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Sample records for empyema

  1. Cholelithoptysis and pleural empyema.

    PubMed

    Chopra, P; Killorn, P; Mehran, R J

    1999-07-01

    We report a case of delayed cholelithoptysis and pleural empyema caused by gallstone spillage at the time of laparoscopic cholecystecomy. An occult subphrenic abscess developed, and the patient became symptomatic only after trans-diaphragmatic penetration occurred. This resulted in expectoration of bile, gallstones, and pus. Spontaneous decompression of the empyema occurred because of a peritoneo-pleuro-bronchial fistula. This is the first case of such managed nonoperatively and provides support for the importance of intraoperative retrieval of spilled gallstones at the time of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:10421159

  2. Pediatric parafalcine empyemas

    PubMed Central

    Niklewski, Franziska; Petridis, Athanasios K.; Al Hourani, Jasmin; Blaeser, Klaus; Ntoulias, Georgios; Bitter, Andrej; Rosenbaum, Thorsten; Scholz, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Subdural intracranial empyemas and brain abscesses are a rare complication of bacterial sinusitis. Pediatric parafalcine abscesses are a rare entity with different treatment compared with other brain abscesses. We present two pediatric cases with falcine abscess as a sinusitis complication and introduce our department’s treatment management. In addition a review of literature is performed. Surgical cases of our department and their management are compared with the current literature. In our cases, both of the children showed a recurrent empyema after the first surgical treatment and antibiotic therapy. A second surgical evacuation was necessary. The antibiotic therapy was given for 3 months. Short-time follow-up imaging is necessary irrespective of infection parameters in blood and patient's clinical condition. Especially in parafalcine abscesses a second look may be an option and surgical treatment with evacuation of pus is the treatment of choice if abscess remnants are visualized. PMID:24964473

  3. Pediatric parafalcine empyemas.

    PubMed

    Niklewski, Franziska; Petridis, Athanasios K; Al Hourani, Jasmin; Blaeser, Klaus; Ntoulias, Georgios; Bitter, Andrej; Rosenbaum, Thorsten; Scholz, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Subdural intracranial empyemas and brain abscesses are a rare complication of bacterial sinusitis. Pediatric parafalcine abscesses are a rare entity with different treatment compared with other brain abscesses. We present two pediatric cases with falcine abscess as a sinusitis complication and introduce our department's treatment management. In addition a review of literature is performed. Surgical cases of our department and their management are compared with the current literature. In our cases, both of the children showed a recurrent empyema after the first surgical treatment and antibiotic therapy. A second surgical evacuation was necessary. The antibiotic therapy was given for 3 months. Short-time follow-up imaging is necessary irrespective of infection parameters in blood and patient's clinical condition. Especially in parafalcine abscesses a second look may be an option and surgical treatment with evacuation of pus is the treatment of choice if abscess remnants are visualized. PMID:24964473

  4. Management of empyema in children.

    PubMed

    Golladay, E S; Wagner, C W

    1989-12-01

    The antibiotic era has changed the incidence, causal factors, and gravity of empyema. Between 1977 and 1988, 27 children with empyema were surgically managed. Ten cases occurred after an operation (8 esophageal and 2 abdominal). There were 15 girls and 12 boys. The age range was newborn to 12 years. Symptoms included fever, cough, tube drainage postoperatively, anorexia, weight loss, chest pain, tachypnea, and lymphadenitis. Multiple aerobic and anaerobic organisms were cultured. Treatment included thoracentesis and antibiotics, tube thoracostomy, tube thoracostomy and bronchoscopy, decortication, or decortication with lobectomy. The total hospital stay averaged 28.3 days, and after decortication, 11.6 days. Empyemas in children frequently have multiple organisms and should be treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics while awaiting culture results. Thoracentesis and tube thoracostomy are often ineffective in curing the disease. Decortication can abbreviate hospital stay if performed promptly for persistent pleural sepsis. PMID:2589599

  5. Interhemispheric subdural empyema--case report.

    PubMed

    Stephanov, S; Sidani, A H; Amacker, J J

    2001-01-01

    We report a case of interhemispheric subdural empyema following a meningoencephalitis. Ten days after the beginning of his illness a CT scan showed a left interhemispheric subdural empyema with a low density collection, a faintly enhancing rim, multiple very small cortical abscesses and brain edema. The empyema was successfully treated by the direct introduction of a catheter into the left interhemispheric subdural space via a single posterior frontal parasagittal burr hole, irrigation with saline, aspiration of the empyema, and removal of the catheter at the end of operation. PMID:11678024

  6. [Open window thoracostomy and muscle flap transposition for thoracic empyema].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Y

    2010-07-01

    Open window thoracostomy for thoracic empyema: Open window thoracostomy is a simple, certain and final drainage procedure for thoracic empyema. It is most useful to drain purulent effusion from empyema space, especially for cases with broncho-pleural fistulas, and to clean up purulent necrotic debris on surface of empyema sac. For changing of packing gauzes in empyema space through a window once or twice every day after this procedure, thoracostomy will have to be made on the suitable position to empyema space. Usually skin incision will be layed along the costal bone just at the most expanded position of empyema. Following muscle splitting to thoracic wall, a costal bone just under the incision will be removed as 8-10 cm as long, and opened the empyema space through a costal bed. After the extension of empyema space will be preliminarily examined through a primary window by a finger or a long forceps, it will be decided costal bones must be removed how many (usually 2 or 3 totally) and how long (6-8 cm) to make a window up to 5 cm in diameter. Thickened empyema wall will be cut out just according to a window size, and finally skin edge and empyema wall will be sutured roughly along circular edge. Muscle flap transposition for empyema space: Pediclued muscle flap transposition is one of space-reducing operations for (chronic) empyema Usually this will be co-performed with other several procedures as curettages on empyema surface, closure of bronchopleural fistula and thoracoplasty. This is radically curable for primarily non fistulous empyema or secondarily empyema after open window thoracostomy done for fistula. Furthermore this is less invasive than other radical operations as like pleuro-pneumonectomy, decortication or air-plombage for empyema. There are 2 important points to do this technique. One is a volume of muscle flap and another is good blood flow in flap. The former suitable muscle volume is need to impact empyema space or to close fistula, and the

  7. Cancer Risk in Patients With Empyema

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Chung-Jen; Hu, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Liu, Chia-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to evaluate cancer risk and possible risk factors in patients diagnosed with empyema. A total of 31,636 patients with newly diagnosed empyema between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2010 were included in this study. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to compare the cancer incidence in these empyema patients to that in the general population. Adjusted hazard ratios were also calculated to investigate whether characteristics increased cancer risk. During the 12-year study period, 2,654 cancers occurred in 31,636 patients with empyema, yielding an SIR of 2.67 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.57–2.78). We excluded cancer that occurred within 1 year to avoid surveillance bias. The cancer risk remained significantly increased (SIR 1.50, 95% CI 1.41–1.58). Specifically, patients with empyema had higher SIR of cancers of the head and neck (1.50, 95% CI 1.41–1.58), esophagus (2.56, 95% CI 1.92–3.33), stomach (1.49, 95% CI 1.16–1.89), liver and biliary tract (2.18, 95% CI 1.93–2.45), and lung and mediastinum (1.62, 95% CI 1.39–1.86). Age ≥ 60, male sex, diabetes mellitus, and liver cirrhosis were independent risk factors for cancer development. Our study demonstrates an increased incidence of cancer development in patients with empyema, and patients’ age ≥ 60, men, and those with diabetes mellitus and liver cirrhosis showed a higher incidence of developing cancer compared to the general population. The association between such kind of infection and secondary malignancy may be elucidated by further study. PMID:26945399

  8. Rhodococcus empyema in a heart transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Richard; Nord, John; Lanspa, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a rare cause of pneumonia and empyema almost exclusively occurring in immunocompromised patients. Most people who become infected have direct exposure to livestock. We present a case where the exposure was presumed to be through a family member in close contact with horses. Our case describes an infection in a heart transplant patient that was initially identified as a probable intra-abdominal infection and later reidentified as Rhodococcus equi empyema, and was treated with surgery and prolonged antibiotics. PMID:25473561

  9. Management of chronic empyema with unexpandable lung in poor surgical risk patients using an empyema tube

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Abhishek; Jantz, Michael A; Penley, Andrea M; Mehta, Hiren J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: High preoperative risk precludes decortication and other surgical interventions in some patients with chronic empyema. We manage such patients by converting the chest tube into an “empyema tube,” cutting the tube near the skin and securing the end with a sterile clip to allow for open pleural drainage. The patient is followed serially, and the tube gradually withdrawn based on radiological resolution and amount of drainage. Methods: Between 2010 and 2014, patients with chronic empyema and unexpandable lung, deemed high-risk surgical candidates, had staged chest tube removal, and were included for the study. The volume of fluid drained, culture results, duration of drainage, functional status, and comorbidities were recorded. Measurements and Results: Eight patients qualified. All had resolution of infection. The tube was removed after an average of 73.6 ± 49.73 (95% confidence interval [CI]) days. The mean duration of antibiotic treatment was 5.37 ± 1.04 (95% CI) weeks. None required surgery or experienced complications from an empyema tube. Conclusion: A strategy of empyema tube drainage with staged removal is an option in appropriately selected patients with chronic empyema, unexpandable lung, and poor surgical candidacy. PMID:27185989

  10. Clostridium septicum Empyema in an Immunocompetent Woman

    PubMed Central

    Granok, Alexander B.; Mahon, Patrick A.; Biesek, Genesio W.

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of a Clostridium septicum empyema in an immunocompetent woman following operation for an incarcerated internal hernia. The patient was successfully treated with pleural decortication and an extended course of postoperative antibiotics. This is the first report of such an infection in the medical literature. PMID:20490275

  11. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia manifesting as subdural empyema.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Sandeep P; Taylor, Christopher; Robertson, Iain

    2016-06-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) also known as Osler-Weber-Rendu disease is a rare autosomal dominant condition causing vascular dysplasia. Cerebral abscess formation, secondary to paradoxical septic emboli via HHT-derived pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (pAVMs) in this context is well documented. Herein, we present the first case of subdural empyema with this aetiology. PMID:26982736

  12. An unusual presentation of subdural empyema caused by Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Ahmed; Khawchareonporn, Thana; Muengtaweepongsa, Sombat; Suebnukarn, Siriwan

    2013-01-01

    Subdural empyema is an uncommon clinical entity. The first case of Porphyromonas gingivalis subdural empyema is reported. We report a case of 34-year-old male who presented with subdural empyema and sinusitis. Through the utilization of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests on subdural pus, we were able to confirm the diagnosis and institute appropriate treatment. Early surgical intervention and intravenous antibiotics meant that the patient recovered fully. Infections caused by P. gingivalis should be considered in differential diagnoses of central nervous system (CNS) abscesses or subdural empyema especially in patients with precedent periodontal diseases and sinusitis. PMID:24339621

  13. Single-chain urokinase in empyema induced by Pasturella multocida.

    PubMed

    Idell, Steven; Jun Na, Moon; Liao, Huai; Gazar, A E; Drake, Wonder; Lane, Kirk B; Koenig, Kathy; Komissarov, Andrey; Tucker, Torry; Light, Richard W

    2009-10-01

    Intrapleural fibrin deposition and subsequent fibrosis characterize evolving empyema and contribute to the morbidity associated with this condition. Single-chain urokinase (scuPA) is proenzyme form of the urokinase plasminogen activator, which has recently been shown to effectively clear intrapleural loculation in tetracycline-induced pleurodesis in rabbits. The authors therefore hypothesized that scuPA could likewise improve intrapleural injury associated with empyema. The authors used a rabbit model of empyema induced by intrapleural administration of Pasturella multocida to test this hypothesis and determined the effects of intrapleural scuPA on pleural fluids indices of inflammation and intrapleural fibrosis. The authors found that intrapleural administration of scuPA was well tolerated, generated readily detectable fibrinolytic activity in the empyema fluids and did not induce intrapleural or systemic bleeding. Pleural fluid volume, intrapleural protein, and D-dimer concentrations were increased at 24 and 48 hours (P < .01, respectively) after induction of empyema. Intrapleural loculation did not occur in the scuPA- or vehicle control-treated animals and there was no significant change in the pleural empyema or thickening scores. These findings confirm that intrapleural scuPA generates fibrinolysis in empyema fluids but does not alter fibrotic repair at the pleural surface or the intensity of intrapleural inflammation in this empyema model. PMID:19895321

  14. Escherichia coli subdural empyema following subdural hygroma in elderly patient.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ki Sung; Yee, Gi Taek; Han, Seong Rok; Lee, Chae Hyuk

    2010-06-01

    Subdural empyema of the brain is an uncommon disorder that occurs more frequently in children than in adult. Authors report a very rare of subdural empyema following the subdural hygroma after mild head injury. The exact mechanism of infection is not known. However, we have to consider subdural infection as one of differential diagnosis in elderly patient with subdural hygroma when new abnormal density lesion is developed in the subdural space. PMID:20617097

  15. Risk factors for the development of pleural empyema in children.

    PubMed

    Elemraid, Mohamed A; Thomas, Matthew F; Blain, Alasdair P; Rushton, Stephen P; Spencer, David A; Gennery, Andrew R; Clark, Julia E

    2015-07-01

    Pediatric pleural empyema has increased substantially over the past 20 years and reasons for this rise remain not fully explained. We investigated potential risk factors for the development of empyema in children by examining a cohort of patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Demographic, clinical, and socioeconomic characteristics, use of Ibuprofen prior to presentation and selected potential epidemiological risk factors were analyzed. Data were collected from a prospective etiological study of radiologically confirmed pneumonia in hospitalized children aged ≤16 years. One hundred sixty children were enrolled; 56% were male and 69% aged <5 years. Empyema complication developed in 40 (25%) children. Children with empyema were more frequently prescribed Ibuprofen prior to admission to hospital than those without (82% vs. 46.2%; OR 1.94, 97.5% credible interval 0.80-3.18). Bacterial infection was strongly associated with the development of empyema (OR 3.34, 97.5% credible interval 1.70-5.14). In contrast age, sex, maternal age, parental smoking, level of socioeconomic status, nursery attendance, asthma, household characteristics (bedrooms and number of occupants) were not significantly different between groups. In conclusion, children with pneumonia who developed empyema had more often received Ibuprofen prior to hospitalization and confirmed bacterial infection. We suggest a population-based study involving both primary and secondary care settings would help to investigate the role of Ibuprofen use in modulating the course of disease in children with pneumonia. PMID:24692118

  16. Pneumonia and empyema: causal, casual or unknown

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Parapneumonic effusions complicating pneumonia are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Along with increased mortality, complicated parapneumonic effusion and empyema often necessitate prolonged treatment, longer hospital stay and interventions. Parapneumonic effusions arise from inflammation in the lungs and pleural space from direct invasion of bacteria, cascade of inflammatory events and bacteriologic virulence features. Patient factors and comorbidities also contribute to the pathophysiology of parapneumonic effusion development. The evolution of parapneumonic effusion can be divided into three progressive stages: (I) exudative stage; (II) fibrinopurulent stage; and (III) organizing stage with pleural peel formation. These stages can help categorize effusions into groups in order to evaluate the risk of a complicated course requiring intervention. We recommend that clinical data be evaluated and a stepwise approach be taken in management of these patients. This review article discusses current understanding of the development and relationship of parapneumonic effusions with pneumonia. PMID:26150912

  17. Primary Pulmonary Amebiasis Complicated with Multicystic Empyema

    PubMed Central

    Al-Share, Bayan; Al Asad, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Amebiasis is a parasitic infection caused by the protozoan Entamoeba histolytica. While most infections are asymptomatic, the disease could manifest clinically as amebic dysentery and/or extraintestinal invasion in the form of amebic liver abscess or other more rare manifestations such as pulmonary, cardiac, or brain involvement. Herein we are reporting a case of a 24-year-old male with history of Down syndrome who presented with severe right side pneumonia complicated with multicystic empyema resistant to regular medical therapy. Further investigation revealed a positive pleural fluid for E. histolytica cysts and trophozoites. The patient was diagnosed with primary pleuropulmonary amebiasis and he responded promptly to surgical drainage and metronidazole therapy. In patients from endemic areas all physicians should keep a high index of suspicion of amebiasis as a cause of pulmonary disease. PMID:27478673

  18. Primary Pulmonary Amebiasis Complicated with Multicystic Empyema.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Ali; Al-Share, Bayan; Al Asad, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Amebiasis is a parasitic infection caused by the protozoan Entamoeba histolytica. While most infections are asymptomatic, the disease could manifest clinically as amebic dysentery and/or extraintestinal invasion in the form of amebic liver abscess or other more rare manifestations such as pulmonary, cardiac, or brain involvement. Herein we are reporting a case of a 24-year-old male with history of Down syndrome who presented with severe right side pneumonia complicated with multicystic empyema resistant to regular medical therapy. Further investigation revealed a positive pleural fluid for E. histolytica cysts and trophozoites. The patient was diagnosed with primary pleuropulmonary amebiasis and he responded promptly to surgical drainage and metronidazole therapy. In patients from endemic areas all physicians should keep a high index of suspicion of amebiasis as a cause of pulmonary disease. PMID:27478673

  19. Intrapleural streptokinase treatment in children with empyema.

    PubMed

    Aydoğan, Metin; Aydoğan, Ayşen; Ozcan, Ayla; Tugay, Melih; Gokalp, Ayse Sevim; Arisoy, Emin Sami

    2008-07-01

    Our aim was to compare intrapleural streptokinase (SK) treatment and simple tube drainage in the treatment of children with complicated parapneumonic pleural effusion. A retrospective review of medical records included patient demographics, clinical presentation, biochemical and microbial studies of pleural effusion, radiographic evaluation of chest tube drainage, use of fibrinolytic agents and type of surgical intervention. During the 2.5-year period (1999-2002), 53 children (29 M, 24 F) with complicated parapneumonic effusions or empyema were identified. Closed tube drainage and antibiotic treatment were administered to patients with a diagnosis of complicated parapneumonic effusion (n = 24) until October 2000; after that time point, intrapleural streptokinase was added to this regimen (n = 29). The median age at the time of presentation was 2.5 years (range: 5 months-14.6 years). There were no significant differences in terms of clinical outcomes between the two groups. The average length of hospital stay was 19.1 +/- 5.5 and 21.9 +/- 11.2 days for the drainage and streptokinase groups, respectively; the time to afebrile state after admission was 5.8 +/- 4.1 and 7.6 +/- 7.5 days. The percentage of patients who eventually required surgical intervention was 8.3% for the drainage group and 20.6% for the streptokinase group. In conclusion, in the treatment of complicated parapneumonic effusions or empyema, the adjunctive treatment with intrapleural SK does not significantly reduce durations of fever, chest tube drainage and hospital stay, and the need for surgery, regardless of the stage of the disease, compared to simple closed tube drainage. PMID:17710434

  20. Rapidly progressive sarcomatoid malignant mesothelioma of the pleura mimicking pulmonary empyema.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kohei; Kim, Young Hak; Nakatani, Koichi; Mio, Tadashi

    2015-10-01

    Refractory empyema occasionally reflects hidden malignant disease. We presented a rare case of rapidly progressive malignant mesothelioma of the pleura (MPM) mimicking empyema. Physicians should be aware of MPM when patients with empyema are refractory to the standard treatment, and PET-CT may be helpful in establishing a precise diagnosis in such cases. PMID:26509028

  1. EACTS expert consensus statement for surgical management of pleural empyema.

    PubMed

    Scarci, Marco; Abah, Udo; Solli, Piergiorgio; Page, Aravinda; Waller, David; van Schil, Paul; Melfi, Franca; Schmid, Ralph A; Athanassiadi, Kalliopi; Sousa Uva, Miguel; Cardillo, Giuseppe

    2015-11-01

    Pleural infection is a frequent clinical condition. Prompt treatment has been shown to reduce hospital costs, morbidity and mortality. Recent advances in treatment have been variably implemented in clinical practice. This statement reviews the latest developments and concepts to improve clinical management and stimulate further research. The European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS) Thoracic Domain and the EACTS Pleural Diseases Working Group established a team of thoracic surgeons to produce a comprehensive review of available scientific evidence with the aim to cover all aspects of surgical practice related to its treatment, in particular focusing on: surgical treatment of empyema in adults; surgical treatment of empyema in children; and surgical treatment of post-pneumonectomy empyema (PPE). In the management of Stage 1 empyema, prompt pleural space chest tube drainage is required. In patients with Stage 2 or 3 empyema who are fit enough to undergo an operative procedure, there is a demonstrated benefit of surgical debridement or decortication [possibly by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS)] over tube thoracostomy alone in terms of treatment success and reduction in hospital stay. In children, a primary operative approach is an effective management strategy, associated with a lower mortality rate and a reduction of tube thoracostomy duration, length of antibiotic therapy, reintervention rate and hospital stay. Intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy is a reasonable alternative to primary operative management. Uncomplicated PPE [without bronchopleural fistula (BPF)] can be effectively managed with minimally invasive techniques, including fenestration, pleural space irrigation and VATS debridement. PPE associated with BPF can be effectively managed with individualized open surgical techniques, including direct repair, myoplastic and thoracoplastic techniques. Intrathoracic vacuum-assisted closure may be considered as an adjunct to the standard

  2. [MRSA-related empyema as thoracic surgical site infection].

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Hisao

    2009-09-01

    The incidence of empyema as a thoracic surgical site infection (SSI) is relating low, but empyema related to MRSA poses an unenviable therapeutic challenge. We review 3 cases of MRSA-related empyema as SSI seem in the last 10 years, and evaluate therapeutic measures. All 3 subjects began being administered vancomycin (VCM) systemically once the diagnosis was established. Subject 1 developed MRSA-related empyema following pulmonary segmentectomy for small-cell lung cancer. The subject was treated following a diagnosis of incisional SSI, with delayed adequate pleural drainage, resulting in treatment difficulties, but was cured without becoming MRSA-negative. Subject 2 developed MRSA-related empyema following pulmonary lobectomy for advanced lung cancer associated with pneumoconiosis. Following bronchoplasty, a chest tube was placed for long-term drainage. The subject did not become MRSA-negative after VCM administration, but became so after linezolid treatment, facilitating a cure. Subject 3, who had secondary pneumothorax, underwent thoracoscopic partial hepatic resection. Intraoperative findings suggested pleural cavity infection, necessitating a prophylactic drain, but MRSA-related pyothorax developed. Fibrinolysis with urokinase effectively cleared up the poor drainage and the subject was cured without becoming MRSA-negative. In conclusion, in controlling MRSA-related empyema as SSI noted that: (1) long-term postperative thoracic drain retention may lead to retrograde infection; (2) surgical procedures reducing the extent of pulmonary resection may effectively prevent pyothorax progression; (3) for poor drainage in advanced pyothorax, fibrinolytic therapy is worth attempting before thoracoscopic surgery; and (4) the timing for discontinuing anti-MRSA drugs should be determined based on the clinical course rather than negative conversion of bacteria. PMID:19860251

  3. [Pleural empyema - treatment strategies in light of etiology].

    PubMed

    Hecker, E; Hecker, H C; Hecker, K A

    2013-06-01

    The variety of strategies in the treatment of parapneumonic pleural empyema demonstrates the ambiguity for the method of choice. Parapneumonic pleural empyema has been classified into different stages and classes. While the American Thoracic Society (ATS) classification is based on the natural course of the disease, or according to the radiological, physical and biochemical characteristics respectively, the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) has categorized the patients with pleural empyema according to the risk of a poor outcome. The British Thoracic Society (BTS) developed a treatment algorithm based on a systematic review of peer-reviewed literature. With regard to this classification the management of parapneumonic and postoperative pleural empyema is based on the stage of the disease. Therapeutic strategies include chest tube alone, chest tube with fibrinolysis, thoracoscopic debridement and decortication in open or minimally invasive techniques, closed empyemectomy, or treatment with thoracomyoplasty, open window treatment or vacuum clothing with negative pressure. The different conservative and operative therapeutic possibilities determinate the central treatment function of thoracic surgery. PMID:23807591

  4. Prosthesis for Open Pleurostomy (POP): Management for Chronic Empyemas

    PubMed Central

    Filomeno, Luiz Tarcísio Brito; de Campos, José Ribas Milanez; Machuca, Tiago Noguchi; Neves-Pereira, João Carlos das; Terra, Ricardo Mingarini

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We developed a prosthesis for open pleurostomy cases where pulmonary decortication is not indicated, or where post-pneumonectomy space infection occurs. The open pleural window procedure not only creates a large hole in the chest wall that is shocking to patients, also results in a permanent deformation of the thorax. prosthesis for open pleurostomy is a self-retained silicone tube that requires the removal of 3 cm of one rib for insertion, and acts as a mature conventional open pleural window. Herein, we report our 13–year experience with this device in the management of different kinds of pleural empyema. METHODS Forty-four consecutive patients with chronic empyema were treated. The etiology of empyema was diverse: pneumonia, 20; lung resections, 12 (pneumonectomies, 7; lobectomies, 4; non-anatomical, 1); mixed-tuberculous, 6; and mixed-malignant pleural effusion, 6. After debridment of both pleural surfaces, the prosthesis for open pleurostomy was inserted and attached to a small recipient plastic bag. RESULTS Infection control was achieved in 20/20 (100%) of the parapneumonic empyemas, in 3/4 (75%) of post-lobectomies, in 6/7 (85%) of post-pneumectomies, in 6/6 (100%) of mixed-tuberculous cases, and in 4/6 (83%) of mixed-malignant cases. Lung re-expansion was also successful in 93%, 75%, 33%, and 40% of the groups, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Prosthesis for open pleurostomy insertion is a minimally invasive procedure that can be as effective as conventional open pleural window for management of chronic empyemas. Thus, we propose that the use of prosthesis for open pleurostomy should replace the conventional method. PMID:19330246

  5. Video-assisted thoracoscopic decortication for the management of late stage pleural empyema, is it feasible?

    PubMed Central

    Hajjar, Waseem M.; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Al-Nassar, Sami A.; Alsultan, Rawan K.; Alwgait, Waad A.; Alkhalaf, Hanoof H.; Bisht, Shekhar C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical decortication (VATSD) is widely applicable in fibrinopurulent Stage II empyema. While, more chronic thick walled Stage III empyema (organizing stage) needs conversion to open thoracotomy, and existing reports reveal a lacuna in the realm of late stage empyema patient's management through VATS utilization, particularly Stage III empyema. We prospectively evaluated the application of VATSD regardless of the stage of pleural empyema for the effective management of late stage empyema in comparison to open decortications (ODs) to minimize the adverse effects of the disease. METHODS: All patients with pyogenic pleural empyema (Stage II and Stage III) in King Khalid University Hospital (KKUH) (admitted from January 2009 to December 2013) who did not respond to chest tube/pigtail drainage and/or antibiotic therapy were treated with VATSD and/or open thoracotomy. Prospective evaluation was carried out, and the effect of this technique on perioperative outcomes was appraised to evaluate our technical learning with the passage of time and experience with VATS for late stage empyema management. RESULTS: Out of total 63 patients, 26 had Stage II empyema and 37 had Stage III empyema. VATSD was employed on all empyema patients admitted in the KKUH. VATSD was successful in all patients with Stage II empyema. Twenty-five patients (67.6%) with Stage III empyema completed VATSD successfully. However, only 12 cases (32.4%) required conversions to open (thoracotomy) drainage (OD). The median hospital stay for Stage III VATSD required 9.65 ± 4.1 days. Whereas, patients who underwent open thoracotomy took longer time (21.82 ± 16.35 days). Similarly, Stage III VATSD and Stage III open surgery cases showed significance difference among chest tube duration (7.84 ± 3.33 days for VATS and 15.92 ± 8.2 days for open thoracotomy). Significantly, lower postoperative complications were detected in patients treated with VATSD in terms of

  6. Empyema necessitans: very late complication of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Manuel Mendes; Alves, Márcia; Correia, José Bernardes; Santos, Lèlita

    2013-01-01

    Empyema necessitans is a rare clinical finding nowadays. We report the case of a patient admitted in our ward for investigation of an unknown onset anterior chest wall mass, with no accompanying signs or symptoms. It is noteworthy that the patient had had pulmonary tuberculosis submitted to thoracoplasty more than 60 years before. Thoracic MRI showed a large heterogeneous mass, with a thick wall and internal septations located at the right anterior chest wall, as well as a heterogeneous content inside the right pleural cavity, with direct communication between both. An aspirative puncture of both masses was performed, with positive cultures for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, thus leading to the diagnosis of pleural tuberculosis with anterior chest wall empyema necessitans. A drain was inserted and antibiotics started. This case draws our attention to a very rare complication of pulmonary tuberculosis and its surgical treatment, though it aroused many decades after primary infection. PMID:24326441

  7. Empyema Caused by Pseudomonas luteola: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Farid; Shoja, Saeed; Honarvar, Negin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pseudomonas luteola is an uncommon opportunistic pathogen. It is recognized as an uncommon cause of infections in underlying medical disorders. Infections caused by this microorganism are health care associated. Case Presentation: The current study isolated P. luteola from empyema in a patient with tuberculous pleurisy, whose susceptibility to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole differed from previous reports. Conclusions: P. luteola is resistant to TMP-SMX, but in the present case P. luteola was susceptible to TMP-SMX PMID:25368791

  8. Salmonella typhimurium epidural empyema in an HIV-infected patient

    PubMed Central

    Hachfi, Wissem; Bellazreg, Foued; Ladib, Mohamed; Kaabia, Naoufel; Khalifa, Mabrouk; Krifa, Hedi; Letaief, Amel

    2009-01-01

    Salmonella focal intracranial infections are reported rarely. They tend to occur in immunocompromised patients. We present here a case of Salmonella typhimurium epidural empyema, with osteomyelitis of the adjacent frontal bone, in a 37-year-old human immunodeficiency virus positive man who presented with a three-day history of headache, fever, and sweats. He was treated successfully with antibiotics and surgical drainage. PMID:24470883

  9. Subdural empyema due to Lactococcus lactis cremoris: case report.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Mizuho; Saito, Atsushi; Kon, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Hiroki; Koyama, Shinya; Haryu, Shinya; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Nishijima, Michiharu

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis cremoris (L. lactis cremoris) infections are very rare in humans. Only three case reports of brain abscess have been reported and the infectious routes and pathological features are still unknown. We experienced a subdural empyema due to L. lactis cremoris in an immunocompetent adult. A 33-year-old man was admitted with fever, right facial pain, left hemiparesis, and left hemianopsia. Computed tomography demonstrated low density fluid collection in the right falcotentorial subdural space. Magnetic resonance (MR) images revealed a high signal lesion on a diffusion-weighted image (DWI) and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images in the right paratentorial and parafalcine subdural space, right maxillary sinus, and bilateral ethmoidal sinus. He underwent two sequential open surgeries for removal and drainage of empyema and was treated with antibiotics including meropenem and ampicillin. To our knowledge, this is the first report of subdural empyema caused by L. lactis cremoris infection. We report the case and discuss the pathological features with the previous literature. PMID:24257498

  10. Chronic expanding hematoma with bronchopleural fistula and empyema space.

    PubMed

    Tsubochi, Hiroyoshi; Sato, Nobuyuki; Imai, Tadashi

    2009-06-01

    Chronic expanding hematoma of the thorax is not typically accompanied by a bronchopleural fistula or purulent lesion. We report an extremely rare case of chronic expanding hematoma with a bronchopleural fistula and empyema space in a 66-year-old man with a history of tuberculous pleurisy admitted because of fever and bloody sputa. Computed tomography and a magnetic resonance imaging revealed a huge mass and an air space in the right thorax. A fiber-optic bronchoscope examination showed hemorrhagic effusion from the apical bronchus of the right lower lobe. First, open-window thoracostomy was undertaken to control the septic state and to prevent aspiration of infected pleural fluid. At operation, air leakage was found at the most superior portion in the rear of the thoracic empyema space; this was thought to be from the bronchopleural fistula. Enterococcus casseliflavus was detected in cultures for bacteria of the effusion from the empyema space. After an improvement of his general condition, a radical operation, including the complete extirpation of the hematoma and intrathoracic muscle transposition using the latissimus dorsi muscle, was successfully performed. PMID:19597392

  11. [Post-pneumonectomy Empyema Successfully Treated with Negative Pressure Wound Therapy].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Nana; Yasuda, Shunsuke; Ishibashi, Kei; Kitada, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    A 61-year-old man underwent right pneumonectomy for primary lung cancer. Four weeks later, he was referred to our hospital for empyema. After 2 months of irrigation with saline, vacuum-assited closure therapy followed by the open thoracotomy was started. After cleaning thoracic cavity bacteriologically, the thoracoplasty and muscle flap transposition was performed, and the empyema completely disappeared. PMID:27075283

  12. Meningoencephalitis with Subdural Empyema Caused by Toxigenic Clostridium perfringens Type A

    PubMed Central

    Achermann, Yvonne; Kovari, Helen; Dent, Wolfgang; Hombach, Michael; Bloemberg, Guido

    2012-01-01

    We report a clinical case of meningoencephalitis with subdural empyema in an immunocompromised farmer caused by toxigenic Clostridium perfringens type A, which was identified by 16S RNA gene analysis of cerebrospinal fluid and subdural empyema. In immunocompromised patients, C. perfringens should be considered a potential pathogen of sepsis. PMID:22895036

  13. Empyema Necessitans Complicating Pleural Effusion Associated with Proteus Species Infection: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Yauba, M. S.; Ahmed, H.; Imoudu, I. A.; Yusuf, M. O.; Makarfi, H. U.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Empyema necessitans, a rare complication of pleural effusion, could result in significant morbidity and mortality in children. It is characterized by the dissection of pus through the soft tissues and the skin of the chest wall. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Actinomyces israelii are common causes but Gram negative bacilli could be a rare cause. However, there were challenges in differentiating between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and nontuberculous empyema in a resource poor setting like ours. We report a child with pleural effusion and empyema necessitans secondary to Proteus spp. infection. Methods. We describe a 12-year-old child with empyema necessitans complicating pleural effusion and highlight management challenges. Results. This case was treated with quinolones, antituberculous drugs, chest tube drainage, and nutritional rehabilitation. Conclusion. Empyema necessitatis is a rare condition that can be caused by Gram negative bacterial pathogens like Proteus species. PMID:25893125

  14. Subdural empyema and unilateral pansinusitis due to a tooth infection.

    PubMed

    Derin, Serhan; Sahan, Murat; Hazer, Derya Burcu; Sahan, Leyla

    2015-01-01

    Paranasal sinus infections are very common. Dental infections, tumours and anatomical malformations can cause unilateral sinusitis. Most cases can be treated without complications. However, rare life-threatening intracranial complications can occur. Generally, an intracranial complication progresses rapidly and can cause meningismus, focal neurological disorders, loss of consciousness and seizures. In such cases, an emergency craniotomy and concurrent sinus surgery are required. This article presents a 16-year-old patient with pansinusitis and subdural empyema that developed after a dental abscess. PMID:26123452

  15. [ANALYSIS OF MICROFLORA OF PLEURAL CAVITY IN PLEURAL EMPYEMA].

