real-time transmission. Currently, a growing number of real-time media applications over Internet are being implemented using UDP, because reliable delivery mechanism of TCP can obstruct real-time data transmission that is timing critical. However, in our experimental environment, retransmission and congestion control mechanism of TCP make use of bandwidth guaranteed by Diffserv, and help to provide more reliable delivery of real-time data than UDP without serious impacts on time-sensitive delivery. Therefore, despite of the general belief that TCP is not suitable for time-sensitive delivery, in our experiment, we show that TCP is a transport layer protocol suitable for real-time data transmission over Diffserv networks.

  17. Fabrication of Nano-Composite Surface Layers on Aluminium Employing Friction Stir Processing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozorg, S. F. K.; Zarghani, A. S.; Zarei-Hanzaki, A.

    2010-03-01

    Al/Al2O3 nano-composite surface layer was fabricated via friction stir processing technique. Commercial AA6082 aluminium alloy extruded bar and nanometric Al2O3 powder were subjected to friction stir processing at a substrate travel speed of 80 mm/min and a tool rotation speed of 1000 rpm using a hardened H-13 tool steel. The grain structure and reinforcement particles were investigated by using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Results show that Al2O3 particles can be more uniformly dispread in aluminium substrate by increasing the number of processing passes. Also, hardness enhancement of the nano-composite surface layer was found. This is attributed to uniform dispersion of Al2O3 particles.

  18. Fabrication of Nano-Composite Surface Layers on Aluminium Employing Friction Stir Processing Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Bozorg, S. F. K.; Zarghani, A. S.; Zarei-Hanzaki, A.

    2010-03-11

    Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-composite surface layer was fabricated via friction stir processing technique. Commercial AA6082 aluminium alloy extruded bar and nanometric Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder were subjected to friction stir processing at a substrate travel speed of 80 mm/min and a tool rotation speed of 1000 rpm using a hardened H-13 tool steel. The grain structure and reinforcement particles were investigated by using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Results show that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles can be more uniformly dispread in aluminium substrate by increasing the number of processing passes. Also, hardness enhancement of the nano-composite surface layer was found. This is attributed to uniform dispersion of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles.

  19. High Efficiency Alternating Current Driven Organic Light Emitting Devices Employing Active Semiconducting Gate Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Gregory; Xu, Junwei; Carroll, David

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we describe the role of semiconductor-polymer interfaces in alternating current (AC) driven organic electroluminescent (EL) devices. We implement inorganic semiconducting materials between the external contact and the active layers in organic light EL devices. Precise control of capacitance and charge injection is required to realize bright and efficient large area AC driven devices. We show how this architecture results in active gating to the polymer layers, resulting in the novel ability to control the capacitance and charge injection characteristics. We propose a model based on band bending at the semiconductor-polymer interface. Furthermore, we elucidate the influence of the semiconductor-polymer interface on the internally coupled magnetic field generated in an alternating current driven organic light emitting device configuration. Magnetic fields can alter the ratios of singlet and triplet populations, and we show that internal generation of a magnetic field can dramatically alter the efficiency of light emission in organic EL devices.

  20. Surface immobilization of a tetra-ruthenium substituted polyoxometalate water oxidation catalyst through the employment of conducting polypyrrole and the layer-by-layer (LBL) technique.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Nargis; Sartorel, Andrea; Yaqub, Mustansara; Wearen, Kevin; Laffir, Fathima; Armstrong, Gordon; Dickinson, Calum; Bonchio, Marcella; McCormac, Timothy

    2014-06-11

    A tetra Ru-substituted polyoxometalate Na10[{Ru4O4(OH)2(H2O)4}(γ-SiW10O36)2] (Ru4POM) has been successfully immobilised onto glassy carbon electrodes and indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass slides through the employment of a conducting polypyrrole matrix and the layer-by-layer (LBL) technique. The resulting Ru4POM doped polypyrrole films showed stable redox behavior associated with the Ru centres within the Ru4POM, whereas, the POM's tungsten-oxo redox centres were not accessible. The films showed pH dependent redox behavior within the pH range 2-5 whilst exhibiting excellent stability towards redox cycling. The layer-by-layer assembly was constructed onto poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) modified carbon electrodes by alternate depositions of Ru4POM and a Ru(II) metallodendrimer. The resulting Ru4POM assemblies showed stable redox behavior for the redox processes associated with Ru4POM in the pH range 2-5. The charge transfer resistance of the LBL films was calculated through AC-Impedance. Surface characterization of both the polymer and LBL Ru4POM films was carried out using atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Initial investigations into the ability of the Ru4POM LBL films to electrocatalytically oxidise water at pH 7 have also been conducted. PMID:24758586

  1. Carrier Transport in Epitaxial Multi-layer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Ming; Dimitrakopoulos, Christos; Farmer, Damon; Han, Shu-Jen; Wu, Yanqing; Zhu, Wenjuan; Gaskill, D. Kurt; Tedesco, Joseph; Myers-Ward, Rachael; Eddy, Charles, Jr.; Grill, Alfred; Avouris, Phaedon; Ibm Team; Nrl Team

    2011-03-01

    Significant attention has been focused recently on the electrical properties of graphene grown epitaxially on SiC substrates, because it offers an ideal platform for carbon-based electronics using conventional top-down lithography techniques. The transport properties of graphene are usually studied via Hall effect measurements, which provide information on the carrier mobility and density. Hall measurements performed at a single magnetic field yield a weighted average of carrier mobility and density, and are strictly applicable to homogeneous samples. In this study, we performed variable-field Hall and resistivity measurements on epitaxial graphene, and the results were analyzed with a multi-carrier model. Good agreements were obtained between experimental data and the model, providing further evidence of multi-carrier transport in the C-face grown MLG. This work is supported by DARPA under contract FA8650-08-C-7838 through the CERA program and by the Office of Naval Research.

  2. First principles calculations of solid-state thermionic transport in layered van der Waals heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zebarjadi, Mona; Esfarjani, Keivan

    2016-08-21

    This work aims at understanding solid-state energy conversion and transport in layered (van der Waals) heterostructures in contact with metallic electrodes via a first-principles approach. As an illustration, a graphene/phosphorene/graphene heterostructure in contact with gold electrodes is studied by using density functional theory (DFT)-based first principles calculations combined with real space Green's function (GF) formalism. We show that for a monolayer phosphorene, quantum tunneling dominates the transport. By adding more phosphorene layers, one can switch from tunneling-dominated transport to thermionic-dominated transport, resulting in transporting more heat per charge carrier, thus, enhancing the cooling coefficient of performance. The use of layered van der Waals heterostructures has two advantages: (a) thermionic transport barriers can be tuned by changing the number of layers, and (b) thermal conductance across these non-covalent structures is very weak. The phonon thermal conductance of the present van der Waals heterostructure is found to be 4.1 MW m(-2) K(-1) which is one order of magnitude lower than the lowest value for that of covalently-bonded interfaces. The thermionic coefficient of performance for the proposed device is 18.5 at 600 K corresponding to an equivalent ZT of 0.13, which is significant for nanoscale devices. This study shows that layered van der Waals structures have great potential to be used as solid-state energy-conversion devices. PMID:27314610

  3. Influence of geologic layering on heat transport and storage in an aquifer thermal energy storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridger, D. W.; Allen, D. M.

    2013-09-01

    A modeling study was carried out to evaluate the influence of aquifer heterogeneity, as represented by geologic layering, on heat transport and storage in an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system in Agassiz, British Columbia, Canada. Two 3D heat transport models were developed and calibrated using the flow and heat transport code FEFLOW including: a "non-layered" model domain with homogeneous hydraulic and thermal properties; and, a "layered" model domain with variable hydraulic and thermal properties assigned to discrete geological units to represent aquifer heterogeneity. The base model (non-layered) shows limited sensitivity for the ranges of all thermal and hydraulic properties expected at the site; the model is most sensitive to vertical anisotropy and hydraulic gradient. Simulated and observed temperatures within the wells reflect a combination of screen placement and layering, with inconsistencies largely explained by the lateral continuity of high permeability layers represented in the model. Simulation of heat injection, storage and recovery show preferential transport along high permeability layers, resulting in longitudinal plume distortion, and overall higher short-term storage efficiencies.

  4. Structural design of a double-layered porous hydrogel for effective mass transport

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyejeong; Kim, Hyeon Jeong; Huh, Hyung Kyu; Hwang, Hyung Ju; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-01-01

    Mass transport in porous materials is universal in nature, and its worth attracts great attention in many engineering applications. Plant leaves, which work as natural hydraulic pumps for water uptake, have evolved to have the morphological structure for fast water transport to compensate large water loss by leaf transpiration. In this study, we tried to deduce the advantageous structural features of plant leaves for practical applications. Inspired by the tissue organization of the hydraulic pathways in plant leaves, analogous double-layered porous models were fabricated using agarose hydrogel. Solute transport through the hydrogel models with different thickness ratios of the two layers was experimentally observed. In addition, numerical simulation and theoretical analysis were carried out with varying porosity and thickness ratio to investigate the effect of structural factors on mass transport ability. A simple parametric study was also conducted to examine unveiled relations between structural factors. As a result, the porosity and thickness ratio of the two layers are found to govern the mass transport ability in double-layered porous materials. The hydrogel models with widely dispersed pores at a fixed porosity, i.e., close to a homogeneously porous structure, are mostly turned out to exhibit fast mass transport. The present results would provide a new framework for fundamental design of various porous structures for effective mass transport. PMID:25825619

  5. A charge carrier transport model for donor-acceptor blend layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Janine; Widmer, Johannes; Kleemann, Hans; Tress, Wolfgang; Koerner, Christian; Riede, Moritz; Vandewal, Koen; Leo, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Highly efficient organic solar cells typically comprise donor-acceptor blend layers facilitating effective splitting of excitons. However, the charge carrier mobility in the blends can be substantially smaller than in neat materials, hampering the device performance. Currently, available mobility models do not describe the transport in blend layers entirely. Here, we investigate hole transport in a model blend system consisting of the small molecule donor zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and the acceptor fullerene C60 in different mixing ratios. The blend layer is sandwiched between p-doped organic injection layers, which prevent minority charge carrier injection and enable exploiting diffusion currents for the characterization of exponential tail states from a thickness variation of the blend layer using numerical drift-diffusion simulations. Trap-assisted recombination must be considered to correctly model the conductivity behavior of the devices, which are influenced by local electron currents in the active layer, even though the active layer is sandwiched in between p-doped contacts. We find that the density of deep tail states is largest in the devices with 1:1 mixing ratio (Et = 0.14 eV, Nt = 1.2 × 1018 cm-3) directing towards lattice disorder as the transport limiting process. A combined field and charge carrier density dependent mobility model are developed for this blend layer.

  6. A charge carrier transport model for donor-acceptor blend layers

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Janine Widmer, Johannes; Koerner, Christian; Vandewal, Koen; Leo, Karl; Kleemann, Hans; Tress, Wolfgang; Riede, Moritz

    2015-01-28

    Highly efficient organic solar cells typically comprise donor-acceptor blend layers facilitating effective splitting of excitons. However, the charge carrier mobility in the blends can be substantially smaller than in neat materials, hampering the device performance. Currently, available mobility models do not describe the transport in blend layers entirely. Here, we investigate hole transport in a model blend system consisting of the small molecule donor zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and the acceptor fullerene C{sub 60} in different mixing ratios. The blend layer is sandwiched between p-doped organic injection layers, which prevent minority charge carrier injection and enable exploiting diffusion currents for the characterization of exponential tail states from a thickness variation of the blend layer using numerical drift-diffusion simulations. Trap-assisted recombination must be considered to correctly model the conductivity behavior of the devices, which are influenced by local electron currents in the active layer, even though the active layer is sandwiched in between p-doped contacts. We find that the density of deep tail states is largest in the devices with 1:1 mixing ratio (E{sub t} = 0.14 eV, N{sub t} = 1.2 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}) directing towards lattice disorder as the transport limiting process. A combined field and charge carrier density dependent mobility model are developed for this blend layer.

  7. Layer-by-layer synthesis of metal-containing conducting polymers: caged metal centers for interlayer charge transport.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjun; Huang, Weijie; Pink, Maren; Lee, Dongwhan

    2010-09-01

    Metal-templated [2 + 3]-type cocondensation of a pi-extended boronic acid and nioxime furnished a series of cage molecules, which were electropolymerized to prepare metal-containing conducting polymers (MCPs). Despite sharing essentially isostructural organic scaffolds, these materials display metal-dependent electrochemical properties as evidenced by different redox windows observed for M = Co, Fe, Ru. Consecutive electropolymerization using two different monomers furnished bilayer MCPs having different metals in each layer. In addition to functioning as heavy atom markers in cross-sectional analysis by FIB and EDX, redox-active metal centers participate in voltage-dependent interlayer electron transport to give rise to cyclic voltammograms that are distinctively different from those of each layer alone or random copolymers. A simple electrochemical technique can thus be used as a straightforward diagnostic tool to investigate the structural ordering of electrically conductive layered materials. PMID:20690667

  8. Semianalytical Solutions of Radioactive or Reactive Tracer Transport in Layered Fractured Media

    SciTech Connect

    G.J. Moridis; G. S. Bodvarsson

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, semianalytical solutions are developed for the problem of transport of radioactive or reactive tracers (solutes or colloids) through a layered system of heterogeneous fractured media with misaligned fractures. The tracer transport equations in the matrix account for (a) diffusion, (b) surface diffusion (for solutes only), (c) mass transfer between the mobile and immobile water fractions, (d) linear kinetic or equilibrium physical, chemical, or combined solute sorption or colloid filtration, and (e) radioactive decay or first order chemical reactions. Any number of radioactive decay daughter products (or products of a linear, first-order reaction chain) can be tracked. The tracer-transport equations in the fractures account for the same processes, in addition to advection and hydrodynamic dispersion. Additionally, the colloid transport equations account for straining and velocity adjustments related to the colloidal size. The solutions, which are analytical in the Laplace space, are numerically inverted to provide the solution in time and can accommodate any number of fractured and/or porous layers. The solutions are verified using analytical solutions for limiting cases of solute and colloid transport through fractured and porous media. The effect of important parameters on the transport of {sup 3}H, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu (and its daughters) is investigated in several test problems involving layered geological systems of varying complexity. {sup 239}Pu colloid transport problems in multilayered systems indicate significant colloid accumulations at straining interfaces but much faster transport of the colloid than the corresponding strongly sorbing solute species.

  9. Semianalytical solutions of radioactive or reactive tracer transport in layered fractured media

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2001-10-10

    In this paper, semianalytical solutions are developed for the problem of transport of radioactive or reactive tracers (solutes or colloids) through a layered system of heterogeneous fractured media with misaligned fractures. The tracer transport equations in the matrix account for (a) diffusion, (b) surface diffusion (for solutes only), (c) mass transfer between the mobile and immobile water fractions, (d) linear kinetic or equilibrium physical, chemical, or combined solute sorption or colloid filtration, and (e) radioactive decay or first order chemical reactions. Any number of radioactive decay daughter products (or products of a linear, first-order reaction chain) can be tracked. The tracer-transport equations in the fractures account for the same processes, in addition to advection and hydrodynamic dispersion. Additionally, the colloid transport equations account for straining and velocity adjustments related to the colloidal size. The solutions, which are analytical in the Laplace space, are numerically inverted to provide the solution in time and can accommodate any number of fractured and/or porous layers. The solutions are verified using analytical solutions for limiting cases of solute and colloid transport through fractured and porous media. The effect of important parameters on the transport of {sup 3}H, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu (and its daughters) is investigated in several test problems involving layered geological systems of varying complexity. {sup 239}Pu colloid transport problems in multilayered systems indicate significant colloid accumulations at straining interfaces but much faster transport of the colloid than the corresponding strongly sorbing solute species.

  10. Small particle transport across turbulent nonisothermal boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.; Fernandez De La Mora, J.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction between turbulent diffusion, Brownian diffusion, and particle thermophoresis in the limit of vanishing particle inertial effects is quantitatively modeled for applications in gas turbines. The model is initiated with consideration of the particle phase mass conservation equation for a two-dimensional boundary layer, including the thermophoretic flux term directed toward the cold wall. A formalism of a turbulent flow near a flat plate in a heat transfer problem is adopted, and variable property effects are neglected. Attention is given to the limit of very large Schmidt numbers and the particle concentration depletion outside of the Brownian sublayer. It is concluded that, in the parameter range of interest, thermophoresis augments the high Schmidt number mass-transfer coefficient by a factor equal to the product of the outer sink and the thermophoretic suction.

  11. A composite nanostructured electron-transport layer for stable hole-conductor free perovskite solar cells: design and characterization.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhenhua; Qi, Fei; Liu, Pei; You, Sujian; Kondamareddy, Kiran Kumar; Wang, Changlei; Cheng, Nian; Bai, Sihang; Liu, Wei; Guo, Shishang; Zhao, Xing-zhong

    2016-03-21

    A novel composite nanostructured titanium dioxide (TiO2) based electron-transport layer (ETL) is designed by combining size blended nanoparticles (SBNP) and nanoarrays (NA) for efficient perovskite solar cell (PSC) applications. The composite nanostructured (SBNP + NA) ETL is successfully employed in hole-conductor free PSCs, there by achieving a stable device with a maximum efficiency of 13.5%. The improvement in the performance is attributed to the better charge transport and lower recombination in the SBNP + NA ETL. Despite the stable high efficiency, SBNP + NA ETL based PSCs are advantageous owing to their low cost, ease of all-solution fabrication process in an open environment and good reproducibility. PMID:26932777

  12. Improved air stability of perovskite solar cells via solution-processed metal oxide transport layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Jingbi; Meng, Lei; Song, Tze-Bin; Guo, Tzung-Fang; Yang, Yang (Michael); Chang, Wei-Hsuan; Hong, Ziruo; Chen, Huajun; Zhou, Huanping; Chen, Qi; Liu, Yongsheng; De Marco, Nicholas; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Lead halide perovskite solar cells have recently attracted tremendous attention because of their excellent photovoltaic efficiencies. However, the poor stability of both the perovskite material and the charge transport layers has so far prevented the fabrication of devices that can withstand sustained operation under normal conditions. Here, we report a solution-processed lead halide perovskite solar cell that has p-type NiOx and n-type ZnO nanoparticles as hole and electron transport layers, respectively, and shows improved stability against water and oxygen degradation when compared with devices with organic charge transport layers. Our cells have a p-i-n structure (glass/indium tin oxide/NiOx/perovskite/ZnO/Al), in which the ZnO layer isolates the perovskite and Al layers, thus preventing degradation. After 60 days storage in air at room temperature, our all-metal-oxide devices retain about 90% of their original efficiency, unlike control devices made with organic transport layers, which undergo a complete degradation after just 5 days. The initial power conversion efficiency of our devices is 14.6 ± 1.5%, with an uncertified maximum value of 16.1%.

  13. Improved air stability of perovskite solar cells via solution-processed metal oxide transport layers.

    PubMed

    You, Jingbi; Meng, Lei; Song, Tze-Bin; Guo, Tzung-Fang; Yang, Yang Michael; Chang, Wei-Hsuan; Hong, Ziruo; Chen, Huajun; Zhou, Huanping; Chen, Qi; Liu, Yongsheng; De Marco, Nicholas; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Lead halide perovskite solar cells have recently attracted tremendous attention because of their excellent photovoltaic efficiencies. However, the poor stability of both the perovskite material and the charge transport layers has so far prevented the fabrication of devices that can withstand sustained operation under normal conditions. Here, we report a solution-processed lead halide perovskite solar cell that has p-type NiO(x) and n-type ZnO nanoparticles as hole and electron transport layers, respectively, and shows improved stability against water and oxygen degradation when compared with devices with organic charge transport layers. Our cells have a p-i-n structure (glass/indium tin oxide/NiO(x)/perovskite/ZnO/Al), in which the ZnO layer isolates the perovskite and Al layers, thus preventing degradation. After 60 days storage in air at room temperature, our all-metal-oxide devices retain about 90% of their original efficiency, unlike control devices made with organic transport layers, which undergo a complete degradation after just 5 days. The initial power conversion efficiency of our devices is 14.6 ± 1.5%, with an uncertified maximum value of 16.1%. PMID:26457966

  14. Electroosmosis in Membranes: Effects of Unstirred Layers and Transport Numbers

    PubMed Central

    Barry, P. H.; Hope, A. B.

    1969-01-01

    When a current is passed through a membrane system, differences in transport numbers between the membrane and the adjacent solutions will, in general, result in depletion and enhancement of concentrations at the membrane-solution interfaces. This will be balanced by diffusion back into the bulk solution, diffusion of solute back across the membrane itself, and osmosis resulting from these local concentration gradients. The two main results of such a phenomenon are (1) that there is a current-induced volume flow, which may be mistaken for electroosmosis, and (2) that there will generally develop transient changes in potential difference (PD) across membranes during and after the passage of current through them. PMID:5786317

  15. 41 CFR 102-34.210 - May I use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities? 102-34.210... of employment and mass transit facilities? Yes, you may use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities under the following conditions: (a)...

  16. 41 CFR 102-34.210 - May I use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities? 102-34.210... of employment and mass transit facilities? Yes, you may use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities under the following conditions: (a)...

  17. 41 CFR 102-34.210 - May I use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities? 102-34.210... of employment and mass transit facilities? Yes, you may use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities under the following conditions: (a)...

  18. 41 CFR 102-34.210 - May I use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities? 102-34.210... of employment and mass transit facilities? Yes, you may use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities under the following conditions: (a)...

  19. 41 CFR 102-34.210 - May I use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities? 102-34.210... of employment and mass transit facilities? Yes, you may use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities under the following conditions: (a)...

  20. Ion transport in complex layered graphene-based membranes with tuneable interlayer spacing

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi; Jiang, Gengping; Garvey, Christopher J.; Wang, Yuanyuan; Simon, George P.; Liu, Jefferson Z.; Li, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of the transport properties of ions confined in nanoporous carbon is generally difficult because of the stochastic nature and distribution of multiscale complex and imperfect pore structures within the bulk material. We demonstrate a combined approach of experiment and simulation to describe the structure of complex layered graphene-based membranes, which allows their use as a unique porous platform to gain unprecedented insights into nanoconfined transport phenomena across the entire sub–10-nm scales. By correlation of experimental results with simulation of concentration-driven ion diffusion through the cascading layered graphene structure with sub–10-nm tuneable interlayer spacing, we are able to construct a robust, representative structural model that allows the establishment of a quantitative relationship among the nanoconfined ion transport properties in relation to the complex nanoporous structure of the layered membrane. This correlation reveals the remarkable effect of the structural imperfections of the membranes on ion transport and particularly the scaling behaviors of both diffusive and electrokinetic ion transport in graphene-based cascading nanochannels as a function of channel size from 10 nm down to subnanometer. Our analysis shows that the range of ion transport effects previously observed in simple one-dimensional nanofluidic systems will translate themselves into bulk, complex nanoslit porous systems in a very different manner, and the complex cascading porous circuities can enable new transport phenomena that are unattainable in simple fluidic systems. PMID:26933689

  1. Transportation & Work: Exploring Car Usage and Employment Outcomes in the LSAL Data. NCSALL Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Kerri

    2003-01-01

    This analysis addresses the role of car usage in employment outcomes such as employment status, average weekly wages, and weeks worked per year. It postulates that car ownership is an important employment tool for adults of low educational attainment in Portland, even in the context of other factors such as social networks/resources (social…

  2. Effects of hole-transporting layers of perovskite-based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Atsushi; Kida, Tomoyasu; Takagi, Tatsuru; Oku, Takeo

    2016-02-01

    Fabrication and characterization of the photovoltaic and optical properties, and microstructure of perovskite-based solar cells with lead phthalocyanine (PbPc), zinc phthalocyanine, poly[bis(4-phenyl)(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)amine], and copper(I) thiocyanate as hole-transporting layers were investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to identify surface morphologies of the crystal structure and the elemental composition. Introducing PbPc into perovskite solar cells extended the retaining period of photovoltaic activity and performance. The effects of the hole-transporting layer on incident photon-to-current efficiency were investigated. The energy diagram and photovoltaic mechanism of the perovskite solar cells with the hole-transporting layer are discussed.

  3. Highly stable perovskite solar cells with an all-carbon hole transport layer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feijiu; Endo, Masaru; Mouri, Shinichiro; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Ohno, Yutaka; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Murata, Yasujiro; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2016-06-01

    Nano-carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide) have potential application for photovoltaics because of their excellent optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate that a single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer greatly improves the photovoltaic performance of organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer works as an efficient hole transport/electron blocking layer. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.3% was achieved in the organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cell due to the complementary properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. Furthermore, the great improvement of photovoltaic performance stability in the perovskite solar cells using carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide/polymethyl methacrylate was demonstrated in comparison with that using a typical organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene. PMID:27232674

  4. Laminarization model for turbulent eddy transport in highly accelerated nozzle turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, J. F.; Boldman, D. R.; Todd, C.

    1972-01-01

    A laminarization model which consists of a completely laminar sublayer region near the wall and a turbulent wake region is developed for the turbulent eddy transport in accelerated turbulent boundary layers. This laminarization model is used in a differential boundary layer calculation which was applied to nozzle flows. The resulting theoretical velocity profiles are in good agreement with the experimental nozzle data in the convergent region.

  5. Highly stable perovskite solar cells with an all-carbon hole transport layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feijiu; Endo, Masaru; Mouri, Shinichiro; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Ohno, Yutaka; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Murata, Yasujiro; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2016-06-01

    Nano-carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide) have potential application for photovoltaics because of their excellent optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate that a single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer greatly improves the photovoltaic performance of organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer works as an efficient hole transport/electron blocking layer. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.3% was achieved in the organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cell due to the complementary properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. Furthermore, the great improvement of photovoltaic performance stability in the perovskite solar cells using carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide/polymethyl methacrylate was demonstrated in comparison with that using a typical organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene.Nano-carbon materials (carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide) have potential application for photovoltaics because of their excellent optical and electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate that a single-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer greatly improves the photovoltaic performance of organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cells. The carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide buffer layer works as an efficient hole transport/electron blocking layer. The photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 13.3% was achieved in the organo-lead iodide perovskite solar cell due to the complementary properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. Furthermore, the great improvement of photovoltaic performance stability in the perovskite solar cells using carbon nanotubes/graphene oxide/polymethyl methacrylate was demonstrated in comparison with that using a typical organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-4-methoxyphenylamino)-9,9'-spirobifluorene. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  6. Magneto-transport properties of a random distribution of few-layer graphene patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovella, Fabrice; Trinsoutrot, Pierre; Mitioglu, Anatolie; Conédéra, Véronique; Pierre, Mathieu; Raquet, Bertrand; Goiran, Michel; Vergnes, Hugues; Caussat, Brigitte; Plochocka, Paulina; Escoffier, Walter

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we address the electronic properties of conducting films constituted of an array of randomly distributed few layer graphene patches and investigate on their most salient galvanometric features in the moderate and extreme disordered limit. We demonstrate that, in annealed devices, the ambipolar behaviour and the onset of Landau level quantization in high magnetic field constitute robust hallmarks of few-layer graphene films. In the strong disorder limit, however, the magneto-transport properties are best described by a variable-range hopping behaviour. A large negative magneto-conductance is observed at the charge neutrality point, in consistency with localized transport regime.

  7. An Evaluation of Open MPI's Matching Transport Layer on the Cray XT

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Richard L; Brightwell, Ron; Barrett, Brian; Bosilca, George; Pjesivac-Grbovic, Jelena

    2007-01-01

    Open MPI was initially designed to support a wide variety of high-performance networks and network programming interfaces. Recently, Open MPI was enhanced to support networks that have full support for MPI matching semantics. Previous Open MPI efforts focused on networks that require the MPI library to manage message matching, which is sub-optimal for some networks that inherently support matching. We describes a new matching transport layer in Open MPI, present results of micro-benchmarks and several applications on the Cray XT platform, and compare performance of the new and the existing transport layers, as well as the vendor-supplied implementation of MPI.

  8. Magneto-transport properties of a random distribution of few-layer graphene patches

    SciTech Connect

    Iacovella, Fabrice; Mitioglu, Anatolie; Pierre, Mathieu; Raquet, Bertrand; Goiran, Michel; Plochocka, Paulina; Escoffier, Walter; Trinsoutrot, Pierre; Vergnes, Hugues; Caussat, Brigitte

    2014-11-21

    In this study, we address the electronic properties of conducting films constituted of an array of randomly distributed few layer graphene patches and investigate on their most salient galvanometric features in the moderate and extreme disordered limit. We demonstrate that, in annealed devices, the ambipolar behaviour and the onset of Landau level quantization in high magnetic field constitute robust hallmarks of few-layer graphene films. In the strong disorder limit, however, the magneto-transport properties are best described by a variable-range hopping behaviour. A large negative magneto-conductance is observed at the charge neutrality point, in consistency with localized transport regime.

  9. Exclusion of metal oxide by an RF sputtered Ti layer in flexible perovskite solar cells: energetic interface between a Ti layer and an organic charge transporting layer.

    PubMed

    Ameen, Sadia; Akhtar, M Shaheer; Seo, Hyung-Kee; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja; Shin, Hyung-Shik

    2015-04-14

    In this work, the effects of a titanium (Ti) layer on the charge transport and recombination rates of flexible perovskite solar cells were studied. Ti as an efficient barrier layer was deposited directly on PET-ITO flexible substrates through RF magnetic sputtering using a Ti-source and a pressure of ∼5 mTorr. A Ti coated PET-ITO was used for the fabrication of a flexible perovskite solar cell without using any metal oxide layer. The fabricated flexible perovskite solar cell was composed of a PET-ITO/Ti/perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3)/organic hole transport layer of 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis [N,N'-di-p-methoxyphenylamine]-9,9'-spirobifluorene (spiro-OMeTAD)-Li-TFSI/Ag. A high conversion efficiency of ∼8.39% along with a high short circuit current (JSC) of ∼15.24 mA cm(-2), an open circuit voltage (VOC) of ∼0.830 V and a high fill factor (FF) of ∼0.66 was accomplished by the fabricated flexible perovskite solar cell under a light illumination of ∼100 mW cm(-2) (1.5 AM). Intensity-modulated photocurrent (IMPS)/photovoltage spectroscopy (IMVS) studies demonstrated that the fabricated flexible perovskite solar cell considerably reduced the recombination rate. PMID:25747794

  10. Temperature Dependence of Electric Transport in Few-layer Graphene under Large Charge Doping Induced by Electrochemical Gating

    PubMed Central

    Gonnelli, R. S.; Paolucci, F.; Piatti, E.; Sharda, Kanudha; Sola, A.; Tortello, M.; Nair, Jijeesh R.; Gerbaldi, C.; Bruna, M.; Borini, S.

    2015-01-01

    The temperature dependence of electric transport properties of single-layer and few-layer graphene at large charge doping is of great interest both for the study of the scattering processes dominating the conductivity at different temperatures and in view of the theoretically predicted possibility to reach the superconducting state in such extreme conditions. Here we present the results obtained in 3-, 4- and 5-layer graphene devices down to 3.5 K, where a large surface charge density up to about 6.8·1014 cm−2 has been reached by employing a novel polymer electrolyte solution for the electrochemical gating. In contrast with recent results obtained in single-layer graphene, the temperature dependence of the sheet resistance between 20 K and 280 K shows a low-temperature dominance of a T2 component – that can be associated with electron-electron scattering – and, at about 100 K, a crossover to the classic electron-phonon regime. Unexpectedly, this crossover does not show any dependence on the induced charge density, i.e. on the large tuning of the Fermi energy. PMID:25906088

  11. The effect of interfacial layers on charge transport in organic solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbuyise, Xolani G.; Tonui, Patrick; Mola, Genene Tessema

    2016-09-01

    The effect of interfacial buffer layers in organic photovoltaic cell (OPV) whose active layer is composed of poly(3 hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend was studied. The electrical properties of OPV devices produced with and without interfacial layers are compared and discussed in terms of measured parameters of the cells. The charge transport properties showed significant difference on the mobility and activation factor between the two types of device structures. The life time measurements in the unprotected conditions are also presented and discussed.

  12. First principles calculations of solid-state thermionic transport in layered van der Waals heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zebarjadi, Mona; Esfarjani, Keivan

    2016-08-01

    This work aims at understanding solid-state energy conversion and transport in layered (van der Waals) heterostructures in contact with metallic electrodes via a first-principles approach. As an illustration, a graphene/phosphorene/graphene heterostructure in contact with gold electrodes is studied by using density functional theory (DFT)-based first principles calculations combined with real space Green's function (GF) formalism. We show that for a monolayer phosphorene, quantum tunneling dominates the transport. By adding more phosphorene layers, one can switch from tunneling-dominated transport to thermionic-dominated transport, resulting in transporting more heat per charge carrier, thus, enhancing the cooling coefficient of performance. The use of layered van der Waals heterostructures has two advantages: (a) thermionic transport barriers can be tuned by changing the number of layers, and (b) thermal conductance across these non-covalent structures is very weak. The phonon thermal conductance of the present van der Waals heterostructure is found to be 4.1 MW m-2 K-1 which is one order of magnitude lower than the lowest value for that of covalently-bonded interfaces. The thermionic coefficient of performance for the proposed device is 18.5 at 600 K corresponding to an equivalent ZT of 0.13, which is significant for nanoscale devices. This study shows that layered van der Waals structures have great potential to be used as solid-state energy-conversion devices.This work aims at understanding solid-state energy conversion and transport in layered (van der Waals) heterostructures in contact with metallic electrodes via a first-principles approach. As an illustration, a graphene/phosphorene/graphene heterostructure in contact with gold electrodes is studied by using density functional theory (DFT)-based first principles calculations combined with real space Green's function (GF) formalism. We show that for a monolayer phosphorene, quantum tunneling dominates the

  13. Assessing the performance of reactant transport layers and flow fields towards oxygen transport: A new imaging method based on chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Thiago; Ho, Matthew; Kakati, Biraj K.; Kucernak, Anthony R. J.

    2015-01-01

    A new, simple and precise ex-situ optical imaging method is developed which allows indirect measurement of the partial pressure of oxygen (as ozone) within fuel cell components. Images of oxygen distribution are recorded with higher spatial (∼20 μm) and time (40 ms) resolutions. This approach is applied to assess oxygen concentration across the face of a pseudo polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC), with a serpentine design flow field. We show that the amount of light produced is directly proportional to the partial pressure of ozone, in the same way as the local current density in a PEFC is proportional to the partial pressure of bimolecular oxygen. Hence the simulated system provides information relevant to a PEFC with the same geometry operating at the same stoichiometric ratio. This new approach allows direct imaging of flow under lands due to pressure gradients between the adjacent channels and non-laminar flow effects due to secondary flow around U-turns. These are major discoveries of fundamental importance in guiding materials development and in validating modelling studies. We find that contrary to many simulation papers, advection is an important mechanism in both the gas diffusion layer (more properly "reactant transport layer") and the microporous layer. Models which do not include these effects may underestimate reactant transport to the catalyst layer.

  14. Phase Conjugated and Transparent Wavelength Conversions of Nyquist 16-QAM Signals Employing a Single-Layer Graphene Coated Fiber Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao; Zeng, Mengqi; Long, Yun; Liu, Jun; Zhu, Yixiao; Zou, Kaiheng; Zhang, Fan; Fu, Lei; Wang, Jian

    2016-03-01

    We fabricate a nonlinear optical device based on a fiber pigtail cross-section coated with a single-layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Using the fabricated graphene-assisted nonlinear optical device and employing Nyquist 16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16-QAM) signal, we experimentally demonstrate phase conjugated wavelength conversion by degenerate four-wave mixing (FWM) and transparent wavelength conversion by non-degenerate FWM in graphene. We study the conversion efficiency as functions of the pump power and pump wavelength and evaluate the bit-error rate (BER) performance. We also compare the time-varying symbol sequence for graphene-assisted phase conjugated and transparent wavelength conversions of Nyquist 16-QAM signal.

  15. Phase Conjugated and Transparent Wavelength Conversions of Nyquist 16-QAM Signals Employing a Single-Layer Graphene Coated Fiber Device.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao; Zeng, Mengqi; Long, Yun; Liu, Jun; Zhu, Yixiao; Zou, Kaiheng; Zhang, Fan; Fu, Lei; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    We fabricate a nonlinear optical device based on a fiber pigtail cross-section coated with a single-layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Using the fabricated graphene-assisted nonlinear optical device and employing Nyquist 16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16-QAM) signal, we experimentally demonstrate phase conjugated wavelength conversion by degenerate four-wave mixing (FWM) and transparent wavelength conversion by non-degenerate FWM in graphene. We study the conversion efficiency as functions of the pump power and pump wavelength and evaluate the bit-error rate (BER) performance. We also compare the time-varying symbol sequence for graphene-assisted phase conjugated and transparent wavelength conversions of Nyquist 16-QAM signal. PMID:26932470

  16. Phase Conjugated and Transparent Wavelength Conversions of Nyquist 16-QAM Signals Employing a Single-Layer Graphene Coated Fiber Device

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao; Zeng, Mengqi; Long, Yun; Liu, Jun; Zhu, Yixiao; Zou, Kaiheng; Zhang, Fan; Fu, Lei; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    We fabricate a nonlinear optical device based on a fiber pigtail cross-section coated with a single-layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Using the fabricated graphene-assisted nonlinear optical device and employing Nyquist 16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16-QAM) signal, we experimentally demonstrate phase conjugated wavelength conversion by degenerate four-wave mixing (FWM) and transparent wavelength conversion by non-degenerate FWM in graphene. We study the conversion efficiency as functions of the pump power and pump wavelength and evaluate the bit-error rate (BER) performance. We also compare the time-varying symbol sequence for graphene-assisted phase conjugated and transparent wavelength conversions of Nyquist 16-QAM signal. PMID:26932470

  17. Multi-color colloidal quantum dot based light emitting diodes micropatterned on silicon hole transporting layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Ashwini; Hoshino, Kazunori; Kim, Sunmin; Zhang, Xiaojing

    2009-06-01

    We present a colloidal quantum dot based light emitting diode (QD-LED) which utilizes the p-type silicon substrate as the hole transporting layer. A microcontact printing technique was introduced to pattern self-assembled CdSe/ZnS QD films, which allowed creation of an LED with well-defined geometry suitable for monolithic integration on silicon substrates. Our QD-LED consists of multi-layers of inorganic materials: a combination of Au (thickness: 5 nm) and Ag (12 nm) as the cathode, a ZnO:SnO2 mixture (ratio 3:1, 40 nm) as the electron transporting layer, CdSe/ZnS QDs as the light emission layer, 1 nm SiO2 as an energy barrier layer, and p-type silicon as the hole transporting layer. These printed QD-LEDs are capable of multi-color emission peaked at wavelengths of 576 nm, 598 nm, and 622 nm, corresponding to sizes of the embedded QDs with the diameters of 8.4 nm, 9.0 nm, and 9.8 nm respectively. The optimal thickness of the quantum dot layers needed for light emission is characterized using atomic force microscopy: for 8.4 nm QDs, the value is 33 nm (± 5 nm) or ~4 ML (monolayers). Larger turn on voltages were measured (2, 4 and 5 V) for the smaller average particle diameters (9.8 nm, 9.0 nm and 8.4 nm, respectively). The mixture ratio of Zn and Sn was optimized (40% Zn and 25% Sn) to maintain proper hole-electron recombination at the QD layer and avoid the yellowish-white emission from ZnO/SnO2.

  18. Charge transport and device physics of layered-crystalline organic semiconductors (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Tatsuo

    2015-10-01

    Here we present and discuss our recent investigations into the understanding of microscopic charge transport, novel film processing technologies, and a development of layered-crystalline organic semiconductors for high performance OTFTs. We first discuss the microscopic charge transport in the OTFTs, as investigated by field-induced electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The technique can detect signals due to tiny amount of field-induced carriers, accumulated at the semiconductor-insulator interfaces. Following aspects are presented and discussed; 1) Carrier motion within the crystalline domains can be understood in terms of the trap-and-release transport, 2) charge trap states are spatially extended over several sites depending on the trap levels, and 3) the intra- and inter-domain transport can be discriminated by anisotropic electron spin resonance measurements. Next we discuss novel print production technologies for organic semiconductors showing high layered crystallinity. The concept of "printed electronics" is now regarded as a realistic paradigm to manufacture light-weight, thin, and impact-resistant electronics devices, although production of highly crystalline semiconductor films may be incompatible with conventional printing process. We here present printing techniques for manufacturing high performance OTFTs; 1) double-shot inkjet printing for small-molecule-based semiconductors, and 2) push-coating for semiconducting polymers. We demonstrate that both processes are useful to manufacture high quality semiconductor layers with the high layered crystallinity.

  19. Quantitative characterization of water transport and flooding in the diffusion layers of polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalegno, A.; Colombo, L.; Galbiati, S.; Marchesi, R.

    Optimization of water management in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) and in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) is a very important factor for the achievement of high performances and long lifetime. A good hydration of the electrolyte membrane is essential for high proton conductivity; on the contrary water in excess may lead to electrode flooding and severe reduction in performances. Many studies on water transport across the gas diffusion layer (GDL) have been carried out to improve these components; anyway efforts in this field are affected by lack of effective experimental methods. The present work reports an experimental investigation with the purpose to determine the global coefficient of water transport across different diffusion layers under real operating conditions. An appropriate and accurate experimental apparatus has been designed and built to test the single GDL under a wide range of operating conditions. Data analysis has allowed quantification of both the water vapor transport across different diffusion layers, and the effects of micro-porous layers; furthermore flooding onset and its consequences on the mass transport coefficient have been characterized by means of suitably defined parameters.

  20. Interrelated structures of the transport shock and collisional relaxation layer in a multitemperature, multilevel ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinolo, A. R.; Clarke, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    The gas dynamic structures of the transport shock and the downstream collisional relaxation layer are evaluated for partially ionized monatomic gases. Elastic and inelastic collisional nonequilibrium effects are taken into consideration. In the microscopic model of the atom, three electronic levels are accounted for. By using an asymptotic technique, the shock morphology is found on a continuum flow basis. This procedure gives two distinct layers in which the nonequilibrium effects to be considered are different. A transport shock appears as the inner solution to an outer collisional relaxation layer. The results show four main interesting points: (1) on structuring the transport shock, ionization and excitation rates must be included in the formulation, since the flow is not frozen with respect to the population of the different electronic levels; (2) an electron temperature precursor appears at the beginning of the transport shock; (3) the collisional layer is rationally reduced to quadrature for special initial conditions, which (4) are obtained from new Rankine-Hugoniot relations for the inner shock.

  1. Water Transport Characteristics of Gas Diffusion Layer in a PEM Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Damle, Ashok S; Cole, J Vernon

    2008-11-01

    A presentation addressing the following: Water transport in PEM Fuel Cells - a DoE Project 1. Gas Diffusion Layer--Role and Characteristics 2. Capillary Pressure Determinations of GDL Media 3. Gas Permeability Measurements of GDL Media 4. Conclusions and Future Activities

  2. Analytical solution for the advection-dispersion transport equation in layered media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The advection-dispersion transport equation with first-order decay was solved analytically for multi-layered media using the classic integral transform technique (CITT). The solution procedure used an associated non-self-adjoint advection-diffusion eigenvalue problem that had the same form and coef...

  3. Semianalytical solutions of radioactive or reactive transport invariably-fractured layered media: 1. Solutes

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George J.

    2001-10-10

    In this paper, semianalytical solutions are developed for the problem of transport of radioactive or reactive solute tracers through a layered system of heterogeneous fractured media with misaligned fractures. The tracer transport equations in the non-flowing matrix account for (a) diffusion, (b) surface diffusion, (c) mass transfer between the mobile and immobile water fractions, (d) linear kinetic or equilibrium physical, chemical, or combined solute sorption or colloid filtration, and (e) radioactive decay or first-order chemical reactions. The tracer-transport equations in the fractures account for the same processes, in addition to advection and hydrodynamic dispersion. Any number of radioactive decay daughter products (or products of a linear, first-order reaction chain) can be tracked. The solutions, which are analytical in the Laplace space, are numerically inverted to provide the solution in time and can accommodate any number of fractured and/or porous layers. The solutions are verified using analytical solutions for limiting cases of solute and colloid transport through fractured and porous media. The effect of important parameters on the transport of {sup 3}H, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu (and its daughters) is investigated in several test problems involving layered geological systems of varying complexity.

  4. Semianalytical Solutions of Radioactive or Reactive Transport in Variably-Fractured Layered Media: 1. Solutes

    SciTech Connect

    George J. Moridis

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, semianalytical solutions are developed for the problem of transport of radioactive or reactive solute tracers through a layered system of heterogeneous fractured media with misaligned fractures. The tracer transport equations in the non-flowing matrix account for (a) diffusion, (b) surface diffusion, (c) mass transfer between the mobile and immobile water fractions, (d) linear kinetic or equilibrium physical, chemical, or combined solute sorption or colloid filtration, and (e) radioactive decay or first-order chemical reactions. The tracer-transport equations in the fractures account for the same processes, in addition to advection and hydrodynamic dispersion. Any number of radioactive decay daughter products (or products of a linear, first-order reaction chain) can be tracked. The solutions, which are analytical in the Laplace space, are numerically inverted to provide the solution in time and can accommodate any number of fractured and/or porous layers. The solutions are verified using analytical solutions for limiting cases of solute and colloid transport through fractured and porous media. The effect of important parameters on the transport of {sup 3}H, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu (and its daughters) is investigated in several test problems involving layered geological systems of varying complexity.

  5. Interrelated structures of the transport shock and collisional relaxation layer in a multitemperature, multilevel ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinolo, A. R.; Clarke, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    The gas dynamic structures of the transport shock and the downstream collisional relaxation layer are evaluated for partially ionized monatomic gases. Elastic and inelastic collisional nonequilibrium effects are taken into consideration. Three electronic levels are accounted for in the microscopic model of the atom. Nonequilibrium processes with respect to population of levels and species plus temperature are considered. By using an asymptotic technique the shock morphology is found on a continuum flow basis. The asymptotic procedure gives two distinct layers in which the nonequilibrium effects to be considered are different. A transport shock appears as the inner solution to an outer collisional relaxation layer in which the gas reaches local equilibrium. A family of numerical examples is displayed for different flow regimes. Argon and helium models are used in these examples.

  6. High performance of inverted polymer solar cells with cobalt oxide as hole-transporting layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangdong; Peng, Qing; Zhu, Weiguo; Lei, Gangtie

    2015-05-01

    Cobalt oxide (II, III) (CoOx) was inserted as efficient hole-transporting interlayer between the active layer and top electrode in inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs) with titanium (diisopropoxide) bis(2, 4-pentanedionate) (TIPD) as an electron selective layer. The work function of CoOx was measured by Kelvin probe and the device performances with different thicknesses of cobalt oxide were studied. The device with CoOx exhibited a remarkable improvement in power conversion efficiency compared with that without CoOx, which indicated that CoOx efficiently prevented the recombination of charge carriers at the organic/top electrode interface. The performance improvement was attributed to the fact that the CoOx thin film can module the Schottky barrier and form an ohmic contact at the organic/metal interface, which makes it a promising hole-transporting layer.

  7. The boundary layers as the primary transport regions of the earth's magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, T. E.; Frank, L. A.; Huang, C. Y.

    1985-01-01

    A comprehensive survey of ISEE and IMP LEPEDEA plasma measurements in the earth's magnetotail reveals that the magnetospheric boundary layer and the plasma sheet boundary layer are the primary transport regions there. These plasma measurements also reveal various components of the plasma sheet, including the central plasma sheet and plasma sheet boundary layer. A significant new result reported here is that of cold- and hot-plasma components that are spatially co-present within the central plasma sheet. Such plasma components cannot be explained merely by temporal variations in spectra involving the entire plasma sheet. Contributions to a low temperature component of the plasma sheet enter directly from the boundary layer located along the magnetotail flanks. Field-aligned flows predominate within the plasma sheet boundary layer which is almost always present and is located near the high- and low-latitude border of the plasma sheet. The plasma sheet boundary layer comprises highly anisotropic ion distributions, including counter-streaming ion beams, that evolve into the hot, isotropic component of the plasma sheet. Tailward acceleration regions generate these ion beams with plasma input from the magnetospheric boundary layer. Antisunward-flowing ion beams, at E/q less than 1 kV and of ionospheric composition, are frequently observed in the plasma sheet boundary layer and in tail lobes. These ion beams are likely accelerated at low altitude over the polar cap and especially along auroral field lines.

  8. Charge Transport in Field-Effect Transistors based on Layered Materials and their Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jatinder

    In the quest for energy efficiency and device miniaturization, the research in using atomically thin materials for device applications is gaining momentum. The electronic network in layered materials is different from 3D counterparts. It is due to the interlayer couplings and density of states because of their 2D nature. Therefore, understanding the charge transport in layered materials is fundamental to explore the vast opportunities these ultra-thin materials offer. Hence, the challenges targeted in the thesis are: (1) understanding the charge transport in layered materials based on electronic network of quantum and oxide capacitances, (2) studying thickness dependence, ranging from monolayer to bulk, of full range-characteristics of field-effect transistor (FET) based on layered materials, (3) investigating the total interface trap charges to achieve the ultimate subthreshold slope (SS) theoretically possible in FETs, (4) understanding the effect of the channel length on the performance of layered materials, (5) understanding the effect of substrate on performance of the TMDC FETs and studying if the interface of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs)/hexagonalboron nitride (h-BN) can have less enough trap charges to observe ambipolar behavior, (6) Exploring optoelectronic properties in 2D heterostructures that includes understanding graphene/WS2 heterostructure and its optoelectronic applications by creating a p-n junction at the interface. The quality of materials and the interface are the issues for observing and extracting clean physics out of these layered materials and heterostructures. In this dissertation, we realized the use of quantum capacitance in layered materials, substrate effects and carrier transport in heterostructure.

  9. Comparative study of hole transport in polyspirobifluorene polymers measured by the charge-generation layer time-of-flight technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laquai, Frédéric; Wegner, Gerhard; Im, Chan; Bässler, Heinz; Heun, Susanne

    2006-01-01

    Hole transport in a polyspirobifluorene homopolymer and a statistical polyspirobifluorene-triarylamine copolymer has been studied in detail employing the charge-generation layer time-of-flight (TOF) technique over a wide range of electric fields and temperatures. Both materials exhibit nondispersive TOF signals after injection of a sheet of charge carriers from a thin (10 nm) perylene-diimide charge-carrier generation layer into a relatively thick (d>1 μm) polymer film. Results were analyzed within the framework of the Gaussian disorder model and the charge transport parameters were extracted for both polymers. The zero-field hole mobility of the spirohomopolymer was found to be on the order of 10-6 cm2/V s, whereas the copolymer showed a considerably lower hole mobility of 6×10-8 cm2/V s. The width of the density of states σ was determined to be 86 meV for the homopolymer and 107 meV for the copolymer. The latter polymer also showed an increased positional disorder due to the statistically incorporated triarylamine units.

  10. Thermal transport across few-layer boron nitride encased by silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yuxiang; Jiang, Jiechao; Meletis, Efstathios; Dumitric, Traian

    2015-07-01

    Two dimensional hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) attracted attention for use in applications. Using equilibrium molecular dynamics, we examine the phonon transport in few-layer h-BN encased by silica (SiO2). We report large interfacial thermal resistances, of about 2.2 × 10-8 m2 K W-1, which are not sensitive to the number of h-BN layers or the SiO2 crystallinity. The h-BN/SiO2 superlattices exhibit ultra-low thermal conductivities across layers, as low as 0.3 W/m K. They are structurally stable up to 2000 K while retaining the low-thermal conductivity attributes. Our simulations indicate that incorporation of h-BN layers and nanoparticles in silica could establish thermal barriers and heat spreading paths, useful for high performance coatings and electronic device applications.

  11. Design and application of carbon nanomaterials for photoactive and charge transport layers in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Sunghwan; Jun, Gwang Hoon; Jeon, Seokwoo; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2016-04-01

    Commercialization of organic solar cell (OSC) has faltered due to their low power conversion efficiency (PCE) compared to inorganic solar cell. Low electrical conductivity, low charge mobility, and short-range light absorption of most organic materials limit the PCE of OSCs. Carbon nanomaterials, especially carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphenes, are of great interest for use in OSC applications due to their high electrical conductivity, mobility, and unique optical properties for enhancing the performance of OSCs. In this review, recent progress toward the integration of carbon nanomaterials into OSCs is described. The role of carbon nanomaterials and strategies for their integration into various layers of OSCs, including the photoactive layer and charge transport layer, are discussed. Based on these, we also discuss the prospects of carbon nanomaterials for specific OSC layers to maximize the PCE.

  12. All-solution-processed inverted organic solar cell with a stacked hole-transporting layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wen-Kai; Su, Shui-Hsiang; Liu, Che-Chun; Yokoyama, Meiso

    2014-11-01

    In this study, inverted organic solar cells (IOSCs) have been fabricated and characterized. A sol-gel zinc oxide (ZnO) film is used as a hole-blocking layer (HBL). Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) are used as a hole-transporting layer (HTL). The HBL, active layer, and HTL films are fabricated by spin-coating technique. The anode is fabricated from Ag nanoparticles by drop titration using a Pasteur burette. Experimental results show that the PEDOT:PSS/CuPc stacked HTL provides a stepwise hole-transporting energy diagram configuration, which subsequently increases the charge carrier transporting capability and extracts holes from the active layer to the anode. The characteristics of the IOSCs were optimized and exhibited an open-circuit voltage (Voc), short-circuit current density (Jsc), fill factor (FF), and power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.53 V, 6.13 mA/cm2, 37.53%, and 1.24%, respectively, under simulated AM1.5G illumination of 100 mW/cm2. Hence, a solution process is feasible for fabricating low-cost and large-area solar energy devices.

  13. Epitaxial 1D electron transport layers for high-performance perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Gill Sang; Chung, Hyun Suk; Kim, Dong Hoe; Kim, Byeong Jo; Lee, Jin-Wook; Park, Nam-Gyu; Cho, In Sun; Lee, Jung-Kun; Lee, Sangwook; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate high-performance perovskite solar cells with excellent electron transport properties using a one-dimensional (1D) electron transport layer (ETL). The 1D array-based ETL is comprised of 1D SnO2 nanowires (NWs) array grown on a F:SnO2 transparent conducting oxide substrate and rutile TiO2 nanoshells epitaxially grown on the surface of the 1D SnO2 NWs. The optimized devices show more than 95% internal quantum yield at 750 nm, and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 14.2%. The high quantum yield is attributed to dramatically enhanced electron transport in the epitaxial TiO2 layer, compared to that in conventional nanoparticle-based mesoporous TiO2 (mp-TiO2) layers. In addition, the open space in the 1D array-based ETL increases the prevalence of uniform TiO2/perovskite junctions, leading to reproducible device performance with a high fill factor. This work offers a method to achieve reproducible, high-efficiency perovskite solar cells with high-speed electron transport. PMID:26324759

  14. Development of Layered Sediment Structure and its Effects on Pore Water Transport and Hyporheic Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Packman, Aaron I.; Marion, Andrea; Zaramella, Mattia; Chen, Cheng; Gaillard, Jean-François; Keane, Denis T.

    2008-04-15

    Hyporheic exchange is known to provide an important control on nutrient and contaminant fluxes across the stream-subsurface interface. Similar processes also mediate interfacial transport in other permeable sediments. Recent research has focused on understanding the mechanics of these exchange processes and improving estimation of exchange rates in natural systems. While the structure of sediment beds obviously influences pore water flow rates and patterns, little is known about the interplay of typical sedimentary structures, hyporheic exchange, and other transport processes in fluvial/alluvial sediments. Here we discuss several processes that contribute to local-scale sediment heterogeneity and present results that illustrate the interaction of overlying flow conditions, the development of sediment structure, pore water transport, and stream-subsurface exchange. Layered structures are shown to develop at several scales within sediment beds. Surface sampling is used to analyze the development of an armor layer in a sand-and-gravel bed, while innovative synchrotron-based X-ray microtomography is used to observe patterns of grain sorting within sand bedforms. We show that layered bed structures involving coarsening of the bed surface increase interfacial solute flux but produce an effective anisotropy that favors horizontal pore water transport while limiting vertical penetration.

  15. Charge transport studies of polymeric photovoltaic thin films with an electron blocking and trapping layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Harrison K. H.; Chan, Kevin K. H.; So, S. K.