    PubMed

    Chubar, I V

    2016-04-01

    In the pleural empyema (PE) treatment, not depending on introduction of multiple operative procedures and the medicinal preparations application, some issues remain unsolved, including the infection agents verification, the most rapid bronchial fistula elimination and the lung volume restoration. The EP infection agents spectrum, their sensitivity to preparations were revealed, as well as the enhanced rate of the methicillin-resistant stamms (MRSA) and the microorganisms associations verification. A reduction of the infection agents sensitivity towards "simple" antibacterial preparations was established, so the physicians, treating PE, must prescribe "hard" antibiotics, what enhances its cost. PMID:27434955

  16. Decompensated Liver Cirrhosis Presenting as a Spontaneous Left-Sided Bacterial Empyema

    PubMed Central

    Nathoo, Sunina

    2016-01-01

    Decompensation of cirrhosis presents with ascites, encephalopathy, variceal bleeding, or spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. Infrequently, decompensation can result from spontaneous bacterial empyema. A 38-year-old man presented with fevers, chills, and dyspnea. Labs were significant for leukocytosis, transaminitis, and coagulopathy. Imaging showed liver cirrhosis with ascites and a left pleural effusion. Treatment of the effusion consisted of chest tube drainage and antibiotics. Spontaneous bacterial empyema was diagnosed after pleural fluid cultures were positive for Escherichia coli. Our case demonstrates that spontaneous bacterial empyemas can be left-sided, and the first sign of decompensation. PMID:26958567

  17. Decompensated Liver Cirrhosis Presenting as a Spontaneous Left-Sided Bacterial Empyema.

    PubMed

    Chertoff, Jason; Nathoo, Sunina

    2016-01-01

    Decompensation of cirrhosis presents with ascites, encephalopathy, variceal bleeding, or spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. Infrequently, decompensation can result from spontaneous bacterial empyema. A 38-year-old man presented with fevers, chills, and dyspnea. Labs were significant for leukocytosis, transaminitis, and coagulopathy. Imaging showed liver cirrhosis with ascites and a left pleural effusion. Treatment of the effusion consisted of chest tube drainage and antibiotics. Spontaneous bacterial empyema was diagnosed after pleural fluid cultures were positive for Escherichia coli. Our case demonstrates that spontaneous bacterial empyemas can be left-sided, and the first sign of decompensation. PMID:26958567

  18. Intrapleural administration of DNase alone for pleural empyema

    PubMed Central

    Bobek, Vladimir; Majewski, Andrzej; Kolostova, Katarina; Rzechonek, Adam; Lischke, Robert; Schutzner, Jan; Kacprzak, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pleural empyema is a severe complication of various diseases. The essential is the inserting a drain into the pleural cavity and evacuation of the pus. Sometimes the pus is very thick and its evacuation and re-expansion of the lung is very difficult. Methods: We report a group of 10 patients with intrapleural administration of Pulmozyme (dornase alpha) in dosages of either 2.5 mg once or on two separate occasions. All of the patients had a chest tube inserted into the pleural cavity. Measurement of viscosity was done before and after the instillation of the dornase alpha. Results: In six patients dornase alfa was introduced into the pleural cavity once. Three of them received this on the 4th whilst the rest were treated with the agent on the 6th day. Four patients received the dornase alpha twice because of the small amount of drainage fluid after the previous instillation. Five patients were discharged from hospital with complete re-expansion of their lungs. Two patients were qualified for a surgical operation since the lung was trapped and did not re-expand. Three patients had to be discharged with a drain as a result of incomplete re-expansion of the lung. In all the patients the density of the pus after administering the dornase alpha decreased and the amount of the pus drainage increased. Conclusions: Dornase alpha may be used in some patients with pleural empyema with good results. PMID:26885174

  19. Thoracoscopic examination of empyema in a patient with sparganosis mansoni.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Keita; Suzuki, Junko; Nagai, Hideaki; Watanabe, Kaoru; Yokoyama, Akira; Ando, Takahiro; Suzuki, Jun; Ohshima, Nobuharu; Masuda, Kimihiko; Tamura, Atsuhisa; Akagawa, Shinobu; Kitani, Masashi; Hebisawa, Akira; Matsui, Hirotoshi; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Ohta, Ken

    2016-02-01

    A 27-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with right pleural effusion. He had suffered from right chest and back pain and a high fever for one week prior to the admission. He had been treated with clarithromycin without improvement. Since thoracoscopy under local anesthesia revealed purulent effusion, synechiae and fibrous septa in the thoracic cavity, synechiotomy was performed and we started antibiotic treatment with the diagnosis of acute bacterial empyema. At the same time, we also suspected parasitic infection because of massive eosinophilic infiltration in pleural effusion and his dietary history of eating raw frogs. During the course of the disease, he had an infiltration in the right lower lobe and pneumothorax. Finally, we diagnosed him with sparganosis mansoni because his serum as well as pleural effusion was positive for the binding to sparganosis mansoni plerocercoid antigen, without any positive findings in bacteriology. His pleural effusion and lung infiltration were resolved after the administration of a high-dose praziquantel. We report this rare parasitic empyema with findings by thoracoscopic examination. PMID:26603428

  20. Empyema Caused by Prevotella bivia Complicating an Unusual Case of Spontaneous Chylothorax

    PubMed Central

    Di Marco Berardino, Alessandro; Smargiassi, Andrea; Re, Antonina; Torelli, Riccardo; Fiori, Barbara; d'Inzeo, Tiziana; Corbo, Giuseppe Maria; Valente, Salvatore; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Spanu, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous chylothorax is rare in adults. We present an unusual case that was complicated by Prevotella bivia empyema. Full recovery was achieved with chest tube drainage and prompt treatment with intravenous clindamycin. PMID:24452170

  1. Analysis of pediatric subdural empyema outcome in relation to computerized tomography brain scan.

    PubMed

    Md Ralib, Ahmad Razali; Ariff, Abdul Rahman Mohd; Shuaib, Ibrahim Lutfi; Naing, N N; George, P Jain; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2004-06-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to predict the outcome in patients with subdural empyema, using initial and post-treatment CT scan brain parameters. Data collection was done on those children who were diagnosed to have subdural empyema by CT scan of the brain with contrast, who underwent burrhole evacuation, from February 2000 until April 2002. Numerous factors, such as coma or loss of unconsciousness at diagnosis, age, types of antibiotic, microbiology, extension of empyema, associated cerebral infarction and ventriculitis, were analyzed. Poor prognosis was associated with loss of consciousness, and hypodensity by CT scan at presentation (p < 0.005). Patients with an extensive subdural empyema will have a good outcome if they are treated early and aggressively with antibiotics and burrhole evacuation. PMID:15691152

  2. Intracranial subdural empyema after surgery for lumbar lipomyelomeningocele: A rare complication

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Foy, Andrew; Havens, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgery is routinely recommended for lumbar lipomyelomeningocele, especially in the setting of tethered cord syndrome. The most common complications are wound infections and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, which remain confined to the surgical site. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no prior reports relating an intracranial subdural empyema following detethering surgery. Prompt diagnosis is essential since subdural empyema is a neurosurgical emergency. Case Description: The patient was an 11-month-old male who underwent detethering surgery for a lumbar lipomyelomeningocele. This was followed by wound drainage consistent with CSF leak, requiring revision. Cultures grew three aerobes (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus, and Klebsiella) and three anaerobes (Clostridium, Veillonella, and Bacteroides). He was started on cefepime, vancomycin, and flagyl. The patient required two more wound revisions and placement of an external ventricular drain (EVD) secondary to persistent wound leakage. A subsequent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain was carried out due to protracted irritability, which revealed extensive left subdural empyema along the parietooccipital region and the inferior and anterior temporal lobe. He underwent evacuation of the subdural empyema where cultures exhibited no growth. Subsequently, he progressed well. His lumbar incision continued to heal. Serial MRI brains and inflammatory markers were reassuring. He weaned off his EVD and went home to complete a 6-week course of antibiotics. Upon completion of his antibiotics, he returned for a clinic visit; he exhibited no interim fevers or wound issues; cranial imaging documented no evidence of a residual or recurrent subdural empyema. Conclusion: Intracranial subdural empyema may occur after wound complications from detethering surgery despite early initiation of broad-spectrum antibiotics. Possible etiology may be local wound infection that seeds the subdural space and travels to the

  3. Effect of hemothorax on experimental empyema thoracis in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Mavroudis, C; Ganzel, B L; Katzmark, S; Polk, H C

    1985-01-01

    An experimental model for empyema thoracis in the Duncan-Harley guinea pig is introduced. Empyema thoracis development and early death (less than 14 days after bacterial inoculation) were noted after various concentrations and species were inoculated into the pleural space with a piece of umbilical tape, which was used as a cofactor. The effect of concomitant hemothorax was also tested. Group I (N = 90) had intrapleural inoculation of umbilical tape and various concentrations (10(4), 10(6), 10(8) organisms/ml) of various bacterial species, which included Staphylococcus aureus (N = 30), Escherichia coli (N = 30), and Bacteroides fragilis (N = 30). Group II (N = 90) had intrapleural inoculation of umbilical tape, 1 ml of autologous blood, and the same varying concentrations and species of bacteria as Group I. The observation period was 14 days, during which time early deaths were noted. Fifty-eight percent of the staphylococcal group of animals, 37% of the E. coli group of animals, and none of the B. fragilis group of animals developed empyema. Animals with empyema developed significant weight loss (p less than 0.05) and roentgenographic evidence of empyema, which was supported by postmortem pleural reaction and pneumonia scores (p less than 0.05). Higher concentrations of inoculated bacteria produced a higher incidence of empyema in the S. aureus and E. coli groups (p less than 0.05), but concomitant hemothorax did not increase the already high incidence of empyema and early death in the E. coli group. Empyema caused by B. fragilis did not develop, even with cofactors of umbilical tape and blood. Anaerobic infections in this model may require the presence of other aerobic or facultative organisms, the presence of necrotic lung, prior malnutrition, or a combination thereof. PMID:3880847

  4. Posttraumatic Intracranial Tuberculous Subdural Empyema in a Patient with Skull Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiha; Kim, Choonghyo; Ryu, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial tuberculous subdural empyema (ITSE) is extremely rare. To our knowledge, only four cases of microbiologically confirmed ITSE have been reported in the English literature to date. Most cases have arisen in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis regardless of trauma. A 46-year-old man presented to the emergency department after a fall. On arrival, he complained of pain in his head, face, chest and left arm. He was alert and oriented. An initial neurological examination was normal. Radiologic evaluation revealed multiple fractures of his skull, ribs, left scapula and radius. Though he had suffered extensive skull fractures of his cranium, maxilla, zygoma and orbital wall, the sustained cerebral contusion and hemorrhage were mild. Eighteen days later, he suddenly experienced a general tonic-clonic seizure. Radiologic evaluation revealed a subdural empyema in the left occipital area that was not present on admission. We performed a craniotomy, and the empyema was completely removed. Microbiological examination identified Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). After eighteen months of anti-tuberculous treatment, the empyema disappeared completely. This case demonstrates that tuberculosis can induce empyema in patients with skull fractures. Thus, we recommend that M. tuberculosis should be considered as the probable pathogen in cases with posttraumatic empyema. PMID:27226867

  5. Posttraumatic Intracranial Tuberculous Subdural Empyema in a Patient with Skull Fracture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiha; Kim, Choonghyo; Ryu, Young-Joon; Lee, Seung Jin

    2016-05-01

    Intracranial tuberculous subdural empyema (ITSE) is extremely rare. To our knowledge, only four cases of microbiologically confirmed ITSE have been reported in the English literature to date. Most cases have arisen in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis regardless of trauma. A 46-year-old man presented to the emergency department after a fall. On arrival, he complained of pain in his head, face, chest and left arm. He was alert and oriented. An initial neurological examination was normal. Radiologic evaluation revealed multiple fractures of his skull, ribs, left scapula and radius. Though he had suffered extensive skull fractures of his cranium, maxilla, zygoma and orbital wall, the sustained cerebral contusion and hemorrhage were mild. Eighteen days later, he suddenly experienced a general tonic-clonic seizure. Radiologic evaluation revealed a subdural empyema in the left occipital area that was not present on admission. We performed a craniotomy, and the empyema was completely removed. Microbiological examination identified Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). After eighteen months of anti-tuberculous treatment, the empyema disappeared completely. This case demonstrates that tuberculosis can induce empyema in patients with skull fractures. Thus, we recommend that M. tuberculosis should be considered as the probable pathogen in cases with posttraumatic empyema. PMID:27226867

  6. Two surgical methods used in 90 patients with intracranial subdural empyema.

    PubMed

    Mat Nayan, S A; Mohd Haspani, M S; Abd Latiff, A Z; Abdullah, J M; Abdullah, S

    2009-12-01

    We studied the efficacy of two surgical methods used for the treatment of intracranial subdural empyema (ISDE) at our centre. A cross-sectional study (1999-2005) of 90 patients with non-traumatic supratentorial ISDE revealed that the two surgical methods used for empyema removal were burr hole/s and drainage (50 patients, 55.6%) and a cranial bone opening procedure (CBOP) (40 patients, 44.4%). Patients in the CBOP group had a better result in terms of clinical improvement (chi-squared analysis, p=0.006) and clearance of empyema on brain CT scan (chi-squared analysis, p<0.001). Reoperation was more frequent among patients who had undergone burr hole surgery (multiple logistic regression, p<0.001). The outcome and morbidity of ISDE survivors were not related to the surgical method used (p>0.05). The only factor that significantly affected the morbidity of ISDE was level of consciousness at the time of surgery (multiple logistic regression, p<0.001). We conclude that CBOP and evacuation of the empyema is a better surgical method for ISDE than burr hole/s and drainage. Wide cranial opening and empyema evacuation improves neurological status, gives better clearance of the empyema and reduces the need for reoperation. Level of consciousness at the time of presentation is a predictor of the morbidity of ISDE. Thus, aggressive surgical treatment should occur as early as possible, before the patient deteriorates. PMID:19793660

  7. Spontaneous bilateral bacterial empyema in a patient with nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Chin; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2006-09-01

    Spontaneous bacterial empyema (SBEM), a rare infectious complication among liver cirrhosis patients, is characterized by infection in the presence of pleural effusion without evidence of pre-existing pneumonia. The prevalence of SBEM in cirrhotic patients with hydrothorax is about 13%. However, it has previously not been reported in medical literature in patients with nephrotic syndrome. The most common microorganism identified is Escherichia coli, followed by Streptococcus species, Enterococcus species, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas stutzeri. We present a patient with a history of nephrotic syndrome caused by membranous nephropathy, who received steroids and cyclophosphamide. He developed bilateral SBEM due to Aeromonas hydrophila and E. coli, which were isolated from the left- and right-side pleural fluid, respectively. The detailed clinical course, treatment, and outcome are described. PMID:16457891

  8. Spontaneous bacterial empyema in a noncirrhotic patient: an unusual scenario.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ha; Gupta, Shweta; Eiger, Glenn

    2011-12-01

    Spontaneous bacterial empyema (SBEM) is infection of a preexisting pleural effusion without evidence of pneumonia. It has been reported mostly in patients with hepatic hydrothorax. Only 1 case of SBEM in a noncirrhotic patient has been reported. We present an unusual case of bilateral SBEM from Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia in a noncirrhotic patient. A 52-year-old man presented with bilateral pleuritic chest pain and dyspnea for 2 days. His medical history included congestive heart failure, hemodialysis-dependent renal failure and known bilateral pleural effusions. No ascites or hepatosplenomegaly was noticed. Bilateral pleural effusions were again present on physical examination and confirmed by a chest computed tomography scan. Cardiac medical treatment and hemodialysis failed to improve his condition. Bilateral thoracentesis revealed purulent pleural fluid that was culture-positive for Streptococcus pneumonia as were blood cultures. There was no clinical or radiographic evidence of pneumonia. The detailed clinical course, treatment and highlighted points are described. PMID:21825962

  9. Delayed Occurrence of Escherichia coli Subdural Empyema Following Head Injury in an Elderly Patient: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Munusamy, Thangaraj; Dinesh, Shree Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Subdural empyema is a rare but serious intracranial infection that warrants prompt management to reduce morbidity and avoid mortality. However, clinical and radiologic features may be subtle or ambivalent. Thus a diagnosis of subdural empyema should not be discounted, especially in a patient with a history of head trauma. Treatment consists of surgery to establish bacteriologic identification and subsequently guide antibiotic therapy. Here we present a case of delayed Escherichia coli subdural empyema following a head injury in an elderly patient without significant risk factors. Computed tomography imaging was equivocal for subdural empyema. The patient underwent surgery and was treated with intravenous antibiotic therapy. Although initial improvement in the patient's clinical condition was observed, he eventually succumbed to nosocomial pneumonia. In this article, we discuss the presentation, diagnostic tools, and treatment options for subdural empyema with an emphasis on the challenges. The management conundrum that follows prompted us subsequently to review the literature. PMID:26251817

  10. An unexpected cause for cavitary pneumonia and empyema.

    PubMed

    Bloch-Infanger, Constantine; Furrer, Katarzyna; Wiese, Mark; Hiebinger, Andreas; Bucher, Christoph M; Kopp, Sébastien; Hinić, Vladimira; Goldenberger, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Tularemia is an emerging zoonotic disease mainly of the Northern Hemisphere caused by the Gram-negative coccobacillus Francisella tularensis. It is affecting a wide range of animals and causes human disease after insect and tick bites, skin contact, ingestion and inhalation. A 66-year-old man presented to our clinic with cavitary pneumonia and distinct pleural effusion. After failure of empiric antibiotic therapy, thoracoscopic assisted decortication and partial excision of the middle lobe were conducted. Conventional culture methods and broad-range bacterial PCR including RipSeqMixed analysis were performed from the excised biopsies. Culture results remained negative but broad-range PCR targeting the first half of the 16S rRNA gene revealed F. tularensis DNA. This result was confirmed by F. tularensis-specific PCR and by serology. The source of infection could not be explored. To conclude, we report the rare clinical picture of a community-acquired pneumonia followed by pleural effusion and empyema due to F. tularensis. Broad range bacterial PCR proved to be a powerful diagnostic tool to detect the etiologic organism. PMID:26621335

  11. Treatment of complicated parapneumonic pleural effusion and pleural parapneumonic empyema

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Pedro Rodríguez; Gilart, Jorge Freixinet; Pérez, José María Hernández; Serhal, Mohamed Hussein; Artalejo, Antonio López

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background We performed this observational prospective study to evaluate the results of the application of a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for complicated parapneumonic pleural effusion (CPPE) and pleural parapneumonic empyema (PPE). Material/Methods From 2001 to 2007, 210 patients with CPPE and PPE were confirmed through thoracocentesis and treated with pleural drainage tubes (PD), fibrinolytic treatment or surgical intervention (videothoracoscopy and posterolateral thoracotomy). Patients were divided into 3 groups: I (PD); II (PD and fibrinolytic treatment); IIIa (surgery after PD and fibrinolysis), and IIIb (direct surgery). The statistical study was done by variance analysis (ANOVA), χ 2 and Fisher exact test. Results The presence of alcohol or drug consumption, smoking and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were strongly associated with a great necessity for surgical treatment. The IIIa group was associated with increased drainage time, length of stay and complications. No mortality was observed. The selective use of PD and intrapleural fibrinolysis makes surgery unnecessary in more than 75% of cases. Conclusions The selective use of PD and fibrinolysis avoids surgery in more than 75% of cases. However, patients who require surgery have more complications, longer hospital stay, and more days on PD and they are more likely to require admittance to the Intensive Care Unit. PMID:22739734

  12. [Parapneumonic pleural effusions and empyema in adults:current practice].

    PubMed

    Porcel, J M; Light, R W

    2009-11-01

    About 20% of hospitalized patients with bacterial pneumonia have an accompanying pleural effusion. Parapneumonic effusions (PPE) are associated with a considerable morbidity and mortality. The main decision in managing a patient with a PPE is whether to insert a chest tube (complicated PPE). Imaging (i.e., chest radiograph, ultrasound and computed tomography) and pleural fluid analysis (i.e., pH, glucose, lactate dehydrogenase, bacterial cults) provide essential information for patient management. Therefore, all PPEs should be aspirated for diagnostic purposes. This may require image-guidance if the effusion is small or heavily loculated. According to the current guidelines, any PPE that fulfills at least one of the following criteria should be drained: size > or = 1/2 of the hemithorax, loculations, pleural fluid pH < 7.20 (or alternatively pleural fluid glucose < 60 mg/dl), positive pleural fluid Gram stain or culture, or purulent appearance. The key components of the treatment of complicated PPE and empyema are the use of appropriate antibiotics, provision of nutritional support, and drainage of the pleural space by one of the following methods: therapeutic thoracentesis, tube thoracostomy, intrapleural fibrinolytics, thoracoscopy with breakdown of adhesions or thoracotomy with decortication. The routine use of intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy remains controversial. (c) 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved. PMID:19889319

  13. [Subdural empyema due to gemella morbillorum as a complication of acute sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Boto, Leonor Reis; Calado, Cláudia; Vieira, Marisa; Camilo, Cristina; Abecasis, Francisco; Campos, Alexandre R; Correia, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    Subdural empyema is a life-threatening infection that may complicate acute sinusitis. The authors report the case of a previously healthy 10 year-old girl who presented with subdural empyema due to Gemella morbillorum after an untreated maxillary, ethmoidal and esphenoidal sinusitis. Despite immediate drainage of the empyema and underlying primary infection and treatment with broad spectrum antibiotics, she later developed frontal cerebritis and refractory intracranial hypertension, needing urgent decompressive craniectomy. She recovered gradually, maintaining to date slight right hemyparesis and aphasia. Even though it is considered a low virulence organism, G. morbillorum has been increasingly described in central nervous system infection. In this case, the prompt institution of broad spectrum antibiotics and surgical drainage, as well as the agressive treatment of complications, including decompressive craniectomy, were crucial to the patient's recovery. PMID:22015038

  14. Brain abscess and subdural empyema. Factors influencing mortality and results of various surgical techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Van Alphen, H A; Dreissen, J J

    1976-01-01

    The authors review the results of various surgical techniques in relation to mortality and morbidity in 100 consecutive cases of brain abscess and subdural empyema. The mortality rate is the same with total excision and fractional drainage of brain abscesses, although in acute and subacute cases slight differences between both techniques are seen. In terms of morbidity, fractional drainage appears to be more favourable than total excision. The authors believe that factors other than surgical procedure influence mortality in cases of brain abscess and subdural empyema. These factors are defined in detail. Images PMID:932767

  15. Nocardia nova causing empyema necessitatis afterlung re-transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Severo, Cecília Bittencourt; Matter, Letícia Beatriz; Oliveira, Flávio de Mattos; Vargas, Agueda Palmira Castagna; Schio, Sadi Marcelo; Camargo, José de Jesus Peixoto; Hochhegger, Bruno; Severo, Luiz Carlos

    2016-01-01

    We report herein a case of thoracic infection due to Nocardia nova following lung re-transplantation performed for emphysema related to alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency. The infection extended from the lung into the pleural space, thoracic wall, and mediastinum, presenting as pericarditis and empyema necessitatis. Nocardia nova was identified by 16S ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid (rDNA) sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. According to a literature search of PubMed, LILACS and MEDLINE databases, we describe herein the first case of empyema necessitatis caused by N. nova species in a transplanted patient. PMID:27598645

  16. Analysis of Cytokine Levers in Pleural Effusions of Tuberculous Pleurisy and Tuberculous Empyema

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yan-Jie; Li, Fu-Gen; Chang, Xiu-Jun; Zhang, Tian-Hui

    2016-01-01

    The aim is to examine whether the interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-2, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1), and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) levels were different in pleural effusions of tuberculous pleurisy and tuberculous empyema. IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, PAI-1, and t-PA levels in pleural fluids of 40 patients with tuberculous pleurisy and 38 patients with tuberculous empyema were measured. The levels of IL-1β, PAI-1, and t-PA in the pleural effusions were different between tuberculous pleurisy and tuberculous empyema; it could be helpful to differentiate the two diseases. The levels of PAI-1, IL-1β were higher and t-PA, IL-6 were lower in pleural effusions of the patients with tuberculous empyema and who must undergo operation than the patients who could be treated with closed drainage and anti-TB chemotheraphy. These indications may be helpful to evaluate whether the patient needs the operation. PMID:27034588

  17. [Late empyema after pneumonectomy. Demonstration in x-ray computed tomography].

    PubMed

    Laissy, J P; Genevois, A; Nouvet, G; Benozio, M

    1988-01-01

    The authors describe CT signs of a thoracic empyema, developed several years after a pneumonectomy. The disappearance of the concavity of post-pneumonectomy space in contact with mediastinum, associated to the absence of retraction of the hemithorax are the main signs of the diagnosis. PMID:3361469

  18. Fatal pneumonia and empyema thoracis caused by imipenem-resistant Nocardia abscessus in a cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chih-Cheng; Tsai, Hsih-Yeh; Ruan, Sheng-Yuan; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2015-12-01

    We describe a case of pneumonia and empyema thoracis caused by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-susceptible, but imipenem-resistant Nocardia abscessus in a cancer patient. The isolate was confirmed to the species level by 16S rRNA sequencing analysis. The patient did not respond to antibiotic therapy, including ceftriaxone and imipenem, and died of progressing pneumonia and multiple organ failure. PMID:23523047

  19. Successful Treatment of Aspergillus Empyema Using Open Window Thoracostomy Salvage Treatment and the Local Administration of an Antifungal Agent.

    PubMed

    Ashizawa, Nobuyuki; Nakamura, Shigeki; Ide, Shotaro; Tashiro, Masato; Takazono, Takahiro; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Miyazaki, Taiga; Izumikawa, Koichi; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    A 76-year-old woman received long-term immunosuppressive treatment for collagen vascular disease-associated interstitial pneumonia. The patient developed a cavitary mass lesion in the right lower lung field, and both nontuberculous mycobacteria and Aspergillus spp. were isolated after bronchial washing. The patient underwent a right lower lobectomy but developed Aspergillus empyema. Empyema due to Aspergillus spp. is a rare and life-threatening condition; however, the standard therapeutic strategies for treating Aspergillus empyema are not clear. We herein report a case of Aspergillus empyema that was successfully treated with a combination therapy which included open-window thoracostomy and the administration of antifungal agents (systemic micafungin and local amphotericin-B). PMID:27477422

  20. [Empyema and subdural effusion after meningitis. 2 cases of unusual location].

    PubMed

    Thauvoy, C; Brucher, J M; Evrard, P; Dechef, G; Plaen, J; Stroobandt, G

    1975-01-01

    A 12-year old child and a 2-month old infant developed, in the wane of a purulent meningitis, the former, an infratentorial subdural empyema, the latter, a large, encapsulated, haemoorhagic, aseptic subdural effusion, in the right parieto-temporo-occipital region. In both cases, signs of intracranial hypertension dominated the clinical picture. Neuroradiological investigations permitted diagnosis and localisation of the expansive processes, whose subdural position was recognized at operation and confirmed by histopathological examination. According to the literature, purulent meningitis is a rare cause of subdural empyema, except in infants; the solely infratentorial location is also unusual. Sterile subdural effusion is a more common complication of purulent meningitis in infancy, but the unilateral posterior supratentorial location is also a peculiar feature. Subdural collections after memingitis may be aseptic and possibly haemorrhagic, or septic and purulent; these different modes of presentation correspond perhaps to different degrees or stages of subdural pathological changes in the neighbourhood of leptomeningeal infection. PMID:1233386

  1. Mycobacterium avium Complex Empyema in a Patient with Interferon Gamma Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Heath H; Opal, Steven M; Dworkin, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) autoantibodies are a relatively recently discovered clinical entity, which have been shown to be associated with disseminated non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infections and other opportunistic infections. Interestingly, isolated NTM infections (without disseminated NTM infection) have not been shown to be a good predictor of the presence of IFN-γ autoantibodies. This case describes an isolated NTM empyema in a patient with IFN-γ autoantibodies and makes the argument that the development of an NTM empyema in a patient with no known immunodeficiency should prompt consideration for IFN-γ testing. Additionally, this case underscores the importance for clinicians to recognize that an unusual infection without the typical cause of impairment in immunity should prompt a more thorough investigation of the patient's immune system. PMID:25285250

  2. Minimally Invasive Vacuum-Assisted Closure Therapy With Instillation (Mini-VAC-Instill) for Pleural Empyema.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Hans-Stefan; Neu, Reiner; Potzger, Tobias; Schemm, Rudolf; Grosser, Christian; Szöke, Tamas; Sziklavari, Zsolt

    2015-06-01

    Enthusiasm for minimally invasive thoracic surgery is increasing. Thoracoscopy plays a significant therapeutic role in the fibrinopurulent stage (stage II) of empyema, in which loculated fluid cannot often be adequately drained by chest tube alone. For some debilitated and septic patients, further procedures such as open-window thoracostomy (OWT) with daily wound care or vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy are necessary. In the present article, we propose a new option of minimally invasive VAC therapy including a topical solution of the empyema without open-window thoracostomy (Mini-VAC-instill). Three patients who underwent surgery using this technique are also presented. The discussion is focused on the advantages and disadvantages of the approach. PMID:25049317

  3. Late-Onset Postpneumonectomy Empyema Presenting as Right-Sided Heart Failure: Extrinsic Right Atrial Compression

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Jae-Jin; Choe, Hyunmin; Kwon, Sung Uk; Doh, Joon Hyung; Lee, Sung Yun; Ryoo, Ji-Yoon; Hur, Gham; Lee, Won Ro

    2012-01-01

    Although it is rare, the right atrium can be encroached on by abnormal mediastinal structures, including aortic aneurysms, carcinomas, hepatic cysts and diaphragmatic paralysis. Extrinsic compression of the right atrium causes significant hemodynamic compromise and can lead to fatal outcomes. We describe the case of a 66-year old man with a past history of pulmonary tuberculosis that had undergone right pneumonectomy 40 years previously. He then presented with signs and symptoms of right-sided heart failure. These new signs and symptoms were recognized to be secondary to extrinsic compression of the right atrium, which was due to late-onset postpneumonectomy empyema, and the signs and symptoms were successfully relieved by performing open drainage of the empyema. PMID:22563341

  4. A case of recurrent desmoplastic malignant melanoma presenting as empyema with underlying lung mass.

    PubMed

    Patil, Mangaladevi S; Day, Kristopher M; Aswad, Bassam I; Hart, Jesse; Ng, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Desmoplastic malignant melanoma (DMM) is an extremely rare subtype of cutaneous melanoma that has diverse clinical presentations. We describe the unique case of a 57-year-old man presenting with empyema secondary to vascular occlusion from metastatic DMM. Only two other cases of DMM presenting as a lung mass have been previously reported in the literature. This report highlights potential insidious pathology of DMM, which requires a high clinical suspicion to properly diagnose and manage. PMID:27106614

  5. A case of recurrent desmoplastic malignant melanoma presenting as empyema with underlying lung mass

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Mangaladevi S.; Day, Kristopher M.; Aswad, Bassam I.; Hart, Jesse; Ng, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Desmoplastic malignant melanoma (DMM) is an extremely rare subtype of cutaneous melanoma that has diverse clinical presentations. We describe the unique case of a 57-year-old man presenting with empyema secondary to vascular occlusion from metastatic DMM. Only two other cases of DMM presenting as a lung mass have been previously reported in the literature. This report highlights potential insidious pathology of DMM, which requires a high clinical suspicion to properly diagnose and manage. PMID:27106614

  6. Gastric perforation presenting as empyema in a patient with pancreatic cancer on bevacizumab treatment.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yu-Yun; Lin, Zhong-Zhe; Liang, Po-Chin; Tien, Yu-Wen; Cheng, Ann-Lii

    2009-05-01

    Bowel perforation is a rare but life-threatening complication of bevacizumab, a new anticancer treatment. Patients with bowel perforation usually present with acute abdominal symptoms. Here a case history is presented to highlight a pancreatic cancer patient on bevacizumab chemotherapy who developed empyema as the first manifestation of gastric perforation. This unusual presentation warns physicians that bevacizumab-related bowel perforation can arise as a thoracic complication, without typical gastrointestinal manifestations, in an advanced cancer patient. PMID:19443383

  7. Characterization of a new mouse model of empyema and the mechanisms of pleural invasion by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Wilkosz, Sylwia; Edwards, Lindsey A; Bielsa, Silvia; Hyams, Catherine; Taylor, Abigail; Davies, Robert J O; Laurent, Geoffrey J; Chambers, Rachel C; Brown, Jeremy S; Lee, Y C Gary

    2012-02-01

    Although empyema affects more than 65,000 people each year in the United States and in the United Kingdom, there are limited data on the pathogenesis of pleural infection. We investigated the pathogenesis of empyema using animal and cell culture models of Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. The pathological processes during the development of empyema associated with murine pneumonia due to S. pneumoniae (strain D39) were investigated. Lungs were examined using histology, and pleural fluid and blood bacterial colony-forming units, cytokine levels, and cellular infiltrate were determined over time. Bacterial migration across mesothelial monolayers was investigated using cell culture techniques, flow cytometry, and confocal microscopy. After intranasal inoculation with 10(7) S. pneumoniae D39 strain, mice developed pneumonia associated with rapid bacterial invasion of the pleural space; raised intrapleural IL-8, VEGF, MCP-1, and TNF-α levels; and caused significant intrapleural neutrophilia followed by the development of fibrinous pleural adhesions. Bacterial clearance from the pleural space was poor, and in vitro assays demonstrated that S. pneumoniae crossed mesothelial layers by translocation through cells rather than by a paracellular route. This study describes key events during the development of S. pneumoniae empyema using a novel murine model of pneumonia-associated empyema that closely mimics human disease. The model allows for future assessment of molecular mechanisms involved in the development of empyema and evaluation of potential new therapies. The data suggest that transmigration of bacteria through mesothelial cells could be important in empyema development. Furthermore, upon entry the pleural cavity offers a protected compartment for the bacteria. PMID:21885676

  8. Infantile subdural empyema: The role of brain sonography and percutaneous subdural tapping in a resource-challenged region

    PubMed Central

    Kanu, Okezie Obasi; Nnoli, Chinenye; Olowoyeye, Omodele; Ojo, Omotayo; Esezobor, Christopher; Adeyomoye, Adekunle; Bankole, Olufemi; Asoegwu, Chinyere; Temiye, Edamisan

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study explored the outcome of children with patent anterior fontanelles who were treated with trans-fontanelle ultrasound scan (TFUSS), which is more affordable and available than CT scan and MRI in the diagnosis of childhood intracranial pathologies and treatment of subdural empyema, in developing countries. Patients and Methods: Seventeen infants with post-meningitic subdural empyema, diagnosed using trans-fontanelle ultrasound alone and treated with subdural tapping over a 31-months period, were studied. Results: Eleven patients presented with grades II and III Bannister and William grading for level of consciousness in intracranial subdural empyema. Aspirate from 7 (41.2%) patients were sterile. The most common organisms isolated were Streptococcus faecalis 3 (17.6%), Haemophilus Influenza 2 (11.8) and Staphylococcus aureus 2 (11.8), multiple organisms were isolated in three of the patients. Ninety-four percent (94%) of the patients had good outcome. Five subjects developed hydrocephalus, one patient had a recurrence of subdural empyema, four patients had residual hemiparesis, two of the four patients had speech difficulties, while one patient (~6%) died. Conclusion: While CT and MRI remain the gold standard for investigating intracranial lesions, transfontanelle ultrasonography is adequate for diagnosis of infantile subdural empyema in resource-challenged areas. Percutaneous subdural tap is an affordable and effective therapy in such patients with financial challenges. PMID:25288836

  9. Surgical treatment of empyema after pulmonary resection using pedicle skeletal muscle plombage, thoracoplasty, and continuous cavity ablution procedures: a report on three cases

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Tetsuya; Kuroda, Hiroaki; Sakao, Yukinori; Uchida, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    We present three cases of postoperative empyema after pulmonary resection: case 1, acute empyema without fistula after lobectomy and chest wall resection; case 2, continuing empyema with fistula and total left residual lung abscess after upper divisionectomy; and case 3, chronic empyema with middle lobe bronchopleural fistula after lower lobectomy. Pedicle skeletal muscle plombage into the cavity, thoracoplasty, and continuous cavity ablution with 24-h instillation of minocycline and saline solution through drains were used for treatment. In case 2, a completion extrapleural left pneumonectomy was concurrently performed. In all three cases, the surgery was successful; however, case 2 developed a massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage, which led to blood aspiration pneumonitis, renal failure, and death. Muscle plombage effectively achieves the closure of empyema cavity and thoracoplasty complements this. When a residual space remains, cavity ablution is considered to be effective. However, concurrent completion lung parenchyma resection might be excessively aggressive. PMID:27293855

  10. Combined Clagett procedure, negative pressure therapy, and thoracomyoplasty for treatment of late-onset postpneumonectomy empyema necessitatis

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Wojciech; Sirbu, Horia

    2015-01-01

    Late-onset post-pneumonectomy empyema necessitatis can occur many years after the surgery and is a life-threatening condition. A 58-year-old male presented with empyema necessitatis 18 years after undergoing pneumonectomy. He was successfully treated with a modified two-stage Clagett procedure and ambulatory negative pressure as the bridge between the stages. The 72-month follow-up was uneventful. The complete obliteration of the rigid and wide residual postpneumonectomy cavity was necessary to avoid re-recurrence of the infection. PMID:26702286

  11. The Aquamantys® system improves haemostasis and pneumostasis in open decortication for thoracic empyema

    PubMed Central

    Kadlec, Jakub; Iyer, Swetha; Mani, Aleksander; Solli, Piergiorgio; Scarci, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Background Decortication for thoracic empyema is associated with significant blood loss and prolonged postoperative air leak. We sought to assess the potential application of an irrigated-tip radiofrequency (RF) sealing device, in an attempt to reduce this morbidity. Methods Data for all patients undergoing open decortication (OD) for stage II thoracic empyema, using either conventional approach or facilitated by use of the Aquamantys® device, at a single thoracic surgical unit between April 2010 and July 2014, were retrospectively analysed. Unpaired t-test and Fisher’s exact test were used for statistical analysis. Results Thirty-three patients, aged 54±15 years (mean ± SD), and with a Charlson comorbidity index of 2.5±1.9 were included. Preoperative and intraoperative characteristics, including surgical time, were similar in the conventional and Aquamantys® groups. Patients in the Aquamantys group were less likely to require red cell transfusion (9/22 vs. 10/11 patients, P=0.024) and received lower volume transfusions [0.0 (2.0) vs. 3.0 (1.6) units (median, IQR), P<0.0001]; chest drain duration was shorter [3.0 (1.0) vs. 6.5 (6.8) days, P=0.006], as was length of postoperative hospital stay [6.0 (8.7) vs. 10.0 (4.6) days, P=0.031]. There was no demonstrable difference in mortality. Conclusions Our data indicates that the use of irrigated tip RF ablation is safe and effective in improving pneumostasis and haemostasis in decortication for thoracic empyema; and that this translates to morbidity and logistical benefit. PMID:27499941

  12. Does videothoracoscopy improve clinical outcomes when implemented as part of a pleural empyema treatment algorithm?

    PubMed Central

    Terra, Ricardo Mingarini; Waisberg, Daniel Reis; de Almeida, José Luiz Jesus; Devido, Marcela Santana; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate whether the inclusion of videothoracoscopy in a pleural empyema treatment algorithm would change the clinical outcome of such patients. METHODS: This study performed quality-improvement research. We conducted a retrospective review of patients who underwent pleural decortication for pleural empyema at our institution from 2002 to 2008. With the old algorithm (January 2002 to September 2005), open decortication was the procedure of choice, and videothoracoscopy was only performed in certain sporadic mid-stage cases. With the new algorithm (October 2005 to December 2008), videothoracoscopy became the first-line treatment option, whereas open decortication was only performed in patients with a thick pleural peel (>2 cm) observed by chest scan. The patients were divided into an old algorithm (n = 93) and new algorithm (n = 113) group and compared. The main outcome variables assessed included treatment failure (pleural space reintervention or death up to 60 days after medical discharge) and the occurrence of complications. RESULTS: Videothoracoscopy and open decortication were performed in 13 and 80 patients from the old algorithm group and in 81 and 32 patients from the new algorithm group, respectively (p<0.01). The patients in the new algorithm group were older (41±1 vs. 46.3±16.7 years, p = 0.014) and had higher Charlson Comorbidity Index scores [0(0-3) vs. 2(0-4), p = 0.032]. The occurrence of treatment failure was similar in both groups (19.35% vs. 24.77%, p = 0.35), although the complication rate was lower in the new algorithm group (48.3% vs. 33.6%, p = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: The wider use of videothoracoscopy in pleural empyema treatment was associated with fewer complications and unaltered rates of mortality and reoperation even though more severely ill patients were subjected to videothoracoscopic surgery. PMID:22760892

  13. Salmonella pneumonia complicated with encysted empyema in an immunocompromised youth: Case report and literature Review.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Nermin Kamal

    2016-01-01

    In this case report we described a Bahraini male patient of twenty years of age, a smoker and diagnosed with stage IV B Hodgkin lymphoma. He presented with fever, nonproductive cough, upper back pain and shortness of breath due to right upper lobe pneumonia with right encysted pleural effusion. Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis was isolated from the sputum. He was successfully treated with 2 weeks of ceftriaxone followed by 2 weeks of oral cefixime. This was the first case of encysted empyema caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis reported in the Kingdom of Bahrain. The different aspects of pulmonary Salmonella infections were discussed and the literature was reviewed. PMID:27131011

  14. Salvage therapy with topical antifungal for Aspergillus fumigatus empyema complicating extrapleural pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Manoj; Guleri, Achyut; Zacharias, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    We describe an unusual case of Aspergillus fumigatus empyema and bronchopleural fistulae after extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) and chemoradiotherapy (CRT), which was treated successfully under salvage conditions with debridement, an innovative topical antifungal application and supplemented systemic antifungal therapy and which went on for a definitive surgical procedure. Combinations of CRT and EPP have been recommended in a select group of patients with malignant mesothelioma. Irrespective of the combination, EPP is associated with mortality in the range of 4–15% and a complication rate as high as 62%. PMID:22617507

  15. Management of an intrapleural foreign body and empyema with video-assisted thoracoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ekeke, Chigozirim; Noble, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Intrapleural foreign bodies are rare and there are few reports on the occurrence and management of this uncommon clinical presentation. We report a case of a patient with a history of ingesting multiple foreign bodies, which resulted in multiple laparotomy procedures for extraction. The patient recently required surgical removal of innumerable ingested foreign bodies from the stomach and developed a left empyema post-operatively. Subsequent imaging studies revealed evidence of a foreign object in the left pleural space without evidence of an esophageal perforation or diaphragm injury.

  16. [REACTIVATION OF TUBERCULOSIS PRESENTING WITH EMPYEMA DUE TO ANTICANCER CHEMOTHERAPY FOR DIFFUSE LARGE B CELL LYMPHOMA].

    PubMed

    Yuba, Tatsuya; Hatsuse, Mayumi; Kodama, Mai; Uda, Sayaka; Yoshimura, Akihiro; Kurisu, Naoko

    2016-04-01

    A 79-year-old man with a history of tuberculosis was found to have chronic empyema in the right lung and was diagnosed with malignant diffuse large-cell lymphoma (Ann Arbor stage IIE). After completion of one course of rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, pirarubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (R-CHOP) chemotherapy, the patient developed lung abscess and sepsis caused by Streptococcus intermedius. This condition was treated with antimicrobial agents, and chemotherapy was resumed. After the second course, the chemotherapy regimen was continued without prednisolone, and after administration of the third course, a chest wall mass was found in the right lung. An acid-fast bacillus smear test of the abscess aspirate was positive, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis was detected in a polymerase chain reaction assay, leading to a diagnosis of perithoracic tuberculosis. Chemotherapy for the lymphoma was discontinued, and treatment with four oral antitubercular agents was started. This treatment led to remission of perithoracic tuberculosis. In Japan, tuberculous scar and chronic empyema are relatively common findings, and relapse of tuberculosis should always be considered for patients with these findings during chemotherapy and immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:27530021

  17. Subdural empyema following lumbar facet joint injection: An exceeding rare complication.

    PubMed

    Fayeye, Oluwafikayo; Silva, Adikarige Haritha Dulanka; Chavda, Swarupsinh; Furtado, Navin Raoul

    2016-01-01

    Chronic low back pain is extremely common with a life time prevalence estimated at greater than 70% [1]. Facet joint arthrosis is thought to be the causative aetiological substrate in approximately 25% of chronic low back pain cases [2]. Facet joint injection is a routine intervention in the armamentarium for both the diagnostic and therapeutic management of chronic low back pain. In fact, a study by Carrino et al. reported in excess of 94,000 facet joint injection procedures were carried out in the US in 1999 [3]. Although generally considered safe, the procedure is not entirely without risk. Complications including bleeding, infection, exacerbation of pain, dural puncture headache, and pneumothorax have been described. We report a rare case of a 47-year-old female patient who developed a left L4/5 facet septic arthrosis with an associated subdural empyema and meningitis following facet joint injection. This case is unique, as to the best of our knowledge no other case of subdural empyema following facet joint injection has been reported in the literature. Furthermore this case serves to highlight the potential serious adverse sequelae of a routine and apparently innocuous intervention. The need for medical practitioners to be alert to and respond rapidly to the infective complications of facet joint injection cannot be understated. PMID:27154449

  18. [The current role of thoracoplasty in treatment of chronic pleural empyema].

    PubMed

    Stamatis, G; Goebel, R; Konietzko, N; Greschuchna, D

    1992-11-01

    To demonstrate the indication for surgery, the preoperative and postoperative course, and to assess the influence of thoracoplasty on respiratory physiology, the data of patients subjected to thoracoplasty during the past 30 years at our hospital were evaluated. Final assessment was performed separately for patients with and without preceding pulmonary resection. In 21 cases there was an unspecific empyema of the pleura and in 6 cases a specific one; in 14 cases there was also a concomitant bronchopleural fistula. After a washing-out period of 92 days (24-283) and after surgery had been unsuccessful in 9 patients, standard thoracoplasty was performed, complemented by a "jalousie" ("Venetian blind") plasty after Heller. Postoperative lethality was 11.1%. 5 patients developed pleuro-cutaneous fistulas that healed by local treatment; in one patient, a small residual cavity remained that required an additional plasty for correction. In 94% of the patients who had been operated upon, scoliosis occurred convex to the thoracoplasty; this was more marked in patients in whom lung resection had been performed than in patients without resection. Restrictive ventilatory disorders were seen in the lung function of 55% of the patients, whereas mixed restrictive-obstructive disorders occurred in 45%. Ergospirometry resulted under load besides in an increased respiratory minute volume (AMV), in a proportionate dead space of the AMV which was significantly higher than preoperatively. Despite the considerable functional and aesthetic consequences resulting therefrom, thoracoplasty still has its justification in refractory pleura empyemas as an ultimate means of cleaning up. PMID:1475265

  19. Tuberculous Empyema Necessitatis in a 40-Year-Old Immunocompetent Male

    PubMed Central

    Babamahmoodi, Farhang; Sheikholeslami, Roya; Ahangarkani, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Empyema necessitans (EN) is a kind of empyema that diffuses to extrapleural space and can involve chest pain. Tuberculosis (TB) is the most common cause of EN. This disease can be found in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent individuals but is usually seen in the immunocompromised individuals. Because of long duration and ambiguous symptoms of the disease, diagnosis can be hard. The disease can be treated both medically and surgically. Missing the disease can lead to undesirable effects on patient's condition and health care setting. This problem can be seen in endemic area in which controlling of TB is hard. Report of the disease in local health care center for desirable treatment and health maintenance is necessary. We explained a rare case of pulmonary TB in a patient that was healthy in other fields and just showed the minimum systemic symptoms. The patient came with a mass in lower part of back of chest cage, with a mild pain. The imaging survey showed EN. Smear and Ziehl-Neelsen stains from subcutaneous aspiration were positive for TB. This case showed importance of clinical view and awareness of this silent but serious disease in endemic area especially for TB. PMID:27555974

  20. New trends in the diagnosis and treatment in parapneumonic effusion and empyema.

    PubMed

    Na, Moon Jun; Dikensoy, Oner; Light, Richard W

    2008-01-01

    Despite treatment with antibiotics, patients with complicated parapneumonic effusion (PPE) and empyema have an increased morbidity and mortality due at least in part to inappropriate management of the pleural effusion. PPE should be considered in all patients with pneumonia as antibiotic therapy is being initiated. If the diaphragms cannot be seen throughout their length on the chest radiographs, a lateral decubitus radiograph, ultrasonography or computerized tomography scan should be obtained. If the effusion is more than 10 mm in thickness, a therapeutic thoracentesis should be performed. If the fluid cannot all be removed and the characteristics of the pleural fluid indicate a poor prognosis, a chest tube should be inserted. If the drainage is incomplete due to loculation of the PPE intrapleural fibrinolytics or thoracoscopy should be performed. If the lung does not reexpand completely with thoracoscopy, then decortication should be performed without delay. PMID:18330766

  1. Empyema and bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in children under five years of age*, **

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Maria Regina Alves; Nascimento-Carvalho, Cristiana Maria Costa; Ferrero, Fernando; Berezin, Eitan Naaman; Ruvinsky, Raul; Sant'Anna, Clemax Couto; Brandileone, Maria Cristina de Cunto; March, Maria de Fátima Bazhuni Pombo; Maggi, Ruben; Feris-Iglesias, Jesus; Benguigui, Yehuda; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira

    2014-01-01

    We compared bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia (BPP) and pneumococcal empyema (PE), in terms of clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings, in under-fives. A cross-sectional nested cohort study, involving under-fives (102 with PE and 128 with BPP), was conducted at 12 centers in Argentina, Brazil, and the Dominican Republic. Among those with PE, mean age was higher; disease duration was longer; and tachypnea, dyspnea, and high leukocyte counts were more common. Among those with BPP, fever and lethargy were more common. It seems that children with PE can be distinguished from those with BPP on the basis of clinical and laboratory findings. Because both conditions are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, prompt diagnosis is crucial. PMID:24626272

  2. A rarely seen cause for empyema: Leuconostoc mesenteroıdes.

    PubMed

    Usta-Atmaca, Hanife; Akbas, Feray; Karagoz, Yesim; Piskinpasa, Mehmet Emin

    2015-04-01

    Leuconostoc species are Gram-positive, non-motile, vancomycin-resistant bacteria placed within the family of Streptococcaceae. They naturally exist in food and are important in the sauerkraut, milk and wine industries due to their role in fermentation. Infections caused by Leuconostocs are generally reported in immunosuppressed patients with an underlying disease, or in those who were previously treated with vancomycin. Central venous catheter insertion is also a risk factor for introducing bacteria into the body. Although they are resistant to vancomycin, leuconostocs are sensitive to erythromycin and clindamycin. Here, we report a case with pleural empyema due to Leuconostoc mesenteroides in an otherwise healthy person whose occupation is known to be selling pickles. PMID:25881534

  3. Empyema of the gallbladder detected by gallium scan and abdominal ultrasonography

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, O.M.; Kovac, A.; Plauche, W.E.

    1981-08-01

    A case history of patient with a abnormal gallium uptake and sonogram in the region of the gallbladder is described. The abnormality was interpreted as empyema of the gallbladder and later proven surgically. A liver-spleen scan was normal except for slight prominence of the hilar structures. Gallium citrate Ga-67 scans done at 24 and 48 hours showed a persistent area of increased tracer localization around the gallbladder with a central clear zone in the latter scan. Ultrasonography revealed poor definition and slight thickening of the gallbladder wall. Because of the lack of specificity of gallium scans, the combination of ultrasonic imaging and gallium uptake scans appears much superior in diagnostic efficiency than either of the two alone. The sequence of performing these two examinations does not seem to be critical though it was prefered that the scintigraphy precede the sonography.

  4. Empyema and bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in children under five years of age.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Maria Regina Alves; Nascimento-Carvalho, Cristiana Maria Costa; Ferrero, Fernando; Berezin, Eitan Naaman; Ruvinsky, Raul; Sant'Anna, Clemax Couto; Brandileone, Maria Cristina de Cunto; March, Maria de Fátima Bazhuni Pombo; Maggi, Ruben; Feris-Iglesias, Jesus; Benguigui, Yehuda; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira

    2014-01-01

    We compared bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia (BPP) and pneumococcal empyema (PE), in terms of clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings, in under-fives. A cross-sectional nested cohort study, involving under-fives (102 with PE and 128 with BPP), was conducted at 12 centers in Argentina, Brazil, and the Dominican Republic. Among those with PE, mean age was higher; disease duration was longer; and tachypnea, dyspnea, and high leukocyte counts were more common. Among those with BPP, fever and lethargy were more common. It seems that children with PE can be distinguished from those with BPP on the basis of clinical and laboratory findings. Because both conditions are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, prompt diagnosis is crucial. PMID:24626272

  5. Challenging pyogenic cerebral abscess complicated by subdural empyema. A case report.

    PubMed

    Valencia, M P; Moon, A

    2012-12-20

    Brain abscesses develop in response to a parenchymal infection with pyogenic bacteria, beginning as a localized area of cerebritis and evolving into a suppurative lesion surrounded by a well-vascularized fibrotic capsule. The leading etiologic agents of brain abscess are the streptococcal strains and S. aureus. Abscesses may also be secondary to fungal or parasitic organisms. Brain abscess represents a significant medical problem, accounting for one in every 10,000 hospital admissions in the United States, and remains a serious situation despite recent advances made in detection and therapy. These lesions often produce complex clinical and radiologic findings and require prompt recognition and treatment to avoid a fatal neurologic outcome. Subdural empyema represents an important type of intracranial suppurative infectious-inflammatory disorder. Clinically, these patients initially have signs and symptoms of meningitis, but this course might be complicated later by the development of seizures and focal neurologic signs. PMID:24029180

  6. A Simple Method for Differentiating Complicated Parapneumonic Effusion/Empyema from Parapneumonic Effusion Using the Split Pleura Sign and the Amount of Pleural Effusion on Thoracic CT

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimoto, Naoki; Saraya, Takeshi; Light, Richard W.; Tsukahara, Yayoi; Koide, Takashi; Kurai, Daisuke; Ishii, Haruyuki; Kimura, Hirokazu; Goto, Hajime; Takizawa, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Background Pleural separation, the “split pleura” sign, has been reported in patients with empyema. However, the diagnostic yield of the split pleura sign for complicated parapneumonic effusion (CPPE)/empyema and its utility for differentiating CPPE/empyema from parapneumonic effusion (PPE) remains unclear. This differentiation is important because CPPE/empyema patients need thoracic drainage. In this regard, the aim of this study was to develop a simple method to distinguish CPPE/empyema from PPE using computed tomography (CT) focusing on the split pleura sign, fluid attenuation values (HU: Hounsfield units), and amount of fluid collection measured on thoracic CT prior to diagnostic thoracentesis. Methods A total of 83 consecutive patients who underwent chest CT and were diagnosed with CPPE (n=18)/empyema (n=18) or PPE (n=47) based on the diagnostic thoracentesis were retrospectively analyzed. Results On univariate analysis, the split pleura sign (odds ratio (OR), 12.1; p<0.001), total amount of pleural effusion (≥30 mm) (OR, 6.13; p<0.001), HU value≥10 (OR, 5.94; p=0.001), and the presence of septum (OR, 6.43; p=0.018), atelectasis (OR, 6.83; p=0.002), or air (OR, 9.90; p=0.002) in pleural fluid were significantly higher in the CPPE/empyema group than in the PPE group. On multivariate analysis, only the split pleura sign (hazard ratio (HR), 6.70; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.91-23.5; p=0.003) and total amount of pleural effusion (≥30 mm) on thoracic CT (HR, 7.48; 95%CI, 1.76-31.8; p=0.006) were risk factors for empyema. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the presence of both split pleura sign and total amount of pleural effusion (≥30 mm) on thoracic CT for CPPE/empyema were 79.4%, 80.9%, 75%, and 84.4%, respectively, with an area under the curve of 0.801 on receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Conclusion This study showed a high diagnostic yield of the split pleura sign and total

  7. [Vacuum-assisted Closure Therapy for Residual Space after Open Window Thoracotomy for Pleural Empyema due to Bronchopleural Fistula].

    PubMed

    Togo, Takeo; Hasumi, Tohru; Hoshi, Fumihiko; Hoshikawa, Yasushi; Okada, Yoshinori; Saito, Yasuki

    2016-05-01

    A 73-year-old man underwent right middle-lower bilobectomy for lung adenocarcinoma. He suffered from pneumonia followed by empyema due to bronchopleural fistula. On day 19 after the operation, an open window thoracostomy was created. Then the pleural space was treated conservatively with saline irrigation and petrolatum gauze packing. Progressive formation of healthy granulation tissue was observed around the bronchopleural fistula and the adjacent pulmonary artery, resulting in a complete closure of the bronchopleural fistula. And then we applied vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy to the residual pleural cavity. At 4 weeks after the initiation of VAC therapy, the pleural cavity was completely filled with granulation tissue and re-expanded residual lung. In conclusion, VAC therapy is a safe and effective treatment for residual space after open window thoracostomy for empyema due to bronchopleural fistula, if it is applied after closure of bronchopleural fistula and adequate granulation tissue formation on the great vessels. PMID:27220922

  8. Experience with Vacuum-Assisted Closure in the Management of Postpneumonectomy Empyema: An Analysis of Eight Cases.

    PubMed

    Karapinar, Kemal; Saydam, Özkan; Metin, Muzaffer; Erdogan, Sertan; Aker, Cemal; Arik, Burcu; Citak, Necati

    2016-04-01

    Background The treatment of postpneumonectomic empyema is challenging. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) in the treatment of patients with open window thoracostomy (OWT). Methods Between January 2010 and April 2014, eight patients developed empyema following pneumonectomy for malignant diseases in our department and then underwent an OWT with subsequent VAC therapy; their cases were retrospectively studied. Each session of VAC therapy lasted 72 hours, and therapy was completed after approximately 6 sessions. Results OWT in six patients resulted in either decreased size or complete closure after VAC treatment. Five patients had a bronchopleural fistula (BPF), which was closed either with a tracheal stent (three patients), primary suture, or omentoplasty. The BPF in one of these patients closed during VAC therapy. The treatment failed in two patients due to the microfistula becoming obvious in one and persistence of the fistula in the other. Conclusion We believe that the use of VAC in the treatment of postpneumonectomy empyema is effective, except for patients with BPF. PMID:25602849

  9. Conservative management of empyema-complicated post-lobectomy bronchopleural fistulas: experience of consecutive 13 cases in 9 years

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Rui; Ying, Peng-Qing; Xie, Dong; Dai, Chen-Yang; Zha, Jun-Yan; Chen, Tao; Jiang, Ge-Ning; Fei, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Background Bronchopleural fistula (BPF) is an infrequent but life-threatening complication after lung surgery. Tentative closure of the fistula and irrigation have been the conventional treatments, but are also surgically challenging and associated with a considerable failure rate. This study reports on a conservative practice of this difficult issue, in aim to examine its outcomes. Method All enrolled cases were handled consecutively from September 2006 to June 2015. The empyema was first properly drained till disseminated pneumonia controlled. After conducting lavage, tube drainage was gradually transited to postural drainage. During the follow-up, information on tube removal, fistula healing, and survival were recorded. Results Thirteen cases were enrolled, including 9 rights and 4 lefts. The primary diseases were lung cancer [10], lung abscess [1], organizing pneumonia [1], and aspergillosis [1]. Early fistula (≤30 days postoperatively) occurred in 8 cases and late fistula (>30 days postoperatively) in 5 cases. Two patients underwent debridement to ascertain complete drainage. Chest tubes retained from 7 to 114 days (mean 40.54±30.49 days) before removal. At follow-up, we observed gradually narrowing-down of all residual cavities, and symptoms of fistula and empyema eventually disappeared in all patients. No complication or death occurred during the follow-up. Conclusions Conservative management by a combination of tube and postural drainage provides an effective and safe treatment for empyema-complicated post-lobectomy BPFs.

  10. Empyema thoracis: a review of a 4 1/2 year experience of cases requiring surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Forty, J; Yeatman, M; Wells, F C

    1990-03-01

    During the period January 1985 to June 1989, 53 cases of empyema thoracis were treated surgically at Papworth hospital regional cardio-thoracic centre. Of these, 47 patients underwent thoracotomy and decortication as their primary surgical treatment. The remaining six patients were treated by rib resection. Prior to surgical referral 20 of these had undergone previous tube drainage for a mean period of 18 days (range 7-42 days). The principle cause of empyema was broncho-pulmonary infection. In 57% of cases no organisms were isolated from pleural debris or fluid. In the remainder, a variety of organisms were encountered. Early surgical drainage and freeing of the underlying lung met with good results and no deaths in the uncomplicated group. The median duration of postoperative chest drainage for the whole group was 7 days (mean 12 days) and median postoperative in-hospital stay was 13 days (mean 20 days). This is in stark contrast to the duration of hospitalization of patients prior to surgical referral (mean 103.6 days). There were five deaths. All occurred in patients with severe debilitating associated illnesses. In these patients initial drainage of the empyema space with a tube or by rib resection may have allowed recovery prior to more major surgery. PMID:2371438

  11. [Invasive pneumococcal disease in two non-vaccinated pediatric cases: pleural empyema and bacteremia].

    PubMed

    Kanık Yüksek, Saliha; Gülhan, Belgin; Tezer, Hasan; Özkaya Parlakay, Aslınur; Uzun Kenan, Bahriye; Sayed Oskovi, Hülya; Nar Ötgün, Selin

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, a gram-positive diplococcus, is the causative agent of invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPDs) characterized by severe infections such as bacteraemia, sepsis and meningitis. S.pneumoniae and IPDs are situated in the focus of the vaccine studies because of being encompassed of a significant burden of disease in the world, severe mortality and morbidities, and location in vaccine-preventable diseases group. Although S.pneumoniae has more than 90 defined serotypes, certain serotypes are often identified as the cause of IPDs. Individuals with comorbid and chronic diseases, primary or secondary immune deficiencies, and <2 years or >65 years of age are at increased risk for IPDs. Currently, a 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine and also 7, 10 and 13 valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccines (PCV) have been produced for pneumococci. Phase studies of protein based vaccines, which will provide protection independent of serotypes, and 15-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine are still ongoing. In Turkey, in November 2008 PCV7 and in April 2011 PCV13 have been implemented in the national immunization program. First case of the pneumococcal unvaccinated cases presented in this report was a 6-year-old girl patient with pneumonia and pleural empyema due to S.pneumoniae serotype 1, without any underlying risk factors. The other case is a 52-days-old male patient, who had a history of pneumococcal septicemia in the newborn period and was followed for bacteremia associated S.pneumoniae serotype 12B and diagnosed as complement deficiency on follow-up. S.pneumoniae serotype 1 is within serotypes covered by 10 and 13 valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine that are in use today, and is a highly invasive strain often isolated in pneumococcal lobar pneumonia and empyema. S.pneumoniae serotype 12B is a non-vaccine serotype not included in any of conjugate and polysaccharide vaccines, and usually obtained in respiratory infections

  12. Which should be appropriate surgical treatment for subtentorial epidural empyema? Burr-hole evacuation versus decompressive craniectomy: Review of the literature with a case report

    PubMed Central

    Köksal, Vaner; Özgür, Abdulkadir; Terzi, Suat

    2016-01-01

    Subtentorial empyema is a rare intracranial complication of chronic otitis media. Moreover, if not correctly treated, it is a life-threatening infection. Epidural and subdural empyemas on subtentorial space have different effects. This difference is not mentioned in literature. If the distinction can be made, surgical treatment method will be different, and the desired surgical treatment may be less minimal invasive. A 26-year-old male patient was found to have developed epidural empyema in the subtentorial space. We performed a burr-hole evacuation in this case because there was low cerebellar edema, Also, the general condition of the patient was good, the empyema was a convex image on the lower surface of tentorium on magnetic resonance images, and when the dura mater base is reached during mastoidectomy for chronic otitis media, we were observed to drain a purulent material through the epidural space. After 10 days from surgery increased posterior fossa edema caused hydrocephalus. Therefore, ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion was performed. The patient fully recovered and was discharged after 6 weeks. Complete correction in the posterior fossa was observed by postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Burr-hole evacuation from inside of the mastoidectomy cavity for subtentorial epidural empyema is an effective and minimal invasive surgical treatment. PMID:27057210

  13. Eikenella corrodens: an unusual cause of severe parapneumonic infection and empyema in immunocompetent patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hoyler, S. L.; Antony, S.

    2001-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, Eikenella corrodens has increasingly been recognized for its pathogenic potential. Previously identified as an organism most likely to cause opportunistic infection in the immunocompromised host, Eikenella more recently has been implicated in a number of clinical infections in non-immunocompromised patients. We report a case of community-acquired pneumonia, caused by Eikenella, in a patient with diabetes mellitus and a past history of testicular cancer. A review of the literature was conducted in order to review other cases of pulmonary infection with Eikenella, in immunocompetent adults. The condition was diagnosed in 15 patients, occurring most often in men with a mean age of 50. Patients most often presented with fever, cough and pleuritic chest pain. Complications often involved parapneumonic effusion, empyema, and necrotic parenchymal disease. Mortality rates appear to be low. Eikenella is most often susceptible to ampicillin and has variable susceptibility to aminoglycosides. The addition of clindamycin in non-immunocompromised patients with Eikenella infection, co-infected with other pathogens, also appears to be useful. Surgical intervention plays an important role in the recovery of these patients. PMID:11446395

  14. Bacterial sinusitis and its frightening complications: subdural empyema and Lemierre syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, German Alcoba; Ferreira, Cristiane Rúbia; Felipe-Silva, Aloísio; Gilio, Alfredo Elias

    2015-01-01

    The symptoms of a previously healthy 14-year-old female with an initial history of tooth pain and swelling of the left maxillary evolved to a progressive headache and altered neurological findings characterized by auditory hallucinations, sleep disturbances, and aggressiveness. She was brought to the emergency department after 21 days of the initial symptoms. An initial computed tomography (CT) scan showed frontal subdural empyema with bone erosion. The symptoms continued to evolve to brain herniation 24 hours after admission. A second CT scan showed a left internal jugular vein thrombosis. The outcome was unfavorable and the patient died on the second day after admission. The autopsy findings depicted rarefaction of the cranial bone at the left side of the frontal sinus, and overt meningitis. The severe infection was further complicated by thrombophlebitis of the left internal jugular vein up to the superior vena cava with septic embolization to the lungs, pneumonia, and sepsis. This case report highlights the degree of severity that a trivial infection can reach. The unusual presentation of the sinusitis may have wrongly guided the approach of this unfortunate case. PMID:26894042

  15. Bacterial sinusitis and its frightening complications: subdural empyema and Lemierre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Benevides, Gabriel Núncio; Salgado, German Alcoba; Ferreira, Cristiane Rúbia; Felipe-Silva, Aloísio; Gilio, Alfredo Elias

    2015-01-01

    The symptoms of a previously healthy 14-year-old female with an initial history of tooth pain and swelling of the left maxillary evolved to a progressive headache and altered neurological findings characterized by auditory hallucinations, sleep disturbances, and aggressiveness. She was brought to the emergency department after 21 days of the initial symptoms. An initial computed tomography (CT) scan showed frontal subdural empyema with bone erosion. The symptoms continued to evolve to brain herniation 24 hours after admission. A second CT scan showed a left internal jugular vein thrombosis. The outcome was unfavorable and the patient died on the second day after admission. The autopsy findings depicted rarefaction of the cranial bone at the left side of the frontal sinus, and overt meningitis. The severe infection was further complicated by thrombophlebitis of the left internal jugular vein up to the superior vena cava with septic embolization to the lungs, pneumonia, and sepsis. This case report highlights the degree of severity that a trivial infection can reach. The unusual presentation of the sinusitis may have wrongly guided the approach of this unfortunate case. PMID:26894042

  16. [Intranasal endoscopy-controlled surgery of the frontal sinus in mucopyocele and empyema].

    PubMed

    Hosemann, W; Leuwer, A; Wigand, M E

    1992-04-01

    Twenty-six patients diagnosed as having mucopyoceles or empyemas of the frontal sinus were submitted to endoscopy-aided endonasal surgery of the anterior ethmoid and the adjacent frontal sinus between April 1989 and July 1991. Eighteen patients followed-up for a period exceeding the 3 months normally required for wound healing are presented (follow-up 3-22 months, mean 11 months). The subjective assessment of the patient was good to excellent in 16 cases. Two of these patients refused endoscopic follow-up, since they felt so well that they saw no need for it. At endoscopy, the frontal sinus was highly accessible in 5 patients, while in another 8 patients with a smaller frontal ostium it was possible to explore it adequately. Two patients in whom symptoms persisted had to be submitted to transfacial revisional surgery. An increasing percentage of patients with inflammatory frontal sinus disease can be treated by endoscopic endonasal surgery followed by thorough endoscopic aftercare. PMID:1575848

  17. Esophgeal Perforation and Bilateral Empyema Following Endoscopic EsophyX Transoral Incisionless Fundoplication.

    PubMed

    Edriss, Hawa; El-Bakush, Amal; Nugent, Kenneth

    2014-11-01

    Transoral incisionless fundoplication (TIF) has been used for endoscopic treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). TIF using the EsophyX device system (EndoGastric Solutions) was designed to create a full-thickness valve at the gastroesophageal junction through the insertion of multiple fasteners; it improves GERD, reduces proton pump inhibitor use, and improves quality of life. Although TIF is effective in select patients, a significant subset of patients undergoing TIF develop persistent or recurrent GERD symptoms and may need antireflux surgery to control the GERD symptoms. We now report a 48-year-old man with chronic GERD unresponsive to medical management. He underwent TIF complicated by esophageal perforation and developed mediastinitis, left pneumothorax, bilateral pleural effusions, and acute respiratory failure. He required chest tube placement and bilateral decortication for treatment of nonresolving empyemas. Additional postmarketing studies are required to assess the safety, efficacy, and clinical outcomes of this novel procedure, and patients undergoing this procedure need close postprocedural follow-up. PMID:25505723

  18. Giant frontal mucocele complicated by subdural empyema: treatment of a rare association.

    PubMed

    Visocchi, Massimiliano; Esposito, Giuseppe; Della Pepa, Giuseppe Maria; Doglietto, Francesco; Nucci, Carlotta Ginevra; Fontanella, Marco Maria; Montano, Nicola

    2012-03-01

    Giant frontal mucocele (GFM) is an extremely rare cause of frontal lobe syndrome. Subdural empyema (SDE) is an uncommon complication of paranasal sinisutis, for which craniotomy and decompressive craniotomy are the most effective surgical procedures. A 54-year-old man was brought unconscious to the emergency room where recurrent generalized seizures occurred. Heroine abuse, HCV-related hepatitis, prolonged antibiotic therapy for treatment of purulent rhinorrhea, along with recent personality changes were reported. High white blood cell count, pansinusitis, GFM, SDE and cerebritis were documented. The patient underwent bifrontal craniotomy in emergency, extensive drilling of the inner aspect of the frontal bone, surgical toilet of the enlarged frontal sinus and its "cranialization". Prevotella intermedia and Fusobacterium nucleatum were isolated and antibiotic therapy was started intravenously and then continued orally for 3 months. 2 years later the patient has recovered, though minor signs of frontal lobe syndrome persist. To the authors knowledge, this is the first case of GFM with SDE reported in the literature. Although decompressive craniectomy is advocated in extreme conditions, as in this case, "internal decompressive craniectomy", obtained with craniotomy and cranialization of the frontal sinuses, is strongly advocated in cases of SDE associated with megasinuses. PMID:22427297

  19. Spontaneous Subdural Empyema Following a High-Parasitemia Falciparum Infection in a 58-Year-Old Female From a Malaria-Endemic Region

    PubMed Central

    Pallangyo, Pedro; Lyimo, Frederick; Nicholaus, Paulina; Kain, Ulimbakisya; Janabi, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Malaria remains a significant public health problem of the tropical world. Falciparum malaria is most prevalent in the sub-Saharan African region, which harbors about 90% of all malaria cases and fatalities globally. Infection by the falciparum species often manifests with a spectrum of multi-organ complications (eg, cerebral malaria), some of which are life-threatening. Spontaneous subdural empyema is a very rare complication of cerebral malaria that portends a very poor prognosis unless diagnosed and treated promptly. We report a case of spontaneous subdural empyema in a 58-year-old woman from Tanzania who presented with high-grade fever, decreased urine output, and altered sensorium.

  20. Is open decortication superior to fibrinolytic therapy as a first line treatment in the management of pleural empyema?

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Sultan; Azam, Hammad; Basheer, Imran

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To confirm that either Fibrinolytic therapy or open decortication which of the two is an effective First line treatment of pleural empyema. Methods: This prospective comparative study was conducted in the department of surgery Sheikh Zayed Medical College and Hospital, Rahim Yaar Khan. Seventy eight (78) patients were included in this study. There were two groups of patients; Group I (n=35) patients treated with fibrinolytic therapy, Group II (n=43) patients treated with open decortication. Data was entered and analyzed in SPSS v16. Student’s t-test was used for comparison of quantitative variables. Chi-square and Fisher’s Exact test were used for comparison of qualitative variables. P-value ≤ 0.05 was taken as significant difference. Results: There was no significant difference in base baseline characteristics of patients of Group I and II. Incidence of comorbidities was also same between the groups. Most of the patients in Group I and II were in empyema stage III. Fluid cultures was positive in 33 (94.3%) patients in group I and 39 (90.7%) patients in group II. 30 (85.7%) was successfully treated using fibrinolytic therapy but this therapy failed in five (14.3%) patients, two of these patients expired within the hospital. There was only one (2.3%) treatment failure in open decortication Group that patient expired within the hospital (p-value 0.04). Overall duration of hospitalization was significantly high in fibrinolytic group, this was 17.6± 1.95 days versus 12.09± 2.18 days in open decortication group (p-value<0.0001). There was no significant difference regarding operative mortality within the two groups. Conclusion: Open Drainage is associated with better outcomes as compared to fibrinolytic therapy when used as a First line treatment of empyema. PMID:27182233

  1. Dose dependency of outcomes of intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy in new rabbit empyema models.

    PubMed

    Komissarov, Andrey A; Florova, Galina; Azghani, Ali O; Buchanan, Ann; Boren, Jake; Allen, Timothy; Rahman, Najib M; Koenig, Kathleen; Chamiso, Mignote; Karandashova, Sophia; Henry, James; Idell, Steven

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of empyema (EMP) is increasing worldwide; EMP generally occurs with pleural loculation and impaired drainage is often treated with intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy (IPFT) or surgery. A number of IPFT options are used clinically with empiric dosing and variable outcomes in adults. To evaluate mechanisms governing intrapleural fibrinolysis and disease outcomes, models of Pasteurella multocida and Streptococcus pneumoniae were generated in rabbits and the animals were treated with either human tissue (tPA) plasminogen activator or prourokinase (scuPA). Rabbit EMP was characterized by the development of pleural adhesions detectable by chest ultrasonography and fibrinous coating of the pleura. Similar to human EMP, rabbits with EMP accumulated sizable, 20- to 40-ml fibrinopurulent pleural effusions associated with extensive intrapleural organization, significantly increased pleural thickness, suppression of fibrinolytic and plasminogen-activating activities, and accumulation of high levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, plasminogen, and extracellular DNA. IPFT with tPA (0.145 mg/kg) or scuPA (0.5 mg/kg) was ineffective in rabbit EMP (n = 9 and 3 for P. multocida and S. pneumoniae, respectively); 2 mg/kg tPA or scuPA IPFT (n = 5) effectively cleared S. pneumoniae-induced EMP collections in 24 h with no bleeding observed. Although intrapleural fibrinolytic activity for up to 40 min after IPFT was similar for effective and ineffective doses of fibrinolysin, it was lower for tPA than for scuPA treatments. These results demonstrate similarities between rabbit and human EMP, the importance of pleural fluid PAI-1 activity, and levels of plasminogen in the regulation of intrapleural fibrinolysis and illustrate the dose dependency of IPFT outcomes in EMP. PMID:27343192

  2. Management of pleural empyema with a vacuum-assisted closure device and reconstruction of open thoracic window in a patient with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Munguía-Canales, Daniel Alejandro; Vargas-Mendoza, Gary Kosai; Alvarez-Bestoff, Gustavo; Calderón-Abbo, Moisés Cutiel

    2013-10-01

    The patient is a 21-year-old female, diagnosed with cryptogenic cirrhosis at the age of 9. She presented with left post-pneumonic empyema that did not remit with conventional medical management and evolved with fistulization to the skin in the 7th intercostal space in the left subscapular region. We performed an open thoracic window procedure, and on the 6th day the patient was sent home with a portable vacuum-assisted closure device, with changes of the material every 4 days until the cavity was completed obliterated (92 days). Imaging tests showed full expansion of the lung, and chest wall reconstruction was performed with titanium rods. The high mortality of empyema in patients with liver disease requires both implementing and searching for new adjuvant therapies, like the use of vacuum-assisted closure systems and reconstruction with titanium rods. Controlled studies with a wide range of cases are needed for proper evaluation. PMID:23312986

  3. Co-presentation of a subdural empyema and an infected ventriculoperitoneal shunt in an adult patient: A rare complication with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Mueller, Wade

    2015-01-01

    Background: The occurrence of a subdural empyema as a complication of a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt infection is rare. Only three articles have been published on this topic. Moreover, the available literature only involves pediatric patients. Case Description: The authors present a 38-year-old male with a preexisting right frontal subdural hygroma that developed into a subdural empyema in the presence of an infected right occipital VP shunt. A brief literature review is provided, and the pathogenesis is discussed. Conclusion: This is the first known report regarding an adult patient with a subdural empyema and a VP shunt infection. Although a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain is not typically ordered during diagnosis of a shunt infection, the authors advocate a low threshold to employ MRI brain to evaluate for other sources of infection, especially in an immunocompromised patient or in a patient with a history of a subdural hematoma or hygroma that can be easily overlook as being stable on computed tomography of head. PMID:26539321

  4. Lemierre syndrome complicated by cavernous sinus thrombosis, the development of subdural empyemas, and internal carotid artery narrowing without cerebral infarction. Case report.

    PubMed

    Westhout, Franklin; Hasso, Anton; Jalili, Mehrdad; Afghani, Behnoosh; Armstrong, William; Nwagwu, Chiedozie; Ackerman, Laurie L

    2007-01-01

    Lemierre syndrome is an extremely rare complication of mild-to-moderate pharyngeal infections. The authors present an unusual case of Lemierre syndrome in a 16-year-old boy with cavernous sinus thrombosis and right internal carotid artery narrowing without neurological sequelae, right subdural empyema, and cerebritis in the right temporal and occipital lobes. Neuroimaging also demonstrated right jugular vein thrombosis. Cultures of samples from the blood proved positive for the presence of Fusobacterium necrophorum. The patient underwent unilateral tonsillectomy, drainage of the peritonsillar abscess, and a myringotomy on the right side. Postoperatively the patient was treated conservatively with antibiotic therapy resulting in an excellent outcome. PMID:17233314

  5. A case of post-upper lobectomy empyema treated by serratus anterior muscle and pedicled latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flaps plombage via open-window thoracostomy.