    2012-06-01

    The transport properties of two photovoltaic polymers, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and poly(2,7-carbazole) derivative (PCDTBT), and their polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) are studied by space-charge-limited current (SCLC), dark-injection space-charge-limited current (DI-SCLC), and admittance spectroscopy(AS). For a nominally hole-only device, electrons leakage occurs. This results in a current larger than the theoretical SCLC and ill-defined DI-SCLC and AS signals. In order to prevent electron leakage, a hole-transporting but electron blocking/trapping thin layer is added between active layer and Au. The layer composed of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) doped into an amine-based small molecule. Using this interlayer, well-defined carrier transit time can be obtained for mobility extraction. With a suitable interlayer to suppress undesirable carrier injection and transport, these techniques should find broad applications in the transport characterization of narrow gap photovoltaic polymers and BHJ blends.

  16. Implementation of a convective atmospheric boundary layer scheme in a tropospheric chemistry transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.-Y.; Pyle, J. A.; Sanderson, M. G.; Bridgeman, C.

    1999-10-01

    A convective atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) scheme for the transport of trace gases in the lower troposphere has been implemented from the Community Climate Model, Version 2 [Hack et al., 1993] into a tropospheric chemistry transport model [Wang, 1998]. The atmospheric boundary layer scheme includes the calculation of atmospheric radiative transfer, surface energy balance, and land surface temperature and has a specified annual variation of sea surface temperature. The calculated diurnal variation of the height of the boundary layer is similar to the results of Troen and Mahrt [1986] and is in a good agreement with Holtslag and Boville [1993]. The modeled height of the boundary layer shows a seasonal shift between land and sea in the Northern Hemisphere. In summer (June-July-August), the height of the boundary layer is deeper over land (850-2250 m) and shallower over sea (50-850 m); while in winter (December-January-February), it is shallower over land (50-850 m) and deeper over sea (850-2850 m). The coupled ABL-chemical transport model is verified against measurements of radon 222 and methane. Comparison of the coupled model with a non-ABL model indicates significant differences between these model simulations and a better agreement between the coupled model and measurements. There is a significant effect on the trace gas distribution when the ABL model is compared with the non-ABL schemes. For example, the ABL scheme shows more O3 transported from the middle troposphere down to the surface, while more CO is pumped up from the surface into the middle troposphere. The seasonal cycle of modeled CH4 is significantly improved with the inclusion of the new ABL scheme, especially in regions which are not remote from methane sources.

  17. Effect of benthic boundary layer transport on the productivity of Mono Lake, California

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Louise C; Jellison, Robert; Imberger, Jörg; Melack, John M

    2008-01-01

    The significance of the transport of nutrient-rich hypolimnetic water via the benthic boundary layer (BBL) to the productivity of Mono Lake was studied using a coupled hydrodynamic and ecological model validated against field data. The coupled model enabled us to differentiate between the role of biotic components and hydrodynamic forcing on the internal recycling of nutrients necessary to sustain primary productivity. A 4-year period (1991–1994) was simulated in which recycled nutrients from zooplankton excretion and bacterially-mediated mineralization exceeded sediment fluxes as the dominant source for primary productivity. Model outputs indicated that BBL transport was responsible for a 53% increase in the flux of hypolimnetic ammonium to the photic zone during stratification with an increase in primary production of 6% and secondary production of 5%. Although the estimated impact of BBL transport on the productivity of Mono Lake was not large, significant nutrient fluxes were simulated during periods when BBL transport was most active. PMID:18710583

  18. Quantum transport measurement of few-layer WTe2 field effect devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianhao; Liu, Xin; Tian, Shibing; Zhang, Chenglong; Jia, Shuang

    2015-03-01

    We have performed systematic quantum transport measurement on field effect devices fabricated from few-layer WTe2 single crystals. We found that the magnetoresistance of few-layer WTe2 could be very different from that of bulk samples, which may arise from the imbalance of electron and hole carriers in the samples. We shall discuss our findings in more details in light of recent progress in our experiment. This work is supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11374021 and 11327406); by China Ministry of Science and Technology under Contract # 2014CB920900 and 2013CB921900; and by the Young 1000-Talent Program of China.

  19. Parameterizations for convective transport in various cloud-topped boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikma, M.; Ouwersloot, H. G.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the representation of convective transport of atmospheric compounds by boundary layer clouds. We focus on three key parameterizations that, when combined, express this transport: the area fraction of transporting clouds, the upward velocity in the cloud cores and the chemical concentrations at cloud base. The first two parameterizations combined represent the kinematic mass flux by clouds. To investigate the key parameterizations under a wide range of conditions, we use large-eddy simulation model data for 10 meteorological situations, characterized by either shallow cumulus or stratocumulus clouds. The parameterizations have not been previously tested with such large data sets. In the analysis, we show that the parameterization of the area fraction of clouds currently used in mixed-layer models is affected by boundary layer dynamics. Therefore, we (i) simplify the independent variable used for this parameterization, Q1, by considering the variability in moisture rather than in the saturation deficit and update the parameters in the parameterization to account for this simplification. We (ii) next demonstrate that the independent variable has to be evaluated locally to capture cloud presence. Furthermore, we (iii) show that the area fraction of transporting clouds is not represented by the parameterization for the total cloud area fraction, as is currently assumed in literature. To capture cloud transport, a novel active cloud area fraction parameterization is proposed. Subsequently, the scaling of the upward velocity in cloud cores by the Deardorff convective velocity scale and the parameterization for the concentration of atmospheric reactants at cloud base from literature are verified and improved by analysing six shallow cumulus cases. For the latter, we additionally discuss how the parameterization is affected by wind conditions. This study contributes to a more accurate estimation of convective transport, which occurs at sub-grid scales.

  20. A way for studying the impact of PEDOT:PSS interface layer on carrier transport in PCDTBT:PC71BM bulk hetero junction solar cells by electric field induced optical second harmonic generation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Zubair; Abdullah, Shahino Mah; Taguchi, Dai; Sulaiman, Khaulah; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2015-04-01

    Electric-field-induced optical second-harmonic generation (EFISHG) measurement was employed to study the impact of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) interface layer on the carrier transport mechanism of the PCDTBT:PC71BM bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells (OSCs). We revealed that the electric fields in the PCDTBT and PC71BM were allowed to be measured individually by choosing fundamental laser wavelengths of 1000 nm and 1060 nm, respectively, in dark and under illumination. The results showed that the direction of the internal electric fields in the PCDTBT:PC71BM BHJ layer is reversed by introducing the PEDOT:PSS layer, and this results in longer electron transport time in the BHJ layer. We conclude that TR-EFISHG can be used as a novel way for studying the impact of interfacial layer on the transport of electrons and holes in the bulk-heterojunction OSCs.

  1. Sky-Blue Phosphorescent OLEDs with 34.1% External Quantum Efficiency Using a Low Refractive Index Electron Transporting Layer.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Moon, Chang-Ki; Huh, Jin-Suk; Sim, Bomi; Kim, Jang-Joo

    2016-06-01

    Blue-phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with 34.1% external quantum efficiency (EQE) and 79.6 lm W(-1) are demonstrated using a hole-transporting layer and electron-transporting layer with low refractive index values. Using optical simulations, it is predicted that outcoupling efficiencies with EQEs > 60% can be achieved if organic layers with a refractive index of 1.5 are used for OLEDs. PMID:27060851

  2. Effects of impurity transport and melt layer motion to the tungsten wall erosion during anomaly events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibano, K.; Tsutsui, T.; Lang, T. L.; Togo, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Developing designs of future fusion devices, safety and soundness of the rector at anomaly events must be ensured. A computational approach is being taken by developing a homegrown integrated reactor simulation code and analyzing a loss-of-cooling-gas-puff accident (LCGA). This code currently includes simple plasma, edge, and wall models. In this study, models for the tungsten transport and melt layer motion was added and used for the analysis. It was found that this accident results significant erosion of the wall while impurities from the wall would contribute the radiation cooling for the intense heat flux. However, these effects strongly depend on an uncertain parameter of the tungsten transport as well as the tungsten melt layer motion. Thus, parametric survey for these uncertain quantities were taken and discussed.

  3. Efficient organic solar cells using copper(I) iodide (CuI) hole transport layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ying; Yaacobi-Gross, Nir; Perumal, Ajay K.; Faber, Hendrik A.; Vourlias, George; Patsalas, Panos A.; Bradley, Donal D. C.; He, Zhiqun; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.

    2015-06-01

    We report the fabrication of high power conversion efficiency (PCE) polymer/fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) photovoltaic cells using solution-processed Copper (I) Iodide (CuI) as hole transport layer (HTL). Our devices exhibit a PCE value of ˜5.5% which is equivalent to that obtained for control devices based on the commonly used conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): polystyrenesulfonate as HTL. Inverted cells with PCE >3% were also demonstrated using solution-processed metal oxide electron transport layers, with a CuI HTL evaporated on top of the BHJ. The high optical transparency and suitable energetics of CuI make it attractive for application in a range of inexpensive large-area optoelectronic devices.

  4. Efficient organic solar cells using copper(I) iodide (CuI) hole transport layers

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Ying; Yaacobi-Gross, Nir; Perumal, Ajay K.; Faber, Hendrik A.; Bradley, Donal D. C.; Anthopoulos, Thomas D. E-mail: t.anthopoulos@imperial.ac.uk; Vourlias, George; Patsalas, Panos A.; He, Zhiqun E-mail: t.anthopoulos@imperial.ac.uk

    2015-06-15

    We report the fabrication of high power conversion efficiency (PCE) polymer/fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) photovoltaic cells using solution-processed Copper (I) Iodide (CuI) as hole transport layer (HTL). Our devices exhibit a PCE value of ∼5.5% which is equivalent to that obtained for control devices based on the commonly used conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): polystyrenesulfonate as HTL. Inverted cells with PCE >3% were also demonstrated using solution-processed metal oxide electron transport layers, with a CuI HTL evaporated on top of the BHJ. The high optical transparency and suitable energetics of CuI make it attractive for application in a range of inexpensive large-area optoelectronic devices.

  5. Electronic band gaps and transport properties in periodically alternating mono- and bi-layer graphene superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiong; Huang, Wenjun; Ma, Tianxing; Wang, Li-Gang; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the electronic band structure and transport properties of periodically alternating mono- and bi-layer graphene superlattices (MBLG SLs). In such MBLG SLs, there exists a zero-averaged wave vector (zero-\\overline{k} ) gap that is insensitive to the lattice constant. This zero-\\overline{k} gap can be controlled by changing both the ratio of the potential widths and the interlayer coupling coefficient of the bilayer graphene. We also show that there exist extra Dirac points; the conditions for these extra Dirac points are presented analytically. Lastly, we demonstrate that the electronic transport properties and the energy gap of the first two bands in MBLG SLs are tunable through adjustment of the interlayer coupling and the width ratio of the periodic mono- and bi-layer graphene.

  6. Electronic band gaps and transport properties in periodically alternating mono- and bi-layer graphene superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiong; Huang, Wenjun; Ma, Tianxing; Wang, Li-Gang; Lin, Hai-Qing

    We investigated electronic band structure and transport properties of periodically alternating mono- and bi-layer graphene superlattices (MBLG SLs). In such MBLG SLs, there exists the zero-averaged wave vector (zero- k) gap, which is insensitive to the lattice constant, and this zero- k gap can be controlled via changing both the ratio of potentials' widths and the interlayer coupling coefficient of bilayer graphene. It is also found that there exist the extra Dirac points and their conditions are analytically presented. Lastly, it shows that the electronic transport properties and the energy gap (Eg) of the first two bands in MBLG SLs are tunable by the interlayer coupling and the widths' ratio of the periodic mono- and bi-layer graphene.

  7. Doped hole transport layer for efficiency enhancement in planar heterojunction organolead trihalide perovskite solar cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Qi; Bi, Cheng; Huang, Jinsong

    2015-05-06

    We demonstrated the efficiency of a solution-processed planar heterojunction organometallic trihalide perovskite solar cell can be increased to 17.5% through doping the hole transporting layer for reducing the resistivity. Doped Poly(triaryl amine) (PTAA) by 2,3,5,6-Tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-Tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4-TCNQ) reduced device series resistance by three-folds, increasing the device fill factor to 74%, open circuit voltage to 1.09 V without sacrificing the short circuit current. As a result, this study reveals that the high resistivity of currently broadly applied polymer hole transport layer limits the device efficiency, and points a new direction to improve the device efficiency.

  8. The impacts of moisture transport on drifting snow sublimation in the saltation layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ning; Dai, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Drifting snow sublimation (DSS) is an important physical process related to moisture and heat transfer that happens in the atmospheric boundary layer, which is of glaciological and hydrological importance. It is also essential in order to understand the mass balance of the Antarctic ice sheets and the global climate system. Previous studies mainly focused on the DSS of suspended snow and ignored that in the saltation layer. Here, a drifting snow model combined with balance equations for heat and moisture is established to simulate the physical DSS process in the saltation layer. The simulated results show that DSS can strongly increase humidity and cooling effects, which in turn can significantly reduce DSS in the saltation layer. However, effective moisture transport can dramatically weaken the feedback effects. Due to moisture advection, DSS rate in the saltation layer can be several orders of magnitude greater than that of the suspended particles. Thus, DSS in the saltation layer has an important influence on the distribution and mass-energy balance of snow cover.

  9. Transport of Water Vapor and Ozone to the Northern Sacramento Valley Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conley, S. A.; Faloona, I. C.; Cooper, O. R.

    2011-12-01

    Ground based studies of atmospheric composition typically suffer from incomplete constraints on the influence of vertical transport on the surface air. While horizontal transport can be explored by multiple surface stations, and chemical processing by the judicious addition of surface measurements, vertical transport is often controlled by the entrainment flux of compounds at the opposite interface: between the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and the lower free troposphere (FT.) This entrainment flux is most significantly determined by the difference in concentration between the two layers, a gradient that is nearly always out of reach of traditional measurement techniques, or subject to very sporadic investigation by aircraft. In this work we examine the extent to which surface layer air in the Sacramento valley originated from higher altitudes. Given a strong vertical gradient of ozone and water vapor, the extent to which free tropospheric air is mixed down into the PBL will impact the surface layer mixing ratios of both compounds. Here we use sonde, surface, and radar wind profiler data from several Calnex sites in the Northern Sacramento Valley to estimate the advection and temporal change of water vapor and ozone in the ABL. Performing an ABL water budget analysis with estimates of evapotranspiration from the CIMIS (California Irrigation Management Information System) network, provides the vertical flux of water vapor at the top of the boundary layer and yields an average entrainment velocity for the region. Using the entrainment velocity so derived with the ozone vertical gradient measured during Calnex, we are able to solve for the net photochemical production in a region that frequently exceeds EPA standards. We work towards combining continuous measurements of ozone from an upwind mountain site in Mendocino County (Cahto Peak) along with periodic sampling of ozone profiles in the valley and offshore by aircraft to build a comprehensive picture of the

  10. Buoyancy-driven flow in a peat moss layer as a mechanism for solute transport

    PubMed Central

    Rappoldt, Cornelis; Pieters, Gert-Jan J. M.; Adema, Erwin B.; Baaijens, Gerrit J.; Grootjans, Ab P.; van Duijn, Cornelis J.

    2003-01-01

    Transport of nutrients, CO2, methane, and oxygen plays an important ecological role at the surface of wetland ecosystems. A possibly important transport mechanism in a water-saturated peat moss layer (usually Sphagnum cuspidatum) is nocturnal buoyancy flow, the downward flow of relatively cold surface water, and the upward flow of warm water induced by nocturnal cooling. Mathematical stability analysis showed that buoyancy flow occurs in a cooling porous layer if the system's Rayleigh number (Ra) exceeds 25. For a temperature difference of 10 K between day and night, a typical Ra value for a peat moss layer is 80, which leads to quickly developing buoyancy cells. Numerical simulation demonstrated that fluid flow leads to a considerable mixing of water. Temperature measurements in a cylindrical peat sample of 50-cm height and 35-cm diameter were in agreement with the theoretical results. The nocturnal flow and the associated mixing of the water represent a mechanism for solute transport in water-saturated parts of peat land and in other types of terrestrializing vegetation. This mechanism may be particularly important in continental wetlands, where Ra values in summer are often much larger than the threshold for fluid flow. PMID:14657381

  11. Nickel Oxide as an Inorganic Hole Transport Layer in Organic Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Brian; Widjonarko, N. Edwin; Berry, Joseph J.; Shaheen, Sean E.; Ginley, David S.; Olson, Dana C.

    2009-10-01

    This work explores the use of nickel oxide as a hole transport layer in organic photovoltaics (OPV). The purpose of the hole transport layer (HTL) is to provide an energetic barrier to electrons at the anode of the OPV device, while facilitating extraction of holes. At present, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) is commonly used in this layer of the device, but it suffers from inherent problems in phase separation of the PEDOT and PSS components leading to non-uniform conductivity, incompatibility with various transparent conducting oxides due to its acidity, and high rate of water uptake that can accelerate degradation of interfaces and surrounding layers. Inorganic metal oxides such as nickel oxide present a potential solution to these problems. Using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to deposit nickel oxide films, we show OPV device performance to be tunable by varying deposition parameters. Parameters explored include oxygen partial pressure during PLD, substrate temperature, film thickness, and post PLD surface treatments. These tune physical properties of the film such as work function and conductivity, which were measured directly, and in device performance.

  12. Diagnosis of energy transport in iron buried layer targets using an extreme ultraviolet laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shahzad, M.; Culfa, O.; Rossall, A. K.; Tallents, G. J.; Wilson, L. A.; Guilbaud, O.; Kazamias, S.; Delmas, O.; Demailly, J.; Maitrallain, A.; Pittman, M.; Baynard, E.; Farjardo, M.

    2015-02-15

    We demonstrate the use of extreme ultra-violet (EUV) laboratory lasers in probing energy transport in laser irradiated solid targets. EUV transmission through targets containing a thin layer of iron (50 nm) encased in plastic (CH) after irradiation by a short pulse (35 fs) laser focussed to irradiances 3 × 10{sup 16} Wcm{sup −2} is measured. Heating of the iron layer gives rise to a rapid decrease in EUV opacity and an increase in the transmission of the 13.9 nm laser radiation as the iron ionizes to Fe{sup 5+} and above where the ion ionisation energy is greater than the EUV probe photon energy (89 eV). A one dimensional hydrodynamic fluid code HYADES has been used to simulate the temporal variation in EUV transmission (wavelength 13.9 nm) using IMP opacity values for the iron layer and the simulated transmissions are compared to measured transmission values. When a deliberate pre-pulse is used to preform an expanding plastic plasma, it is found that radiation is important in the heating of the iron layer while for pre-pulse free irradiation, radiation transport is not significant.

  13. Remote monitoring of aerosol layers over Sofia during Sahara dust transport episode (April, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, Dimitar; Grigorov, Ivan; Deleva, Atanaska; Kolev, Nikolay; Peshev, Zahari; Kolarov, Georgi; Donev, Evgeni; Ivanov, Danko

    2013-03-01

    In this work we present results of lidar remote sensing of aerosol layers in the atmosphere above Sofia during an episode of Sahara dust transport, 02-07 April, 2012. The investigations were made using two lidar systems, one equipped with a CuBr-vapor laser, emitting at wavelength 510.6 nm, and a second one - with Nd:YAG laser, at wavelengths 1064 nm and 532 nm. The results of lidar measurements are presented in terms of vertical atmospheric backscatter coefficient profiles and color maps of the aerosol stratification evolution. The involved into discussions ceilometer data (CHM 15k ceilometer) and satellite data from CALIPSO lidar, enhance the synergy of observations. Conclusion about atmospheric aerosol's origin was made upon analyses of the information of weather-forecast maps provided by the Forecast system of Barcelona Supercomputing Centre, which are accessible via Internet. Additional information was provided by calculations of the backward air mass trajectories, using online software of NOAA about HYSPLIT model. The comparison between the data from the two lidars and the ceilometer showed similar behavior of aerosol layers development in the atmosphere above Sofia. All information about aerosol layers origin, their altitude above ground, persistence during lidar observations, confirmed the conclusion of observation of a long-distance Sahara dust transport beyond Balkans and Sofia. An interesting completion of CALIPSO lidar and ground based lidars results of measurement is presented in case of thick opaque cloud layer in the atmosphere, which slices the path of lidar sensing in both directions.

  14. A nano-grid structure made of perovskite SrTiO3 nanowires for efficient electron transport layers in inverted polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong Won; Suh, Yo-Han; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Kim, Yong Seok; Kim, Won Bae

    2015-02-01

    A nano-grid structure of perovskite SrTiO3 NWs is developed for a novel electron transport layer in inverted polymer solar cells. Due to the excellent charge transporting properties of the SrTiO3 nano-grid structure, the device employing this nanostructure showed ~32% enhanced photovoltaic performance, compared to the solar cell using a TiO2 thin film.A nano-grid structure of perovskite SrTiO3 NWs is developed for a novel electron transport layer in inverted polymer solar cells. Due to the excellent charge transporting properties of the SrTiO3 nano-grid structure, the device employing this nanostructure showed ~32% enhanced photovoltaic performance, compared to the solar cell using a TiO2 thin film. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, HR-TEM images with EDX atomic ratio analysis, FE-SEM images, transmittance spectra and light absorbance spectra. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06720g

  15. Perovskite Solar Cells Employing Dopant-Free Organic Hole Transport Materials with Tunable Energy Levels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongsheng; Hong, Ziruo; Chen, Qi; Chen, Huajun; Chang, Wei-Hsuan; Yang, Yang Michael; Song, Tze-Bin; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-20

    Conjugated small-molecule hole-transport materials (HTMs) with tunable energy levels are designed and synthesized for efficient perovskite solar cells. A champion device with efficiency of 16.2% is demonstrated using a dopant-free DERDTS-TBDT HTM, while the DORDTS-DFBT-HTM-based device shows an inferior performance of 6.2% due to its low hole mobility and unmatched HOMO level with the valence band of perovskite film. PMID:26588665

  16. Electron transport mechanism of bathocuproine exciton blocking layer in organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeihyun; Park, Soohyung; Lee, Younjoo; Kim, Hyein; Shin, Dongguen; Jeong, Junkyeong; Jeong, Kwangho; Cho, Sang Wan; Lee, Hyunbok; Yi, Yeonjin

    2016-02-21

    Efficient exciton management is a key issue to improve the power conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaics (OPVs). It is well known that the insertion of an exciton blocking layer (ExBL) having a large band gap promotes the efficient dissociation of photogenerated excitons at the donor-acceptor interface. However, the large band gap induces an energy barrier which disrupts the charge transport. Therefore, building an adequate strategy based on the knowledge of the true charge transport mechanism is necessary. In this study, the true electron transport mechanism of a bathocuproine (BCP) ExBL in OPVs is comprehensively investigated by in situ ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, inverse photoemission spectroscopy, density functional theory calculation, and impedance spectroscopy. The chemical interaction between deposited Al and BCP induces new states within the band gap of BCP, so that electrons can transport through these new energy levels. Localized trap states are also formed upon the Al-BCP interaction. The activation energy of these traps is estimated with temperature-dependent conductance measurements to be 0.20 eV. The Al-BCP interaction induces both transport and trap levels in the energy gap of BCP and their interplay results in the electron transport observed. PMID:26821701

  17. Interface modified thermally stable hole transporting layer for efficient organic light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, Rakhi; Srivastava, Ritu Dagar, Janardan; Kamalasanan, M. N.; Mehta, D. S.

    2014-08-14

    Electrical transport in thermally stable 2, 7-bis [N, N-bis (4-methoxy-phenyl) amino]-9, 9-spirobifluorene (MeO-Spiro-TPD) thin films has been investigated as a function of temperature and organic layer thickness. ITO/MeO-Spiro-TPD interface was found to be injection limited and has been studied in detail to find barrier height for hole injection. The thickness of tetra-fluoro-tetracyano-quinodimethane thin films were optimized to be used as hole injection buffer layer which resulted in switching of charge transport mechanism from injection limited to space charge limited conduction above a critical thickness of 3 nm. Hole mobility has been measured using transient space charge limited conduction (SCLC), field dependent SCLC, and top contact transistor characteristics. The charge carrier transport in interface modified hole only devices was analysed using Gaussian disorder model. The thermal stability of MeO-Spiro-TPD has been investigated by atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction studies. The study indicates a thermally stable and highly efficient hole transport material for application in organic semiconductor based devices.

  18. Charge-transport anisotropy in black phosphorus: critical dependence on the number of layers.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Swastika; Pati, Swapan K

    2016-06-28

    Phosphorene is a promising candidate for modern electronics because of the anisotropy associated with high electron-hole mobility. Additionally, superior mechanical flexibility allows the strain-engineering of various properties including the transport of charge carriers in phosphorene. In this work, we have shown the criticality of the number of layers to dictate the transport properties of black phosphorus. Trilayer black phosphorus (TBP) has been proposed as an excellent anisotropic material, based on the transport parameters using Boltzmann transport formalisms coupled with density functional theory. The mobilities of both the electron and the hole are found to be higher along the zigzag direction (∼10(4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at 300 K) compared to the armchair direction (∼10(2) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)), resulting in the intrinsic directional anisotropy. Application of strain leads to additional electron-hole anisotropy with 10(3) fold higher mobility for the electron compared to the hole. Critical strain for maximum anisotropic response has also been determined. Whether the transport anisotropy is due to the spatial or charge-carrier has been determined through analyses of the scattering process of electrons and holes, and their recombination as well as relaxation dynamics. In this context, we have derived two descriptors (S and F(k)), which are general enough for any 2D or quasi-2D systems. Information on the scattering involving purely the carrier states also helps to understand the layer-dependent photoluminescence and electron (hole) relaxation in black phosphorus. Finally, we justify trilayer black phosphorus (TBP) as the material of interest with excellent transport properties. PMID:27257640

  19. Insight from ozone and water vapour on transport in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploeger, F.; Fueglistaler, S.; Grooß, J.-U.; Günther, G.; Konopka, P.; Liu, Y. S.; Müller, R.; Ravegnani, F.; Schiller, C.; Ulanovski, A.; Riese, M.

    2011-01-01

    We explore the potential of ozone observations to constrain transport processes in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), and contrast it with insights that can be obtained from water vapour. Global fields from Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) and in-situ observations are predicted using a backtrajectory approach that captures advection, instantaneous freeze-drying and photolytical ozone production. Two different representations of transport (kinematic and diabatic 3-month backtrajectories based on ERA-Interim data) are used to evaluate the sensitivity to differences in transport. Results show that mean profiles and seasonality of both tracers can be reasonably reconstructed. Water vapour predictions are similar for both transport representations, but predictions for ozone are systematically higher for kinematic transport. Compared to global HALOE observations, the diabatic model prediction underestimates the vertical ozone gradient. Comparison of the kinematic prediction with observations obtained during the tropical SCOUT-O3 campaign shows a large high bias above 390 K potential temperature. We show that ozone predictions and vertical dispersion of the trajectories are highly correlated, rendering ozone an interesting tracer for aspects of transport to which water vapour is not sensitive. We show that dispersion and mean upwelling have similar effects on ozone profiles, with slower upwelling and larger dispersion both leading to higher ozone concentrations. Analyses of tropical upwelling based on mean transport characteristics, and model validation have to take into account this ambiguity between tropical ozone production and in-mixing from the stratosphere. In turn, ozone provides constraints on transport in the TTL and lower stratosphere that cannot be obtained from water vapour.

  20. Epitaxial 1D electron transport layers for high-performance perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Gill Sang; Chung, Hyun Suk; Kim, Dong Hoe; Kim, Byeong Jo; Lee, Jin-Wook; Park, Nam-Gyu; Cho, In Sun; Lee, Jung-Kun; Lee, Sangwook; Jung, Hyun Suk

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate high-performance perovskite solar cells with excellent electron transport properties using a one-dimensional (1D) electron transport layer (ETL). The 1D array-based ETL is comprised of 1D SnO2 nanowires (NWs) array grown on a F:SnO2 transparent conducting oxide substrate and rutile TiO2 nanoshells epitaxially grown on the surface of the 1D SnO2 NWs. The optimized devices show more than 95% internal quantum yield at 750 nm, and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 14.2%. The high quantum yield is attributed to dramatically enhanced electron transport in the epitaxial TiO2 layer, compared to that in conventional nanoparticle-based mesoporous TiO2 (mp-TiO2) layers. In addition, the open space in the 1D array-based ETL increases the prevalence of uniform TiO2/perovskite junctions, leading to reproducible device performance with a high fill factor. This work offers a method to achieve reproducible, high-efficiency perovskite solar cells with high-speed electron transport.We demonstrate high-performance perovskite solar cells with excellent electron transport properties using a one-dimensional (1D) electron transport layer (ETL). The 1D array-based ETL is comprised of 1D SnO2 nanowires (NWs) array grown on a F:SnO2 transparent conducting oxide substrate and rutile TiO2 nanoshells epitaxially grown on the surface of the 1D SnO2 NWs. The optimized devices show more than 95% internal quantum yield at 750 nm, and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 14.2%. The high quantum yield is attributed to dramatically enhanced electron transport in the epitaxial TiO2 layer, compared to that in conventional nanoparticle-based mesoporous TiO2 (mp-TiO2) layers. In addition, the open space in the 1D array-based ETL increases the prevalence of uniform TiO2/perovskite junctions, leading to reproducible device performance with a high fill factor. This work offers a method to achieve reproducible, high-efficiency perovskite solar cells with high-speed electron transport

  1. Mesoscale imperfections in MoS2 atomic layers grown by a vapor transport technique.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingnan; Ghosh, Rudresh; Wu, Di; Ismach, Ariel; Ruoff, Rodney; Lai, Keji

    2014-08-13

    The success of isolating small flakes of atomically thin layers through mechanical exfoliation has triggered enormous research interest in graphene and other two-dimensional materials. For device applications, however, controlled large-area synthesis of highly crystalline monolayers with a low density of electronically active defects is imperative. Here, we demonstrate the electrical imaging of dendritic ad-layers and grain boundaries in monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) grown by a vapor transport technique using microwave impedance microscopy. The micrometer-sized precipitates in our films, which appear as a second layer of MoS2 in conventional height and optical measurements, show ∼ 2 orders of magnitude higher conductivity than that of the single layer. The zigzag grain boundaries, on the other hand, are shown to be more resistive than the crystalline grains, consistent with previous studies. Our ability to map the local electrical properties in a rapid and nondestructive manner is highly desirable for optimizing the growth process of large-scale MoS2 atomic layers. PMID:25019334

  2. Measurements and theory for transport layer structure in intense bed-load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraccarollo, L.; Capart, H.

    2012-04-01

    We focus on sediment laden flows driven by turbulent open-channel flows where the bed surface is fully mobilized and nonetheless the thickness of the bedload layer is conveniently smaller than the flow depth. This regime presents dynamic and kinematic features which persist in the range of applied Shields stress between about 0.3 and 3. Below the lower limit the moving grains do not develop significant stresses compared to the applied ones; above the upper limit, debris-flow type frictional contacts develop in a non negligible portion of the bedload layer. We report laboratory experiments in which, using high-speed cameras and a laser light sheet, detailed profiles of granular velocity and concentration have been measured. We checked that the transversal bed profile is flat and that the sidewall measurements are representative of the interior domain. The profiles provide new information on transport layer structure and its relation to the applied Shields stress. Contrary to expectations, we find that intense bed-load layers respond to changes in flow conditions by adjusting their granular concentration at the base. Two mechanisms account for the resulting behavior: stresses generated by immersed granular collisions, and equilibration by density stratification. Without parameter adjustment, the deduced constitutive relations capture the responses of velocity, concentration, and layer thickness in the above reported ten-fold increase Shields-stress range. Away from this intermediate range, in both directions, we show how the flow features rapidly change and the theoretical inferences decay.

  3. Effect of the endothelial glycocalyx layer on arterial LDL transport under normal and high pressure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Fan, Yubo; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2011-08-21

    To quantitatively investigate the role of the endothelial glycocalyx layer (EGL) in protecting the artery from excessive infiltration of atherogenic lipids such as low density lipoproteins (LDLs), a multilayer model with the EGL of an arterial segment was developed to numerically simulate the flow and the transport of LDLs under normal and high pressure. The transport parameters of the layers of the model were obtained from the hydrodynamic theory, the stochastic theory, and from the literature. The results showed that the increase in the thickness of the EGL could lead to a sharp drop in LDL accumulation in the intima. A partial damage to the EGL could compromise its barrier function, hence leading to enhanced infiltration/accumulation of LDLs within the wall of the arterial model. Without the EGL, hypertension could lead to a significantly enhanced LDL transport into the wall of the model. However, the intact EGL could protect the arterial wall from hypertension so that the LDL concentration in the intima layer was almost the same as that under normal pressure conditions. The results also showed that LDL concentration within the arterial wall increased with Φ (the fraction of leaky junctions) on the intima layer. The increase in LDL concentration with Φ was much more dramatic for the model without the EGL. For instance, without the EGL, a Φ of 0.0005 could lead LDL concentration within the arterial wall to be even higher than that predicted for the EGL intact model with a Φ of 0.002. In conclusion, an intact EGL with a sufficient thickness may act as a barrier to LDL infiltration into the arterial wall and has the potential to suppress the hypertension-driven hike of LDL infiltration/accumulation in the arterial wall. PMID:21645523

  4. The essential role of the poly(3-hexylthiophene) hole transport layer in perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Liu, Wenqiang; Tan, Furui; Gu, Yuzong

    2015-01-01

    The compact and oriented TiO2 films are prepared by a solvothermal method, and used as electron transporting layers in perovskite CH3NH3PbI3-xClx based solar cells incorporating poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) as the hole transporting material layer. The devices with P3HT exhibit a substantial increase in power conversion efficiency, open circuit voltage, and fill factor, compared with the reference device without P3HT. Impedance spectroscopy measurements demonstrate that the present P3HT layer decreases the internal resistance in solar cells and allows the interface between oriented TiO2 and CH3NH3PbI3-xClx to form more perfect in electronics. It is also found that the electron lifetime in the devices with P3HT is much longer than that of the device without P3HT. Thus, the charge collection efficiency of the device with P3HT is markedly enhanced, compared with the devices without P3HT. Analysis of the energy levels of the involved materials indicates that the P3HT film between the CH3NH3PbI3-xClx layer and the Au electrode provides a better energy level matching for efficient transporting holes to the anode. Meanwhile, the stability of such P3HT solar cells is enhanced because of the compact and oriented TiO2 film preventing the possible interaction between TiO2 and perovskite as time went on.

  5. Charge transport in organic multi-layer devices under electric and optical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, June Hyoung

    2007-12-01

    Charge transport in small organic molecules and conjugated conducting polymers under electric or optical fields is studied by using field effect transistors and photo-voltaic cells with multiple thin layers. With these devices, current under electric field, photo-current under optical field, and luminescence of optical materials are measured to characterize organic and polymeric materials. For electric transport studies, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped by polystyrenesulfonic acid is used, which is conductive with conductivity of approximately 25 S/cm. Despite their high conductance, field effect transistors based on the films are successfully built and characterized by monitoring modulations of drain current by gate voltage and IV characteristic curves. Due to very thin insulating layers of poly(vinylphenol), the transistors are relative fast under small gate voltage variation although heavy ions are involved in charge transport. In IV characteristic curves, saturation effects can be observed. Analysis using conventional field effect transistor model indicates high mobility of charge carriers, 10 cm2/V·sec, which is not consistent with the mobility of the conducting polymer. It is proposed that the effect of a small density of ions injected via polymer dielectric upon application of gate voltage and the ion compensation of key hopping sites accounts for the operation of the field effect transistors. For the studies of transport under optical field, photovoltaic cells with 3 different dendrons, which are efficient to harvest photo-excited electrons, are used. These dendrons consist of two electron-donors (tetraphenylporphyrin) and one electron-accepter (naphthalenediimide). Steady-state fluorescence measurements show that inter-molecular interaction is dominant in solid dendron film, although intra-molecular interaction is still present. Intra-molecular interaction is suggested by different fluorescence lifetimes between solutions of donor and dendrons. This

  6. Synthesis and characterization of polymer layers for control of fluid transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatansever, Fehime

    The level of wetting of fiber surface with liquids is an important characteristic of fibrous materials. It is related to fiber surface energy and the structure of the material. Surface energy can be changed by surface modification via the grafting methodologies that have been reported for introducing new and stable functionality to fibrous substrates without changing bulk properties. Present work is dedicated to synthesis and characterization of macromolecular layers grafted to fiber surface in order to achieve directional liquid transport for the modified fabric. Modification technique used here is based on formation of stable polymer layer on fabric surface using "grafting to" technique. Specifically, modification of fabric with wettability gradient for facilitated one way-liquid transport, and pointed modification of yarn-based channels on textile microfluidic device for directional liquid transport are reported here. First, fabric was activated with alkali (NaOH) solution. Second, poly (glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) was deposited on fabric as an anchoring layer. Finally, polymers of interest were grafted to surface through the epoxy functionality of PGMA. Effect of polymer grafting on the wicking property of the fabric has been evaluated by vertical wicking technique at the each step of surface modification. The results shows that wicking performance of fabric can be altered by grafting of a thin nanoscale polymeric film. For the facilitated liquid transport, the gradient polymer coating was created using "grafting to" technique and its dependence on the grafting temperature. Wettability gradient from hydrophilic to hydrophobic (change in water contact angle from 0 to 140 degrees on fabric) was achieved by grafting of polystyrene (PS) and polyacrylic acid (PAA) sequentially with concentration gradient. This study proposes that fabric with wettability gradient property can be used to transfer sweat from skin and support moisture management when it is used in a

  7. Sources and Transport of Aerosol above the Boundary Layer over the Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Greg; Corrigan, Craig; Ritchie, John; Pont, Veronique; Claeys, Marine; Sciare, Jean; Mallet, Marc; Dulac, François; Mihalopoulos, Nikos

    2015-04-01

    The Mediterranean Region has been identified as sensitive to changes in the hydrological cycle, which could affect the water resources for millions of people by the turn of the century. However, prior to recent observations, most climate models have not accounted for the impacts of aerosol in this region. Past airborne studies have shown that aerosol sources from Europe and Africa are often transported throughout the lower troposphere; yet, because of their complex vertical distribution, it is a challenge to capture the variability and quantify the contribution of these sources to the radiative budget and precipitation processes. The PAEROS ChArMEx Mountain Experiment (PACMEx) complemented the regional activities by collecting aerosol data from atop a mountain on the island of Corsica, France in order to assess boundary layer / free troposphere atmospheric processes. In June/July 2013, PACMEx instruments were deployed at 2000 m.asl near the center of Corsica, France to complement ground-based aerosol observations at 550 m.asl on the northern peninsula, as well as airborne measurements. Comparisons between the peninsula site and the mountain site show similar general trends in aerosol properties; yet, differences in aerosol properties reveal the myriad transport mechanisms over the Mediterranean Basin. Using aerosol physicochemical data coupled with back trajectory analysis, different sources have been identified including Saharan dust transport, residual dust mixed with sea salt, anthropogenic emissions from Western Europe, and a period of biomass burning from Eastern Europe. Each period exhibits distinct signatures in the aerosol related to transport processes above and below the boundary layer. In addition, the total aerosol concentrations at the mountain site revealed a strong diurnal cycling the between the atmospheric boundary layer and the free troposphere, which is typical of mountain-top observations. PACMEx was funded by the National Science Foundation

  8. Transport and Evolution of Aerosol Above/Below the Boundary Layer in the Western Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, G. C.; Corrigan, C.; Ritchie, J.; Pont, V.; Claeys, M.; Sciare, J.; Mallet, M.; Dulac, F.

    2014-12-01

    The Mediterranean Region has been identified as sensitive to changes in the hydrological cycle, which could affect the water resources for millions of people by the turn of the century. However, prior to recent observations, most climate models have not accounted for the impacts of aerosol in this region. Past airborne studies have shown that aerosol sources from Europe and Africa are often transported throughout the lower troposphere; yet, because of their complex vertical distribution, it is a challenge to capture the variability and quantify the contribution of these sources to the radiative budget and precipitation processes. The PAEROS ChArMEx Mountain Experiment (PACMEx) complemented the regional activities of the ChArMEx/ADRIMED summer 2013 campaign by collecting aerosol data from atop a mountain on the island of Corsica, France in order to assess boundary layer / free troposphere atmospheric processes. In June/July 2013, PACMEx instruments were deployed at 2000 m.asl near the center of Corsica to complement ground-based aerosol observations at 550 m.asl on the northern peninsula, as well as airborne measurements. Comparisons between the peninsula site and the mountain site show similar general trends in aerosol properties; yet, differences in aerosol properties reveal the myriad transport mechanisms over the Mediterranean Basin. Using aerosol physicochemical data coupled with back trajectory analysis, different sources have been identified including Saharan dust transport, residual dust mixed with sea salt, anthropogenic emissions from Western Europe, and a period of biomass burning from Eastern Europe. Each period exhibits distinct signatures in the aerosol related to transport processes above and below the boundary layer. In addition, the total aerosol concentrations at the mountain site revealed a strong diurnal cycling between the atmospheric boundary layer and the free troposphere, which is typical of mountain-top observations. PACMEx was funded by the

  9. Glassy Metal Alloy Nanofiber Anodes Employing Graphene Wrapping Layer: Toward Ultralong-Cycle-Life Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji-Won; Ryu, Won-Hee; Shin, Jungwoo; Park, Kyusung; Kim, Il-Doo

    2015-07-28

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) has been intensively explored as one of the most attractive candidates for high-capacity and long-cycle-life anode in Li-ion batteries (LIBs) primarily because of its reduced volume expansion characteristic (∼280%) compared to crystalline Si anodes (∼400%) after full Li(+) insertion. Here, we report one-dimensional (1-D) electrospun Si-based metallic glass alloy nanofibers (NFs) with an optimized composition of Si60Sn12Ce18Fe5Al3Ti2. On the basis of careful compositional tailoring of Si alloy NFs, we found that Ce plays the most important role as a glass former in the formation of the metallic glass alloy. Moreover, Si-based metallic glass alloy NFs were wrapped by reduced graphene oxide sheets (specifically Si60Sn12Ce18Fe5Al3Ti2 NFs@rGO), which can prevent the direct exposure of a-Si alloy NFs to the liquid electrolyte and stabilize the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layers on the surfaces of rGO sheets while facilitating electron transport. The metallic glass nanofibers exhibited superior electrochemical cell performance as an anode: (i) Si60Sn12Ce18Fe5Al3Ti2 NFs show a high specific capacity of 1017 mAh g(-1) up to 400 cycles at 0.05C with negligible capacity loss as well as superior cycling performance (nearly 99.9% capacity retention even after 2000 cycles at 0.5C); (ii) Si60Sn12Ce18Fe5Al3Ti2 NFs@rGO reveals outstanding rate behavior (569.77 mAh g(-1) after 2000 cycles at 0.5C and a reversible capacity of around 370 mAh g(-1) at 4C). We demonstrate the potential suitability of multicomponent a-Si alloy NFs as a long-cycling anode material. PMID:26028125

  10. ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT BY ACOUSTIC MODES GENERATED IN THE BOUNDARY LAYER. II. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Rafikov, Roman R.; Stone, James M.

    2013-06-10

    We perform global unstratified three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of an astrophysical boundary layer (BL)-an interface region between an accretion disk and a weakly magnetized accreting object such as a white dwarf-with the goal of understanding the effects of magnetic field on the BL. We use cylindrical coordinates with an isothermal equation of state and investigate a number of initial field geometries including toroidal, vertical, and vertical with zero net flux. Our initial setup consists of a Keplerian disk attached to a non-rotating star. In a previous work, we found that in hydrodynamical simulations, sound waves excited by shear in the BL were able to efficiently transport angular momentum and drive mass accretion onto the star. Here we confirm that in MHD simulations, waves serve as an efficient means of angular momentum transport in the vicinity of the BL, despite the magnetorotational instability (MRI) operating in the disk. In particular, the angular momentum current due to waves is at times larger than the angular momentum current due to MRI. Our results suggest that angular momentum transport in the BL and its vicinity is a global phenomenon occurring through dissipation of waves and shocks. This point of view is quite different from the standard picture of transport by a local anomalous turbulent viscosity. In addition to angular momentum transport, we also study magnetic field amplification within the BL. We find that the field is indeed amplified in the BL, but only by a factor of a few, and remains subthermal.

  11. Thermal transport in bismuth telluride quintuple layer: mode-resolved phonon properties and substrate effects

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Cheng; Bao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The successful exfoliation of atomically-thin bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) quintuple layer (QL) attracts tremendous research interest in this strongly anharmonic quasi-two-dimensional material. The thermal transport properties of this material are not well understood, especially the mode-wise properties and when it is coupled with a substrate. In this work, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations and normal mode analysis to study the mode-resolved thermal transport in freestanding and supported Bi2Te3 QL. The detailed mode-wise phonon properties are calculated and the accumulated thermal conductivities with respect to phonon mean free path (MFP) are constructed. It is shown that 60% of the thermal transport is contributed by phonons with MFP longer than 20 nm. Coupling with a-SiO2 substrate leads to about 60% reduction of thermal conductivity. Through varying the interfacial coupling strength and the atomic mass of substrate, we also find that phonon in Bi2Te3 QL is more strongly scattered by interfacial potential and its transport process is less affected by the dynamics of substrate. Our study provides an in-depth understanding of heat transport in Bi2Te3 QL and is helpful in further tailoring its thermal property through nanostructuring. PMID:27263656

  12. Thermal transport in bismuth telluride quintuple layer: mode-resolved phonon properties and substrate effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Cheng; Bao, Hua

    2016-06-01

    The successful exfoliation of atomically-thin bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) quintuple layer (QL) attracts tremendous research interest in this strongly anharmonic quasi-two-dimensional material. The thermal transport properties of this material are not well understood, especially the mode-wise properties and when it is coupled with a substrate. In this work, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations and normal mode analysis to study the mode-resolved thermal transport in freestanding and supported Bi2Te3 QL. The detailed mode-wise phonon properties are calculated and the accumulated thermal conductivities with respect to phonon mean free path (MFP) are constructed. It is shown that 60% of the thermal transport is contributed by phonons with MFP longer than 20 nm. Coupling with a-SiO2 substrate leads to about 60% reduction of thermal conductivity. Through varying the interfacial coupling strength and the atomic mass of substrate, we also find that phonon in Bi2Te3 QL is more strongly scattered by interfacial potential and its transport process is less affected by the dynamics of substrate. Our study provides an in-depth understanding of heat transport in Bi2Te3 QL and is helpful in further tailoring its thermal property through nanostructuring.

  13. Turbulent transport in the atmospheric boundary layer with application to wind farm dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waggy, Scott B.

    With the recent push for renewable energy sources, wind energy has emerged as a candidate to replace some of the power produced by traditional fossil fuels. Recent studies, however, have indicated that wind farms may have a direct effect on local meteorology by transporting water vapor away from the Earth's surface. Such turbulent transport could result in an increased drying of soil, and, in turn, negatively affect the productivity of land in the wind farm's immediate vicinity. This numerical study will analyze four scenarios with the goal of understanding turbulence transport in the wake of a turbine: the neutrally-stratified boundary layer with system rotation, the unstably-stratified atmospheric boundary layer, and wind turbine simulations of these previous two cases. For this work, the Ekman layer is used as an approximation of the atmospheric boundary layer and the governing equations are solved using a fully-parallelized direct numerical simulation (DNS). The in-depth studies of the neutrally and unstably-stratified boundary layers without introducing wind farm effects will act to provide a concrete background for the final study concerning turbulent transport due to turbine wakes. Although neutral stratification rarely occurs in the atmospheric boundary layer, it is useful to study the turbulent Ekman layer under such conditions as it provides a limiting case when unstable or stable stratification are weak. In this work, a thorough analysis was completed including turbulent statistics, velocity and pressure autocorrelations, and a calculation of the full turbulent energy budget. The unstably-stratified atmospheric boundary layer was studied under two levels of heating: moderate and vigorous. Under moderate stratification, both buoyancy and shearing contribute significantly to the turbulent dynamics. As the level of stratification increases, the role of shearing is shown to diminish and is confined to the near-wall region only. A recent, multi

  14. Dispersed solar thermal generation employing parabolic dish-electric transport with field modulated generator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramakumar, R.; Bahrami, K.

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of field modulated generator systems (FMGS) to dispersed solar-thermal-electric generation from a parabolic dish field with electric transport. Each solar generation unit is rated at 15 kWe and the power generated by an array of such units is electrically collected for insertion into an existing utility grid. Such an approach appears to be most suitable when the heat engine rotational speeds are high (greater than 6000 r/min) and, in particular, if they are operated in the variable speed mode and if utility-grade a.c. is required for direct insertion into the grid without an intermediate electric energy storage and reconversion system. Predictions of overall efficiencies based on conservative efficiency figures for the FMGS are in the range of 25 per cent and should be encouraging to those involved in the development of cost-effective dispersed solar thermal power systems.

  15. Multi-dimensional Simulations of Core Collapse Supernovae employing Ray-by-Ray Neutrino Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hix, W. R.; Mezzacappa, A.; Liebendoerfer, M.; Messer, O. E. B.; Blondin, J. M.; Bruenn, S. W.

    2001-12-01

    Decades of research on the mechanism which causes core collapse supernovae has evolved a paradigm wherein the shock that results from the formation of the proto-neutron star stalls, failing to produce an explosion. Only when the shock is re-energized by the tremendous neutrino flux that is carrying off the binding energy of this proto-neutron star can it drive off the star's envelope, creating a supernova. Work in recent years has demonstrated the importance of multi-dimensional hydrodynamic effects like convection to successful simulation of an explosion. Further work has established the necessity of accurately characterizing the distribution of neutrinos in energy and direction. This requires discretizing the neutrino distribution into multiple groups, adding greatly to the computational cost. However, no supernova simulations to date have combined self-consistent multi-group neutrino transport with multi-dimensional hydrodynamics. We present preliminary results of our efforts to combine these important facets of the supernova mechanism by coupling self-consistent ray-by-ray multi-group Boltzmann and flux-limited diffusion neutrino transport schemes to multi-dimensional hydrodynamics. This research is supported by NASA under contract NAG5-8405, by the NSF under contract AST-9877130, and under a SciDAC grant from the DoE Office of Science High Energy and Nuclear Physics Program. Work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  16. Spin transport in tantalum studied using magnetic single and double layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Eric; Omelchenko, Pavlo; Coutts, Chris; Lee-Hone, Nicholas R.; Hübner, René; Broun, David; Heinrich, Bret; Girt, Erol

    2016-08-01

    We report on spin transport in sputter-grown Ta films measured by ferromagnetic resonance. Spin diffusion length and spin mixing conductance are determined from magnetic damping measurements for a varying thickness of Ta layer 0 ≤dTa≤10 nm. The different boundary conditions of single- and double-magnetic-layer heterostructures Py |Ta and Py |Ta | [Py |Fe ] allow us to significantly narrow down the parameter space and test various models. We show that a common approach of using bulk resistivity value in the analysis yields inconsistent spin diffusion length and spin mixing conductance values for magnetic single- and double-layer structures. X-ray diffraction shows that bulk Ta is a combination of β -Ta and bcc-Ta . However, in the region of significant spin transport, ≲2 nm, there is an intermediate region of growth where the Ta lacks long-range structural order, as observed by transmission electron microscopy. Thickness-dependent resistivity measurements confirm that the bulk and intermediate regions have significantly different resistivity values. We find that the data can be well represented if the intermediate region resistivity value is used in the analysis. Additionally, the data can be fit if resistivity has the measured thickness dependence and spin diffusion length is restricted to be inversely proportional to resistivity. Finally, we rule out a model in which spin diffusion length is a constant, while the resistivity has the measured thickness dependence.

  17. Vertical electron transport in van der Waals heterostructures with graphene layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhii, V.; Otsuji, T.; Ryzhii, M.; Aleshkin, V. Ya.; Dubinov, A. A.; Mitin, V.; Shur, M. S.

    2015-04-01

    We propose and analyze an analytical model for the self-consistent description of the vertical electron transport in van der Waals graphene-layer (GL) heterostructures with the GLs separated by the barriers layers. The top and bottom GLs serve as the structure emitter and collector. The vertical electron transport in such structures is associated with the propagation of the electrons thermionically emitted from GLs above the inter-GL barriers. The model under consideration describes the processes of the electron thermionic emission from and the electron capture to GLs. It accounts for the nonuniformity of the self-consistent electric field governed by the Poisson equation which accounts for the variation of the electron population in GLs. The model takes also under consideration the cooling of electrons in the emitter layer due to the Peltier effect. We find the spatial distributions of the electric field and potential with the high-electric-field domain near the emitter GL in the GL heterostructures with different numbers of GLs. Using the obtained spatial distributions of the electric field, we calculate the current-voltage characteristics. We demonstrate that the Peltier cooling of the two-dimensional electron gas in the emitter GL can strongly affect the current-voltage characteristics resulting in their saturation. The obtained results can be important for the optimization of the hot-electron bolometric terahertz detectors and different devices based on GL heterostructures.

  18. Vertical electron transport in van der Waals heterostructures with graphene layers

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhii, V.; Otsuji, T.; Ryzhii, M.; Aleshkin, V. Ya.; Dubinov, A. A.; Mitin, V.; Shur, M. S.

    2015-04-21

    We propose and analyze an analytical model for the self-consistent description of the vertical electron transport in van der Waals graphene-layer (GL) heterostructures with the GLs separated by the barriers layers. The top and bottom GLs serve as the structure emitter and collector. The vertical electron transport in such structures is associated with the propagation of the electrons thermionically emitted from GLs above the inter-GL barriers. The model under consideration describes the processes of the electron thermionic emission from and the electron capture to GLs. It accounts for the nonuniformity of the self-consistent electric field governed by the Poisson equation which accounts for the variation of the electron population in GLs. The model takes also under consideration the cooling of electrons in the emitter layer due to the Peltier effect. We find the spatial distributions of the electric field and potential with the high-electric-field domain near the emitter GL in the GL heterostructures with different numbers of GLs. Using the obtained spatial distributions of the electric field, we calculate the current-voltage characteristics. We demonstrate that the Peltier cooling of the two-dimensional electron gas in the emitter GL can strongly affect the current-voltage characteristics resulting in their saturation. The obtained results can be important for the optimization of the hot-electron bolometric terahertz detectors and different devices based on GL heterostructures.

  19. Vertical structure of aeolian turbulence in a boundary layer with sand transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Zoe S.; Baas, Andreas C. W.