    PubMed

    Kitami, Akihiko; Suzuki, Takashi; Suzuki, Shuichi; Noriyoshi, Sumiya

    2004-06-01

    A 62-year-old male was admitted to our hospital for operation for Aspergillus empyema with a fungus ball in the right upper lobe. We performed a right upper lobectomy and decortication of the middle and lower lobes through a standard posterolateral thoracotomy with dissection of the latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior muscles, in October 2000. Twenty-one days postoperatively (POD), he developed an empyema and a bronchopleural fistula. We performed open-window thoracostomy through the axilla with removal of the third and fourth ribs at 41 POD, and sterilized the open drainage cavity in the out-patient clinic 11 months after discharge. Although the condition of the bronchopleural fistulas was not improved, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was found in the purulent discharge, the discharge decreased. Finally, a pedicled latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous and serratus anterior muscle flap plombage was performed 11 months after initial operation. The patient is now well and works as a driver 21 months after discharge. We conclude that muscle flaps of the pedicled latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior muscles can be useful for plombage of the cavity in cases of post-standard thoracotomy. PMID:15312015

  6. Mediastinal Mature Teratoma Revealed by Empyema.

    PubMed

    Raoufi, Mohammed; Herrak, Laila; Benali, Anas; Achaachi, Leila; El Ftouh, Mustapha; Bellarbi, Salma; Tilfine, Charaf; Taouarsa, Firdaous

    2016-01-01

    Teratomas are germ cell tumors, manifested with a great variety of clinical features; the most common extragonadal site is the anterior mediastinum. In this case, we report the patient with a large mature mediastinal teratoma with several components of ectodermal and endothermal epithelium. A 24-year-old female patient presented with history of persistent chest pain and progressively aggravating dyspnea for the previous 3 months. A chest X-ray showed a large opacity of the entire left hemithorax. Transcutaneous needle aspiration revealed a purulent fluid. The tube thoracostomy was introduced and the effusion was evacuated. Some weeks later, patient was seen in emergency for persistent cough and lateral chest pain. CT scan revealed a mass of the left hemithorax. The mass showed heterogeneous density, without compressing mediastinum great vessels and left hilar structures. Lipase value was elevated in needle aspiration. The patient underwent a total resection of the mediastinum mass via a left posterolateral thoracotomy. Microscopy revealed a mature teratoma with cystic structures. The patient subsequently made a full recovery. This case provide benign mediastinal teratoma with total atelectasis of left lung and elevated lipase value in needle transcutaneous aspiration; this event is explained by pancreatic component in the cystic tumor. Total removal of the tumor is adequate treatment for this type of teratoma and the prognosis is excellent. PMID:27144046

  7. Mediastinal Mature Teratoma Revealed by Empyema

    PubMed Central

    Raoufi, Mohammed; Herrak, Laila; Benali, Anas; Achaachi, Leila; El Ftouh, Mustapha; Bellarbi, Salma; Tilfine, Charaf; Taouarsa, Firdaous

    2016-01-01

    Teratomas are germ cell tumors, manifested with a great variety of clinical features; the most common extragonadal site is the anterior mediastinum. In this case, we report the patient with a large mature mediastinal teratoma with several components of ectodermal and endothermal epithelium. A 24-year-old female patient presented with history of persistent chest pain and progressively aggravating dyspnea for the previous 3 months. A chest X-ray showed a large opacity of the entire left hemithorax. Transcutaneous needle aspiration revealed a purulent fluid. The tube thoracostomy was introduced and the effusion was evacuated. Some weeks later, patient was seen in emergency for persistent cough and lateral chest pain. CT scan revealed a mass of the left hemithorax. The mass showed heterogeneous density, without compressing mediastinum great vessels and left hilar structures. Lipase value was elevated in needle aspiration. The patient underwent a total resection of the mediastinum mass via a left posterolateral thoracotomy. Microscopy revealed a mature teratoma with cystic structures. The patient subsequently made a full recovery. This case provide benign mediastinal teratoma with total atelectasis of left lung and elevated lipase value in needle transcutaneous aspiration; this event is explained by pancreatic component in the cystic tumor. Total removal of the tumor is adequate treatment for this type of teratoma and the prognosis is excellent. PMID:27144046

  8. New tetratrichomonas species in two patients with pleural empyema.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Escamilla, Eduardo; Sanchez-Aguillon, Fabiola; Alatorre-Fernandez, Cynthia Pamela; Aguilar-Zapata, Daniel; Arroyo-Escalante, Sara; Arellano, Teresa; Moncada-Barron, David; Romero-Valdovinos, Mirza; Martinez-Hernandez, Fernando; Rodriguez-Zulueta, Patricia; Maravilla, Pablo

    2013-09-01

    Two unusual occurrences of pleural trichomonosis due to a new Tetratrichomonas species previously reported but not named were confirmed. In one patient, Trichomonas tenax and a Tetratrichomonas species were also detected in the oral cavity by molecular methods. We suggest that this new Tetratrichomonas species be named Tetratrichomonas empyemagena. PMID:23784131

  9. Thorax ultrasound in the management of pediatric pneumonias complicated with empyema.

    PubMed

    Pinotti, Karin F; Ribeiro, Sérgio M; Cataneo, Antonio José Maria

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this work is to prospectively study the value of thoracic ultrasound (US) before pleural drainage in children with parapneumonic effusion (PPE). All children hospitalized for PPE, identified by thoracic radiography, underwent US to assess pleural loculation, echogenicity, and pleural fluid quantity. From August 2001 to July 2003, 52 children were examined. US was performed on 48 of these children, of whom 35 received chest tube drainage and 13 only received clinical treatment. US identified 38 patients with free flowing and 10 with loculated pleural fluid. About 25 of the free flowing (65.8%) and 10 (100%) of the loculated patients received chest tube drainage. Echogenicity was anechoic in 13, echoic without septations in 17 and echoic with septations in 18. Chest tube drainage was required in 6 anechoic (46.15%), 14 echoic without septations (82.35%), and 15 echoic with septations (83.33%). Quantity of fluid estimated by US varied from 20 to 860 ml. Effusion volume was higher in patients that were echoic with septations and loculated effusions. Pleural glucose and pH were lower, and LDH was higher in loculated PPE patients. In conclusion, US is an auxiliary exam for determining whether thoracic drainage is needed in parapneumonic effusion; loculated or echoic effusion should be drained, and free anechoic fluid needs further investigation. PMID:16906429

  10. Chronic cutaneous chest wall fistula and gallstone empyema due to retained gallstones

    PubMed Central

    Gaster, Richard S; Berger, Aaron J; Ahmadi-Kashani, Mastaneh; Shrager, Joseph B; Lee, Gordon K

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 72-year-old man who presented with a persistent pleural effusion and painful abscess in the right lower chest wall 6 months following a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The patient subsequently developed a chronic cutaneous chest wall fistula requiring a large resection and complex closure. The complication was likely secondary to intraoperative spillage of gallstones. While previous reports describe gallstone spillage in the abdominal cavity as benign, this case illustrates that stones left in the abdominal cavity can potentially lead to significant morbidity. Therefore, stones should be diligently removed from the abdominal cavity when spillage occurs. In addition, it is important that operative notes reflect the occurrence of stone spillage so stones may be suspected when a patient presents with an abdominal or thoracic infection following a cholecystectomy. PMID:25123567

  11. Providencia rettgeri: an unusual cause of central nervous system infections.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Tanmoy Kumar; Singh, Veena Kumari; Pandey, Paritosh

    2013-08-01

    Providencia, unlike other enterobacteriaceae, is a lesser known causative agent of hospital-acquired and community-acquired neuroinfection. Two cases of meningitis and one patient with subdural empyema, where Providencia rettgeri was the causative agent, are reported. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of hospital-acquired and community-acquired meningitis or empyema caused by P rettgeri. PMID:23811573

  12. Three cases of severe invasive infections caused by Campylobacter rectus and first report of fatal C. rectus infection.

    PubMed

    Lam, Jimmy Y W; Wu, Alan K L; Ngai, Dickson C; Teng, Jade L L; Wong, Elsa S Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Lee, Rodney A; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2011-04-01

    We report the first fatal case of Campylobacter rectus infection due to a subdural empyema and ruptured mycotic intracranial aneurysm and two cases of limb-threatening C. rectus necrotizing soft tissue and bone infection and empyema thoracis that responded to amoxicillin-clavulanate and surgical debridement and drainage. All three strains were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. PMID:21270212

  13. Three Cases of Severe Invasive Infections Caused by Campylobacter rectus and First Report of Fatal C. rectus Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Jimmy Y. W.; Wu, Alan K. L.; Ngai, Dickson C.; Teng, Jade L. L.; Wong, Elsa S. Y.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Lee, Rodney A.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2011-01-01

    We report the first fatal case of Campylobacter rectus infection due to a subdural empyema and ruptured mycotic intracranial aneurysm and two cases of limb-threatening C. rectus necrotizing soft tissue and bone infection and empyema thoracis that responded to amoxicillin-clavulanate and surgical debridement and drainage. All three strains were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. PMID:21270212

  14. Neuroimaging of pediatric intracranial infection--part 1: techniques and bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Joshua P; Richner, Beat; Santy, Ky; Lequin, Maarten H; Poretti, Andrea; Filippi, Christopher G; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2012-04-01

    Conventional and advanced neuroimaging have become central to the diagnosis of infectious diseases of the pediatric central nervous system. Imaging modalities used by (pediatric) neuroradiologists include cranial ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, including advanced techniques such as diffusion weighted or tensor imaging, perfusion weighted imaging, susceptibility weighted imaging, and (1) H magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In this first of a two part review, imaging techniques in general and the imaging findings of bacterial infections of the intracranial compartment including epidural empyema, subdural empyema, meningitis, cerebritis, cerebral abscess, and pyogenic intraventricular empyema (ventriculitis) are discussed. PMID:22304299

  15. Hemothorax

    MedlinePlus

    Collapsed lung , leading to respiratory failure (inability to breathe properly, provide the body enough oxygen and remove carbon ... membranes Infection of the pleural fluid ( empyema ) Associated pneumothorax (air in the pleural cavity, which reduces lung ...

  16. Diesel oil

    MedlinePlus

    Various hydrocarbons ... Empyema Many of the most dangerous effects of hydrocarbon (such as diesel oil) poisoning are due to ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 75. Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  17. Pulmonary actinomycosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dental care - adult Empyema Meningitis Osteomyelitis Pleural effusion Tooth abscess Update Date 3/13/2016 Updated by: Jatin M. Vyas, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Assistant in Medicine, Division of ...

  18. Anti-rust product poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... the nose, eyes, ears, lips, or tongue GASTROINTESTINAL SYSTEM Blood in the stool Burns of the throat ( ... distress or failure Pneumothorax Pleural effusion Empyema NERVOUS SYSTEM Agitation Coma Confusion Dizziness Incoordination Somnolence Headache Blurred ...

  19. Scintimaging of bronchopleural fistula. A simple method of diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, R.E.; Siddiqui, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    A bronchopleural fistula in a patient with empyema was demonstrated by xenon-133 ventilation lung scanning. Because of its ease and simplicity, the ventilation study should be one of the first diagnostic tests performed when bronchopleural fistula is suspected.

  20. Thoracic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Worrell, Stephanie G; Demeester, Steven R

    2014-02-01

    This article discusses thoracic emergencies, including the anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, examination, diagnosis, technique, management, and treatment of acute upper airway obstruction, massive hemoptysis, spontaneous pneumothorax, and pulmonary empyema. PMID:24267505

  1. Streptococcus pluranimalium: A novel human pathogen?

    PubMed Central

    Aryasinghe, Lasanthi; Sabbar, Saweera; Kazim, Yasmin; Awan, Liaqat Mahmood; Khan, Hammad Khan Nadir

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION We present the first case of a subdural empyema caused by Streptococcus pluranimalium, in a healthy adolescent male as a possible complication of subclinical frontal sinusitis. Clinical features, diagnostic approach and management of subdural empyema are discussed. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 17-year-old male with a 2 day history of headache and nausea was referred to our Emergency Department (ED) as a case of possible meningitis. He was afebrile, lethargic and drowsy with significant neck stiffness on examination. Computerized tomography (CT) revealed a large frontotemporoparietal subdural fluid collection with significant midline shift. Subsequent contrast-enhanced CT established the presence of intracranial empyema; the patient underwent immediate burr-hole evacuation of the pus and received 7 weeks of intravenous antibiotics, recovering with no residual neurological deficit. DISCUSSION The diagnosis of subdural empyema as a complication of asymptomatic sinusitis in an immunocompetent patient with no history of fever or upper respiratory symptoms was unanticipated. Furthermore, the organism Streptococcus pluranimalium that was cultured from the pus has only been documented twice previously in medical literature to cause infection in humans, as it is primarily a pathogen responsible for infection in bovine and avian species. CONCLUSION Subdural empyema represents a neurosurgical emergency and if left untreated is invariably fatal. Rapid diagnosis, surgical intervention and intensive antibiotic therapy improve both morbidity and mortality. PMID:25437686

  2. Surgical Treatment of Facial Abscesses and Facial Surgery in Pet Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Capello, Vittorio

    2016-09-01

    Odontogenic facial abscesses associated with periapical infections and osteomyelitis of the jaw represent an important part of the acquired and progressive dental disease syndrome in pet rabbits. Complications such as retromasseteric and retrobulbar abscesses, extensive osteomyelitis of the mandible, and empyemas of the skull are possible sequelae. Standard and advanced diagnostic imaging should be pursued to make a detailed and proper diagnosis, and plan the most effective surgical treatment. This article reviews the surgical anatomy, the pathophysiology, and the classification of abscesses and empyemas of the mandible, the maxilla, and the skull. It also discusses surgical techniques for facial abscesses. PMID:27497207

  3. Nontyphoidal Salmonellosis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection, and Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Piggott, Damani A.; Carroll, Karen C.; Lim, Michael; Melia, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella infection and stroke are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with increased risk in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population. We report a rare case of ischemic stroke associated with Salmonella enteritidis subdural empyema in an older HIV-infected patient with multimorbidity, despite surgery and treatment with susceptible antimicrobial drugs. PMID:27419176

  4. Multiple Brain Abscesses due to Streptococcus anginosus: Prediction of Mortality by an Imaging Severity Index Score

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    An elderly patient with altered mental status, brain abscesses, ventriculitis, and empyemas died of septic shock and brain abscesses secondary to Streptococcus anginosus despite aggressive treatment. An imaging severity index score with a better prognostic value than the Glasgow coma scale predicted mortality in this patient. PMID:27034878

  5. Nontyphoidal Salmonellosis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection, and Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Piggott, Damani A; Carroll, Karen C; Lim, Michael; Melia, Michael T

    2016-04-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella infection and stroke are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with increased risk in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population. We report a rare case of ischemic stroke associated with Salmonella enteritidis subdural empyema in an older HIV-infected patient with multimorbidity, despite surgery and treatment with susceptible antimicrobial drugs. PMID:27419176

  6. The man with the boggy head: cranial melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Y C; How, S H; Ng, T H; Fauzi, A R

    2010-02-01

    Melioidosis is known to cause abscesses in various organs, including the cranium, though less commonly. We present a patient with scalp abscess and subdural empyema that was visible on computed tomography of the brain. The neurosurgical drainage grew Burkholderia pseudomallei. Despite our best effort to treat the patient using parenteral antibiotics and surgical drainage, the patient did not survive. PMID:20358143

  7. Boerhaave Syndrome, Pneumothorax, and Chylothorax in a Critically Ill Patient with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ijaz, Mohsin; Rafiq, Arsalan; Venkatram, Sindhaghatta; Diaz-Fuentes, Gilda

    2015-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant, variably expressed multisystem disease. The predominant pulmonary features of TSC are identical to those of lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM). Pneumothorax, multifocal micronodular pneumocyte hyperplasia, and chylothorax are rare complications of TSC. We report a young male with pneumothorax, lung nodules, and chylous effusion who developed empyema thoracis after esophageal rupture. Hospital course was complicated by respiratory failure. Family opted to transfer to hospice care. Chylothorax is a rare complication of TSC with few scattered reports mostly in female patients. Patients with TSC are usually managed by multispecialists and it is important to be aware of the rare pulmonary manifestations of this disease. A male patient with TSC having lung nodules presenting with chylothorax and empyema thoracis from Boerhaave syndrome makes our case unique. PMID:26550497

  8. Post-pneumonectomy broncho-pleural fistula successfully closed by open-window thoracostomy associated with V.A.C. therapy.

    PubMed

    Laperuta, Paolo; Napolitano, Filomena; Vatrella, Alessandro; Di Crescenzo, Rosa Maria; Cortese, Antonio; Di Crescenzo, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Broncho-pleural fistula (BPF), is a dramatic complication that may occur after lung resection. The treatment is challenging due to its high rate of morbidity and mortality. Herein, a case of BPF associated with empyema, occurred in an elderly patient who had undergone to left pneumonectomy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), is reported. After various treatments including chest drainage and endoscopic procedures, BPF was successfully closed by open-window thoracotomy associated with vacuum assisted closure (V.A.C.) device therapy. The authors conclude that V.A.C. is a convenient and safe measure in the management of empyema with BPF. Moreover, in similar clinical contexts, V.A.C. may be the only option available that may assure the survival of the patient and the avoiding any later-phases of residual cavity. PMID:25159544

  9. Radiographically guided percutaneous catheter drainage of pleural fluid collections.

    PubMed

    Merriam, M A; Cronan, J J; Dorfman, G S; Lambiase, R E; Haas, R A

    1988-12-01

    We reviewed the outcome of guided percutaneous catheter drainage of pleural fluid collections in 18 patients over a 5-year period. Catheter positioning was guided by fluoroscopy in 10 (56%) cases, CT in seven (39%), and sonography in one (6%). Included were 16 patients with empyemas and one each with a sterile hematoma and transudate. In nine of the patients, previous surgical chest tube drainage had been unsuccessful. The majority of collections were treated with a 12- or 14-French catheter and closed underwater seal drainage. Twelve (80%) of the 15 patients who had an adequate trial of guided drainage were cured. Propyliodone oil suspension contrast sinography after catheter placement showed two clinically unsuspected bronchopleural fistulas. Although an extensive multilocular pleural collection was a contraindication to percutaneous catheter drainage, the thick fibrous peel of a chronic empyema was not. Drainage of pleural fluid collections with radiographic guidance ensures proper catheter placement and is successful in a high percentage of cases. PMID:3055887

  10. Actinomyces infection causing acute right iliac fossa pain

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajah, Narendranath; Hameed, Waseem; Middleton, Simon; Booth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This is a case of a 75-year-old man being admitted to the on-call surgical department with acute abdominal pain. On arrival he was clinically dehydrated and shocked with localised pain over McBurney's point and examination findings were suggestive of appendiceal or other colonic pathology. Full blood testing revealed a white cell count of 38×109/L and a C reactive protein (CRP) of 278 mg/L. A CT scan revealed a gallbladder empyema that extended into the right iliac fossa. This case highlights the potential for a hyperdistended gallbladder empyema to present as acute right iliac fossa pain with blood tests suggestive of complicated disease. Further analysis confirmed Actinomyces infection as the underlying aetiology prior to a laparoscopic subtotal cholecystectomy. This case serves to remind clinicians of this as a rare potential cause of atypical gallbladder pathology. PMID:24872493

  11. [Impact of vaccination on the epidemiology of childhood pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Crisinel, Pierre-Alex

    2016-02-17

    The impact of vaccination on non-bacteremic Haemophilus influenza pneumonia is difficult to appreciate, in the absence of proper microbiological documentation. It has certainly been largely underestimated. Vaccination has reduced the incidence of pneumococcal pneumonia. However, the increase of incidence of empyema due to nonvaccine serotypes was observed in several countries. The replacement of Prevenar 7 by Prevenar 13 portends a decrease in the occurrence of these infections, but, unfortunately, without eliminating them completely. PMID:27039460

  12. Askin tumor: A rare neoplasm of thoracopulmonary region

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ankur; Abhinay, Abhishek; Kumar, Abhishek; Prasad, Rajniti; Ghosh, Amrita; Mishra, Om Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Askin tumor is a rare neoplasm of thoracopulmonary region. But it mimics other common pediatric disorders, such as empyema, lymphoma, and tuberculosis, posing a great diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to the treating clinicians. So it is of utmost importance to make an early diagnosis and proper referral/treatment in such cases. We highlighted diagnostic challenge, treatment, and favorable outcome of a case that presented to us. PMID:27051109

  13. Pharmacokinetics of Linezolid and Ertapenem in experimental parapneumonic pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent of linezolid and ertapenem penetration into the empyemic fluid using a rabbit model of empyema. Methods An empyema was created via the intrapleural injection of Escherichia coli bacteria (ATCC 35218) into the pleural space of New Zealand white rabbits. After an empyema was verified by thoracocentesis, 24 hours post inoculation, linezolid (10 mg/kg) and ertapenem (60 mg/kg) were administered intravenously into 10 and 8 infected empyemic rabbits, respectively. Antibiotic levels were determined in samples of pleural fluid and blood serum, collected serially at 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours, after administration each of the two antibiotics. Results Linezolid as well as ertapenem penetrate well into the empyemic pleural fluid, exhibiting a slower onset and decline compared to the corresponding blood serum levels. Equilibration between blood serum and pleural fluid compartments seems to occur at 1.5 hours for both linezolid and ertapenem, with peak pleural fluid levels (Cmaxpf of 2.02 ± 0.73 «mu»g/ml and Cmaxpf of 3.74 ± 1.39 «mu»g/ml, correspondingly) occurring 2 hours post antibiotics administration and decreasing very slowly thereafter. The serum concentrations for both antibiotics were significantly lower from the corresponding pleural fluid ones during the 8 hours collecting data, with the exception of samples collected at the 1st hour (Cmaxserum of 2.1 ± 1.2 «mu»g/ml for linezolid and Cmaxserum of 6.26 ± 2.98 «mu»g/ml for ertapenem). Conclusion Pleural fluid levels of both antibiotics are inhibitory for common specified pathogens causing empyema. PMID:20482752

  14. Chylothorax following anterior thoraco-lumbar spine exposure. A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Mora de Sambricio, A; Garrido Stratenwerth, E

    2015-01-01

    Pleural effusion is a possible complication of the thoraco-abdominal approach to the spine. It is more commonly a reactive effusion, but it also may be caused by hemothorax, empyema or, less commonly, a chylothorax. The case of a chylothorax is reported as a late onset complication of a double anterior and posterior instrumented fusion of the lumbar spine. Its management and clinical outcome, and a review of the literature is presented. PMID:24794096

  15. Bilorrhea secondary to bronchobiliary fistula.

    PubMed

    Olivencia-Yurvati, A H; Rollins, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Bronchobiliary fistula (BBF) is a rare condition which occurs most commonly as a complication of hydatid cyst liver disease. The following report describes a patient who presented with biliptysis 6 months following decortication of an empyema that had occurred following partial hepatectomy of a colon cancer metastasis. This is the only case to our knowledge that describes the presentation of a BBF in this context. The patient was diagnosed with BBF and successfully underwent open thoracotomy for fistulectomy and repair. PMID:25058780

  16. Recurrent spontaneous pneumomediastinum: a rare but possible event!

    PubMed Central

    Fiorelli, Alfonso; Messina, Gaetana; Capaccio, Damiano

    2012-01-01

    A number of risk indices have been formulated in an attempt to predict risk of a major hemorrhage in an individual on warfarin therapy. No single index to date is able to reliably predict this risk in an individual patient. Although most warfarin related hemorrhages are gastrointestinal or intracranial in origin this case represents a particularly rare entity of a major hemorrhage presenting as an encysted empyema. To the best of our knowledge this has never before been described. PMID:22934148

  17. An interesting thinner intoxication case: intrathoracic injection.

    PubMed

    Solak, Ilhami; Cankayali, Ilkin; Aksu, Hasim; Moral, Ali Resat

    2006-01-01

    Thinners, including aromatic hydrocarbons such as toluene, xylene, and N-hexane, are widely used in industry for the production of plastics, varnish, paint, and glue. Use of these toxic agents frequently leads to chronic intoxication caused by abuse or misuse of solvents, which are usually taken in through inhalation. Thinners may have neurotoxic, myotoxic, hepatotoxic, nephrotoxic, and cardiotoxic systemic effects. The patient described in this report attempted to commit suicide by injecting 10 cc thinner into the left hemithorax. Acute chemical empyema developed at the left hemithorax. No bacterial growth was noted in empyema liquid and blood samples. Empyema was treated with tube thoracostomy, and full remission was observed after 33 d. No systemic toxic signs were noted, other than a low level of hepatotoxicity. Although pleural effusion, atelectasis, and pleural thickening were observed at the acute phase on computed tomography (CT) of the thorax, only pleural thickening persisted on CT of the thorax after 1 y. Investigators could not find a documented case of parenteral use of thinners in the medical literature. PMID:16912033

  18. Clinical Characteristics of Community-Acquired Viridans Streptococcal Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sun Ha; Choi, Keum-Ju; Lim, Jae-Kwang; Seo, Hyewon; Yoo, Seung-Soo; Lee, Jaehee; Lee, Shin-Yup; Kim, Chang-Ho; Park, Jae-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background Viridans streptococci (VS) are a large group of streptococcal bacteria that are causative agents of community-acquired respiratory tract infection. However, data regarding their clinical characteristics are limited. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the clinical and radiologic features of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with or without parapneumonic effusion caused by VS. Methods Of 455 consecutive CAP patients with or without parapneumonic effusion, VS were isolated from the blood or pleural fluid in 27 (VS group, 5.9%) patients. Streptococcus pneumoniae was identified as a single etiologic agent in 70 (control group) patients. We compared various clinical parameters between the VS group and the control group. Results In univariate analysis, the VS group was characterized by more frequent complicated parapneumonic effusion or empyema and bed-ridden status, lower incidences of productive cough, elevated procalcitonin (>0.5 ng/mL), lower age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index score, and more frequent ground glass opacity (GGO) or consolidation on computed tomography (CT) scans. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that complicated parapneumonic effusion or empyema, productive cough, bed-ridden status, and GGO or consolidation on CT scans were independent predictors of community-acquired respiratory tract infection caused by VS. Conclusion CAP caused by VS commonly presents as complicated parapneumonic effusion or empyema. It is characterized by less frequent productive cough, more frequent bed-ridden status, and less common CT pulmonary parenchymal lesions. However, its treatment outcome and clinical course are similar to those of pneumococcal pneumonia. PMID:26175772

  19. Risk factors for conversion to conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy in single incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Gon; Moon, Ju Ik; Lee, Sang Eok; Sung, Nak Song; Chun, Ki Won; Lee, Hye Yoon; Yoon, Dae Sung; Choi, Won Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors for conversion to conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy (CLC) in single incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SILC) along with the proposal for procedure selection guidelines in treating patients with benign gallbladder (GB) diseases. Methods SILC was performed in 697 cases between April 2010 and July 2014. Seventeen cases (2.4%) underwent conversion to conventional LC. We compared these 2 groups and analyzed the risk factors for conversion to CLC. Results In univariate analysis, American Society of Anesthesiologist score > 3, preoperative percutaneous transhepatic GB drainage status and pathology (acute cholecystitis or GB empyema) were significant risk factors for conversion (P = 0.010, P = 0.019 and P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, pathology (acute cholecystitis or GB empyema) was significant risk factors for conversion to CLC in SILC (P < 0.001). Conclusion Although SILC is a feasible method for most patients with benign GB disease, CLC has to be considered in patients with acute cholecystitis or GB empyema because it is likely to result in inadequate visualization of the Calot's triangle and greater bleeding risk. PMID:27274505

  20. Intrapleural therapy.

    PubMed

    Huggins, J Terrill; Doelken, Peter; Sahn, Steven A

    2011-08-01

    Numerous intrapleural therapies have been adopted to treat a vast array of pleural diseases. The first intrapleural therapies proposed focused on the use of fibrinolytics and DNase to promote fluid drainage in empyema. Numerous case series and five randomized controlled trials have been published to determine the outcomes of fibrinolytics in empyema treatment. In the largest randomized trial, the use of streptokinase had no reduction in mortality, decortication rates or hospital days compared with placebo in the treatment of empyema. Criticism over study design and patient selection may have potentially affected the outcomes in this study. The development of dyspnoea is common in the setting of malignant pleural effusions. Pleural fluid evacuation followed by pleurodesis is often attempted. Numerous sclerosing agents have been studied, with talc emerging as the most effective agent. Small particle size of talc should be avoided because of increased systemic absorption potentiating toxicity, such as acute lung injury. Over the past several years, the use of chronic indwelling pleural catheters have emerged as the preferred modality in the treating a symptomatic malignant pleural effusion. For patients with malignant-related lung entrapment, pleurodesis often fails due to the presence of visceral pleural restriction; however, chronic indwelling pleural catheters are effective in palliation of dyspnoea. Finally, the use of staphylococcal superantigens has been proposed as a therapeutic model for the treatment of non-small lung cancer. Intrapleural instillation of staphylococcal superantigens increased median survival by 5 months in patients with non-small cell lung cancer with a malignant pleural effusion. PMID:21672085

  1. Cerebral air embolism after pleural streptokinase instillation.

    PubMed

    Janisch, Thorsten; Siekmann, Ullrich; Kopp, Rüdger

    2013-12-01

    Iatrogenic pulmonary barotrauma and cerebral arterial gas embolism (CAGE) may complicate a variety of medical procedures, such as certain types of surgery, drug administration through thoracic drainage, pneumoperitoneum, cystoscopy, bronchoscopy, etc. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment following the guidelines for CAGE in diving is the treatment of choice. Pleural streptokinase instillation is a common treatment for parapneumonic pleural effusion and may lead to CAGE. We present such a complication in a 79-year-old woman with a left-sided empyema. Neurological recovery was reasonable, but a left hemiparesis persisted. Prompt treatment of CAGE is necessary to avoid permanent injury and severe disability. PMID:24510333

  2. Pediatric Chest Tubes And Pigtails: An Evidence-Based Approach To The Management Of Pleural Space Diseases.

    PubMed

    Strutt, Jonathan; Kharbanda, Anupam

    2015-11-01

    Pediatric thoracostomy procedures are used in the emergency department to treat diseases of the pleural space. As children have unique thoracic anatomy and physiology, they may present with management challenges that the emergency clinician must consider. This issue reviews the use of chest tubes and pigtail catheters in pediatric patients, techniques and indications for placement, and possible complications. Diagnostic and treatment options for diseases of the pleural space, such as spontaneous pneumothorax, traumatic injury, and parapneumonic effusions/empyema, are examined. Additionally, this issue discusses the use of imaging modalities to aid in the diagnosis of pleural space diseases and the emerging practice of ambulatory management in certain cases. PMID:26488231

  3. Primary lymphoma of the gallbladder.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, E. P.; Lazda, E.; Grant, D.; Davis, J.

    1993-01-01

    A case of primary lymphoma of the gallbladder is described which is rare in the medical literature. A 76 year old man presented with acute cholecystitis and septicaemia. Investigation showed a lung abscess and a gallbladder mass. The mass was thought to be an empyema and cholecystostomy was performed. Biopsy of the gallbladder wall showed high-grade B cell lymphoma. The patient unfortunately succumbed to overwhelming septicaemia in the postoperative period. Postmortem examination confirmed primary lymphoma of the gallbladder without dissemination. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8415351

  4. Rare but numerous serious complications of acute otitis media in a young child

    PubMed Central

    Van Munster, Mariëtte P E; Brus, Frank; Mul, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Acute otitis media is a very common disease in children. Most children recover with symptomatic therapy like potent analgesics, but occasionally serious complications occur. We present a 3-year-old girl who suffered from acute otitis media for already 2 weeks and presented with fever, abducens nerve palsy of her left eye and vomiting. She was finally diagnosed with an acute otitis media complicated by a mastoiditis, sinus thrombosis, meningitis and cerebellar empyema. Fusobacterium necrophorum was cultured from cerebrospinal fluid. The girl recovered following appropriate antibiotic and anticoagulation treatment. PMID:23486343

  5. [Malignant hemangioendothelioma associated with chronic pyothorax].

    PubMed

    Mita, Y; Dobashi, K; Saitoh, R; Tsuchiya, S; Nakano, H; Watanabe, S; Makimoto, T; Ishihara, S; Mori, M

    1997-06-01

    A 67-year-old man was admitted to the hospital because of a fever. A chest CT scan showed multilobular heterogeneous shadows on the right side in the chest wall and the lung, but clinical examinations and examination of a biopsy specimen did not lead to a diagnosis. At autopsy, a hemorrhagic tumor was found on the right side in the chest wall. Microscopical examination showed that large atypical cells had proliferated and formed vascular structures, which were stained positively with anti-factor VIII antibody. The histological findings led to the diagnosis of malignant hemangioendothelioma. Chronic empyema-associated malignant hemangioendothelioma is rare. PMID:9294300

  6. Pneumococcal Disease in the Era of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Inci; Shea, Kimberly M; Pelton, Stephen I

    2015-12-01

    Universal immunization of infants and toddlers with pneumococcal conjugate vaccines over the last 15 years has dramatically altered the landscape of pneumococcal disease. Decreases in invasive pneumococcal disease, all-cause pneumonia, empyema, mastoiditis, acute otitis media, and complicated otitis media have been reported from multiple countries in which universal immunization has been implemented. Children with comorbid conditions have higher rates of pneumococcal disease and increased case fatality rates compared with otherwise healthy children, and protection for the most vulnerable pediatric patients will require new strategies to address the underlying host susceptibility and the expanded spectrum of serotypes observed. PMID:26610421

  7. Tuberculosis of gallbladder with candidiasis, a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Leong, B D K; Chan, K W; Ramu, P; Kumar, V M; Chuah, J A

    2011-06-01

    Gallbladder tuberculosis (GT) is an extremely rare condition. This is thought to be due to the protective property of bile against the infection. Clinical and radiological diagnosis of GT is difficult. We describe a case of GT who initially presented to us with jaundice, a right hypochondrial mass and computed tomographic findings suggestive of gallbladder empyema. Diagnosis was made from histopathological examination of the resected gallbladder which revealed epitheloid granulomas with caseating necrosis and presence of Langhan's giant cells. From a literature search and to the best of our knowledge, this is the first GT to be reported in South East Asia. PMID:22106698

  8. Pulmonary Manifestations of Primary Immunodeficiency Disorders.

    PubMed

    Nonas, Stephanie

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary disease, ranging from infectious pneumonia, lung abscess, and empyema to structural lung diseases to malignancy, significantly increase morbidity and mortality in primary immune deficiency. Treatment with supplemental immunoglobulin (intravenous or subcutaneous) and antimicrobials is beneficial in reducing infections but are largely ineffective in preventing noninfectious complications, including interstitial lung disease, malignancy, and autoimmune disease. A low threshold for suspecting pulmonary complications is necessary for the early diagnosis of pulmonary involvement in primary immunodeficiency disorders, before irreversible damage is done, to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26454317

  9. When size matters: changing opinion in the management of pleural space—the rise of small-bore pleural catheters

    PubMed Central

    Sandri, Alberto; Guerrera, Francesco; Ferraris, Andrea; Marchisio, Filippo; Bora, Giulia; Costardi, Lorena; Solidoro, Paolo; Ruffini, Enrico; Oliaro, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Tube thoracostomy is usually the first step to treat several thoracic/pleural conditions such as pneumothorax, pleural effusions, haemothorax, haemo-pneumothorax and empyema. Today, a wide range of drains is available, ranging from small to large bore ones. Indications for an appropriate selection remains yet matter of debate, especially regarding the use of small bore catheters. Through this paper, we aimed to retrace the improvements of drains through the years and to review the current clinical indications for chest drain placement in pleural/thoracic diseases, comparing the effectiveness of small-bore drains vs. large-bore ones. PMID:27499983

  10. Safety of reduced antibiotic prescribing for self limiting respiratory tract infections in primary care: cohort study using electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Michael V; Little, Paul; Hay, Alastair D; Fox, Robin; Prevost, A Toby; Juszczyk, Dorota; Charlton, Judith; Ashworth, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the incidence of pneumonia, peritonsillar abscess, mastoiditis, empyema, meningitis, intracranial abscess, and Lemierre’s syndrome is higher in general practices that prescribe fewer antibiotics for self limiting respiratory tract infections (RTIs). Design Cohort study. Setting 610 UK general practices from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Participants Registered patients with 45.5 million person years of follow-up from 2005 to 2014. Exposures Standardised proportion of RTI consultations with antibiotics prescribed for each general practice, and rate of antibiotic prescriptions for RTIs per 1000 registered patients. Main outcome measures Incidence of pneumonia, peritonsillar abscess, mastoiditis, empyema, meningitis, intracranial abscess, and Lemierre’s syndrome, adjusting for age group, sex, region, deprivation fifth, RTI consultation rate, and general practice. Results From 2005 to 2014 the proportion of RTI consultations with antibiotics prescribed decreased from 53.9% to 50.5% in men and from 54.5% to 51.5% in women. From 2005 to 2014, new episodes of meningitis, mastoiditis, and peritonsillar abscess decreased annually by 5.3%, 4.6%, and 1.0%, respectively, whereas new episodes of pneumonia increased by 0.4%. Age and sex standardised incidences for pneumonia and peritonsillar abscess were higher for practices in the lowest fourth of antibiotic prescribing compared with the highest fourth. The adjusted relative risk increases for a 10% reduction in antibiotic prescribing were 12.8% (95% confidence interval 7.8% to 17.5%, P<0.001) for pneumonia and 9.9% (5.6% to 14.0%, P<0.001) for peritonsillar abscess. If a general practice with an average list size of 7000 patients reduces the proportion of RTI consultations with antibiotics prescribed by 10%, then it might observe 1.1 (95% confidence interval 0.6 to 1.5) more cases of pneumonia each year and 0.9 (0.5 to 1.3) more cases of peritonsillar abscess each decade

  11. Antigenemia detected by radioimmunoassay in systemic aspergillosis

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, M.H.

    1980-06-01

    Because of difficulties in antemortem diagnosis of systemic aspergillosis, a radioimmunoassay to an Aspergillus fumigatus carbohydrate was developed and evaluated in patients with mycotic or bacterial infections. Antigenemia was detected in sera obtained antemortem from four of seven patients with systemic aspergillosis and in pleural fluid from an Aspergillus empyema but not in control sera or pleural fluid from 43 patients or 27 normal donors. When characterized with reference to onset of disease, antigenemia was an early sign of infection. This study shows the usefulness of the Aspergillus antigen radioimmunoassay for early, specific immunodiagnosis of systemic aspergillosis.

  12. Long-term treatment of persistent disseminated Nocardia cyriacigeorgica infection.

    PubMed

    Ozgenç, Onur; Avcı, Meltem; Arı, Alpay; Celebi, Ismail Yunus; Coşkuner, Seher Ayten

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a disseminated persistent Nocardia cyriacigeorgica infection in an immunocompetent patient is described. The patient's long-term treatment, as well as its implications for managing similar cases in the future, is emphasized. Presenting with high fever, multiple nodules, and ulcerative cutaneous lesions of body sites, the patient was treated with various antimicrobials. Under combined therapy, empyema and arthritis, leading to disseminated nocardiosis, were seen. The overall treatment course was 28 months. It can be concluded that the choice of the antibiotics and optimal duration of treatment are uncertain; therefore the treatment of nocardiosis requires expertise. PMID:24833199

  13. Chest tube injury to left ventricle: complication or negligence?

    PubMed

    Haron, Hairufaizi; Rashid, Norfaezan Abdul; Dimon, Mohd Zamrin; Azmi, Muhd Helmi; Sumin, Joanna Ooi; Zabir, Azmil Farid; Abdul Rahman, Mohd Ramzisham

    2010-07-01

    An injury to the left ventricle after a chest tube insertion is a rare but lethal phenomenon that is likely to occur if precautions are not seriously addressed. We present a 15-year-old girl who was diagnosed a left empyema thoracis. An attempt to place a chest drain in this young girl was almost fatal. A left ventricular repair together with thoracotomy and decortication were successful. This case emphasizes the rarity of this lethal complication and the importance of the correct technique for chest tube insertion. PMID:20609810

  14. Mycotic aneurysm of the descending aorta diagnosed by echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Ozkutlu, S; Ozbarlas, N; Bilgiç, A; Paşaoğlu, I

    1992-10-01

    We present a 3-yr-old girl with coarctation of aorta and patent ductus arteriosus in whom mycotic aneurysm and bacterial endarteritis developed postoperatively and was diagnosed by two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography. Five weeks after the operation of ligation of ductus and resection of coarctated segment, the patient was readmitted with complaints of vomiting, fever and coughing. Bacterial endarteritis, empyema and septic arthritis were diagnosed. Suprasternal echocardiographic examination demonstrated an aneurysmatic appearance 60 x 65 mm in size at the location of coarctation. The patient died, most probably due to aortic rupture, before surgical treatment could be undertaken. Autopsy study confirmed our diagnosis. PMID:1428279

  15. Neonatal opaque right lung: delayed fluid resorption

    SciTech Connect

    Swischuk, L.E.; Hayden, K.; Richardson, J.

    1981-12-01

    Eight newborn infants with opaque right lungs were examined. Clinically, the main problem associated with the opaque right lung is mild respiratory distress, and radiographyically, the findings consist of (a) a totally opaque right lung, (b) a semiopaque right lung, or (c) an opaque right upper lobe only. These findings are usually interpreted as representing pneumonia, empyema, or hydrochlothorax, but the fact that they clear within 24 to 48 hours indicates that none of these diseases is the cause. It is thought that neonatal opaque right lung results from the transient retention of normal fetal fluid in the right lung.

  16. A case of lung volume reduction surgery with decortication for a septic patient in respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Tarazi, M.; Mayooran, N.; Anwer, M.; Anjum, M.N.; Doddakula, K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Decortication and lung volume reduction surgery are both major operations and each has its independent risk of morbidity and mortality. Case report We present the case of a 41 year old gentleman with left sided empyema and giant bullae of the upper lobe with an active air leak that was transferred to our tertiary referral centre for further management. We performed emergency left thoracotomy, decorticated the left lower lobe with extensive lung volume reduction surgery of the upper lobe. Patient’s respiratory status significantly improved along with excellent radiological results. Conclusion Our case demonstrates that a combination of complex procedures is feasible with excellent outcomes. PMID:26588664

  17. Subdural collections due to non-typhi Salmonella infections in two Malaysian children.

    PubMed

    Intan, H I; Zubaidah, C D; Norazah, A; Norlijah, O

    2008-07-01

    Subdural collections caused by Salmonella infection are rarely encountered in children. We present two cases caused by non-typhi Salmonella, one a four-and-a-half-month-old boy presenting with subdural effusion, and the other, a 16-month-old boy with empyema. The diagnosis was confirmed on blood and subdural pus cultures. One patient had status epilepticus following focal fit, and the other had prolonged fever without any localising signs of infection on admission. They responded well to prompt surgical drainage and prolonged systemic antibiotic therapy. Contrary to previous reports, both patients showed favourable outcome in terms of neurological sequelae. PMID:18695854

  18. [Repeated lung resection in patients with postoperative recurrent tuberculosis in the operated lung].

    PubMed

    Giller, D B; Murgustov, I B; Martel, I I; Enilenis, I I; Glotov, A A; Kesaev, O Sh

    2015-01-01

    The literature data of 18 authors about surgical treatment of 1723 patients with recurrent tuberculosis are presented in the article. Also authors reported their own experience in repeated lung resection in 50 patients. Intraoperative complications were observed in 7 patients including empyema cavity dissection in 2 cases, scalping lung injury in 2 cases, peristump abscess dissection in 1 case, v. azygas injury in 1 patient and rupture of membranous part of trachea due to swollen cuff of intubation tube in 1 case. In postoperative period complications developed in 5 patients including early intrapleural bleeding in 1 case, later intrapleural bleeding in 1 case, empyema with bronchial fistula in 1 patient, residual pleural cavity in 1 patient and wound complication in 1 case. All postoperative complications were eliminated and there was no postoperative mortality. The authors concluded that although severe patients' condition, technical complexity and higher surgical risk of repeated resections compared with organ-preserving and collapsosurgical interventions satisfactory remote results and high proportion of labour rehabilitation earnestly prove advantages of repeated lung resections for recurrent tuberculosis of operated lung. PMID:26753197

  19. [Experience with thoracoscopy for rifle gunshot penetrating trauma of the chest; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Kambayashi, T; Moriuchi, T; Noguchi, T; Kamakari, K; Terada, T

    2005-10-01

    A 57-year-old man came to our hospital by ambulance for a chest injury by a rifle gunshot. He had a penetrating injury of the chest wall, hemopneumothorax and pulmonary laceration. He was managed with chest drainage, oxygen inhalation. His respiratory and cardiac status was stable. However, for the purpose to prevent the development of empyema or pneumonia, and to check the existence of damage of intrathoracic structures by the gunshot injury, thoracoscopy was performed next day. He discharged without postoperative complications 17 days after the injury. Open thoracotomy is reported to be required in only about 10-15% of patients with chest injuries. However, operative indication of the chest injuries may spread in the future with the spread of thoracoscopy and its low invasiveness. PMID:16235855

  20. A review of complications of odontogenic infections.

    PubMed

    Bali, Rishi Kumar; Sharma, Parveen; Gaba, Shivani; Kaur, Avneet; Ghanghas, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening infections of odontogenic or upper airway origin may extend to potential spaces formed by fascial planes of the lower head and upper cervical area. Complications include airway obstruction, mediastinitis, necrotizing fascitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, sepsis, thoracic empyema, Lemierre's syndrome, cerebral abscess, orbital abscess, and osteomyelitis. The incidence of these "space infections" has been greatly reduced by modern antibiotic therapy. However, serious morbidity and even fatalities continue to occur. This study reviews complications of odontogenic infections. The search done was based on PubMed and Google Scholar, and an extensive published work search was undertaken. Advanced MEDLINE search was performed using the terms "odontogenic infections," "complications," and "risk factors." PMID:27390486

  1. Actinomyces meyeri brain abscess following dental extraction.

    PubMed

    Clancy, U; Ronayne, A; Prentice, M B; Jackson, A

    2015-01-01

    We describe the rare occurrence of an Actinomyces meyeri cerebral abscess in a 55-year-old woman following a dental extraction. This patient presented with a 2-day history of hemisensory loss, hyper-reflexia and retro-orbital headache, 7 days following a dental extraction for apical peridonitis. Neuroimaging showed a large left parietal abscess with surrounding empyema. The patient underwent craniotomy and drainage of the abscess. A. meyeri was cultured. Actinomycosis is a rare cause of cerebral abscess. The A. meyeri subtype is particularly rare, accounting for less than 1% of specimens. This case describes an unusually brief course of the disease, which is usually insidious. Parietal lobe involvement is unusual as cerebral abscesses usually have a predilection for the frontal and temporal regions of the brain. Although there are no randomised trials to guide therapy, current consensus is to use a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotics, followed by 6-12 months of oral therapy. PMID:25870213

  2. Bronchopleural fistula after pneumonectomy: interdisciplinary surgical closure by an ipsilateral pedicled latissimus dorsi flap supported by video-assisted thoracoscopy.

    PubMed

    Wolter, A; Scholz, T; Diedrichson, J; Arens-Landwehr, A; Schroeder-Finckh, R; Liebau, J

    2013-11-01

    Post-pneumonectomy bronchopleural fistula (BPF) remains a rare but often life-threatening complication and therapeutic challenge. Traditional surgical procedures include chronic open drainage, attempts at direct stump closure, thoracoplasty with or without chest wall muscle transposition and trans-sternal bronchial closure. We describe a case with successful closure of a chronic BPF after pneumonectomy by intrathoracic transposition of a pedicled latissimus dorsi muscle flap circumferentially fixed on the surrounding pleural tissue under continuous video-assisted thoracoscopic overview. The postoperative course was without complications; no tumour, empyema or fistula re-occurred. In this article we want to present the potential advantages of video-assisted thoracoscopic support and interdisciplinary teamwork to improve the outcome of patients with BPFs after pneumonectomy. PMID:23587680

  3. Poor accumulation of technetium-99m glucoheptonate in sarcoidosis and other diffuse infiltrative lung diseases as compared with gallium-67 citrate

    SciTech Connect

    Vorne, M.; Sahlstroem, K.A.; Alanko, K.

    1988-02-01

    Forty-two patients with diffuse infiltrative lung diseases were imaged with Ga-67 citrate and Tc-99m glucoheptonate (GH). Twenty patients had sarcoidosis, six had fibrosis, six had tuberculosis, nine had lung infiltration, and one had pleural empyema. The main difference between Ga-67 and Tc-99m GH was the much greater uptake of Ga-67 in sarcoidosis than that of Tc-99m GH. Fifteen patients with sarcoidosis had positive Ga-67 scans but only six had positive Tc-99m GH scans. The results in other diffuse infiltrative lung diseases were almost equal with Ga-67 and Tc-99m GH. Although Tc-99m GH is less expensive and simpler to use, it is not an adequate substitute for Ga-67 in diffuse infiltrative lung diseases.

  4. Chryseobacterium indologenes: an emerging infection in the USA.

    PubMed

    Mukerji, Ridhwi; Kakarala, Radhika; Smith, Susan Jane; Kusz, Halina G

    2016-01-01

    Nursing home-associated infections and antibiotic resistant pathogens constitute common and serious problems in the geriatric population.Chryseobacterium indologenes, a non-motile Gram-negative rod, though widely distributed in nature, is an uncommon human pathogen. Typically thought of as an organism of low virulence, it may cause serious infections, particularly among the immunocompromised. The majority of reported cases are nosocomial, often associated with immunosuppression or indwelling catheters. It has been reported as the causative agent in bacteraemia, peritonitis, pneumonia, empyema, pyelonephritis, cystitis, meningitis and central venous catheter-associated infections. We report a rare case of C. indologenesinfection affecting a nursing home resident in the USA and we provide a review of similar cases. This report emphasises the importance of individualised treatment and promotes awareness about this organism as one of several emerging pathogens in immunocompromised adults and in the frail elderly who are often nursing home residents, in the Western Hemisphere. PMID:27053540

  5. Pyogenic liver abscess caused by Gemella morbillorum

    PubMed Central

    Sumberaz, Alessandro; Testino, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    Even though Gemella morbillorum infection (GMI) is rare in humans, it may nevertheless, cause endocarditis, meningitis, brain abscess, pleural empyema, nephritis, mediastinitis, and occasionally, liver abscess. We are describing the case of a 64-years-old Caucasian male admitted with fever and abdominal pain. Laboratory parameters revealed inflammation signs, and instrumental examinations showed the presence of diverticula in the ascending colon. Abdominal ultrasound (US) and computer tomography (CT) showed two focal lesions in the right liver lobe. One had the characteristics of a simple cyst; the second was hypoechoic with a low density area, possibly containing necrotic material. US-guided needle biopsy was found negative for neoplastic cells, showing purulent infiltrate. Pus culture was found positive for GMI. Systemic antibiotic therapy coupled with repeated US-guided needle aspiration, induced the resolution of the hepatic abscess. Few cases have been reported of hepatic abscess caused by GMI in immunocompetent non-cirrhotic subjects. PMID:25100894

  6. A review of complications of odontogenic infections

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Rishi Kumar; Sharma, Parveen; Gaba, Shivani; Kaur, Avneet; Ghanghas, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening infections of odontogenic or upper airway origin may extend to potential spaces formed by fascial planes of the lower head and upper cervical area. Complications include airway obstruction, mediastinitis, necrotizing fascitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, sepsis, thoracic empyema, Lemierre's syndrome, cerebral abscess, orbital abscess, and osteomyelitis. The incidence of these “space infections” has been greatly reduced by modern antibiotic therapy. However, serious morbidity and even fatalities continue to occur. This study reviews complications of odontogenic infections. The search done was based on PubMed and Google Scholar, and an extensive published work search was undertaken. Advanced MEDLINE search was performed using the terms “odontogenic infections,” “complications,” and “risk factors.” PMID:27390486

  7. Minimally Invasive Thoracic Surgery in Pediatric Patients: The Taiwan Experience

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Kai; Chou, Chieh; Li, Chung-Liang; Chiu, Hui-Gin; Chang, Yu-Tang

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive technology or laparoscopic surgery underwent a major breakthrough over the past two decades. The first experience of thoracoscopy in children was reported around 1980 for diagnosis of intrathoracic pathology and neoplasia. Up until the middle of the 1990s, the surgical community in Taiwan was still not well prepared to accept the coming era of minimally invasive surgery. In the beginning, laparoscopy was performed in only a few specialties and only relatively short or simple surgeries were considered. But now, the Taiwan's experiences over the several different clinical scenarios were dramatically increased. Therefore, we elaborated on the experience about pectus excavatum: Nuss procedure, primary spontaneous hemopneumothorax, thoracoscopic thymectomy, and empyema in Taiwan. PMID:23819123

  8. Thoracoscopy in diagnosis of ruptured pulmonary hydatid cyst

    PubMed Central

    Sokouti, Mohsen; Nazemieh, Massoud

    2008-01-01

    A 26-year-old man presented with dyspnoea and pneumothorax diagnosed by chest radiography. He had previously presented with a massive right hydropneumothorax on his chest x ray 6 months ago, which was followed by 2 weeks of intercostal tube drainage resulting in a partial improvement of his symptoms. He was referred for a thoracoscopy to investigate the possible causes of the non-resolving pneumothorax, during which a large ruptured, crumpled hydatid cyst in the right pleural space, without empyema, was found. With a limited right thoracotomy, the crumpled laminated membrane of the hydatid cyst was removed. After extraction of the remaining particle of the laminated membrane of the same hydatid cyst in the right lower lobe and suturing of the bronchial opening, the pericyst layer was capitonnaged. Apart from common causes of pneumothorax in endemic areas, ruptured pulmonary hydatid cyst should be considered in pneumothoraces with an unusual clinical course. PMID:21716817

  9. Metronidazole- and Carbapenem-Resistant Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron Isolated in Rochester, Minnesota, in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Sadarangani, Sapna P.; Cunningham, Scott A.; Jeraldo, Patricio R.; Wilson, John W.; Khare, Reeti

    2015-01-01

    Emerging antimicrobial resistance in members of the Bacteroides fragilis group is a concern in clinical medicine. Although metronidazole and carbapenem resistance have been reported in Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a member of the B. fragilis group, they have not, to the best of our knowledge, been reported together in the same B. thetaiotaomicron isolate. Herein, we report isolation of piperacillin-tazobactam-, metronidazole-, clindamycin-, ertapenem-, and meropenem-resistant B. thetaiotaomicron from a patient with postoperative intra-abdominal abscess and empyema. Whole-genome sequencing demonstrated the presence of nimD with at least a portion of IS1169 upstream, a second putative nim gene, two β-lactamase genes (one of which has not been previously reported), two tetX genes, tetQ, ermF, two cat genes, and a number of efflux pumps. This report highlights emerging antimicrobial resistance in B. thetaiotaomicron and the importance of identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of selected anaerobic bacteria. PMID:25941219

  10. Anaerobes: a new aetiology in cavitary pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, J M; Hitado, J; Gea, G; Colmeiro, A; Lanza, A M; Muñoz, J A; Mosquera, J A

    1982-01-01

    The role of mycobacteria in the cavitation of large pneumoconiotic masses is well established. In other cases softness is attributed to an ischaemic or aseptic necrosis. Five cases are described in which cavitation of the pulmonary masses was caused by anaerobic bacteria, confirmed by the growth of such bacterial in cultures after transtracheal or transpleural puncture. Repeated cultures for mycobacteria gave negative results. Two cases were acute, having serious complications such as bronchopleural fistula, empyema, and serious respiratory insufficiency. The role of anaerobes in cavitary pneumoconiosis has not been recognised previously, probably because of the special conditions required to culture these bacteria and the infrequent use of transtracheal puncture in the diagnosis of this entity. The prevalence of anaerobes as agents capable of cavitating pneumoconiotic masses remains to be established. Images PMID:6128024

  11. Acute Biliary Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Forty-seven cases of biliary tract infection with septic shock are presented. The sepsis was caused by empyema of the gallbladder in 23 cases and by cholangitis in the remainder. Gallstones were most frequently the cause of the sepsis. An appropriate diagnostic description of the syndrome of biliary tract infection and septic shock should therefore include a description of the underlying biliary disease as well as the term acute biliary shock. In this series, emergency surgical management by removal of gallstones and drainage of suppuration was felt to be the most appropriate treatment. There was a high incidence of gallbladder rupture (10.6%) and intrahepatic stones (53.2%). Of the 13 patients who died, 8 might have survived if early operation had been performed after the diagnosis of acute biliary septic shock was established. PMID:2278914

  12. [How to do - the chest tube drainage].

    PubMed

    Klopp, Michael; Hoffmann, Hans; Dienemann, Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    A chest tube is used to drain the contents of the pleural space to reconstitute the physiologic pressures within the pleural space and to allow the lungs to fully expand. Indications for chest tube placement include pneumothorax, hemothorax, pleural effusion, pleural empyema, and major thoracic surgery. The most appropriate site for chest tube placement is the 4th or 5th intercostal space in the mid- or anterior- axillary line. Attention to technique in placing the chest tube is vital to avoid complications from the procedure. Applying the step-by-step technique presented, placement of a chest tube is a quick and safe procedure. Complications - frequently occurring when the tube is inserted with a steel trocar - include hemothorax, dislocation, lung lacerations, and injury to organs in the thoracic or abdominal cavity." PMID:25734676

  13. [Community acquired pneumonia in children: Treatment of complicated cases and risk patients. Consensus statement by the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases (SEIP) and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases (SENP)].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Andrés Martín, A; Tagarro García, A; Escribano Montaner, A; Figuerola Mulet, J; García García, J J; Moreno-Galdó, A; Rodrigo Gonzalo de Lliria, C; Saavedra Lozano, J

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia complications has increased during the last decade. According to the records from several countries, empyema and necrotizing pneumonia became more frequent during the last few years. The optimal therapeutic approach for such conditions is still controversial. Both pharmacological management (antimicrobials and fibrinolysis), and surgical management (pleural drainage and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery), are the subject of continuous assessment. In this paper, the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases have reviewed the available evidence. Consensus treatment guidelines are proposed for complications of community-acquired pneumonia in children, focusing on parapneumonic pleural effusion. Recommendations are also provided for the increasing population of patients with underlying diseases and immunosuppression. PMID:25617977

  14. Unusual neurological presentation of Fusobacterium necrophorum disease.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Nasrean; Morris, Trefor; Dhillon, Rishi; Gibbon, Frances

    2016-01-01

    A 2-year-old girl presented to hospital, with reduced consciousness and fever. She had a 4-week history of fever treated with two courses of amoxicillin for tonsillitis diagnosed in primary care. Neuroimaging revealed multiple cerebral abscesses and subdural empyema. Pus aspirated from the intracranial collections grew Fusobacterium necrophorum and meropenem was started. Following neurosurgery, the patient continued to be agitated with fluctuating fever. She underwent close monitoring with regular neuroimaging. To control the progression of intracranial infection, she underwent three separate neurosurgical procedures following which she made a good recovery. This case demonstrates how an organism rarely associated with childhood illnesses presented atypically and progressed into a complex potentially fatal intracranial infection requiring a high degree of neurosurgical intervention. Awareness of this organism is important. The combination of source control together with appropriate antibiotic use was crucial in controlling the infection. PMID:26759436

  15. Brain abscess: Current management

    PubMed Central

    Alvis Miranda, Hernando; Castellar-Leones, Sandra Milena; Elzain, Mohammed Awad; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Brain abscess (BA) is defined as a focal infection within the brain parenchyma, which starts as a localized area of cerebritis, which is subsequently converted into a collection of pus within a well-vascularized capsule. BA must be differentiated from parameningeal infections, including epidural abscess and subdural empyema. The BA is a challenge for the neurosurgeon because it is needed good clinical, pharmacological, and surgical skills for providing good clinical outcomes and prognosis to BA patients. Considered an infrequent brain infection, BA could be a devastator entity that easily left the patient into dead. The aim of this work is to review the current concepts regarding epidemiology, pathophysiology, etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of BA. PMID:24174804

  16. Chest drainage systems in use.

    PubMed

    Zisis, Charalambos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Lazaridis, George; Lampaki, Sofia; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Zarogoulidis, Paul

    2015-03-01

    A chest tube is a flexible plastic tube that is inserted through the chest wall and into the pleural space or mediastinum. It is used to remove air in the case of pneumothorax or fluid such as in the case of pleural effusion, blood, chyle, or pus when empyema occurs from the intrathoracic space. It is also known as a Bülau drain or an intercostal catheter. Insertion of chest tubes is widely performed by radiologists, pulmonary physicians and thoracic surgeons. Large catheters or small catheters are used based on each situation that the medical doctor encounters. In the current review we will focus on the chest drain systems that are in use. PMID:25815304

  17. Sinus thrombectomy for purulent cerebral venous sinus thrombosis utilizing a novel combination of the Trevo stent retriever and the Penumbra ACE aspiration catheter: the stent anchor with mobile aspiration technique.

    PubMed

    Mascitelli, Justin R; Pain, Margaret; Zarzour, Hekmat K; Baxter, Peter; Ghatan, Saadi; Mocco, J

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial complications of sinusitis are rare but life threatening. We present a case of a 17-year-old woman with sinusitis who deteriorated over the course of 12 days from subdural empyema and global purulent cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The patient was managed with surgery and mechanical thrombectomy utilizing a novel 'stent anchor with mobile aspiration technique', in which a Trevo stent retriever (Stryker) was anchored in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) while a 5 MAX ACE reperfusion catheter (Penumbra) was passed back and forth from the SSS to the sigmoid sinus with resultant dramatic improvement in venous outflow. The patient was extubated on postoperative day 3 and was discharged with minimal lower extremity weakness on postoperative day 11. This is the first report using the Trevo stent retriever for sinus thrombosis. It is important to keep these rare complications in mind when evaluating patients with oral and facial infections. PMID:26002667

  18. Retroperitoneal abscess and acute acalculous cholecystitis after iatrogenic colon injury: report of a case

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chengwei; Wang, Yuxu; Hu, Sanyuan; Du, Futian; Ding, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis has a high mortality rate due to the difficulties in early diagnosis and high rate of complications like empyema, gangrene and perforation. We report a case of 20-year-old male with acute severe pancreatitis, acute renal failure and acute peripancreatic fluid collection who was transferred to our department after blood filtration treatment in ICU. After percutaneous catheter drainage for 20 hours, the patient got a high fever. Computed tomography revealed retroperitoneal colon injury. In this case, percutaneous catheter drainage was performed again and the pus cavity was flushed regularly, after which the patient’s state gradually improved. Unpredictably, septic shock appeared on the 51st day. Repeated computed tomography revealed acute acalculous cholecystitis and abscess formation. After percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder catheterization and drainage, the patient got better gradually. Three months later the retroperitoneal catheter was removed. Four months later, ultrasound examination showed normal gallbladder and the catheter was removed. PMID:26131252

  19. Uncomplicated pneumonia in healthy Canadian children and youth: Practice points for management

    PubMed Central

    Le Saux, Nicole; Robinson, Joan L

    2015-01-01

    Although immunization has decreased the incidence of bacterial pneumonia in vaccinated children, pneumonia remains common in healthy children. Symptoms of bacterial pneumonia frequently overlap those present with viral infections or reactive airway disease. Optimally, the diagnosis of bacterial pneumonia should be supported by a chest radiograph before starting antimicrobials. Factors such as age, vital signs and other measures of illness severity are critical when deciding whether to admit a patient to hospital. Because Streptococcus pneumoniae continues to be the most common cause of bacterial pneumonia in children, prescribing amoxicillin or ampicillin for seven to 10 days remains the mainstay of empirical therapy for nonsevere pneumonia. If improvement does not occur, consideration should be given to searching for complications (empyema or lung abscess). Routine chest radiographs at the end of therapy are not recommended unless clinically indicated. PMID:26744558

  20. Extensive complex odontoma in the maxillary sinus pushing 3rd molar near the orbital floor causing transient diplopia and chronic sinusitis: a rare presentation and surgical management.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Monika; Das, Debdutta

    2015-03-01

    Odontoma is a mixed odontogenic hamartoma involving both epithelial and mesenchymal tissues. If left untreated, it can lead to complications in certain conditions. Here is a rare presentation of an extensive complex odontoma in maxillary sinus pushing third molar near the orbital floor causing transient diplopia in upward gaze occasionally and chronic sinusitis. Although odontomata are not uncommon and are familiar to practitioners, but some aggressive cases may cause problematic sequelae. Even postoperative complications may result if oral surgeons are not aware of the potential pitfalls associated with the surgical removal of large maxillary antrum odontomata. This article reports a rare presentation which can be considered unique because when obstruction of sinus drainage is evident, serious complications such as orbital infections, epidural and subdural empyema, meningitis, cerebritis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, brain abscess and death can occur. It also addresses points and pitfalls concerning surgery to remove odontoma. PMID:25848139

  1. Delayed phlegmon with gallstone fragments masquerading as soft tissue sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Laura F.; Bateni, Cyrus P.; Bishop, John W.; Canter, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Complications from lost gallstones after cholecystectomy are rare but varied from simple perihepatic abscess to empyema and expectoration of gallstones. Gallstone complications have been reported in nearly every organ system, although reports of malignant masquerade of retained gallstones are few. We present the case of an 87-year-old woman with a flank soft tissue tumor 4 years after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The initial clinical, radiographic and biopsy findings were consistent with soft tissue sarcoma (STS), but careful review of her case in multidisciplinary conference raised the suspicion for retained gallstones rather than STS. The patient was treated with incisional biopsy/drainage of the mass, and gallstones were retrieved. The patient recovered completely without an extensive resectional procedure, emphasizing the importance of multidisciplinary sarcoma care to optimize outcomes for potential sarcoma patients. PMID:27333918

  2. Localised pulmonary resection for bronchiectasis in hypogammaglobulinaemic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, A. J.; Roifman, C.; Brendan, J.; Mullen, M.; Reid, B.; Weisbrod, G.; Downey, G. P.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Bronchiectasis and pulmonary infections are common in patients with hypogammaglobulinaemia. Despite intravenous gammaglobulin treatment and appropriate antibiotics, a subgroup of patients remains with persistent localised pulmonary infection in segments where bronchiectasis had developed before appropriate treatment. As such localised pulmonary suppuration (segmental or lobar) may serve as a focus for progression of bronchiectasis, surgical resection of the involved segments may be considered. The outcome of pulmonary resection in four such patients is reported. RESULTS--Surgery was well tolerated except for one postoperative empyema. Information on follow up is available from 3.5 to 5 years. All patients experienced considerable reduction of symptoms including cough, sputum production, antibiotic use, and hospital admissions. CONCLUSIONS--Surgical resection of localised bronchiectatic segments should be considered in patients with hypogammaglobulinaemia with persistent localised suppuration and symptoms refractory to medical treatment. PMID:8016776

  3. A mistaken case of tension pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Michael Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The patient was an otherwise usually fit and well 25-year-old man who presented to A&E department in extremis. The initial working diagnosis was a tension pneumothorax, and he was subsequently treated with needle thoracocentesis causing a release of air. A chest radiograph was taken, after which a chest drain was inserted. Bilious fluid was drained from the chest drain. The patient was taken for an emergency CT, which demonstrated a Bochdalek diaphragmatic hernia, with the spleen and bowel found to be causing a near total left lung collapse. He was taken to the theatre to return the bowel to the correct anatomical position, in addition to undergoing a sleeve gastrectomy, and diaphragmatic defect repair. The patient has had a complex and protracted recovery in the intensive therapy unit (ITU) with complications including wound dehiscence, gastrectomy leak requiring additional surgical repair, fluid overload and bilateral pleural empyema. PMID:24835806

  4. Pleural tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, B; Davies, P D O

    2006-03-01

    Pleural effusions in tuberculosis are commonly seen in young adults as an immunological phenomenon occurring soon after primary infection. However, the epidemiology and demographics of tuberculous pleurisy are changing due to the impact of HIV co-infection and the increasing number of pleural effusions seen as part of re-activation disease. Pleural biopsy for histology and culture is the mainstay of diagnosis with closed needle biopsy adequate in the majority of cases. Techniques such as PCR of biopsy specimens and the role of pleural fluid ADA are still being evaluated as a diagnostic aid. Tuberculous empyema is less commonly seen in the western world and the diagnostic yield from pleural fluid here is greater than in "primary" effusions. Treatment with appropriate antituberculous chemotherapy is generally successful though there is currently insufficient evidence to recommend the routine use of corticosteroids in this condition. PMID:16700190

  5. Thoracoscopy in diagnosis of ruptured pulmonary hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    Sokouti, Mohsen; Nazemieh, Massoud

    2008-01-01

    A 26-year-old man presented with dyspnoea and pneumothorax diagnosed by chest radiography. He had previously presented with a massive right hydropneumothorax on his chest x ray 6 months ago, which was followed by 2 weeks of intercostal tube drainage resulting in a partial improvement of his symptoms. He was referred for a thoracoscopy to investigate the possible causes of the non-resolving pneumothorax, during which a large ruptured, crumpled hydatid cyst in the right pleural space, without empyema, was found. With a limited right thoracotomy, the crumpled laminated membrane of the hydatid cyst was removed. After extraction of the remaining particle of the laminated membrane of the same hydatid cyst in the right lower lobe and suturing of the bronchial opening, the pericyst layer was capitonnaged. Apart from common causes of pneumothorax in endemic areas, ruptured pulmonary hydatid cyst should be considered in pneumothoraces with an unusual clinical course. PMID:21716817

  6. Sinus thrombectomy for purulent cerebral venous sinus thrombosis utilizing a novel combination of the Trevo stent retriever and the Penumbra ACE aspiration catheter: the stent anchor with mobile aspiration technique.

    PubMed

    Mascitelli, Justin R; Pain, Margaret; Zarzour, Hekmat K; Baxter, Peter; Ghatan, Saadi; Mocco, J

    2016-06-01

    Intracranial complications of sinusitis are rare but life threatening. We present a case of a 17-year-old woman with sinusitis who deteriorated over the course of 12 days from subdural empyema and global purulent cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The patient was managed with surgery and mechanical thrombectomy utilizing a novel 'stent anchor with mobile aspiration technique', in which a Trevo stent retriever (Stryker) was anchored in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) while a 5 MAX ACE reperfusion catheter (Penumbra) was passed back and forth from the SSS to the sigmoid sinus with resultant dramatic improvement in venous outflow. The patient was extubated on postoperative day 3 and was discharged with minimal lower extremity weakness on postoperative day 11. This is the first report using the Trevo stent retriever for sinus thrombosis. It is important to keep these rare complications in mind when evaluating patients with oral and facial infections. PMID:26019186

  7. Colosplenopleural fistula: An unusual colonic fistula in a 44-year-old male with Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Michael W.; Lee, Steven

    2015-01-01

    A 44-year-old male with a history of well-controlled human immunodeficiency virus disease and Crohn's disease presented with fever, cough, and left-sided chest pain with radiation to his back. His medical history was notable for a medically managed spontaneous microperforation of the colon at the splenic flexure 30 months prior, and recurrent left-lower-lobe pneumonia with empyema and a splenic abscess within the past 24 months. CT demonstrated a complex left pleural fluid collection with fistulous connection through the spleen and into the large bowel. The patient tolerated a diverting loop ileostomy without complications and was discharged home with plans for resection of the fistulous tract and splenectomy in several months.

  8. Lung abscess revisited. A survey of 184 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Hagan, J L; Hardy, J D

    1983-01-01

    One hundred eighty-four patients with lung abscess, admitted to the Hospital of the University of Mississippi between 1960 and 1982, were studied with respect to sex (149 men and 35 women), age (mainly fourth to sixth decades), location of abscess(es) (RLL, RUL, and LLL mainly), predisposing factors (aspiration in sensorium disorders, obstruction, gingivo-dental suppuration, immunoincompetence) and nonoperative (89%) and operative (11%) therapy, usually lobectomy. Data from the different decades were compared, but there were few major differences. Mortality rate was 22% in the 1960s, 25% in the 1970s, and 28% in 1980-1982. Major management problems involved massive pulmonary hemorrhage, impaired immune defenses, old-age debility, bronchopleural fistula with empyema, or very large cavity. Anaerobic bacteria predominate and penicillin is the treatment of choice. Incidence of operation is declining, but cases are more often complicated. Prognosis is good in the uncomplicated case. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6859981

  9. [Effect of the continuous epidural saline infusion for patients with postdural puncture headache after pulmonary resection].

    PubMed

    Katayama, Tatsuya; Hirai, Shinji; Hamanaka, Yoshiharu; Fukui, Takayuki; Itou, Shimon; Hatooka, Shunzou; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2011-11-01

    The dual puncture is one of the diseaseful complications at the induction of the epidural anesthesia, which causes severe symptoms of intracranial hypotension such as headache and nausea. The clinical courses of 3 patients with the dual puncture symptoms after pulmonary resections were retrospectively reviewed, and the effect of the continuous epidural saline infusion treatment (CESI) for the dual puncture was evaluated. Pneumococcal empyema developed in 1 patient who had been treated with conservative management. In contrast, the symptoms of the others who were treated with the CESI were quickly recovered or were effectively prevented. This report strongly suggested that the CESI was convenient and effective treatment for dual punctune symptoms by suppressing the cerebrospinal fluid leakage by elevation of the fluid pressure in the extradural space. PMID:22187867

  10. A 61-Year-Old Man With Shortness of Breath, Ascites, and Lower Extremity Edema.

    PubMed

    Ataya, Ali; Cope, Jessica M; Moguillansky, Diego; Machuca, Tiago N; Alnuaimat, Hassan

    2016-06-01

    A 61-year-old man presented with an 18-month history of progressive shortness of breath on exertion, fatigue, worsening bilateral lower extremity edema, abdominal swelling, and increased assistance with activities of daily living. Pertinent past medical history included right-sided pneumonia secondary to Streptococcus pneumoniae that was complicated by empyema, requiring right-sided video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery with decortication 2 years earlier. He had a negative cardiac history, no recent travel in the last 3 years, and no known exposure to tuberculosis. His medications included aspirin and daily furosemide. His symptoms appeared to be refractory to diuretic therapy. Previous workup 6 months earlier included an echocardiography (ECHO) showing enlarged left and right atria with a normal ejection fraction, and a catheterization of the left side of the heart with reported normal left ventricular function and unobstructed coronary arteries. PMID:27287597

  11. Spontaneous Esophageal Perforation in a Patient with Mixed Connective Tissue Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lyman, David

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous esophageal perforation is a rare and life-threatening disorder. Failure to diagnosis within the first 24-48 hours of presentation portends a poor prognosis. A patient with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) on low-dose prednisone and methotrexate presented moribund with chest and shoulder pain, a left hydropneumothorax, progressive respiratory failure and shock. Initial management focussed on presumed community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in a patient on immunosuppressants. Bilateral yeast empyemas were treated and attributed to immunosuppression. On day 26, the patient developed mediastinitis, and the diagnosis of esophageal perforation was first considered. A review of the literature suggests that the diagnosis and management of spontaneous esophageal perforation could have been more timely and the outcome less catastrophic. PMID:22279514

  12. Encephalopathy of infection and systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Young, G Bryan

    2013-10-01

    This review will discuss several intracranial infections and sepsis-associated encephalopathy. Intracranial infections and inflammation of interest to the neurologist and EEG technicians include viral and autoimmune encephalitides; bacterial, fungal, and other meningitides; cerebritis; and brain abscess and subdural empyema. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy refers to a diffuse brain dysfunction secondary to infection that is principally located outside of the central nervous system. It is much more common than all of the intracranial infections put together, at least for adults in Western society. It probably involves a number of mechanisms that are not mutually exclusive and likely vary from patient to patient. Morbidity and mortality are directly related to the severity of SAE. The earliest features of SAE are delirium and mild EEG slowing; it is crucial to recognize these early features and to search for and treat the underlying infection promptly to reduce mortality and morbidity. PMID:24084178

  13. Brain abscess: Current management.

    PubMed

    Alvis Miranda, Hernando; Castellar-Leones, Sandra Milena; Elzain, Mohammed Awad; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2013-08-01

    Brain abscess (BA) is defined as a focal infection within the brain parenchyma, which starts as a localized area of cerebritis, which is subsequently converted into a collection of pus within a well-vascularized capsule. BA must be differentiated from parameningeal infections, including epidural abscess and subdural empyema. The BA is a challenge for the neurosurgeon because it is needed good clinical, pharmacological, and surgical skills for providing good clinical outcomes and prognosis to BA patients. Considered an infrequent brain infection, BA could be a devastator entity that easily left the patient into dead. The aim of this work is to review the current concepts regarding epidemiology, pathophysiology, etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of BA. PMID:24174804

  14. Renal Abscess Caused by Salmonella Typhi

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Amarjeet; Sarma, Smita; Kumar, Navin; Sengupta, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella typhi is a true pathogen, which is capable of causing both intestinal and extraintestinal infections. Unusual presentations of Salmonella should always be kept in mind as this organism can cause disease in almost any organ of the body. S. typhi has been reported to cause the life-threatening infections such as meningitis, endocarditis, myocarditis, empyema, and hepatic abscess. Renal involvement by S. typhi is a relatively rare presentation. We report a case of renal abscess caused by S. typhi in an afebrile, 10-year-old child who did not have any clinical history of enteric fever. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of isolation of S. typhi from the renal abscess, and interestingly this isolate was found to be resistant to quinolones. PMID:26417164

  15. Chest drainage systems in use

    PubMed Central

    Zisis, Charalambos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Lazaridis, George; Lampaki, Sofia; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    A chest tube is a flexible plastic tube that is inserted through the chest wall and into the pleural space or mediastinum. It is used to remove air in the case of pneumothorax or fluid such as in the case of pleural effusion, blood, chyle, or pus when empyema occurs from the intrathoracic space. It is also known as a Bülau drain or an intercostal catheter. Insertion of chest tubes is widely performed by radiologists, pulmonary physicians and thoracic surgeons. Large catheters or small catheters are used based on each situation that the medical doctor encounters. In the current review we will focus on the chest drain systems that are in use. PMID:25815304

  16. Applications of Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Thorax in Pleural Diseases: A State-of-the-Art Review.