    2016-04-01

    Recently we have found that Reynolds shear stress shows a significant variability with measurement height (Lee and Baas, 2016), and so an alternative parameter for boundary layer turbulence may help to explain the relationship between wind forcing and sediment transport. We present data that were collected during a field study of boundary layer turbulence conducted on a North Atlantic beach. High-frequency (50 Hz) 3D wind velocity measurements were collected using ultrasonic anemometry at thirteen different measurement heights in a tight vertical array between 0.11 and 1.62 metres above the surface. Thanks to the high density installation of sensors a detailed analysis of the boundary layer flow can be conducted using methods more typically used in studies where data is only available from one or just a few measurement heights. We use quadrant analysis to explore the vertical structure of turbulence and track the changes in quadrant signatures with measurement elevation and over time. Results of quadrant analysis, at the 'raw' 50 Hz timescale, demonstrates the tendency for event clustering across all four quadrants, which implies that at-a-point quadrant events are part of larger-scale turbulent structures. Using an HSV colour model, applied to the quadrant analysis data and plotted in series, we create colour maps of turbulence, which can provide a clear visualisation of the clustering of event activity at each height and illustrate the shape of the larger coherent flow structures that are present within the boundary layer. By including a saturation component to the colour model, the most significant stress producing sections of the data are emphasised. This results in a 'banded' colour map, which relates to clustering of quadrant I (Outward Interaction) and quadrant IV (Sweep) activity, separate from clustering of quadrant II (Burst) and quadrant III (Inward Interaction). Both 'sweep-type' and 'burst-type' sequences are shown to have a diagonal structure

  20. Thre-dimensiana model for transportation of particulate plumes in boundary layer with obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, Arakel; Karelsky, Kirill

    2015-04-01

    This presentation is aimed at creating and realization of new physical model of impurity transfer (solid particles and heavy gases) in areas with non-flat and/or nonstationary boundaries. The main idea of suggested method is to use non-viscous equations for solid particles transport modeling in the vicinity of complex boundary. In viscous atmosphere with as small as one likes coefficient of molecular viscosity, the non-slip boundary condition on solid surface must be observed. This postulates the reduction of velocity to zero at a solid surface. It is unconditionally in this case Prandtle hypothesis must be observed: for rather wide range of conditions in the surface neighboring layers energy dissipation of atmosphere flows is comparable by magnitude with manifestation of inertia forces. That is why according to Prandtle hypothesis in atmosphere movement characterizing by a high Reynolds number the boundary layer is forming near a planet surface, within which the required transition from zero velocities at the surface to magnitudes at the external boundary of the layer that are quite close to ones in ideal atmosphere flow. In that layer fast velocity gradients cause viscous effects to be comparable in magnitude with inertia forces influence. For conditions considered essential changes of hydrodynamic fields near solid boundary caused not only by nonslip condition but also by a various relief of surface: mountains, street canyons, individual buildings. Transport of solid particles, their ascent and precipitation also result in dramatic changes of meteorological fields. As dynamic processes of solid particles transfer accompanying the flow past of complex relief surface by wind flows is of our main interest we are to use equations of non-viscous hydrodynamic. We should put up with on the one hand idea of high wind gradients in the boundary layer and on the other hand disregard of molecular viscosity in two-phase atmosphere equations. We deal with describing high

  1. Band offset of vanadium-doped molybdenum oxide hole transport layer in organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Feng-Kuei; Huang, Yi-Chi; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chen, Jen-Sue

    2016-08-01

    Solution-processed vanadium-doped molybdenum oxide films (V)MoOx films with mole ratios of Mo:V = 1:0, 1:0.05, 1:0.2, 1:0.5, 0:1, are fabricated as hole transport layer (HTL) in organic photovoltaics with active layer blend comprising poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). The device structure is ITO/(V)MoOx/P3HT:PCBM/ZnO NP/Al, and the working area is 0.16 cm2. The result shows that the device using V0.05MoOx HTL has the best performance, including power conversion efficiency of 2.16%, Voc of 0.6 V, Jsc of 6.93 mA/cm2, and FF of 51.9%. Using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), we can define the energy levels of valence band edge and Fermi level of (V)MoOx films. UPS analysis indicates that V0.05MoOx has the smallest energy band offset between its valence band edge to the HOMO of P3HT, which is advantageous for hole transporting from P3HT to ITO anode via the V0.05MoOx HTL. In addition, V0.05MoOx film shows the lowest electrical resistivity among all (V)MoOx films, which is further beneficial for hole transportation.

  2. The design and optimization of two low frequency energy harvesters employing 3C-SiC/AlN/Mo composite layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Abid; Mohd-Yasin, Faisal; Dimitrijev, Sima

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents the design and simulation of twocantilever-based energy harvesters that employs cubic silicon carbide on silicon (3C-SiC-on-Si) wafer as the base material and bottom electrode. Aluminum Nitride (AlN) is employed as the piezoelectric/middle layer due to its excellent material properties and high stability in varying temperature and harsh environment. Molybdenum (Mo) serves as the top layer/electrode. The thickness of the structural layers are optimized through MATLAB and also analyzed via Finite Element Analysis using Intellisuite. Two designs are proposed at low resonant frequency, one with conventional cantilever beam, the other being a T-shaped cantilever beam. Both structures are simulated and their performances are compared.

  3. The design and optimization of two low frequency energy harvesters employing 3C-SiC/AlN/Mo composite layers

    SciTech Connect

    Iqbal, Abid Mohd-Yasin, Faisal Dimitrijev, Sima

    2014-10-24

    This paper presents the design and simulation of twocantilever-based energy harvesters that employs cubic silicon carbide on silicon (3C-SiC-on-Si) wafer as the base material and bottom electrode. Aluminum Nitride (AlN) is employed as the piezoelectric/middle layer due to its excellent material properties and high stability in varying temperature and harsh environment. Molybdenum (Mo) serves as the top layer/electrode. The thickness of the structural layers are optimized through MATLAB and also analyzed via Finite Element Analysis using Intellisuite. Two designs are proposed at low resonant frequency, one with conventional cantilever beam, the other being a T-shaped cantilever beam. Both structures are simulated and their performances are compared.

  4. Design of an Advanced Membrane Electrode Assembly Employing a Double-Layered Cathode for a PEM Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Kim, GyeongHee; Eom, KwangSup; Kim, MinJoong; Yoo, Sung Jong; Jang, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyoung-Juhn; Cho, EunAe

    2015-12-23

    The membrane electrolyte assembly (MEA) designed in this study utilizes a double-layered cathode: an inner catalyst layer prepared by a conventional decal transfer method and an outer catalyst layer directly coated on a gas diffusion layer. The double-layered structure was used to improve the interfacial contact between the catalyst layer and membrane, to increase catalyst utilization and to modify the removal of product water from the cathode. Based on a series of MEAs with double-layered cathodes with an overall Pt loading fixed at 0.4 mg cm(-2) and different ratios of inner-to-outer Pt loading, the MEA with an inner layer of 0.3 mg Pt cm(-2) and an outer layer of 0.1 mg Pt cm(-2) exhibited the best performance. This performance was better than that of the conventional single-layered electrode by 13.5% at a current density of 1.4 A cm(-2). PMID:26630367

  5. Thermal Transport Phenomena in the Quasi-laminarization Process of Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Luciano; Araya, Guillermo; Hussain, Fazle

    2014-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulation of a spatially evolving turbulent boundary layer subject to strong favorable pressure gradient (SFPG) with eventual quasi-laminarization has been performed to include the thermal field. In this talk, the following questions will be addressed: i) to which extend the Reynolds analogy is satisfied during flow laminarization? ii) can the thermal boundary layer under quasi-laminarization be described as two quasi-independent inner/outer regions? To the best of our knowledge, documented investigation regarding heat transfer phenomena associated with quasi-laminarization process of spatially developing boundary layers is rather scarce. In order to introduce realistic thermal inlet fluctuations in a SFPG we employed the multi-scale technique for thermal boundary layers devised by Araya and Castillo PoF (2013). Such methodology enable us to more effective capture the pressure gradient and thermal field than using a single scaling approach. It is shown that the Reynolds normal stresses for the streamwise component remains frozen in space while the wall-normal and spanwise components continue to decrease as the flow moves downstream and never becomes laminar due to the survival of the upstream turbulence during dissipation on viscous time scales.

  6. Effective Transport Properties Accounting for Electrochemical Reactions of Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Catalyst Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Pharoah, Jon; Choi, Hae-Won; Chueh, Chih-Che; Harvey, David

    2011-07-01

    There has been a rapidly growing interest in three-dimensional micro-structural reconstruction of fuel cell electrodes so as to derive more accurate descriptors of the pertinent geometric and effective transport properties. Due to the limited accessibility of experiments based reconstruction techniques, such as dual-beam focused ion beam-scanning electro microscopy or micro X-Ray computed tomography, within sample micro-structures of the catalyst layers in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), a particle based numerical model is used in this study to reconstruct sample microstructure of the catalyst layers in PEMFCs. Then the reconstructed sample structure is converted into the computational grid using body-fitted/cut-cell based unstructured meshing technique. Finally, finite volume methods (FVM) are applied to calculate effective properties on computational sample domains.

  7. A simple stochastic quadrant model for the transport and deposition of particles in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeks, Michael; Jin, Chunyu; Potts, Ian

    2015-11-01

    We present a simple stochastic quadrant model for calculating the transport and deposition of heavy particles in a fully developed turbulent boundary layer based on the statistics of wall-normal fluid velocity fluctuations obtained from a fully developed channel flow. Individual particles are tracked through the boundary layer via their interactions with a succession of random eddies found in each of the quadrants of the fluid Reynolds shear stress domain in a homogeneous Markov chain process. Deposition rates for a range of heavy particles predicted by the model compare well with benchmark experimental measurements. In addition deposition rates are compared with those obtained continuous random walk (CRW) models including those based on the Langevin equation for the turbulent fluctuations. In addition, various statistics related to the particle near wall behavior are also presented.

  8. ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT AND VARIABILITY IN BOUNDARY LAYERS OF ACCRETION DISKS DRIVEN BY GLOBAL ACOUSTIC MODES

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Stone, James M.; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2012-11-20

    Disk accretion onto a weakly magnetized central object, e.g., a star, is inevitably accompanied by the formation of a boundary layer near the surface, in which matter slows down from the highly supersonic orbital velocity of the disk to the rotational velocity of the star. We perform high-resolution two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations in the equatorial plane of an astrophysical boundary layer with the goal of exploring the dynamics of non-axisymmetric structures that form there. We generically find that the supersonic shear in the boundary layer excites non-axisymmetric quasi-stationary acoustic modes that are trapped between the surface of the star and a Lindblad resonance in the disk. These modes rotate in a prograde fashion, are stable for hundreds of orbital periods, and have a pattern speed that is less than and of the order of the rotational velocity at the inner edge of the disk. The origin of these intrinsically global modes is intimately related to the operation of a corotation amplifier in the system. Dissipation of acoustic modes in weak shocks provides a universal mechanism for angular momentum and mass transport even in purely hydrodynamic (i.e., non-magnetized) boundary layers. We discuss the possible implications of these trapped modes for explaining the variability seen in accreting compact objects.

  9. Cross-layer restoration with software defined networking based on IP over optical transport networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Cheng, Lei; Deng, Junni; Zhao, Yongli; Zhang, Jie; Lee, Young

    2015-10-01

    The IP over optical transport network is a very promising networking architecture applied to the interconnection of geographically distributed data centers due to the performance guarantee of low delay, huge bandwidth and high reliability at a low cost. It can enable efficient resource utilization and support heterogeneous bandwidth demands in highly-available, cost-effective and energy-effective manner. In case of cross-layer link failure, to ensure a high-level quality of service (QoS) for user request after the failure becomes a research focus. In this paper, we propose a novel cross-layer restoration scheme for data center services with software defined networking based on IP over optical network. The cross-layer restoration scheme can enable joint optimization of IP network and optical network resources, and enhance the data center service restoration responsiveness to the dynamic end-to-end service demands. We quantitatively evaluate the feasibility and performances through the simulation under heavy traffic load scenario in terms of path blocking probability and path restoration latency. Numeric results show that the cross-layer restoration scheme improves the recovery success rate and minimizes the overall recovery time.

  10. Thermal transport across few-layer boron nitride encased by silica

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Yuxiang; Dumitricǎ, Traian; Jiang, Jiechao; Meletis, Efstathios

    2015-07-20

    Two dimensional hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) attracted attention for use in applications. Using equilibrium molecular dynamics, we examine the phonon transport in few-layer h-BN encased by silica (SiO{sub 2}). We report large interfacial thermal resistances, of about 2.2 × 10{sup −8} m{sup 2} K W{sup −1}, which are not sensitive to the number of h-BN layers or the SiO{sub 2} crystallinity. The h-BN/SiO{sub 2} superlattices exhibit ultra-low thermal conductivities across layers, as low as 0.3 W/m K. They are structurally stable up to 2000 K while retaining the low-thermal conductivity attributes. Our simulations indicate that incorporation of h-BN layers and nanoparticles in silica could establish thermal barriers and heat spreading paths, useful for high performance coatings and electronic device applications.

  11. The design, fabrication and maintenance of semi-trailers employed in the highway transport of weight-concentrated radioactive loads

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, D.S.

    1991-12-31

    Transportation of weight-concentrated radioactive loads by truck is an essential part of a safe and economical nuclear industry. This proposed standard presents guidance and performance criteria for the safe transport of these weight-concentrated radioactive loads. ANSI N14.30 will detail specific requirements for the design, fabrication, testing, in-service inspections, maintenance and certification of the semi-trailers to be employed in said service. Furthermore, guidelines for a quality assurance program are also enumerated. This standard would apply to any semi-trailer that may or may not be specifically designed to carry weight-concentrated loads. Equipment not suitable per the criteria established in the standard would be removed from service. The nature of the nuclear industry and the need for a positive public perception of the various processes and players, mandates that the highway transportation of weight-concentrated radioactive loads be standardized and made inherently safe. This proposed standard takes a giant step in that direction.

  12. Technique for studying ablation-products transport in supersonic boundary layers by using PLIF of naphthalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combs, C. S.; Lochman, B. J.; Clemens, N. T.

    2016-05-01

    A technique is developed that uses planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of sublimated gas-phase naphthalene to visualize the transport of ablation products in a high-speed turbulent boundary layer. The naphthalene is molded into a rectangular insert that is mounted flush with the floor of a Mach 5 wind tunnel, where the test gas is air. The naphthalene fluorescence is excited with 266 nm laser light, and broadband detection of the emitted light is used. Using spectroscopic data from a previous study and a first-order approximation for the mean temperature profile across the boundary layer, naphthalene PLIF images collected in a Mach 5 turbulent boundary layer are converted into two-dimensional fields of naphthalene mole fraction with an instantaneous uncertainty of ±20 %. These quantitative naphthalene PLIF images in the Mach 5 boundary layer reveal large-scale naphthalene vapor structures that are regularly ejected out to wall distances of approximately y/ δ = 0.6 for a field of view that spans 3 δ-5 δ downstream of the trailing edge of the naphthalene insert. The magnitude of the calculated naphthalene mole fraction in these structures at y/ δ = 0.2 ranges from approximately 1 to 6 % of the saturation mole fraction at the wind tunnel recovery temperature and static pressure. Mean mole fraction profiles taken at different streamwise locations collapse into one "universal" mole fraction profile when properly normalized and are in agreement with previous scalar dispersion measurements. The results indicate that PLIF of sublimating naphthalene can be an effective tool for studying scalar transport in supersonic and hypersonic flows.

  13. Conductive conjugated polyelectrolyte as hole-transporting layer for organic bulk heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huiqiong; Zhang, Yuan; Mai, Cheng-Kang; Collins, Samuel D; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen; Bazan, Guillermo C; Heeger, Alan J

    2014-02-01

    Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) has been extensively used as the hole-transporting layer (HTL) in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells, however, its anisotropic electrical conduction and intrinsic acidic nature generally limit the device performance. Here we demonstrate the application of a water/alcohol soluble CPE (CPE-K) as HTLs in BHJ solar cells, achieving a PCE up to 8.2%. The more superior and uniform vertical electrical conductivity found in CPE-K reduces the series resistance and provides efficient hole extraction. PMID:24170587

  14. Evaluating the transport layer of the ALFA framework for the Intel® Xeon Phi™ Coprocessor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santogidis, Aram; Hirstius, Andreas; Lalis, Spyros

    2015-12-01

    The ALFA framework supports the software development of major High Energy Physics experiments. As part of our research effort to optimize the transport layer of ALFA, we focus on profiling its data transfer performance for inter-node communication on the Intel Xeon Phi Coprocessor. In this article we present the collected performance measurements with the related analysis of the results. The optimization opportunities that are discovered, help us to formulate the future plans of enabling high performance data transfer for ALFA on the Intel Xeon Phi architecture.

  15. Towards intrinsic phonon transport in single-layer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Bo; Zhang, Hao; Shao, Hezhu; Xu, Yuanfeng; Zhang, Xiangchao; Zhu, Heyuan

    2016-06-01

    The intrinsic lattice thermal conductivity of MoS$_2$ is an important aspect in the design of MoS$_2$-based nanoelectronic devices. We investigate the lattice dynamics properties of MoS$_2$ by first principles calculations. The intrinsic thermal conductivity of single-layer MoS$_2$ is calculated using the Boltzmann transport equation for phonons. The obtained thermal conductivity agrees well with the measurements. The contributions of acoustic and optical phonons to the lattice thermal conductivity are evaluated. The size dependence of thermal conductivity is investigated as well.

  16. Ultraviolet Electroluminescence and Blue-Green Phosphorescence using an Organic Diphosphine Oxide Charge Transporting Layer.

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, Paul E.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Sapochak, Linda S.; Djurovich, Peter I.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2006-05-01

    We report electroluminescence with a peak wavelength at 338 nm from a simple bilayer organic light emitting device (OLED) made using 4,4’-bis(diphenylphosphine oxide) biphenyl (PO1). In an OLED geometry, the material is preferentially electron transporting. Doping the PO1 layer with iridium(III)bis(4,6-(di-fluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N, C2’)picolinate (FIrpic) gives rise to electrophosphorescence with a peak external quantum efficiency of 7.8% at 0.09 mA/cm2 and 5.8% at 13 mA/cm2. The latter current density is obtained at 6.3 V applied forward bias. This represents a new class of wide-bandgap charge transporting organic materials which may prove useful as host materials for blue electrophosphoresent OLEDs.

  17. Imprinted nonoxidized graphene sheets as an efficient hole transport layer in polymer light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chun-Yuan; Peter Chen, I.-Wen; Chen, Chih-Jung; Chiang, Ray-Kuang; Vu, Hoang-Tuan

    2014-02-01

    Nonoxidized graphene sheets (NGSs) with single- and multilayered structures were generated by direct exfoliation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite in a water-ethanol mixture with the assistances of pyridinium salt (Py+Br3-) and sonication. Raman spectrum exhibited a low intensity ratio (0.055) of D and G bands, indicating that the NGSs were nearly defect-free. Their application for the fabrication of polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) was also demonstrated. The PLEDs that used an imprinted NGS film as a hole transport layer show a luminance exceeding 13000 cd/m2, which was comparable to that of devices using the typical hole transport material: poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-polystyrenesulfonic acid.

  18. Three-dimensional scrape off layer transport in the helically symmetric experiment HSX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerson, A. R.; Bader, A.; Hegna, C. C.; Schmitz, O.; Stephey, L. A.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Likin, K. M.

    2016-08-01

    The edge topology of helically symmetric experiment (HSX) in the quasi-helically symmetric configuration is characterized by an 8/7 magnetic island remnant embedded in a short connection length scrape-off layer (SOL) domain. A 2D mapping of edge plasma profiles within this heterogeneous SOL has been constructed using a movable, multi-pin Langmuir probe. Comparisons of these measurements to edge simulations using the EMC3-EIRENE 3D plasma fluid and kinetic neutral gas transport model have been performed. The measurements provide strong evidence that particle transport is diffusive within the island region and dominantly convective in the SOL region. Measurements indicate that phenomenological cross-field diffusion coefficients are low in the SOL region between the last closed flux surface and edge island (i.e. {{D}\\bot}≈ 0.03 m2 s‑1). This level of transport was found to increase by a factor of two when a limiter is inserted almost completely into the magnetic island. A reduction in gradients of the edge electrostatic plasma potential was also measured in this configuration, suggesting that the reduced electric field may be linked to the increased cross-field transport observed.

  19. Highly efficient polymer-based optoelectronic devices using PEDOT:PSS and a GO composite layer as a hole transport layer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jae Choul; Jang, Jeong In; Lee, Bo Ram; Lee, Geon-Woong; Han, Joong Tark; Song, Myoung Hoon

    2014-02-12

    We demonstrate highly efficient polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs), as well as polymer solar cells (PSCs), using a solution-processable poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS):graphene oxide (GO) (PEDOT:GO) composite layer as hole transport layers (HTLs). The PEDOT:GO composite HTL layer shows enhanced charge carrier transport due to improved conductivity by benzoid-quinoid transitions with a well-matched work function between GO (4.89 eV) and PEDOT:PSS (4.95 eV). Moreover, it reduces remarkably exciton quenching and suppresses recombinations that bring higher charge extraction in PSCs and increases the recombinations of holes and electrons within the active layer by the blocking behavior of the electrons from a fluorescent semiconductor due to the existence of GO with large bandgap (∼3.6 eV) in the PEDOT:GO composite layer, therefore leading to an enhancement of device efficiency in PLEDs and PSCs. The optimized PLEDs and PSCs with a PEDOT:GO composite HTL layer shows the maximum luminous efficiency of 21.74 cd/A (at 6.4 V) for PLEDs, as well as the power conversion efficiency of 8.21% for PSCs, which were improved by ∼220 and 12%, respectively, compared to reference PLEDs and PSCs with a PEDOT:PSS layer. PMID:24433032

  20. Non-Newtonian effects of blood on LDL transport inside the arterial lumen and across multi-layered arterial wall with and without stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyranlou, Amin; Niazmand, Hamid; Sadeghi, Mahmood-Reza; Mesri, Yaser

    2016-06-01

    Blood non-Newtonian behavior on low-density lipoproteins (LDL) accumulation is analyzed numerically, while fluid-multilayered arteries are adopted for nonstenotic and 30%-60% symmetrical stenosed models. Present model considers non-Newtonian effects inside the lumen and within arterial layers simultaneously, which has not been examined in previous studies. Navier-Stokes equations are solved along with the mass transport convection-diffusion equations and Darcy’s model for species transport inside the luminal flow and across wall layers, respectively. Carreau model for the luminal flow and the modified Darcy equation for the power-law fluid within arterial layers are employed to model blood rheological characteristics, appropriately. Results indicate that in large arteries with relatively high Reynolds number Newtonian model estimates LDL concentration patterns well enough, however, this model seriously incompetent for regions with low WSS. Moreover, Newtonian model for plasma underestimates LDL concentration especially on luminal surface and across arterial wall. Therefore, applying non-Newtonian model seems essential for reaching to a more accurate estimation of LDL distribution in the artery. Finally, blood flow inside constricted arteries demonstrates that LDL concentration patterns along the stenoses inside the luminal flow and across arterial layers are strongly influenced as compared to the nonstenotic arteries. Additionally, among four stenosis severity grades, 40% stenosis is prone to more LDL accumulation along the post-stenotic regions.

  1. Thermal Transport across Surfactant Layers on Gold Nanorods in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuewang; Ni, Yuxiang; Zhu, Jie; Burrows, Nathan D; Murphy, Catherine J; Dumitrica, Traian; Wang, Xiaojia

    2016-04-27

    Ultrafast transient absorption experiments and molecular dynamics simulations are utilized to investigate the thermal transport between aqueous solutions and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)- or polyethylene glycol (PEG)-functionalized gold nanorods (GNRs). The transient absorption measurement data are interpreted with a multiscale heat diffusion model, which incorporates the interfacial thermal conductances predicted by molecular dynamics. According to our observations, the effective thermal conductance of the GNR/PEG/water system is higher than that of the GNR/CTAB/water system with a surfactant layer of the same length. We attribute the enhancement of thermal transport to the larger thermal conductance at the GNR/PEG interface as compared with that at the GNR/CTAB interface, in addition to the water penetration into the hydrophilic PEG layer. Our results highlight the role of the GNR/polymer thermal interfaces in designing biological and composite-based heat transfer applications of GNRs, and the importance of multiscale analysis in interpreting transient absorption data in systems consisting of low interfacial thermal conductances. PMID:26938771

  2. What Supergranule Flow Models Tell Us About the Sun's Surface Shear Layer and Magnetic Flux Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David

    2011-01-01

    Models of the photospheric flows due to supergranulation are generated using an evolving spectrum of vector spherical harmonics up to spherical harmonic wavenumber l1500. Doppler velocity data generated from these models are compared to direct Doppler observations from SOHO/MDI and SDO/HMI. The models are adjusted to match the observed spatial power spectrum as well as the wavenumber dependence of the cell lifetimes, differential rotation velocities, meridional flow velocities, and relative strength of radial vs. horizontal flows. The equatorial rotation rate as a function of wavelength matches the rotation rate as a function of depth as determined by global helioseismology. This leads to the conclusions that the cellular structures are anchored at depths equal to their widths, that the surface shear layer extends to at least 70 degrees latitude, and that the poleward meridional flow decreases in amplitude and reverses direction at the base of the surface shear layer (approx.35 Mm below the surface). Using the modeled flows to passively transport magnetic flux indicates that the observed differential rotation and meridional flow of the magnetic elements are directly related to the differential rotation and meridional flow of the convective pattern itself. The magnetic elements are transported by the evolving boundaries of the supergranule pattern (where the convective flows converge) and are unaffected by the weaker flows associated with the differential rotation or meridional flow of the photospheric plasma.

  3. Current transport mechanisms in plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposited AlN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Altuntas, Halit E-mail: biyikli@unam.bilkent.edu.tr; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Donmez, Inci; Biyikli, Necmi E-mail: biyikli@unam.bilkent.edu.tr

    2015-04-21

    Here, we report on the current transport mechanisms in AlN thin films deposited at a low temperature (i.e., 200 °C) on p-type Si substrates by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition. Structural characterization of the deposited AlN was carried out using grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction, revealing polycrystalline films with a wurtzite (hexagonal) structure. Al/AlN/ p-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitor structures were fabricated and investigated under negative bias by performing current-voltage measurements. As a function of the applied electric field, different types of current transport mechanisms were observed; i.e., ohmic conduction (15.2–21.5 MV/m), Schottky emission (23.6–39.5 MV/m), Frenkel-Poole emission (63.8–211.8 MV/m), trap-assisted tunneling (226–280 MV/m), and Fowler-Nordheim tunneling (290–447 MV/m). Electrical properties of the insulating AlN layer and the fabricated Al/AlN/p-Si MIS capacitor structure such as dielectric constant, flat-band voltage, effective charge density, and threshold voltage were also determined from the capacitance-voltage measurements.

  4. Unusual isotope effect on thermal transport of single layer molybdenum disulphide

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xufei; Yang, Nuo; Luo, Tengfei

    2015-11-09

    Thermal transport in single layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) is critical to advancing its applications. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics simulations with first-principles force constants to study the isotope effect on the thermal transport of single layer MoS{sub 2}. Through phonon modal analysis, we found that isotopes can strongly scatter phonons with intermediate frequencies, and the scattering behavior can be radically different from that predicted by conventional scattering model based on perturbation theory, where Tamura's formula is combined with Matthiessen's rule to include isotope effects. Such a discrepancy becomes smaller for low isotope concentrations. Natural isotopes can lead to a 30% reduction in thermal conductivity for large size samples. However, for small samples where boundary scattering becomes significant, the isotope effect can be greatly suppressed. It was also found that the Mo isotopes, which contribute more to the phonon eigenvectors in the intermediate frequency range, have stronger impact on thermal conductivity than S isotopes.

  5. Isochronal Ice Sheet Model: a New Approach to Tracer Transport by Explicitly Tracing Accumulation Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Born, A.; Stocker, T. F.

    2014-12-01

    The long, high-resolution and largely undisturbed depositional record of polar ice sheets is one of the greatest resources in paleoclimate research. The vertical profile of isotopic and other geochemical tracers provides a full history of depositional and dynamical variations. Numerical simulations of this archive could afford great advances both in the interpretation of these tracers as well as to help improve ice sheet models themselves, as show successful implementations in oceanography and atmospheric dynamics. However, due to the slow advection velocities, tracer modeling in ice sheets is particularly prone to numerical diffusion, thwarting efforts that employ straightforward solutions. Previous attemps to circumvent this issue follow conceptually and computationally extensive approaches that augment traditional Eulerian models of ice flow with a semi-Lagrangian tracer scheme (e.g. Clarke et al., QSR, 2005). Here, we propose a new vertical discretization for ice sheet models that eliminates numerical diffusion entirely. Vertical motion through the model mesh is avoided by mimicking the real-world ice flow as a thinning of underlying layers (see figure). A new layer is added to the surface at equidistant time intervals (isochronally). Therefore, each layer is uniquely identified with an age. Horizontal motion follows the shallow ice approximation using an implicit numerical scheme. Vertical diffusion of heat which is physically desirable is also solved implicitly. A simulation of a two-dimensional section through the Greenland ice sheet will be discussed.

  6. Analysis of subgrid-scale vertical transport in convective boundary layers at gray-zone resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyeyum Hailey; Hong, Song-You

    2013-04-01

    The gray zone of a physics process in numerical models is defined as the range of model resolution in which the process is partly resolved by model dynamics and partly parameterized. In this study, we examine the effects of grid size on resolved and parameterized vertical transport for horizontal grid scales including the gray zone. To assess how stability alters the dependency on grid size, four convective boundary layer (CBL)s with different surface heating and geostrophic winds are considered. For this purpose, reference data for grid-scale (GS) and subgrid-scale (SGS) fields are constructed for 50-4000 mesh sizes by filtering 25-m large-eddy simulations (LES) data. As wind shear becomes stronger, turbulent kinetic energy and the vertical transport of potential temperature and momentum are more resolved for a given grid spacing. A passive scalar with bottom-up diffusion behaves in a similar fashion. For a top-down diffusion scalar, the cospectral peak scale of the scalar flux is larger than the horizontal size of the thermals and increases in time. For the scalar, the entrainment ratio, in conjunction with the shear, influences the mesh-size dependency of GS and SGS transport. The total vertical transport of heat and the bottom-up scalar is decomposed into a non-local mixing owing to the coherent structures and remaining local mixing. The contribution of the resolved parts is larger when roll-like structures are present than when only thermals exist, for both non-local and local fluxes. The grid-size dependency of the non-local flux and its sensitivity to stability predominantly determines the dependency of total (non-local plus local) transport.

  7. High-efficiency fluorescent white organic light-emitting diodes using double hole-transporting-layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, Jwo-Huei; Shen, Shih-Ming; Chen, Cheng-Chung; Chung, Yu-Chiao; Wang, Chun-Jan; Hsu, Mao-Feng; Wang, Wei-Ben; Wu, Ming-Hsuan; Yang, Chih-Jie; Liu, Chi-Ping

    2008-04-01

    High-efficiency fluorescent white organic light-emitting diodes (OLED) were fabricated by using double holetransporting- layers (HTLs), poly(3,4-ethylene- dioxythiophene)-poly-(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT) and N,N'-bis-(1- naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-1,10-biphenyl-4-4'-diamine (NPB). The diodes were composed of a single emissive-layer (EML), with 0.5 wt% red 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-tbutyl-6-(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl)-4H-pyran doped in a mixed-host of 25% trans-1,2-bis(6-(N,N-di-p-tolylamino)-Naphthalene-2-yl)ethene and 75% 1-butyl-9,10-naphthaleneanthracene. The device structure comprised a 125 nm anode layer of indium tin oxide, a 25 nm first HTL of PEDOT, a 0 to 10 nm second HTL of NPB, a 30 nm EML, a 40 nm electron-transporting-layer of 2,2',2"-(1,3,5-benzenetriyl)-tris(1- phenyl-1-H-benzimidazole), a 1 nm electron-injection-layer of lithium fluoride and a 150 nm cathode layer of aluminum. With the addition of a 7.5 nm second HTL (NPB), the resultant power-efficiency at 100 cd/m2, for example, was increased from 11.9 to 18.9 lm/W, an improvement of 59%. The improvement was even more marked at 1,000 cd/m2, i.e. that the power-efficiency was increased from 9.1 to 16.5 lm/W, an improvement of 81%. The marked efficiency improvement may be attributed to a better balance of carrier-injection in the desired emissive zone since the addition of the NPB layer in between the first HTL and the EML may have effectively reduced the injection of excessive holes into the EML due to the relatively high energy-barrier to hole, which was 0.5 eV, at the interface of the two HTLs. The resultant hole-blocking function was plausibly more effective at higher voltage so that comparatively much less holes would be injected into the EML, leading to a much better balanced carrier-injection and consequently a higher efficiency-improvement at the higher brightness.

  8. Modeling contaminant transport and biodegradation in a layered porous media system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Brian D.; Dawson, Clint N.; Szecsody, Jim E.; Streile, Gary P.

    1994-06-01

    The transport and biodegradation of an organic compound (quinoline) were studied in a meter-scale system of layered porous media. A two-dimensional laboratory experiment was conducted in a saturated system with two hydraulic layers with a ratio of conductivities of 1:13. A solution containing dissolved quinoline was injected as a front at one end of the system, and the aqueous-phase concentrations of quinoline, its first degradation product (2-hydroxyquinoline), and oxygen were monitored over time at several spatial locations. Results from a set of ancillary batch and small-column experiments were used to generate a mathematical model for the microbial kinetics; these kinetics described the time rate of change of the concentrations of the two organic compounds (quinoline and 2-hydroxyquinoline), the electron acceptor (oxygen), and microbial biomass. This independently developed kinetic model was incorporated into a two-dimensional numerical model for flow and transport, so that simulations of the laboratory system could be conducted and the results compared with observed data. An analysis of the applicability of single-phase and multiple-phase models for the description of the microbial kinetics was conducted. The results of this analysis indicated that for some cases, it is not necessary to explicitly model the mass transfer between the aqueous phase and the biomass phase. A single-phase model was used for simulating the laboratory system described here. Favorable comparisons between the laboratory and simulation data suggested that a single-phase model was appropriate for describing the microbially mediated reactions in this system. A method for incorporating the effects of metabolic lag into microbial kinetics is described. Metabolic lag was explicitly accounted for in the degradation kinetics for this system; the inclusion of metabolic lag proved to be important for describing transient concentration pulses that were observed in the low-conductivity layer.

  9. Layered Chalcogenides beyond Graphene: from Electronic Structure Evolution to the Spin Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hongtao

    2014-03-01

    Recent efforts on graphene-like atomic layer materials, aiming at novel electronic properties and quantum phenomena beyond graphene, have attracted much attention for potential electronics/spintronics applications. Compared to the weak spin-orbit-interaction (SOI) in graphene, metal chalcogenides MX2 have heavy 4d/5d elements with strong atomic SOI, providing a unique way for generating spin polarization based on valleytronics physics. Indeed, such a spin-polarized band structure has been demonstrated theoretically and supported by optical investigations. However, despite these exciting progresses, following two important issues in MX2 community remain elusive: 1. the quantitative band structure of MX2 compounds (where are the valleys -band maxima/minima- locating in the BZ) have not been experimentally confirmed. Especially for those cleaved ultrathin mono- and bi-layer flakes hosting most of recently-reported exotic phenomena at the 2D limit, the direct detection for band dispersion becomes of great importance for valleytronics. 2. Spin transports have seldom been reported even though such a strong SOI system can serve as an ideal platform for the spin polarization and spin transport. In this work, we started from the basic electronic structures of representative MX2, obtained by ARPES, and investigated both the band variation between these compounds and their band evolution from bulk to the monolayer limit. After having a systematic understanding on band structures, we reported a giant Zeeman-type spin-polarization generated and modulated by an external electric field in WSe2 electric-double-layer transistors. The non-magnetic approach for realizing such an intriguing spin splitting not only keeps the system time-reversally invariant but also suggests a new paradigm for manipulating the spin-degrees of freedom of electrons. Acknowledge the support from DoE, BES, Division of MSE under contract DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  10. Anomalous transport in discrete arcs and simulation of double layers in a model auroral circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The evolution and long-time stability of a double layer in a discrete auroral arc requires that the parallel current in the arc, which may be considered uniform at the source, be diverted within the arc to charge the flanks of the U-shaped double-layer potential structure. A simple model is presented in which this current re-distribution is effected by anomalous transport based on electrostatic lower hybrid waves driven by the flank structure itself. This process provides the limiting constraint on the double-layer potential. The flank charging may be represented as that of a nonlinear transmission. A simplified model circuit, in which the transmission line is represented by a nonlinear impedance in parallel with a variable resistor, is incorporated in a 1-d simulation model to give the current density at the DL boundaries. Results are presented for the scaling of the DL potential as a function of the width of the arc and the saturation efficiency of the lower hybrid instability mechanism.

  11. Anomalous transport in discrete arcs and simulation of double layers in a model auroral circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The evolution and long-time stability of a double layer (DL) in a discrete auroral arc requires that the parallel current in the arc, which may be considered uniform at the source, be diverted within the arc to charge the flanks of the U-shaped double layer potential structure. A simple model is presented in which this current redistribution is effected by anomalous transport based on electrostatic lower hybrid waves driven by the flank structure itself. This process provides the limiting constraint on the double layer potential. The flank charging may be represented as that of a nonlinear transmission line. A simplified model circuit, in which the transmission line is represented by a nonlinear impedance in parallel with a variable resistor, is incorporated in a one-dimensional simulation model to give the current density at the DL boundaries. Results are presented for the scaling of the DL potential as a function of the width of the arc and the saturation efficiency of the lower hybrid instability mechanism.

  12. Amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide as electron transport layer in organic photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, H.; Malinowski, P. E. Chasin, A.; Cheyns, D.; Steudel, S.; Schols, S.; Heremans, P.

    2015-04-06

    Amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) is demonstrated as an electron transport layer (ETL) in a high-performance organic photodetector (OPD). Dark current in the range of 10 nA/cm{sup 2} at a bias voltage of −2 V and a high photoresponse in the visible spectrum were obtained in inverted OPDs with poly(3-hexylthiophene) and phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester active layer. The best results were obtained for the optimum a-IGZO thickness of 7.5 nm with specific detectivity of 3 × 10{sup 12} Jones at the wavelength of 550 nm. The performance of the best OPD devices using a-IGZO was shown to be comparable to state-of-the-art devices based on TiO{sub x} as ETL, with higher rectification achieved in reverse bias. Yield and reproducibility were also enhanced with a-IGZO, facilitating fabrication of large area OPDs. Furthermore, easier integration with IGZO-based readout backplanes can be envisioned, where the channel material can be used as photodiode buffer layer after additional treatment.

  13. Low band gap polymeric solar cells using solution-processable copper iodide as hole transporting layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Neeraj; Kesari, J. P.; Chaudhary, Rajiv; Patra, Asit

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, we have shown the performance of solution-processable copper iodide (CuI) as an alternative hole transporting layer (HTL) for polymeric solar cells. Optical spectra of the CuI thin film reveal highly transparent and practically no absorption in the range vis-NIR region (450-1110 nm). X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of CuI exhibits as a p-type semiconductor as well as crystalline nature. The photovoltaic devices were fabricated using PCDTBT and PTB7 as donor materials blended with PC71BM as an acceptor material. The power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) based on CuI as an HTL have been achieved to up to 3.04% and 4.48% for PCDTBT and PTB7 based donor materials respectively with a configuration based on ITO/CuI(40 nm)/active layer (60 nm)/Al (120 nm). This study clearly indicated that the devices made with CuI as an HTL showed superior performance than the device fabricated from PEDOT:PSS layer as an HTL. Morphological characterization of the HTL using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) were carried for better understanding.

  14. An Alkane-Soluble Dendrimer as Electron-Transport Layer in Polymer Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhiming; Zhao, Sen; Pei, Jian; Wang, Jian; Ying, Lei; Peng, Junbiao; Cao, Yong

    2016-08-10

    Polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) have attracted broad interest due to their solution-processable properties. It is well-known that to achieve better performance, organic light-emitting diodes require multilayer device structures. However, it is difficult to realize multilayer device structures by solution processing for PLEDs. Because most semiconducting polymers have similar solubility in common organic solvents, such as toluene, xylene, chloroform, and chlorobenzene, the deposition of multilayers can cause layers to mix together and damage each layer. Herein, a novel semiorthogonal solubility relationship was developed and demonstrated. For the first time, an alkane-soluble dendrimer is utilized as the electron-transport layer (ETL) in PLEDs via a solution-based process. With the dendrimer ETL, the external quantum efficiency increases more than threefold. This improvement in the device performance is attributed to better exciton confinement, improved exciton energy transfer, and better charge carrier balance. The semiorthogonal solubility provided by alkane offers another process dimension in PLEDs. By combining them with water/alcohol-soluble polyelectrolytes, more exquisite multilayer devices can be fabricated to achieve high device performance, and new device structures can be designed and realized. PMID:27435357

  15. Charge transport in thick SiO 2-based dielectric layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanitz, Sven

    1997-12-01

    Charge transport in thick (≥ 1 μm) SiO 2-based dielectric layers was investigated by means of I( U) measurements. Investigations were carried out on thermally grown field oxide (FOX) as well as on TEOS and BPSG. Gate oxide layers (GOX) were measured as reference. C( U) measurements were performed for the determination of charges in the oxide. To determine the electrical parameters of the layers, the model from Chen and Wu[1] was developed further. The model takes into account tunnelling, capture and emission processes, impact ionization, recombination, interface states and ohmic currents. The I( U) characteristics for all dielectrics examined can be described with the aid of the model. The FOX parameters correspond to those of GOX. The parameters of TEOS and BPSG fluctuate strongly with the process parameters. After high-temperature annealing and from measurement of the examined parameters, the insulation properties of TEOS and BPSG were found to be at least as good as those of FOX.

  16. Evaluation of water transport in PEMFC gas diffusion layers using image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daino, Michael Mario

    Liquid water transport through the gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was investigated through three interrelated studies utilizing the tools of image processing. First, a new framework and model for the digital generation and characterization of the microstructure of GDL materials with localized binder and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) distributions were developed using 3D morphological imaging processing. The new generation technique closely mimics manufacturing processes and produces realistic 3D phase-differentiated digital microstructures in a cost- and time- effective manner. The generated distributions of hydrophobic (PTFE) and hydrophilic (carbon) regions representative of commercial GDL materials provides water transport modeling efforts with more accurate geometries to improve PEMFC water management. Second, through-plane transport in an operating PEMFC was investigated by developing and testing a transparent (visible and infrared) fuel cell. Visible observations and subsequent video processing revealed condensation of microdroplets on the GDL and implied the existence of condensation within the GDL. Temperature gradients across the cathode GDL under realistic operating conditions were obtained in a noninvasive manner using infrared imaging and subsequent image analysis. Recommendations for improving accuracy of PEMFC temperature measurements using infrared imaging were made. The final contribution of this work was the measurement and analysis of water breakthrough dynamics across GDL materials with and without microporous layers (MPLs). Dynamic breakthrough events, or recurrent breakthroughs, were observed for all GDL material investigated indicating the breakdown and re-build of water paths through the GDL caused by an intermittent water drainage process from the GDL surface. GDL materials without an MPL exhibited a dynamic breakthrough location phenomenon and significantly elevated water saturations. The results

  17. Thickness-dependent charge transport in few-layer MoS2 field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ming-Wei; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Fowlkes, Jason; Li, Xufan; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Geohegan, David B.; Xiao, Kai

    2016-04-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is currently under intensive study because of its exceptional optical and electrical properties in few-layer form. However, how charge transport mechanisms vary with the number of layers in MoS2 flakes remains unclear. Here, exfoliated flakes of MoS2 with various thicknesses were successfully fabricated into field-effect transistors (FETs) to measure the thickness and temperature dependences of electrical mobility. For these MoS2 FETs, measurements at both 295 K and 77 K revealed the maximum mobility for layer thicknesses between 5 layers (˜3.6 nm) and 10 layers (˜7 nm), with ˜70 cm2 V-1 s-1 measured for 5 layer devices at 295 K. Temperature-dependent mobility measurements revealed that the mobility rises with increasing temperature to a maximum. This maximum occurs at increasing temperature with increasing layer thickness, possibly due to strong Coulomb scattering from charge impurities or weakened electron-phonon interactions for thicker devices. Temperature-dependent conductivity measurements for different gate voltages revealed a metal-to-insulator transition for devices thinner than 10 layers, which may enable new memory and switching applications. This study advances the understanding of fundamental charge transport mechanisms in few-layer MoS2, and indicates the promise of few-layer transition metal dichalcogenides as candidates for potential optoelectronic applications.

  18. Thickness-dependent charge transport in few-layer MoS2 field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Wei; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Fowlkes, Jason; Li, Xufan; Puretzky, Alexander A; Rouleau, Christopher M; Geohegan, David B; Xiao, Kai

    2016-04-22

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is currently under intensive study because of its exceptional optical and electrical properties in few-layer form. However, how charge transport mechanisms vary with the number of layers in MoS2 flakes remains unclear. Here, exfoliated flakes of MoS2 with various thicknesses were successfully fabricated into field-effect transistors (FETs) to measure the thickness and temperature dependences of electrical mobility. For these MoS2 FETs, measurements at both 295 K and 77 K revealed the maximum mobility for layer thicknesses between 5 layers (∼3.6 nm) and 10 layers (∼7 nm), with ∼70 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) measured for 5 layer devices at 295 K. Temperature-dependent mobility measurements revealed that the mobility rises with increasing temperature to a maximum. This maximum occurs at increasing temperature with increasing layer thickness, possibly due to strong Coulomb scattering from charge impurities or weakened electron-phonon interactions for thicker devices. Temperature-dependent conductivity measurements for different gate voltages revealed a metal-to-insulator transition for devices thinner than 10 layers, which may enable new memory and switching applications. This study advances the understanding of fundamental charge transport mechanisms in few-layer MoS2, and indicates the promise of few-layer transition metal dichalcogenides as candidates for potential optoelectronic applications. PMID:26963583

  19. Settling and compaction of chromite cumulates employing a centrifuging piston cylinder and application to layered mafic intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoochehri, Shahrzad; Schmidt, Max W.

    2014-12-01

    The time scales and mechanics of gravitationally driven crystal settling and compaction is investigated through high temperature (1,280-1,500 °C) centrifuge-assisted experiments on a chromite-basalt melt system at 100-1,500 g (0.5 GPa). Subsequently, the feasibility of this process for the formation of dense chromite cumulate layers in large layered mafic intrusions (LMIs) is assessed. Centrifugation leads to a single cumulate layer formed at the gravitational bottom of the capsule. The experimentally observed mechanical settling velocity of a suspension of ~24 vol% chromite is calculated to be about half (~0.53) of the Stokes settling velocity, with a sedimentation exponent n of 2.35 (3). Gravitational settling leads to an orthocumulate layer with a porosity of 0.52 (all porosities as fraction). Formation times for such a layer from a magma with initial chromite contents of 0.1-1 vol% are 140-3.5 days, equal to a growth rate of 0.007-0.3 m/day for grain sizes of 1-2 mm. More compacted chromite layers form with increasing centrifugation time and acceleration through chemical compaction: An increase of grain contact areas and grain sizes together with a decrease in porosity is best explained by pressure dissolution at grain contacts, reprecipitation and grain growth into the intergranular space and a concomitant expulsion of intergranular melt. The relation between the porosity in the cumulate pile and effective pressure integrated over time (Δ ρ · h · a · t) is best fit with a logarithmic function, in fact confirming that a (pressure) dissolution-reprecipitation process is the dominant mechanism of compaction. The experimentally derived equation allows calculating compaction times: 70-80 % chromite at the bottom of a 1-m-thick chromite layer are reached after 9-250 years, whereas equivalent compaction times are 0.2-0.9 years for olivine (both for 2 mm grain size). The experiments allow to determine the bulk viscosities of chromite and olivine cumulates to be

  20. Thermal transport in low-dimensional systems: the case of Graphene and single layer Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Luiz Felipe; Donadio, Davide

    2013-03-01

    Low-dimensional systems present unusual transport properties in comparison to bulk materials. In contrast with the three-dimensional case, in one- and two-dimensions heat transport models predict a divergence of the thermal conductivity with system size. In reality, in a low-dimensional system the mean-free-path of heat carriers (phonons) becomes comparable to the micrometer size of experimental samples. Recent developments in nanostructure fabrication allow a direct comparison between theory and experiments for such low-dimensional systems. We perform extensive molecular dynamics simulations of heat transport in graphene and single layer BN, in order to clarify the behavior of the thermal conductivity in realistic low-dimensional systems. In particular, we address the influence of system size on the simulation results. Equilibrium molecular dynamics predicts a convergence of the thermal conductivity with system size, even for systems with less than one hundred nanometers and thousands of atoms. Meanwhile, large scale non-equilibrium molecular dynamics shows a divergence of the thermal conductivity with system size up to the micrometer scale. We analyse the discrepancy between methods in terms of perturbations in phonon populations induced by the non-equilibrium regime.

  1. Ion transport through a charged cylindrical membrane pore contacting stagnant diffusion layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Mathias B.; Biesheuvel, P. M.; Bazant, Martin Z.; Mani, Ali

    2012-11-01

    Fundamental understanding of the ion transport in membrane systems by diffusion, electromigration and advection is important in widespread processes such as de-ionization by reverse osmosis and electrodialysis and electro-osmotic micropumps. Here we revisit the classical analysis of a single cylindrical pore, see e.g. Gross and Osterle [J Chem Phys 49, 228 (1968)]. We extend the analysis by including the well-established concept of contacting stagnant diffusion layers on either side of the pore; thus, the pore is not in direct equilibrium with the reservoirs. Inside the pore the ions are assumed to be in quasi-equilibrium in the radial direction with the surface charge on the pore wall and we obtain a 1D model by area-averaging. We demonstrate that in some extreme limits this model reduces to simpler models studied in the literature; see e.g. Yaroshchuk [J Membrane Sci 396, 43 (2012)]. Using our model we present predictions of important transport effects such as variation of transport numbers inside the membrane, onset of limiting current, and transient dynamics described by the method of characteristics.

  2. Fukushima-derived fission nuclides monitored around Taiwan: Free tropospheric versus boundary layer transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Chih-An; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Lin, Chuan-Yao

    2012-02-01

    The 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan was the worst nuclear disaster following the 1986 Chernobyl accident. Fission products (nuclides) released from the Fukushima plant site since March 12, 2011 had been detected around the northern hemisphere in about two weeks and also in the southern hemisphere about one month later. We report here detailed time series of radioiodine and radiocesium isotopes monitored in a regional network around Taiwan, including one high-mountain and three ground-level sites. Our results show several pulses of emission from a sequence of accidents in the Fukushima facility, with the more volatile 131I released preferentially over 134Cs and 137Cs at the beginning. In the middle of the time series, there was a pronounced peak of radiocesium observed in northern Taiwan, with activity concentrations of 134Cs and 137Cs far exceeding that of 131I during that episode. From the first arrival time of these fission nuclides and their spatial and temporal variations at our sampling sites and elsewhere, we suggest that Fukushima-derived radioactive nuclides were transported to Taiwan and its vicinity via two pathways at different altitudes. One was transported in the free troposphere by the prevailing westerly winds around the globe; the other was transported in the planetary boundary layer by the northeast monsoon wind directly toward Taiwan.

  3. Transport of polluted boundary layer air from the Po Valley to high-alpine sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibert, Petra; Kromp-kolb, Helga; Kasper, Anne; Kalina, Michael; Puxbaum, Hans; Jost, Dieter T.; Schwikowski, Margit; Baltensperger, Urs

    Within the EUROTRAC subproject ALPTRAC the occurrence of reactive trace species at high-alpine sites was investigated. As a part of these studies, the transport of boundary layer air from the Po Valley, which is one potential major source region for air pollution in the Alps, to the high-mountain sites Sonnblick (3106 m) in Austria and Jungfraujoch (3579 m) in Switzerland was studied. A case study based on isentropic trajectories derived from a fine-mesh analysis showed the potential of such transports to cause substantial peaks in the aerosol concentration at Sonnblick. However, on a climatological basis the Po Valley does not seem to cause higher-than-average concentrations of species such as SO 2, SO 2-4, NH +4 and NO -3. Its contribution was estimated to be about 15% in summer and much less in winter. Indications of orographically induced, subgrid vertical transports were found which are important for the interpretation of data from pollution monitoring programmes at high-alpine sites.

  4. Scrape-Off Layer Transport and Deposition Studies in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Groth, M; Allen, S; Boedo, J; Brooks, N; Elder, J; Fenstermacher, M; Groebner, R; Lasnier, C; McLean, A; Leonard, A; Lisgo, S; Porter, G; Rensink, M; Rognlien, T; Rudakov, D; Stangeby, P; Wampler, W; Watkins, J

    2006-10-27

    Trace {sup 13}CH{sub 4} injection experiments into the main scrape-off layer of low density L-mode and high-density H-mode plasmas have been performed in the DIII-D tokamak [Luxon{_}NF02] to mimic the transport and deposition of carbon arising from a main chamber sputtering source. These experiments indicated entrainment of the injected carbon in plasma flow in the main SOL, and transport toward the inner divertor. Ex-situ surface analysis showed enhanced {sup 13}C surface concentration at the corner formed by the divertor floor and the angled target plate of the inner divertor in L-mode; in H-mode, both at the corner and along the surface bounding the private flux region inboard of the outer strike point. Interpretative modeling was made consistent with these experimental results by imposing a parallel carbon ion flow in the main SOL toward the inner target, and a radial pinch toward the separatrix. Predictive modeling carried out to better understand the underlying plasma transport processes suggests that the deuterium flow in the main SOL is related to the degree of detachment of the inner divertor leg. These simulations show that carbon ions are entrained with the deuteron flow in the main SOL via frictional coupling, but higher charge state carbon ions may be suspended upstream of the inner divertor X-point region due to balance of the friction force and the ion temperature gradient.

  5. Nondestructive detection of gangliosides with lipophilic fluorochromes and their employment for preparative high-performance thin-layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Müthing, J; Heitmann, D

    1993-01-01

    A simple and effective procedure for the isolation and purification of gangliosides by preparative thin-layer chromatography is described. The method is based on nondestructive visualization of gangliosides on silica gel-precoated thin-layer chromatography plates by staining with uncharged lipophilic fluorochromes. Fluorescent dyes were added in low concentrations into the mobile phase (0.002%, w/v) without any interference of the ganglioside separation. After uv localization, the fluorescent zones were scraped off the plate and the silica gel was extracted with chloroform/methanol/water (30/60/8). In the following step fluorochromes were removed from gangliosides containing crude extracts by anion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose. After desalting, impurities were removed by Iatrobeads chromatography. The method described offers an easy to handle and successful preparative thin-layer chromatography strategy to obtain pure gangliosides in microgram and miligram quantities. PMID:8434781

  6. High-performance hole transport layers for polymer light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, He

    One key component in more advanced multilayer polymer light-emitting diode (PLED) structures is the hole transport layer (HTL). Conventional PLED conductive polymer HTLs exhibit serious drawbacks such as corrosion of anodes, significant absorption in visible region, and mediating oxidative doping of polyfluorene emissive layers (EMLs). In addition, the question still remains as to whether conventional PLED HTLs have the electron-blocking capacity required to achieve high-performance PLEDs. If not, the question arises as to how a PLED structure can be modified to afford greater electron-blocking at the HTL/EML interface. In the present thesis work, three generations of PLED HTLs were developed based on a siloxane-derivatized, crosslinkable, hole-transporting material, 4,4'-bis[(p-trichlorosilylpropylphenyl)phenylamino]biphenyl, TPDSi2. The first generation is the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of TPDSi2, which can increase the work function of indium tin oxide (ITO) anode, enhance ITO anode hole injection, and hence improve PLED performance. The second generation is the spin-coated blend of TPDSi2 and a hole transporting polymer TFB on ITO, which forms an insoluble crosslinked network that can be used as a PLED HTL. The third generation is a double-layer HTL with the TPDSi2 + TFB on top of a conventional PLED HTL, which combines the hole injection capacity of conventional PLED HTLs and the electron-blocking capacity of the TPDSi2 + TFB blend. PLED devices based on these new HTLs exhibit comparable or superior performance compared to those based on conventional HTLs; high current efficiencies of ˜17 cd/A and maximum luminance of ˜140,000 cd/m2 have been achieved. These siloxane-based HTLs not only enhance PLED anode hole-injection by chemically bonding the HTL to the ITO anode, they also exhibit great electron-blocking capacity. The present organosiloxane HTL approach offers many other attractions such as convenience of fabrication, flexibility in choosing HTL

  7. Measurement of a new parameter representing the gas transport properties of the catalyst layers of polymer electrolyte fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Iden, Hiroshi; Ohma, Atsushi; Tokunaga, Tomomi; Yokoyama, Kouji; Shinohara, Kazuhiko

    2016-05-14

    The optimization of the catalyst layers is necessary for obtaining a better fuel cell performance and reducing fuel cell cost. Although the ionomer coverage of the Pt catalyst is said to be a key parameter in this regard, the proportion of Pt either directly or indirectly covered by the ionomer is thought to be an important parameter with regard to gas transport (indirectly covered Pt: its gas transport paths are completely blocked by the ionomer even if it does not directly cover Pt). In this study, a new technique has been developed for evaluating the proportion of Pt covered indirectly or directly by the ionomer, which is defined as the "capped proportion", based on the carbon monoxide (CO) adsorption properties at different temperatures. The validity of the method was thoroughly examined by identifying the CO adsorption properties of the components of the catalyst layers. The capped proportion and oxygen transport resistance in the catalyst layers showed a good correlation, indicating that the capped proportion is a dominant factor of oxygen transport resistance. This technique thus enables the evaluation of the dominant factor of the gas transport properties of the catalyst layers. The method has another significant advantage in that it does not require a membrane electrode assembly, let alone electrochemical measurement, which should be helpful for catalyst layer optimization. PMID:27113681

  8. Synthesis of transport layers with controlled anisotropy and application thereof to study proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Devin; Mérida, Walter

    2016-04-01

    We report on a novel method for the synthesis of fibre-based proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell porous transport layers (PTLs) with controllable fibre alignment. We also report the first application of such layers as diagnostics tools to probe the effect of within-plane PTL anisotropy upon PEM fuel cell performance. These structures are realized via adaptation of electrospinning technology. Electrospun layers with progressive anisotropy magnitude are produced and evaluated. This novel approach is distinguished from the state-of-the-art because an equivalent study using commercially available materials is impossible due to lack of structurally similar substrates with different anisotropies. The anisotropy is visualized via scanning electron microscopy, and quantified using electrical resistivity. The capacity is demonstrated to achieve fibre alignment, and the associated impact on transport properties. A framework is presented for assessing the in-situ performance, whereby transport layer orientation versus bipolar plate flow-field geometry is manipulated. While an effect upon the commercial baseline cannot be discerned, electrospun transport layers with greater anisotropy magnitude suggest greater sensitivity to orientation; where greater performance is obtained with fibres cross-aligned to flow-field channels. Our approach of electrospun transport enables deterministic structures by which fuel cell performance can be explained and optimized.