    PubMed

    Pessôa, Fernanda Miraldi Clemente; de Melo, Alessandro Severo Alves; Souza, Arthur Soares; de Souza, Luciana Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Zanetti, Gláucia; Marchiori, Edson

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this review was to present the main aspects of pleural diseases seen with conventional and advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. This modality is considered to be the gold standard for the evaluation of the pleural interface, characterization of complex pleural effusion, and identification of exudate and hemorrhage, as well as in the analysis of superior sulcus tumors, as it enables more accurate staging. The indication for MRI of the thorax in the identification of these conditions is increasing in comparison to computerized tomography, and it can also be used to support the diagnosis of pulmonary illnesses. This literature review describes the morphological and functional aspects of the main benign and malignant pleural diseases assessed with MRI, including mesothelioma, metastasis, lymphoma, fibroma, lipoma, endometriosis, asbestos-related pleural disease, empyema, textiloma, and splenosis. PMID:27300447

  17. Isolation of gram-positive rods that resemble but are clearly distinct from Actinomyces pyogenes from mixed wound infections.

    PubMed Central

    Wüst, J; Lucchini, G M; Lüthy-Hottenstein, J; Brun, F; Altwegg, M

    1993-01-01

    Beginning in 1990, gram-positive rods resembling Actinomyces pyogenes were found with increasing frequency in mixed cultures from various infectious processes, most of them from patients with otitis, empyema, pilonidal cysts, perianal abscesses, and decubitus ulcers. Ribotyping and hybridization showed that these gram-positive rods could be divided into five groups not related to known Actinomyces species. Biochemical markers for reliable differentiation into these groups, however, could not be found. Therefore, naming new species is not warranted unless parameters are discovered that allow identification without DNA hybridization. These gram-positive rods have been isolated only in mixed cultures with anaerobes, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus "milleri," enterococci, and gram-negative rods. Their exact role in these possibly synergistic infections needs further investigation. Images PMID:8501213

  18. Recurrent Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Children: Underlying Clinical Conditions, and Immunological and Microbiological Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Alsina, Laia; Basteiro, Maria G.; de Paz, Hector D.; Iñigo, Melania; de Sevilla, Mariona F.; Triviño, Miriam; Juan, Manel; Muñoz-Almagro, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Clinical, immunological and microbiological characteristics of recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children were evaluated, differentiating relapse from reinfection, in order to identify specific risk factors for both conditions. Methods All patients <18 years-old with recurrent IPD admitted to a tertiary-care pediatric center from January 2004 to December 2011 were evaluated. An episode of IPD was defined as the presence of clinical findings of infection together with isolation and/or pneumococcal DNA detection by Real-Time PCR in any sterile body fluid. Recurrent IPD was defined as 2 or more episodes in the same individual at least 1 month apart. Among recurrent IPD, we differentiated relapse (same pneumococcal isolate) from reinfection. Results 593 patients were diagnosed with IPD and 10 patients died. Among survivors, 23 episodes of recurrent IPD were identified in 10 patients (1.7%). Meningitis was the most frequent form of recurrent IPD (10 episodes/4 children) followed by recurrent empyema (8 episodes/4 children). Three patients with recurrent empyema caused by the same pneumococcal clone ST306 were considered relapses and showed high bacterial load in their first episode. In contrast, all other episodes of recurrent IPD were considered reinfections. Overall, the rate of relapse of IPD was 0.5% and the rate of reinfection 1.2%. Five out of 7 patients with reinfection had an underlying risk factor: cerebrospinal fluid leak (n = 3), chemotherapy treatment (n = 1) and a homozygous mutation in MyD88 gene (n = 1). No predisposing risk factors were found in the remainder. Conclusions recurrent IPD in children is a rare condition associated with an identifiable risk factor in case of reinfection in almost 80% of cases. In contrast, recurrent IPD with pleuropneumonia is usually a relapse of infection. PMID:25738983

  19. Indications and Complications of Tube Thoracostomy with Improvised Underwater Seal Bottles

    PubMed Central

    Edaigbini, Sunday A; Delia, Ibrahim Z; Aminu, Muhammad B; Orogade, Abosede A; Anumenechi, Ndubuisi; Aliyu, Ibrahim D

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tube thoracostomy is a lifesaving and frequently performed procedure in hospitals where the expertise and necessary tools are available. Where the ideal drainage receptacle is unavailable, the underwater seal device can be improvised with bottled water plastic can especially in emergency situations. Aims and Objectives: To determine the frequencies of the various indications and complications of tube thoracostomy with improvised underwater seal. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study with a structured proforma was used for assessment over a 3-year period (May 2010-April 2013). The proforma was filled at the time of the procedure by the performing surgeon and patients were followed up with serial chest X-rays until certified cured. A 1.5 L bottled water container was used as the underwater seal receptacle. The data was analysed with SPSS 15 software program. Results: A total of 167 patients were managed. There were 106 (63.5%) males and 61 (36.5%) females. The mean age was 34.85 ± 16.72 with a range of 1-80 years. The most frequent indication was for malignant/paramalignant effusion, 46 (27.5%). Others were trauma, 44 (26.3%), Parapneumonic effusion, 20 (12%), postthoracotomy 14 (8.4%), empyema thoracis 12 (7.2%), heart disease and tuberculous effusion 11 (6.6%) each, pneumothorax 8 (4.8%) and misdiagnosis 1 (0.6%). A hundred and one (60.5%) of the procedures were performed by registrars, 41 (24.6%) by consultants, house officers 15 (9%) and senior registrars 10 (6%). The overall complication rate was 16.8% with the more frequent complications been empyema (5.6%) and pneumothorax (3.6%). The average duration of tube placement was 13.02 ± 12.362 days and range of 1-110 days. Conclusion: Tube thoracostomy can be a relatively safe procedure with acceptable complication rates even with improvised underwater seal drainage bottles. PMID:25191098

  20. PubMed Central

    Cocchio, S.; Gallo, T.; Furlan, P.; Clagnan, E.; Del Zotto, S.; Saia, M.; Bertoncello, C.; Buja, A.; Baldovin, T.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction. Pneumonia remains a common reason for hospitalizing infants and the elderly worldwide, and streptococcal infection is often responsible. The aim of this study was to assess the burden of pneumonia in a large general population. Methods. All pneumonia-related hospitalizations from 2004 to 2013 in north-east Italy were identified from the hospital records with a first-listed diagnosis on discharge of bacterial pneumonia, or a first-listed diagnosis on discharge of meningitis, septicemia or empyema associated with a secondary diagnosis of bacterial pneumonia. We identified major comorbidities, calculated agespecific case-fatality rates (CFR), and estimated the related cost to the health care system. Results. Of the 125,722 hospitalizations identified, 96.9% were cases of pneumonia, 2.4% of septicemia, 0.4% of meningitis, and 0.3% of empyema; 75.3% of hospitalizations involved ≥ 65-yearolds. The overall CFR was 12.4%, and it increased with age, peaking in people over 80 (19.6%). The mean annual pneumonia-associated hospitalization rate was 204.6 per 100,000 population, and it peaked in 0- to 4-year-old children (325.6 per 100,000 in males, 288.9 per 100,000 in females), and adults over 65 (844.9 per 100,000 in males, 605.7 per 100,000 in females). Hospitalization rates dropped over the years for the 0-4 year-olds, and rose for people over 80. The estimated overall annual cost of these pneumonia-related hospitalizations was approximately € 41 million. Conclusions. This study shows that the burden on resources for pneumonia-related hospitalization is an important public health issue. Prevention remains the most valuable tool for containing pneumonia, and vaccination strategies can help in the primary prevention of infection, possibly reducing the number of cases in all age groups. PMID:27582630

  1. Co-Transcriptomes of Initial Interactions In Vitro between Streptococcus Pneumoniae and Human Pleural Mesothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Claire J.; del Mar Cendra, Maria; Watson, Alastair; Auger, Jean-Philippe; Pandey, Anish; Tighe, Paddy; Christodoulides, Myron

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) is a major causative organism of empyema, an inflammatory condition occurring in the pleural sac. In this study, we used human and Spn cDNA microarrays to characterize the transcriptional responses occurring during initial contact between Spn and a human pleural mesothelial cell line (PMC) in vitro. Using stringent filtering criteria, 42 and 23 Spn genes were up-and down-regulated respectively. In particular, genes encoding factors potentially involved in metabolic processes and Spn adherence to eukaryotic cells were up-regulated e.g. glnQ, glnA, aliA, psaB, lytB and nox. After Spn initial contact, 870 human genes were differentially regulated and the largest numbers of significant gene expression changes were found in canonical pathways for eukaryotic initiation factor 2 signaling (60 genes out of 171), oxidative phosphorylation (32/103), mitochondrial dysfunction (37/164), eIF4 and p70S6K signaling (28/142), mTOR signaling (27/182), NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response (20/177), epithelial adherens junction remodeling (11/66) and ubiquitination (22/254). The cellular response appeared to be directed towards host cell survival and defense. Spn did not activate NF-kB or phosphorylate p38 MAPK or induce cytokine production from PMC. Moreover, Spn infection of TNF-α pre-stimulated PMC inhibited production of IL-6 and IL-8 secretion by >50% (p<0.01). In summary, this descriptive study provides datasets and a platform for examining further the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of empyema. PMID:26566142

  2. Traumatic chest injury in children: A single thoracic surgeon's experience in two Nigerian tertiary hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Okonta, Kelechi Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was to determine the extent and outcome of childhood chest injury in Nigeria, and to compare results with that of other literatures. Patients and Methods: A Prospective study of all children under 18 years of age with chest trauma in two tertiary hospitals in Southern Nigeria from January 2012 to December 2014 was reviewed. The aetiology, type, associated injury, mechanism, treatment and outcome were evaluated. The patients were followed up in the clinic. The data were analysed using SPSS version 20.0 with a significant P < 0.05. Results: Thirty-one patients (12.1%) under 18 years of age of 256 chest trauma patients were managed in the thoracic units. The mean age was 9.78 ± 6.77 years and 27 (87.1%) were male. The aetiology in 13 was from falls, 10 from automobile crashes, 3 from gunshots, 4 from stabbing and 1 from abuse. The highest peak of chest injury was on Saturday of the week and April of the year. The pleural collections are as follows: 15 (71.4%) was haemothorax, 4 (19.1%) pneumothorax, 2 (9.5%) haemopneumothorax and 18 patients had lung contusion in combination or alone with the pleural collections. Seven patients who presented >12-h versus 2 who presented <12-h and 6 of children between 0 and 9 years versus 3 at 10-18 years of age had empyema thoracis (P value not significant). One death was recorded. Conclusion: Chest trauma in children is still not common, and blunt chest injury from falls and automobile accidents are more common than penetrating chest injury. Treatment with tube thoracostomy is the major management modality with empyema thoracis as the most common complication. PMID:26612123

  3. Risk factors for prolonged operative time in single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Seong Uk; Choi, In Seok

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We performed 3-channel single incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SILC) in earlier period of this study and modified our method to 4-channel SILC using a snake retractor for better operative field in later period. This study has been designed to evaluate the risk factors for prolonged operative time in SILC. Methods From April 2010 to August 2014, 323 cases of 3-channel SILC (Konyang standard method [KSM] group) and 399 cases of 4-channel SILC (modified KSM [mKSM] group) using a snake retractor were performed. Results The clinical characteristics were not significantly different between KSM and mKSM group except preoperative percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage (PTGBD) treatment (9.6% vs. 16.5%, P < 0.007). The mean operation time was longer in mKSM group than KSM group (55.8 ± 19.7 minutes vs. 51.7 ± 20.1 minutes, P = 0.006). The estimated blood loss of KSM group was more than mKSM group (24.6 ± 54.1 mL vs. 16.9 ± 27.0 mL, P = 0.013). According to the histopathologic findings, acute cholecystitis or empyema were confirmed more in mKSM group as compared with KSM group (28% vs. 14.0%, P = 0.025). In multivariate analysis, the risk factors for prolonged operation time were drainage insertion, histopathologic findings (acute cholecystitis or empyema), surgeons' technical expertise, body mass index > 30 kg/m2 as well as the 4-channel SILC. Conclusion Among patients with these risk factors, conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy could be considered as well although SILC might be safe and feasible modality for benign gallbladder disease. PMID:26576404

  4. Modelling staphylococcal pneumonia in a human 3D lung tissue model system delineates toxin-mediated pathology

    PubMed Central

    Mairpady Shambat, Srikanth; Chen, Puran; Nguyen Hoang, Anh Thu; Bergsten, Helena; Vandenesch, Francois; Siemens, Nikolai; Lina, Gerard; Monk, Ian R.; Foster, Timothy J.; Arakere, Gayathri; Svensson, Mattias; Norrby-Teglund, Anna

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus necrotizing pneumonia is recognized as a toxin-mediated disease, yet the tissue-destructive events remain elusive, partly as a result of lack of mechanistic studies in human lung tissue. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) tissue model composed of human lung epithelial cells and fibroblasts was used to delineate the role of specific staphylococcal exotoxins in tissue pathology associated with severe pneumonia. To this end, the models were exposed to the mixture of exotoxins produced by S. aureus strains isolated from patients with varying severity of lung infection, namely necrotizing pneumonia or lung empyema, or to purified toxins. The necrotizing pneumonia strains secreted high levels of α-toxin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), and triggered high cytotoxicity, inflammation, necrosis and loss of E-cadherin from the lung epithelium. In contrast, the lung empyema strain produced moderate levels of PVL, but negligible amounts of α-toxin, and triggered limited tissue damage. α-toxin had a direct damaging effect on the epithelium, as verified using toxin-deficient mutants and pure α-toxin. Moreover, PVL contributed to pathology through the lysis of neutrophils. A combination of α-toxin and PVL resulted in the most severe epithelial injury. In addition, toxin-induced release of pro-inflammatory mediators from lung tissue models resulted in enhanced neutrophil migration. Using a collection of 31 strains from patients with staphylococcal pneumonia revealed that strains producing high levels of α-toxin and PVL were cytotoxic and associated with fatal outcome. Also, the strains that produced the highest toxin levels induced significantly greater epithelial disruption. Of importance, toxin-mediated lung epithelium destruction could be inhibited by polyspecific intravenous immunoglobulin containing antibodies against α-toxin and PVL. This study introduces a novel model system for study of staphylococcal pneumonia in a human

  5. Pleural effusion adenosine deaminase: a candidate biomarker to discriminate between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruolin; Wang, Junli; Wang, Xinfeng; Wang, Maoshui

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Delay in the treatment of pleural infection may contribute to its high mortality. In this retrospective study, we aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of pleural adenosine deaminase in discrimination between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space prior to selecting antibiotics. METHODS: A total of 76 patients were enrolled and grouped into subgroups according to Gram staining: 1) patients with Gram-negative bacterial infections, aged 53.2±18.6 years old, of whom 44.7% had empyemas and 2) patients with Gram-positive bacterial infections, aged 53.5±21.5 years old, of whom 63.1% had empyemas. The pleural effusion was sampled by thoracocentesis and then sent for adenosine deaminase testing, biochemical testing and microbiological culture. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to examine the differences in adenosine deaminase levels between the groups. Correlations between adenosine deaminase and specified variables were also quantified using Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Moreover, receiver operator characteristic analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of pleural effusion adenosine deaminase. RESULTS: Mean pleural adenosine deaminase levels differed significantly between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space (191.8±32.1 U/L vs 81.0±16.9 U/L, p<0.01). The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve was 0.689 (95% confidence interval: 0.570, 0.792, p<0.01) at the cutoff value of 86 U/L. Additionally, pleural adenosine deaminase had a sensitivity of 63.2% (46.0-78.2%); a specificity of 73.7% (56.9-86.6%); positive and negative likelihood ratios of 2.18 and 0.50, respectively; and positive and negative predictive values of 70.6% and 66.7%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Pleural effusion adenosine deaminase is a helpful alternative biomarker for early and quick discrimination of Gram-negative from Gram-positive bacterial infections of the pleural space

  6. Laser plasmapheresis for treatment of pulmonary and pleural suppurative diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akopov, A. L.; Bely, K. P.; Berezin, Yu. D.; Orlov, S. V.

    1996-04-01

    Plasmapheresis in pulmonology is one of the leading methods of extracorporeal detoxification of patients with purulent lung and pleura diseases. However this method causes a decrease in patients' leukocyte level and humoral immunity indices. The medico-biological research conducted at the State Scientific Center of Pulmonology demonstrated that a combination of plasmapheresis with additional irradiation of the patients' reinfused erythrocyte mass with low intensive He-Ne laser light with the wavelength of 0.63 mkm considerably reduces the probability of these complications. It may be due to the fact that laser irradiation of autologous erythrocytes induces local and general stimulation, favoring in this way the inflammatory process involution. The suggested method of plasmapheresis was used in the process of treatment of 76 patients with lung abscess, empyema, purulent mediastinitis, sepsis. The essence of the method consists in irradiating with He-Ne laser the last portion of the erythrocyte mass (130 - 170 ml), diluted with saline, during its reinfusion in the course of a routine plasmapheresis. The positive impact of practical application of the above method allows to characterize it as highly effective for treatment of purulent diseases in pulmonology.

  7. [Tuberculosis in perinatal stage. A challenge to the binomial care mother-son. Report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Verónica, Ricardo; López-Vargas, Laura; Avalos-Huizar, Luis Manuel; Aviz-Vinaña, Lizeth Dimelza; Gutiérrez-Padilla, Alfonso

    2014-03-01

    Case report of 18-year old female patient with clinical signs of pulmonary tuberculosis during pregnancy at beginning of fourth month into term, with airway impairment, as evidenced by dry cough, fever and night sweats, as well as a 6 kg. weightloss. Twenty-two days after giving birth, the patient was hospitalized with high fever and deteriorated health conditions, requiring treatment in the intensive care unit due to complications such as severe malnutrition, septic shock, pulmonary abscess, pachypleuritis, empyema and bronchopleural fistula. The tuberculosis diagnosis was established through ABF identification with Ziehl-Neelsen stain of the pleural fluid. The patient was hospitalized for 42 days, including eleven days on a mechanical ventilator, before being discharged. Her newborn daughter was admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit on the 19th day of life due to coughing, fever, difficulty in breathing, liquid stool and rejecting food. The newborn was hospitalized in the newborn intensive care unit for twenty-two days, developing major sepsis and multiple organ failure, which complications led to her death. An autopsy was conducted, revealing granulomatous lesions consistent with tuberculosis in lungs, liver, small intestine, large intestine and peritoneum; additionally the PCR of bronchial aspirate was positive to Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA. PMID:24779276

  8. Malignant pleural mesothelioma in a 17-year old boy: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Guzmán, C.; Barrera-Rodríguez, R.; Portilla-Segura, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a rare, invasive and often fatal neoplasm that develops in the thin layer of tissue surrounding the lungs known as the pleura. Although rare, mesotheliomas do occur in the young; their characteristics are distinct from those of older patients. Case presentation This is a case report of a 17-year-old boy who had moderate dyspnea, cough, right-sided pleuritic chest pain, fever, headache and no weight loss. Physical examination showed a right pleural effusion and chest roentgenograms revealed a homogenous opacity on lower right hemithorax. Biochemical analysis of pleural fluid showed hemorrhagic/turbid effusion compatible with exudate. It was initially treated as an empyema. The pleural fluid culture was negative. Adenosine deaminase level was 34.3 U/L (admission) and 19.02 U/L (two weeks after). Pleural fluid smear and culture for Mtb were negative. During the open pleural biopsy, thickened pleura and multiple pale yellow nodules in the lung were observed. The histopathological report was compatible with malignant pleural mesothelioma. With this diagnosis, a chemotherapy regimen with cisplatin was initiated. After two cycles, the patient had no clinical and radiological improvement. The patient is currently under regular follow up. Conclusion MPM is rare in young adults and its clinical presentation makes it different from mesothelioma in elderly patients, so it will be necessary to identify the new risk factors that can identify these patients. PMID:27222787

  9. Retrospective case series analysing the clinical data and treatment options of patients with a tubercular abscess of the chest wall

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Satona; Aoki, Minoru; Nakanishi, Takao; Otake, Yosuke; Matsumoto, Masataka; Sakurai, Toshiyasu; Tada, Kimihide; Ikeda, Akihiko

    2012-01-01

    The tubercular abscess of the chest wall remains one of the differential diagnoses of a chest wall tumour, and the management strategy is controversial. We reviewed the medical records of 22 patients treated at our institution. Two patients were managed by antitubercular medications alone; eight patients were managed by medication and open drainage. Five patients underwent open drainage with subsequent radical surgery at a constant interval of time, and the mean duration between open drainage and radical surgery was 9.8 weeks (range, 3–12). Seven patients underwent radical surgery without prior open drainage. Five patients required rib resections, and curettage of infected pleural peel was necessary in 5 patients. Antitubercular drugs were administered basically for more than 6 months regardless of surgical management, including for more than 1 month prior to radical surgery. Postoperative empyema was seen in 1 patient after radical surgery. The mean follow-up duration was 32.8 months (range, 3–100), and there was no recurrence. Complete resection of the tubercular abscess with sufficient antitubercular therapy resulted in a satisfactory outcome. Antitubercular therapy with or without open drainage can be a viable choice. PMID:22184463

  10. Feasibility of the custom-made titanium cranioplasty CRANIOTOP®

    PubMed Central

    Höhne, Julius; Brawanski, Alexander; Gassner, Holger G.; Schebesch, Karl-Michael.

    2013-01-01

    Background: With decompressive craniectomy for ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, and skull-infiltrating tumors, the need for cranioplasty has increased. Different materials for custom-made cranioplasties have been evaluated, but a gold standard could not yet be established. We report our experience with the new custom-made titanium CRANIOTOP®cranioplasty (CL Instruments, Germany). Methods: A total of 50 consecutive patients received a CRANIOTOP cranioplasty within a 2 year interval. We reviewed the charts for time between initial surgery and cranioplasty, indication, complications, operative time, and cosmetic outcome. Postoperative imaging (computed tomography [CT] scan n = 48, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) n = 5) was screened for fitting accuracy and for hemorrhages. Results: The most common indication for craniectomy were diffuse edema due to traumatic brain injury (n = 17, 34%) and ischemic stroke (n = 12, 24%). All patients were satisfied with the cosmetic result. In the postoperative CT scan accurate fitting was confirmed in all patients, the postoperative MRI was free of artifacts. Surgical revision was necessary in five patients because of empyema (n = 2), wound exposure (n = 2), and one cerebrospinal fluid fistula. Thus, the surgical morbidity was 10%. Conclusion: With due consideration of the limitations of this retrospective study, we feel the present data allow concluding that the custom-made titanium cranioplasty CRANIOTOP®is safe and feasible. PMID:23956931

  11. Pneumonia in the immunocompetent patient

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, J H; Mcdonald, G; Alton, H; Gordon, S B

    2010-01-01

    Pneumonia is an acute inflammation of the lower respiratory tract. Lower respiratory tract infection is a major cause of mortality worldwide. Pneumonia is most common at the extremes of life. Predisposing factors in children include an under-developed immune system together with other factors, such as malnutrition and over-crowding. In adults, tobacco smoking is the single most important preventable risk factor. The commonest infecting organisms in children are respiratory viruses and Streptoccocus pneumoniae. In adults, pneumonia can be broadly classified, on the basis of chest radiographic appearance, into lobar pneumonia, bronchopneumonia and pneumonia producing an interstitial pattern. Lobar pneumonia is most commonly associated with community acquired pneumonia, bronchopneumonia with hospital acquired infection and an interstitial pattern with the so called atypical pneumonias, which can be caused by viruses or organisms such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Most cases of pneumonia can be managed with chest radiographs as the only form of imaging, but CT can detect pneumonia not visible on the chest radiograph and may be of value, particularly in the hospital setting. Complications of pneumonia include pleural effusion, empyema and lung abscess. The chest radiograph may initially indicate an effusion but ultrasound is more sensitive, allows characterisation in some cases and can guide catheter placement for drainage. CT can also be used to characterise and estimate the extent of pleural disease. Most lung abscesses respond to medical therapy, with surgery and image guided catheter drainage serving as options for those cases who do not respond. PMID:21088086

  12. Pneumonia in the immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, J H; McDonald, G; Alton, H; Gordon, S B

    2010-12-01

    Pneumonia is an acute inflammation of the lower respiratory tract. Lower respiratory tract infection is a major cause of mortality worldwide. Pneumonia is most common at the extremes of life. Predisposing factors in children include an under-developed immune system together with other factors, such as malnutrition and over-crowding. In adults, tobacco smoking is the single most important preventable risk factor. The commonest infecting organisms in children are respiratory viruses and Streptoccocus pneumoniae. In adults, pneumonia can be broadly classified, on the basis of chest radiographic appearance, into lobar pneumonia, bronchopneumonia and pneumonia producing an interstitial pattern. Lobar pneumonia is most commonly associated with community acquired pneumonia, bronchopneumonia with hospital acquired infection and an interstitial pattern with the so called atypical pneumonias, which can be caused by viruses or organisms such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Most cases of pneumonia can be managed with chest radiographs as the only form of imaging, but CT can detect pneumonia not visible on the chest radiograph and may be of value, particularly in the hospital setting. Complications of pneumonia include pleural effusion, empyema and lung abscess. The chest radiograph may initially indicate an effusion but ultrasound is more sensitive, allows characterisation in some cases and can guide catheter placement for drainage. CT can also be used to characterise and estimate the extent of pleural disease. Most lung abscesses respond to medical therapy, with surgery and image guided catheter drainage serving as options for those cases who do not respond. PMID:21088086

  13. Pancreatic abnormalities and AIDS related sclerosing cholangitis.

    PubMed Central

    Teare, J P; Daly, C A; Rodgers, C; Padley, S P; Coker, R J; Main, J; Harris, J R; Scullion, D; Bray, G P; Summerfield, J A

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Biliary tract abnormalities are well recognised in AIDS, most frequently related to opportunistic infection with Cryptosporidium, Microsporidium, and cytomegalovirus. We noted a high frequency of pancreatic abnormalities associated with biliary tract disease. To define these further we reviewed the clinical and radiological features in these patients. METHODS: Notes and radiographs were available from two centres for 83 HIV positive patients who had undergone endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for the investigation of cholestatic liver function tests or abdominal pain. RESULTS: 56 patients had AIDS related sclerosing cholangitis (ARSC); 86% of these patients had epigastric or right upper quadrant pain and 52% had hepatomegaly. Of the patients with ARSC, 10 had papillary stenosis alone, 11 had intra- and extrahepatic sclerosing cholangitis alone, and 35 had a combination of the two. Ampullary biopsies performed in 24 patients confirmed an opportunistic infection in 16. In 15 patients, intraluminal polyps were noted on the cholangiogram. Pancreatograms were available in 34 of the 45 patients with papillary stenosis, in which 29 (81%) had associated pancreatic duct dilatation, often with associated features of chronic pancreatitis. In the remaining 27 patients, final diagnoses included drug induced liver disease, acalculous cholecystitis, gall bladder empyema, chronic B virus hepatitis, and alcoholic liver disease. CONCLUSION: Pancreatic abnormalities are commonly seen with ARSC and may be responsible for some of the pain not relieved by biliary sphincterotomy. The most frequent radiographic biliary abnormality is papillary stenosis combined with ductal sclerosis. Images PMID:9389948

  14. Septic arthritis: a unique complication of nasal septal abscess.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Steven M; Koch, Cody A; Ekbom, Dale C

    2015-03-01

    Nasal septal abscesses (NSAs) occur between the mucoperichondrium and the nasal septum. They most often arise when an untreated septal hematoma becomes infected. The most commonly reported sequela is a loss of septal cartilage support, which can result in a nasal deformity. Other sequelae include potentially life-threatening conditions such as meningitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, brain abscess, and subarachnoid empyema. We report the case of a 17-year-old boy who developed an NSA after he had been struck in the face with a basketball. He presented to his primary care physician 5 days after the injury and again the next day, but his condition was not correctly diagnosed. Finally, 7 days after his injury, he presented to an emergency department with more serious symptoms, and he was correctly diagnosed with NSA. He was admitted to the intensive care unit, and he remained hospitalized for 6 days. Among the abscess sequelae he experienced was septic arthritis, which has heretofore not been reported as a complication of NSA. He responded well to appropriate treatment, although he lost a considerable amount of septal cartilage. He was discharged home on intravenous antibiotic therapy, and his condition improved. Reconstruction of the nasal septum will likely need to be pursued in the future. PMID:25738728

  15. [Large-scale questionnaire surveillance concerning invasive infections with group C and G streptococci].

    PubMed

    Ubukata, Kimiko; Sunaoshi, Katsuhiko; Kobayashi, Reiko; Okuzumi, Katsuko

    2006-09-01

    A large-scale questionnaire surveillance was conducted regarding the onset of invasive infections with beta-hemolytic group C (GCS) and group G (GGS) streptococci from clinical specimens that are normally aseptic and the backgrounds of these cases. The surveillance period of the questionnaire was 8 months from January to August 2005. Completed questionnaires were received from the clinical laboratories of 193 medical institutions. One hundred two clinical laboratories (52.8%) had isolated these beta-hemolytic streptococci. Of all the isolates, GCS and GGS accounted for 25 and 216 cases, respectively, or a ratio of almost 1:10. Isolates from blood cultures accounted for half the number of all isolates, followed by isolates from atretic pus or joint fluid. The isolates gradually became more prevalent from patients in their 40s, and peaked in patients in their 70s. The most prevalent disorder, described in 184 cases, was suppurative disease followed by (in descending order), bacteremia, sepsis, arthritis purulenta and cellulitis. A small number of patients had developed with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, empyema or meningitis. Most of the patients had an underlying disease, such as diabetes mellitus, malignancy or cerebrovascular disease (in descending order). We conclude from the above findings that background factors in patients as well as identification of the pathogen should be made public when GCS or GGS is isolated from normally aseptic clinical specimens. PMID:17073260

  16. The Differential Diagnostic Values of Cytokine Levels in Pleural Effusions

    PubMed Central

    Akarsu, Saadet; Kurt, A. Nese Citak; Dogan, Yasar; Yilmaz, Erdal; Godekmerdan, Ahmet; Aygun, A. Denizmen

    2005-01-01

    The aim is to examine whether the changes in pleural fluid interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-6, and IL-8 levels were significant in differential diagnosis of childhood pleural effusions. IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, and IL-8 levels in pleural fluids of all 36 patients were measured. The levels of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, and IL-8 in pleural fluids were statistically significantly higher in the transudate group compared with those of the exudate group. The levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 were also found to be statistically significantly higher in the empyema group compared with both the parapneumonic and the tuberculous pleural effusion groups. The levels of IL-2 and IL-6 were detected to be statistically significantly higher in the tuberculous pleural effusion group in comparison with those of the parapneumonic effusion group. The results showed that pleural fluids IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, and IL-8 could be used in pleural fluids exudate and transudate distinction. PMID:15770060

  17. Identification and Clinical Significance of Helcococcus species, with Description of Helcococcus seattlensis sp. nov. from a Patient with Urosepsis

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Siu-Kei

    2014-01-01

    Helcococcus spp. are Gram-positive, catalase-negative, facultatively anaerobic cocci that are associated with wound and prosthetic joint infections as well bacteremia and empyema. Five Helcococcus spp. strains were isolated from our patient population, including 2 strains of Helcococcus kunzii from trauma-associated wounds, 2 Helcococcus sueciensis strains from blood and abscess, and a novel Helcococcus spp. strain from blood associated with urosepsis. Based on the phenotypic and phylogenetic evidence, we propose that the unknown bacterium be classified as Helcococcus seattlensis sp. nov. We found that all 5 tested Helcococcus strains grew as satellite colonies around Staphylococcus aureus and, interestingly, both H. kunzii strains were isolated together with S. aureus. In addition to 16S rRNA gene sequencing, conventional methods for leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and pyrrolidonyl arylamidase (PYR) testing can be cost-effective and efficient for differentiation of Helcococcus spp. from Abiotrophia and Granulicatella species. Using nonstandard methods, we found that all tested Helcococcus spp. had high MICs of >4/76 μg/ml for trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, an antibiotic commonly used to treat urinary tract infections. High MICs for erythromycin, azithromycin, and clindamycin, and intermediate to high MICs for moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, and gentamicin were also observed among the Helcococcus strains. PMID:24371247

  18. Management of Parapneumonic Pleural Effusion in Adults.

    PubMed

    Ferreiro, Lucía; San José, María Esther; Valdés, Luis

    2015-12-01

    Pleural infections have high morbidity and mortality, and their incidence in all age groups is growing worldwide. Not all infectious effusions are parapneumonic and, in such cases, the organisms found in the pleural space are not the same as those observed in lung parenchyma infections. The diagnostic difficulty lies in knowing whether an infectious effusion will evolve into a complicated effusion/empyema, as the diagnostic methods used for this purpose provide poor results. The mainstays of treatment are to establish an early diagnosis and to commence an antibiotic regimen and chest drain as soon as possible. This should preferably be carried out with fine tubes, due to certain morphological, bacteriological and biochemical characteristics of the pleural fluid. Fluid analysis, particularly pH, is the most reliable method for assessing evolution. In a subgroup of patients, fibrinolytics may help to improve recovery, and their combination with DNase has been found to obtain better results. If medical treatment fails and surgery is required, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is, at least, comparable to decortication by thoracotomy, so should only undertaken if previous techniques have failed. Further clinical trials are needed to analyze factors that could affect the results obtained, in order to define new evidence-based diagnostic and therapeutic strategies that provide more effective, standardized management of this disease. PMID:25820035

  19. Nonsurgical treatment of 8 cases with esophageal perforations caused by ESD

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Henggao; Ma, Limei; Zhang, Yin; Shuang, Jinquan; Qian, Yun; Sheng, Yu; Wang, Xiang; Miao, Lin; Fan, Zhining

    2015-01-01

    Background: Esophageal perforation is a serious, but rare complication of high mortality following the endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) procedure. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of nonsurgical treatment of esophageal perforations caused by ESD based on our clinical experience. Methods: From January 2009 to November 2013, 8 patients were diagnosed with endoscopic perforation of the esophagus caused by ESD in our center. All cases were treated with nonsurgical measures, such as metallic clips, conservative treatment alone and therapeutic drainage. Results: The places of perforation were closured by metallic clips immediately in 4 patients. Two patients were cured with conservative treatment alone. Therapeutic drainage with large-bore tube thoracostomy was applied in another 2 patients who had empyema following esophageal perforation. All of the patients were treated nonsurgically, and recovered well. Conclusion: Esophageal perforation caused by ESD can be detected and treated timely, and nonsurgical treatment seems to be a feasible and effective option for clinicians. PMID:26885139

  20. Flavimonas oryzihabitans bacteremia: clinical features and microbiological characteristics of isolates.

    PubMed

    Lin, R D; Hsueh, P R; Chang, J C; Teng, L J; Chang, S C; Ho, S W; Hsieh, W C; Luh, K T

    1997-05-01

    Flavimonas oryzihabitans is rarely reported as a pathogen in humans. Twelve cases of F. oryzihabitans bacteremia were diagnosed at National Taiwan University Hospital over a 3-year period. The clinical features of these patients were analyzed, and antimicrobial susceptibilities and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) patterns of the 12 isolates were studied. Among these 12 patients, eight (67%) had underlying neoplastic diseases and all acquired F. oryzihabitans bacteremia while hospitalized. The clinical syndromes included primary bacteremia in 5 patients (42%), biliary tract infection in 3 (25%), and peritonitis, subdural empyema, infusion-related bacteremia, and pneumonia in 1 each. Polymicrobial bacteremia or concomitant fungemia was seen in three patients (25%). All the patients survived after antibiotic treatment. All isolates were susceptible to piperacillin, third-generation cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, and quinolones but resistant to cephalothin, cefuroxime, and trimethoprim. Susceptibility to aztreonam was variable (25%). The RAPD patterns differed among the isolates, indicating the epidemiological unrelatedness of these infections. F. oryzihabitans should be included as an etiology of severe nosocomial infection in patients with underlying debilitating diseases. PMID:9142784

  1. Pyogenic psoas abscess: analysis of 27 cases.

    PubMed

    Lin, M F; Lau, Y J; Hu, B S; Shi, Z Y; Lin, Y H

    1999-12-01

    From 1993 to 1998, 29 pyogenic psoas abscesses occurring in 27 patients were seen in Taichung Veterans General Hospital. Their age range was 25 to 85 years. Diabetes mellitus was the leading underlying disease. Fever and pain in the flank area, back and hip were the usual manifestations. The duration of symptoms prior to the diagnosis ranged from 3 days to 6 months. Most abscesses were diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) images and proven by abscess cultures, which were divided into primary and secondary types. Eighteen of 29 abscesses were regarded as primary. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogen in the primary abscesses, followed by Streptococcus agalactiae, Escherichia coli, viridans streptococci, S. epidermidis, and Salmonella spp.. In the secondary abscess category, E. coli was the leading organism in this series, followed by S. aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, viridans streptococci and Candida albicans. The associated conditions included epidural abscess, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, perirenal abscess, pulmonary tuberculosis, empyema, hydronephrosis and trauma history. The initial empiric therapy comprised mostly of cefazolin or oxacillin with or without an aminoglycoside. Thirteen patients underwent percutaneous drainage, while six received surgical debridement, including two with a recurrent abscess. One patient had both drainage and debridement. Others received medical treatment only. Two of the patients with primary abscess died in spite of percutaneous drainage. Therefore, open drainage, besides appropriate antibiotic treatment, is still required to control complex abscesses with sepsis. PMID:10650491

  2. A clinical evaluation of sulbactam/ampicillin in the treatment of pediatric infections.

    PubMed

    Huang, L M; Lee, C Y; Lee, M J; Hsu, C Y; Liu, C C; Hong, J Y; Chen, J M

    1989-01-01

    We have treated 42 episodes of pediatric infections with sulbactam/ampicillin since 1987. Included were 9 cellulitis, 9 urinary tract infections, 5 cervical lymphadenitis, 4 meningitis, 2 thoracic empyema, 2 osteomyelitis, 2 sepsis, 1 furuncle, 1 perianal abscess, 1 dental abscess, 1 peritonsillitis, 1 salmonellosis, 1 shigellosis, 1 peritonitis, 1 suppurative thyroiditis, 1 infective endocarditis. Responsible pathogens were Escherichia coli in 8, Staphylococcus aureus in 6, Hemophilus influenzae in 2, Streptococcus pneumoniae in 3, Streptococcus viridans in 2, Staphylococcus epidermidis in 1, Bacteroides fragilis in 1, Salmonella D1 in 1, Shigella sonnei in 1, Klebsiella pneumoniae in 1, Enterobacter agglomerans in 1, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus in 1, Enterobacter cloacae in 1, group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus in 1, and polymicrobial infection in 4 cases. Thirty-nine out of 41 (95%) clinically evaluable patients cured and all (34/34) bacteriologically evaluable patients eradicated their pathogens after treatment with sulbactam/ampicillin. Side reactions were seen in five patients; one maculopapular skin rash, one hemolytic anemia, two diarrhea, and one liver function impairment plus leukopenia. All these reactions were transient and did not require interruption of therapy. These results indicate that sulbactam/ampicillin is safe and effective in the treatment of common pediatric infections beyond the neonatal period. PMID:2637593

  3. Diagnostic utility and clinical application of imaging for pleural space infections.

    PubMed

    Heffner, John E; Klein, Jeffrey S; Hampson, Christopher

    2010-02-01

    Timely diagnosis of pleural space infections and rapid initiation of effective pleural drainage for those patients with complicated parapneumonic effusions or empyema represent keystone principles for managing patients with pneumonia. Advances in chest imaging provide opportunities to detect parapneumonic effusions with high sensitivity in patients hospitalized for pneumonia and to guide interventional therapy. Standard radiographs retain their primary role for screening patients with pneumonia for the presence of an effusion to determine the need for thoracentesis. Ultrasonography and CT scanning, however, have greater sensitivity for fluid detection and provide additional information for determining the extent and nature of pleural infection. MRI and PET scan can image pleural disease, but their role in managing parapneumonic effusions is not yet clearly defined. Effective application of chest images for patients at risk for pleural infection, however, requires a comprehensive understanding of the unique features of each modality and relative value. This review presents the diagnostic usefulness and clinical application of chest imaging studies for evaluating and managing pleural space infections in patients hospitalized for pneumonia. PMID:20133295

  4. Pyogenic liver abscess caused by Fusobacterium in a 21-year-old immunocompetent male.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zohair; Bansal, Saurabh K; Dhillon, Sonu

    2015-03-28

    A 21-year-old male with no significant past medical history, presented with right upper quadrant (RUQ) abdominal pain along with fevers and chills. Lab work revealed leukocytosis, anemia, and slightly elevated alkaline phosphatase. Viral serology for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus were negative and he was immunocompetent. Computed tomography imaging revealed hepatic abscesses, the largest measuring 9.5 cm. Empiric antibiotics were started and percutaneous drains were placed in the abscesses. Anaerobic cultures from the abscesses grew Fusobacterium nucleatum. This is a gram negative anaerobic bacteria; a normal flora of the oral cavity. Fusobacterium is most commonly seen in Lemiere's disease, which is translocation of oral bacteria to the internal jugular vein causing a thrombophlebitis and subsequent spread of abscesses. Our patient did not have Lemiere's, and is the first case described of fusobacterium pyogenic liver abscess in a young immunocompetent male with good oral hygiene. This case was complicated by sepsis, empyema, and subsequent abscesses located outside the liver. These abscesses' have the propensity to flare abruptly and can be fatal. This case not only illustrates fusobacterium as a rare entity for pyogenic liver abscess, but also the need for urgent diagnosis and treatment. It is incumbent on physicians to diagnose and drain any suspicious hepatic lesions. While uncommon, such infections may develop without any overt source and can progress rapidly. Prompt drainage with antibiotic therapy remains the cornerstone of therapy. PMID:25834342

  5. Intracranial abscesses associated with chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Seven, Huseyin; Coskun, Berna Uslu; Calis, Asli B; Sayin, Ibrahim; Turgut, Suat

    2005-10-01

    Intracranial abscesses are serious complications of chronic suppurative otitis media (COM). This study included 32 patients presenting with intracranial abscesses from 780 patients hospitalized for treatment of COM. The 32 patients had 59 intracranial complications. Perisinus abscess (13 of 32) was the most common intracranial abscess, followed by temporal lobe abscess (8 of 32), epidural abscess (7 of 32), cerebellar abscess (6 of 32) and subdural empyema (2 of 32). Headache (93%), fever (87%) and altered mental status (62%) were the most common presenting symptoms and signs, along with symptoms of COM. All patients were treated with intravenous antibiotics and canal wall down mastoidectomy. Cholesteatoma with granulation tissue and bony defects at the sinus plate and/or dural plate were seen in most of the patients. Gram negative bacilli and anaerobes were the most common organisms cultured from the abscesses. Three patients had neurological sequels. One patient died. The early diagnosis of these complications requires a high index of suspicion and imaging studies. A multidisciplinary and coordinated approach is important for the management of these patients. PMID:15959795

  6. Multiply antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: introduction, transmission, and evolution of nosocomial infection.