  9. Ultraviolet-enhanced light emitting diode employing individual ZnO microwire with SiO{sub 2} barrier layers

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yingtian; Xu, Li; Dai, Jun; Ma, Yan; Chu, Xianwei; Zhang, Yuantao; Du, Guotong; Zhang, Baolin; Yin, Jingzhi

    2015-05-25

    This paper details the fabrication of n-ZnO single microwire (SMW)-based high-purity ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) with an added SiO{sub 2} barrier layer on the p-Si substrate. However, the current-voltage (I-V) curve exhibited non-ideal rectifying characteristics. Under forward bias, both UV and visible emissions could be detected by electroluminescence (EL) measurement. When bias voltage reached 60 V at room temperature, a UV emission spike occurred at 390 nm originating from the n-ZnO SMW. Compared with the EL spectrum of the n-ZnO SMW/p-Si heterojunction device without the SiO{sub 2} barrier layer, we saw improved UV light extraction efficiency from the current-blocking effect of the SiO{sub 2} layer. The intense UV emission in the n-ZnO SMW/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si heterojunction indicated that the SiO{sub 2} barrier layer can restrict the movement of electrons as expected and result in effective electron-hole recombination in ZnO SMW.

  10. Layering Networked and Symphonic Selves: A Critical Role for e-Portfolios in Employability through Integrative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cambridge, Darren

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: E-portfolios, which document and facilitate learning and performance, have recently attracted interest in the USA, UK, and Europe as means to increase employability and support lifelong learning. This article aims to critically examine these objectives in order to guide the future e-portfolio practice. Design/methodology/approach: Social…

  11. Amorphous silicon as electron transport layer for colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals light emitting diode

    SciTech Connect

    Song Tao; Shen Xiaojuan; Sun Baoquan; Zhang Fute; Zhang Xiaohong; Zhu Xiulin

    2009-12-07

    We demonstrate the fabrication of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) made from all-inorganic colloidal semiconducting nanocrystals (NCs). The diode utilizes a sandwich structure formed by placing CdSe/CdS NCs between two layers of Si and Ag{sub x}O, which act as electron- and hole-transporting materials, respectively. The photoluminescence properties of NCs are rendered less dependent upon surface chemistry and chemical environment by growing a thick CdS shell. It also enhances stability of the NCs during the process of magnetron sputtering for silicon deposition. The resulting LED device exhibits a low turn-on voltage of 2.5 V and the maximum external quantum efficiency of nearly 0.08%.

  12. Effect of collisional temperature isotropisation on ELM parallel transport in a tokamak scrape-off layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulette, David; Hirstoaga, Sever A.; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2016-08-01

    We develop a hybrid model to describe the parallel transport in a tokamak scrape-off layer following an edge-localized mode (ELM) event. The parallel dynamics is treated with a kinetic Vlasov–Poisson model, while the evolution of the perpendicular temperature {{T}\\bot} is governed by a fluid equation. The coupling is ensured by isotropising collisions. The model generalises an earlier approach where {{T}\\bot} was constant in space and time (Manfredi et al 2011 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 53 015012). Numerical results show that the main effect comes from electron–electron collisions, which limit the decrease of the parallel electron temperature and increase the potential drop in the Debye sheath in front of the surface. Ion–ion collisions have an almost negligible impact. The net effect is an increased peak power load on the target plates.

  13. Helium transport in the core and stochastic edge layer in LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Goto, M.; Schmitz, O.; Dai, S.; Bader, A.; Kobayashi, M.; Kawamura, G.; Moon, C.; Nakamura, Y.; The LHD Experiment Group

    2016-07-01

    Radial profiles of the density ratio of helium to hydrogen ions are measured using charge exchange spectroscopy with a two-wavelength spectrometer in the large helical device. Helium transport at the last closed flux surface (LCFS) and stochastic magnetic field layer outside the LCFS as well as in the core plasma is studied for a wide range of helium fractions, i.e. from hydrogen-dominated plasmas up to helium-dominated plasmas. The helium density profile becomes more peaked and inward convection velocity increases in the hydrogen-dominant plasma, while it becomes flat or hollow and the convection velocity is in the outward direction in the helium-dominant plasmas. The density gradient of helium at the LCFS is twice that of hydrogen and becomes steeper as the hydrogen becomes more dominant.

  14. Graphene oxide hole transport layers for large area, high efficiency organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Chris T. G.; Rhodes, Rhys W.; Beliatis, Michail J.; Imalka Jayawardena, K. D. G.; Rozanski, Lynn J.; Mills, Christopher A.; Silva, S. Ravi P.

    2014-08-18

    Graphene oxide (GO) is becoming increasingly popular for organic electronic applications. We present large active area (0.64 cm{sup 2}), solution processable, poly[[9-(1-octylnonyl)-9H-carbazole-2,7-diyl]-2,5-thiophenediyl-2,1, 3-benzothiadiazole-4,7-diyl-2,5-thiophenediyl]:[6,6]-Phenyl C{sub 71} butyric acid methyl ester (PCDTBT:PC{sub 70}BM) organic photovoltaic (OPV) solar cells, incorporating GO hole transport layers (HTL). The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of ∼5% is the highest reported for OPV using this architecture. A comparative study of solution-processable devices has been undertaken to benchmark GO OPV performance with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) HTL devices, confirming the viability of GO devices, with comparable PCEs, suitable as high chemical and thermal stability replacements for PEDOT:PSS in OPV.

  15. Investigation of the mobile granular layer in bed-load transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guazzelli, Elisabeth; Aussillous, Pascale; Chauchat, Julien; Pailha, Mickael; Medale, Marc; Aix Marseille Université, Cnrs, Iusti Umr 7343 Team; Legi, Ujf/Inpg/Cnrs Team; Locie, Cnrs-Université de Savoie Team

    2012-11-01

    The mobile layer of a granular bed composed of spherical particles is experimentally investigated in a laminar rectangular-channel flow. Both particle and fluid velocity profiles are obtained using particle image velocimetry for different index-matched combinations of particles and fluid. While the Shields number controls incipient motion, it is not the most appropriate parameter for describing bed-load transport. The experimental observations suggest that the appropriate length-scale is the fluid height and that the proper control parameter is the dimensionless fluid flow-rate. A two-phase continuum model having a frictional rheology to describe particle-particle interactions can capture most of the experimental observations. Rheological constitutive laws having increasing degree of sophistication are discussed. Funding from Agence Nationale de la Recherche (Project Dunes ANR-07-3 18-3892) is gratefully acknowledged.

  16. TRANSPORT PROPERTIES IN MISFIT-LAYERED Ca2Co2O5 COMPOUND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Jinle; Zhan, Bin; Lin, Yuan-Hua; Nan, Ce-Wen; Liu, Yao-Chun

    2013-10-01

    The low temperature transport and magnetic properties were investigated in the misfit-layered Ca2Co2O5 compound. The compound exhibits incommensurate spin-density-wave (SDW) state in the dχ-1/dT curve at 20 K, which is confirmed by the resistivity (ρ) characterization. The resistivity shows an upturn from metallic to insulating behavior at TM-I (130 K) and strong Fermi liquid behaviors with ρ T2 relation between TM-I and T*(225 K). The Seebeck coefficient shows abnormal temperature dependence at Tp (40 K), which is suggested to origin from the long order of atomic in [Ca2CoO3] sublayer and spin fluctuation of Co ions. Moreover, large Seebeck coefficient (120 μV/K) and low thermal conductivity (2.5 W/mK) were obtained at room temperature, indicating that it is a promising p-type thermoelectric material for energy conversion.

  17. Copper thiocyanate: An attractive hole transport/extraction layer for use in organic photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treat, Neil D.; Yaacobi-Gross, Nir; Faber, Hendrik; Perumal, Ajay K.; Bradley, Donal D. C.; Stingelin, Natalie; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.

    2015-07-01

    We report the advantageous properties of the inorganic molecular semiconductor copper(I) thiocyanate (CuSCN) for use as a hole collection/transport layer (HTL) in organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. CuSCN possesses desirable HTL energy levels [i.e., valence band at -5.35 eV, 0.35 eV deeper than poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS)], which produces a 17% increase in power conversion efficiency (PCE) relative to PEDOT:PSS-based devices. In addition, a two-fold increase in shunt resistance for the solar cells measured in dark conditions is achieved. Ultimately, CuSCN enables polymer:fullerene based OPV cells to achieve PCE > 8%. CuSCN continues to offer promise as a chemically stable and straightforward replacement for the commonly used PEDOT:PSS.

  18. Narrow Band Gap Lead Sulfide Hole Transport Layers for Quantum Dot Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nanlin; Neo, Darren C J; Tazawa, Yujiro; Li, Xiuting; Assender, Hazel E; Compton, Richard G; Watt, Andrew A R

    2016-08-24

    The band structure of colloidal quantum dot (CQD) bilayer heterojunction solar cells is optimized using a combination of ligand modification and QD band gap control. Solar cells with power conversion efficiencies of up to 9.33 ± 0.50% are demonstrated by aligning the absorber and hole transport layers (HTL). Key to achieving high efficiencies is optimizing the relative position of both the valence band and Fermi energy at the CQD bilayer interface. By comparing different band gap CQDs with different ligands, we find that a smaller band gap CQD HTL in combination with a more p-type-inducing CQD ligand is found to enhance hole extraction and hence device performance. We postulate that the efficiency improvements observed are largely due to the synergistic effects of narrower band gap QDs, causing an upshift of valence band position due to 1,2-ethanedithiol (EDT) ligands and a lowering of the Fermi level due to oxidation. PMID:27421066

  19. Carrier transport in multilayer organic photodetectors: I. Effects of layer structure on dark current and photoresponse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jiangeng; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2004-02-01

    In this and the following article (Parts I and II, respectively), we discuss carrier transport in multilayer organic photodetectors. In Part I, we analyze carrier tunneling in multilayer organic photodetectors, both within the organic active region and at the anode/organic interface. The external quantum efficiency of an organic photodetector whose individual layers in the active region are ⩽30 Å thick shows an activation energy of ⩽0.1 eV, suggesting that the photogenerated carriers tunnel through the potential wells formed by the multilayer stack. In such photodetectors, electron tunneling injection from the anode into the organic active region dominates the dark current at T⩾200 K. Fitting of the dark current-voltage characteristics using a semiclassical tunneling model leads to barrier heights in agreement with experimental data. In Part II, the effects of anode preparation on performance of multilayer organic photodetectors are discussed.

  20. Copper thiocyanate: An attractive hole transport/extraction layer for use in organic photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Treat, Neil D. E-mail: t.anthopoulos@imperial.ac.uk; Stingelin, Natalie; Yaacobi-Gross, Nir; Faber, Hendrik; Perumal, Ajay K.; Bradley, Donal D. C.; Anthopoulos, Thomas D. E-mail: t.anthopoulos@imperial.ac.uk

    2015-07-06

    We report the advantageous properties of the inorganic molecular semiconductor copper(I) thiocyanate (CuSCN) for use as a hole collection/transport layer (HTL) in organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. CuSCN possesses desirable HTL energy levels [i.e., valence band at −5.35 eV, 0.35 eV deeper than poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS)], which produces a 17% increase in power conversion efficiency (PCE) relative to PEDOT:PSS-based devices. In addition, a two-fold increase in shunt resistance for the solar cells measured in dark conditions is achieved. Ultimately, CuSCN enables polymer:fullerene based OPV cells to achieve PCE > 8%. CuSCN continues to offer promise as a chemically stable and straightforward replacement for the commonly used PEDOT:PSS.

  1. Stacking Fault Enriching the Electronic and Transport Properties of Few-Layer Phosphorenes and Black Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Lei, Shuangying; Wang, Han; Huang, Lan; Sun, Yi-Yang; Zhang, Shengbai

    2016-02-10

    Interface engineering is critical for enriching the electronic and transport properties of two-dimensional materials. Here, we identify a new stacking, named Aδ, in few-layer phosphorenes (FLPs) and black phosphorus (BP) based on first-principles calculation. With its low formation energy, the Aδ stacking could exist in FLPs and BP as a stacking fault. The presence of the Aδ stacking fault induces a direct to indirect transition of the band gap in FLPs. It also affects the carrier mobilities by significantly increasing the carrier effective masses. More importantly, the Aδ stacking enables the fabrication of a whole spectrum of lateral junctions with all the type-I, II, and III alignments simply through the manipulation of the van der Waals stacking without resorting to any chemical modification. This is achieved by the widely tunable electron affinity and ionization potential of FLPs and BP with the Aδ stacking. PMID:26799596

  2. Turbulence avoidance and the wind-driven transport of plankton in the surface Ekman layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pringle, James M.

    2007-03-01

    Observations of turbulence avoidance in zooplankton are compared to estimates of the wind-driven turbulence in the upper ocean. Plankton that avoid wind-driven turbulence by moving deeper are no longer transported by the wind-driven Ekman currents near the surface because they are no longer near the surface. Here, a threshold level of turbulence that triggers an avoidance response is estimated, and is used to infer the wind speed and water column stratification conditions that would lead to zooplankton leaving the Ekman layer. Turbulence avoidance is argued to lead to near-shore retention in wind-driven upwelling systems, and to a reduction of the delivery of zooplankton to Georges Bank from the deeper waters of the Gulf of Maine.

  3. Transport of desert dust mixed with North African industrial pollutants in the subtropical Saharan Air Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, S.; Alastuey, A.; Alonso-Pérez, S.; Querol, X.; Cuevas, E.; Abreu-Afonso, J.; Viana, M.; Pérez, N.; Pandolfi, M.; de La Rosa, J.

    2011-07-01

    An analysis of chemical composition data of particulate matter samples (TSP, PM10 and PM2.5) collected from 2002 to 2008 in the North Atlantic free troposphere at the Izaña Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) observatory (Tenerife, Canary Islands) shows that desert dust is very frequently mixed with particulate pollutants in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL). The study of this data set with Median Concentrations At Receptor (MCAR) plots allowed the identification of the potential source regions of the dust and particulate pollutants. Areas located at the south of the southern slope of the Atlas mountains emerge as the most frequent source of the soil desert dust advected to the northern edge of the SAL in summer. Industrial emissions occurring in Northern Algeria, Eastern Algeria, Tunisia and the Atlantic coast of Morocco appear as the most important source of the nitrate, ammonium and a fraction of sulphate (at least 60 % of the sulphate <10 μm transported from some regions) observed in the SAL. These emissions are mostly linked to crude oil refineries, phosphate-based fertilizer industry and power plants. Although desert dust emissions appear as the most frequent source of the phosphorous observed in the SAL, high P concentrations are observed when the SAL is affected by emissions from open mines of phosphate and phosphate based fertilizer industry. The results also show that a significant fraction of the sulphate (up to 90 % of sulphate <10 μm transported from some regions) observed in the SAL may be influenced by soil emissions of evaporite minerals in well defined regions where dry saline lakes (chotts) are present. These interpretations of the MCAR plots are consistent with the results obtained with the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF2) receptor modelling. The results of this study show that North African industrial pollutants may be mixed with desert dust and exported to the North Atlantic in the Saharan Air Layer.

  4. Transport of desert dust mixed with North African industrial pollutants in the subtropical Saharan Air Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, S.; Alastuey, A.; Alonso-Pérez, S.; Querol, X.; Cuevas, E.; Abreu-Afonso, J.; Viana, M.; Pandolfi, M.; de La Rosa, J.

    2011-03-01

    The chemical composition of particulate matter samples (TSP, PM10 and PM2.5) collected from 2002 to 2008 in the North Atlantic free troposphere at Izaña Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) observatory (Tenerife, The Canary Islands) was studied. The analysis of the samples collected in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) shows that soil desert dust is very frequently mixed with particulate pollutants. An analysis of this data set with Median Concentrations At Receptor (MCAR) plots allowed to identify the potential source regions of the dust and particulate pollutants. Areas located at the south of the Southern slope of Atlas emerge as the most frequent source of the soil desert dust advected to the northern edge of the SAL in summer. Industrial emissions occurring along the Atlantic coast of Morocco, Northern Algeria, Eastern Algeria and Tunisia appear as the most important source of the nitrate, ammonium and a fraction of sulphate (at least a 60% of the sulphate <10 μm transported from some regions) observed in the SAL. These emissions are mostly linked to crude oil refineries, phosphate-based fertilizer industry and power plants. Although desert dust emissions appear as the most frequent source of the phosphorous observed in the SAL, high P concentrations are observed when the SAL is affected by emissions from open mines of phosphate and phosphate based fertilizer industry. The results also show that a significant fraction of the sulphate (up to 90% of sulphate <10 μm transported from some regions) observed in the SAL is linked to soil emissions of evaporite minerals in well defined regions where dry saline lakes (chotts) are present. These interpretations of the MCAR plots are consistent with the results obtained with the Positive Matrix Factorization receptor modelling. The results of this study show that North African industrial pollutants may be mixed with desert dust and exported to the North Atlantic in the Saharan Air Layer.

  5. Parameterizing Urban Canopy Layer transport in an Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöckl, Stefan; Rotach, Mathias W.

    2016-04-01

    The percentage of people living in urban areas is rising worldwide, crossed 50% in 2007 and is even higher in developed countries. High population density and numerous sources of air pollution in close proximity can lead to health issues. Therefore it is important to understand the nature of urban pollutant dispersion. In the last decades this field has experienced considerable progress, however the influence of large roughness elements is complex and has as of yet not been completely described. Hence, this work studied urban particle dispersion close to source and ground. It used an existing, steady state, three-dimensional Lagrangian particle dispersion model, which includes Roughness Sublayer parameterizations of turbulence and flow. The model is valid for convective and neutral to stable conditions and uses the kernel method for concentration calculation. As most Lagrangian models, its lower boundary is the zero-plane displacement, which means that roughly the lower two-thirds of the mean building height are not included in the model. This missing layer roughly coincides with the Urban Canopy Layer. An earlier work "traps" particles hitting the lower model boundary for a recirculation period, which is calculated under the assumption of a vortex in skimming flow, before "releasing" them again. The authors hypothesize that improving the lower boundary condition by including Urban Canopy Layer transport could improve model predictions. This was tested herein by not only trapping the particles, but also advecting them with a mean, parameterized flow in the Urban Canopy Layer. Now the model calculates the trapping period based on either recirculation due to vortex motion in skimming flow regimes or vertical velocity if no vortex forms, depending on incidence angle of the wind on a randomly chosen street canyon. The influence of this modification, as well as the model's sensitivity to parameterization constants, was investigated. To reach this goal, the model was

  6. Structural factors affecting lithium transport in lithium-excess layered cathode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fell, Christopher R.

    Lithium ion batteries have drawn significant attention as the principle energy storage device powering today's mobile electronic equipment. Despite the increased usage, the performance of current lithium ion battery technology falls short of the requirements needed for large format applications such as electric vehicles. The layered lithium-excess oxide compounds Li[NixLi1/3-2x/3Mn2/3-x/3]O2 are of interest as a new generation of cathode materials for high energy density lithium ion batteries. Efforts to achieve a better understanding of the electrochemistry of lithium-excess materials require the connection of crystal structure to electrochemical properties. In this dissertation, a combination of advanced characterization techniques was used as a tool to understand the intercalation mechanism of the layered lithium-excess transition metal oxide Li[NixLi1/3-2x/3Mn 2/3-x/3]O2. The research identified that synthesis influences the structure of the material specifically the surface of the particles. The formation of a hydroxide rich surface film decreases the electrochemical performance. Post synthesis modifications including high pressure and high temperature leads to the formation of a second layered phase in the bulk; however, the treated samples display good electrochemical properties. This result underlines the flexibility of the structure of Li[NixLi1/3-2x/3Mn 2/3-x/3]O2, a feature uncommon to other layered transition metal oxides. Surface characterization of the layered lithium-excess cathodes following electrochemical cycling revealed the formation of a new surface phase 1 to 5 nm thick as well as insight to the complex cation rearrangement process and phase transformation. This part of the research identified that significant changes occurred during electrochemical cycling; however did not identify when the transformations occurred. Investigation using in situ techniques during the first electrochemical cycle shows that the structure undergoes irreversible

  7. Molecular self ordering and charge transport in layer by layer deposited poly (3,3‴-dialkylquarterthiophene) films formed by Langmuir-Schaefer technique

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Rajiv K.; Singh, Arun Kumar; Upadhyay, C.; Prakash, Rajiv

    2014-09-07

    The performance of π-conjugated polymer based electronic devices is directly governed by the molecular morphology of polymer aggregation, the extent to which a molecule is electronically coupled (self ordered and interacted) to neighboring molecules, and orientation. The well electronic coupled and crystalline/ordered polymer films have the potential to enhance the charge transport properties up to a benchmark. However, there is insufficient knowledge about the direct formation of large area, oriented, crystalline, and smooth films. In this study, we have presented Langmuir Schaefer technique to obtain the large area, oriented, crystalline, and smooth film of Poly (3,3‴-dialkylquarterthiophene) (PQT-12) polymer. The effect of self ordering and orientation of PQT-12 polymer on optical, morphological, and charge transport properties has been investigated. The prepared films have been characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area diffractions pattern (SAED), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. UV-vis spectra, TEM, SAED, and AFM images of monolayer films reveal the formation of well ordered and electronically coupled polymer domains. Layer by layer deposited films reveal the change in the orientation, which is confirmed by Raman spectra. Electronic properties and layer dependent charge transport properties are investigated using sandwiched structure Al/PQT-12/ITO Schottky configuration with perpendicular to the deposited films. It is observed that the charge transport properties and device electronic parameters (ideality factor and turn on voltage) are significantly changing with increasing the number of PQT-12 layers. Our study also demonstrates the charge transport between polymer crystallites and cause of deviation of ideal behavior of organic Schottky diodes. It may be further explored for improving the performance of other organic and optoelectronic devices.

  8. Particle transport and flow modulation in particle-laden mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Xiao-Ling

    Shear flows provide a means to rapidly mix and disperse discrete solid particles and droplets in natural and industrial processes. Moderate mass loadings of particles in a gas mixing layer may also alter the gas shear flow. While the modeling of single-phase shear flows has undergone several decades of development and validation, the consideration of the corresponding problem in two- phase shear flows has just began. This dissertation represents a systematic effort to use a tool known as direct numerical simulations (DNS) to advance our understanding of particle transport and flow modulation in a gas mixing layer laden with solid particles. In DNS, almost all dynamically important flow scales are directly resolved. Previously, DNS of three-dimensional (3D) particle-laden shear flows have not been possible due to their high computational cost. Therefore, we first set out to develop and validate a computationally efficient and numerically accurate DNS methodology for particle-laden mixing layer. The method relies on a Fourier vorticity-based formulation together with a divergence-free decomposition. While almost all previous numerical studies adopted the trajectory approach for the dispersed phase in the context of DNS, a continuum approach has been developed and shown to reduce the computational time by a factor of 15 for the simulations of 3D particle-laden mixing layers. The validity and interpretation of the continuum approach were illustrated analytically with a stagnation point flow model. Detailed comparisons showed that the continuum approach and the trajectory approach yielded very similar results. Since the particulate field is compressible, numerical diffusion must be applied to remove local singularities. A dynamic-diffusion model has been developed as an optimum numerical diffusion model to ensure spectral resolution of particulate continuum fields. The numerical method was then used to study the interactions of finite-inertia particles with 3D flow

  9. Substrate-Electrode Interface Engineering by an Electron-Transport Layer in Hematite Photoanode.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chunmei; Wang, Zhiliang; Shi, Jingying; Yao, Tingting; Li, Ailong; Yan, Pengli; Huang, Baokun; Li, Can

    2016-03-23

    The photoelectrochemical water oxidation efficiency of photoanodes is largely limited by interfacial charge-transfer processes. Herein, a metal oxide electron-transport layer (ETL) was introduced at the substrate-electrode interface. Hematite photoanodes prepared on Li(+)- or WO3-modified substrates deliver higher photocurrent. It is inferred that a Li-doped Fe2O3 (Li:Fe2O3) layer with lower flat band potential than the bulk is formed. Li:Fe2O3 and WO3 are proved to function as an expressway for electron extraction. Via introducing ETL, both the charge separation and injection efficiencies are improved. The lifetime of photogenerated electrons is prolonged by 3 times, and the ratio of surface charge transfer and recombination rate is enhanced by 5 times with Li:Fe2O3 and 125 times with WO3 ETL at 1.23 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode. This result indicates the expedited electron extraction from photoanode to the substrate can suppress not only the recombination at the back contact interface but also those at the surface, which results in higher water oxidation efficiency. PMID:26926845

  10. Study of effective transport properties of fresh and aged gas diffusion layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosomoiu, Magdalena; Tsotridis, Georgios; Bednarek, Tomasz

    2015-07-01

    Gas diffusion layers (GDLs) play an important role in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) for the diffusion of reactant and the removal of product water. In the current study fresh and aged GDLs (Sigracet® GDL34BC) were investigated by X-ray computed tomography to obtain a representative 3D image of the real GDL structure. The examined GDL samples are taken from areas located under the flow channel and under the land. Additionally, a brand new Sigracet® GDL34BC was taken as a reference sample in order to find out the impact of fuel cell assembly on GDL. The produced 3D image data were used to calculate effective transport properties such as thermal and electrical conductivity, diffusivity, permeability and capillary pressure curves of the dry and partially saturated GDL. The simulation indicates flooding by product water occurs at contact angles lower than 125° depending on sample porosity. In addition, GDL anisotropy significantly affects the permeability as well as thermal and electrical conductivities. The calculated material bulk properties could be next used as input for CFD modelling of PEM fuel cells where GDL is usually assumed layer-like and homogeneous. Tensor material parameters allow to consider GDL anisotropy and lead to more realistic results.

  11. { P }{ T }-symmetric transport in non-{ P }{ T }-symmetric bi-layer optical arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Hernandez, J.; Izrailev, F. M.; Makarov, N. M.; Christodoulides, D. N.

    2016-09-01

    We study transport properties of an array created by alternating (a, b) layers with balanced loss/gain characterized by the key parameter γ. It is shown that for non-equal widths of (a, b) layers, i.e., when the corresponding Hamiltonian is non-{ P }{ T }-symmetric, the system exhibits the scattering properties similar to those of truly { P }{ T }-symmetric models provided that without loss/gain the structure presents the matched quarter stack. The inclusion of the loss/gain terms leads to an emergence of a finite number of spectral bands characterized by real values of the Bloch index. Each spectral band consists of a central region where the transmission coefficient {T}N≥slant 1, and two side regions with {T}N≤slant 1. At the borders between these regions the unidirectional reflectivity occurs. Also, the set of Fabry–Perot resonances with T N = 1 are found in spite of the presence of loss/gain.

  12. Numerical modeling of diffusive heat transport across magnetic islands and highly stochastic layers

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelzl, M.; Guenter, S.; Yu, Q.; Lackner, K.

    2007-05-15

    Diffusive heat transport across magnetic islands and highly stochastic layers is studied numerically for realistic values of {chi}{sub parallel}/{chi}{sub perpendicular} in cylindrical geometry, where {chi}{sub parallel} denotes the heat diffusion coefficient parallel and {chi}{sub perpendicular} the one perpendicular to the magnetic field lines. The computations are performed with a second-order finite difference scheme, for which the numerical errors are independent from the value of {chi}{sub parallel}/{chi}{sub perpendicular} [S. Guenter et al., J. Comput. Phys. 209, 354 (2005)]. Sufficient spatial resolution is ensured by using an unsheared helical coordinate system. The heat flux around magnetic islands as well as the effective radial heat diffusivity {chi}{sub r} are examined and compared to analytical theory. The temperature perturbations caused by magnetic islands and the resulting bootstrap current perturbations essential for the stability of neoclassical tearing modes are analyzed and compared to analytical predictions [R. Fitzpatrick, Phys. Plasmas 2, 825 (1995)]. Agreement is found in the 'small' and 'large' island limits, but an enhanced NTM drive is observed in between. A correction factor that can reproduce the numerical results very well is presented. For a highly stochastic layer, produced by five strongly overlapping islands, the radial heat diffusivity {chi}{sub r} is determined and compared to several analytical theories.

  13. Ozone Transport and Mixing Processes in the Boundary Layer Observed with Lidar during Discover-AQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senff, C. J.; Langford, A. O.; Alvarez, R. J. _II, II; Choukulkar, A.; Brewer, A.; Weickmann, A. M.; Kirgis, G.; Sandberg, S.; Hardesty, M.; Delgado, R.; Long, R.; Brown, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    The final two Discover-AQ air quality studies were conducted in Houston, TX in September 2013 and the Colorado Front Range in July/August 2014. These two regions are characterized by different ozone precursor sources and exhibit unique regional wind flow patterns. During these studies, NOAA deployed its truck-based, scanning TOPAZ ozone lidar to document the vertical structure and temporal evolution of ozone concentrations from near the surface up to about 2.5 km above ground level. In Houston, TOPAZ was located next to a radar wind profiler while during the Colorado campaign, Doppler wind lidars collocated with TOPAZ measured wind profiles and vertical velocity statistics throughout the boundary layer (BL). For both studies, nearby in situ sensors provided continuous observations of surface ozone and NOx. These combinations of remote and in situ sensors lend themselves to study the influence of BL transport and mixing processes on surface-level ozone. In this presentation, we focus on characterizing and quantifying changes in surface ozone due to several BL processes, including the Houston land-sea breeze circulation, the terrain-driven BL flow in the Colorado Front Range area, thunderstorm outflows, BL growth rate and depth, and entrainment of air from the residual layer or lower free troposphere into the BL.

  14. Regimes of gas transport through macroscopic areas of multi-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutilier, Michael; Karnik, Rohit; Sun, Chengzhen; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas

    2013-11-01

    Nanoporous graphene membranes have the potential to surpass the permeance and selectivity limits of current gas separation membranes. Recent experiments and simulations on individual graphene nanopores have demonstrated that molecule-size-selective nanopores can be created and used to separate components of a gas mixture. However, micrometer-scale tears and nanometer-scale intrinsic defects, inherently present in macroscopic areas of graphene, can severely limit the gas separation performance of graphene membranes of practical size. In this study, we measure the inherent permeance of macroscopic, multi-layer graphene membranes to various gases. A model for the transport of gases through these membranes is developed and shown to accurately explain the measured flow rates. The results quantify the separate contributions of tears and intrinsic defects to the inherent permeance of macroscopic areas of multi-layer graphene. The model is then extended to graphene membranes with engineered selective nanopores to optimize design parameters for defect-tolerant gas separation membranes. This work was supported in part by the MIT Energy Initiative and in part by a NSERC PGS-D3 Fellowship.

  15. A simple stochastic quadrant model for the transport and deposition of particles in turbulent boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, C.; Potts, I.; Reeks, M. W.

    2015-05-15

    We present a simple stochastic quadrant model for calculating the transport and deposition of heavy particles in a fully developed turbulent boundary layer based on the statistics of wall-normal fluid velocity fluctuations obtained from a fully developed channel flow. Individual particles are tracked through the boundary layer via their interactions with a succession of random eddies found in each of the quadrants of the fluid Reynolds shear stress domain in a homogeneous Markov chain process. In this way, we are able to account directly for the influence of ejection and sweeping events as others have done but without resorting to the use of adjustable parameters. Deposition rate predictions for a wide range of heavy particles predicted by the model compare well with benchmark experimental measurements. In addition, deposition rates are compared with those obtained from continuous random walk models and Langevin equation based ejection and sweep models which noticeably give significantly lower deposition rates. Various statistics related to the particle near wall behavior are also presented. Finally, we consider the model limitations in using the model to calculate deposition in more complex flows where the near wall turbulence may be significantly different.

  16. Improved Performance of Organic Light-Emitting Field-Effect Transistors by Interfacial Modification of Hole-Transport Layer/Emission Layer: Incorporating Organic Heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Song, Li; Hu, Yongsheng; Zhang, Nan; Li, Yantao; Lin, Jie; Liu, Xingyuan

    2016-06-01

    Organic heterojunctions (OHJs) consisting of a strong electron acceptor 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene hexacarbonitrile (HAT-CN) and an electron donor N,N'-di(naphthalene-1-yl)-N,N'-diphenyl-benzidine (NPB) were demonstrated for the first time that they can be implemented as effective modification layers between hole transport layer (HTL) and emission layer in the heterostructured organic light-emitting field effect transistors (OLEFETs). The influence of both HAT-CN/NPB junction (npJ) and NPB/HAT-CN junction (pnJ) on the optoelectronic performance of OLEFETs were conscientiously investigated. It is found that both the transport ability of holes and the injection ability of holes into emissive layer can be dramatically improved via the charge transfer of the OHJs and that between HAT-CN and the HTL. Consequently, OLEFETs with pnJ present optimal performance of an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 3.3% at brightness of 2630 cdm(-2) and the ones with npJs show an EQE of 4.7% at brightness of 4620 cdm(-2). By further utilizing npn OHJs of HAT-CN/NPB/HAT-CN, superior optoelectronic performance with an EQE of 4.7% at brightness of 8350 cdm(-2) and on/off ratio of 1 × 10(5) is obtained. The results demonstrate the great practicality of implementing OHJs as effective modification layers in heterostructured OLEFETs. PMID:27215694

  17. Material transport in a convective surface mixed layer under weak wind forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensa, Jean A.; Özgökmen, Tamay M.; Poje, Andrew C.; Imberger, Jörg

    2015-12-01

    Flows in the upper ocean mixed layer are responsible for the transport and dispersion of biogeochemical tracers, phytoplankton and buoyant pollutants, such as hydrocarbons from an oil spill. Material dispersion in mixed layer flows subject to diurnal buoyancy forcing and weak winds (| u10 | = 5m s-1) are investigated using a non-hydrostatic model. Both purely buoyancy-forced and combined wind- and buoyancy-forced flows are sampled using passive tracers, as well as 2D and 3D particles to explore characteristics of horizontal and vertical dispersion. It is found that the surface tracer patterns are determined by the convergence zones created by convection cells within a time scale of just a few hours. For pure convection, the results displayed the classic signature of Rayleigh-Benard cells. When combined with a wind stress, the convective cells become anisotropic in that the along-wind length scale gets much larger than the cross-wind scale. Horizontal relative dispersion computed by sampling the flow fields using both 2D and 3D passive particles is found to be consistent with the Richardson regime. Relative dispersion is an order of magnitude higher and 2D surface releases transition to Richardson regime faster in the wind-forced case. We also show that the buoyancy-forced case results in significantly lower amplitudes of scale-dependent horizontal relative diffusivity, kD(ℓ), than those reported by Okubo (1970), while the wind- and buoyancy-forced case shows a good agreement with Okubo's diffusivity amplitude, and the scaling is consistent with Richardson's 4/3rd law, kD ∼ ℓ4/3. These modeling results provide a framework for measuring material dispersion by mixed layer flows in future observational programs.

  18. Turbulent transport regimes and the scrape-off layer heat flux width

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Russell, D. A.

    2015-04-15

    Understanding the responsible mechanisms and resulting scaling of the scrape-off layer (SOL) heat flux width is important for predicting viable operating regimes in future tokamaks and for seeking possible mitigation schemes. In this paper, we present a qualitative and conceptual framework for understanding various regimes of edge/SOL turbulence and the role of turbulent transport as the mechanism for establishing the SOL heat flux width. Relevant considerations include the type and spectral characteristics of underlying instabilities, the location of the gradient drive relative to the SOL, the nonlinear saturation mechanism, and the parallel heat transport regime. We find a heat flux width scaling with major radius R that is generally positive, consistent with the previous findings [Connor et al., Nucl. Fusion 39, 169 (1999)]. The possible relationship of turbulence mechanisms to the neoclassical orbit width or heuristic drift mechanism in core energy confinement regimes known as low (L) mode and high (H) mode is considered, together with implications for the future experiments.

  19. Conjugated polyelectrolyte hole transport layer for inverted-type perovskite solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyosung; Mai, Cheng-Kang; Kim, Hak-Beom; Jeong, Jaeki; Song, Seyeong; Bazan, Guillermo C.; Kim, Jin Young; Heeger, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    Organic–inorganic hybrid perovskite materials offer the potential for realization of low-cost and flexible next-generation solar cells fabricated by low-temperature solution processing. Although efficiencies of perovskite solar cells have dramatically improved up to 19% within the past 5 years, there is still considerable room for further improvement in device efficiency and stability through development of novel materials and device architectures. Here we demonstrate that inverted-type perovskite solar cells with pH-neutral and low-temperature solution-processable conjugated polyelectrolyte as the hole transport layer (instead of acidic PEDOT:PSS) exhibit a device efficiency of over 12% and improved device stability in air. As an alternative to PEDOT:PSS, this work is the first report on the use of an organic hole transport material that enables the formation of uniform perovskite films with complete surface coverage and the demonstration of efficient, stable perovskite/fullerene planar heterojunction solar cells. PMID:26081865

  20. Flow and suspended particulate transport in a tidal bottom layer, south San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.; Gartner, J.W.; Cacchione, D.A.; Tate, G.B.

    1998-01-01

    Field investigations of the hydrodynamics and the resuspension and transport of particulate matter in a bottom boundary layer were carried out in South San Francisco Bay, California during March-April 1995. The GEOPROBE, an instrumented bottom tripod, and broad-band acousti Doppler current profilers were used in this investigation. The instrument assemblage provided detailed measurements of 1) turbulent mean velocity distribution within 1.5 m of sediment-w interface; 2) characteristics of 3-D tidal current in the water column; 3) friction velocity u* or bottom shear stress and bottom roughness length zo; 4) hydrodynamic conditions conducive for s resuspension; and 5) circulation patterns which are responsible for transporting suspended particulate matter in South San Francisco Bay. An unusual flow event was recorded by the instruments during March 8-11, 1995. A 3-D numerical model was implemented which re qualitatively, the unusual observations and supported the hypothesis that the unusual flow event caused by a combination of wind driven circulation and weak neap tides.

  1. Effect of gaseous void on bipolar charge transport in layered polymer film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lean, Meng H.; Chu, Wei-Ping L.

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes a hybrid algorithm to study the effect of a gaseous void on bipolar charge transport in layered polymer film. This hybrid algorithm uses a source distribution technique based on an axisymmetric boundary integral equation method to solve the Poisson equation and a fourth order Runge-Kutta (RK4) method with an upwind scheme for time integration. Iterative stability is assured by satisfying the Courant-Friedrichs-Levy stability criterion. Dynamic charge mapping is achieved by allowing conducting and insulating boundaries and material interfaces to be represented by equivalent free and bound charge distributions that collectively satisfy all local and far-field conditions. This hybrid technique caters to bipolar charge injection, field-dependent mobility transport, recombination, and trapping/de-trapping in the bulk and at material and physical interfaces. The resulting charge map is the taxonomy of the different charge types and their abundance, and presents a dynamic view of the temporal and spatial distributions. The paper is motivated by images of breakdown experiments that point to the role of gaseous void in delamination growth. For the test configuration, the high field at the edge of the gaseous void act as a sink first for positive and then negative charge. The net effect is to increase delamination stress at the edge leading to further growth of the defect and increasing the potential for partial discharge within the void.

  2. Kinetic Particle-In Simulations of Transport in a Tokamak Scrape-Off Layer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procassini, Richard Joseph

    1990-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is the application of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation techniques to the study of particle and energy transport in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of a tokamak fusion device. The PIC computer code that is used in this endeavor provides a fully-kinetic, self-consistent description of plasma transport in one spatial dimension (along the open magnetic field lines in the SOL) and two velocity components (v_ {|} and v_{ |}). The diverted-tokamak SOL system was modeled with various levels of physical complexity. The most rudimentary system studied, a collisionless bounded plasma-sheath region, was used to investigate the dependence of the potential structure on the source distribution function used to inject plasma into the SOL. The results from this study were in reasonable agreement with the predictions of previously developed analytic theories. The next level of complexity included the effects of Coulomb collisions. Plasma transport in the SOL was modeled over the wide range of collisionality encountered in current and near-term devices. The electron heat conduction flux in these simulations was limited to 11-21% of the free-streaming thermal flux. Finally, the atomic physics processes of charge exchange and ionization were included in the collisional model. These interactions between the charged-plasma and recycled-neutral particles can significantly affect energy transport through the SOL. This complete version of the kinetic PIC model was used to simulate SOL transport for various values of neutral particle density between the low-and high-recycling limits. The electron and ion kinetic energy fluxes to the divertor plate exhibit a marked decrease as the level of neutral particle recycling increases. The performance of the direct implicit PIC code has been determined with regard to the size of the time step Delta t and grid spacing Delta z. Each of the physics packages incorporated into the PIC code has been benchmarked against either available

  3. Transport of trace gases into the Tropical Tropopause Layer: the CAST experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, N. R.

    2013-12-01

    The transport of trace gases from the lower troposphere into and through the Tropical Tropopause Layer is of fundamental importance in determining the chemical composition of the stratosphere. This occurs in convection which is particularly strong in the West Pacific in Boreal winter. A joint aircraft experiment will take place which involves the NERC CAST (Coordinated Airborne Studies in the Tropics), the NASA ATTREX (Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment) and the NSF/NCAR CONTRAST Convective Transport of Active Species in the Tropics) projects. These will be supplemented by ground-based and sonde measurements made at Palau in CAST and in Biak in the Japanese SOWER experiment. One aim of the combined experiment is to measure the chemical composition of both the inflow and the outflow of the convection. The use of tracers with different lifetimes, including a range of short-lived halocarbons and hydrocarbons, should reveal a great deal about the mass fluxes of air from the lower troposphere to different altitudes in the TTL. This presentation describes the studies examining the composition and structure of the TTL, the plans for the aircraft and ground-based measurements, and the analyses to be used for interpretation. Examples of similar analyses based on the ATTREX measurements made in the East Pacific in February 2013 will be presented. These show the variability in the amount of air transported from the lower troposphere into the TTL calculated by the UK Met Office's NAME dispersion model as well as that model's ability to reproduce tracer distributions in the TTL.

  4. Spreading Layers in Accreting Objects: Role of Acoustic Waves for Angular Momentum Transport, Mixing, and Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippov, Alexander A.; Rafikov, Roman R.; Stone, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Disk accretion at a high rate onto a white dwarf (WD) or a neutron star has been suggested to result in the formation of a spreading layer (SL)—a belt-like structure on the object's surface, in which the accreted matter steadily spreads in the poleward (meridional) direction while spinning down. To assess its basic characteristics, we perform two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of supersonic SLs in the relevant morphology with a simple prescription for cooling. We demonstrate that supersonic shear naturally present at the base of the SL inevitably drives sonic instability that gives rise to large-scale acoustic modes governing the evolution of the SL. These modes dominate the transport of momentum and energy, which is intrinsically global and cannot be characterized via some form of local effective viscosity (e.g., α-viscosity). The global nature of the wave-driven transport should have important implications for triggering Type I X-ray bursts in low-mass X-ray binaries. The nonlinear evolution of waves into a system of shocks drives effective rearrangement (sensitively depending on thermodynamical properties of the flow) and deceleration of the SL, which ultimately becomes transonic and susceptible to regular Kelvin–Helmholtz instability. We interpret this evolution in terms of the global structure of the SL and suggest that mixing of the SL material with the underlying stellar fluid should become effective only at intermediate latitudes on the accreting object's surface, where the flow has decelerated appreciably. In the near-equatorial regions the transport is dominated by acoustic waves and mixing is less efficient. We speculate that this latitudinal nonuniformity of mixing in accreting WDs may be linked to the observed bipolar morphology of classical nova ejecta.

  5. Performance enhancement of planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells by n-doping of the electron transporting layer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin Sung; Bae, Seunghwan; Jo, Won Ho

    2015-12-21

    Herein we report a simple n-doping method to enhance the performance of perovskite solar cells with a planar heterojunction structure. Devices with an n-doped PCBM electron transporting layer exhibit a power conversion efficiency of 13.8% with a remarkably enhanced short-circuit current of 22.0 mA cm(-2) as compared to the devices with an un-doped PCBM layer. PMID:26466302

  6. Membranes with well-defined ions transport channels fabricated via solvent-responsive layer-by-layer assembly method for vanadium flow battery

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wanxing; Li, Xianfeng; Cao, Jingyu; Zhang, Hongzhang; Zhang, Huamin

    2014-01-01

    In this work we presented a general strategy for the fabrication of membranes with well-defined ions transport channels through solvent-responsive layer-by-layer assembly (SR-LBL). Multilayered poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) and poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) complexes were first introduced on the inner pore wall and the surface of sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone)/poly (ether sulfone) (PES/SPEEK) nanofiltration membranes to form ions transport channels with tuned radius. This type of membranes are highly efficient for the separators of batteries especially vanadium flow batteries (VFBs): the VFBs assembled with prepared membranes exhibit an outstanding performance in a wide current density range, which is much higher than that assembled with commercial Nafion 115 membranes. This idea could inspire the development of membranes for other flow battery systems, as well as create further progress in similar areas such as fuel cells, electro-dialysis, chlor-alkali cells, water electrolysis and so on. PMID:24500376

  7. Membranes with well-defined ions transport channels fabricated via solvent-responsive layer-by-layer assembly method for vanadium flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wanxing; Li, Xianfeng; Cao, Jingyu; Zhang, Hongzhang; Zhang, Huamin

    2014-02-01

    In this work we presented a general strategy for the fabrication of membranes with well-defined ions transport channels through solvent-responsive layer-by-layer assembly (SR-LBL). Multilayered poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) and poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) complexes were first introduced on the inner pore wall and the surface of sulfonated poly (ether ether ketone)/poly (ether sulfone) (PES/SPEEK) nanofiltration membranes to form ions transport channels with tuned radius. This type of membranes are highly efficient for the separators of batteries especially vanadium flow batteries (VFBs): the VFBs assembled with prepared membranes exhibit an outstanding performance in a wide current density range, which is much higher than that assembled with commercial Nafion 115 membranes. This idea could inspire the development of membranes for other flow battery systems, as well as create further progress in similar areas such as fuel cells, electro-dialysis, chlor-alkali cells, water electrolysis and so on.

  8. General circulation driven by baroclinic forcing due to cloud layer heating: Significance of planetary rotation and polar eddy heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masaru; Takahashi, Masaaki

    2016-04-01

    A high significance of planetary rotation and poleward eddy heat fluxes is determined for general circulation driven by baroclinic forcing due to cloud layer heating. In a high-resolution simplified Venus general circulation model, a planetary-scale mixed Rossby-gravity wave with meridional winds across the poles produces strong poleward heat flux and indirect circulation. This strong poleward heat transport induces downward momentum transport of indirect cells in the regions of weak high-latitude jets. It also reduces the meridional temperature gradient and vertical shear of the high-latitude jets in accordance with the thermal wind relation below the cloud layer. In contrast, strong equatorial superrotation and midlatitude jets form in the cloud layer in the absence of polar indirect cells in an experiment involving Titan's rotation. Both the strong midlatitude jet and meridional temperature gradient are maintained in the situation that eddy horizontal heat fluxes are weak. The presence or absence of strong poleward eddy heat flux is one of the important factors determining the slow or fast superrotation state in the cloud layer through the downward angular momentum transport and the thermal wind relation. For fast Earth rotation, a weak global-scale Hadley circulation of the low-density upper atmosphere maintains equatorial superrotation and midlatitude jets above the cloud layer, whereas multiple meridional circulations suppress the zonal wind speed below the cloud layer.

  9. Numerical modeling studies of wake vortex transport and evolution within the planetary boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Kaplan, Michael L.

    1994-01-01

    The proposed research involves four tasks. The first of these is to simulate accurately the turbulent processes in the atmospheric boundary layer. TASS was originally developed to study meso-gamma scale phenomena, such as tornadic storms, microbursts and windshear effects in terminal areas. Simulation of wake vortex evolution, however, will rely on appropriate representation of the physical processes in the surface layer and mixed layer. This involves two parts. First, a specified heat flux boundary condition must be implemented at the surface. Using this boundary condition, simulation results will be compared to experimental data and to other model results for validation. At this point, any necessary changes to the model will be implemented. Next, a surface energy budget parameterization will be added to the model. This will enable calculation of the surface fluxes by accounting for the radiative heat transfer to and from the ground and heat loss to the soil rather than simple specification of the fluxes. The second task involves running TASS with prescribed wake vortices in the initial condition. The vortex models will be supplied by NASA Langley Research Center. Sensitivity tests will be performed on different meteorological environments in the atmospheric boundary layer, which include stable, neutral, and unstable stratifications, calm and severe wind conditions, and dry and wet conditions. Vortex strength may be varied as well. Relevant non-dimensional parameters will include the following: Richardson number or Froude number, Bowen ratio, and height to length scale ratios. The model output will be analyzed and visualized to better understand the transport, decay, and growth rates of the wake vortices. The third task involves running simulations using observed data. MIT Lincoln Labs is currently planning field experiments at the Memphis airport to measure both meteorological conditions and wake vortex characteristics. Once this data becomes available, it can be

  10. Co-precipitation of tobramycin into biomimetically coated orthopedic fixation pins employing submicron-thin seed layers of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Sörensen, Jan H; Lilja, Mirjam; Åstrand, Maria; Sörensen, Torben C; Procter, Philip; Strømme, Maria; Steckel, Hartwig

    2014-01-01

    The migration, loosening and cut-out of implants and nosocomial infections are current problems associated with implant surgery. New innovative strategies to overcome these issues are emphasized in today's research. The current work presents a novel strategy involving co-precipitation of tobramycin with biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HA) formation to produce implant coatings that control local drug delivery to prevent early bacterial colonization of the implant. A submicron- thin HA layer served as seed layer for the co-precipitation process and allowed for incorporation of tobramycin in the coating from a stock solution of antibiotic concentrations as high as 20 mg/ml. Concentrations from 0.5 to 20 mg/ml tobramycin and process temperatures of 37 °C and 60 °C were tested to assess the optimal parameters for a thin tobramycin- delivering HA coating on discs and orthopedic fixation pins. The morphology and thickness of the coating and the drug-release profile were evaluated via scanning electron microscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. The coatings delivered pharmaceutically relevant amounts of tobramycin over a period of 12 days. To the best of our knowledge, this is the longest release period ever observed for a fast-loaded biomimetic implant coating. The presented approach could form the foundation for development of combination device/antibiotic delivery vehicles tailored to meet well-defined clinical needs while combating infections and ensuring fast implant in-growth. PMID:24611653

  11. A novel alignment mechanism employing orthogonal connected multi-layered flexible hinges for both leveling and centering.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Wang, Hongxi; Gao, Renjing; Hu, Ping; Yang, Yintang

    2012-06-01

    To eliminate the effects of motion coupling for measuring cylindrical work pieces, a novel alignment mechanism integrating functions of both leveling and centering is designed and fabricated by introducing multi-layered orthogonal connected flexible hinges as the key supporting and joining elements. Different from traditional leveling mechanisms with many separate parts fabricated together, all of the flexible hinges were integrated in one three-dimensioned machining part without assembling process, and thus synchronously simplifying the structure and reducing assembly errors. Based on the screw theory, the mathematic model of the proposed alignment mechanism is established for any resolution requirements depending on screw characteristics. A millimeter-sized device is fabricated with the alignment precision of 1.0 μm for centering within the range of ±1 mm and 1 in. for leveling within ±1°. The experiment results are in very close agreement to those obtained by simulation, which validate the feasibility of introducing multi-layered orthogonal flexible hinges in the centering and leveling mechanisms. PMID:22755657

  12. Improvement in Mobility and Stability of n-Type Organic Field-Effect Transistors with a Hole Transporting Interfacial Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Ken-ichi; Ishikawa, Motomi; Yokoyama, Masaaki

    2009-02-01

    Field-effect electron mobility and stability of N,N'-dioctyl-3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic diimide (PTCDI-C8H) improved when a hole-transporting layer, used in organic light-emitting diodes, was inserted between the gate insulator and the channel layer. This result suggests that insertion of an electronically active interfacial layer of an organic semiconductor is more effective in eliminating electron traps of the insulator surface compared to conventional surface treatment to obtain an inert surface.

  13. Employing X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy for Determining Layer Homogeneity in Mixed Polar Self-Assembled Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Hehn, Iris; Schuster, Swen; Wächter, Tobias; Abu-Husein, Tarek; Terfort, Andreas; Zharnikov, Michael; Zojer, Egbert

    2016-08-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) containing embedded dipolar groups offer the particular advantage of changing the electronic properties of a surface without affecting the SAM-ambient interface. Here we show that such systems can also be used for continuously tuning metal work functions by growing mixed monolayers consisting of molecules with different orientations of the embedded dipolar groups. To avoid injection hot-spots when using the SAM-modified electrodes in devices, a homogeneous mixing of the two components is crucial. We show that a combination of high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with state-of-the-art simulations is an ideal tool for probing the electrostatic homogeneity of the layers and thus for determining phase separation processes in polar adsorbate assemblies down to inhomogeneities at the molecular level. PMID:27429041

  14. Employing X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy for Determining Layer Homogeneity in Mixed Polar Self-Assembled Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) containing embedded dipolar groups offer the particular advantage of changing the electronic properties of a surface without affecting the SAM–ambient interface. Here we show that such systems can also be used for continuously tuning metal work functions by growing mixed monolayers consisting of molecules with different orientations of the embedded dipolar groups. To avoid injection hot-spots when using the SAM-modified electrodes in devices, a homogeneous mixing of the two components is crucial. We show that a combination of high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with state-of-the-art simulations is an ideal tool for probing the electrostatic homogeneity of the layers and thus for determining phase separation processes in polar adsorbate assemblies down to inhomogeneities at the molecular level. PMID:27429041

  15. Large Eddy Simulation and Field Experiments of Pollen Transport in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamecki, M.; Meneveau, C.; Parlange, M. B.; van Hout, R.

    2006-12-01

    Dispersion of airborne pollen by the wind has been a subject of interest for botanists and allergists for a long time. More recently, the development of genetically modified crops and questions about cross-pollination and subsequent contamination of natural plant populations has brought even more interest to this field. A critical question is how far from the source field pollen grains will be advected. Clearly the answer depends on the aerodynamic properties of the pollen, geometrical properties of the field, topography, local vegetation, wind conditions, atmospheric stability, etc. As a consequence, field experiments are well suited to provide some information on pollen transport mechanisms but are limited to specific field and weather conditions. Numerical simulations do not have this drawback and can be a useful tool to study pollen dispersal in a variety of configurations. It is well known that the dispersion of particles in turbulent fields is strongly affected by the large scale coherent structures. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is a technique that allows us to study the typical distances reached by pollen grains and, at the same time, resolve the larger coherent structures present in the atmospheric boundary layer. The main objective of this work is to simulate the dispersal of pollen grains in the atmospheric surface layer using LES. Pollen concentrations are simulated by an advection-diffusion equation including gravitational settling. Of extreme importance is the specification of the bottom boundary conditions characterizing the pollen source over the canopy and the deposition process everywhere else. In both cases we make use of the theoretical profile for suspended particles derived by Kind (1992). Field experiments were performed to study the applicability of the theoretical profile to pollen grains and the results are encouraging. Airborne concentrations as well as ground deposition from the simulations are compared to experimental data to validate the

  16. Fate and Transport of Methane Formed in the Active Layer of Alaskan Permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, M. E.; Curtis, J. B.; Smith, L. J.; Bill, M.; Torn, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past 2 years a series of tracer tests designed to estimate rates of methane formation via acetoclastic methanogenesis in the active layer of permafrost soils were conducted at the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO) in northernmost Alaska. The tracer tests consisted of extracting 0.5 to 1.0 liters of soil water in gas-tight bags from different features of polygons at the BEO, followed by addition of a tracer cocktail including acetate with a 13C-labeled methyl group and D2O (as a conservative tracer) into the soil water and injection of the mixture back into the original extraction site. Samples were then taken at depths of 30 cm (just above the bottom of the active layer), 20 cm, 10 cm and surface flux to determine the fate of the 13C-labeled acetate. During 2014 (2015 results are pending) water, soil gas, and flux gas were sampled for 60 days following injection of the tracer solution. Those samples were analyzed for concentrations and isotopic compositions of CH4, DIC/CO2 and water. At one site (the trough of a low-centered polygon) the 13C acetate was completely converted to 13CH4 within the first 2 days. The signal persisted for throughout the entire monitoring period at the injection depth with little evidence of transport or oxidation in any of the other sampling depths. In the saturated center of the same polygon, the acetate was also rapidly converted to 13CH4, but water turnover caused the signal to rapidly dissipate. High δ13C CO2 in flux samples from the polygon center indicate oxidation of the 13CH4 in near-surface waters. Conversely, CH4 production in the center of an unsaturated, flat-centered polygon was relatively small 13CH4 and dissipated rapidly without any evidence of either 13CH4 transport to shallower levels or oxidation. At another site in the edge of that polygon no 13CH4 was produced, but significant 13CO2/DIC was observed indicating direct aerobic oxidation of the acetate was occurring at this site. These results suggest that

  17. Impact of Planetary Boundary Layer Depth on Climatological Tracer Transport in the GEOS-5 AGCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath-Spangler, E. L.; Molod, A.

    2013-12-01

    Planetary boundary layer (PBL) processes have large implications for tropospheric tracer transport since surface fluxes are diluted by the depth of the PBL through vertical mixing. However, no consensus on PBL depth definition currently exists and various methods for estimating this parameter can give results that differ by hundreds of meters or more. In order to facilitate comparisons between the Goddard Earth Observation System (GEOS-5) and other modeling and observational systems, seven PBL depth estimation methods are used to diagnose PBL depth and produce climatologies that are evaluated here. All seven methods evaluate a single atmosphere so differences are related solely to the definition chosen. PBL depths that are estimated using a Richardson number are shallower than those given by methods based on the scalar diffusivity during warm, moist conditions at midday and collapse to lower values at night. In GEOS-5, the PBL depth is used in the estimation of the turbulent length scale and so impacts vertical mixing. Changing the method used to determine the PBL depth for this length scale thus changes the tracer transport. Using a bulk Richardson number method instead of a scalar diffusivity method produces changes in the quantity of Saharan dust lofted into the free troposphere and advected to North America, with more surface dust in North America during boreal summer and less in boreal winter. Additionally, greenhouse gases are considerably impacted. During boreal winter, changing the PBL depth definition produces carbon dioxide differences of nearly 5 ppm over Siberia and gradients of about 5 ppm over 1000 km in Europe. PBL depth changes are responsible for surface carbon monoxide changes of 20 ppb or more over the biomass burning regions of Africa.

  18. Urban Pollution in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer: Chemical Processing and Vertical Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Rappenglück, B.; Lefer, B.; Brune, W. H.; Dibb, J. E.; Griffin, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    For many decades research on urban pollution and its chemistry has concentrated on processes occurring during the day. In recent years, however, it has become clear that transport and chemical processing at night can also play an important role for urban air quality. Various chemical pathways are known to remove gaseous pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides, ozone and hydrocarbons, as well as influence aerosol composition at night. The quantification of these processes is difficult due to the influence of vertical stability, which leads to a much slower vertical transport of trace gases emitted at the surface at night than during the day. As a consequence, chemistry at night is often very altitude dependent, making investigations in the NBL challenging. In recent years a number of field experiments have been performed where the nocturnal meteorology and the vertical distribution of the dominant trace gases at night have been observed. Here we will review the lessons learned in past studies and present results from a recent study in Houston, TX, which gives new insights into the meteorological and chemical processes at night. The TexAQS II Radical Measurement Project (TRAMP) was performed in August and September 2006, on the University of Houston campus. We will present data from a number of measurements, including a long-path Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer, in situ instrumentation for gas phase compounds (O3, NO, NO2, CO, VOC), HOx radicals, aerosol size and composition, various meteorological and radiation parameters, and an aerosol LIDAR. The field observations will be compared to 1D model calculations which show the dominant chemical processes and allow the identification of gaps in our understanding of the polluted nocturnal urban boundary layer.

  19. Turbulent Transport in a Strongly Stratified Forced Shear Layer with Thermal Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaud, Pascale; Kulenthirarajah, Logithan

    2016-04-01

    This work presents numerical results on the transport of heat and chemical species by shear-induced turbulence in strongly stratified, thermally diffusive environments. The shear instabilities driven in this regime are sometimes called “secular” shear instabilities, and can take place when the Richardson number of the flow is large, provided the Péclet number is small. We have identified a set of simple criteria to determine whether these instabilities can take place or not. Generally speaking, we find that they may be relevant whenever the thermal diffusivity of the fluid is very large (typically larger than 1014 cm2 s-1), which is the case in the outer layers of high-mass stars (M ≥ 10 M⊙), for instance. Using a simple model setup in which the shear is forced by a spatially sinusoidal, constant-amplitude body-force, we have identified several regimes ranging from effectively unstratified to very strongly stratified, each with its own set of dynamical properties. Unless the system is in one of the two extreme regimes (effectively unstratified or completely stable), however, we find that (1) only about 10% of the input power is used toward heat transport, while the remaining 90% is viscously dissipated; (2) that the effective compositional mixing coefficient is well-approximated by the model of Zahn, with D ≃ 0.02κT/J where κT is the thermal diffusivity and J is the Richardson number. These results need to be confirmed, however, with simulations in different model setups and at higher effective Reynolds number.

  20. Turbulent Transport in a Strongly Stratified Forced Shear Layer with Thermal Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaud, Pascale; Kulenthirarajah, Logithan

    2016-04-01

    This work presents numerical results on the transport of heat and chemical species by shear-induced turbulence in strongly stratified, thermally diffusive environments. The shear instabilities driven in this regime are sometimes called “secular” shear instabilities, and can take place when the Richardson number of the flow is large, provided the Péclet number is small. We have identified a set of simple criteria to determine whether these instabilities can take place or not. Generally speaking, we find that they may be relevant whenever the thermal diffusivity of the fluid is very large (typically larger than 1014 cm2 s‑1), which is the case in the outer layers of high-mass stars (M ≥ 10 M⊙), for instance. Using a simple model setup in which the shear is forced by a spatially sinusoidal, constant-amplitude body-force, we have identified several regimes ranging from effectively unstratified to very strongly stratified, each with its own set of dynamical properties. Unless the system is in one of the two extreme regimes (effectively unstratified or completely stable), however, we find that (1) only about 10% of the input power is used toward heat transport, while the remaining 90% is viscously dissipated; (2) that the effective compositional mixing coefficient is well-approximated by the model of Zahn, with D ≃ 0.02κT/J where κT is the thermal diffusivity and J is the Richardson number. These results need to be confirmed, however, with simulations in different model setups and at higher effective Reynolds number.

  1. Impact of planetary boundary layer turbulence on model climate and tracer transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath-Spangler, E. L.; Molod, A.; Ott, L. E.; Pawson, S.

    2014-12-01

    Planetary boundary layer (PBL) processes are important for weather, climate, and tracer transport and concentration. One measure of the strength of these processes is the PBL depth. However, no single PBL depth definition exists and several studies have found that the estimated depth can vary substantially based on the definition used. In the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) atmospheric general circulation model, the PBL depth is particularly important because it is used to calculate the turbulent length scale that is used in the estimation of turbulent mixing. This study analyzes the impact of using three different PBL depth definitions in this calculation. Two definitions are based on the scalar eddy diffusion coefficient and the third is based on the bulk Richardson number. Over land, the bulk Richardson number definition estimates shallower nocturnal PBLs than the other estimates while over water this definition generally produces deeper PBLs. The near surface wind velocity, temperature, and specific humidity responses to the change in turbulence are spatially and temporally heterogeneous, resulting in changes to tracer transport and concentrations. Near surface wind speed increases in the bulk Richardson number experiment cause Saharan dust increases on the order of 1 × 10-4 kg m-2 downwind over the Atlantic Ocean. Carbon monoxide (CO) surface concentrations are modified over Africa during boreal summer, producing differences on the order of 20 ppb, due to the model's treatment of emissions from biomass burning. While differences in carbon dioxide (CO2) are small in the time mean, instantaneous differences are on the order of 10 ppm and these are especially prevalent at high latitude during boreal winter. Understanding the sensitivity of trace gas and aerosol concentration estimates to PBL depth is important for studies seeking to calculate surface fluxes based on near-surface concentrations and to studies projecting future concentrations.

  2. Impact of planetary boundary layer turbulence on model climate and tracer transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath-Spangler, E. L.; Molod, A.; Ott, L. E.; Pawson, S.

    2015-07-01

    Planetary boundary layer (PBL) processes are important for weather, climate, and tracer transport and concentration. One measure of the strength of these processes is the PBL depth. However, no single PBL depth definition exists and several studies have found that the estimated depth can vary substantially based on the definition used. In the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) atmospheric general circulation model, the PBL depth is particularly important because it is used to calculate the turbulent length scale that is used in the estimation of turbulent mixing. This study analyzes the impact of using three different PBL depth definitions in this calculation. Two definitions are based on the scalar eddy diffusion coefficient and the third is based on the bulk Richardson number. Over land, the bulk Richardson number definition estimates shallower nocturnal PBLs than the other estimates while over water this definition generally produces deeper PBLs. The near-surface wind velocity, temperature, and specific humidity responses to the change in turbulence are spatially and temporally heterogeneous, resulting in changes to tracer transport and concentrations. Near-surface wind speed increases in the bulk Richardson number experiment cause Saharan dust increases on the order of 1 × 10-4 kg m-2 downwind over the Atlantic Ocean. Carbon monoxide (CO) surface concentrations are modified over Africa during boreal summer, producing differences on the order of 20 ppb, due to the model's treatment of emissions from biomass burning. While differences in carbon dioxide (CO2) are small in the time mean, instantaneous differences are on the order of 10 ppm and these are especially prevalent at high latitude during boreal winter. Understanding the sensitivity of trace gas and aerosol concentration estimates to PBL depth is important for studies seeking to calculate surface fluxes based on near-surface concentrations and for studies projecting future concentrations.

  3. MODELING NON-PRECIPITATING CUMULUS CLOUDS AS FLOW-THROUGH-REACTOR TRANSFORMER AND VENTING TRANSPORTER OF MIXED LAYER POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple diagnostic model of cumulus convective clouds is developed and used in a sensitivity study to examine the extent to which the rate of change of mixed and cloud layer pollutant concentration is influenced by vertical transport and chemical transformation processes occurri...

  4. Meeting Skills Needs in a Market-Based Training System: A Study of Employer Perceptions and Responses to Training Challenges in the Australian Transport and Logistics Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gekara, Victor O.; Snell, Darryn; Chhetri, Prem; Manzoni, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Many countries are adopting market-based training systems to address industry skills needs. This paper examines the marketisation of Australia's training system and the implications for training provision and outcomes in the Transport and Logistics industry. Drawing on qualitative interviews from industry employers and training providers, we…

  5. Observed bottom boundary layer transport and uplift on the continental shelf adjacent to a western boundary current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, A.; Roughan, M.; Wood, J. E.

    2014-08-01

    Western boundary currents strongly influence the dynamics on the adjacent continental shelf and in particular the cross-shelf transport and uplift through the bottom boundary layer. Four years of moored in situ observations on the narrow southeastern Australian shelf (in water depths of between 65 and 140 m) were used to investigate bottom cross-shelf transport, both upstream (30°S) and downstream (34°S) of the separation zone of the East Australian Current (EAC). Bottom transport was estimated and assessed against Ekman theory, showing consistent results for a number of different formulations of the boundary layer thickness. Net bottom cross-shelf transport was onshore at all locations. Ekman theory indicates that up to 64% of the transport variability is driven by the along-shelf bottom stress. Onshore transport in the bottom boundary layer was more intense and frequent upstream than downstream, occurring 64% of the time at 30°S. Wind-driven surface Ekman transport estimates did not balance the bottom cross-shelf flow. At both locations, strong variability was found in bottom water transport at periods of approximately 90-100 days. This corresponds with periodicity in EAC fluctuations and eddy shedding as evidenced from altimeter observations, highlighting the EAC as a driver of variability in the continental shelf waters. Ocean glider and HF radar observations were used to identify the bio-physical response to an EAC encroachment event, resulting in a strong onshore bottom flow, the uplift of cold slope water, and elevated coastal chlorophyll concentrations.

  6. Verification of the multi-layer SNOWPACK model with different water transport schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wever, N.; Schmid, L.; Heilig, A.; Eisen, O.; Fierz, C.; Lehning, M.

    2015-04-01

    The widely-used detailed SNOWPACK model has undergone constant development over the years. A notable recent extension is the introduction of a Richards Equation (RE) solver as an alternative for the bucket-type approach for describing water transport in the snow and soil layers. In addition, continuous updates of snow settling and new snow density parametrisations have changed model behaviour. This study presents a detailed evaluation of model performance against a comprehensive multi-year data set from Weissfluhjoch near Davos, Switzerland. The data set is collected by automatic meteorological and snowpack measurements and manual snow profiles. During the main winter season, snow height (RMSE: <4.2 cm), snow water equivalent (SWE, RMSE: <40 mm w.e.), snow temperature distributions (typical deviation with measurements: <1.0 °C) and snow density (typical deviation with observations: <50 kg m-3) as well as their temporal evolution are well simulated in the model and the influence of the two water transport schemes is small. The RE approach reproduces internal differences over capillary barriers but fails to predict enough grain growth since the growth routines have been calibrated using the bucket scheme in the original SNOWPACK model. The agreement in both density and grain size is sufficient to parametrise the hydraulic properties. In the melt season, a more pronounced underestimation of typically 200 mm w.e. in SWE is found. The discrepancies between the simulations and the field data are generally larger than the differences between the two water transport schemes. Nevertheless, the detailed comparison of the internal snowpack structure shows that the timing of internal temperature and water dynamics is adequately and better represented with the new RE approach when compared to the conventional bucket scheme. On the contrary, the progress of the meltwater front in the snowpack as detected by radar and the temporal evolution of the vertical distribution of melt

  7. Verification of the multi-layer SNOWPACK model with different water transport schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wever, N.; Schmid, L.; Heilig, A.; Eisen, O.; Fierz, C.; Lehning, M.

    2015-12-01

    The widely used detailed SNOWPACK model has undergone constant development over the years. A notable recent extension is the introduction of a Richards equation (RE) solver as an alternative for the bucket-type approach for describing water transport in the snow and soil layers. In addition, continuous updates of snow settling and new snow density parameterizations have changed model behavior. This study presents a detailed evaluation of model performance against a comprehensive multiyear data set from Weissfluhjoch near Davos, Switzerland. The data set is collected by automatic meteorological and snowpack measurements and manual snow profiles. During the main winter season, snow height (RMSE: < 4.2 cm), snow water equivalent (SWE, RMSE: < 40 mm w.e.), snow temperature distributions (typical deviation with measurements: < 1.0 °C) and snow density (typical deviation with observations: < 50 kg m-3) as well as their temporal evolution are well simulated in the model and the influence of the two water transport schemes is small. The RE approach reproduces internal differences over capillary barriers but fails to predict enough grain growth since the growth routines have been calibrated using the bucket scheme in the original SNOWPACK model. However, the agreement in both density and grain size is sufficient to parameterize the hydraulic properties successfully. In the melt season, a pronounced underestimation of typically 200 mm w.e. in SWE is found. The discrepancies between the simulations and the field data are generally larger than the differences between the two water transport schemes. Nevertheless, the detailed comparison of the internal snowpack structure shows that the timing of internal temperature and water dynamics is adequately and better represented with the new RE approach when compared to the conventional bucket scheme. On the contrary, the progress of the meltwater front in the snowpack as detected by radar and the temporal evolution of the vertical

  8. Photodiode Based on CdO Thin Films as Electron Transport Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soylu, M.; Kader, H. S.

    2016-08-01

    Cadmium oxide (CdO) thin films were synthesized by the sol-gel method. The films were analyzed by means of XRD, AFM, and UV/Vis spectrophotometry. X-ray diffraction patterns confirm that the films are formed from CdO with cubic crystal structure and consist of nano-particles. The energy gap of the prepared film was found to be 2.29 eV. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the CdO/p-Si heterojunction were examined in the dark and under different illumination intensities. The heterojunction showed high rectifying behavior and a strong photoresponse. Main electrical parameters of the photodiode such as series and shunt resistances (R s and R sh), saturation current I 0, and photocurrent I ph, were extracted considering a single diode equivalent circuit of a photovoltaic cell. Results indicate that the application of CdO thin films as an electron transport layer on p-Si acts as a photodetector in the field of the UV/visible.

  9. Investigation of scrape-off layer and divertor heat transport in ASDEX Upgrade L-mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieglin, B.; Eich, T.; Faitsch, M.; Herrmann, A.; Scarabosio, A.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-05-01

    Power exhaust is one of the major challenges for the development of a fusion power plant. Predictions based upon a multimachine database give a scrape-off layer power fall-off length {λq}≤slant 1 mm for large fusion devices such as ITER. The power deposition profile on the target is broadened in the divertor by heat transport perpendicular to the magnetic field lines. This profile broadening is described by the power spreading S. Hence both {λq} and S need to be understood in order to estimate the expected divertor heat load for future fusion devices. For the investigation of S and {λq} L-Mode discharges with stable divertor conditions in hydrogen and deuterium were conducted in ASDEX Upgrade. A strong dependence of S on the divertor electron temperature and density is found which is the result of the competition between parallel electron heat conductivity and perpendicular diffusion in the divertor region. For high divertor temperatures it is found that the ion gyro radius at the divertor target needs to be considered. The dependence of the in/out asymmetry of the divertor power load on the electron density is investigated. The influence of the main ion species on the asymmetric behaviour is shown for hydrogen, deuterium and helium. A possible explanation for the observed asymmetry behaviour based on vertical drifts is proposed.

  10. Low-temperature photo-activated inorganic electron transport layers for flexible inverted polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Wook; Lee, Soo-Hyoung; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Park, Sung Kyu

    2014-09-01

    A simple and versatile route of forming sol-gel-derived metal oxide n-type electron transport layers (ETLs) for flexible inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs) is proposed using low-temperature photochemical activation process. The photochemical activation, which is induced by deep ultraviolet irradiation on sol-gel films, allows formation of metal oxide n-type ETLs such as zinc oxide (ZnO) and indium gallium zinc oxide films at a low temperature. Compared to poly(3-hexylthiophene)/phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester inverted PSCs with thermally annealed ZnO ETLs (optimized efficiency of 3.26 ± 0.03 %), the inverted PSCs with photo-activated ZnO ETLs showed an improved efficiency of 3.60 ± 0.02 %. The enhanced photovoltaic property is attributed to efficient charge collection from low overall series resistance and high surface area-to-geometric area ratio by the photo-activated ZnO ETLs.

  11. Carbon materials with quasi-graphene layers: The dielectric, percolation properties and the electronic transport mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ming-Ming; Yuan, Jie; Wen, Bo; Liu, Jia; Cao, Wen-Qiang; Cao, Mao-Sheng

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the dielectric properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and graphite filling in SiO2 with the filling concentration of 2-20 wt.% in the frequency range of 102-107 Hz. MWCNTs and graphite have general electrical properties and percolation phenomena owing to their quasi-structure made up of graphene layers. Both permittivity ɛ and conductivity σ exhibit jumps around the percolation threshold. Variations of dielectric properties of the composites are in agreement with the percolation theory. All the percolation phenomena are determined by hopping and migrating electrons, which are attributed to the special electronic transport mechanism of the fillers in the composites. However, the twin-percolation phenomenon exists when the concentration of MWCNTs is between 5-10 wt.% and 15-20 wt.% in the MWCNTs/SiO2 composites, while in the graphite/SiO2 composites, there is only one percolation phenomenon in the graphite concentration of 10-15 wt.%. The unique twin-percolation phenomenon of MWCNTs/SiO2 is described and attributed to the electronic transfer mechanism, especially the network effect of MWCNTs in the composites. The network formation plays an essential role in determining the second percolation threshold of MWCNTs/SiO2.

  12. Influence of electron transport layer thickness on optical properties of organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guohong; Liu, Yong; Li, Baojun; Zhou, Xiang

    2015-06-07

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically the influence of electron transport layer (ETL) thickness on properties of typical N,N′-diphenyl-N,N′-bis(1-naphthyl)-[1,1′-biphthyl]-4,4′-diamine (NPB)/tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq{sub 3}) heterojunction based organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), where the thickness of ETL is varied to adjust the distance between the emitting zone and the metal electrode. The devices showed a maximum current efficiency of 3.8 cd/A when the ETL thickness is around 50 nm corresponding to an emitter-cathode distance of 80 nm, and a second maximum current efficiency of 2.6 cd/A when the ETL thickness is around 210 nm corresponding to an emitter-cathode distance of 240 nm. We adopt a rigorous electromagnetic approach that takes parameters, such as dipole orientation, polarization, light emitting angle, exciton recombination zone, and diffusion length into account to model the optical properties of devices as a function of varying ETL thickness. Our simulation results are accurately consistent with the experimental results with a widely varying thickness of ETL, indicating that the theoretical model may be helpful to design high efficiency OLEDs.

  13. A first-principles study on the phonon transport in layered BiCuOSe

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Hezhu; Tan, Xiaojian; Liu, Guo-Qiang; Jiang, Jun; Jiang, Haochuan

    2016-01-01

    First-principles calculations are employed to investigate the phonon transport of BiCuOSe. Our calculations reproduce the lattice thermal conductivity of BiCuOSe. The calculated grüneisen parameter is 2.4 ~ 2.6 at room temperature, a fairly large value indicating a strong anharmonicity in BiCuOSe, which leads to its ultralow lattice thermal conductivity. The contribution to total thermal conductivity from high-frequency optical phonons, which are mostly contributed by the vibrations of O atoms, is larger than 1/3, remarkably different from the usual picture with very little contribution from high-frequency optical phonons. Our calculations show that both the high group velocities and low scattering processes involved make the high-frequency optical modes contribute considerably to the total lattice thermal conductivity. In addition, we show that the sound velocity and bulk modulus along a and c axes exhibit strong anisotropy, which results in the anisotropic thermal conductivity in BiCuOSe. PMID:26878884

  14. A first-principles study on the phonon transport in layered BiCuOSe.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hezhu; Tan, Xiaojian; Liu, Guo-Qiang; Jiang, Jun; Jiang, Haochuan

    2016-01-01

    First-principles calculations are employed to investigate the phonon transport of BiCuOSe. Our calculations reproduce the lattice thermal conductivity of BiCuOSe. The calculated grüneisen parameter is 2.4 ~ 2.6 at room temperature, a fairly large value indicating a strong anharmonicity in BiCuOSe, which leads to its ultralow lattice thermal conductivity. The contribution to total thermal conductivity from high-frequency optical phonons, which are mostly contributed by the vibrations of O atoms, is larger than 1/3, remarkably different from the usual picture with very little contribution from high-frequency optical phonons. Our calculations show that both the high group velocities and low scattering processes involved make the high-frequency optical modes contribute considerably to the total lattice thermal conductivity. In addition, we show that the sound velocity and bulk modulus along a and c axes exhibit strong anisotropy, which results in the anisotropic thermal conductivity in BiCuOSe. PMID:26878884

  15. New Physical Deposition Approach for Low Cost Inorganic Hole Transport Layer in Normal Architecture of Durable Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Nejand, Bahram Abdollahi; Ahmadi, Vahid; Shahverdi, Hamid Reza

    2015-10-01

    In this work we reported sputter deposited NiOx/Ni double layer as an HTM/contact couple in normal architecture of perovskite solar cell. A perovskite solar cell that is durable for more than 60 days was achieved, with increasing efficiency from 1.3% to 7.28% within 6 days. Moreover, low temperature direct deposition of NiOx layer on perovskite layer was introduced as a potential hole transport material for an efficient cost-effective solar cell applicable for various morphologies of perovskite layers, even for perovskite layers containing pinholes, which is a notable challenge in perovskite solar cells. The angular deposition of NiOx layers by dc reactive magnetron sputtering showed uniform and crack-free coverage of the perovskite layer with no negative impact on perovskite structure that is suitable for nickel back contact layer, surface shielding against moisture, and mechanical damages. Replacing the expensive complex materials in previous perovskite solar cells with low cost available materials introduces cost-effective scalable perovskite solar cells. PMID:26402149

  16. Controlling hole-transport in aluminum tris (8-hydroxyquinoline), Alq3-based organic light emitting diodes to improve the device lifetime by an oxidized transport layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathai, Mathew K.; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios; Hsieh, Bing R.

    2004-06-01

    A salt containing polymer, called an oxidized transport layer (OTL), was investigated for hole injection and transport into Alq3-based multilayered organic light emitting diode (OLED) devices. The OTL comprises an aryldiamine containing hole transport polymer binder with a corresponding low molecular weight radical cation salt. We demonstrate herein that the OTL behaves like a tunable resistor for holes, and its hole-transport properties can be controlled by the salt concentration and thickness of the OTL. Based on a careful analysis of the current density-voltage (J-V) device characteristics as a function of the above parameters, electron/hole currents were balanced to minimize oxidative degradation of Alq3. It was found that an OLED device (ITO/OTL/NPB/Alq3/CsF/Al) with a 5000 Å thick OTL at 5% salt concentration operated with a half-life exceeding 1000 h at a constant current of 10 mA/cm2. Similar devices with 2.5% and 10% salt doping showed an order of magnitude lower half-life attributed to unbalanced carrier concentrations. Moreover, by demonstrating that the majority of the field drops across the Alq3 layer, the doping level as opposed to OTL thickness was established as the primary contributor controlling hole transport in these OLEDs. This beneficial behavior is, however, observed only above a certain OTL thickness in the vicinity of 5000 Å.

  17. Suspended particulate loads and transports in the nepheloid layer of the abyssal Atlantic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biscaye, P.E.; Eittreim, S.L.

    1977-01-01

    Vertical profiles of light scattering from over 1000 L-DGO nephelometer stations in the Atlantic Ocean have been used to calculate mass concentrations of suspended particles based on a calibration from the western North American Basin. From these data are plotted the distributions of particulate concentrations at clear water and in the more turbid near-bottom water. Clear water is the broad minimum in concentration and light scattering that occurs at varying mid-depths in the water column. Concentrations at clear water are as much as one-to-two orders of magnitude lower than those in surface water but still reflect a similar geographic distribution: relatively higher concentrations at ocean margins, especially underneath upwelling areas, and the lowest concentrations underneath central gyre areas. These distributions within the clear water reflect surface-water biogenic productivity, lateral injection of particles from shelf areas and surface circulation patterns and require that the combination of downward vertical and horizontal transport processes of particles retain this pattern throughout the upper water column. Below clear water, the distribution of standing crops of suspended particulate concentrations in the lower water column are presented. The integration of mass of all particles per unit area (gross particulate standing crop) reflects a relative distribution similar to that at the surface and at clear water levels, superimposed on which is the strong imprint of boundary currents along the western margins of the Atlantic. Reducing the gross particulate standing crop by the integral of the concentration of clear water yields a net particulate standing crop. The distribution of this reflects primarily the interaction of circulating abyssal waters with the ocean bottom, i.e. a strong nepheloid layer which is coincident with western boundary currents and which diminishes in intensity equatorward. The resuspended particulate loads in the nepheloid layer of the

  18. Effects of physical processes on structure and transport of thin zooplankton layers in the coastal ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McManus, M.A.; Cheriton, O.M.; Drake, P.J.; Holliday, D.V.; Storlazzi, C.D.; Donaghay, P.L.; Greenlaw, C.F.

    2005-01-01

    Thin layers of plankton are recurrent features in a variety of coastal systems. These layers range in thickness from a few centimeters to a few meters. They can extend horizontally for kilometers and have been observed to persist for days. Densities of organisms found within thin layers are far greater than those above or below the layer, and as a result, thin layers may play an important role in the marine ecosystem. The paramount objective of this study was to understand the physical processes that govern the dynamics of thin layers of zooplankton in the coastal ocean. We deployed instruments to measure physical processes and zooplankton distribution in northern Monterey Bay; during an 11 d period of persistent upwelling-favorable winds, 7 thin zooplankton layers were observed. These zooplankton layers persisted throughout daylight hours, but were observed to dissipate during evening hours. These layers had an average vertical thickness of 1.01 m. No layers were found in regions where the Richardson number was <0.25. In general, when the Richardson number is <0.25 the water column is unstable, and incapable of supporting thin layers. Thin zooplankton layers were also located in regions of reduced flow. In addition, our observations show that the vertical depth distribution of thin zooplankton layers is modulated by high-frequency internal waves, with periods of 18 to 20 min. Results from this study clearly show an association between physical structure, physical processes and the presence of thin zooplankton layers in Monterey Bay. With this new understanding we may identify other coastal regions that have a high probability of supporting thin layers. ?? Inter-Research 2005.

  19. Enhancing electrochemical performance by control of transport properties in buffer layers--solid oxide fuel/electrolyser cells.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, Devaraj; Nasani, Narendar; Brandão, Ana D; Pérez Coll, Domingo; Fagg, Duncan P

    2015-05-01

    The current work demonstrates how tailoring the transport properties of thin ceria-based buffer layers in solid oxide fuel or electrolyser cells can provide the necessary phase stability against chemical interaction at the electrolyte/electrode interface, while also providing radical improvements in the electrochemical performance of the oxygen electrode. Half cells of Ce0.8R0.2O2-δ + 2 mol% Co buffer layers (where R = Gd, Pr) with Nd2NiO4+δ electrodes were fabricated by spin coating on dense YSZ electrolyte supports. Dramatic decreases in polarization resistance, Rp, of up to an order of magnitude, could be achieved in the order, Pr ≪ Gd < no buffer layer. The current article shows how this improvement can be related to increased levels of ambipolar conductivity in the mixed conducting buffer layer, which provides an additional parallel path for electrochemical reaction. This is an important breakthrough as it shows how electrode polarization resistance can be substantially improved, in otherwise identical electrochemical cells, solely by tailoring the transport properties of thin intermediate buffer layers. PMID:25857870

  20. Low-cost copper complexes as p-dopants in solution processable hole transport layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellermann, Renate; Taroata, Dan; Maltenberger, Anna; Hartmann, David; Brabec, Christoph J.; Schmid, Guenter

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate the usage of the Lewis-acidic copper(II)hexafluoroacetylacetonate (Cu(hfac)2) and copper(II)trifluoroacetylacetonate (Cu(tfac)2) as low-cost p-dopants for conductivity enhancement of solution processable hole transport layers based on small molecules in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). The materials were clearly soluble in mixtures of environmentally friendly anisole and xylene and spin-coated under ambient atmosphere. Enhancements of two and four orders of magnitude, reaching 4.0 × 10-11 S/cm with a dopant concentration of only 2 mol% Cu(hfac)2 and 1.5 × 10-9 S/cm with 5 mol% Cu(tfac)2 in 2,2',7,7'-tetra(N,N-ditolyl)amino-9,9-spiro-bifluorene (spiro-TTB), respectively, were achieved. Red light emitting diodes were fabricated with reduced driving voltages and enhanced current and power efficiencies (8.6 lm/W with Cu(hfac)2 and 5.6 lm/W with Cu(tfac)2) compared to the OLED with undoped spiro-TTB (3.9 lm/W). The OLED with Cu(hfac)2 doped spiro-TTB showed an over 8 times improved LT50 lifetime of 70 h at a starting luminance of 5000 cd/m2. The LT50 lifetime of the reference OLED with PEDOT:PSS was only 8 h. Both non-optimized OLEDs were operated at similar driving voltage and power efficiency.

  1. Low-cost copper complexes as p-dopants in solution processable hole transport layers

    SciTech Connect

    Kellermann, Renate; Taroata, Dan; Maltenberger, Anna; Hartmann, David; Schmid, Guenter; Brabec, Christoph J.

    2015-09-07

    We demonstrate the usage of the Lewis-acidic copper(II)hexafluoroacetylacetonate (Cu(hfac){sub 2}) and copper(II)trifluoroacetylacetonate (Cu(tfac){sub 2}) as low-cost p-dopants for conductivity enhancement of solution processable hole transport layers based on small molecules in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). The materials were clearly soluble in mixtures of environmentally friendly anisole and xylene and spin-coated under ambient atmosphere. Enhancements of two and four orders of magnitude, reaching 4.0 × 10{sup −11} S/cm with a dopant concentration of only 2 mol% Cu(hfac){sub 2} and 1.5 × 10{sup −9} S/cm with 5 mol% Cu(tfac){sub 2} in 2,2′,7,7′-tetra(N,N-ditolyl)amino-9,9-spiro-bifluorene (spiro-TTB), respectively, were achieved. Red light emitting diodes were fabricated with reduced driving voltages and enhanced current and power efficiencies (8.6 lm/W with Cu(hfac){sub 2} and 5.6 lm/W with Cu(tfac){sub 2}) compared to the OLED with undoped spiro-TTB (3.9 lm/W). The OLED with Cu(hfac){sub 2} doped spiro-TTB showed an over 8 times improved LT{sub 50} lifetime of 70 h at a starting luminance of 5000 cd/m{sup 2}. The LT{sub 50} lifetime of the reference OLED with PEDOT:PSS was only 8 h. Both non-optimized OLEDs were operated at similar driving voltage and power efficiency.

  2. A way for studying the impact of PEDOT:PSS interface layer on carrier transport in PCDTBT:PC{sub 71}BM bulk hetero junction solar cells by electric field induced optical second harmonic generation measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Zubair Abdullah, Shahino Mah; Sulaiman, Khaulah; Taguchi, Dai; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2015-04-28

    Electric-field-induced optical second-harmonic generation (EFISHG) measurement was employed to study the impact of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) interface layer on the carrier transport mechanism of the PCDTBT:PC{sub 71}BM bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells (OSCs). We revealed that the electric fields in the PCDTBT and PC{sub 71}BM were allowed to be measured individually by choosing fundamental laser wavelengths of 1000 nm and 1060 nm, respectively, in dark and under illumination. The results showed that the direction of the internal electric fields in the PCDTBT:PC{sub 71}BM BHJ layer is reversed by introducing the PEDOT:PSS layer, and this results in longer electron transport time in the BHJ layer. We conclude that TR-EFISHG can be used as a novel way for studying the impact of interfacial layer on the transport of electrons and holes in the bulk-heterojunction OSCs.

  3. Preparation of a hole transport layer tethered to ITO surface via a self-assembled monolayer with reactive terminal group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagihara, Yuya; Kim, Seong-Ho; Tanaka, Kuniaki; Advincula, Rigoberto C.; Usui, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Characteristics of a junction between a polymer thin film and an indium-tin oxide (ITO) substrate was controlled by forming covalent chemical bonds at the interface through self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with reactive terminal groups. For this purpose, SAMs with vinyl, epoxide, and benzophenone terminal groups were formed on ITO substrates, on which a vinyl derivative of a hole transport molecule was vapor-deposited, and then annealed in vacuum. This procedure produced a polymer layer strongly attached to the substrate surface. It was also found that the charge injection from the ITO electrode to the polymer layer can be improved by chemically tethering the interface via the SAMs.

  4. Thermal Conductivity and Phonon Transport in Suspended Few-Layer Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Insun; Pettes, Michael Thompson; Kim, Jaehyun; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Yao, Zhen; Shi, Li

    2013-02-01

    The thermal conductivity of suspended few-layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) was measured using a micro-bridge device with built-in resistance thermometers. Based on the measured thermal resistance values of 11-12 atomic layer h-BN samples with suspended length ranging between 3 and 7.5 um, the room-temperature thermal conductivity of a 11-layer sample was found to be about 360 Wm-1K-1, approaching the basal plane value reported for bulk h-BN. The presence of a polymer residue layer on the sample surface was found to decrease the thermal conductivity of a 5-layer h-BN sample to be about 250 Wm-1K-1 at 300 K. Thermal conductivities for both the 5 layer and the 11 layer samples are suppressed at low temperatures, suggesting increasing scattering of low frequency phonons in thin h-BN samples by polymer residue.

  5. Modeling the effect of anisotropy of gas diffusion layer on transport phenomena in a direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Zheng; He, Ya-Ling; Zou, Jin-Qiang

    Transport phenomena in the gas diffusion layer (GDL) are of vital importance for the operation of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). In this work, a two-phase mass transport model is developed to investigate the effects of anisotropic characteristics of a GDL, including the inherent anisotropy, deformation, and electrical and thermal contact resistances, on the coupled species, charges and thermal transport processes in a DMFC. In this model, methanol crossover and non-equilibrium evaporation/condensation of water and methanol are considered. The multistep electrochemical mechanisms are used to obtain a detailed description of the kinetics of methanol oxidization reaction (MOR) in both the anode and cathode catalyst layers (CLs). The numerical results show that the anisotropy of the GDL has a great effect on the distribution of species concentration, overpotential, local current density, and temperature. The deformation of the GDL depresses the transport of species through the GDL, particularly methanol diffusion in anode GDL, but facilitates the transport of electron and the removal of heat. The electrical contact resistance plays an important role in determining the cell performance.

  6. Transport driven plasma flows in the scrape-off layer of ADITYA Tokamak in different orientations of magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Sangwan, Deepak; Jha, Ratneshwar; Brotankova, Jana; Gopalkrishna, M. V.

    2014-06-15

    Parallel plasma flows in the scrape-off layer of ADITYA tokamak are measured in two orientations of total magnetic field. In each orientation, experiments are carried out by reversing the direction of the toroidal magnetic field and the plasma current. The transport-driven component is determined by averaging flow Mach numbers, measured in two directions of the toroidal magnetic field and the plasma current for the same orientation. It is observed that there is a significant transport-driven component in the measured flow and the component depends on the field orientation.

  7. Impact of compression on gas transport in non-woven gas diffusion layers of high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froning, Dieter; Yu, Junliang; Gaiselmann, Gerd; Reimer, Uwe; Manke, Ingo; Schmidt, Volker; Lehnert, Werner

    2016-06-01

    Gas transport in non-woven gas diffusion layers of a high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell was calculated with the Lattice Boltzmann method. The underlying micro structure was taken from two sources. A real micro structure was analyzed in the synchrotron under the impact of a compression mask mimicking the channel/rib structure of a flow field. Furthermore a stochastic geometry model based on synchrotron X-ray tomography studies was applied. The effect of compression is included in the stochastic model. Gas transport in these micro structures was simulated and the impact of compression was analyzed. Fiber bundles overlaying the micro structure were identified which affect the homogeneity of the gas flow. There are significant deviations between the impact of compression on effective material properties for this type of gas diffusion layers and the Kozeny-Carman equation.

  8. An experimental study of the turbulent boundary layer on a transport wing in subsonic and transonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaid, Frank W.; Roos, Frederick W.; Hicks, Raymond M.

    1990-01-01

    The upper surface boundary layer on a transport wing model was extensively surveyed with miniature yaw probes at a subsonic and a transonic cruise condition. Additional data were obtained at a second transonic test condition, for which a separated region was present at mid-semispan, aft of mid-chord. Significant variation in flow direction with distance from the surface was observed near the trailing edge except at the wing root and tip. The data collected at the transonic cruise condition show boundary layer growth associated with shock wave/boundary layer interaction, followed by recovery of the boundary layer downstream of the shock. Measurements of fluctuating surface pressure and wingtip acceleration were also obtained. The influence of flow field unsteadiness on the boundary layer data is discussed. Comparisons among the data and predictions from a variety of computational methods are presented. The computed predictions are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data in the outboard regions where 3-D effects are moderate and adverse pressure gradients are mild. In the more highly loaded mid-span region near the trailing edge, displacement thickness growth was significantly underpredicted, except when unrealistically severe adverse pressure gradients associated with inviscid calculations were used to perform boundary layer calculations.

  9. Transport of Mass and Water Vapor in Cumulus Topped Boundary Layer: A Case-Study from Arm Darwin Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghate, V. P.; Jensen, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Shallow cumulus clouds are intimately tied to the turbulence in the boundary layer and transport momentum and enthalpy upwards from the surface. These clouds have a significant impact on the Earth's radiation budget as they reflect more incoming solar radiation back to space compared to the underlying surface. They form when water vapor is transported upwards from the surface above the lifting condensation level at which point the water vapor condenses to form cloud droplets. These clouds typically have a life-time of less than an hour after which they evaporate, with the active cumuli venting the boundary layer moisture into the free troposphere. We use data collected during a 24-hour period at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) observing facility at Darwin, Australia to study the turbulent transport of mass and water vapor associated with shallow cumulus clouds. The instruments at the site include a vertically pointing Doppler cloud radar, Doppler Lidar, ceilometer among others. Three balloon borne radiosondes were also launched during the study period. Data from the cloud radar and Doppler Lidar were combined to retrieve the vertical velocity structure of the entire boundary layer at a high resolution (2 sec; 30 m). Additionally, high resolution (10 s; 37 m) retrievals of water vapor mixing ratio were also performed using the data collected by the collocated Raman Lidar. We will use the high resolution observations of vertical velocity and water vapor to characterize the second order turbulent transport terms of water vapor and vertical velocity. These turbulent transport terms will then be used together with a parcel model to calculate entrainment rates of individual cloud elements. The contrast in the entrainment rates of forced, active and passive cumuli will be presented together with the moisture and dynamic structure of surrounding environmental air.

  10. Application of Hybrid Fillers for Improving the Through-Plane Heat Transport in Graphite Nanoplatelet-Based Thermal Interface Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaojuan; Itkis, Mikhail E.; Haddon, Robert C.

    2015-08-01

    The in-plane alignment of graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs) in thin thermal interface material (TIM) layers suppresses the though-plane heat transport thus limiting the performance of GNPs in the geometry normally required for thermal management applications. Here we report a disruption of the GNP in-plane alignment by addition of spherical microparticles. The degree of GNP alignment was monitored by measurement of the anisotropy of electrical conductivity which is extremely sensitive to the orientation of high aspect ratio filler particles. Scanning Electron Microscopy images of TIM layer cross-sections confirmed the suppression of the in-plane alignment. The hybrid filler formulations reported herein resulted in a synergistic enhancement of the through-plane thermal conductivity of GNP/Al2O3 and GNP/Al filled TIM layers confirming that the control of GNP alignment is an important parameter in the development of highly efficient GNP and graphene-based TIMs.

  11. Application of Hybrid Fillers for Improving the Through-Plane Heat Transport in Graphite Nanoplatelet-Based Thermal Interface Layers

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaojuan; Itkis, Mikhail E.; Haddon, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    The in-plane alignment of graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs) in thin thermal interface material (TIM) layers suppresses the though-plane heat transport thus limiting the performance of GNPs in the geometry normally required for thermal management applications. Here we report a disruption of the GNP in-plane alignment by addition of spherical microparticles. The degree of GNP alignment was monitored by measurement of the anisotropy of electrical conductivity which is extremely sensitive to the orientation of high aspect ratio filler particles. Scanning Electron Microscopy images of TIM layer cross-sections confirmed the suppression of the in-plane alignment. The hybrid filler formulations reported herein resulted in a synergistic enhancement of the through-plane thermal conductivity of GNP/Al2O3 and GNP/Al filled TIM layers confirming that the control of GNP alignment is an important parameter in the development of highly efficient GNP and graphene-based TIMs. PMID:26279183

  12. Discrete and continuous modelling of convective heat transport in a thin porous layer of mono sized spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burström, Per E. C.; Frishfelds, Vilnis; Ljung, Anna-Lena; Lundström, T. Staffan; Marjavaara, B. Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Convective heat transport in a relatively thin porous layer of monosized particles is here modeled. The size of the particles is only one order of magnitude smaller than the thickness of the layer. Both a discrete three-dimensional system of particles and a continuous one-dimensional model are considered. The methodology applied for the discrete system is Voronoi discretization with minimization of dissipation rate of energy. The discrete and continuous model compares well for low velocities for the studied uniform inlet boundary conditions. When increasing the speed or for a thin porous layer however, the continuous model diverge from the discrete approach if a constant dispersion is used in the continuous approach. The new result is thus that a special correlation must be used when using a continuous model for flow perpendicular to a thin porous media in order to predict the dispersion in proper manner, especially in combination with higher velocities.

  13. TRANSPORT OF HEAT, WATER VAPOR AND CARBON DOXIDE BY LONG PERIOD EDDIES IN THE STABLE BOUNDARY LAYER

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.

    2010-07-26

    The vertical transport of heat and trace chemicals for a night in April has been studied with a wavelet analysis and conventional one-hour averages. It was found that for the night of April 20, 2009, turbulent kinetic energy, heat and trace chemicals were transported directed downward from the jet core. The most significant periods for this transport were less than 5 minutes and greater than one hour with intermittent transport taking place in the 5 min to 1 hour time frame. The nocturnal boundary layer is characterized by turbulent intermittency, long period oscillations, and a slow approach to equilibrium, (Mahrt, 1999). Although turbulence is usually maintained by surface friction, downward transport from low-level jets can also play an important role in turbulence maintenance and in the transport of scalars, Mahrt (1999), Banta et al. (2006). The eddy covariance flux measurement technique assumes continuous turbulence which is unusual in the stable boundary because significant flux transport occurs via turbulent eddies whose periods are long compared with the averaging time (Goulden et al., 1996). Systematic error in eddy flux measurements is attributed mainly to the neglect of long period eddies. Banta et al. (2006) noted that observations of turbulence below the low level jet suggested that while upward transport of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) is common, downward transport from the jet can also occur. They found that in the CASES 99 experiments that turbulence scaled well with the strength of the low-level jet, and that surface cooling was more important than surface roughness. Because nocturnal turbulence is intermittent and non-stationary, the appropriate averaging time for calculation of TKE and EC fluxes is not obvious. Wavelet analysis is, thus, a more suitable analysis tool than conventional Fourier analysis.

  14. Morphology and Transport Properties of Novel Polymer Nanocomposites Resulted from Melt Processing of Polyvinylacetate Substrates Coated with Layer-by-Layer Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, Iman; Spontak, Richard J.

    Novel polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) were processed through layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition of clay and polyethylene terephthalate ionomer layers on polyvinylacetate (PVAc) substrates, followed by repetitive melt pressing of coated samples to crush LBL assemblies into the polymeric matrix. The increase in the clay content in resulted PNCs prepared through similar LBL coatings, relative to previously studied hydrophobic polystyrene-based nanocomposites, postulated superiority of PVAc, with relatively higher hydrophilicity, to interact with LBL assemblies. Also, these PNCs showed relatively good barrier improvement against transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide gases, proposing the scavenging effect of LBL assemblies crushed portions as highly tortuous labyrinths with high aspect ratios, comprising edge-edge flocculated exfoliated clay platelets, observed through transmission electron micrographs. However, combinative morphological investigations through optical microscopy, x-ray diffractometry, and transmission electron microscopy proposed low global dispersion of clay throughout polymeric matrix, conjecturing insufficient intensity of stress applied through cyclic melt pressing, and/or slight thermal degradation of samples via extended times of processing at high temperatures.

  15. Investigating the source, transport, and isotope composition of water vapor in the planetary boundary layer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Griffis, Timothy J.; Wood, Jeffrey D.; Baker, John M.; Lee, Xuhui; Xiao, Ke; Chen, Zichong; Welp, Lisa R.; Schultz, Natalie M.; Gorski, Galen; Chen, Ming; et al

    2016-04-25

    Increasing atmospheric humidity and convective precipitation over land provide evidence of intensification of the hydrologic cycle – an expected response to surface warming. The extent to which terrestrial ecosystems modulate these hydrologic factors is important to understand feedbacks in the climate system. We measured the oxygen and hydrogen isotope composition of water vapor at a very tall tower (185 m) in the upper Midwest, United States, to diagnose the sources, transport, and fractionation of water vapor in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over a 3-year period (2010 to 2012). These measurements represent the first set of annual water vapor isotopemore » observations for this region. Several simple isotope models and cross-wavelet analyses were used to assess the importance of the Rayleigh distillation process, evaporation, and PBL entrainment processes on the isotope composition of water vapor. The vapor isotope composition at this tall tower site showed a large seasonal amplitude (mean monthly δ18Ov ranged from –40.2 to –15.9 ‰ and δ2Hv ranged from –278.7 to –113.0 ‰) and followed the familiar Rayleigh distillation relation with water vapor mixing ratio when considering the entire hourly data set. However, this relation was strongly modulated by evaporation and PBL entrainment processes at timescales ranging from hours to several days. The wavelet coherence spectra indicate that the oxygen isotope ratio and the deuterium excess (dv) of water vapor are sensitive to synoptic and PBL processes. According to the phase of the coherence analyses, we show that evaporation often leads changes in dv, confirming that it is a potential tracer of regional evaporation. Isotope mixing models indicate that on average about 31 % of the growing season PBL water vapor is derived from regional evaporation. However, isoforcing calculations and mixing model analyses for high PBL water vapor mixing ratio events ( > 25 mmol mol–1) indicate that regional

  16. Investigating the source, transport, and isotope composition of water vapor in the planetary boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffis, Timothy J.; Wood, Jeffrey D.; Baker, John M.; Lee, Xuhui; Xiao, Ke; Chen, Zichong; Welp, Lisa R.; Schultz, Natalie M.; Gorski, Galen; Chen, Ming; Nieber, John

    2016-04-01

    Increasing atmospheric humidity and convective precipitation over land provide evidence of intensification of the hydrologic cycle - an expected response to surface warming. The extent to which terrestrial ecosystems modulate these hydrologic factors is important to understand feedbacks in the climate system. We measured the oxygen and hydrogen isotope composition of water vapor at a very tall tower (185 m) in the upper Midwest, United States, to diagnose the sources, transport, and fractionation of water vapor in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over a 3-year period (2010 to 2012). These measurements represent the first set of annual water vapor isotope observations for this region. Several simple isotope models and cross-wavelet analyses were used to assess the importance of the Rayleigh distillation process, evaporation, and PBL entrainment processes on the isotope composition of water vapor. The vapor isotope composition at this tall tower site showed a large seasonal amplitude (mean monthly δ18Ov ranged from -40.2 to -15.9 ‰ and δ2Hv ranged from -278.7 to -113.0 ‰) and followed the familiar Rayleigh distillation relation with water vapor mixing ratio when considering the entire hourly data set. However, this relation was strongly modulated by evaporation and PBL entrainment processes at timescales ranging from hours to several days. The wavelet coherence spectra indicate that the oxygen isotope ratio and the deuterium excess (dv) of water vapor are sensitive to synoptic and PBL processes. According to the phase of the coherence analyses, we show that evaporation often leads changes in dv, confirming that it is a potential tracer of regional evaporation. Isotope mixing models indicate that on average about 31 % of the growing season PBL water vapor is derived from regional evaporation. However, isoforcing calculations and mixing model analyses for high PBL water vapor mixing ratio events ( > 25 mmol mol-1) indicate that regional evaporation can account

  17. Investigation of chemical properties and transport phenomena associated with pollutants in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Heather A.

    Under the Clean Air Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is required to determine which air pollutants are harmful to human health, then regulate, monitor and establish criteria levels for these pollutants. To accomplish this and for scientific advancement, integration of knowledge from several disciplines is required including: engineering, atmospheric science, chemistry and public health. Recently, a shift has been made to establish interdisciplinary research groups to better understand the atmospheric processes that govern the transport of pollutants and chemical reactions of species in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The primary reason for interdisciplinary collaboration is the need for atmospheric processes to be treated as a coupled system, and to design experiments that measure meteorological, chemical and physical variables simultaneously so forecasting models can be improved (i.e., meteorological and chemical process models). This dissertation focuses on integrating research disciplines to provide a more complete framework to study pollutants in the ABL. For example, chemical characterization of particulate matter (PM) and the physical processes governing PM distribution and mixing are combined to provide more comprehensive data for source apportionment. Data from three field experiments were utilized to study turbulence, meteorological and chemical parameters in the ABL. Two air quality field studies were conducted on the U.S./Mexico border. The first was located in Yuma, AZ to investigate the spatial and temporal variability of PM in an urban environment and relate chemical properties of ambient aerosols to physical findings. The second border air quality study was conducted in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico to investigate the relationship between indoor and outdoor air quality in order to better correlate cooking fuel types and home activities to elevated indoor PM concentrations. The final study was executed in southern Idaho and focused on

  18. Investigating the source, transport, and isotope composition of water vapor in the planetary boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Griffis, Timothy J.; Wood, Jeffrey D.; Baker, John M.; Lee, Xuhui; Xiao, Ke; Chen, Zichong; Welp, Lisa R.; Schultz, Natalie M.; Gorski, Galen; Chen, Ming; Nieber, John

    2016-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric humidity and convective precipitation over land provide evidence of intensification of the hydrologic cycle – an expected response to surface warming. The extent to which terrestrial ecosystems modulate these hydrologic factors is important to understand feedbacks in the climate system. We measured the oxygen and hydrogen isotope composition of water vapor at a very tall tower (185 m) in the upper Midwest, United States, to diagnose the sources, transport, and fractionation of water vapor in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over a 3-year period (2010 to 2012). These measurements represent the first set of annual water vapor isotope observations for this region. Several simple isotope models and cross-wavelet analyses were used to assess the importance of the Rayleigh distillation process, evaporation, and PBL entrainment processes on the isotope composition of water vapor. The vapor isotope composition at this tall tower site showed a large seasonal amplitude (mean monthly δ18Ov ranged from −40.2 to −15.9 ‰ and δ2Hv ranged from −278.7 to −113.0 ‰) and followed the familiar Rayleigh distillation relation with water vapor mixing ratio when considering the entire hourly data set. However, this relation was strongly modulated by evaporation and PBL entrainment processes at timescales ranging from hours to several days. The wavelet coherence spectra indicate that the oxygen isotope ratio and the deuterium excess (dv) of water vapor are sensitive to synoptic and PBL processes. According to the phase of the coherence analyses, we show that evaporation often leads changes in dv, confirming that it is a potential tracer of regional evaporation. Isotope mixing models indicate that on average about 31 % of the growing season PBL water vapor is derived from regional evaporation. However, isoforcing calculations and mixing model

  19. Downscaling the Sample Thickness to Sub-Micrometers by Employing Organic Photovoltaic Materials as a Charge-Generation Layer in the Time-of-Flight Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shun-Wei; Lee, Chih-Chien; Su, Wei-Cheng; Yuan, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Chun-Feng; Chen, Kuan-Ting; Shu, Yi-Sheng; Li, Ya-Ze; Su, Tsung-Hao; Huang, Bo-Yao; Chang, Wen-Chang; Liu, Yu-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) measurements typically require a sample thickness of several micrometers for determining the carrier mobility, thus rendering the applicability inefficient and unreliable because the sample thicknesses are orders of magnitude higher than those in real optoelectronic devices. Here, we use subphthalocyanine (SubPc):C70 as a charge-generation layer (CGL) in the TOF measurement and a commonly hole-transporting layer, N,N’-diphenyl-N,N’-bis(1,1’-biphenyl)-4,4’-diamine (NPB), as a standard material under test. When the NPB thickness is reduced from 2 to 0.3 μm and with a thin 10-nm CGL, the hole transient signal still shows non-dispersive properties under various applied fields, and thus the hole mobility is determined accordingly. Only 1-μm NPB is required for determining the electron mobility by using the proposed CGL. Both the thicknesses are the thinnest value reported to data. In addition, the flexibility of fabrication process of small molecules can deposit the proposed CGL underneath and atop the material under test. Therefore, this technique is applicable to small-molecule and polymeric materials. We also propose a new approach to design the TOF sample using an optical simulation. These results strongly demonstrate that the proposed technique is valuable tool in determining the carrier mobility and may spur additional research in this field. PMID:25999238

  20. Downscaling the Sample Thickness to Sub-Micrometers by Employing Organic Photovoltaic Materials as a Charge-Generation Layer in the Time-of-Flight Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shun-Wei; Lee, Chih-Chien; Su, Wei-Cheng; Yuan, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Chun-Feng; Chen, Kuan-Ting; Shu, Yi-Sheng; Li, Ya-Ze; Su, Tsung-Hao; Huang, Bo-Yao; Chang, Wen-Chang; Liu, Yu-Hsuan

    2015-05-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) measurements typically require a sample thickness of several micrometers for determining the carrier mobility, thus rendering the applicability inefficient and unreliable because the sample thicknesses are orders of magnitude higher than those in real optoelectronic devices. Here, we use subphthalocyanine (SubPc):C70 as a charge-generation layer (CGL) in the TOF measurement and a commonly hole-transporting layer, N,N’-diphenyl-N,N’-bis(1,1’-biphenyl)-4,4’-diamine (NPB), as a standard material under test. When the NPB thickness is reduced from 2 to 0.3 μm and with a thin 10-nm CGL, the hole transient signal still shows non-dispersive properties under various applied fields, and thus the hole mobility is determined accordingly. Only 1-μm NPB is required for determining the electron mobility by using the proposed CGL. Both the thicknesses are the thinnest value reported to data. In addition, the flexibility of fabrication process of small molecules can deposit the proposed CGL underneath and atop the material under test. Therefore, this technique is applicable to small-molecule and polymeric materials. We also propose a new approach to design the TOF sample using an optical simulation. These results strongly demonstrate that the proposed technique is valuable tool in determining the carrier mobility and may spur additional research in this field.