    PubMed

    Locksley, R M; Cohen, M L; Quinn, T C; Tompkins, L S; Coyle, M B; Kirihara, J M; Counts, G W

    1982-09-01

    A burn patient with a multiply antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection was transferred to Harborview Medical Center from a burn unit in another state. Despite standard wound precautions, transmission to 34 patients occurred during the subsequent 15 months. Twenty-seven of the patients were infected. Disease included pneumonia, empyema, bacteremia, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and burn and wound infections. Seventeen of the 34 patients died. Phage typing and plasmid analysis showed the spread of multiply resistant S. aureus from the burn unit to the surgical intensive care unit where a study evaluating the use of chloramphenicol in cases of bowel sepsis was in progress. During this period the organism became resistant to chloramphenicol by acquiring either of two chloramphenicol R-plasmids. Using plasmid profiles and antibiograms, four epidemic strains were identified that assisted in identifying patient and personnel reservoirs. The outbreak was controlled only after rifampin was added to vancomycin treatment of infected patients, which correlated with eradication of the carrier state. PMID:7114628

  7. Conservative management of pyothorax in an Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    PubMed

    Schrader, Gabby M; Whiteside, Douglas P; Slater, Owen M; Black, Sandra R

    2012-06-01

    Therapy for pyothorax, or pleural empyema, has not been described for large felids. This case describes the successful treatment of pyothorax in a captive, large felid. A 15-yr-old multiparous, female Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) presented with nonspecific clinical signs caused by an insidious onset of pyothorax. Management of pyothorax cases in companion animals often involves thoracostomy tube placement with recurrent drainage of the pleural cavity, intensive supportive care, and monitoring. In this case, conservative management was elected because hospitalization was not a viable option. Thoracocentesis was performed to drain as much fluid from the chest cavity as possible, yielding more than 1.3 L. Corynebacterium sp. and unidentified anaerobic gram-positive cocci were cultured. Treatment included cefovecin subcutaneously, oral antibiotic therapy with clindamycin and marbofloxacin, meloxicam, and restricted exercise by minimizing access to the main exhibit. Significant improvement was noted clinically and radiographically 6 wk later, and no relapses were noted in the following weeks. An examination 11.5 mo later confirmed resolution. PMID:22779255

  8. Fluoroscopy-Guided Percutaneous Gallstone Removal Using a 12-Fr Sheath in High-Risk Surgical Patients with Acute Cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Joo; Shin, Tae Beom

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of percutaneous transhepatic cholecystolithotomy under fluoroscopic guidance in high-risk surgical patients with acute cholecystitis. Materials and Methods Sixty-three consecutive patients of high surgical risk with acute calculous cholecystitis underwent percutaneous transhepatic gallstone removal under conscious sedation. The stones were extracted through the 12-Fr sheath using a Wittich nitinol stone basket under fluoroscopic guidance on three days after performing a percutaneous cholecystostomy. Large or hard stones were fragmented using either the snare guide wire technique or the metallic cannula technique. Results Gallstones were successfully removed from 59 of the 63 patients (94%). Reasons for stone removal failure included the inability to grasp a large stone in two patients, and the loss of tract during the procedure in two patients with a contracted gallbladder. The mean hospitalization duration was 7.3 days for acute cholecystitis patients and 9.4 days for gallbladder empyema patients. Bile peritonitis requiring percutaneous drainage developed in two patients. No symptomatic recurrence occurred during follow-up (mean, 608.3 days). Conclusion Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous gallstone removal using a 12-Fr sheath is technically feasible and clinically effective in high-risk surgical patients with acute cholecystitis. PMID:21430938

  9. Intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy (IPFT) in loculated pleural effusions—analysis of predictors for failure of therapy and bleeding: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Daff, Saleh; Maziak, Donna E; Alshehab, Derar; Threader, Jennifer; Ivanovic, Jelena; Deslaurier, Valerie; Villeneuve, Patrick-James; Gilbert, Sebastian; Sundaresan, Sudhir; Shamji, Farid; Lougheed, Colleen; Seely, Jean M; Seely, Andrew J E

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess risk factors associated with failure and bleeding in intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy (IPFT) for pleural effusions. Design Retrospective case series. Setting Two tertiary-care centres in North America. Participants We identified 237 cases that received IPFT for the treatment of pleural effusions. Data for 227 patients were compiled including demographics, investigations, radiological findings pretherapy and post-therapy and outcomes. Intervention Fibrinolytic therapy in the form of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) or streptokinase. Primary and secondary outcomes Success of therapy is defined as the presence of both clinical and radiological improvement leading to resolution. Failure was defined as persistence (ie, ineffective treatment) or complications requiring intervention from IPFT. Incidence of bleeding post-IPFT, identifying factors related to failure of therapy and bleeding. Results IPFT was used in 237 patients with pleural effusions; 163 with empyema/complicated parapneumonic effusions, 32 malignant effusions and 23 with haemothorax. Overall, resolution was achieved in 80% of our cases. Failure occurred in 46 (20%) cases. Multivariate analysis revealed that failure was associated with the presence of pleural thickening (>2 mm) on CT scan (p=0.0031, OR 3, 95% CI 1.46 to 6.57). Bleeding was not associated with any specific variable in our study (antiplatelet medications, p=0.08). Conclusions Pleural thickening on a CT scan was found to be associated with failure of IPFT. PMID:23377992

  10. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  11. Clinical Implications of Pneumococcal Serotypes: Invasive Disease Potential, Clinical Presentations, and Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nahm, Moon H.; Moseley, M. Allen

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae can asymptomatically colonize the nasopharynx and cause a diverse range of illnesses. This clinical spectrum from colonization to invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) appears to depend on the pneumococcal capsular serotype rather than the genetic background. According to a literature review, serotypes 1, 4, 5, 7F, 8, 12F, 14, 18C, and 19A are more likely to cause IPD. Although serotypes 1 and 19A are the predominant causes of invasive pneumococcal pneumonia, serotype 14 remains one of the most common etiologic agents of non-bacteremic pneumonia in adults, even after 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) introduction. Serotypes 1, 3, and 19A pneumococci are likely to cause empyema and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Serotype 1 pneumococcal meningitis is prevalent in the African meningitis belt, with a high fatality rate. In contrast to the capsule type, genotype is more closely associated with antibiotic resistance. CC320/271 strains expressing serotype 19A are multidrug-resistant (MDR) and prevalent worldwide in the era of PCV7. Several clones of MDR serotype 6C pneumococci emerged, and a MDR 6D clone (ST282) has been identified in Korea. Since the pneumococcal epidemiology of capsule types varies geographically and temporally, a nationwide serosurveillance system is vital to establishing appropriate vaccination strategies for each country. PMID:23341706

  12. Detection and treatment of an aneurysma spurium of the arteria hepatica dextra after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Massive upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage can be the dominant symptom of decompensated liver cirrhosis, varices and ulcerations in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Postoperative complications are known to lead to these bleedings. Commonly, emergency endoscopy will be performed. Here we report of a patient with extensive bleeding caused by an aneurysma spurium of the arteria hepatica dextra induced by a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The condition was diagnosed by the Doppler ultrasound scan of the liver. Case presentation Initially the source of the gastrointestinal bleeding was caused by an ulcus Dieulafoy in the jejunum which was stopped by clipping. Continous bleeding was observed and traced to a rare complication of a laparoscopic cholecystectomy due to a gallbladder empyema. After surgical intervention the patient developed an aneurysma spurium of the arteria hepatica dextra which was in communication with the small bowel. The successful treatment was performed by embolizing the aneurysma. Conclusion The reasons for gastrointestinal bleedings are manifold. This case presents a seldom cause of a gastrointestinal bleeding due to an aneurysma of the hepatic arteria. The successful embolization was performed to ultimately stop the bleeding. PMID:23885918

  13. Surgery and pleuro-pulmonary tuberculosis: a scientific literature review

    PubMed Central

    Subotic, Dragan; Yablonskiy, Piotr; Sulis, Giorgia; Cordos, Ioan; Petrov, Danail; Centis, Rosella; D’Ambrosio, Lia; Sotgiu, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major public health concern, mostly affecting resource-constrained settings and marginalized populations. The fight against the disease is hindered by the growing emergence of drug-resistant forms whose management can be rather challenging. Surgery may play an important role to support diagnosis and treatment of the most complex cases and improve their therapeutic outcome. We conducted a non-systematic review of the literature based on relevant keywords through PubMed database. Papers in English and Russian were included. The search was focused on five main areas of intervention as follows: (I) diagnosis of complicated cases; (II) elimination of contagious persisting cavities, despite appropriate chemotherapy; (III) treatment of destroyed lung; (V) resection of tuberculomas; (VI) treatment of tuberculous pleural empyema. Although specific practical guidelines concerning surgical indications and approaches are currently unavailable, a summary of the evidence emerged from the scientific literature was elaborated to help the clinician in the management of severely compromised TB patients. The decision to proceed to surgery is usually individualized and a careful assessment of the patient’s risk profile is always recommended before performing any procedure in addition to appropriate chemotherapy. PMID:27499980

  14. Long-term efficacy and safety of tocilizumab in giant cell arteritis and large vessel vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jobie; Steel, Lauren; Borg, Frances; Dasgupta, Bhaskar

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a chronic systemic vasculitis affecting large-sized and medium-sized vessels. Glucocorticoids are currently the mainstay of treatment for GCA and associated large vessel vasculitis (LVV) but are associated with frequent adverse events. Methotrexate has only demonstrated a modest benefit while anti-TNF biological agents (infliximab and etanercept) have been inefficacious. Elevated levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a proinflammatory cytokine, has been associated with GCA. Tocilizumab (TCZ), a humanised antihuman IL-6 receptor antibody, has been used successfully in several reports as a treatment for GCA and LVV. We report the potentially long-term successful use of TCZ in 8 cases of refractory LVV. All of our patients achieved a good clinical response to TCZ and C reactive protein reduced from an average of 70.3 to 2.5. In all cases, the glucocorticoid dose was reduced, from an average of 24.6 mg prednisolone prior to TCZ treatment to 4.7 mg, indicating that TCZ may enable a reduction in glucocorticoid-associated adverse events. However, regular TCZ administration was needed for disease control in most cases. TCZ was discontinued in one case due to the development of an empyema indicating the need for careful monitoring of infection when using this treatment. PMID:26819753

  15. [Complications and mortality of surgery for bronchogenic cancers].

    PubMed

    Roeslin, N; Morand, G

    1992-01-01

    Resection surgery for lung cancer is beset with specific or non-specific complications which often darken the prognosis for life. The specific complications, related to surgical dissections, are mainly per- and postoperative haemorrhages of various origins and, less frequently, disturbances in respiration, nerve wound or chylothorax. Soon after pneumonectomy a bronchial fistula encouraged by different factors may appear (3.3% of the cases) and empyema, usually caused by staphylococci, may develop (3%). Non-specific complications may disturb the post-resection period, involving the lungs (atelectasia, parenchymal infections, acute respiratory failure) or the cardiovascular system (pulmonary embolism, dysarrhythmia). The overall perioperative mortality rate has decreased with time owing to advances in anaesthesia and intensive care: in the hands of certain medico-surgical teams it does not exceed 3%. It is significantly lower in lobar (mean: 4.5%) than in pulmonary (mean: 8.4%) resections. Enlarged resections and lymph node dissections are aggravating factors. Patients aged 70 or more do not tolerate these operations so well: their mean overall mortality rate is twice that observed in younger patients (8% on average and up to 20%). Resection surgery for lung cancer remains a necessarily hazardous procedure but is the only treatment that can cure the patient. Its success is directly conditioned by a good preoperative risk evaluation. PMID:1303584

  16. Role of medical thoracoscopy in the treatment of tuberculous pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xusheng; Zhu, Huaiyang; Ding, Caihong

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibrous tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE) represents common disease in tuberculous clinic. Medical thoracoscopy has been used to treat pleural empyema and shown promising outcomes, but data of its use in multiloculated and organized TPE remains limited to know. Methods The study was performed on 430 cases with TPE. The cases were divided into free-flowing, multiloculated effusion and organized effusion group. Each group was subdivided into two or three types of therapeutic approaches: ultrasound guided pigtail catheter, large-bore tube chest drainage and medical thoracoscopy. Patients with multiloculated or organized effusions received streptokinase, introduced into the pleural cavity via chest tubes. The successful effectiveness of the study was defined as duration of chest drainage, time from treatment to discharge days and no further managements. Results Patients with organized effusion were older than those with free-flowing effusion and incidence of organized effusion combined with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) was higher than those of multiloculated effusion and free-flowing effusion respectively. Positive tuberculosis of pleural fluid culture was higher in organized effusion than that in free-flowing effusion. Sputum positive for acid-fast bacillus (AFB) in organized effusion was higher than that in multiloculated effusion and free-flowing effusion. Medical thoracoscopy showed significant efficacy in the group of multiloculated effusion and organized effusion but free-flowing effusion. No chronic morbidity and mortality related to complications was observed. Conclusions Medical thoracoscopy was a safe and successful method in treating multiloculated and organized TPE. PMID:26904212

  17. Pyogenic liver abscess caused by Fusobacterium in a 21-year-old immunocompetent male

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Zohair; Bansal, Saurabh K; Dhillon, Sonu

    2015-01-01

    A 21-year-old male with no significant past medical history, presented with right upper quadrant (RUQ) abdominal pain along with fevers and chills. Lab work revealed leukocytosis, anemia, and slightly elevated alkaline phosphatase. Viral serology for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus were negative and he was immunocompetent. Computed tomography imaging revealed hepatic abscesses, the largest measuring 9.5 cm. Empiric antibiotics were started and percutaneous drains were placed in the abscesses. Anaerobic cultures from the abscesses grew Fusobacterium nucleatum. This is a gram negative anaerobic bacteria; a normal flora of the oral cavity. Fusobacterium is most commonly seen in Lemiere’s disease, which is translocation of oral bacteria to the internal jugular vein causing a thrombophlebitis and subsequent spread of abscesses. Our patient did not have Lemiere’s, and is the first case described of fusobacterium pyogenic liver abscess in a young immunocompetent male with good oral hygiene. This case was complicated by sepsis, empyema, and subsequent abscesses located outside the liver. These abscesses’ have the propensity to flare abruptly and can be fatal. This case not only illustrates fusobacterium as a rare entity for pyogenic liver abscess, but also the need for urgent diagnosis and treatment. It is incumbent on physicians to diagnose and drain any suspicious hepatic lesions. While uncommon, such infections may develop without any overt source and can progress rapidly. Prompt drainage with antibiotic therapy remains the cornerstone of therapy. PMID:25834342

  18. Medical Applications of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, A. K.; Rai, N. K.; Singh, Ankita; Rai, A. K.; Rai, Pradeep K.; Rai, Pramod K.

    2014-11-01

    Sedentary lifestyle of human beings has resulted in various diseases and in turn we require a potential tool that can be used to address various issues related to human health. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is one such potential optical analytical tool that has become quite popular because of its distinctive features that include applicability to any type/phase of samples with almost no sample preparation. Several reports are available that discusses the capabilities of LIBS, suitable for various applications in different branches of science which cannot be addressed by traditional analytical methods but only few reports are available for the medical applications of LIBS. In the present work, LIBS has been implemented to understand the role of various elements in the formation of gallstones (formed under the empyema and mucocele state of gallbladder) samples along with patient history that were collected from Purvancal region of Uttar Pradesh, India. The occurrence statistics of gallstones under the present study reveal higher occurrence of gallstones in female patients. The gallstone occurrence was found more prevalent for those male patients who were having the habit of either tobacco chewing, smoking or drinking alcohols. This work further reports in-situ LIBS study of deciduous tooth and in-vivo LIBS study of human nail.

  19. The death of Henry II, King of France (1519-1559). From myth to medical and historical fact.

    PubMed

    Zanello, Marc; Charlier, Philippe; Corns, Robert; Devaux, Bertrand; Berche, Patrick; Pallud, Johan

    2015-01-01

    On 30 June 1559, Henry II, King of France, was mortally wounded in the head by a lance during a jousting match. Despite the best efforts of his physicians, Ambroise Paré and Andreas Vesalius, King Henry died 11 days later. This article, based on previously unpublished evidence, aims at examining the historical account of his death against modern medical practice to establish the probable cause of the king's death. We also discuss what treatments the doctors in the sixteenth century may have had to offer. Historical accounts of the joust provide details of the incident including the position of the visor of the king's helmet. Descriptions of the wood fragments removed from the right orbit by Italian observers and a new translation of the autopsy by Andreas Vesalius allow an accurate description of the actual injury. Our research counters previous theories and concludes that Henry II was the victim of craniofacial trauma involving the right eye and that he died from periorbital cellulitis caused by a retained foreign body in the wound, complicated by a left interhemispheric empyema preceded by a traumatic interhemispheric haematoma. It would appear that the royal court doctors advocated a wait-and-see strategy, with little actual input from Ambroise Paré or Andreas Vesalius, with a clearly regrettable outcome. PMID:25421951

  20. Cryoglobulinemic Glomerulonephritis as a Presentation of Atypical Post-Infectious Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Boumitri, Christine; Haddad, Fady G.; Rondla, Chetana; El-Sayegh, Suzanne; El-Charabaty, Elie

    2016-01-01

    Post-infectious glomerulonephritis (PIGN) usually occurs within few days to weeks following an infection. Clinical presentation is variable, but in general, it is considered a benign entity with good prognosis. It rarely requires kidney biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. We present a case of a 55-year-old, previously healthy, male who presented for worsening shortness of breath, persistent cough, and right-sided pleuritic chest pain. Initial workup revealed a right exudative effusion with empyema. Hospital course was complicated by acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy with a peak creatinine of 10.2 mg/dL from a baseline of 1.18 mg/dL. On kidney biopsy, findings were compatible with a diagnosis of cryoglobulinemic glomerulonephritis or an atypical form of PIGN. While a wide variety of histopathological findings on renal biopsies have been described to complement the usual diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis pattern, cryoglobulinemic features with negative cryoglobulin have never been reported. Our case is unique not only by having an atypical histological presentation but also by meeting the criteria of atypical PIGN with persistent hypertension and microscopic hematuria. PMID:26668683

  1. Management of acute cholecystitis in UK hospitals: time for a change.

    PubMed

    Cameron, I C; Chadwick, C; Phillips, J; Johnson, A G

    2004-05-01

    Early cholecystectomy for patients with acute cholecystitis is safe, cost effective, and leads to less time off work compared with delayed surgery. This study was designed to assess current practice in the management of acute cholecystitis in the UK. A postal questionnaire was sent to 440 consultant general surgeons to ascertain their current management of patients with acute cholecystitis. Replies were received from 308 consultants who were involved in treating patients with acute cholecystitis of whom 18 transferred these patients on to another team for further management the day after admission. Thirty two consultants (11%) routinely treated patients by early cholecystectomy, with limiting factors stated to be the availability of surgical staff, theatre space, and radiological investigations. The remaining consultants (n = 258) routinely manage their patients conservatively with intravenous antibiotics and allow the inflammation to resolve before undertaking cholecystectomy at a later date. Indications for undertaking early cholecystectomy during the first admission by this latter group included the presence of spreading peritonitis due to bile leak, empyema, and unexpected space on theatre list. The commonest method for both elective and early cholecystectomy is laparoscopic, but the percentage of consultants using an open method rises from 8% in the elective situation to 47% for urgent early cholecystectomy. Despite evidence which strongly advocates early cholecystectomy, this practice is routinely carried out by only 11% of consultants in the UK at present. PMID:15138321

  2. The expanded role of extracellular matrix patch in malignant and non-malignant chest wall reconstruction in thoracic surgery†

    PubMed Central

    George, Robert S.; Kostopanagiotou, Kostas; Papagiannopoulos, Kostas

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The extracellular matrix (XCM Biologic Tissue Matrix) is a non-cross-linked 3D patch derived from porcine dermis. Once implanted, it is infiltrated by recipient's cells and becomes incorporated in the repair. Here, we report the first series of using this device for chest wall reconstruction. METHODS The XCM Biologic Tissue Matrix was utilized to provide the restoration of chest wall defects. It was used either alone or in conjunction with the Synthes titanium system to provide additional support. The decision was made intraoperatively. RESULTS Since April 2010, 21 (12 females) patients received the device. Average age at operation was 47 ± 17 years. Eleven (52%) patients had the patch inserted alone, while the remaining 10 received it in combination with another implantable medical device. The biological tissue matrix was used to reconstruct chest wall defects in cancer involving chest wall (n = 9), chest wall deformity (n = 6), chest wall hernia (n = 5) and chest wall repair following empyema drainage (n = 1). Complications were witnessed in 3 patients receiving the combined XCM and Synthes bar mechanisms; infection (n = 2) and bar displacement and infection (n = 1). CONCLUSIONS The XCM patch can be safely used to provide the strength required for chest wall reconstruction and to replace previously infected reconstructions. PMID:24263580

  3. [DR ALEKSANDAR DORŠNER THE FIRST HOSPITAL OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGIST IN SPLIT AND DALMATIA].

    PubMed

    Ivanišević, Petar; Poljak, Nikola Kolja; Cikojević, Draško; Doršner, Katarina; Ivanišević, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Dr Aleksandar Doršner (Trebinje, 1892 - Lima, 1967) was the first hospital otorhinolaryngologist in Split and Dalmatia. He graduated from the Faculty of Medicine in Prague in 1919, and specialized otorhinolaryngology in Graz and Vienna. He led and organized otorhinolaryngological service in Split Hospital from 1923 to 1934, and he also had a private practice. Temporarily he also worked outside Split in Dalmatian hinterland and in Šibenik, Zadar and Dubrovnik. Most frequently he performed the following otorhinolaryngological operations: tonsillectomies and adenoidectomies and operations of purulent middle ear inflammations with mastoiditis, nasal polyps, deviated nasal septum, maxillary sinus empyema and otorhinolaryngological trauma. In 1928 he became a member of Otorhinolaryngological section of Croatian Medical Chamber. He participated in the work of the first otorhinolaryngological congress of the former Yugoslavia in 1931, taken place in Zagreb. From 1928 he was a member of Oto-Neuro-Ophthalmological Society. From 1933 to 1937 he was a vice-president of the main board of Free Organization of Dalmatian Physicians in Split. In 1938 he left Split permanently and continued living with his family in Lima (Peru) where he died in 1967. He was an erudite. He lived for his profession which he liked very much and dedicated his life to. He is one of the most meritorious doctors in Split medical history, whom otorhinolaryngology service in Split Hospital started with. PMID:26502677

  4. Cholecystitis: the Ethiopian experience, a report of 712 operated cases from one of the referral hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bekele, Zenebe; Tegegn, Kassahun

    2002-07-01

    This is a prospective study conducted from September 1991 to September 2000. Seven-hundred and twelve patients operated for acute and chronic cholecystitis were studied. The male to female ratios for elective and emergency admissions were 1:5 and 1:2.4, respectively. The mean age was 42.7 years. Acute cholecystitis accounted for 10.6% of the 712 cases. There were a total of 666 (93.5%) calculus and 46 (6.5%) acalculus cases. Empyema was seen in 77 (10.8%) patients and hydrops of the gallbladder in 35 (4.9%). Iatrogenic Common Bile Duct (CBD) injury was found to be more of a problem of the contracted gallbladder. In this study severe complications like gangrenous gallbladder, perforated gallbladder, suppurative cholangitis and subhepatic abscess were found more in males than in females. Calculus cholecystitis was found to be a common disease in Ethiopia, and that its features and prevalence as well as sex predilection compare well with reports from other areas. However the findings in this report were found to be different from the reports of the rest of the African Continent. PMID:12602244

  5. A severe case of rat lungworm disease in Hawa'i.

    PubMed

    Howe, Kathleen

    2013-06-01

    A 23-year-old man living on the island of Hawa'i developed a life threatening case of eosinophilic meningitis caused by infection with Angiostrongylus cantonensis (rat lungworm disease: RLWD). He was comatose for 3 months, incurring brain and nerve damage sufficiently extensive that he was not expected to recover. The case was complicated by secondary infections of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium difficile, and pneumonia, which resulted in an empyema requiring a thoracoscopy and decortication. He was treated with prednisone, mebendozal, and pain medication for RLWD, and antibiotics and antifungal medications for the secondary infections. The administration of herbal supplements was requested by the family and approved, and these were administered through a gastric tube. Less than a month after being declared in a persistent vegetative state the man was able to talk, eat, and had regained some muscle functions. After release from the hospital he continued the use of supplements and received treatments of intravenous vitamin therapy. Four years after onset of the illness he is able to ride a bicycle, is a part time student, plays guitar, and is fluent in two foreign languages. RLWD is an emerging tropical disease of growing importance in Hawa'i. PMID:23900708

  6. "To afford the wounded speedy assistance": Dominique Jean Larrey and Napoleon.

    PubMed

    Skandalakis, Panagiotis N; Lainas, Panagiotis; Zoras, Odyseas; Skandalakis, John E; Mirilas, Petros

    2006-08-01

    Dominique Jean Larrey (1766-1842) has been described as the father of modern military surgery and is considered even today as the model military surgeon. He developed a plan of rapid evacuation of wounded soldiers from the battlefield during combat, using flexible medical units which he named ambulances volantes ("flying ambulances"). He won the admiration of Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821), who was amazed by the results of Larrey's sanitary system. Larrey spent almost 18 years with Napoleon, accompanying him in 25 campaigns, 60 battles, and more than 400 engagements. Napoleon's enormous military success was due not only to his strategy and skill but also to the medical services provided by Larrey. The surgeon became a master of wound management and limb amputation. In his vivid battlefield journals, Larrey documented the course of tetanus, the pathophysiology of cold injury, the effective control of hemorrhage, the drainage of empyema and hemothorax, the aspiration of pericardial effusion or hemopericardium, and the packing of sucking chest wounds. Larrey established a categorical rule for the triage of war casualties, treating the wounded according to the observed gravity of their injuries and the urgency for medical care, regardless of their rank or nationality. PMID:16850154

  7. Effectiveness and safety of diagnostic flexi-rigid thoracoscopy in differentiating exudative pleural effusion of unknown etiology: a retrospective study of 215 patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Gang; Guan, Li; Zhang, Ling-Yun; Xiang, Guang-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of diagnostic flexi-rigid thoracoscopy in differentiating exudative pleural effusion of unknown etiology. Methods A total of 215 patients with undiagnosed exudative pleural effusion were consecutively recruited between January 2011 and February 2013. Thoracoscopy was carried out under local anesthesia, and multisite pleural biopsies were performed using a flexi-rigid thoracoscope. The tolerance of the patients, surgical complications and postoperative pathological diagnosis rate were used to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of the thoracoscopy procedures. Results All patients, Karnofsky performance status (KPS) >70, could tolerate both the thoracoscopic surgery and pleural biopsy; there were no severe complications. Thoracoscopic findings included pleural hyperaemia, fibrinous adhesion, nodular bulge and fester. The pathological biopsy confirmed diagnoses of malignant tumor (97 cases), tuberculous pleuritis (91 cases), tuberculous empyema (one case), pulmonary schistosomiasis (one case) and unknown etiology (25 cases). The total diagnosis rate was 88.4%. Subcutaneous emphysema occurred in ten cases and fever in six cases, all of which recovered completely with conservative treatment. Conclusions Flexi-rigid thoracoscopy had a high diagnosis rate, differentiating exudative pleural effusion of unknown etiology with satisfactory effectiveness and safety. There was high degree of relationship between thoracoscopic appearance and primary disease or tumor classification. PMID:24822100

  8. Can Peripheral Bronchopleural Fistula Demonstrated on Computed Tomography be Treated Conservatively? A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tsubakimoto, Maho; Murayama, Sadayuki; Iraha, Rin; Kamiya, Hisashi; Tsuchiya, Nanae; Yamashiro, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Peripheral bronchopleural fistulas (BPF) are communications between a peripheral bronchus or the lung parenchyma and the pleural space. Although reported cases with peripheral BPF might have typical symptoms, we postulate that there may be BPF patients without typical symptoms who are diagnosed on computed tomography (CT) for the first time. Materials and Methods We searched retrospectively for how frequently BPF is found on CT in cases with known or suspected empyema or hydropneumothorax. Also, we examined the clinical charts to ascertain if a diagnosis of BPF was suspected in the CT reports or clinically, and to determine the outcome of each case. Results Thirteen thoracic cavities of 12 patients were included in this study. Of these, BPF was suspected clinically in only 1. Mention in the CT report about the presence of BPF was found in 2 cases. An apparent finding of BPF on CT was found in 7 of 13 (53%) thoracic cavities of 6 cases. The outcomes were that 1 patient died 1 month later due to multiple organ failure, and 1 patient was discharged subsequently after CT. In the other 10 cases, there was no exacerbation of the symptom regardless of definite evidence of BPF on CT. Conclusions In conclusion, when there is hydropneumothorax on CT, it is important for radiologists to diligently search for findings of peripheral BPF and to document it. However, a reference about the need for a surgical approach for BPF may not be required. PMID:26571054

  9. Whole body MRI: Improved Lesion Detection and Characterization With Diffusion Weighted Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Attariwala, Rajpaul; Picker, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is an established functional imaging technique that interrogates the delicate balance of water movement at the cellular level. Technological advances enable this technique to be applied to whole-body MRI. Theory, b-value selection, common artifacts and target to background for optimized viewing will be reviewed for applications in the neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis. Whole-body imaging with DWI allows novel applications of MRI to aid in evaluation of conditions such as multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and skeletal metastases, while the quantitative nature of this technique permits evaluation of response to therapy. Persisting signal at high b-values from restricted hypercellular tissue and viscous fluid also permits applications of DWI beyond oncologic imaging. DWI, when used in conjunction with routine imaging, can assist in detecting hemorrhagic degradation products, infection/abscess, and inflammation in colitis, while aiding with discrimination of free fluid and empyema, while limiting the need for intravenous contrast. DWI in conjunction with routine anatomic images provides a platform to improve lesion detection and characterization with findings rivaling other combined anatomic and functional imaging techniques, with the added benefit of no ionizing radiation. PMID:23960006

  10. Tube Thoracostomy: Complications and Its Management

    PubMed Central

    Kesieme, Emeka B.; Dongo, Andrew; Ezemba, Ndubueze; Irekpita, Eshiobo; Jebbin, Nze; Kesieme, Chinenye

    2012-01-01

    Background. Tube thoracostomy is widely used throughout the medical, surgical, and critical care specialities. It is generally used to drain pleural collections either as elective or emergency. Complications resulting from tube thoracostomy can occasionally be life threatening. Aim. To present an update on the complications and management of complications of tube thoracostomy. Methods. A review of the publications obtained from Medline search, medical libraries, and Google on tube thoracostomy and its complications was done. Results. Tube thoracostomy is a common surgical procedure which can be performed by either the blunt dissection technique or the trocar technique. Complication rates are increased by the trocar technique. These complications have been broadly classified as either technical or infective. Technical causes include tube malposition, blocked drain, chest drain dislodgement, reexpansion pulmonary edema, subcutaneous emphysema, nerve injuries, cardiac and vascular injuries, oesophageal injuries, residual/postextubation pneumothorax, fistulae, tumor recurrence at insertion site, herniation through the site of thoracostomy, chylothorax, and cardiac dysrhythmias. Infective complications include empyema and surgical site infection. Conclusion. Tube thoracostomy, though commonly performed is not without risk. Blunt dissection technique has lower risk of complications and is hence recommended. PMID:22028963

  11. A ray of hope for a woman with Sheehan's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepti

    2013-01-01

    A 25-year-old woman presented with a history of secondary amenorrhoea for the last 3 years, coinciding with her delivery. She delivered at home and had massive postpartum haemorrhage. She was brought in a state of circulatory collapse to the nearest teaching hospital, where she was resuscitated. She developed anaemia, septicaemia and extradural empyema. The complications were managed and the woman improved. Presently, she approached us for infertility. She was investigated and diagnosed with postpartum hypopituitarism, that is, Sheehan's syndrome. Her gonadotrophin levels, luteinising hormone/follicle-stimulating hormone, were normal, serum oestradiol was low and serum prolactin was also on the lower side. She had started with genital atrophy and was given three cycles of cyclic oestrogen +progesterone combination. Ovulation was induced. She conceived and her antenatal period was uneventful. She delivered a full-term baby vaginally. However, she had inadequate lactation after delivery and lost the baby at one-and-a-half months’ age due to gastroenteritis. PMID:23386498

  12. Intracranial complications following mastoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Migirov, Lela; Eyal, Ana; Kronenberg, Jona

    2004-01-01

    Mastoidectomy is a common surgical procedure in otology. However, postoperative complications of various degrees of severity may occur. We present 4 children who underwent mastoidectomy for middle ear and mastoid disease and developed postoperative intracranial complications. One child was operated on for brain abscess 1 week after the initial mastoidectomy. Another child appeared with seizures 5 days after the initial mastoidectomy and a subdural empyema was drained during revision surgery. Large bone defects with exposed middle cranial fossa dura were found at revision surgery in both cases and Proteus vulgaris and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from the mastoid and abscess cavities in these children. A small epidural collection was diagnosed in the third patient 2 days after initial mastoid surgery and was managed with intravenous antibiotics only. The other child was found to have sigmoid sinus thrombosis the day after mastoidectomy that was performed for nonresponsive acute mastoiditis. This child received both intravenous antibiotics and anticoagulants. Timely revision surgery, combinations of third- or fourth-generation cephalosporins with vancomycin or metronidazole and the addition of anticoagulants in cases of sinus thrombosis can lead to full recovery. PMID:15689642

  13. Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae infections of children in central Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ma, J S; Chen, P Y; Chi, C S; Lin, J F; Lau, Y J

    2000-09-01

    We carried out a retrospective study on childhood invasive pneumococcal infections (IPI) diagnosed from the January 1990 through the April 2000 at a medical center in central Taiwan. Their clinical features, outcome of the patients and the resistance patterns of the isolates were analyzed. A total of 95 clinical isolates from 72 patients younger than 14 years of age were included in this study. Of these 72 patients, 51 had bacteremia, 28 meningitis, 14 bacteremic pneumonia, 12 pleural empyema, eight otitis media, four arthritis, three sinusitis, two periorbital abscesses, one deep neck infection, one psoas muscle abscess, one peritonitis, one urinary tract infection, and one cutaneous infection. Ancillary diagnostic tests, including Gram stain smears and latex agglutination tests, were applied and the sensitivities were 86.2% and 54.3%, respectively. The prevalence rate of penicillin nonsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae has increased dramatically since 1995 in central Taiwan, with rates of 5.6% and 74.1% before and after 1995, and the overall mortality rate was 20.8% and 53.3% respectively. Ten of 19 children (52.6%) with pneumococcal meningitis who survived had long-term sequelae. PMID:11045380

  14. A Severe Case of Rat Lungworm Disease in Hawai‘i

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A 23-year-old man living on the island of Hawai‘i developed a life threatening case of eosinophilic meningitis caused by infection with Angiostrongylus cantonensis (rat lungworm disease: RLWD). He was comatose for 3 months, incurring brain and nerve damage sufficiently extensive that he was not expected to recover. The case was complicated by secondary infections of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium difficile, and pneumonia, which resulted in an empyema requiring a thoracoscopy and decortication. He was treated with prednisone, mebendozal, and pain medication for RLWD, and antibiotics and antifungal medications for the secondary infections. The administration of herbal supplements was requested by the family and approved, and these were administered through a gastric tube. Less than a month after being declared in a persistent vegetative state the man was able to talk, eat, and had regained some muscle functions. After release from the hospital he continued the use of supplements and received treatments of intravenous vitamin therapy. Four years after onset of the illness he is able to ride a bicycle, is a part time student, plays guitar, and is fluent in two foreign languages. RLWD is an emerging tropical disease of growing importance in Hawai‘i. PMID:23900708

  15. Stenting of the Cystic Duct in Benign Disease: A Definitive Treatment for the Elderly and Unwell

    SciTech Connect

    Hersey, N.; Goode, S. D.; Peck, R. J. Lee, F.