  1. Model Simulation of Ionosphere Electron Density with Dynamic Transportation and Mechanism of Sporadic E Layers in Lower Part of Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. C.; Chu, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    There are many physical theories responsible for explanation the generation mechanism of sporadic E (Es) plasma irregularities. In middle latitude, it's generally believed that sporadic E layers occur in vertical ion convergent areas driven by horizontal neutral wind shear. The sporadic E layers appear characteristic of abundant metallic ion species (i.e., Fe+, Mg+, Na+), that lifetime are longer than molecular ions by a factor of several orders, have been demonstrated by rocket-borne mass spectrometric measurements. On the basic of the GPS Radio Occultation (RO), using the scintillations of the GPS signal-to-noise ratio and intense fluctuation of excess phase, the global and seasonal sporadic E layers occurrence rates could be retrieved. In our previous study we found there is averaged 10 kilometers shift in height between the COSMIC-retrieved sporadic E layer occurrence rate and the sporadic E occurrence rate modeled from considering the convergence/divergence of Fe+ vertical flux. There are many reasons that maybe result in the altitude differences, e.g., tidal wind with phase shift, electric field driven force, iron species distributions. In this research, the quantitative analyses for electric field drives Es layers translations in vertical direction are presented. The tidal wind driven sporadic E layers have been simulating by modeling several nonmetallic ions (O+(4S), O+(2D), O+(2p), N+, N2+, O2+, NO+) and metallic ions (Fe+, FeO2+, FeN2+, FeO+) with wind shear transportation. The simulation result shows the Fe+ particles accumulate at zonal wind shear convergent regions and form the thin sporadic E layers. With the electric field taking into account, the whole shape of sporadic E layers vertical shift 2~5 km that depending on what magnitude and direction of electric field is added.

  2. Methane transport from the active layer to lakes in the Arctic using Toolik Lake, Alaska, as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Paytan, Adina; Lecher, Alanna L.; Dimova, Natasha; Sparrow, Katy J.; Kodovska, Fenix Garcia-Tigreros; Murray, Joseph; Tulaczyk, Slawomir; Kessler, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Methane emissions in the Arctic are important, and may be contributing to global warming. While methane emission rates from Arctic lakes are well documented, methods are needed to quantify the relative contribution of active layer groundwater to the overall lake methane budget. Here we report measurements of natural tracers of soil/groundwater, radon, and radium, along with methane concentration in Toolik Lake, Alaska, to evaluate the role active layer water plays as an exogenous source for lake methane. Average concentrations of methane, radium, and radon were all elevated in the active layer compared with lake water (1.6 × 104 nM, 61.6 dpm⋅m−3, and 4.5 × 105 dpm⋅m−3 compared with 1.3 × 102 nM, 5.7 dpm⋅m−3, and 4.4 × 103 dpm⋅m−3, respectively). Methane transport from the active layer to Toolik Lake based on the geochemical tracer radon (up to 2.9 g⋅m−2⋅y−1) can account for a large fraction of methane emissions from this lake. Strong but spatially and temporally variable correlations between radon activity and methane concentrations (r2 > 0.69) in lake water suggest that the parameters that control methane discharge from the active layer also vary. Warming in the Arctic may expand the active layer and increase the discharge, thereby increasing the methane flux to lakes and from lakes to the atmosphere, exacerbating global warming. More work is needed to quantify and elucidate the processes that control methane fluxes from the active layer to predict how this flux might change in the future and to evaluate the regional and global contribution of active layer water associated methane inputs. PMID:25775530

  3. Atomic layer deposition of SIO2 on porous alumina membranes: controlling the pore size and transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velleman, Leonora; Traini, Gerry; Evans, Peter J.; Atanacio, Armand; Shapter, Joe G.; Losic, Dusan

    2008-12-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of SiO2 onto nanoporous alumina (PA) membranes was investigated with the aim of adjusting the pore size and transport properties. PA membranes from commercial sources with a range of pore diameters (20 nm, 100 nm and 200 nm) were used and modified by atomic layer deposition using tris(tert-butoxy)silanol and water as the precursor couple. By adjusting the number of deposition cycles, the thickness of the conformal silica coating was controlled, reducing the effective pore diameter, and subsequently changing the transport properties of the PA membrane. Silica coated PA membranes with desired pore diameters from <5 nm to 100 nm were fabricated. In addition to the pore size, the transport properties and selectivity of fabricated silica coated PA membranes were controlled by chemical functionalisation using a silane with hydrophobic properties. Structural and chemical properties of modified membranes were studied by dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry (DSIMS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Spectrophotometric methods were used to evaluate the transport properties and selectivity of silica coated membranes by permeation studies of hydrophobic and hydrophilic organic molecules. The resultant silica/PA membranes with specific surface chemistry and controlled pore size are applicable for molecular separation, cell culture, bioreactors, biosensing and drug delivery.

  4. Effects of disorder state and interfacial layer on thermal transport in copper/diamond system

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, V.; Gengler, J. J.; Muratore, C.; Spowart, J. E.

    2015-02-21

    The characterization of Cu/diamond interface thermal conductance (h{sub c}) along with an improved understanding of factors affecting it are becoming increasingly important, as Cu-diamond composites are being considered for electronic packaging applications. In this study, ∼90 nm thick Cu layers were deposited on synthetic and natural single crystal diamond substrates. In several specimens, a Ti-interface layer of thickness ≤3.5 nm was sputtered between the diamond substrate and the Cu top layer. The h{sub c} across Cu/diamond interfaces for specimens with and without a Ti-interface layer was determined using time-domain thermoreflectance. The h{sub c} is ∼2× higher for similar interfacial layers on synthetic versus natural diamond substrate. The nitrogen concentration of synthetic diamond substrate is four orders of magnitude lower than natural diamond. The difference in nitrogen concentration can lead to variations in disorder state, with a higher nitrogen content resulting in a higher level of disorder. This difference in disorder state potentially can explain the variations in h{sub c}. Furthermore, h{sub c} was observed to increase with an increase of Ti-interface layer thickness. This was attributed to an increased adhesion of Cu top layer with increasing Ti-interface layer thickness, as observed qualitatively in the current study.

  5. Effect of compression on water transport in gas diffusion layer of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell using lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Dong Hyup; Kim, Hansang

    2015-10-01

    The effect of the compression ratio on the dynamic behavior of liquid water transport in a gas diffusion layer (GDL) is studied both experimentally and numerically. We experimentally study the emergence and growth of liquid droplets in a channel at various compression ratios by adopting a direct visualization device. The results of the experiment show that water breakthrough occurs at the channel for a low compression ratio, whereas it is observed at the channel/rib interface for a high compression ratio. To determine the mechanism of water transport in the GDL, a multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is developed for a simplified porous structure of the GDL. The observation of lattice Boltzmann (LB) simulation shows that the compression ratio significantly affects the water transport in the GDL. The results indicate that the lower compression ratio reduces the water saturation in the GDL. The simulation and experimental result are similar.

  6. Sequential Electron Transport and Vibrational Excitations in an Organic Molecule Coupled to Few-Layer Graphene Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Burzurí, Enrique; Island, Joshua O; Díaz-Torres, Raúl; Fursina, Alexandra; González-Campo, Arántzazu; Roubeau, Olivier; Teat, Simon J; Aliaga-Alcalde, Núria; Ruiz, Eliseo; van der Zant, Herre S J

    2016-02-23

    Graphene electrodes are promising candidates to improve reproducibility and stability in molecular electronics through new electrode-molecule anchoring strategies. Here we report sequential electron transport in few-layer graphene transistors containing individual curcuminoid-based molecules anchored to the electrodes via π-π orbital bonding. We show the coexistence of inelastic co-tunneling excitations with single-electron transport physics due to an intermediate molecule-electrode coupling; we argue that an intermediate electron-phonon coupling is the origin of these vibrational-assisted excitations. These experimental observations are complemented with density functional theory calculations to model electron transport and the interaction between electrons and vibrational modes of the curcuminoid molecule. We find that the calculated vibrational modes of the molecule are in agreement with the experimentally observed excitations. PMID:26841282

  7. Charge transport dependent high open circuit voltage tandem organic photovoltaic cells with low temperature deposited HATCN-based charge recombination layers.

    PubMed

    Wei, Huai-Xin; Zu, Feng-Shuo; Li, Yan-Qing; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Yuan, Yi; Tang, Jian-Xin; Fung, Man-Keung; Lee, Chun-Sing; Noh, Yong-Young

    2016-02-01

    Mechanisms of charge transport between the interconnector and its neighboring layers in tandem organic photovoltaic cells have been systematically investigated by studying electronic properties of the involving interfaces with photoelectron spectroscopies and performance of the corresponding devices. The results show that charge recombination occurs at HATCN and its neighboring hole transport layers which can be deposited at low temperature. The hole transport layer plays an equal role to the interconnector itself. These insights provide guidance for the identification of new materials and the device architecture for high performance devices. PMID:26775613

  8. High color rending index and high-efficiency white organic light-emitting diodes based on the control of red phosphorescent dye-doped hole transport layer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M Y; Wang, F F; Wei, N; Zhou, P C; Peng, K J; Yu, J N; Wang, Z X; Wei, B

    2013-01-14

    We have investigated the transport characteristics of red phosphorescent dye bis(1-(phenyl)isoquinoline) iridium (III) acetylanetonate (Ir(piq)₂acac) doped 4,4',4"-tri(N-carbazolyl)triphenylamine (TCTA), and found that the increasing doping ratio was facilitated to improve the ability of hole transporting. A high color rendering index (CRI) and high-efficiency WOLED was achieved by employing Ir(piq)₂acac doped TCTA film as an effective red emissive layer due to the generation of charge transfer complex (CTC) at the interface. The relative proportion in red: green: blue emission intensity can be controlled by the CTC concentration to obtain high CRI WOLEDs. The WOLED with an optimal red dye doping concentration of 5 wt% exhibits a high CRI of 89 and a power efficiency of 31.2 lm/W and 27.5 lm/W at the initial luminance and 100 cd/m², respectively. The devices show little variation of the Commission Internationale de I'Eclairage coordinates in a wide range of luminance. PMID:23389269

  9. Low driving voltage in an organic light-emitting diode using MoO3/NPB multiple quantum well structure in a hole transport layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Xue; Wu, Xiao-Ming; Hua, Yu-Lin; Jiao, Zhi-Qiang; Shen, Li-Ying; Su, Yue-Ju; Bai, Juan-Juan; Bi, Wen-Tao; Yin, Shou-Gen; Zheng, Jia-Jin

    2013-02-01

    The driving voltage of an organic light-emitting diode (OLED) is lowered by employing molybdenum trioxide (MoO3)/N, N'-bis(naphthalene-1-yl)-N,N'-bis(phe-nyl)-benzidine (NPB) multiple quantum well (MQW) structure in the hole transport layer. For the device with double quantum well (DQW) structure of ITO/ [MoO3 (2.5 nm)/NPB (20 nm)]2/Alq3(50 nm)/LiF (0.8 nm)/Al (120 nm)], the turn-on voltage is reduced to 2.8 V, which is lowered by 0.4 V compared with that of the control device (without MQW structures), and the driving voltage is 5.6 V, which is reduced by 1 V compared with that of the control device at the 1000 cd/m2. In this work, the enhancement of the injection and transport ability for holes could reduce the driving voltage for the device with MQW structure, which is attributed not only to the reduced energy barrier between ITO and NPB, but also to the forming charge transfer complex between MoO3 and NPB induced by the interfacial doping effect of MoO3.

  10. A bill to require the Transportation Security Administration to comply with the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Lieberman, Joseph I. [ID-CT

    2011-12-14

    12/14/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (text of measure as introduced: CR S8604) (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.3670, which became Public Law 112-171 on 8/16/2012. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. 41 CFR 109-38.301-1.50 - Authorization for transportation between residence and place of employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS AVIATION, TRANSPORTATION, AND MOTOR VEHICLES 38-MOTOR EQUIPMENT... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Authorization...

  12. 41 CFR 109-38.301-1.50 - Authorization for transportation between residence and place of employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS AVIATION, TRANSPORTATION, AND MOTOR VEHICLES 38-MOTOR EQUIPMENT... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Authorization...

  13. 41 CFR 109-38.301-1.50 - Authorization for transportation between residence and place of employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS AVIATION, TRANSPORTATION, AND MOTOR VEHICLES 38-MOTOR EQUIPMENT... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authorization...

  14. Lidar Characterization of Boundary Layer Transport and Mixing for Estimating Urban-Scale Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardesty, R. Michael; Brewer, W. Alan; Sandberg, Scott P.; Weickmann, Ann M.; Shepson, Paul B.; Cambaliza, Maria; Heimburger, Alexie; Davis, Kenneth J.; Lauvaux, Thomas; Miles, Natasha L.; Sarmiento, Daniel P.; Deng, A. J.; Gaudet, Brian; Karion, Anna; Sweeney, Colm; Whetstone, James

    2016-06-01

    A compact commercial Doppler lidar has been deployed in Indianapolis for two years to measure wind profiles and mixing layer properties as part of project to improve greenhouse measurements from large area sources. The lidar uses vertical velocity variance and aerosol structure to measure mixing layer depth. Comparisons with aircraft and the NOAA HRDL lidar generally indicate good performance, although sensitivity might be an issue under low aerosol conditions.

  15. O2-filled swimbladder employs monocarboxylate transporters for the generation of O2 by lactate-induced root effect hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Umezawa, Takahiro; Kato, Akira; Ogoshi, Maho; Ookata, Kayoko; Munakata, Keijiro; Yamamoto, Yoko; Islam, Zinia; Doi, Hiroyuki; Romero, Michael F; Hirose, Shigehisa

    2012-01-01

    The swimbladder volume is regulated by O(2) transfer between the luminal space and the blood In the swimbladder, lactic acid generation by anaerobic glycolysis in the gas gland epithelial cells and its recycling through the rete mirabile bundles of countercurrent capillaries are essential for local blood acidification and oxygen liberation from hemoglobin by the "Root effect." While O(2) generation is critical for fish flotation, the molecular mechanism of the secretion and recycling of lactic acid in this critical process is not clear. To clarify molecules that are involved in the blood acidification and visualize the route of lactic acid movement, we analyzed the expression of 17 members of the H(+)/monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) family in the fugu genome and found that only MCT1b and MCT4b are highly expressed in the fugu swimbladder. Electrophysiological analyses demonstrated that MCT1b is a high-affinity lactate transporter whereas MCT4b is a low-affinity/high-conductance lactate transporter. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that (i) MCT4b expresses in gas gland cells together with the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH at high level and mediate lactic acid secretion by gas gland cells, and (ii) MCT1b expresses in arterial, but not venous, capillary endothelial cells in rete mirabile and mediates recycling of lactic acid in the rete mirabile by solute-specific transcellular transport. These results clarified the mechanism of the blood acidification in the swimbladder by spatially organized two lactic acid transporters MCT4b and MCT1b. PMID:22496829

  16. High-field and thermal transport in 2D atomic layer devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serov, Andrey; Dorgan, Vincent E.; Behnam, Ashkan; English, Chris D.; Li, Zuanyi; Islam, Sharnali; Pop, Eric

    2014-06-01

    This paper reviews our recent results of high-field electrical and thermal properties of atomically thin two-dimensional materials. We show how self-heating affects velocity saturation in suspended and supported graphene. We also demonstrate that multi-valley transport must be taken into account to describe high-field transport in MoS2. At the same time we characterized thermal properties of suspended and nanoscale graphene samples over a wide range of temperatures. We uncovered the effects of edge scattering and grain boundaries on thermal transport in graphene, and showed how the thermal conductivity varies between diffusive and ballistic heat flow limits.

  17. Hierarchically Structured Hole Transport Layers of Spiro-OMeTAD and Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes for Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiyong; Menamparambath, Mini Mol; Hwang, Jae-Yeol; Baik, Seunghyun

    2015-07-20

    The low electrical conductivity of spiro-OMeTAD hole transport layers impedes further enhancements of the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of perovskite solar cells. We embedded multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in spiro-OMeTAD (spiro-OMeTAD/MWNTs) to increase carrier mobility and conductivity. However, direct electrical contact between CH3 NH3 PbI3 and the MWNTs created pathways for undesirable back-electron transfer, owing to the large work function of MWNTs, limiting enhancements of the PCE. A hierarchical structure of pure spiro-OMeTAD and spiro-OMeTAD/MWNTs was designed to block back-electron transfer and fully exploit the enhanced charge transport of spiro-OMeTAD/MWNTs. The enhanced fill factor, short-circuit current density, open-circuit voltage, and PCE (15.1 %) were achieved by using this hierarchical hole transport layer structure (MWNT concentration=2 wt %). The perovskite solar cells were fabricated by a low-temperature solution process, further decreasing their per-Watt cost. PMID:26013428

  18. Low resistivity ZnO-GO electron transport layer based CH3NH3PbI3 solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Muhammad Imran; Hussain, Zakir; Mujahid, Mohammad; Khan, Ahmed Nawaz; Javaid, Syed Saad; Habib, Amir

    2016-06-01

    Perovskite based solar cells have demonstrated impressive performances. Controlled environment synthesis and expensive hole transport material impede their potential commercialization. We report ambient air synthesis of hole transport layer free devices using ZnO-GO as electron selective contacts. Solar cells fabricated with hole transport layer free architecture under ambient air conditions with ZnO as electron selective contact achieved an efficiency of 3.02%. We have demonstrated that by incorporating GO in ZnO matrix, low resistivity electron selective contacts, critical to improve the performance, can be achieved. We could achieve max efficiency of 4.52% with our completed devices for ZnO: GO composite. Impedance spectroscopy confirmed the decrease in series resistance and an increase in recombination resistance with inclusion of GO in ZnO matrix. Effect of temperature on completed devices was investigated by recording impedance spectra at 40 and 60 oC, providing indirect evidence of the performance of solar cells at elevated temperatures.

  19. On statistical properties of transport barriers in magnetospheric and laboratory boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, Sergey; Budaev, Viacheslav; Zeleniy, Lev; Amata, Ermanno; Kozak, Lyudmila; Buechner, Joerg; Romanov, Stanislav; Blecki, Jan; Balikhin, Michael A.; Lezhen, Liudmila

    Transport barriers at outer magnetospheric boundaries have a dualistic feature: being effec-tive in limitation of the momentum transfer and serving as an effective obstacle, they display the super-diffusive statistical properties and provide partial exchange of plasmas. In tokamaks namely the statistical properties of transport barriers look to control the high and low heating modes, while small size of the barriers prevents their detailed studies. We tend to use magne-tospheric multi-spacecraft data to improve understanding of common physics in the transport barriers. We show examples from Interball-1 and Cluster with quiet solar wind. The inherently turbulent crossings in this equilibrium cases demonstrate ion heating namely in the transport barrier. It agrees with the kinetic energy transformation into the thermal one inside the barrier -the turbulent dissipation of the magnetosheath kinetic energy -as simultaneously with the ion temperature rise, the general velocity component drops from its model prediction. In sense of the momentum transfer the transport turbulent barriers effectively isolate the high-alti-tude cusp from fast-flowing magnetosheath. Contrary to that, several examples from different missions and different plasma parameters demonstrate the super-diffusive transport character. The individual coherent structures inside the barriers, which we call Alfvenic 'collapsons', have similar scale chains to that of high kinetic plasma pressure jets, showing mutual interaction features. We think that the interacting jets and barriers, accompanying by classic and/ or micro-reconnection, have rather general importance for the plasma physics, and for understanding of turbulence and mechanisms of magnetic field generation. These coherent, nonlinear interacting structures, most probably, provide intermittency a long-range correlations inside the transport barriers (c.f. blobs and flow spikes in fusion devices). We recall that very high-amplitude turbulence in

  20. Moisture Transport, Lower-Tropospheric Stability, and Decoupling of Cloud-Topped Boundary Layers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretherton, Christopher S.; Wyant, Matthew C.

    1997-01-01

    Decoupling during the `Lagrangian' evolution of a cloud-topped boundary layer advected equatorward by the trade winds in an idealized eastern subtropical ocean is studied using a mixed-layer model (MLM). The sea surface temperature is gradually warmed while the free tropospheric sounding remains unchanged, causing the boundary layer to deepen, the surface relative humidity to decrease, and surface latent heat fluxes to increase. Diurnally averaged insolation is used.For entrainment closures in which entrainment rate is related to a large-eddy convective velocity scale w(, the MLM predicts an increasingly prominent layer of negative buoyancy fluxes below cloud base as the sea surface temperature warms. Decoupling of the mixed layer can be inferred when the MLM-predicted negative buoyancy fluxes become too large for the internal circulations to sustain. The authors show that decoupling is mainly driven by an increasing ratio of the surface latent heat flux to the net radiative cooling in the cloud, and derive a decoupling criterion based on this ratio. Other effects such as drizzle, the vertical distribution of radiative cooling in the cloud, and sensible heat fluxes, also affect decoupling but are shown to be less important in typical subtropical boundary layers. A comparison of MLM results with a companion numerical study with a cloud-resolving model shows that the decoupling process is similar and the same decoupling criterion applies. A regional analysis of decoupling using Lagrangian trajectories based on summertime northeast Pacific climatology predicts decoupling throughout the subtropical stratocumulus region except in coastal zones where the boundary layer is under 750 m deep.A `flux-partitioning' entrainment closure, in which the entrainment rate is chosen to maintain a specified ratio of some measure of negative subcloud buoyancy fluxes to positive buoyancy fluxes within the cloud and near the surface, was also considered. By construction, such an MLM

  1. Chemical reactions during plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition of SiO2 films employing aminosilane and O2/Ar plasma at 50 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yi; Kobayashi, Akiko; Kondo, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    We report the temporal evolution of surface species observed in situ using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) during plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) of SiO2 films employing aminosilane and an O2/Ar plasma at a temperature of 50 °C. Reversals in the appearance of IR absorbance features associated with SiO-H, C-Hx, and Si-H proved to coincide with the self-limiting reaction property in ALD. Our IR results indicate that an O2/Ar plasma can both removed CHx groups and transform SiH surface species to SiOH. In addition, SiO2 deposition was confirmed by a continuous increase in Si-O absorbance with each PE-ALD step, which becomes stable after several cycles. On the basis of our results, the mechanism of low temperature SiO2 PE-ALD was discussed.

  2. Formation of BaSi{sub 2} heterojunction solar cells using transparent MoO{sub x} hole transport layers

    SciTech Connect

    Du, W.; Takabe, R.; Baba, M.; Takeuchi, H.; Toko, K.; Hara, K. O.; Usami, N.; Suemasu, T.

    2015-03-23

    Heterojunction solar cells that consist of 15 nm thick molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub x}, x < 3) as a hole transport layer and 600 nm thick unpassivated or passivated n-BaSi{sub 2} layers were demonstrated. Rectifying current-voltage characteristics were observed when the surface of BaSi{sub 2} was exposed to air. When the exposure time was decreased to 1 min, an open circuit voltage of 200 mV and a short circuit current density of 0.5 mA/cm{sup 2} were obtained under AM1.5 illumination. The photocurrent density under a reverse bias voltage of −1 V reached 25 mA/cm{sup 2}, which demonstrates the significant potential of BaSi{sub 2} for solar cell applications.

  3. Resonant Pedestal Pressure Reduction Induced by a Thermal Transport Enhancement due to Stochastic Magnetic Boundary Layers in High Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, O.; Evans, T.E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Unterberg, E. A.; Austin, M. E.; Bray, B. D.; Brooks, N. H.; Frerichs, H.; Groth, M.; Jakubowski, M. W.; Lasnier, C. J.; Lehnen, M.; Leonard, A. W.; Mordijck, S.; Moyer, R.A.; Osborne, T. H.; Reiter, D.; Samm, U.; Schaffer, M. J.; Unterberg, B.; West, W. P.

    2009-01-01

    Good alignment of the magnetic field line pitch angle with the mode structure of an external resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field is shown to induce modulation of the pedestal electron pressure p(e) in high confinement high rotation plasmas at the DIII-D tokamak with a shape similar to ITER, the next step tokamak experiment. This is caused by an edge safety factor q(95) resonant enhancement of the thermal transport, while in contrast, the RMP induced particle pump out does not show a significant resonance. The measured p(e) reduction correlates to an increase in the modeled stochastic layer width during pitch angle variations matching results from resistive low rotation plasmas at the TEXTOR tokamak. These findings suggest a field line pitch angle resonant formation of a stochastic magnetic edge layer as an explanation for the q(95) resonant character of type-I edge localized mode suppression by RMPs.

  4. Resonant Pedestal Pressure Reduction Induced by a Thermal Transport Enhancement due to Stochastic Magnetic Boundary Layers in High Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Lehnen, M.; Reiter, D.; Samm, U.; Unterberg, B.; Evans, T. E.; Austin, M. E.; Bray, B. D.; Brooks, N. H.; Leonard, A. W.; Osborne, T. H.; Schaffer, M. J.; West, W. P.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Groth, M.; Lasnier, C. J.; Unterberg, E. A.; Jakubowski, M. W.; Mordijck, S.

    2009-10-16

    Good alignment of the magnetic field line pitch angle with the mode structure of an external resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field is shown to induce modulation of the pedestal electron pressure p{sub e} in high confinement high rotation plasmas at the DIII-D tokamak with a shape similar to ITER, the next step tokamak experiment. This is caused by an edge safety factor q{sub 95} resonant enhancement of the thermal transport, while in contrast, the RMP induced particle pump out does not show a significant resonance. The measured p{sub e} reduction correlates to an increase in the modeled stochastic layer width during pitch angle variations matching results from resistive low rotation plasmas at the TEXTOR tokamak. These findings suggest a field line pitch angle resonant formation of a stochastic magnetic edge layer as an explanation for the q{sub 95} resonant character of type-I edge localized mode suppression by RMPs.

  5. Substantial improvement of perovskite solar cells stability by pinhole-free hole transport layer with doping engineering

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Min-Cherl; Raga, Sonia R.; Ono, Luis K.; Qi, Yabing

    2015-01-01

    We fabricated perovskite solar cells using a triple-layer of n-type doped, intrinsic, and p-type doped 2,2′,7,7′-tetrakis(N,N′-di-p-methoxyphenylamine)-9,9′-spirobifluorene (spiro-OMeTAD) (n-i-p) as hole transport layer (HTL) by vacuum evaporation. The doping concentration for n-type doped spiro-OMeTAD was optimized to adjust the highest occupied molecular orbital of spiro-OMeTAD to match the valence band maximum of perovskite for efficient hole extraction while maintaining a high open circuit voltage. Time-dependent solar cell performance measurements revealed significantly improved air stability for perovskite solar cells with the n-i-p structured spiro-OMeTAD HTL showing sustained efficiencies even after 840 h of air exposure. PMID:25985417

  6. Low driving voltage and high stability organic light-emitting diodes with rhenium oxide-doped hole transporting layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leem, Dong-Seok; Park, Hyung-Dol; Kang, Jae-Wook; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Ji Whan; Kim, Jang-Joo

    2007-07-01

    The authors report a promising metal oxide-doped hole transporting layer (HTL) of rhenium oxide (ReO3)-doped N ,N'-diphenyl-N ,N'-bis (1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (NPB). The tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum-based organic light-emitting diodes with ReO3-doped NPB HTL exhibit driving voltage of 5.2-5.4V and power efficiency of 2.2-2.3lm/W at 20mA/cm2, which is significantly improved compared to those (7.1V and 2.0lm/W, respectively) obtained from the devices with undoped NPB. Furthermore, the device with ReO3-doped NPB layer reveals the prolonged lifetime than that with undoped NPB. Details of ReO3 doping effects are described based on the UV-Vis absorption spectra and characteristics of hole-only devices.

  7. Selective modulation of charge-carrier transport of a photoanode in a photoelectrochemical cell by a graphitized fullerene interfacial layer.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun-Young; Lim, Dong Chan; Hong, Eun Mi; Lee, Joo-Yeoul; Heo, Jinhee; Lim, Jae Hong; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Kim, Young Dok; Mul, Guido

    2015-01-01

    We show that a graphitic carbon interfacial layer, derived from C70 by annealing at 500 °C, results in a significant increase in the attainable photocurrent of a photoelectrochemical cell that contains a WO3 -functionalized fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) photoanode. Time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy, photoconductive atomic force microscopy, Hall measurements, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy show that the increase in photocurrent is the result of fast and selective electron transport from optically excited WO3 through the graphitic carbon interfacial layer to the FTO-coated glass electrode. Thus the energy efficiency of perspective solar-to-fuel devices can be improved by modification of the interface of semiconductors and conducting substrate electrodes by using graphitized fullerene derivatives. PMID:25410298

  8. Risk Factors, Health Behaviors, and Injury Among Adults Employed in the Transportation, Warehousing, and Utilities Super Sector

    PubMed Central

    Helmkamp, James C.; Lincoln, Jennifer E.; Sestito, John; Wood, Eric; Birdsey, Jan; Kiefer, Max

    2015-01-01

    Background The TWU super sector is engaged in the movement of passengers and cargo, warehousing of goods, and the delivery of services. The purpose of this study is to describe employee self-reported personal risk factors, health behaviors and habits, disease and chronic conditions, and employer-reported nonfatal injury experiences of workers in the TWU super sector. Methods National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data for 1997–2007, grouped into six morbidity and disability categories and three age groups, were reviewed. Demographic characteristics and prevalence estimates are reported for workers in the TWU super sector and the entire U.S. workforce, and compared with national adult population data from the NHIS. Bureau of Labor Statistics employer-reported TWU injury data from 2003 to 2007 was also reviewed. Results An average of 8.3 million workers were employed annually in the TWU super sector. TWU workers 65 or older reported the highest prevalence of hypertension (49%) across all industry sectors, but the 20% prevalence is notable among middle age workers (25–64). TWU workers had the highest prevalence of obesity (28%), compared to workers in all other industry sectors. Female TWU workers experienced the highest number of lost workdays (6.5) in the past year across all TWU demographic groups. Conclusions Self-reported high proportions of chronic conditions including hypertension and heart disease combined with elevated levels of being overweight and obese, and lack of physical activity—particularly among TWUs oldest workers—can meaningfully inform wellness strategies and interventions focused on this demographic group. PMID:23255331

  9. Well-Defined Nanostructured, Single-Crystalline TiO2 Electron Transport Layer for Efficient Planar Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jongmin; Song, Seulki; Hörantner, Maximilian T; Snaith, Henry J; Park, Taiho

    2016-06-28

    An electron transporting layer (ETL) plays an important role in extracting electrons from a perovskite layer and blocking recombination between electrons in the fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) and holes in the perovskite layers, especially in planar perovskite solar cells. Dense TiO2 ETLs prepared by a solution-processed spin-coating method (S-TiO2) are mainly used in devices due to their ease of fabrication. Herein, we found that fatal morphological defects at the S-TiO2 interface due to a rough FTO surface, including an irregular film thickness, discontinuous areas, and poor physical contact between the S-TiO2 and the FTO layers, were inevitable and lowered the charge transport properties through the planar perovskite solar cells. The effects of the morphological defects were mitigated in this work using a TiO2 ETL produced from sputtering and anodization. This method produced a well-defined nanostructured TiO2 ETL with an excellent transmittance, single-crystalline properties, a uniform film thickness, a large effective area, and defect-free physical contact with a rough substrate that provided outstanding electron extraction and hole blocking in a planar perovskite solar cell. In planar perovskite devices, anodized TiO2 ETL (A-TiO2) increased the power conversion efficiency by 22% (from 12.5 to 15.2%), and the stabilized maximum power output efficiency increased by 44% (from 8.9 to 12.8%) compared with S-TiO2. This work highlights the importance of the ETL geometry for maximizing device performance and provides insights into achieving ideal ETL morphologies that remedy the drawbacks observed in conventional spin-coated ETLs. PMID:27183030

  10. Non-local approach to kinetic effects on parallel transport in fluid models of the scrape-off layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omotani, J. T.; Dudson, B. D.

    2013-05-01

    Using a non-local model, fluid simulations can capture kinetic effects in the parallel electron heat-flux better than is possible using flux limiters in the usual diffusive models. Non-local and diffusive models are compared using a test case representative of an edge-localized mode crash in the JET scrape-off layer (SOL), simulated in one dimension. The non-local model shows substantially enhanced electron temperature gradients, which cannot be achieved using a flux limiter. The performance of the implementation, in the BOUT++ framework, is also analysed to demonstrate its suitability for application in three-dimensional simulations of turbulent transport in the SOL.

  11. Phase-coherent electron transport in (Zn, Al)O{sub x} thin films grown by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, D. E-mail: pmisra@rrcat.gov.in; Misra, P. E-mail: pmisra@rrcat.gov.in; Ajimsha, R. S.; Joshi, M. P.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2014-11-24

    A clear signature of disorder induced quantum-interference phenomena leading to phase-coherent electron transport was observed in (Zn, Al)O{sub x} thin films grown by atomic layer deposition. The degree of static-disorder was tuned by varying the Al concentration through periodic incorporation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sub-monolayer in ZnO. All the films showed small negative magnetoresistance due to magnetic field suppressed weak-localization effect. The temperature dependence of phase-coherence length (l{sub φ}∝T{sup −3/4}), as extracted from the magnetoresistance measurements, indicated electron-electron scattering as the dominant dephasing mechanism. The persistence of quantum-interference at relatively higher temperatures up to 200 K is promising for the realization of ZnO based phase-coherent electron transport devices.

  12. The influence of subgrid surface-layer variability on vertical transport of a chemical species in a convective environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devine, G. M.; Carslaw, K. S.; Parker, D. J.; Petch, J. C.

    2006-08-01

    We use a 2-D cloud-resolving model over a 256 km domain to examine the influence of subgrid-scale processes on the concentration and vertical transport of a chemical species (dimethyl sulphide, or DMS) in a deep convective marine environment. Two issues are highlighted. Firstly, deriving fluxes using a spatially averaged surface wind representative of a global model reduces the domain-mean DMS concentration by approximately 50%. Emission of DMS from the surface is greater in the CRM because it resolves the localized intense winds embedded in the dynamical structure of convective systems. Secondly, we find that the spatial pattern of DMS concentration in the boundary layer is positively correlated with the pattern of convective updraughts. Using a mean concentration field reduces transport to the upper troposphere by more than 50%. The explanation is that secondary convection occurs preferentially on the edges of cold pools, where DMS concentrations are higher than the domain mean.

  13. Convective Transport Suppression in the Scrape-Off Layer Using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating on the ASDEX Upgrade Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Antar, G.; Assas, S.; Bobkov, V.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Wolfrum, E.; Herrmann, A.; Rohde, V.

    2010-10-15

    Turbulence properties in the scrape-off layer (SOL) in the presence of ion cyclotron frequency heating (ICRH) are compared to instances where it is absent. The discharges are all in a high-confinement mode (H-mode) regime. During ICRH, the SOL plasma density increases whereas turbulence large-scale and convective structures are shown to be suppressed. The probability distribution function is thus recorded to be closer to a Gaussian, and a net decrease in the low-frequency density fluctuations is reflected in the power spectra. Consequently, the level of turbulent fluctuations decreases significantly. Turbulence suppression is also reported during edge localized modes (ELMs) where both the ELMs-induced transport and duration are strongly affected. The increase of neutrals by gas puffing did not alter this behavior. We deduce that ICRH can be used as to suppress convective transport and reduce the ELM's amplitude.

  14. The concentration variation of NOy and T.NO3 during the transport in the remote marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadanaga, Y.; Yuba, A.; Takami, A.; Hatakeyama, S.; Masui, Y.; Ohara, T.; Yokouchi, Y.; Yonemura, S.; Kato, S.; Kajii, Y. J.; Takenaka, N.; Bandow, H.

    2012-12-01

    The recent studies reported that the emission of nitrogen oxides from the East Asia has been increasing recently. NOx (= NO + NO2) are chemically transformed into other nitrogen oxides species such as NO3, N2O5, peroxyacylnitrate (PANs), gaseous nitric acid (HNO3), particulate nitrate (NO3-(p)) and so on. Especially, HNO3 and NO3-(p) have a relatively longer lifetime in the atmosphere so that these species can be transported and removed by the dry/wet deposition. Deposited N-containing species have an impact on the atmospheric and aquatic environment such as changing biological activities, acidification and eutrophication in the remote marine boundary layer. The removal rate of N-containing species is important for the estimation of the impact on the remote atmospheric and aquatic environment. We conducted the continuous measurements of total odd nitrogen species (NOy) and T.NO3 (= HNO3 + NO3-(p)) at Cape Hedo, Okinawa and Fukue Island, Nagasaki, Japan. We analyzed the transport event defined as the case that the same air mass transported from the Asian Continent through Fukue to Hedo. The variations of NOy and T.NO3 are mainly due to the deposition and dilution process during the transport. According to the comparison of NOy /CO ratio measured in Fukue and Hedo during the transport event, NOy mainly decreased due to the dry deposition. The removal rate constant and lifetime of NOy was calculated as (1.16 ± 0.36) × 10-5 s-1 and 18 - 35 hour, respectively. We will discuss the chemical transformation of T.NO3 during the transport in the meeting.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann method for short-pulsed laser transport in a multi-layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2015-04-01

    We construct a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for transient radiative transfer in one-dimensional multi-layered medium with distinct refractive index in each layer. The left boundary is irradiated normally by a short-pulsed laser. The Fresnel interfaces conditions, which incorporate reflection and refraction, are used at the boundaries and the interfaces. Based on the Fresnel's law and Snell's law, the interfacial intensity formulas are introduced. The collimated and diffuse intensities are treated individually. At a transient time step, the collimated component is first solved by LBM and then embedded into the transient radiative transfer equation as a source term. To keep the consistency of the directions in all the layers, angular interpolation of the intensities at the interfaces is adopted. The transient radiative transfer in a two-layer medium is first investigated, and the time-resolved results are validated by comparing with those by the Monte Carlo method (MCM). Of particular interest, the angular intensities along the slab at different times are presented to illustrate a variety of interesting phenomena, and the discontinuous nature of the intensity at the interfaces is discussed. The effects of various parameters on the time-resolved signals are examined.

  16. A New Model for Mixing by Double-diffusive Convection (Semi-convection). III. Thermal and Compositional Transport through Non-layered ODDC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Ryan; Garaud, Pascale; Stellmach, Stephan

    2016-05-01

    Oscillatory double-diffusive convection (ODDC; also known as semi-convection) refers to a type of double-diffusive instability that occurs in regions of planetary and stellar interiors that have a destabilizing thermal stratification and a stabilizing mean molecular weight stratification. In this series of papers, we use an extensive suite of three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations to quantify the transport of heat and chemical species by ODDC. Rosenblum et al. first showed that ODDC can either spontaneously form layers that significantly enhance the transport of heat and chemical species compared to microscopic transport or remain in a state dominated by large-scale gravity waves, in which there is a more modest enhancement of the turbulent transport rates. Subsequent studies in this series focused on identifying under what conditions layers form and quantifying transport through layered systems. Here we proceed to characterize transport through systems that are unstable to ODDC, but do not undergo spontaneous layer formation. We measure the thermal and compositional fluxes in non-layered ODDC from both two-dimensional (2D) and 3D numerical simulations, and show that 3D simulations are well approximated by similar simulations in a 2D domain. We find that the turbulent mixing rate in this regime is weak and can, to a first-level approximation, be neglected. We conclude by summarizing the findings of papers I through III into a single prescription for transport systems unstable to ODDC.

  17. Organic solar cells with graphene electrodes and vapor printed poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) as the hole transporting layers.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyesung; Howden, Rachel M; Barr, Miles C; Bulović, Vladimir; Gleason, Karen; Kong, Jing

    2012-07-24

    For the successful integration of graphene as a transparent conducting electrode in organic solar cells, proper energy level alignment at the interface between the graphene and the adjacent organic layer is critical. The role of a hole transporting layer (HTL) thus becomes more significant due to the generally lower work function of graphene compared to ITO. A commonly used HTL material with ITO anodes is poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) with poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS) as the solid-state dopant. However, graphene's hydrophobic surface renders uniform coverage of PEDOT:PSS (aqueous solution) by spin-casting very challenging. Here, we introduce a novel, yet simple, vapor printing method for creating patterned HTL PEDOT layers directly onto the graphene surface. Vapor printing represents the implementation of shadow masking in combination with oxidative chemical vapor deposition (oCVD). The oCVD method was developed for the formation of blanket (i.e., unpatterened) layers of pure PEDOT (i.e., no PSS) with systematically variable work function. In the unmasked regions, vapor printing produces complete, uniform, smooth layers of pure PEDOT over graphene. Graphene electrodes were synthesized under low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) using a copper catalyst. The use of another electron donor material, tetraphenyldibenzoperiflanthene, instead of copper phthalocyanine in the organic solar cells also improves the power conversion efficiency. With the vapor printed HTL, the devices using graphene electrodes yield comparable performances to the ITO reference devices (η(p,LPCVD) = 3.01%, and η(p,ITO) = 3.20%). PMID:22724887

  18. High-Efficiency Perovskite Solar Cells Employing a S,N-Heteropentacene-based D-A Hole-Transport Material.

    PubMed

    Bi, Dongqin; Mishra, Amaresh; Gao, Peng; Franckevičius, Marius; Steck, Christopher; Zakeeruddin, Shaik Mohammed; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja; Bäuerle, Peter; Grätzel, Michael; Hagfeldt, Anders

    2016-03-01

    We developed a new donor-π-acceptor-type hole-transport material (HTMs) incorporating S,N-heteropentacene as π-spacer, triarylamine as donor, and dicyanovinylene as acceptor. In addition to appropriate frontier molecular orbital energies, the new HTM showed high photo absorptivity in the visible region. Without the use of p-dopants, solution-processed mixed perovskite devices using the HTM achieved power conversion efficiencies of up to 16.9% and high photocurrents of up to 22.2 mA cm(-2) . These results demonstrate that heteroacene can be an excellent building block to prepare alternative HTMs for perovskite solar cells and hold promise for further advancement through fine-tuning the molecular structure. PMID:26813331

  19. Tunable Electronic Transport Properties of 2D Layered Double Hydroxide Crystalline Microsheets with Varied Chemical Compositions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yibing; Hu, Hai; Yang, Xiaoxia; Yan, Dongpeng; Dai, Qing

    2016-09-01

    Transistors based on layered double hydroxides (LDH) single microcrystal are fabricated, whose conductivity of LDH can be tuned by varying metal cations or interlayer anions, but weakly affected by external electric field. The carrier mobility can reach about 1 × 10(-5) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) , a value comparable to that of organic C60-based transistors. This work paves a way for future electrical applications of LDH. PMID:27416544

  20. Predictions of Separated and Transitional Boundary Layers Under Low-Pressure Turbine Airfoil Conditions Using an Intermittency Transport Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzen, Y. B.; Huang, P. G.; Hultgren, Lennart S.; Ashpis, David E.

    2003-01-01

    A new transport equation for the intermittency factor was proposed to predict separated and transitional boundary layers under low-pressure turbine airfoil conditions. The intermittent behavior of the transitional flows is taken into account and incorporated into computations by modifying the eddy viscosity, t , with the intermittency factor, y. Turbulent quantities are predicted by using Menter s two-equation turbulence model (SST). The intermittency factor is obtained from a transport equation model, which not only can reproduce the experimentally observed streamwise variation of the intermittency in the transition zone, but also can provide a realistic cross-stream variation of the intermittency profile. In this paper, the intermittency model is used to predict a recent separated and transitional boundary layer experiment under low pressure turbine airfoil conditions. The experiment provides detailed measurements of velocity, turbulent kinetic energy and intermittency profiles for a number of Reynolds numbers and freestream turbulent intensity conditions and is suitable for validation purposes. Detailed comparisons of computational results with experimental data are presented and good agreements between the experiments and predictions are obtained.

  1. Predictions of Separated and Transitional Boundary Layers Under Low-Pressure Turbine Airfoil Conditions Using an Intermittency Transport Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzen, Y. Bora; Huang, P. G.; Hultgren, Lennart S.; Ashpis, David E.

    2001-01-01

    A new transport equation for the intermittency factor was proposed to predict separated and transitional boundary layers under low-pressure turbine airfoil conditions. The intermittent behavior of the transitional flows is taken into account and incorporated into computations by modifying the eddy viscosity, mu(sub t), with the intermittency factor, gamma. Turbulent quantities are predicted by using Menter's two-equation turbulence model (SST). The intermittency factor is obtained from a transport equation model, which not only can reproduce the experimentally observed streamwise variation of the intermittency in the transition zone, but also can provide a realistic cross-stream variation of the intermittency profile. In this paper, the intermittency model is used to predict a recent separated and transitional boundary layer experiment under low pressure turbine airfoil conditions. The experiment provides detailed measurements of velocity, turbulent kinetic energy and intermittency profiles for a number of Reynolds numbers and freestream turbulent intensity conditions and is suitable for validation purposes. Detailed comparisons of computational results with experimental data are presented and good agreements between the experiments and predictions are obtained.

  2. Carrier transport in layered semiconductor (p-GaSe)-ferroelectric (KNO{sub 3}) composite nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtinov, A. P. Vodopyanov, V. N.; Kovalyuk, Z. D.; Netyaga, V. V.; Konoplyanko, D. Yu.

    2011-03-15

    The current-voltage characteristics and frequency dependences of the impedance of composite nanostructures fabricated on the basis of layered anisotropic semiconductor p-GaSe and ferroelectric KNO{sub 3} are studied. Multilayer nanostructures were obtained by introducing nanoscale pyramidal ferroelectric inclusions into a layered GaSe matrix. Hysteresis phenomena in current-voltage characteristics and abrupt changes in the conductance and capacitance in frequency dependences of the impedance are detected. These phenomena are associated with the collective effect of electric polarization switching in nanoscale 3D ferroelectric inclusions in the layered matrix, features of its local deformation, and polytype phase transitions in this matrix. X-ray, atomic-force microscopy, and impedance studies in a low (B < 400 mT) magnetic field show that the electrical characteristics of nanostructures are associated with the Maxwell-Wagner effect in nanostructures, the formation of quantum wells in GaSe during deformation of crystals in the region of nanoscale inclusion localization, and carrier tunneling in the structures.

  3. Wave generation and particle transport in the plasma sheet and boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dusenbery, P. B.

    1987-01-01

    The one and two ion beam instability was considered as a possible explanation for the observations of broadband electrostatic noise in the plasma sheet region of the geomagnetic tail. When only hot streaming plasma sheet boundary layer ions were present, no broadband waves were excited. Cold, streaming ionospheric ions can generate electrostatic broadband waves propagating in the slow beam-acoustic mode, but the growth rates of the waves were significantly enhanced when warm boundary layer ions were presented. (Both the slow and fast beam-acoustic modes can be excited, depending on the relative ion drift.) This mode predicted that the wave intensity of the broadband noise should peak in the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL). Observations of less intense electrostatic waves in the lobes and plasma sheet were likely a result of the absence of warm ion beams or large ion temperatures, respectively, which resulted in smaller growth rates. The model dependence of the ion beam instability has also been studied. For cold and warm ions streaming in the same direction, researchers found wave growth peaked for wave normal angles theta = 0 deg. and wave frequencies approx. 0.1 x the electron plasma frequency. However, for anti-parallel streaming cold and warm ions, wave growth peaks near theta = 90 deg. and wave frequencies were an order of magnitude smaller.

  4. Contacts and transport characteristics of few-layer transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junjie; Li, Jing; Shevrin, Jacob; Nguyen, An; Mallouk, Tom; Zhu, J.; Rhodes, Daniel; Balicas, Luis; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.

    2014-03-01

    Two-dimensional layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are potentially useful for electronic and optoelectronic applications. However, the lack of reliable methods to make ohmic contacts has been a major challenge. This work addresses two aspects of this challenge, i.e. interface cleanness and conductivity of the material in the contact area. Using gentle Ar ion milling immediately before the deposition of metal electrodes, we can completely remove polymer residue from prior lithography without significantly damaging the few-layer TMD sheet. Gate stacks made of Au and HfO2 films can inject carriers up to 3 ×1013 cm-2. We make van der Pauw devices of few-layer (< 5 L) TMD (MoS2, WS2, WSe2) sheets using Ti/Au contacts with area < 2 (um)2 and observe contact resistance less than 10 k Ω at high carrier densities, where the sheet conductance is well above 2e2/h. We eliminate hysteresis in the transfer curve of TMD devices by pulsing the gate voltage. Ambipolar conduction is observed in WSe2 devices, with an on/off ratio exceeding 106 for both electrons and holes. WSe2 devices supported on h-BN show field-effect (hole) mobility > 100 cm2/(Vs) at 300K. We discuss the effects of the various approaches taken above.

  5. Fission Product Transport in TRISO Particle Layers under Operating and Off-Normal Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Ven, Anton; Was, Gary; Wang, Lumin; Taheri, Mitra

    2014-07-07

    The objective of this project is to determine the diffusivity and chemical behavior of key fission products (ag, Cs, I. Te, Eu and Sr) through SiC and PyC both thermally, under irradiation, and under stress using FP introduction techniques that avoid the pitfalls of past experiments. The experimental approach is to create thin PyC-SiC couples containing the fission product to be studied embedded in the PyC layer. These samples will then be subjected to high temperature exposures in a vacuum and also to irradiation at high temperature, and last, to irradiation under stress at high temperature. The PyC serves as a host layer, providing a means of placing the fission product close to the SiC without damaging the SiC layer by its introduction or losing the FP during heating. Experimental measurements of grain boundary structure and distribution (EBSD, HRTEM, APT) will be used in the modeling effort to determine the qualitative dependence of FP diffusion coefficients on grain boundary orientation, temperature and stress.

  6. Nitrate in the atmospheric boundary layer of the tropical South Pacific - Implications regarding sources and transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savoie, Dennis L.; Prospero, Joseph M.; Merrill, John T.; Uematsu, Mitsuo

    1989-01-01

    Weekly bulk aerosol samples collected at three sites in the tropical South Pacific from 1983 to 1987 are analyzed. The mean nitrate concentrations obtained for the sites range from 0.107 to 0.117 microg/cu m. The results suggest that the region is minimally affected by the transport of soil material and pollutants from the continents. Measurements from sites in the tropical North Pacific show mean nitrate concentrations that are about three times higher than those in the South Pacific, showing that the North Pacific is significantly impacted by the transport of material from Asia and North America. The relationships between the nitrate concentrations to other constituents at American Samoa are discussed, including nonseasalt sulfate, Pb-210, and Be-7.

  7. A nonlinear model for the layer between plates in acoustic noncontact transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin; Cao, Wenwu; Zhang, Wenjun

    2014-12-01

    To more accurately describe the noncontact transport behavior of traveling acoustic waves, a nonlinear model is presented in this paper for the squeeze gas film with consideration of gas inertia in the case of a large amplitude motion and low viscosity of the gas. A closed form solution is derived for the vertical and horizontal forces of the film from this model. Our results have shown that the gas inertia has a significant influence on the pressure distribution in the squeeze film, and the inertial force is higher than the viscous force. The predicted levitation and horizontal driving forces are found to be in good agreement with our experimental measurements. Our inertia model provides a powerful tool for the force estimation and its potential benefits could be far reaching. The accurate prediction of these forces is useful to design the system for levitating and transporting planar objects, such as MEMS devices, glass substrates, and IC chips

  8. Enhanced Efficiency and Stability of Inverted Perovskite Solar Cells Using Highly Crystalline SnO2 Nanocrystals as the Robust Electron-Transporting Layer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zonglong; Bai, Yang; Liu, Xiao; Chueh, Chu-Chen; Yang, Shihe; Jen, Alex K-Y

    2016-08-01

    Highly crystalline SnO2 is demonstrated to serve as a stable and robust electron-transporting layer for high-performance perovskite solar cells. Benefiting from its high crystallinity, the relatively thick SnO2 electron-transporting layer (≈120 nm) provides a respectable electron-transporting property to yield a promising power conversion efficiency (PCE)(18.8%) Over 90% of the initial PCE can be retained after 30 d storage in ambient with ≈70% relative humidity. PMID:27168338

  9. Power conversion efficiency enhancement of polymer solar cells using MoO3/TFB as hole transport layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiao; Sun, Jianbin; Cheng, Shuying; Lai, Yunfeng; Zhou, Haifang; Yu, Jinling

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we report a simple method to increase the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the polymer solar cells based on poly(3-hexylthiophene) and [6, 6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester derivatives blended active layer. The approach includes using a molybdenum oxide (MoO3) and Poly[(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-co-(4,4-( N-(4-sec-butylphenyl))diphenylamine)] (TFB) composites as the hole transport layer (HTL). Compared with that of the device with bare MoO3 HTL, the maximum 39 % increased of PCE is obtained when MoO3/TFB composites as the HTL in the devices. The device with MoO3/TFB shows the best performance with a PCE of 3.70 %, an open-circuit voltage of 0.58 V, and a short-circuit current density of 11.39 mA/cm2. The intrinsically mechanisms behind PCE increased are due to the improvement in the interface layer morphology and the more appropriately energy level of the cells.

  10. Effects of the dielectric environment on the electron transport properties of single-layer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolazzi, Simone; Allain, Adrien; Lembke, Dominik; Kis, Andras

    2014-03-01

    Two-dimensional materials, such as graphene, boron nitride and transition metal dichalcogenides, offer a wide range of electronic, optical and mechanical properties that can be advantageous for several applications in nanotechnology. Among these materials, single-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) shows great potential for scaling field-effect transistor devices, due to an optimal electrostatic control of the 2D semiconducting sheet, large energy bandgap and minimal leakage currents. However, to fully exploit the potential of this atomically thin semiconductor, additional experimental efforts need to be undertaken to boost the device performance and access the theoretical intrinsic electron mobilities. To pursue this objective, it is mandatory to reduce the density of charged impurities, both in the semiconducting sheet and in its surrounding environment, and to limit carrier scattering induced by polar optical phonons in the dielectric surface. Here we present the results of our recent experimental investigation of the electron transport properties of single-layer MoS2 mechanically exfoliated/transferred onto different substrates, with varying surface chemistry, surface roughness and dielectric permittivity. We will show temperature-dependent four-terminal measurements of the electrical conductivity of single-layer MoS2 in contact with various insulating materials, including 2D sheets of hexagonal boron nitride, organic polymers and metal oxides.

  11. Potential Carbon Transport: Linking Soil Aggregate Stability and Sediment Enrichment for Updating the Soil Active Layer within Intensely Managed Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacha, K.; Papanicolaou, T.; Abban, B. K.; Wilson, C. G.

    2014-12-01

    Currently, many biogeochemical models lack the mechanistic capacity to accurately simulate soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics, especially within intensely managed landscapes (IMLs) such as those found in the U.S. Midwest. These modeling limitations originate by not accounting for downslope connectivity of flowpathways initiated and governed by landscape processes and hydrologic forcing, which induce dynamic updates to the soil active layer (generally top 20-30cm of soil) with various sediment size fractions and aggregates being transported and deposited along the downslope. These hydro-geomorphic processes, often amplified in IMLs by tillage events and seasonal canopy, can greatly impact biogeochemical cycles (e.g., enhanced mineralization during aggregate breakdown) and in turn, have huge implications/uncertainty when determining SOC budgets. In this study, some of these limitations were addressed through a new concept, Potential Carbon Transport (PCT), a term which quantifies a maximum amount of material available for transport at various positions of the landscape, which was used to further refine a coupled modeling framework focused on SOC redistribution through downslope/lateral connectivity. Specifically, the size fractions slaked from large and small aggregates during raindrop-induced aggregate stability tests were used in conjunction with rainfall-simulated sediment enrichment ratio (ER) experiments to quantify the PCT under various management practices, soil types and landscape positions. Field samples used in determining aggregate stability and the ER experiments were collected/performed within the historic Clear Creek Watershed, home of the IML Critical Zone Observatory, located in Southeastern Iowa.

  12. In-situ measurement of the heat transport in defect- engineered free-standing single-layer graphene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haidong; Kurata, Kosaku; Fukunaga, Takanobu; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; Zhang, Xing; Ikuta, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Koji; Nishiyama, Takashi; Ago, Hiroki; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing nanomachining technologies, it is possible to manipulate the heat transport in graphene by introducing different defects. However, due to the difficulty in suspending large-area single-layer graphene (SLG) and limited temperature sensitivity of the present probing methods, the correlation between the defects and thermal conductivity of SLG is still unclear. In this work, we developed a new method for fabricating micro-sized suspended SLG. Subsequently, a focused ion beam (FIB) was used to create nanohole defects in SLG and tune the heat transport. The thermal conductivity of the same SLG before and after FIB radiation was measured using a novel T-type sensor method on site in a dual-beam system. The nanohole defects decreased the thermal conductivity by about 42%. It was found that the smaller width and edge scrolling also had significant restriction on the thermal conductivity of SLG. Based on the calculation results through a lattice dynamics theory, the increase of edge roughness and stronger scattering on long-wavelength acoustic phonons are the main reasons for the reduction in thermal conductivity. This work provides reliable data for understanding the heat transport in a defective SLG membrane, which could help on the future design of graphene-based electrothermal devices. PMID:26906476

  13. In-situ measurement of the heat transport in defect- engineered free-standing single-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haidong; Kurata, Kosaku; Fukunaga, Takanobu; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; Zhang, Xing; Ikuta, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Koji; Nishiyama, Takashi; Ago, Hiroki; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2016-02-01

    Utilizing nanomachining technologies, it is possible to manipulate the heat transport in graphene by introducing different defects. However, due to the difficulty in suspending large-area single-layer graphene (SLG) and limited temperature sensitivity of the present probing methods, the correlation between the defects and thermal conductivity of SLG is still unclear. In this work, we developed a new method for fabricating micro-sized suspended SLG. Subsequently, a focused ion beam (FIB) was used to create nanohole defects in SLG and tune the heat transport. The thermal conductivity of the same SLG before and after FIB radiation was measured using a novel T-type sensor method on site in a dual-beam system. The nanohole defects decreased the thermal conductivity by about 42%. It was found that the smaller width and edge scrolling also had significant restriction on the thermal conductivity of SLG. Based on the calculation results through a lattice dynamics theory, the increase of edge roughness and stronger scattering on long-wavelength acoustic phonons are the main reasons for the reduction in thermal conductivity. This work provides reliable data for understanding the heat transport in a defective SLG membrane, which could help on the future design of graphene-based electrothermal devices.

  14. In-situ measurement of the heat transport in defect- engineered free-standing single-layer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haidong; Kurata, Kosaku; Fukunaga, Takanobu; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; Zhang, Xing; Ikuta, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Koji; Nishiyama, Takashi; Ago, Hiroki; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing nanomachining technologies, it is possible to manipulate the heat transport in graphene by introducing different defects. However, due to the difficulty in suspending large-area single-layer graphene (SLG) and limited temperature sensitivity of the present probing methods, the correlation between the defects and thermal conductivity of SLG is still unclear. In this work, we developed a new method for fabricating micro-sized suspended SLG. Subsequently, a focused ion beam (FIB) was used to create nanohole defects in SLG and tune the heat transport. The thermal conductivity of the same SLG before and after FIB radiation was measured using a novel T-type sensor method on site in a dual-beam system. The nanohole defects decreased the thermal conductivity by about 42%. It was found that the smaller width and edge scrolling also had significant restriction on the thermal conductivity of SLG. Based on the calculation results through a lattice dynamics theory, the increase of edge roughness and stronger scattering on long-wavelength acoustic phonons are the main reasons for the reduction in thermal conductivity. This work provides reliable data for understanding the heat transport in a defective SLG membrane, which could help on the future design of graphene-based electrothermal devices. PMID:26906476

  15. Electron-hole asymmetry of spin injection and transport in single-layer graphene.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Wang, W H; Pi, K; McCreary, K M; Bao, W; Li, Yan; Miao, F; Lau, C N; Kawakami, R K

    2009-04-01

    Spin-dependent properties of single-layer graphene (SLG) have been studied by nonlocal spin valve measurements at room temperature. Gate voltage dependence shows that the nonlocal magnetoresistance (MR) is proportional to the conductivity of the SLG, which is the predicted behavior for transparent ferromagnetic-nonmagnetic contacts. While the electron and hole bands in SLG are symmetric, gate voltage and bias dependence of the nonlocal MR reveal an electron-hole asymmetry in which the nonlocal MR is roughly independent of bias for electrons, but varies significantly with bias for holes. PMID:19392401

  16. Anisotropic transport properties in a layered d+s-wave superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, E.J.; Kim, Heesang; Palumbo, M.; Graf, M.J.

    1996-11-01

    Recent measurements of the penetration depth and optical conductivity in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (YBCO) single crystals suggest the possibility of an order parameter with d+s-wave symmetry. The authors present results from calculations of both the anisotropic low temperature penetration depth and the frequency-dependent conductivity for a layered superconductor with such a pairing symmetry. The system is modelled as a stack of weakly coupled, two dimensional superconducting planes, and the effect of non-magnetic impurity scattering in both Born and unitarity limits is examined.

  17. Heat transport in the marine atmospheric boundary layer during an intense cold air outbreak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Zimmerman, Jeffrey

    1988-01-01

    The generation of the virtual heat flux in the convective MABL associated with the January 28, 1986 intense cold air airbreak offshore of the Carolinas is studied. A technique based on the joint frequency distribution of the virtual potential temperature and vertical motion (Mahrt and Paumier, 1984) is used. The results suggest that, if buoyancy is mainly driven by the temperature flux, the physical processes for generating buoyancy flux are about the same for boundary layers over land and ocean, even with different convective regimes.

  18. Application of mesoporous SiO2 layer as an insulating layer in high performance hole transport material free CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Nian; Liu, Pei; Bai, Sihang; Yu, Zhenhua; Liu, Wei; Guo, Shi-Shang; Zhao, Xing-Zhong

    2016-07-01

    A mesoporous SiO2 layer is successfully introduced into the hole transport material free perovskite solar cells by spin-coating a SiO2 paste onto the TiO2 scaffold layer. This SiO2 layer can act as an insulating layer and effectively inhibit the charge recombination between the TiO2 layer and carbon electrode. The variation of power conversion efficiencies with the thickness of SiO2 layer is studied here. Under optimized SiO2 thickness, perovskite solar cell fabricated on the TiO2/SiO2 film shows a superior power conversion efficiency of ∼12% and exhibits excellent long time stability for 30 days.

  19. Low Temperature Transport in Networks Based on Multi-layer Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnam, Ashkan; Johnson, Jason; An, Yanbin; Biswas, Amlan; Ural, Ant

    2010-03-01

    We fabricate and characterize networks composed of narrow but long multi-layer graphene nanoribbons. Fabrication is based on chemical processing of expandable graphite and vacuum filtration of the produced ribbons. We analyze the structure of the networks by various electron and optical imaging techniques, then pattern the networks into four point probe structures using photolithography and plasma etching and measure their resistivity down to 4.2 K. Due to the disordered nature of the networks, resistivity depicts insulating behavior explained by Mott Variable Range Hopping (VRH) at low temperatures. We also investigate the dependence of the network resistivity on electric and magnetic fields. VRH theory can explain most of the magnetoresistance data, although carrier-carrier interaction also becomes important at high fields and the lowest temperatures. Resistivity also decreases sharply at electric fields higher than 10 V/cm. A high localization radius is extracted from this dependence, which is likely due to the high conductance of the nanoribbons and/or good electrical contact between them. The multi-layer graphene nanoribbon networks depict favorable electrical properties that advocate their use for applications such as bolometers, photodetectors, and gas sensors.

  20. The skaergaard layered series. Part IV. reaction-transport simulations of foundered blocks.

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenthal, Eric L.; McBirney, Alexander R.

    1996-01-02

    During the middle stages of crystallization of the Skaergaard Layered Series large numbers of blocks became detached from the Upper Border Series and settled into the mush of crystals on the floor. It has been recognized for some time that these blocks now have compositions and textures that differ markedly from those of the units from which they came. They tend to be more plagioclase rich and seem to have lost mafic components to the surrounding gabbro. Numerical simulations coupling crystallization, melting, and heat and mass transfer for a multicomponent system show how the blocks reacted with the mush in which they were emplaced. Enhanced cooling and crystallization of a compositionally stratified mush adjacent to the blocks resulted in patterns of melt compositions similar to those of layering around the blocks. Volume changes during crystallization and melting induced convection of the interstitial melt leading to changes in the bulk compositions of the blocks and the surrounding mush. Inhomogeneities such as inclusions are likely to facilitate the onset of compositional convection in a chemically stratified solidification zone.

  1. Turbulent transport and production/destruction of ozone in a boundary layer over complex terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhut, Gary K.; Jochum, Anne M.; Neininger, Bruno

    1994-01-01

    The first Intensive Observation Period (IOP) of the Swiss air pollution experiment POLLUMET took place in 1990 in the Aare River Valley between Bern and Zurich. During the IOP, fast response measurements of meteorological variables and ozone concentration were made within the boundary layer aboard a motorglider. In addition, mean values of meteorological variables and the concentrations of ozone and other trace species were measured using other aircraft, pilot balloons, tethersondes, and ground stations. Turbulent flux profiles of latent and sensible heat and ozone are calculated from the fast response data. Terms in the ozone mean concentration budget (time rate of change of mean concentration, horizontal advection, and flux divergence) are calculated for stationary time periods both before and after the passage of a cold front. The source/sink term is calculated as a residual in the budget, and its sign and magnitude are related to the measured concentrations of reactive trace species within the boundary layer. Relationships between concentration ratios of trace species and ozone concentration are determined in order to understand the influence of complex terrain on the processes that produce and destroy ozone.

  2. Investigating the Source, Transport, and Isotope Composition of Water in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffis, T. J.; Schultz, N. M.; Lee, X.

    2011-12-01

    The isotope composition of water (liquid and vapor phases) can provide important insights regarding the source of water used by plants, the origins of atmospheric water vapor, and the sources of carbon dioxide. In recent years there have been significant advances in the ability to quantify the isotope composition of water and water vapor using optical isotope techniques. We have used and helped develop some of these techniques to determine the isotope composition of soil and plant waters, to measure the isoflux of water vapor between the land surface and atmosphere, and to examine the isotope composition of water vapor and deuterium excess in the atmospheric boundary layer. In this presentation we will discuss three related issues: 1) Identification and correction of spectral contamination in soil and plant water samples using optical techniques; 2) The benefits and practical limitations of quantifying the isotope composition of evapotranspiration using the eddy covariance approach; and 3) The scientific value and feasibility of tracking the long-term (seasonal and interannual) behavior of the isotope composition of water vapor and deuterium excess in the atmospheric boundary layer. A few short stories will be provided from experiments conducted in the lab, at the field scale, and from a very tall tower at the University of Minnesota from 2008 to 2011.

  3. Electrical and thermal transport properties of layered Bi2YO4Cu2Se2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yu; Pei, Yanling; Chang, Cheng; Zhang, Xiao; Tan, Xing; Ye, Xinxin; Gong, Shengkai; Lin, Yuanhua; He, Jiaqing; Zhao, Li-Dong

    2016-07-01

    Bi2YO4Cu2Se2 possesses a low thermal conductivity and high electrical conductivity at room temperature, which was considered as a potential thermoelectric material. In this work, we have investigated the electrical and thermal transport properties of Bi2YO4Cu2Se2 system in the temperature range from 300 K to 873 K. We found that the total thermal conductivity decreases from ~1.8 W m-1 K-1 to ~0.9 W m-1 K-1, and the electrical conductivity decreases from ~850 S/cm to ~163 S/cm in the measured temperature range. To investigate how potential of Bi2YO4Cu2Se2 system, we prepared the heavily Iodine doped samples to counter-dope intrinsically high carrier concentration and improve the electrical transport properties. Interestingly, the Seebeck coefficient could be enhanced to ~+80 μV/K at 873 K, meanwhile, we found that a low thermal conductivity of ~0.7 W m-1 K-1 could be achieved. The intrinsically low thermal conductivity in this system is related to the low elastic properties, such as Young's modulus of 70-72 GPa, and Grüneisen parameters of 1.55-1.71. The low thermal conductivity makes Bi2YO4Cu2Se2 system to be a potential thermoelectric material, the ZT value ~0.06 at 873 K was obtained, a higher performance is expected by optimizing electrical transport properties through selecting suitable dopants, modifying band structures or by further reducing thermal conductivity through nanostructuring etc.

  4. Composite oxygen ion transport element

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Jack C.; Besecker, Charles J.; Chen, Hancun; Robinson, Earil T.

    2007-06-12

    A composite oxygen ion transport element that has a layered structure formed by a dense layer to transport oxygen ions and electrons and a porous support layer to provide mechanical support. The dense layer can be formed of a mixture of a mixed conductor, an ionic conductor, and a metal. The porous support layer can be fabricated from an oxide dispersion strengthened metal, a metal-reinforced intermetallic alloy, a boron-doped Mo.sub.5Si.sub.3-based intermetallic alloy or combinations thereof. The support layer can be provided with a network of non-interconnected pores and each of said pores communicates between opposite surfaces of said support layer. Such a support layer can be advantageously employed to reduce diffusion resistance in any type of element, including those using a different material makeup than that outlined above.

  5. Metal-molecule contacts and charge transport across monomolecular layers: measurement and theory.

    PubMed

    Kushmerick, J G; Holt, D B; Yang, J C; Naciri, J; Moore, M H; Shashidhar, R

    2002-08-19

    Charge transport studies across molecular length scales under symmetric and asymmetric metal-molecule contact conditions using a simple crossed-wire tunnel junction technique are presented. It is demonstrated that oligo(phenylene ethynylene), a conjugated organic molecule, acts like a molecular wire under symmetric contact conditions, but exhibits characteristics of a molecular diode when the connections are asymmetric. To understand this behavior, we have calculated current-voltage (I-V) characteristics using extended Huckel theory coupled with a Green's function approach. The experimentally observed I-V characteristics are in excellent qualitative agreement with the theory. PMID:12190491

  6. Mass transport in gas diffusion layers of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Michael J.

    This dissertation describes fundamental properties of gas diffusion media (GDM) and their relationship to the mass transport in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). First, the accuracy of solving the multi-component equations for PEMFC by using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique is examined. This technique uses an approximated multi-component (AMC) model with a correction term that guarantees the overall mass balance. Accuracy is assessed by comparing the species concentrations computed with the Maxwell-Stefan and the AMC model. This comparison is important because the structure of some CFD programs does not permit the direct use of the Maxwell-Stefan equations. Here, it is shown that the maximum error between the two models is less than 5%. Second, the ratio of tortuosity to porosity, known as the MacMullin number, is reported for different carbon cloth and carbon paper GDM. This analysis show that only carbon cloths GDM follow the commonly accepted Bruggeman equation and that carbon paper GDM have a different relationship between the tortuosity and the porosity. These differences are discussed in terms of path length created by the orientation of fibers of each GDM. Third, data for the hydrophilic and hydrophobic pore size distributions (PSD) are presented for two types of GDM used in PEMFCs. The data were obtained by using two common measurement methods, intrusion porosimetry (IP) and the method of standard porosimetry (MSP). The use of multiple working fluids to access hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores is discussed as well as the limitations associated with structural changes of the GDM during the tests. The differences in interpretations of the data between the two methods for both GDM have significant implications relative to the distribution of hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores that control liquid water transport. Finally, a two-phase mass-transport-only model (MTOM) that incorporates the tortuosity and the PSD data described above is

  7. Effects of the proximity of Au nanoparticles on magnetic and transport properties of LSMO ultrathin layers

    SciTech Connect

    Brivio, S.; Magen Dominguez, Cesar; Sidorenko, A; Petti, D.; Cantoni, M.; Finazzi, M; Ciccacci, F; Renzi, R; Varela del Arco, Maria; Picozzi, S.; Bertacco, R.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the proximity of Au nanoparticles on the transport and magnetic properties of ultrathin La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 (LSMO) films has been investigated. We find a huge increase of the resistivity of the manganite (by four orders of magnitude for a Au nominal thickness of 2 nm), which is accompanied by a strong decrease of the Curie temperature. A combined scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy (STEM-EELS) analysis shows that interfaces are coherent and atomically sharp, and that the structural quality is very high. On the other end, a strong reduction of the Mn oxidation state is seen upon Au capping. NMR data show a strong attenuation of the double exchange signal upon formation of Au nanoparticles. Ab-initio calculations indicate a negligible influence of Au on LSMO at an ideal interface, with the LSMO surface magnetic and electronic properties essentially unchanged upon creation of the Au/LSMO interface. In view of these calculations, the experimental results cannot be explained in terms of purely electrostatic effects induced by the proximity of a noble metal. Here we propose that the main driving force underlying the observed change in physical properties is the high reactivity of Au nanoparticles which can locally pump oxygen from the manganite, thus favouring a phase separation ensuing from O inhomogeneity which deteriorates the transport and electrical properties.

  8. Characterization of Asian Summer Monsoon Transport from the Boundary Layer to Lower Stratosphere: Recent Progress from Model Studies and New Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Laura; Honomichl, Shawn; Kinnison, Doug; Bian, Jianchun

    2016-04-01

    The Asian Summer Monsoon (ASM) system is a significant driver for transport between the boundary layer and the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UT/LS). Satellite observations, although provide clear evidence of its global impact on seasonal scales, are unable to resolve the details of the transport process. This work summarizes recent progress in characterizing the transport behavior using global chemistry-climate models (CCMs) and in situ observations. NCAR Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model run in specified dynamics mode (WACCM-SD) is used to characterize the sub-seasonal scale dynamical variability of the monsoon system and the impact on transport of boundary layer tracers into lower stratosphere. The analysis focuses on three elements of the transport: uplifting from the boundary layer, transport to the regions outside of ASM at the UTLS level, and transport into stratosphere in association with the Brewer-Dobson circulation. In situ measurements from six years of sounding studies over the Tibetan plateau are analyzed to complement the model analyses. The profiles of ozone, water vapor, cirrus clouds, together with temperature from the soundings provide important insight into the ASM transport behaviors.

  9. Effect of Mechanical Agitation on Cationic Liposome Transport across an Unstirred Water Layer in Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Kono, Yusuke; Iwasaki, Ayu; Matsuoka, Kenta; Fujita, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    To develop an effective oral delivery system for plasmid DNA (pDNA) using cationic liposomes, it is necessary to clarify the characteristics of uptake and transport of cationic liposome/pDNA complexes into the intestinal epithelium. In particular, evaluation of the involvement of an unstirred water layer (UWL), which is a considerable permeability barrier, in cationic liposome transport is very important. Here, we investigated the effects of a UWL on the transfection efficiency of cationic liposome/pDNA complexes into a Caco-2 cell monolayer. When Caco-2 cells were transfected with cationic liposome/pDNA complexes in shaking cultures to reduce the thickness of the UWL, gene expression was significantly higher in Caco-2 cells compared with static cultures. We also found that this enhancement of gene expression by shaking was not attributable to activation of transcription factors such as activator protein-1 and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB). In addition, the increase in gene expression by mechanical agitation was observed at all charge ratios (1.5, 2.3, 3.1, 4.5) of cationic liposome/pDNA complexes. Transport experiments using Transwells demonstrated that mechanical agitation increased the uptake of cationic liposome/pDNA complexes by Caco-2 cells, whereas transport of the complexes across a Caco-2 cell monolayer did not occurr. Moreover, the augmentation of the gene expression of cationic liposome/pDNA complexes by shaking was observed in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. These results indicate that a UWL greatly affects the uptake and transfection efficiency of cationic liposome/pDNA complexes into an epithelial monolayer in vitro. PMID:27476939

  10. Ions Transport and Adsorption Mechanisms in Porous Electrodes During Capacitive-Mixing Double Layer Expansion (CDLE)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A model of the electro-diffusion of ions in porous electrodes is applied to analyze the dynamics of capacitive-mixing extraction of energy from salinity gradients with carbon porous electrodes. The complex time-evolution of the cell voltage observed in experiments is satisfactorily described. The asymmetry on the duration of the solution-change steps performed in open circuit is found to be due to the nonlinear voltage–concentration relationship of the electric double layers and to a current that redistributes the counterions along the depth of the electrode leading to nonuniform charge and salt adsorption. The validated model is an essential tool for the design and optimization of renewable energy extraction by this technique. PMID:24319518

  11. Statistical analysis and modeling of intermittent transport events in the tokamak scrape-off layer

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Johan; Halpern, Federico D.; Ricci, Paolo; Furno, Ivo; Xanthopoulos, Pavlos

    2014-12-15

    The turbulence observed in the scrape-off-layer of a tokamak is often characterized by intermittent events of bursty nature, a feature which raises concerns about the prediction of heat loads on the physical boundaries of the device. It appears thus necessary to delve into the statistical properties of turbulent physical fields such as density, electrostatic potential, and temperature, focusing on the mathematical expression of tails of the probability distribution functions. The method followed here is to generate statistical information from time-traces of the plasma density stemming from Braginskii-type fluid simulations and check this against a first-principles theoretical model. The analysis of the numerical simulations indicates that the probability distribution function of the intermittent process contains strong exponential tails, as predicted by the analytical theory.

  12. Large Eddy Simulation of Pollen Transport in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamecki, Marcelo; Meneveau, Charles; Parlange, Marc B.

    2007-11-01

    The development of genetically modified crops and questions about cross-pollination and contamination of natural plant populations enhanced the importance of understanding wind dispersion of airborne pollen. The main objective of this work is to simulate the dispersal of pollen grains in the atmospheric surface layer using large eddy simulation. Pollen concentrations are simulated by an advection-diffusion equation including gravitational settling. Of great importance is the specification of the bottom boundary conditions characterizing the pollen source over the canopy and the deposition process everywhere else. The velocity field is discretized using a pseudospectral approach. However the application of the same discretization scheme to the pollen equation generates unphysical solutions (i.e. negative concentrations). The finite-volume bounded scheme SMART is used for the pollen equation. A conservative interpolation scheme to determine the velocity field on the finite volume surfaces was developed. The implementation is validated against field experiments of point source and area field releases of pollen.

  13. Technology developments for laminar boundary layer control on subsonic transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. D.; Maddalon, D. V.; Fischer, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of laminar flow control (LFC) technology developments is presented, along with a description of NASA's broadened program concerning laminar flow concepts for commercial transports. Topics covered include developments in LFC airfoils, wing surface panels, and leading-edge systems, as well as the effects of high altitude ice particles and insect impacts. It is suggested that the electron beam perforated titanium surface is superior to the Dynapore surface. The Douglas LFC wing design, the Krueger flap, the Lockheed, and the Douglas leading-edge concepts are covered. Future research includes an evaluation of a hybrid LFC concept, which combines LFC suction in the leading-edge region with natural laminar flow over the wing box.

  14. Type-controlled nanodevices based on encapsulated few-layer black phosphorus for quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Gen; Xu, Shuigang; Shen, Junying; Hou, Jianqiang; Wu, Zefei; Han, Tianyi; Lin, Jiangxiazi; Wong, Wing Ki; Cai, Yuan; Lortz, Rolf; Wang, Ning

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that encapsulation of atomically thin black phosphorus (BP) by hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) sheets is very effective for minimizing the interface impurities induced during fabrication of BP channel material for quantum transport nanodevices. Highly stable BP nanodevices with ultrahigh mobility and controllable types are realized through depositing appropriate metal electrodes after conducting a selective etching to the BP encapsulation structure. Chromium and titanium are suitable metal electrodes for BP channels to control the transition from a p-type unipolar property to ambipolar characteristic because of different work functions. Record-high mobilities of 6000 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 and 8400 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 are respectively obtained for electrons and holes at cryogenic temperatures. High-mobility BP devices enable the investigation of quantum oscillations with an indistinguishable Zeeman effect in laboratory magnetic field.

  15. Electronic, transport, and optical properties of bulk and mono-layer PdSe2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, Jifeng; Shi, Hongliang; Siegrist, Theo; Singh, David J.

    2015-10-13

    In this study, the electronic and optical properties of bulk and monolayer PdSe2 are investigated using firstprinciples calculations. Using the modified Becke-Johnson potential, we find semiconductor behavior for both bulk and monolayer PdSe2 with indirect gap values of 0.03 eV for bulk and 1.43 eV for monolayer, respectively. Our sheet optical conductivity results support this observation and show similar anisotropic feature in the 2D plane. We further study the thermoelectric properties of the 2D PdSe2 using Blotzmann transport model and find interestingly high Seebeck coefficients (>200 μV/K) for both p- and n-type up to high doping level (–2 x 1013more » cm2) with an anisotropic character in an electrical conductivity suggesting better thermoelectric performance along y direction in the plane.V« less

  16. Electronic, transport, and optical properties of bulk and mono-layer PdSe{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jifeng; Shi, Hongliang; Siegrist, Theo; Singh, David J.

    2015-10-12

    The electronic and optical properties of bulk and monolayer PdSe{sub 2} are investigated using first-principles calculations. Using the modified Becke-Johnson potential, we find semiconductor behavior for both bulk and monolayer PdSe{sub 2} with indirect gap values of 0.03 eV for bulk and 1.43 eV for monolayer, respectively. Our sheet optical conductivity results support this observation and show similar anisotropic feature in the 2D plane. We further study the thermoelectric properties of the 2D PdSe{sub 2} using Blotzmann transport model and find interestingly high Seebeck coefficients (>200 μV/K) for both p- and n-type up to high doping level (∼2 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2}) with an anisotropic character in an electrical conductivity suggesting better thermoelectric performance along y direction in the plane.

  17. Direct evaluation of contact injection efficiency into small molecule based transport layers: Influence of extrinsic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkowitz, M.; Facci, J. S.; Rehm, J.

    1998-03-01

    Studies of interface formation on conventional semiconductor materials are typically carried out under relatively pristine conditions. However, for devices based on the use of electronic polymers there is also compelling interest in exploring the variations in contact behavior that might result under realistic manufacturing conditions like multilayer device assembly based on solution coating technology. Small molecule doped polymers (MDPs) developed principally as large area coatings for electrophotographic use are now finding wider device applications. These polymers are insulators capable of transporting excess injected charge with a unipolar drift mobility which can be tuned over a wide range by varying the concentration of transport active species. Most significant in the present context, MDPs can be rendered trap free by molecular design. These unique characteristics of MDPs make it possible to analyze the relative injection efficiencies of their interfaces with various contacts simply by a direct comparison of current-voltage characteristics with time of flight drift mobility measurements carried out on the same film coatings. In this way, and apart from their intrinsic interest and practical value, MDPs and closely related polymeric media provide the ideal venue for the study of contact phenomena on molecular solids. Almost all the present measurements were carried out by measuring dark hole injection from various preformed metal substrates into the MDP film TPD/polycarbonate. Under these circumstances it was found that while injection efficiency nominally scaled with the estimated interfacial energy step there was significant variance that in some cases could be clearly associated with the specific details of interfacial chemistry. For one exceptional case where Au was evaporated on the free surface of an already cast film a time and temperature dependent contact forming process could be delineated in which the interface systematically evolved from emission

  18. Subsonic Investigation of a Leading-Edge Boundary Layer Control Suction System on a High-Speed Civil Transport Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Bryan A.; Applin, Zachary T.; Kemmerly, Guy T.; Coe, Paul L., Jr.; Owens, D. Bruce; Gile, Brenda E.; Parikh, Pradip G.; Smith, Don

    1999-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of a leading edge boundary layer control system was conducted on a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. Data were obtained over a Mach number range of 0.08 to 0.27, with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 1.79 x 10(exp 6) to 5.76 x 10(exp 6). Variations in the amount of suction, as well as the size and location of the suction area, were tested with outboard leading edge flaps deflected 0 and 30 deg and trailing-edge flaps deflected 0 and 20 deg. The longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic data are presented without analysis. A complete tabulated data listing is also presented herein.

  19. Magnetization and magneto-transport staircaselike behavior in layered perovskite Sr2CoO4 at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiuhang; Yuan, Xueping; Xing, Lei; Xu, Mingxiang

    2016-06-01

    Polycrystalline layered perovskite Sr2CoO4 sample was synthesized by high temperature and high pressure method. The staircaselike behavior has been observed in the magnetization and resistivity versus field curves of Sr2CoO4 at low temperature. The main features of the steps can be obtained from the measured results: (i) the positions of the external magnetic field at which steps occur are varying in different measurement runs, (ii) the steps only appear at low temperature and disappear with a slight increase of the temperature, (iii) the steps are dependent on the temperature and field sweep rate. Based on the features of the magnetization and magneto-transport staircaselike behavior in Sr2CoO4, the unusual phenomenon can be ascribed to an avalanche of flipping domains in terms of the random field theory.

  20. Magnetization and magneto-transport staircaselike behavior in layered perovskite Sr2CoO4 at low temperature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiuhang; Yuan, Xueping; Xing, Lei; Xu, Mingxiang

    2016-01-01

    Polycrystalline layered perovskite Sr2CoO4 sample was synthesized by high temperature and high pressure method. The staircaselike behavior has been observed in the magnetization and resistivity versus field curves of Sr2CoO4 at low temperature. The main features of the steps can be obtained from the measured results: (i) the positions of the external magnetic field at which steps occur are varying in different measurement runs, (ii) the steps only appear at low temperature and disappear with a slight increase of the temperature, (iii) the steps are dependent on the temperature and field sweep rate. Based on the features of the magnetization and magneto-transport staircaselike behavior in Sr2CoO4, the unusual phenomenon can be ascribed to an avalanche of flipping domains in terms of the random field theory. PMID:27293142

  1. Stable and null current hysteresis perovskite solar cells based nitrogen doped graphene oxide nanoribbons hole transport layer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongmo; Mat Teridi, Mohd Asri; Mohd Yusoff, Abd. Rashid bin; Jang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells are becoming one of the leading technologies to reduce our dependency on traditional power sources. However, the frequently used component poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) has several shortcomings, such as an easily corroded indium-tin-oxide (ITO) interface at elevated temperatures and induced electrical inhomogeneity. Herein, we propose solution-processed nitrogen-doped graphene oxide nanoribbons (NGONRs) as a hole transport layer (HTL) in perovskite solar cells, replacing the conducting polymer PEDOT:PSS. The conversion efficiency of NGONR-based perovskite solar cells has outperformed a control device constructed using PEDOT:PSS. Moreover, our proposed NGONR-based devices also demonstrate a negligible current hysteresis along with improved stability. This work provides an effective route for substituting PEDOT:PSS as the effective HTL. PMID:27277388

  2. Low-temperature solution-processed tin oxide as an alternative electron transporting layer for efficient perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ke, Weijun; Fang, Guojia; Liu, Qin; Xiong, Liangbin; Qin, Pingli; Tao, Hong; Wang, Jing; Lei, Hongwei; Li, Borui; Wan, Jiawei; Yang, Guang; Yan, Yanfa

    2015-06-01

    Lead halide perovskite solar cells with the high efficiencies typically use high-temperature processed TiO2 as the electron transporting layers (ETLs). Here, we demonstrate that low-temperature solution-processed nanocrystalline SnO2 can be an excellent alternative ETL material for efficient perovskite solar cells. Our best-performing planar cell using such a SnO2 ETL has achieved an average efficiency of 16.02%, obtained from efficiencies measured from both reverse and forward voltage scans. The outstanding performance of SnO2 ETLs is attributed to the excellent properties of nanocrystalline SnO2 films, such as good antireflection, suitable band edge positions, and high electron mobility. The simple low-temperature process is compatible with the roll-to-roll manufacturing of low-cost perovskite solar cells on flexible substrates. PMID:25987132

  3. Synthesis and high temperature transport properties of new quaternary layered selenide NaCuMnSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavan Kumar, V.; Varadaraju, U. V.

    2014-04-01

    Synthesis and high temperature transport properties of NaCu1+xMn1-xSe2, (x=0-0.75) a new quaternary layered selenide, are reported. NaCuMnSe2 crystallizes in a trigonal unit cell with space group of P-3m1 (a=4.1276 Å, c=7.1253 Å). The isovalent substitution of Mn2+ by Cu2+ is carried out. All the compositions show semiconducting nature, whereas the Seebeck coefficient increases gradually over the entire measured temperature range. Compositions with x=0 and 0.025 follow thermally activated behavior. With increase in copper concentration the conduction mechanism transforms to 2D variable range hopping (VRH) for x=0.05 and 0.075.

  4. Magnetization and magneto-transport staircaselike behavior in layered perovskite Sr2CoO4 at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiuhang; Yuan, Xueping; Xing, Lei; Xu, Mingxiang

    2016-01-01

    Polycrystalline layered perovskite Sr2CoO4 sample was synthesized by high temperature and high pressure method. The staircaselike behavior has been observed in the magnetization and resistivity versus field curves of Sr2CoO4 at low temperature. The main features of the steps can be obtained from the measured results: (i) the positions of the external magnetic field at which steps occur are varying in different measurement runs, (ii) the steps only appear at low temperature and disappear with a slight increase of the temperature, (iii) the steps are dependent on the temperature and field sweep rate. Based on the features of the magnetization and magneto-transport staircaselike behavior in Sr2CoO4, the unusual phenomenon can be ascribed to an avalanche of flipping domains in terms of the random field theory. PMID:27293142

  5. Recent Progress in the Development of a Multi-Layer Green's Function Code for Ion Beam Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweed, John; Walker, Steven A.; Wilson, John W.; Tripathi, Ram K.

    2008-01-01

    To meet the challenge of future deep space programs, an accurate and efficient engineering code for analyzing the shielding requirements against high-energy galactic heavy radiation is needed. To address this need, a new Green's function code capable of simulating high charge and energy ions with either laboratory or space boundary conditions is currently under development. The computational model consists of combinations of physical perturbation expansions based on the scales of atomic interaction, multiple scattering, and nuclear reactive processes with use of the Neumann-asymptotic expansions with non-perturbative corrections. The code contains energy loss due to straggling, nuclear attenuation, nuclear fragmentation with energy dispersion and downshifts. Previous reports show that the new code accurately models the transport of ion beams through a single slab of material. Current research efforts are focused on enabling the code to handle multiple layers of material and the present paper reports on progress made towards that end.

  6. Stable and null current hysteresis perovskite solar cells based nitrogen doped graphene oxide nanoribbons hole transport layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeongmo; Mat Teridi, Mohd Asri; Mohd Yusoff, Abd. Rashid Bin; Jang, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Perovskite solar cells are becoming one of the leading technologies to reduce our dependency on traditional power sources. However, the frequently used component poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) has several shortcomings, such as an easily corroded indium-tin-oxide (ITO) interface at elevated temperatures and induced electrical inhomogeneity. Herein, we propose solution-processed nitrogen-doped graphene oxide nanoribbons (NGONRs) as a hole transport layer (HTL) in perovskite solar cells, replacing the conducting polymer PEDOT:PSS. The conversion efficiency of NGONR-based perovskite solar cells has outperformed a control device constructed using PEDOT:PSS. Moreover, our proposed NGONR-based devices also demonstrate a negligible current hysteresis along with improved stability. This work provides an effective route for substituting PEDOT:PSS as the effective HTL.

  7. The Observed Relationship Between Water Vapor and Ozone in the Tropical Tropopause Saturation Layer and the Influence of Meridional Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selkirk, Henry B.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Olsen, M. A.; Douglass, A. R.

    2011-01-01

    We examine balloonsonde observations of water vapor and ozone from three Ticosonde campaigns over San Jose, Costa Rica [10 N, 84 W] during northern summer and a fourth during northern winter. The data from the summer campaigns show that the uppermost portion of the tropical tropopause layer between 360 and 380 K, which we term the tropopause saturation layer or TSL, is characterized by water vapor mixing ratios from proximately 3 to 15 ppmv and ozone from approximately 50 ppbv to 250 ppbv. In contrast, the atmospheric water vapor tape recorder at 380 K and above displays a more restricted 4-7 ppmv range in water vapor mixing ratio. From this perspective, most of the parcels in the TSL fall into two classes - those that need only additional radiative heating to rise into the tape recorder and those requiring some combination of additional dehydration and mixing with drier air. A substantial fraction of the latter class have ozone mixing ratios greater than 150 ppbv, and with water vapor greater than 7 ppmv this air may well have been transported into the tropics from the middle latitudes in conjunction with high-amplitude equatorial waves. We examine this possibility with both trajectory analysis and transport diagnostics based on HIRDLS ozone data. We apply the same approach to study the winter season. Here a very different regime obtains as the ozone-water vapor scatter diagram of the sonde data shows the stratosphere and troposphere to be clearly demarcated with little evidence of mixing in of middle latitude air parcels.

  8. Competitive adsorption and transport of phthalate esters in the clay layer of JiangHan plain, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Zhang, Dan; Li, Minjing; Tong, Lei; Feng, Liang

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the adsorption behavior of phthalate esters (PAEs) in the clay layer of JiangHan Plain, China, so as to make better understanding about the source and control of PAEs in groundwater. Adsorption kinetics, isotherms, and miscible displacement experiments were conducted, and different models were used to simulate the experiment data. Results showed that the adsorption kinetics followed pseudo-second-order model. The kinetic parameters showed quantitative relationships with straight and branched chain carbon numbers of PAEs. These relationships were simulated and carefully discussed. The adsorption isotherms followed linear model better. And partition coefficient (Kd) increased with the carbon chain length of PAEs. Miscible displacement experiments showed that DEHP could not flow out of the column in 100d. HYDRUS-1D and two-site sorption model (linear, first order nonequilibrium adsorption) were used for the simulation of the breakthrough and transport curves of DMP, DEP, DBP, and DiBP. Results showed that the dispersion coefficients (D) and partition coefficient (Kd(')) increased with the carbon chain length. About 10% DBP and DiBP and 1% DMP and DEP were absorbed on the type-1 sites. DMP and DEP were much easier to transfer into the type-2 sites than DBP and DiBP. DBP and DiBP might aggregate in micro-pores of the sorbent. Retardation coefficient and Damkohler number were also calculated and discussed. It was proved that clay layer is an important retarder for PAEs downward transport. However, it can be passed through if the time is sufficient. PMID:23706400

  9. Rational Mutational Analysis of a Multidrug MFS Transporter CaMdr1p of Candida albicans by Employing a Membrane Environment Based Computational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kaushiki, Ajeeta; Pasrija, Ritu; Lynn, Andrew M.; Prasad, Rajendra

    2009-01-01

    CaMdr1p is a multidrug MFS transporter of pathogenic Candida albicans. An over-expression of the gene encoding this protein is linked to clinically encountered azole resistance. In-depth knowledge of the structure and function of CaMdr1p is necessary for an effective design of modulators or inhibitors of this efflux transporter. Towards this goal, in this study, we have employed a membrane environment based computational approach to predict the functionally critical residues of CaMdr1p. For this, information theoretic scores which are variants of Relative Entropy (Modified Relative Entropy REM) were calculated from Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA) by separately considering distinct physico-chemical properties of transmembrane (TM) and inter-TM regions. The residues of CaMdr1p with high REM which were predicted to be significantly important were subjected to site-directed mutational analysis. Interestingly, heterologous host Saccharomyces cerevisiae, over-expressing these mutant variants of CaMdr1p wherein these high REM residues were replaced by either alanine or leucine, demonstrated increased susceptibility to tested drugs. The hypersensitivity to drugs was supported by abrogated substrate efflux mediated by mutant variant proteins and was not attributed to their poor expression or surface localization. Additionally, by employing a distance plot from a 3D deduced model of CaMdr1p, we could also predict the role of these functionally critical residues in maintaining apparent inter-helical interactions to provide the desired fold for the proper functioning of CaMdr1p. Residues predicted to be critical for function across the family were also found to be vital from other previously published studies, implying its wider application to other membrane protein families. PMID:20041202

  10. Transport of ion beam in an annular magnetically expanding helicon double layer thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunchao; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2014-06-01

    An ion beam generated by an annular double layer has been measured in a helicon thruster, which sustains a magnetised low-pressure (5.0 × 10-4 Torr) argon plasma at a constant radio-frequency (13.56 MHz) power of 300 W. After the ion beam exits the annular structure, it merges into a solid centrally peaked structure in the diffusion chamber. As the annular ion beam moves towards the inner region in the diffusion chamber, a reversed-cone plasma wake (with a half opening angle of about 30°) is formed. This process is verified by measuring both the radial and axial distributions of the beam potential and beam current. The beam potential changes from a two-peak radial profile (maximum value ˜ 30 V, minimum value ˜ 22.5 V) to a flat (˜28 V) along the axial direction; similarly, the beam current changes from a two-peak to one-peak radial profile and the maximum value decreases by half. The inward cross-magnetic-field motion of the beam ions is caused by a divergent electric field in the source. Cross-field diffusion of electrons is also observed in the inner plume and is determined as being of non-ambipolar origin.

  11. Transport of ion beam in an annular magnetically expanding helicon double layer thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yunchao Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2014-06-15

    An ion beam generated by an annular double layer has been measured in a helicon thruster, which sustains a magnetised low-pressure (5.0 × 10{sup −4} Torr) argon plasma at a constant radio-frequency (13.56 MHz) power of 300 W. After the ion beam exits the annular structure, it merges into a solid centrally peaked structure in the diffusion chamber. As the annular ion beam moves towards the inner region in the diffusion chamber, a reversed-cone plasma wake (with a half opening angle of about 30°) is formed. This process is verified by measuring both the radial and axial distributions of the beam potential and beam current. The beam potential changes from a two-peak radial profile (maximum value ∼ 30 V, minimum value ∼ 22.5 V) to a flat (∼28 V) along the axial direction; similarly, the beam current changes from a two-peak to one-peak radial profile and the maximum value decreases by half. The inward cross-magnetic-field motion of the beam ions is caused by a divergent electric field in the source. Cross-field diffusion of electrons is also observed in the inner plume and is determined as being of non-ambipolar origin.

  12. Electron transport in Al-doped ZnO nanolayers obtained by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoev, B. S.; Dimitrov, D. Z.; Mehandzhiev, V. B.; Kovacheva, D.; Terziyska, P.; Pavlic, J.; Lovchinov, K.; Mateev, E.; Leclercq, J.; Sveshtarov, P.

    2016-03-01

    Al-doped ZnO thin films with different Al content were prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD). To carry out thermal ALD, diethyl zinc (DEZ) and tri-methyl aluminium (TMA) were used as Zn and Al precursors, respectively, and water vapor as oxidant. Various numbers n of DEZ and m TMA cycles was used to obtain different [ZnO] n [Al2O3] m films, where n = 100 – 95, m = 1 – 5. The X-ray diffraction analysis showed a predominantly (100) oriented polycrystalline phase for the ZnO:Al films with a low Al content (m = 1 – 3) and an amorphous structure for pure Al2O3. In ZnO:Al with a higher Al content (m = 4 – 6) the (100) reflection disappeared and the (002) peak increased. The resistivity of the films decreased with the increase in the Al content, reaching a minimum of 3.3×10-3 Ω cm at about 1.1 % Al2O3 for the [ZnO]99[Al2O3]2 sample; for higher dopant concentrations, the resistivity increased because of the increased crystal inhomogeneity due to axis reorientation.

  13. Tail-ion transport and Knudsen layer formation in the presence of magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, Paul; Molvig, Kim

    2013-10-01

    The impact of magnetic fields on Knudsen layer formation in ICF-relevant plasma is investigated for the first time. Magnetic fields change the energy scaling of the ion diffusivity in a way that eliminates the preferential losses of fast ions compared to thermal ions. Simple threshold criteria give conditions such that the restoration of the ion tail distribution is sufficient to recover much of the lost fusion reactivity. The tail-ion kinetic equations are solved for hot fuel bounded by a cold, nonreacting wall using a numerical stochastic differential equation solver, and the modified fusion reactivities are calculated. We find that modest magnetic fields too weak to magnetize thermal ions are still sufficient to restore much of the lost reactivity, consistent with the threshold conditions. We also find that the Maxwell-averaged fusion reactivities are recovered more fully in cylindrical targets compared to spherical targets. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Numerical Modeling Studies of Wake Vortex Transport and Evolution Within the Planetary Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Kaplan, Michael L.; Han, Jongil

    2000-01-01

    The fundamental objective of this research is study behavior of aircraft wake vortices within atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) in support of developing the system, Aircraft VOrtex Spacing System (AVOSS), under NASA's Terminal Area Productivity (TAR) program that will control aircraft spacing within the narrow approach corridors of airports. The purpose of the AVOSS system is to increase airport capacity by providing a safe reduction in separation of aircraft compared to the now-existing flight rules. In our first funding period (7 January 19994 - 6 April 1997), we have accomplished extensive model development and validation of ABL simulations. Using the validated model, in our second funding period (7 April 1997 - 6 April 2000) we have investigated the effects of ambient atmospheric turbulence on vortex decay and descent, Crow instability, and wake vortex interaction with the ground. Recognizing the crucial influence of ABL turbulence on wake vortex behavior, we have also developed a software generating vertical profiles of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) or energy dissipation rate (EDR), which are, in turn, used as input data in the AVOSS prediction algorithms.

  15. Modeling of particulate matter transport in atmospheric boundary layer following dust emission from source areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katra, Itzhak; Elperin, Tov; Fominykh, Andrew; Krasovitov, Boris; Yizhaq, Hezi

    2016-03-01

    A two-dimensional model for particulate matter (PM) dispersion due to dust emission from soils is presented. Field experiments were performed at a dust source site (Negev loess soil) with a portable boundary layer wind tunnel to determine the emitted PM fluxes for different wind speeds and varying soil conditions. The numerical model is formulated using parameterizations based on the aeolian experiments. The wind velocity profiles used in the simulations were fitted from data obtained in field measurements. Size distribution of the emitted dust particles in the numerical simulations was taken into account using a Monte Carlo method. The PM concentration distributions at a distance of several kilometers from the dust source under specific shear velocities and PM fluxes from the soil were determined numerically by solving advection-diffusion equation. The obtained PM10 concentrations under typical wind and soil conditions are supported by PM data recorded over time in a standard environmental monitoring station. The model enhances our capacity of quantification of dust processes to support climate models as well as health risk assessment.

  16. Electrical transport and low-frequency noise in chemical vapor deposited single-layer MoS2 devices.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepak; Amani, Matin; Motayed, Abhishek; Shah, Pankaj B; Birdwell, A Glen; Najmaei, Sina; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Lou, Jun; Dubey, Madan; Li, Qiliang; Davydov, Albert V

    2014-04-18

    We have studied temperature-dependent (77-300 K) electrical characteristics and low-frequency noise (LFN) in chemical vapor deposited (CVD) single-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) based back-gated field-effect transistors (FETs). Electrical characterization and LFN measurements were conducted on MoS2 FETs with Al2O3 top-surface passivation. We also studied the effect of top-surface passivation etching on the electrical characteristics of the device. Significant decrease in channel current and transconductance was observed in these devices after the Al2O3 passivation etching. For passivated devices, the two-terminal resistance variation with temperature showed a good fit to the activation energy model, whereas for the etched devices the trend indicated a hopping transport mechanism. A significant increase in the normalized drain current noise power spectral density (PSD) was observed after the etching of the top passivation layer. The observed channel current noise was explained using a standard unified model incorporating carrier number fluctuation and correlated surface mobility fluctuation mechanisms. Detailed analysis of the gate-referred noise voltage PSD indicated the presence of different trapping states in passivated devices when compared to the etched devices. Etched devices showed weak temperature dependence of the channel current noise, whereas passivated devices exhibited near-linear temperature dependence. PMID:24642948

  17. Development of a multi-layer diffusion couple to study fission product transport in β-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwaraknath, S.; Was, G. S.

    2014-01-01

    A multi-layer diffusion couple was designed to study fission product diffusion behavior while avoiding the pitfalls of direct ion implantation. Thin films of highly anisotropic pyrolytic carbon (PyC) were deposited onto CVD β-SiC substrates. The PyC films were subsequently implanted with 400 keV silver, cesium, strontium, europium, or iodine at 22 °C to a dose of 1016 cm-2, such that the implanted species resided wholly within the PyC layer. The samples were then coated with 50 nm of SiC via plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD) to retain the implanted species during post-deposition annealing treatments. The design allows for high spatial resolution tracking of the implanted specie using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Annealing at 1100 °C for 10 h resulted in retention of 100% of implanted cesium, strontium, europium and iodine, and 70% of silver. This diffusion couple design provides the opportunity to determine diffusion coefficients of FPs in PyC and SiC and the role of the PyC/SiC interface in FP transport.

  18. An analytical model for solute transport through a GCL-based two-layered liner considering biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Guan, C; Xie, H J; Wang, Y Z; Chen, Y M; Jiang, Y S; Tang, X W

    2014-01-01

    An analytical model for solute advection and dispersion in a two-layered liner consisting of a geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) and a soil liner (SL) considering the effect of biodegradation was proposed. The analytical solution was derived by Laplace transformation and was validated over a range of parameters using the finite-layer method based software Pollute v7.0. Results show that if the half-life of the solute in GCL is larger than 1 year, the degradation in GCL can be neglected for solute transport in GCL/SL. When the half-life of GCL is less than 1 year, neglecting the effect of degradation in GCL on solute migration will result in a large difference of relative base concentration of GCL/SL (e.g., 32% for the case with half-life of 0.01 year). The 100-year solute base concentration can be reduced by a factor of 2.2 when the hydraulic conductivity of the SL was reduced by an order of magnitude. The 100-year base concentration was reduced by a factor of 155 when the half life of the contaminant in the SL was reduced by an order of magnitude. The effect of degradation is more important in approving the groundwater protection level than the hydraulic conductivity. The analytical solution can be used for experimental data fitting, verification of complicated numerical models and preliminary design of landfill liner systems. PMID:23906856

  19. Turbulent transport of heat and momentum in a boundary layer subject to deceleration, suction and variable wall temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlando, A. F.; Moffat, R. J.; Kays, W. M.

    1974-01-01

    The relationship between the turbulent transport of heat and momentum in an adverse pressure gradient boundary layer was studied. An experimental study was conducted of turbulent boundary layers subject to strong adverse pressure gradients with suction. Near-equilibrium flows were attained, evidenced by outer-region similarity in terms of defect temperature and defect velocity profiles. The relationship between Stanton number and enthalpy thickness was shown to be the same as for a flat plate flow both for constant wall temperature boundary conditions and for steps in wall temperature. The superposition principle used with the step-wall-temperature experimental result was shown to accurately predict the Stanton number variation for two cases of arbitrarily varying wall temperature. The Reynolds stress tensor components were measured for strong adverse pressure gradient conditions and different suction rates. Two peaks of turbulence intensity were found: one in the inner and one in the outer regions. The outer peak is shown to be displaced outward by an adverse pressure gradient and suppressed by suction.

  20. Synthesis and high temperature transport properties of new quaternary layered selenide NaCuMnSe{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Pavan Kumar, V.; Varadaraju, U.V.

    2014-04-01

    Synthesis and high temperature transport properties of NaCu{sub 1+x}Mn{sub 1−x}Se{sub 2}, (x=0−0.75) a new quaternary layered selenide, are reported. NaCuMnSe{sub 2} crystallizes in a trigonal unit cell with space group of P-3m1 (a=4.1276 Å, c=7.1253 Å). The isovalent substitution of Mn{sup 2+} by Cu{sup 2+} is carried out. All the compositions show semiconducting nature, whereas the Seebeck coefficient increases gradually over the entire measured temperature range. Compositions with x=0 and 0.025 follow thermally activated behavior. With increase in copper concentration the conduction mechanism transforms to 2D variable range hopping (VRH) for x=0.05 and 0.075. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of NaCuMnSe{sub 2}. - Highlights: • A new quaternary layered selenide NaCuMnSe{sub 2} is synthesized. • All the compositions show semiconducting nature, whereas the Seebeck coefficient increases gradually over the entire measured temperature range. • Conduction mechanism transforms from thermally activated behavior to 2D variable range hopping with increase in copper concentration.

  1. Phenylvinyl-Substituted Carbazole Twin Compounds as Efficient Materials for the Charge-Transporting Layers of OLED Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavgeniene, D.; Liu, L.; Krucaite, G.; Volyniuk, D.; Grazulevicius, J. V.; Xie, Z.; Zhang, B.; Grigalevicius, S.

    2015-10-01

    Twin compounds containing two phenylvinyl-substituted carbazole rings were synthesized by multi-step synthesis. The compounds were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and electron photoemission spectroscopy. The thermal stability of the materials was very high; initial thermal degradation temperatures were in the range 411-419°C. The glass-transition temperatures of the amorphous materials were in the range 74-119°C. Electron photoemission spectra of thin layers of the compounds revealed ionization potentials were in the range 5.05-5.45 eV. The hole-transporting properties of thin amorphous layers of the twin compounds were tested in organic light-emitting diodes with Alq3 as green emitter. The best overall performance was observed for a device based on the twin compound containing 3-[2-(4-methylphenyl)vinyl]carbazole groups; the turn-on voltage was 2.6 V, the maximum photometric efficiency 2.34 cd/A, and maximum brightness approximately 7380 cd/m2. At a brightness of 1000 cd/m2 the photometric efficiency was 23% higher than for a PEDOT:PSS-based device.

  2. Co-functionalized organic/inorganic hybrid ZnO nanorods as electron transporting layers for inverted organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ambade, Swapnil B; Ambade, Rohan B; Eom, Seung Hun; Baek, Myung-Jin; Bagde, Sushil S; Mane, Rajaram S; Lee, Soo-Hyoung

    2016-03-01

    In an unprecedented attempt, we present an interesting approach of coupling solution processed ZnO planar nanorods (NRs) by an organic small molecule (SM) with a strong electron withdrawing cyano moiety and the carboxylic group as binding sites by a facile co-functionalization approach. Direct functionalization by SMs (SM-ZnO NRs) leads to higher aggregation owing to the weaker solubility of SMs in solutions of ZnO NRs dispersed in chlorobenzene (CB). A prior addition of organic 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)acetic acid (MEA) over ZnO NRs not only inhibits aggregation of SMs over ZnO NRs, but also provides enough sites for the SM to strongly couple with the ZnO NRs to yield transparent SM-MEA-ZnO NRs hybrids that exhibited excellent capability as electron transporting layers (ETLs) in inverted organic solar cells (iOSCs) of P3HT:PC60BM bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) photoactive layers. A strongly coupled SM-MEA-ZnO NR hybrid reduces the series resistance by enhancing the interfacial area and tunes the energy level alignment at the interface between the (indium-doped tin oxide, ITO) cathode and BHJ photoactive layers. A significant enhancement in power conversion efficiency (PCE) was achieved for iOSCs comprising ETLs of SM-MEA-ZnO NRs (3.64%) advancing from 0.9% for pristine ZnO NRs, while the iOSCs of aggregated SM-ZnO NRs ETL exhibited a much lower PCE of 2.6%, thus demonstrating the potential of the co-functionalization approach. The superiority of the co-functionalized SM-MEA-ZnO NRs ETL is also evident from the highest PCE of 7.38% obtained for the iOSCs comprising BHJ of PTB7-Th:PC60BM compared with extremely poor 0.05% for non-functionalized ZnO NRs. PMID:26864170

  3. Valley-symmetry-preserved transport in ballistic graphene layers with gate-defined carrier guiding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minsoo; Choi, Ji-Hae; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Hu-Jong

    Zigzag graphene nanoribbons are predicted to exhibit interesting electronic properties stemming from its Dirac band structure. However, to date, investigation of them is highly limited because of the defects and the roughness at the edges, which mix different valley properties of graphene. Here, we report the signature of conservation of valley symmetry in two types of quasi-1D ballistic graphene transport devices; one is a quantum point contact (QPC) and another is an Aharonov-Bohm (AB) interferometer. In measurements, charge carriers were confined in a potential well formed by the dual gates operation and the four-terminal magnetoconductance (MC) was measured with varying the carrier density, dc bias, and temperature. It exhibits the conductance quantization in steps of ΔG = 4e2/ h starting from G = (2, 6), 10 ×e2 / h in a constricted conducting channel of QPC-type devices. This behavior is similar to the one observed in zigzag graphene nanoribbons having edge localized channels. Our tight-binding calculation shows that quasi-1D charge flow on a graphene plane acts a zigzag-type nanoribbon, unless it is perfectly aligned along the armchair direction. In the AB interferometry, we observed h/ e periodic modulation of MC and the zero-field conductance minimum with a negative MC background.

  4. Thermoelectric transport in the layered Ca3Co4-xRhxO9 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Yusuke; Saito, Kengo; Okazaki, Ryuji

    2016-06-01

    We have examined an isovalent Rh substitution effect on the transport properties of the thermoelectric oxide Ca3Co4O9 using single-crystalline form. With increasing Rh content x, both the electrical resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient change systematically up to x = 0.6 for Ca3Co4-xRhxO9 samples. In the Fermi-liquid regime where the resistivity behaves as ρ = ρ 0 + A T 2 around 120 K, the A value decreases with increasing Rh content, indicating that the correlation effect is weakened by Rh 4d electrons with extended orbitals. We find that, in contrast to such a weak correlation effect observed in the resistivity of Rh-substituted samples, the low-temperature Seebeck coefficient is increased with increasing Rh content, which is explained with a possible enhancement of a pseudogap associated with the short-range order of spin density wave. In high-temperature range above room temperature, we show that the resistivity is largely suppressed by Rh substitution while the Seebeck coefficient becomes almost temperature-independent, leading to a significant improvement of the power factor in Rh-substituted samples. This result is also discussed in terms of the differences in the orbital size and the associated spin state between Co 3d and Rh 4d electrons.

  5. Time-resolved soft-x-ray studies of energy transport in layered and planar laser-driven targets

    SciTech Connect

    Stradling, G.L.

    1982-04-19

    New low-energy x-ray diagnostic techniques are used to explore energy-transport processes in laser heated plasmas. Streak cameras are used to provide 15-psec time-resolution measurements of subkeV x-ray emission. A very thin (50 ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/) carbon substrate provides a low-energy x-ray transparent window to the transmission photocathode of this soft x-ray streak camera. Active differential vacuum pumping of the instrument is required. The use of high-sensitivity, low secondary-electron energy-spread CsI photocathodes in x-ray streak cameras is also described. Significant increases in sensitivity with only a small and intermittant decrease in dynamic range were observed. These coherent, complementary advances in subkeV, time-resolved x-ray diagnostic capability are applied to energy-transport investigations of 1.06-..mu..m laser plasmas. Both solid disk targets of a variety of Z's as well as Be-on-Al layered-disk targets were irradiated with 700-psec laser pulses of selected intensity between 3 x 10/sup 14/ W/cm/sup 2/ and 1 x 10/sup 15/ W/cm/sup 2/.

  6. Nano-structural analysis of effective transport paths in fuel-cell catalyst layers by using stochastic material network methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seungho; Kim, Ah-Reum; Um, Sukkee

    2016-02-01

    A two-dimensional material network model has been developed to visualize the nano-structures of fuel-cell catalysts and to search for effective transport paths for the optimal performance of fuel cells in randomly-disordered composite catalysts. Stochastic random modeling based on the Monte Carlo method is developed using random number generation processes over a catalyst layer domain at a 95% confidence level. After the post-determination process of the effective connectivity, particularly for mass transport, the effective catalyst utilization factors are introduced to determine the extent of catalyst utilization in the fuel cells. The results show that the superficial pore volume fractions of 600 trials approximate a normal distribution curve with a mean of 0.5. In contrast, the estimated volume fraction of effectively inter-connected void clusters ranges from 0.097 to 0.420, which is much smaller than the superficial porosity of 0.5 before the percolation process. Furthermore, the effective catalyst utilization factor is determined to be linearly proportional to the effective porosity. More importantly, this study reveals that the average catalyst utilization is less affected by the variations of the catalyst's particle size and the absolute catalyst loading at a fixed volume fraction of void spaces.

  7. Graphene oxide/PEDOT:PSS composite hole transport layer for efficient and stable planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Da-Young; Na, Seok-In; Kim, Seok-Soon

    2016-01-01

    We investigated a graphene oxide (GO)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) composite as a promising candidate for the practical application of a 2-D carbonaceous hole transport layer (HTL) to planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells (PeSCs) consisting of a transparent electrode/HTL/perovskite/fullerene/metal electrode. Both the insulating properties of GO and the non-uniform coating of the transparent electrode with GO cause the poor morphology of perovskite induced low power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 6.4%. On the other hand, PeSCs with a GO/PEDOT:PSS composite HTL, exhibited a higher PCE of 9.7% than that of a device fabricated with conventional PEDOT:PSS showing a PCE of 8.2%. The higher performance is attributed to the decreased series resistance (RS) and increased shunt resistance (RSh). The well-matched work-function between GO (4.9 eV) and PEDOT:PSS (5.1 eV) probably results in more efficient charge transport and an overall decrease in RS. The existence of GO with a large bandgap of ~3.6 eV might induce the effective blocking of electrons, leading to an increase of RSh. Moreover, improvement in the long-term stability under atmospheric conditions was observed.

  8. Steady state and modulated heat conduction in layered systems predicted by the analytical solution of the phonon Boltzmann transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordonez-Miranda, Jose; Yang, Ronggui; Volz, Sebastian; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2015-08-01

    Based on the phonon Boltzmann transport equation under the relaxation time approximation, analytical expressions for the temperature profiles of both the steady state and modulated heat conduction inside a thin film deposited on a substrate are derived and analyzed. It is shown that these components of the temperature depend strongly on the ratio between the film thickness and the average phonon mean free path (MFP), and they exhibit the diffusive behavior as predicted by the Fourier's law of heat conduction when this ratio is much larger than unity. In contrast, in the ballistic regime when this ratio is comparable to or smaller than unity, the steady-state temperature tends to be independent of position, while the amplitude and the phase of the modulated temperature appear to be lower than those determined by the Fourier's law. Furthermore, we derive an invariant of heat conduction and a simple formula for the cross-plane thermal conductivity of dielectric thin films, which could be a useful guide for understanding and optimizing the thermal performance of the layered systems. This work represents the Boltzmann transport equation-based extension of the Rosencwaig and Gersho work [J. Appl. Phys. 47, 64 (1976)], which is based on the Fourier's law and has widely been used as the theoretical framework for the development of photoacoustic and photothermal techniques. This work might shed some light on developing a theoretical basis for the determination of the phonon MFP and relaxation time using ultrafast laser-based transient heating techniques.

  9. Electron Beam-Blip Spectroscopic Diagnostics of the Scrape-off-Layer Parallel Transport in C-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osin, Dmitry; Thompson, Matthew; Garate, Eusebio; TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    C-2 is a microscopically stable, high-performance field-reversed configuration (FRC), where high plasma temperatures with significant fast ion population and record lifetimes were achieved by a combination of tangential neutral beam injection, electrically biased plasma guns at the ends and wall conditioning. FRC confinement depends on the properties of both the open and closed field lines, therefore, understanding the electron transport in the scrape-of-layer (SOL) is critical. To study parallel heat conduction in SOL, a high-energy pulsed electron beam (e-beam) was injected on-axis into C-2 to produce a heat pulse, which causes a fast rise and slower decay of the electron temperature, Te, in the SOL. The heat-blip was observed by means of He-jet spectroscopy. A small fraction of the total deposited e-beam energy is necessary to explain the measured Te increase. The electron thermal conductivity along the magnetic field lines can be inferred from the Te decay. Experiments suggest that a high energy e-beam pulse can serve as a direct diagnostic of heat transport in the SOL.

  10. Magnetism and transport properties of layered rare-earth cobaltates Ln0.3CoO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knížek, K.; Novák, P.; Jirák, Z.; Hejtmánek, J.; Maryško, M.; Buršík, J.

    2015-05-01

    The ab-initio (GGA+U) electronic structure calculations of layered cobaltates Ln0.3CoO2 (Ln = La, Pr, Nd) prepared by ionic exchange from Na0.90CoO2 precursors have been performed. The data are used for numerical modeling of Seebeck coefficient within Boltzmann transport theory using BoltzTraP program [G. K. H. Madsen and D. J. Singh, Comput. Phys. Commun. 175, 67 (2006)], as well as for determination of the crystal field split levels of rare-earth ions using a method based on a transformation of Bloch states into the basis of Wannier functions [P. Novák et al., Phys. Rev. B 87, 205139 (2013)]. An overall agreement with observed magnetism and transport properties is obtained. In particular, the high p-type thermopower is well reproduced in a broad temperature range, but instead of theoretical linear decrease down to the lowest temperatures, the real systems exhibit an anomalous change of Seebeck sign, which might be related to the change of bare metallic carriers into the polaronic ones.

  11. Charge transport improvement employing TiO2 nanotube arrays as front-side illuminated dye-sensitized solar cell photoanodes.

    PubMed

    Lamberti, Andrea; Sacco, Adriano; Bianco, Stefano; Manfredi, Diego; Cappelluti, Federica; Hernandez, Simelys; Quaglio, Marzia; Pirri, Candido Fabrizio

    2013-02-21

    TiO(2) nanotube (NT) arrays with different lengths were fabricated by anodic oxidation of Ti foil and free-standing NT membranes were detached by the metal substrate and bonded on the fluorine-doped tin oxide surface implementing an easy procedure. Morphology of the as-grown material and of the prepared photoanode was investigated by means of electron microscopy, deepening the investigation on the thermal treatment effect. Crystalline orientation and exposed surface area were studied by X-ray diffraction and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurements, showing suitable characteristics for the application in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). DSCs were assembled employing a microfluidic housing system. The cell performances and the electron transport properties as a function of the tube length, before and after a TiCl(4) treatment, were characterized by I-V electrical measurements, incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and open circuit voltage decay. Fitting the impedance spectra with an equivalent circuit, it was possible to obtain information on the electron diffusion properties into the TiO(2) nanotubes. A comparison with the charge transport properties evaluated in nanoparticle-based photoanodes witnesses a noteworthy increase of electron lifetime and diffusion length, yielding an overall power conversion efficiency up to 7.56%. PMID:22918400

  12. Focused helium-ion beam irradiation effects on electrical transport properties of few-layer WSe2: enabling nanoscale direct write homo-junctions

    PubMed Central

    Stanford, Michael G.; Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Belianinov, Alex; Cross, Nicholas; Noh, Joo Hyon; Koehler, Michael R.; Mandrus, David G.; Duscher, Gerd; Rondinone, Adam J.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Ward, T. Zac; Rack, Philip D.

    2016-01-01

    Atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are currently receiving significant attention due to their promising opto-electronic properties. Tuning optical and electrical properties of mono and few-layer TMDs, such as tungsten diselenide (WSe2), by controlling the defects, is an intriguing opportunity to synthesize next generation two dimensional material opto-electronic devices. Here, we report the effects of focused helium ion beam irradiation on the structural, optical and electrical properties of few-layer WSe2, via high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and electrical transport measurements. By controlling the ion irradiation dose, we selectively introduce precise defects in few-layer WSe2 thereby locally tuning the resistivity and transport properties of the material. Hole transport in the few layer WSe2 is degraded more severely relative to electron transport after helium ion irradiation. Furthermore, by selectively exposing material with the ion beam, we demonstrate a simple yet highly tunable method to create lateral homo-junctions in few layer WSe2 flakes, which constitutes an important advance towards two dimensional opto-electronic devices. PMID:27263472

  13. Focused helium-ion beam irradiation effects on electrical transport properties of few-layer WSe2: enabling nanoscale direct write homo-junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanford, Michael G.; Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Belianinov, Alex; Cross, Nicholas; Noh, Joo Hyon; Koehler, Michael R.; Mandrus, David G.; Duscher, Gerd; Rondinone, Adam J.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Ward, T. Zac; Rack, Philip D.

    2016-06-01

    Atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are currently receiving significant attention due to their promising opto-electronic properties. Tuning optical and electrical properties of mono and few-layer TMDs, such as tungsten diselenide (WSe2), by controlling the defects, is an intriguing opportunity to synthesize next generation two dimensional material opto-electronic devices. Here, we report the effects of focused helium ion beam irradiation on the structural, optical and electrical properties of few-layer WSe2, via high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and electrical transport measurements. By controlling the ion irradiation dose, we selectively introduce precise defects in few-layer WSe2 thereby locally tuning the resistivity and transport properties of the material. Hole transport in the few layer WSe2 is degraded more severely relative to electron transport after helium ion irradiation. Furthermore, by selectively exposing material with the ion beam, we demonstrate a simple yet highly tunable method to create lateral homo-junctions in few layer WSe2 flakes, which constitutes an important advance towards two dimensional opto-electronic devices.

  14. Focused helium-ion beam irradiation effects on electrical transport properties of few-layer WSe2: enabling nanoscale direct write homo-junctions.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Michael G; Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Belianinov, Alex; Cross, Nicholas; Noh, Joo Hyon; Koehler, Michael R; Mandrus, David G; Duscher, Gerd; Rondinone, Adam J; Ivanov, Ilia N; Ward, T Zac; Rack, Philip D

    2016-01-01

    Atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are currently receiving significant attention due to their promising opto-electronic properties. Tuning optical and electrical properties of mono and few-layer TMDs, such as tungsten diselenide (WSe2), by controlling the defects, is an intriguing opportunity to synthesize next generation two dimensional material opto-electronic devices. Here, we report the effects of focused helium ion beam irradiation on the structural, optical and electrical properties of few-layer WSe2, via high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and electrical transport measurements. By controlling the ion irradiation dose, we selectively introduce precise defects in few-layer WSe2 thereby locally tuning the resistivity and transport properties of the material. Hole transport in the few layer WSe2 is degraded more severely relative to electron transport after helium ion irradiation. Furthermore, by selectively exposing material with the ion beam, we demonstrate a simple yet highly tunable method to create lateral homo-junctions in few layer WSe2 flakes, which constitutes an important advance towards two dimensional opto-electronic devices. PMID:27263472

  15. Focused helium-ion beam irradiation effects on electrical transport properties of few-layer WSe2: Enabling nanoscale direct write homo-junctions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stanford, Michael; Noh, Joo Hyon; Koehler, Michael R.; Mandrus, David G.; Duscher, Gerd; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Ward, Thomas Zac; Rack, Philip D.; Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; et al

    2016-06-06

    Atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are currently receiving significant attention due to their promising opto-electronic properties. Tuning optical and electrical properties of mono and few-layer TMDs, such as tungsten diselenide (WSe2), by controlling the defects, is an intriguing opportunity to synthesize next generation two dimensional material opto-electronic devices. Here, we report the effects of focused helium ion beam irradiation on the structural, optical and electrical properties of few-layer WSe2, via high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and electrical transport measurements. By controlling the ion irradiation dose, we selectively introduce precise defects in few-layer WSe2 thereby locally tuningmore » the resistivity and transport properties of the material. Hole transport in the few layer WSe2 is degraded more severely relative to electron transport after helium ion irradiation. Moreover, by selectively exposing material with the ion beam, we demonstrate a simple yet highly tunable method to create lateral homo-junctions in few layer WSe2 flakes, which constitutes an important advance towards two dimensional opto-electronic devices.« less

  16. Trace surface-clean palladium nanosheets as a conductivity enhancer in hole-transporting layers to improve the overall performances of perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jing; Mo, Shiguang; Jing, Xiaojing; Yin, Jun; Li, Jing; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-02-01

    Surface-clean Pd nanosheets were synthesized and embedded in a hole transport material (HTM) matrix to improve the conductivity of the HTM layer. Applying only a trace amount of Pd nanosheets readily led to a remarkably enhanced performance of perovskite solar cells (PSCs). This finding provides an effective strategy to build efficient charge-transport materials for improving the overall performance of PSCs.Surface-clean Pd nanosheets were synthesized and embedded in a hole transport material (HTM) matrix to improve the conductivity of the HTM layer. Applying only a trace amount of Pd nanosheets readily led to a remarkably enhanced performance of perovskite solar cells (PSCs). This finding provides an effective strategy to build efficient charge-transport materials for improving the overall performance of PSCs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the XRD, UV-vis spectra, cross-sectional SEM images and the EQE spectra of the cells. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07789c

  17. Solute transport through fractured rock: Radial diffusion into the rock matrix with several geological layers for an arbitrary length decay chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudzadeh, Batoul; Liu, Longcheng; Moreno, Luis; Neretnieks, Ivars

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents a model development to derive a semi-analytical solution to describe reactive solute transport through a single channel in a fracture with cylindrical geometry. The model accounts for advection through the channel, radial diffusion into the adjacent heterogeneous rock matrix comprising different geological layers, adsorption on both the channel surface, and the geological layers of the rock matrix and radioactive decay chain. Not only an arbitrary-length decay chain, but also as many number of the rock matrix layers with different properties as observed in the field can be handled. The solution, which is analytical in the Laplace domain, is transformed back to the time domain numerically e.g. by use of de Hoog algorithm. The solution is verified against experimental data and analytical solutions of limiting cases of solute transport through porous media. More importantly, the relative importance and contribution of different processes on solute transport retardation in fractured rocks are investigated by simulating several cases of varying complexity. The simulation results are compared with those obtained from rectangular model with linear matrix diffusion. It is found that the impact of channel geometry on breakthrough curves increases markedly as the transport distance along the flow channel and away into the rock matrix increase. The effect of geometry is more pronounced for transport of a decay chain when the rock matrix consists of a porous altered layer.

  18. Efficient Planar Perovskite Solar Cells with Reduced Hysteresis and Enhanced Open Circuit Voltage by Using PW12-TiO2 as Electron Transport Layer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun; Liu, Canjun; Di, Yunxiang; Li, Wenzhang; Liu, Fangyang; Jiang, Liangxing; Li, Jie; Hao, Xiaojing; Huang, Haitao

    2016-04-01

    An electron transport layer is essential for effective operation of planar perovskite solar cells. In this Article, PW12-TiO2 composite was used as the electron transport layer for the planar perovskite solar cell in the device structure of fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO)-glass/PW12-TiO2/perovskite/spiro-OMeTAD/Au. A proper downward shift of the conduction band minimum (CBM) enhanced electron extraction from the perovskite layer to the PW12-TiO2 composite layer. Consequently, the common hysteresis effect in TiO2-based planar perovskite solar cells was significantly reduced and the open circuit voltage was greatly increased to about 1.1 V. Perovskite solar cells using the PW12-TiO2 compact layer showed an efficiency of 15.45%. This work can contribute to the studies on the electron transport layer and interface engineering for the further development of perovskite solar cells. PMID:26954448

  19. Nitrate and Aluminum Transport Through Soil Layers in a Clear-Cut Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHale, M. R.; Murdoch, P. S.; Burns, D. A.

    2002-12-01

    The 24-ha Dry Creek watershed in the Catskill Mountains of New York State was clear-cut during 1997 to evaluate nutrient release to New York City reservoirs due to forest harvesting. The Dry Creek watershed is in the headwaters of the Neversink watershed, which is part of the New York City Reservoir system that supplies drinking water to over 20 million people. Soil water, groundwater seeps, and stream water chemistry were monitored to trace the transport of solutes before and after the timber harvest. Automated sequential zero-tension lysimeters and standard zero-tension lysimeters were installed at depths of 70, 300, and 500 mm to sample soil water in the O, B, and C-horizons, respectively. Pre-cut (water years 1993-1996) mean soil water concentrations from zero tension lysimeters indicate that O-horizon soil water (70 mm depth) had the highest nitrate (NO3-) and monomeric aluminum (Alm) concentrations (73 and 18 μmoles l-1, respectively). During that same time period water from ground-water seeps had lower NO3- and Alm concentrations (22 and 0.88 μmoles l-1, respectively) than any soil waters sampled. During the two years following the clear-cut, groundwater seep NO3- concentrations were 138-123 μmoles l-1 and Alm concentrations were 50-30 μmoles l-1 lower than that measured in soil water. Throughout the same time period, B-horizon soil water had the highest mean NO3- concentration (345 μmoles l-1) while C-horizon soil water had the highest mean Alm concentrations (51 μmoles l-1). But during storms in the first year after the clear-cut O-horizon soil water NO3- and Alm concentrations often peaked at more than twice those measured in the B-horizon. During the second year after the clear-cut, B-horizon storm NO3- concentrations were consistently greater than O-horizon concentrations. During the fourth and fifth years following the clear-cut, soil water NO3- concentrations had dropped below pre-cut concentrations however NO3- in groundwater seeps remained

  20. Light-emitting diodes based on solution-processed nontoxic quantum dots: oxides as carrier-transport layers and introducing molybdenum oxide nanoparticles as a hole-inject layer.

    PubMed

    Bhaumik, Saikat; Pal, Amlan J

    2014-07-23

    We report fabrication and characterization of solution-processed quantum dot light-emitting diodes (QDLEDs) based on a layer of nontoxic and Earth-abundant zinc-diffused silver indium disulfide (AIZS) nanoparticles as an emitting material. In the QDLEDs fabricated on indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrates, we use layers of oxides, such as graphene oxide (GO) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles as a hole- and electron-transport layer, respectively. In addition, we introduce a layer of MoO3 nanoparticles as a hole-inject one. We report a comparison of the characteristics of different device architectures. We show that an inverted device architecture, ITO/ZnO/AIZS/GO/MoO3/Al, yields a higher electroluminescence (EL) emission, compared to direct ones, for three reasons: (1) the GO/MoO3 layers introduce barriers for electrons to reach the Al electrode, and, similarly, the ZnO layers acts as a barrier for holes to travel to the ITO electrode; (2) the introduction of a layer of MoO3 nanoparticles as a hole-inject layer reduces the barrier height for holes and thereby balances charge injection in the inverted structure; and (3) the wide-bandgap zinc oxide next to the ITO electrode does not absorb the EL emission during its exit from the device. In the QDLEDs with oxides as carrier inject and transport layers, the EL spectrum resembles the photoluminescence emission of the emitting material (AIZS), implying that excitons are formed in the quaternary nanocrystals and decay radiatively. PMID:24983915

  1. Spin dependent transport properties of Mn-Ga/MgO/Mn-Ga magnetic tunnel junctions with metal(Mg, Co, Cr) insertion layer

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, S. H.; Tao, L. L.; Liu, D. P. Han, X. F.; Lu, Y.

    2014-04-07

    We report a first principles theoretical investigation of spin polarized quantum transport in Mn{sub 2}Ga/MgO/Mn{sub 2}Ga and Mn{sub 3}Ga/MgO/Mn{sub 3}Ga magnetic tunneling junctions (MTJs) with the consideration of metal(Mg, Co, Cr) insertion layer effect. By changing the concentration of Mn, our calculation shows a considerable disparity in transport properties: A tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio of 852% was obtained for Mn{sub 2}Ga-based MTJs, however, only a 5% TMR ratio for Mn{sub 3}Ga-based MTJs. In addition, the influence of insertion layer has been considered in our calculation. We found the Co insertion layer can increase the TMR of Mn{sub 2}Ga-based MTJ to 904%; however, the Cr insertion layer can decrease the TMR by 668%; A negative TMR ratio can be obtained with Mg insertion layer. Our work gives a comprehensive understanding of the influence of different insertion layer in Mn-Ga based MTJs. It is proved that, due to the transmission can be modulated by the interfacial electronic structure of insertion, the magnetoresistance ratio of Mn{sub 2}Ga/MgO/Mn{sub 2}Ga MTJ can be improved by inserting Co layer.

  2. 49 CFR 28.140 - Employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Employment Opportunity Commission in 29 CFR part 1613, shall apply to employment in federally conducted... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Employment. 28.140 Section 28.140 Transportation... PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION § 28.140 Employment. (a) No...

  3. 49 CFR 28.140 - Employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Employment Opportunity Commission in 29 CFR part 1613, shall apply to employment in federally conducted... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Employment. 28.140 Section 28.140 Transportation... PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION § 28.140 Employment. (a) No...

  4. 49 CFR 28.140 - Employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Employment Opportunity Commission in 29 CFR part 1613, shall apply to employment in federally conducted... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Employment. 28.140 Section 28.140 Transportation... PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION § 28.140 Employment. (a) No...

  5. 49 CFR 28.140 - Employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Employment Opportunity Commission in 29 CFR part 1613, shall apply to employment in federally conducted... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Employment. 28.140 Section 28.140 Transportation... PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION § 28.140 Employment. (a) No...

  6. The Impact of Grain Alignment of the Electron Transporting Layer on the Performance of Inverted Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Murali, Banavoth; Labban, Abdulrahman El; Eid, Jessica; Alarousu, Erkki; Shi, Dong; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Xixiang; Bakr, Osman M; Mohammed, Omar F

    2015-10-21

    This report presents a new strategy for improving solar cell power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) through grain alignment and morphology control of the ZnO electron transport layer (ETL) prepared by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. The systematic control over the ETL's grain alignment and thickness is shown, by varying the deposition pressure and operating substrate temperature during the deposition. Notably, a high PCE of 6.9%, short circuit current density (J(sc)) of 12.8 mA cm(-2), open circuit voltage (V(oc)) of 910 mV, and fill factor of 59% are demonstrated using the poly(benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-thieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione):[6,6]-phenyl-C(71) -butyric acid methyl ester polymer blend with ETLs prepared at room temperature exhibiting oriented and aligned rod-like ZnO grains. Increasing the deposition temperature during the ZnO sputtering induces morphological cleavage of the rod-like ZnO grains and therefore reduced conductivity from 7.2 × 10(-13) to ≈1.7 × 10(-14) S m(-1) and PCE from 6.9% to 4.28%. An investigation of the charge carrier dynamics by femtosecond (fs) transient absorption spectroscopy with broadband capability reveals clear evidence of faster carrier recombination for a ZnO layer deposited at higher temperature, which is consistent with the conductivity and device performance. PMID:26270242

  7. A solution-doped small molecule hole transport layer for efficient ITO-free organic solar cells (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, Ludwig; Selzer, Franz; Leo, Karl; Mueller-Meskamp, Lars

    2015-10-01

    Indium-tin-oxide-free (ITO-free) organic solar cells are an important, emerging research field because ITO transparent electrodes are a bottleneck for cheap large area devices on flexible substrates. Among highly conductive PEDOT:PSS and metal grids, percolation networks made of silver nanowires (AgNW) with a diameter in the nanoscale show a huge potential due to easy processing (e.g. spray coating), high aspect ratios and excellent electrical and optical properties like 15 Ohm/sq with a transmission of 83.5 % including the substrate. However, the inherent surface roughness of the AgNW film impedes the implementation as bottom electrode in organic devices, especially fully vacuum deposited ones, where often shunts are obtained. Here, we report about the solution processing of a small molecule hole transport layer (s-HTL) comprising N,N'-((Diphenyl-N,N'-bis)9,9,-dimethyl-fluoren-2-yl)-benzidine (BF-DPB, host material) and the proprietary NDP9 (p-dopant) deposited from tetrahydrofuran (THF) as non-halogenated, "green" solvent. We show, that the doping process already takes place in solution and that conductivities, achieved with this process at high doping efficiencies (4 * 10^-4 S/cm at 10 wt% doping concentration), are comparable to thermal co-evaporation of BF-DPB:NDP9 under high vacuum, which is the proven deposition method for doped small molecule films. Applying this s-HTL to AgNW films leads to well smoothened electrodes, ready for application in organic devices. Vacuum-deposited organic p-i-n solar cells with DCV2-5T-Me(3:3):C60 as active layer show a power conversion efficiency of 4.4% and 3.7% on AgNW electrode with 35nm and 90 nm wire diameter, compared to 4.1% on ITO with the s-HTL.

  8. Wave bottom boundary layer processes below irregular surfzone breaking waves with light-weight sheet flow particle transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassagneux, François Xavier; Hurther, David

    2014-03-01

    The present work investigates the structure of the near-bed flow below irregular surfzone breaking waves inducing light-weight sheet flow particle transport. The experiments are carried out in the LEGI flume under steady equilibrium conditions between the wave forcing and the underlying bed morphology. Synchronized ACVP and video images provide detailed information about the mean wave and current characteristics and the coupled flow regimes across the entire wave breaking region including the outer and the inner surfzones. An analysis of the impact of breaking eddies in the Wave Boundary Layer (WBL) is undertaken at the beginning of the inner surfzone. Subsequently, the intrawave variation of several contributions of the total shearing force per unit area and the net values of the Reynolds stress related to phase-averaged velocities are analyzed. It is found that -ρu˜w˜ is the dominant term. The turbulent Reynolds stress, the low frequency, and the mean terms are at least 1 order of magnitude lower. Due to the irregular wave forcing, the net values are separated into the net wave-by-wave Reynolds stress and the wave Reynolds stress averaged over the entire irregular wave sequence. All these measured bed shear stress terms are then compared to estimations obtained with two different parameterized models in order to evaluate their prediction performances. The values of the model parameters are discussed in comparison to those found in the literature. Finally, the vertical profile of net Reynolds shear stress exhibits a nearly constant value across the sheet-flow layer.

  9. STC-SAB program users manual for the turbulent boundary layer and turbulent separation prediction methods employed in the NASA Langley streamtube curvature computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    The streamtube curvature program (STC) has been developed to predict the inviscid flow field and the pressure distribution about nacelles at transonic speeds. The effects of boundary layer are to displace the inviscid flow and effectively change the body shape. Thus, the body shape must be corrected by the displacement thickness in order to calculate the correct pressure distribution. This report describes the coupling of the Stratford and Beavers boundary layer solution with the inviscid STC analysis so that all nacelle pressure forces, friction drag, and incipient separation may be predicted. The usage of the coupled STC-SAB computer program is outlined and the program input and output are defined. Included in this manual are descriptions of the principal boundary layer tables and other revisions to the STC program. The use of the viscous option is controlled by the engineer during program input definition.

  10. Edge transport studies in the edge and scrape-off layer of the National Spherical Torus Experiment with Langmuir probes

    SciTech Connect

    Boedo, J. A. Rudakov, D. L.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Zweben, S.; Maingi, R.; Maqueda, R. J.; Bell, R.; Kugel, H.; Leblanc, B.; Roquemore, L. A.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Ahn, J. W.; Canik, J.; Crocker, N.

    2014-04-15

    Transport and turbulence profiles were directly evaluated using probes for the first time in the edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) of NSTX [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] in low (L) and high (H) confinement, low power (P{sub in}∼ 1.3 MW), beam-heated, lower single-null discharges. Radial turbulent particle fluxes peak near the last closed flux surface (LCFS) at ≈4×10{sup 21} s{sup −1} in L-mode and are suppressed to ≈0.2×10{sup 21} s{sup −1} in H mode (80%–90% lower) mostly due to a reduction in density fluctuation amplitude and of the phase between density and radial velocity fluctuations. The radial particle fluxes are consistent with particle inventory based on SOLPS fluid modeling. A strong intermittent component is identified. Hot, dense plasma filaments 4–10 cm in diameter, appear first ∼2 cm inside the LCFS at a rate of ∼1×10{sup 21} s{sup −1} and leave that region with radial speeds of ∼3–5 km/s, decaying as they travel through the SOL, while voids travel inward toward the core. Profiles of normalized fluctuations feature levels of 10% inside LCFS to ∼150% at the LCFS and SOL. Once properly normalized, the intermittency in NSTX falls in similar electrostatic instability regimes as seen in other devices. The L-H transition causes a drop in the intermittent filaments velocity, amplitude and number in the SOL, resulting in reduced outward transport away from the edge and a less dense SOL.

  11. Black carbon aerosols in a tropical semi-urban coastal environment: Effects of boundary layer dynamics and long range transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aruna, K.; Kumar, T. V. Lakshmi; Rao, D. Narayana; Murthy, B. V. Krishna; Babu, S. Suresh; Moorthy, K. Krishna

    2013-11-01

    Regular measurements of Black Carbon (BC) aerosol mass concentration have been carried out since March 2011 at a tropical location (12.81°N, 80.03°E) adjoining the mega city, Chennai, on the east coast of India for the first time. As this region is influenced by both the South West and North East monsoons, the BC observations at this site assume importance in understanding the overall BC distribution over India. The data collected until August 2012 has been examined for the general and regionally distinctive features. Spectral absorption characteristics reveal that the BC is mainly from fossil fuel based emissions. The BC concentration shows significant diurnal variation only in the North East monsoon and winter seasons with night time concentration considerably higher than the day time concentration. In the other seasons the day-night contrast in BC is not significant. Seasonal variation is rather subdued with a broad maximum during the Northeast monsoon and winter months and a minimum during the southwest monsoon months. The observed diurnal and seasonal variations are examined in the light of local Atmospheric Boundary Layer dynamics and long range transport. For the first time, an inverse relationship has been established between BC and ABL height on a quantitative basis. A distinctive feature of the region is that in all the seasons transport pathways have long continental overpasses which could lead to the suppressed seasonal variation. It is found that the BC over this region shows distinct diurnal and seasonal features compared to those reported for other coastal and inland regions in India.

  12. The Origin of the Terra Meridiani Sediments: Volatile Transport and the Formation of Sulfate Bearing Layered Deposits on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, P.B.

    2008-01-01

    formation process which must have acted over a large area of Mars. The results of this study suggest a mechanism for volatile transport on Mars without invoking an early greenhouse. They also imply a common formation mechanism for most of the sulfate minerals and layered deposits on Mars, which explains their common occurrence.

  13. 3D effects of edge magnetic field configuration on divertor/scrape-off layer transport and optimization possibilities for a future reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Xu, Y.; Ida, K.; Corre, Y.; Feng, Y.; Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Tabares, F. L.; Evans, T. E.; Coenen, J. W.; Liang, Y.; Bader, A.; Itoh, K.; Yamada, H.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Ciraolo, G.; Tafalla, D.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Guo, H. Y.; Cui, Z. Y.; Reiter, D.; Asakura, N.; Wenzel, U.; Morita, S.; Ohno, N.; Peterson, B. J.; Masuzaki, S.

    2015-10-01

    This paper assesses the three-dimensional (3D) effects of the edge magnetic field structure on divertor/scrape-off layer transport, based on an inter-machine comparison of experimental data and on the recent progress of 3D edge transport simulation. The 3D effects are elucidated as a consequence of competition between transports parallel (\\parallel ) and perpendicular (\\bot ) to the magnetic field, in open field lines cut by divertor plates, or in magnetic islands. The competition has strong impacts on divertor functions, such as determination of the divertor density regime, impurity screening and detachment control. The effects of magnetic perturbation on the edge electric field and turbulent transport are also discussed. Parameterization to measure the 3D effects on the edge transport is attempted for the individual divertor functions. Based on the suggested key parameters, an operation domain of the 3D divertor configuration is discussed for future devices.

  14. Study of ethanolamine surface treatment on the metal-oxide electron transport layer in inverted InP quantum dot light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Ilwan; Kim, Jiwan; Park, Chang Jun; Ippen, Christian; Greco, Tonino; Oh, Min Suk; Lee, Jeongno; Kim, Won Keun; Wedel, Armin; Han, Chul Jong; Park, Sung Kyu

    2015-11-01

    The present work shows the effect of ethanolamine surface treatment on inverted InP quantum dot light-emitting diodes (QD-LEDs) with inorganic metal oxide layers. In the inverted structure of ITO/ZnO/InP QDs/CBP/MoO3/Al, a sol-gel derived ZnO film was used as an electron transport layer (ETL) and MoO3 was used as a hole injection layer (HIL). First, ethanolamine was treated as a surface modifier on top of the ZnO electron transport layer. The optical performance of the QD-LED device was improved by the ethanolamine surface treatment. Second, low temperature annealing (<200°C) was performed on the ZnO sol-gel electron transport layer, followed by an investigation of the effect of the ZnO annealing temperature. The efficiency of the inverted QD-LEDs was significantly enhanced (more than 3-fold) by optimization of the ZnO annealing temperature. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Toward Revealing the Critical Role of Perovskite Coverage in Highly Efficient Electron-Transport Layer-Free Perovskite Solar Cells: An Energy Band and Equivalent Circuit Model Perspective.

    PubMed

    Huang, Like; Xu, Jie; Sun, Xiaoxiang; Du, Yangyang; Cai, Hongkun; Ni, Jian; Li, Juan; Hu, Ziyang; Zhang, Jianjun

    2016-04-20

    Currently, most efficient perovskite solar cells (PVKSCs) with a p-i-n structure require simultaneously electron transport layers (ETLs) and hole transport layers (HTLs) to help collecting photogenerated electrons and holes for obtaining high performance. ETL free planar PVKSC is a relatively new and simple structured solar cell that gets rid of the complex and high temperature required ETL (such as compact and mesoporous TiO2). Here, we demonstrate the critical role of high coverage of perovskite in efficient ETL free PVKSCs from an energy band and equivalent circuit model perspective. From an electrical point of view, we confirmed that the low coverage of perovskite does cause localized short circuit of the device. With coverage optimization, a planar p-i-n(++) device with a power conversion efficiency of over 11% was achieved, implying that the ETL layer may not be necessary for an efficient device as long as the perovskite coverage is approaching 100%. PMID:27020395

  16. Effect of fluorine plasma treatment with chemically reduced graphene oxide thin films as hole transport layer in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Youn-Yeol; Kang, Byung Hyun; Lee, Yang Doo; Lee, Sang Bin; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2013-12-01

    The inorganic materials such as V2O5, MoO3 and WO3 were investigated to replace PEDOT:PSS as hole transport layer (HTL) in organic electronic devices such as organic solar cells (OSCs) and organic lighting emission diodes. However, these methods require vacuum techniques that are long time process and complex. Here, we report about plasma treatment with SF6 and CF4 using reactive ion etching on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) thin films that are obtained using an eco-friendly method with vitamin C. The plasma treated rGO thin films have dipoles since they consist of covalent bonds with fluorine on the surface of rGO. This means it is possible to increase the electrostatic potential energy than bare rGO. Increased potential energy on the surface of rGO films is worth applying organic electronic devices as HTL such as OSCs. Consequently, the power conversion efficiency of OSCs increased more than the rGO films without plasma treatment.

  17. Thermoelectric transport and Hall measurements of low defect Sb2Te3 thin films grown by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zastrow, S.; Gooth, J.; Boehnert, T.; Heiderich, S.; Toellner, W.; Heimann, S.; Schulz, S.; Nielsch, K.

    2013-03-01

    Sb2Te3 has recently been an object of intensive research since its promising applicability in thermoelectric, in phase-change memory devices and as a topological insulator. In this work, we report highly textured Sb2Te3 thin films, grown by atomic layer deposition on Si/SiO2 wafers based on the reaction of SbCl3 and (Et3Si)2Te. The low deposition temperature at 80 °C allows the pre-patterning of the Sb2Te3 by standard lithography processes. A platform to characterize the Seebeck coefficient S, the electrical conductivity σ as well as the Hall coefficient RH on the same film has been developed. Comparing all temperature-dependent transport properties, three different conductive regions in the temperature range of 50-400 K are found. Room temperature values of S = 146 × 10-6 VK-1, σ = 104 Sm-1 and mobility µ = 270.5 × 10-4 m2 V-1 s-1 are determined. The low carrier concentration in the range of n = 2.4 × 1018 cm-3 at 300 K quantifies the low defect content of the Sb2Te3 thin films.

  18. Energy level alignment of electrically doped hole transport layers with transparent and conductive indium tin oxide and polymer anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehse, Karsten; Olthof, Selina; Walzer, Karsten; Leo, Karl; Johnson, Robert L.; Glowatzki, Hendrik; Bröker, Benjamin; Koch, Norbert

    2007-10-01

    Using ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, we investigated the energy level alignment at the interfaces of typical anodes used in organic electronics, indium tin oxide (ITO) and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), with the oligomeric hole transport material N ,N,N',N'-tetrakis(4-methoxyphenyl)-benzidine (MeO-TPD), and studied the influence of electrical interface doping by the strong electron acceptor tetrafluoro tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4-TCNQ). The fundamentally different anode materials with work functions of 4.40eV (ITO) and 4.85eV (PEDOT:PSS) show different hole injection barriers, which also depend on the thickness of the F4-TCNQ interface dopant layer. PEDOT:PSS anodes exhibit a consistently lower hole injection barrier to MeO-TPD compared to ITO by 0.1eV. We attribute this low hole injection barrier to additional charge transfer reactions at the PEDOT:PSS/MeO-TPD interface. In contrast, the deposition of the electron acceptor at the interface helps significantly to lower the hole injection barrier for ITO anodes.

  19. Graphene as transparent conducting electrodes in organic photovoltaics: studies in graphene morphology, hole transporting layers, and counter electrodes.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyesung; Brown, Patrick R; Bulović, Vladimir; Kong, Jing

    2012-01-11

    In this work, organic photovoltaics (OPV) with graphene electrodes are constructed where the effect of graphene morphology, hole transporting layers (HTL), and counter electrodes are presented. Instead of the conventional poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) PEDOT:PSS HTL, an alternative transition metal oxide HTL (molybdenum oxide (MoO(3))) is investigated to address the issue of surface immiscibility between graphene and PEDOT:PSS. Graphene films considered here are synthesized via low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) using a copper catalyst and experimental issues concerning the transfer of synthesized graphene onto the substrates of OPV are discussed. The morphology of the graphene electrode and HTL wettability on the graphene surface are shown to play important roles in the successful integration of graphene films into the OPV devices. The effect of various cathodes on the device performance is also studied. These factors (i.e., suitable HTL, graphene surface morphology and residues, and the choice of well-matching counter electrodes) will provide better understanding in utilizing graphene films as transparent conducting electrodes in future solar cell applications. PMID:22107487

  20. Employment Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This document reviews the progress of the Employment Training (ET) initiative for employed adults in Great Britain. The document begins by explaining the changing context in which the project is operating, which includes a downgrading of the alternatives to ET, increased participation in ET, and increased employer involvement in ET. The response…

  1. Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with transportation and energy use. Its objective is for the student to be able to discuss the implication of energy usage as it applies to the area of transportation. Some topics covered are efficiencies of various transportation…

  2. Co-functionalized organic/inorganic hybrid ZnO nanorods as electron transporting layers for inverted organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambade, Swapnil B.; Ambade, Rohan B.; Eom, Seung Hun; Baek, Myung-Jin; Bagde, Sushil S.; Mane, Rajaram S.; Lee, Soo-Hyoung

    2016-02-01

    In an unprecedented attempt, we present an interesting approach of coupling solution processed ZnO planar nanorods (NRs) by an organic small molecule (SM) with a strong electron withdrawing cyano moiety and the carboxylic group as binding sites by a facile co-functionalization approach. Direct functionalization by SMs (SM-ZnO NRs) leads to higher aggregation owing to the weaker solubility of SMs in solutions of ZnO NRs dispersed in chlorobenzene (CB). A prior addition of organic 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)acetic acid (MEA) over ZnO NRs not only inhibits aggregation of SMs over ZnO NRs, but also provides enough sites for the SM to strongly couple with the ZnO NRs to yield transparent SM-MEA-ZnO NRs hybrids that exhibited excellent capability as electron transporting layers (ETLs) in inverted organic solar cells (iOSCs) of P3HT:PC60BM bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) photoactive layers. A strongly coupled SM-MEA-ZnO NR hybrid reduces the series resistance by enhancing the interfacial area and tunes the energy level alignment at the interface between the (indium-doped tin oxide, ITO) cathode and BHJ photoactive layers. A significant enhancement in power conversion efficiency (PCE) was achieved for iOSCs comprising ETLs of SM-MEA-ZnO NRs (3.64%) advancing from 0.9% for pristine ZnO NRs, while the iOSCs of aggregated SM-ZnO NRs ETL exhibited a much lower PCE of 2.6%, thus demonstrating the potential of the co-functionalization approach. The superiority of the co-functionalized SM-MEA-ZnO NRs ETL is also evident from the highest PCE of 7.38% obtained for the iOSCs comprising BHJ of PTB7-Th:PC60BM compared with extremely poor 0.05% for non-functionalized ZnO NRs.In an unprecedented attempt, we present an interesting approach of coupling solution processed ZnO planar nanorods (NRs) by an organic small molecule (SM) with a strong electron withdrawing cyano moiety and the carboxylic group as binding sites by a facile co-functionalization approach. Direct functionalization by SMs (SM

  3. EMC3-EIRENE modelling of edge impurity transport in the stochastic layer of the large helical device compared with extreme ultraviolet emission measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shuyu; Kobayashi, M.; Kawamura, G.; Morita, S.; Zhang, H. M.; Oishi, T.; Feng, Y.; Wang, D. Z.; Suzuki, Y.; the LHD Experimental Group

    2016-06-01

    The transport properties and line emissions of carbon impurity in the stochastic layer of the Large Helical Device have been investigated with the 3D edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE. A parameter study has been performed to examine the sensitivity of the simulation results on each transport term in the impurity transport model and the impurity source characteristics, i.e. the source amount and the location. The modelling has revealed that in order to reproduce the experimental results of the emission distribution, the impurity perpendicular transport coefficient (D imp) and the first wall source play important roles, while changes to the ion thermal and the friction forces are rather irrelevant. The detailed study of flux tube tracing and magnetic field structure in the edge stochastic layer, in relation to impurity transport, has shown that the deeper penetration of impurity into the higher plasma density region due to the enhanced D imp and the first wall source is responsible for the change of emission pattern as well as the intensity. The analysis indicates that D imp might be larger than that of background plasma by a few factors and also that there probably exists a substantial amount of first wall impurity source.

  4. Coupled Vadose Zone and Atmospheric Surface-Layer Transport of CO2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Unger, Andre J.A.

    2004-03-29

    Geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration is being considered as a way to offset fossil-fuel-related CO{sub 2} emissions to reduce the rate of increase of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. The accumulation of vast quantities of injected carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in geologic sequestration sites may entail health and environmental risks from potential leakage and seepage of CO{sub 2} into the near-surface environment. We are developing and applying a coupled subsurface and atmospheric surface-layer modeling capability built within the framework of the integral finite difference reservoir simulator TOUGH2. The overall purpose of modeling studies is to predict CO{sub 2} concentration distributions under a variety of seepage scenarios and geologic, hydrologic, and atmospheric conditions. These concentration distributions will provide the basis for determining above-ground and near-surface instrumentation needs for carbon sequestration monitoring and verification, as well as for assessing health, safety, and environmental risks. A key feature of CO{sub 2} is its large density ({rho} = 1.8 kg m{sup -3}) relative to air ({rho} = 1.2 kg m{sup -3}), a property that may allow small leaks to cause concentrations in air above the occupational exposure limit of 4 percent in low-lying and enclosed areas such as valleys and basements where dilution rates are low. The approach we take to coupled modeling involves development of T2CA, a TOUGH2 module for modeling the multicomponent transport of water, brine, CO{sub 2}, gas tracer, and air in the subsurface. For the atmospheric surface-layer advection and dispersion, we use a logarithmic vertical velocity profile to specify constant time-averaged ambient winds, and atmospheric dispersion approaches to model mixing due to eddies and turbulence. Initial simulations with the coupled model suggest that atmospheric dispersion quickly dilutes diffuse CO{sub 2} seepage fluxes to negligible concentrations, and that rainfall

  5. Low Work-function Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxylenethiophene): Poly(styrene sulfonate) as Electron-transport Layer for High-efficient and Stable Polymer Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Chen, Lie; Hu, Xiaotian; Zhang, Lin; Chen, Yiwang

    2015-08-01

    Low-work-function poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) modified with polyethylenimine (PEIE) was used as an electron transport layer (ETL) for polymer solar cells (PSCs). A thin layer of PEIE film was spin-coated onto the surface on the PEDOT:PSS films, thus substantially changing their charge selectivity from supporting hole transport to supporting electron transport. It was also found that the PEDOT:PSS/PEIE ETL exhibited higher interfacial contact, a more favorable active morphology, and improved charge mobility. By virtue of these beneficial properties, inverted PSCs based on low-bandgap semiconducting photoactive layers achieved a notably improved power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.94%, superior even to the corresponding performance of devices with only a ZnO layer. Surpassing our expectations, compared with the extreme degradation of device stability observed when pure PEDOT:PSS is used, PEIE-modified PEDOT:PSS can considerably suppress device degradation because of the hydrophobic and alkaline nature of PEIE, which not only reduces the hygroscopicity of the PEDOT:PSS but also neutralizes the acidic PEDOT:PSS and thus prevents the corrosion of the ITO cathode. These results demonstrate the potential of PEIE-modified PEDOT:PSS for use as an efficient ETL in commercial printed electronic devices.

  6. A NEW MODEL FOR MIXING BY DOUBLE-DIFFUSIVE CONVECTION (SEMI-CONVECTION). II. THE TRANSPORT OF HEAT AND COMPOSITION THROUGH LAYERS

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, T. S.; Garaud, P.; Stellmach, S.

    2013-05-10

    Regions of stellar and planetary interiors that are unstable according to the Schwarzschild criterion, but stable according to the Ledoux criterion, are subject to a form of oscillatory double-diffusive (ODD) convection often called ''semi-convection''. In this series of papers, we use an extensive suite of three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations to quantify the transport of heat and composition by ODD convection, and ultimately propose a new 1D prescription that can be used in stellar and planetary structure and evolution models. The first paper in this series demonstrated that under certain conditions ODD convection spontaneously transitions from an initial homogeneous state of weak wave-breaking turbulence into a staircase of fully convective layers, which results in a substantial increase in the transport of heat and composition. Here, we present simulations of ODD convection in this layered regime, we describe the dynamical behavior of the layers, and we derive empirical scaling laws for the transport through layered convection.

  7. Low Work-function Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxylenethiophene): Poly(styrene sulfonate) as Electron-transport Layer for High-efficient and Stable Polymer Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Chen, Lie; Hu, Xiaotian; Zhang, Lin; Chen, Yiwang

    2015-01-01

    Low-work-function poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) modified with polyethylenimine (PEIE) was used as an electron transport layer (ETL) for polymer solar cells (PSCs). A thin layer of PEIE film was spin-coated onto the surface on the PEDOT:PSS films, thus substantially changing their charge selectivity from supporting hole transport to supporting electron transport. It was also found that the PEDOT:PSS/PEIE ETL exhibited higher interfacial contact, a more favorable active morphology, and improved charge mobility. By virtue of these beneficial properties, inverted PSCs based on low-bandgap semiconducting photoactive layers achieved a notably improved power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.94%, superior even to the corresponding performance of devices with only a ZnO layer. Surpassing our expectations, compared with the extreme degradation of device stability observed when pure PEDOT:PSS is used, PEIE-modified PEDOT:PSS can considerably suppress device degradation because of the hydrophobic and alkaline nature of PEIE, which not only reduces the hygroscopicity of the PEDOT:PSS but also neutralizes the acidic PEDOT:PSS and thus prevents the corrosion of the ITO cathode. These results demonstrate the potential of PEIE-modified PEDOT:PSS for use as an efficient ETL in commercial printed electronic devices. PMID:26239868

  8. Highly Efficient and Low Turn-On Voltage Quantum Dot Light-Emitting Diodes by Using a Stepwise Hole-Transport Layer.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wenyu; Lv, Ying; Jing, Pengtao; Zhang, Han; Wang, Jia; Zhang, Hanzhuang; Zhao, Jialong

    2015-07-29

    Highly efficient red quantum dot light-emitting diodes (QD-LEDs) with a very high current efficiency of 16 cd/A were demonstrated by adopting stepwise hole-transport layers (HTLs) consisting of 4,4'-N,N'-dicarbazole-biphenyl (CBP) combined with N,N'-dicarbazolyl-3,5-benzene (mCP). The mCP layer plays two important roles in this kind of QD-LEDs. One is that it can block the electron to leak into the HTL due to its higher LUMO (LUMO = the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital) energy level than that of CBP; and the other is it can separate the carrier accumulation zone from the exciton formation interface, which is attributed to the stepwise hole-transport layer structure. Moreover, the lower HOMO (HOMO = the highest occupied molecular orbital) energy level of mCP decreases the hole-injection barrier from the HTL to the QD emitting layer, which improves the charge carrier balance injected into the QD layer, reducing the turn-on voltage of QD-LEDs fabricated with the stepwise HTL structure. PMID:26137935

  9. p-i-n/n-i-p type planar hybrid structure of highly efficient perovskite solar cells towards improved air stability: synthetic strategies and the role of p-type hole transport layer (HTL) and n-type electron transport layer (ETL) metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Mali, Sawanta S; Hong, Chang Kook

    2016-05-19

    There has been fast recent progress in perovskite solar cells (PSCs) towards low cost photovoltaic technology. Organometal mixed halide (MAPbX or FAPbX) perovskites are the most promising light absorbing material sandwiched between the electron transport layer (ETL) and hole transport layer (HTL). These two layers play a critical role in boosting the power conversion efficiency (PCE) and maintaining air stability. However, the device stability is a serious issue in regular as well as p-i-n inverted type perovskite solar cells. This mini-review briefly outlines the state-of-art of p-i-n/n-i-p type planar hybrid perovskite solar cells using MAPbX/FAPbX perovskite absorbing layers. Later, we will focus on recent trends, progress and further opportunities in exploring the air stable hybrid planar structure PSCs. PMID:27161123

  10. p-i-n/n-i-p type planar hybrid structure of highly efficient perovskite solar cells towards improved air stability: synthetic strategies and the role of p-type hole transport layer (HTL) and n-type electron transport layer (ETL) metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mali, Sawanta S.; Hong, Chang Kook

    2016-05-01

    There has been fast recent progress in perovskite solar cells (PSCs) towards low cost photovoltaic technology. Organometal mixed halide (MAPbX or FAPbX) perovskites are the most promising light absorbing material sandwiched between the electron transport layer (ETL) and hole transport layer (HTL). These two layers play a critical role in boosting the power conversion efficiency (PCE) and maintaining air stability. However, the device stability is a serious issue in regular as well as p-i-n inverted type perovskite solar cells. This mini-review briefly outlines the state-of-art of p-i-n/n-i-p type planar hybrid perovskite solar cells using MAPbX/FAPbX perovskite absorbing layers. Later, we will focus on recent trends, progress and further opportunities in exploring the air stable hybrid planar structure PSCs.

  11. Efficient Organic Light-Emitting Diode through Triplet Exciton Reharvesting by Employing Blended Electron Donor and Acceptor as the Emissive Layer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Cai, Chao; Li, King Fai; Tam, Hoi Lam; Chan, Kin Long; Cheah, Kok Wai

    2015-11-18

    A blended bimolecular exciplex formation was demonstrated between two individual donor and acceptor molecules, which are tris(4-carbazoyl-9-ylphenyl)amine (TCTA) and 2,4,6-tris(3'-(pyridin-3-yl)biphenyl-3-yl)-1,3,5-triazine (Tm3PyBPZ). The photoluminescence spectrum of the exciplex in the solid state showed an emission with a peak around 514 nm (∼2.49 eV). By applying this exciplex as an emitting layer, a highly efficient all-fluorescent organic lighting emitting diode with maximum efficiencies of 13.1% and 53.4 lm/W can be realized under an extremely low turn-on voltage of only 2.4 V. The thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) process is believed to be responsible for the excellent device performance. PMID:26529382

  12. Industry Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This article illustrates projected employment change from an industry perspective over the 2008-2018 decade. Workers are grouped into an industry according to the type of good produced or service provided by the establishment in which they work. Industry employment projections are shown in terms of numeric change (growth or decline in the total…

  13. Engaging Employers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillier, Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    A key factor in the successful development of workplace learning is employer engagement (Leitch, 2006; DfES, 2007). However, despite numerous approaches by government in the United Kingdom to bring together employers, providers and learners so that economic success is generated by a skilled and flexible workforce, there continue to be challenges…

  14. Industry Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article illustrates projected employment change by industry and industry sector over 2010-20 decade. Workers are grouped into an industry according to the type of good produced or service provided by the establishment for which they work. Industry employment projections are shown in terms of numeric change (growth or decline in the total…

  15. Maternal Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Sam

    1975-01-01

    The overwhelming evidence from years of research is that maternal employment, by itself, has little influence on the behaviors of children. More relevant issues are: mother's reasons for working, family's acceptance of mother's employment, quality of substitute child care, family's social and emotional health, and economic conditions. (Author/AJ)

  16. Operator-splitting errors in coupled reactive transport codes for flow and transport under atmospheric boundary conditions or layered soil profiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One possible way of integrating subsurface flow and transport processes with (bio)geochemical reactions is to couple by means of an operator-splitting approach two completely separate codes, one for variably-saturated flow and solute transport and one for equilibrium and kinetic biogeochemical react...

  17. 49 CFR 807.140 - Employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....C. 791), as established by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in 29 CFR part 1613, shall... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Employment. 807.140 Section 807.140 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD § 807.140 Employment. No qualified handicapped person shall, on the basis of...

  18. 49 CFR 807.140 - Employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....C. 791), as established by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in 29 CFR part 1613, shall... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Employment. 807.140 Section 807.140 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD § 807.140 Employment. No qualified handicapped person shall, on the basis of...

  19. 49 CFR 25.505 - Employment criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 25.505 Employment criteria. A recipient shall not... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Employment criteria. 25.505 Section 25.505 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN...

  20. 49 CFR 807.140 - Employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....C. 791), as established by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in 29 CFR part 1613, shall... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Employment. 807.140 Section 807.140 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD § 807.140 Employment. No qualified handicapped person shall, on the basis of...