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThere have been few case reports describing cystic duct stent insertion in the management of acute cholecystitis secondary to benign disease with no case series published to date. We present our series demonstrating the role of cystic duct stents in managing benign gallbladder disease in those patients unfit for surgery.Materials and MethodsThirty three patients unfit for surgery in our institution underwent cystic duct stent insertion for the management of acute cholecystitis in the period June 2008 to June 2013. Patients underwent a mixture of transperitoneal and transhepatic gallbladder puncture. The cystic duct was cannulated with a hydrophilic guidewire which was subsequently passed through the common bile duct and into the duodenum. An 8Fr 12-cm double-pigtail stent was placed with the distal end lying within the duodenum and the proximal end within the gallbladder.ResultsTen patients presented with gallbladder perforation, 21 patients with acute cholecystitis, 1 with acute cholangitis and 1 with necrotising pancreatitis. The technical success rate was 91 %. We experienced a 13 % complication rate with 3 % mortality rate at 30 days.ConclusionCystic duct stent insertion can be successfully used to manage acute cholecystitis, gallbladder empyema or gallbladder perforations in those unfit for surgery and should be considered alongside external gallbladder drainage as a definitive mid-term treatment option.

  16. [A case of post-operative cerebral abscess caused by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii-possibly originating abroad, and poorly susceptible to colistin].

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Goro; Uchida, Kazuyoshi; Takada, Tatsuro; Ueda, Toshihiro; Tanaka, Yu-Ichiro; Hashimoto, Takuo; Wakui, Daisuke; Takemura, Hiroshi

    2012-02-01

    We report a case of post-neurosurgical meningitis, subdural empyema, and cerebral abscess caused by multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MRAB) poorly susceptible to colistin. A 49-year-old man was transferred to our hospital after surgical treatment for putaminal hemorrhage in a foreign country hospital. Several examinations revealed surgical site infection (SSI). From cerebro-spinal fluid examination via ventricular drainage, MRAB was recovered. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of colistin was 2 µg/mL. Intravenous administration of colistin with ceftazidime and rifampicin was started, with intrathecal colistin administration, based on the results of a Break-point Checkerboard examination, and resulted in effective infection control. Nosocomial infection by MRAB has become an emergent problem in many countries. In Japan, several outbreak accidents caused by MRAB have been reported so far. In this case, genetic analysis revealed that the pathogen had originated from a foreign country, and the prevalence of colistin-resistant pathogens has also increased in these countries. Besides adequate isolation precautions, strategies for post-neurosurgical SSI management and establishment of effective treatments are necessary against neurosurgical SSIs caused by colistin-resistant MRAB. PMID:22281468

  17. Actinomycete infections in humans--a review.

    PubMed

    Schaal, K P; Lee, H J

    1992-06-15

    Diseases caused by pathogenic aerobic and facultatively anaerobic actinomycetes differ considerably with respect to their etiology, pathogenesis, clinical appearance and epidemiology. Facultatively anaerobic (fermentative) actinomycetes may not only be involved etiologically in the three classical forms of cervicofacial, thoracic and abdominal actinomycoses, but also in infections of the female genital organs, the eye, the tissue adjacent to dental implantation elements and tooth extraction wounds. The species distribution of the fermentative actinomycetes isolated from these conditions varied to a certain, but characteristic, extent, as did the concomitant actinomycotic flora. The sex ratio reported for human Actinomyces infections (male:female = 3:1) appeared to be restricted to actinomycotic abscesses and empyemas. The prevailing pathogenic, obligately aerobic actinomycete species in Germany was found to be Nocardia farcinica followed by Nocardia asteroides. The comparatively high incidence of N. farcinica infections was chiefly due to the occurrence of nosocomial postoperative wound infections by this pathogen observed in two German hospitals. Besides surgical treatment, immunosuppressive treatment appeared to be the most common factor predisposing for nocardiosis. Recent observations strongly suggested that the spectrum of human nocardial infections in Germany has been changing, as regards the overall incidence, the prevalence of N. farcinica, the sex ratio, the mean age of patients, as well as the role of N. farcinica as a possibly important nosocomial pathogen. PMID:1612438

  18. [Indication of neuro-imaging for the initial management and the follow-up of acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis].

    PubMed

    Béquet, D; de Broucker, T

    2009-01-01

    Lumbar puncture is the best way to prove bacterial meningitis. It should be performed without any delay if the diagnosis is suspected. Herniation is a rare complication of LP. CT is normal in most cases of purulent meningitis, including those complicated by a subsequent herniation; normal CT results does not mean that performing a LP is safe. Three main clinical features can help determine which patient is at risk of herniation and should have a CT before LP. This risk has to be determined rapidly in the emergency ward while assessing anamnestic data, localization signs or symptoms, and level of consciousness. Cranial imaging (mainly MRI) is useful in the course of bacterial meningitis. Patients who do not respond well to treatment or with atypical presentation, persistence of fever, or new neurological signs should undergo brain imaging; MRI and CT may identify subdural effusions, brain abscesses, empyemas, hydrocephaly, or brain parenchymal changes (cerebritis, infarction, hemorrhage). CT and MRI are useful to screen for an ENT cause of bacterial meningitis, and mandatory in case of pneumococcal meningitis. Numerous MRI sequences are useful to identify bacterial meningitis complications: SE T1 without and with gadolinium injection, SE T2, FLAIR, gradient-echo T2, diffusion weighted imaging, MR angiography. PMID:19398288

  19. Group C streptococci in human infection: a study of 308 isolates with clinical correlations.

    PubMed

    Barnham, M; Kerby, J; Chandler, R S; Millar, M R

    1989-06-01

    A collection of 308 clinical isolates of beta-haemolytic Lancefield group C streptococci was assembled from laboratories in England, Nigeria and New Zealand. Of these, 276 isolates were Streptococcus equisimilis, 23 S. milleri and nine S. zooepidemicus. Isolates of S. equisimilis in the African collection, though few, gave higher rates of lactose and raffinose fermentation, aesculin hydrolysis and positive alpha-galactosidase reactions than those from elsewhere. Erythromycin resistance was found in 1.9% of the English isolates of S. equisimilis. Strains from superficial infections accounted for 88% of the collection and were most commonly isolated from the upper respiratory tract, skin or wounds. Amongst the 36 patients yielding isolates from deep sites S. equisimilis was found in septicaemia, cellulitis, abscess, peritonitis, septic arthritis, pneumonia, mycotic aneurysm and acute epiglottitis, S. milleri was found in abdominal abscesses, peritonitis, pleural empyema and osteomyelitis and S. zooepidemicus was found in septicaemia, pneumonia, meningitis and septic arthritis. Within the collection an unselected general catchment of 214 isolates of group C streptococci from the laboratories in Yorkshire showed the following species: from 199 superficial infections 94% S. equisimilis, 5% S. milleri and 1% S. zooepidemicus and 15 patients with deeper, more aggressive infections 67, 27 and 6.7% of these species respectively. PMID:2737252

  20. An alternative method to achieve one-lung ventilation by surgical pneumothorax in difficult lung isolation patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Pin-Hung; Hsu, Po-Kai

    2016-04-01

    It is challenging to establish one-lung ventilation in difficult airway patients. Surgical pneumothorax under spontaneous breathing to obtain well-collapsed lung is a feasible method for thoracic surgery. A 76-year-old man with right empyema was scheduled for decortication. The patient had limited mouth opening due to facial cellulitis extending from the left cheek to neck. Generally, lung isolation is achieved by double-lumen endotracheal tube or bronchial blocker. Double-lumen tube insertion is difficult for patients with limited mouth opening and right-side placement of bronchial blocker usually causes insufficient deflation. We introduce an alternative lung isolation technique by surgical pneumothorax under spontaneous breathing simply with an endotracheal tube placement. This technique has never been applied into the management of difficult one-lung ventilation. By this method, we provide an ideal surgical condition with safer, less time-consuming, and less skill-demanding anesthesia. It would be an alternative choice for management of one-lung ventilation in the difficult lung isolation patient. PMID:26721826

  1. Getting to a Man's Heart through His Colon

    PubMed Central

    DeVore, Adam D.; Durkin, Michael; Stout, Jason E.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Milano, Carmelo A.

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old man presented with a progressively enlarging pulsatile mass in the left side of his chest. Because of a history of an ischemic cardiomyopathy, he had been randomized in 2003 to undergo coronary artery bypass grafting with a Dor procedure, as part of the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) trial. Our patient's imaging studies, including a thoracic computed tomogram and transthoracic echocardiogram, were now of concern for left ventricular pseudoaneurysm. He was taken immediately for surgical exploration. Purulent material, with empyema, extended from the anterior chest wall through the chest cavity into the mediastinum, with communication into the pericardial space. Notably, there was no compromise of the left ventricular cavity, and there was no pseudoaneurysm. The chest was copiously irrigated before closure. The epicardial patch placed 10 years earlier in the STICH trial was not thought to be the nidus of the abscess and was therefore not removed. Three months later, the patient presented again, this time with hemorrhagic shock and bleeding from his left anterior thoracotomy site, which we then re-entered. He was found to have a left ventricular pseudoaneurysm with disruption of the ventricular apex. The epicardial felt-and-Dacron patch, placed 10 years previously during his Dor procedure, was found to be infected with Clostridium difficile and was removed. The left ventricular apex was repaired. Whereas C. difficile bacteremia is rare, the seeding of prosthetic cardiac material with delayed presentation, as in this case, is extraordinarily uncommon. PMID:27127437

  2. Getting to a Man's Heart through His Colon.

    PubMed

    Samsky, Marc D; DeVore, Adam D; Durkin, Michael; Stout, Jason E; Velazquez, Eric J; Milano, Carmelo A

    2016-04-01

    A 69-year-old man presented with a progressively enlarging pulsatile mass in the left side of his chest. Because of a history of an ischemic cardiomyopathy, he had been randomized in 2003 to undergo coronary artery bypass grafting with a Dor procedure, as part of the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) trial. Our patient's imaging studies, including a thoracic computed tomogram and transthoracic echocardiogram, were now of concern for left ventricular pseudoaneurysm. He was taken immediately for surgical exploration. Purulent material, with empyema, extended from the anterior chest wall through the chest cavity into the mediastinum, with communication into the pericardial space. Notably, there was no compromise of the left ventricular cavity, and there was no pseudoaneurysm. The chest was copiously irrigated before closure. The epicardial patch placed 10 years earlier in the STICH trial was not thought to be the nidus of the abscess and was therefore not removed. Three months later, the patient presented again, this time with hemorrhagic shock and bleeding from his left anterior thoracotomy site, which we then re-entered. He was found to have a left ventricular pseudoaneurysm with disruption of the ventricular apex. The epicardial felt-and-Dacron patch, placed 10 years previously during his Dor procedure, was found to be infected with Clostridium difficile and was removed. The left ventricular apex was repaired. Whereas C. difficile bacteremia is rare, the seeding of prosthetic cardiac material with delayed presentation, as in this case, is extraordinarily uncommon. PMID:27127437

  3. Imaging of actinomycosis in various organs: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Heo, Suk Hee; Shin, Sang Soo; Kim, Jin Woong; Lim, Hyo Soon; Seon, Hyun Ju; Jung, Sook-In; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2014-01-01

    Actinomycosis is a chronic suppurative bacterial infection caused by Actinomyces species. Actinomyces israelii is the organism most commonly found in human disease. Actinomycosis usually manifests with abscess formation, dense fibrosis, and draining sinuses. The disease is further characterized by the tendency to extensively spread beyond normal fascial and connective tissue planes. Actinomycosis occurs most commonly in the cervicofacial region (50%-65%), followed by the thoracic (15%-30%) and abdominopelvic (20%) regions, but rarely involves the central nervous system. Most cases of cervicofacial actinomycosis are odontogenic in origin. In the acute form, cervicofacial disease can manifest with soft-tissue swelling, a painful pyogenic abscess, or a mass lesion. In the subacute to chronic form, a painless indurated mass can spread to the skin, leading to draining sinus tracts. Thoracic manifestations include parenchymal, bronchiectatic, and endobronchial actinomycosis. At computed tomography, pulmonary actinomycosis usually appears as chronic segmental airspace consolidation containing necrotic low-attenuation areas with peripheral enhancement. Abdominopelvic actinomycosis preferentially involves the ileocecal region, ovary, and fallopian tube. The imaging findings favoring abdominopelvic actinomycosis include strong enhancement in the solid portion of the mass after contrast material administration, small rim-enhancing abscesses within the mass, and extensive inflammatory extensions. Actinomycosis in the central nervous system may produce brain abscess, meningitis, subdural empyema, actinomycetoma, and spinal and cranial epidural abscess. In general, actinomycosis responds well to antibiotic therapy, but long-term follow-up after treatment is needed because of frequent relapses. PMID:24428279

  4. Tube thoracostomy: complications and its management.

    PubMed

    Kesieme, Emeka B; Dongo, Andrew; Ezemba, Ndubueze; Irekpita, Eshiobo; Jebbin, Nze; Kesieme, Chinenye

    2012-01-01

    Background. Tube thoracostomy is widely used throughout the medical, surgical, and critical care specialities. It is generally used to drain pleural collections either as elective or emergency. Complications resulting from tube thoracostomy can occasionally be life threatening. Aim. To present an update on the complications and management of complications of tube thoracostomy. Methods. A review of the publications obtained from Medline search, medical libraries, and Google on tube thoracostomy and its complications was done. Results. Tube thoracostomy is a common surgical procedure which can be performed by either the blunt dissection technique or the trocar technique. Complication rates are increased by the trocar technique. These complications have been broadly classified as either technical or infective. Technical causes include tube malposition, blocked drain, chest drain dislodgement, reexpansion pulmonary edema, subcutaneous emphysema, nerve injuries, cardiac and vascular injuries, oesophageal injuries, residual/postextubation pneumothorax, fistulae, tumor recurrence at insertion site, herniation through the site of thoracostomy, chylothorax, and cardiac dysrhythmias. Infective complications include empyema and surgical site infection. Conclusion. Tube thoracostomy, though commonly performed is not without risk. Blunt dissection technique has lower risk of complications and is hence recommended. PMID:22028963

  5. Spinal Subdural Abscess Following Laminectomy for Symptomatic Stenosis: A Report of 2 Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Alexander D.; Rolston, John D.; Gauger, Grant E.; Larson, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patient: Male, 87 • Male, 62 Final Diagnosis: Spinal subdural abscess Symptoms: Fever • pain • weakness Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laminectomy • durotomy • drainage • debridement Specialty: Neurosurgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Spinal subdural abscesses, also known as empyemas, are rare infectious lesions, the exact incidence of which is unknown. Presentation is typically dramatic, with back pain, fever, motor, and sensory deficits. Rapid identification and surgical intervention with laminectomy, durotomy, and washout provides the best outcomes. While hematogenous spread of an extra-spinal infection is the most common cause of this condition, a significant number of cases result from iatrogenic mechanisms, including lumbar punctures, epidural injections, and surgery. Case Report: Here we present 2 cases: 1) an 87-year-old man with type 2 diabetes, schizophrenia, mild cognitive impairment, and symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis and 2) a 62-year-old man with a prior L3–4 spinal fusion with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. In both cases, patients underwent laminectomy for spinal stenosis and developed epidural abscess. Following successful drainage of the epidural abscess, they continued to be symptomatic, and repeat imaging revealed the presence of a subdural abscess that was subsequently evacuated. Case 1 had significant improvement with residual lower-extremity weakness, while Case 2 made a complete neurological recovery. Conclusions: These cases illustrate patients at increased risk for developing this rare spinal infection, and demonstrate that rapid recognition and surgical treatment is key to cure and recovery. Review of the literature highlights pertinent risk factors and demonstrates nearly one-third of reported cases have an iatrogenic etiology. The cases presented here demonstrate that a subdural process should be suspected in any patient with intractable pain following treatment of an epidural abscess. PMID

  6. Restricted Diffusion of Pus in the Subarachnoid Space: MRSA Meningo-Vasculitis and Progressive Brainstem Ischemic Strokes – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rose, David Z.; Parra-Herran, Carlos; Petito, Carol K.; Post, M. Judith D.

    2010-01-01

    Extra-axial restriction on diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is an unusual finding on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Intra-axial restriction on DWI, however, is common, and can represent brain parenchymal infarction, tumor, abscess, or toxic-metabolic process. The infrequency of extra-axial DWI restriction and the paucity of clinico-pathological correlation in the literature limit its differential diagnosis. Scant case reports suggest that extra-axial DWI restriction could be a lymphoma, neurenteric cyst, or, in one patient, subdural empyema [1,2,3]. We postulate that pus formation must be excluded first, because it can provoke an aggressive meningo-vasculitis with rapidly fatal, intra-axial infarctions. Our patient was a 45-year-old man, presenting to our hospital with left facial droop and right (contralateral) arm and leg weakness. Initial MRI revealed DWI restriction in the left lateral pons, consistent with a classic Millard-Gubler stroke. Also noted was a subtle, extra-axial area of curvilinear diffusion restriction in the left cerebellar-pontine angle's subarachnoid space. Days later, the patient had a headache, and repeat MRI revealed extension of the two DWI lesions – both the intra-axial pontine infarction and the extra-axial area of restricted diffusion in the subarachnoid space. The patient became comatose, a third MRI revealed more extensive DWI restrictions, and he expired despite aggressive care. Autopsy revealed massive brainstem infarcts, a thick lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, copious Gram-Positive cocci (likely MRSA) and arteries partially occluded with fibrointimal proliferation. This emphasizes the concept that extra-axial DWI restriction can represent pus development in the subarachnoid space – a radiographic marker to identify a patient at risk for demise due to septic, meningo-vasculitic infarctions. PMID:21045937

  7. Evolution of rhinology.

    PubMed

    Kaluskar, S K

    2008-06-01

    The study of the nose is as old as civilisation. Various conditions affecting its structure and function has been documented in Edwin Smith Papyrus in hieroglyphic script, an Egyptian writing system of the mid -4th Millennium BC.The major contribution for the complete reconstruction of the nose originated in India by Sushruta in around 600 BC. Writing in Sanskrit in the form of verses he described in detail the technique of total reconstruction, which is still being practiced today as Indian Rhinoplasty. This surgical reconstruction paved the way to modern plastic surgery in Europe and United States in 18th century. Sushruta contributed not only to the plastic surgery of the nose, but described entire philosophy of Head and Neck and other surgery as well. Other notable contributors were Greek physicians, Hippocrate and Galen, and at the birth of the Christianity, Celsus wrote eight books of medical encyclopaedia, which described various conditions affecting nose.Septal and Sinus surgery, in comparison to rhinoplasty did not develop until 17th century. Septal surgery began with total septectomy, sub mucous resection by Killian & Freer in early 20th century and later septoplasty by Cottle in middle of 20th century.Sinus surgery probably originated in Egypt, where instruments were used to remove brain through the ethmoid sinuses as part of the mummification process. In 18th century, empyema of the maxillary sinus was drained through the tooth socket or anterior wall of the sinus, which lead to the evolution of radical procedures of removal of mucous membrane and inferior meatal antrostomy. In the late 20th century, improved understanding of the mucociliary mechanism described by Prof. Messerklinger and Nasal Endoscopy described by Prof. Draf with the development of fibre optics and CT imaging, heralded a new era, which evolved in functional endoscopic sinus surgery. New technology further enhanced the scope of endoscope being used "around and beyond" the nose. PMID

  8. Oral pristinamycin for the treatment of resistant Gram-positive infections in patients with cancer: Evaluation of clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Teng, J C; Lingaratnam, S M; Trubiano, J A; Thursky, K A; Slavin, M A; Worth, L J

    2016-05-01

    Pristinamycin has been used to treat a range of Gram-positive infections, but reported experience in patients with malignancy is limited. This study aimed to evaluate the use of pristinamycin in patients with cancer at an Australian centre. All patients commenced on oral pristinamycin therapy at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre between January 2005 and December 2014 were identified using the hospital pharmacy dispensing system. Information on demographics, co-morbidities, cancer diagnosis, infection characteristics, pristinamycin regimen, pristinamycin tolerability and outcomes was collected. The median duration of follow-up was 398 days. In total, 26 patients received pristinamycin, with median age of 61 years and a male predominance (65%). Underlying diagnoses were haematological malignancies (50%) and solid tumours (50%). Pathogens included 13 meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, 6 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, 4 meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis, 2 meticillin-susceptible S. aureus and 1 vancomycin-susceptible E. faecium. Infection sites were osteomyelitis (6), skin and soft-tissue (4), intra-abdominal/pelvic abscess (4), bloodstream (3), empyema (3), endocarditis/endovascular (3), prosthesis-related infection (2) and epididymo-orchitis (1). One patient ceased pristinamycin due to nausea. Regarding outcome, 13 patients (50%) were cured of infection, 8 (31%) had suppression and 5 (19%) had relapse. Relapses included 1 endovascular infection, 2 episodes of osteomyelitis, 1 pelvic abscess and 1 skin and soft-tissue infection. Overall, 81% of patients achieved cure or suppression of antibiotic-resistant or complex Gram-positive infections, consistent with published experience in non-cancer populations. A favourable tolerability profile makes oral pristinamycin a viable treatment option, particularly in settings where outpatient management of cancer is the objective. PMID:27089829

  9. [Our experience in the thoracoscopic surgery of the tuberculous pleural effusions].

    PubMed

    Cozma, G; Tudorache, V; Burlacu, O; Tunea, C; Voiculescu, V; Vancea, D; Nicodin, Gabriela; Memu, E; Mureşan, Anca Maria; Nicodin, A

    2007-01-01

    Pleural tuberculosis (TB) is most often treated by a pneumologist. Some cases require operative interventions and may represent a challenge for the thoracic surgeon. There are two specific problems regarding TB pleural effusions: 15-25% of them remain undiagnosed using the conventional methods of diagnosis (imaging, thoracentesis, percutaneous pleural biopsies) and have a tendency for the rapid production of dense adherences and loculations. The authors present their experience in the diagnosis and the treatment of tuberculous pleurisy by means of mini-invasive surgical techniques. The period of study was January 2001-December 2006. In that period, the authors performed 400 video-assisted surgical operations, representing 9% of all the operations carried out in the clinic (3833). The surgical indications were for diagnosis (pleural, pericardial, lung or lymph node biopsy) and for treatment (pleurisy, pleuro-pericarditis, empyema). The contraindications for VATS were the usual ones. 56 cases were diagnosed with pleuro-pulmonary tuberculosis (14% of the VATS). For 43 patients the first approach was strictly thoracoscopic (VATS), while for the rest of 13 we started directly through a minithoracotomy with video assistance. We had 7 conversions to minithoracotomies with video assistance from those 43 aforementioned patients. Minithoracotomy with video assistance was preferred in 13 cases as a primary approach. We used two-port approach in 30 cases and the three-port triangular approach was useful for 6 patients. In 4 cases the bidigital technique was used in order to achieve greater room for exploration. We experienced only one minor intraoperative complication. Our results are comparable to those reported by other authors. The main idea of this paper is that the advantages of VATS in the pathology of the tuberculosis are undeniable. PMID:18019751

  10. Streptococcus tigurinus, a Novel Member of the Streptococcus mitis Group, Causes Invasive Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Nicolas J.; Tarr, Philip E.; Eich, Gerhard; Schulthess, Bettina; Bahlmann, Anna S.; Keller, Peter M.; Bloemberg, Guido V.

    2012-01-01

    We recently described the novel species Streptococcus tigurinus sp. nov. belonging to the Streptococcus mitis group. The type strain AZ_3aT of S. tigurinus was originally isolated from a patient with infective endocarditis. According to its phenotypic and molecular characteristics, S. tigurinus is most closely related to Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus infantis. Accurate identification of S. tigurinus is facilitated by 16S rRNA gene analysis. We retrospectively analyzed our 16S rRNA gene molecular database, which contains sequences of all clinical samples obtained in our institute since 2003. We detected 17 16S rRNA gene sequences which were assigned to S. tigurinus, including sequences from the 3 S. tigurinus strains described previously. S. tigurinus originated from normally sterile body sites, such as blood, cerebrospinal fluid, or heart valves, of 14 patients and was initially detected by culture or broad-range 16S rRNA gene PCR, followed by sequencing. The 14 patients had serious invasive infections, i.e., infective endocarditis (n = 6), spondylodiscitis (n = 3), bacteremia (n = 2), meningitis (n = 1), prosthetic joint infection (n = 1), and thoracic empyema (n = 1). To evaluate the presence of Streptococcus tigurinus in the endogenous oral microbial flora, we screened saliva specimens of 31 volunteers. After selective growth, alpha-hemolytic growing colonies were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and subsequent molecular methods. S. tigurinus was not identified among 608 strains analyzed. These data indicate that S. tigurinus is not widely distributed in the oral cavity. In conclusion, S. tigurinus is a novel agent of invasive infections, particularly infective endocarditis. PMID:22760039

  11. Aerobic and anaerobic microbiology of infections after trauma in children.

    PubMed Central

    Brook, I

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the recovery of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria from infections after trauma in children over a 20 year period. METHODS: Only specimens that were studied for both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria were included in the analysis. They were collected from seven separate centres in which the microbiology laboratories only accepted specimens that were properly collected without contamination and were submitted in appropriate transport media. Anaerobes and aerobic bacteria were cultured and identified using standard techniques. Clinical records were reviewed to identify post-trauma patients. RESULTS: From 1974 to 1994, 175 specimens obtained from 166 children with trauma showed bacterial growth. The trauma included blunt trauma (71), lacerations (48), bites (42), and open fractures (5). Anaerobic bacteria only were isolated in 38 specimens (22%), aerobic bacteria only in 51 (29%), and mixed aerobic-anaerobic flora in 86 (49%); 363 anaerobic (2.1/specimen) and 158 aerobic or facultative isolates (0.9/specimen) were recovered. The predominant anaerobic bacteria included Peptostreptococcus spp (115 isolates), Prevotella spp (68), Fusobacterium spp (52), B fragilis group (42), and Clostridium spp (21). The predominant aerobic bacteria included Staph aureus (51), E coli (13), Ps aeruginosa (12), Str pyogenes (11) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (9). Principal infections were: abscesses (52), bacteraemia (3), pulmonary infections (30, including aspiration pneumonia, tracheostomy associated pneumonia, empyema, and ventilator associated pneumonia), wounds (36, including cellulitis, post-traumatic wounds, decubitus ulcers, myositis, gastrostomy and tracheostomy site wounds, and fasciitis), bites (42, including 23 animal and 19 human), peritonitis (4), osteomyelitis (5), and sinusitis (3). Staph aureus and Str pyogenes were isolated at all sites. However, organisms of the oropharyngeal flora predominated in infections that originated from head and neck wounds and

  12. Pathophysiological significance of gallbladder volume changes in gallstone diseases

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shing-Moo; Yao, Chung-Chin; Pan, Huichin; Hsiao, Kuang-Ming; Yu, Ji-Kuen; Lai, Te-Jen; Huang, Shueh-Ding

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study the pathophysiological significance of gallbladder volume (GBV) and ejection fraction changes in gallstone patients. METHODS: The fasting GBV of gallstone patients with acute cholecystitis (n = 99), chronic cholecystitis (n = 85) and non-gallstone disease (n = 240) were measured by preoperative computed tomography. Direct saline injection measurements of GBV after cholecystectomy were also performed. The fasting and postprandial GBV of 65 patients with gallstones and chronic cholecystitis and 53 healthy subjects who received health examinations were measured by abdominal ultrasonography. Proper adjustments were made after the correction factors were calculated by comparing the preoperative and postoperative measurements. Pathological correlations between gallbladder changes in patients with acute calculous cholecystitis and the stages defined by the Tokyo International Consensus Meeting in 2007 were made. Unpaired Student’s t tests were used. P < 0.05 was deemed statistically significant. RESULTS: The fasting GBV was larger in late stage than in early/second stage acute cholecystitis gallbladders (84.66 ± 26.32 cm3, n = 12, vs 53.19 ± 33.80 cm3, n = 87, P = 0.002). The fasting volume/ejection fraction of gallbladders in chronic cholecystitis were larger/lower than those of normal subjects (28.77 ± 15.00 cm3 vs 6.77 ± 15.75 cm3, P < 0.0001)/(34.6% ± 10.6%, n = 65, vs 53.3% ± 24.9%, n = 53, P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: GBV increases as acute cholecystitis progresses to gangrene and/or empyema. Gallstone formation is associated with poorer contractility and larger volume in gallbladders that contain stones. PMID:20818819

  13. Bacteriophages show promise as antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Alisky, J; Iczkowski, K; Rapoport, A; Troitsky, N

    1998-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has prompted interest in alternatives to conventional drugs. One possible option is to use bacteriophages (phage) as antimicrobial agents. We have conducted a literature review of all Medline citations from 1966-1996 that dealt with the therapeutic use of phage. There were 27 papers from Poland, the Soviet Union, Britain and the U.S.A. The Polish and Soviets administered phage orally, topically or systemically to treat a wide variety of antibiotic-resistant pathogens in both adults and children. Infections included suppurative wound infections, gastroenteritis, sepsis, osteomyelitis, dermatitis, empyemas and pneumonia; pathogens included Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Klebsiella, Escherichia, Proteus, Pseudomonas, Shigella and Salmonella spp. Overall, the Polish and Soviets reported success rates of 80-95% for phage therapy, with rare, reversible gastrointestinal or allergic side effects. However, efficacy of phage was determined almost exclusively by qualitative clinical assessment of patients, and details of dosages and clinical criteria were very sketchy. There were also six British reports describing controlled trials of phage in animal models (mice, guinea pigs and livestock), measuring survival rates and other objective criteria. All of the British studies raised phage against specific pathogens then used to create experimental infections. Demonstrable efficacy against Escherichia, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas and Staphylococcus spp. was noted in these model systems. Two U.S. papers dealt with improving the bioavailability of phage. Phage is sequestered in the spleen and removed from circulation. This can be overcome by serial passage of phage through mice to isolate mutants that resist sequestration. In conclusion, bacteriophages may show promise for treating antibiotic resistant pathogens. To facilitate further progress, directions for future research are discussed and a directory of authors from the reviewed

  14. The efficacy and economical benefits of blood patch pleurodesis in secondary spontaneous pneumothorax patients

    PubMed Central

    Alpay, Levent; Metin, Serda; Kıral, Hakan; Demir, Mine; Yalçinsoy, Murat; Baysungur, Volkan; Yalçinkaya, Irfan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Prolonged air leak in secondary spontaneous pneumothorax (SSP) patients remains one of the biggest challenges for thoracic surgeons. This study investigates the feasibility, effectiveness, clinical outcomes, and economical benefits of the autologous blood patch pleurodesis method in SSP. Material and methods First-episode SSP patients undergoing autologous blood patch pleurodesis for resistant air leak following underwater-seal thoracostomy, between January 2010 and June 2013 were taken into the study. Timing and success rate of pleurodesis, recurrence, additional intervention, hospital length of stay, and complications that occurred during follow-up were examined from medical records, retrospectively. Results Thirty-one (27 male, 4 female) SSP patients with expanded lungs on chest X-ray and resistant air leak on the 3rd post-interventional day were enrolled. Mean age was 53.7 ± 18.9 years (range: 23-81). Twenty-four patients were treated with tube thoracostomy, 2 with pezzer drain, and 5 with 8 F pleural catheter. 96.8% success was achieved; air leak in 29 of 31 patients (93.5%) ceased within the first 24 hours. No procedure-related complication such as fever, pain or empyema was seen. Late pneumothorax recurrence occurred in 4 (12.9%) patients; 1 treated with talc pleurodesis where the other 3 necessitated surgical intervention. Conclusions Autologous blood patch pleurodesis is a safe, effective, and easily performed procedure with no need of any additional equipment or extra cost. This method can be applied to all patients with radiologically expanded lungs and continuous air leak after 48 hours following water-seal drainage thoracostomy, to reduce hospital stay duration, unnecessary surgical interventions, and the expenses. PMID:27212974

  15. [Andreas Vesalius and surgery].

    PubMed

    Van Hee, R

    1993-01-01

    By publishing De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem in 1543, Andries van Wesel (1514-1564) gave surgical science an immense impulse. The revolutionary renovation in the knowledge of man's anatomical structure changed slowly and progressively into topographical and physiological understanding of surgical diseases. At the same time, this made better aimed and more secure operations possible. Apart from the importance of this anatomical publication, Andreas Vesalius also won his spurs as a surgeon. He taught surgery in Padua for many years. He was appointed court physician and surgeon at the Habsburg Court of Charles V and Philip II. He personally performed lots of operations known at the time as major ones. He not only quickly adopted the surgical innovations of his fellow-surgeon Ambroise Paré, but he even performed operations that had been forgotten during several centuries, among which thoracocentesis for pleural empyema. His clinical perspicacity in discovering the indication for some operations was staggering and was appreciated by all great monarchs of Europe in the 16th century. In his several consilia, numerous pieces of advice were given for the treatment of surgical patients. The surgical practice which Vesalius had in Brussels for many years, consequently became most successful. Many publications by Vesalius about surgery and blood-letting are well-known. His Chirurgia magna in septem Libros digesta still remains controversial; these books were published by Prospero Borgarruccio (1560) in 1568 by the Venetian editor Valgrisi. This book gives an excellent survey of surgical pathology as it was taught and treated in the 16th century. The scientific method that Vesalius used, not only in his anatomical studies but also in his surgical practice, deserves not only our full appraisal but should still be studied in our own time. PMID:8209577

  16. Pleural effusion: diagnosis, treatment, and management

    PubMed Central

    Karkhanis, Vinaya S; Joshi, Jyotsna M

    2012-01-01

    A pleural effusion is an excessive accumulation of fluid in the pleural space. It can pose a diagnostic dilemma to the treating physician because it may be related to disorders of the lung or pleura, or to a systemic disorder. Patients most commonly present with dyspnea, initially on exertion, predominantly dry cough, and pleuritic chest pain. To treat pleural effusion appropriately, it is important to determine its etiology. However, the etiology of pleural effusion remains unclear in nearly 20% of cases. Thoracocentesis should be performed for new and unexplained pleural effusions. Laboratory testing helps to distinguish pleural fluid transudate from an exudate. The diagnostic evaluation of pleural effusion includes chemical and microbiological studies, as well as cytological analysis, which can provide further information about the etiology of the disease process. Immunohistochemistry provides increased diagnostic accuracy. Transudative effusions are usually managed by treating the underlying medical disorder. However, a large, refractory pleural effusion, whether a transudate or exudate, must be drained to provide symptomatic relief. Management of exudative effusion depends on the underlying etiology of the effusion. Malignant effusions are usually drained to palliate symptoms and may require pleurodesis to prevent recurrence. Pleural biopsy is recommended for evaluation and exclusion of various etiologies, such as tuberculosis or malignant disease. Percutaneous closed pleural biopsy is easiest to perform, the least expensive, with minimal complications, and should be used routinely. Empyemas need to be treated with appropriate antibiotics and intercostal drainage. Surgery may be needed in selected cases where drainage procedure fails to produce improvement or to restore lung function and for closure of bronchopleural fistula. PMID:27147861

  17. Semirigid thoracoscopy: an effective method for diagnosing pleural malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Rozman, Ales; Camlek, Luka; Kern, Izidor; Malovrh, Mateja Marc

    2014-01-01

    Background Thoracoscopy with a semirigid instrument is a recent technique for diagnosing pleural diseases. The purpose of this study was to report diagnostic yield and complications of the method. Patients and methods. Patients with pleural effusion of unknown origin and/or pleural irregularities suspicious for pleural malignancy were included after less invasive means of diagnosis had failed. All procedures were performed under local anaesthesia with intravenous sedation/analgesia with a single point of entry with a semirigid thoracoscope (Olympus LTF-160). Data were collected prospectively between 2008 and 2012. Results One hundred fifteen thoracoscopies were performed on 111 patients. The median age was 65 years (range 28–86 years), 14.4% were female and 85.6% male. Seventy-three (65.8%) patients had malignant pleural disease (malignant mesothelioma, metastatic cancer) and 38 (34.2%) had benign disease. The sensitivity, negative predictive value, and accuracy of the procedure for malignancy were 96.0%, 93.0%, and 97.4% respectively. Pleurodesis was carried out in 34 patients; in 32 (94.1%) it was assessed as successful after 1 month. There were 24 adverse events: three empyemas/pleural infections, three bronchopleural fistulae after chest tube placement and lung re-expansion, five patients had excessive pain after pleurodesis, six patients had sedation-associated hypotension, and seven patients had self-limited fever after plerodesis. One patient died 11 days after a procedure for advanced carcinoma. Conclusions Semirigid thoracoscopy is an accurate and safe method for evaluation of pleural diseases and useful for therapeutic talc pleurodesis. PMID:24587782

  18. Does intrapleural length and position of the intercostal drain affect the frequency of residual hemothorax? A prospective study from north India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Agarwal, Nitin; Rattan, Amulya; Rathi, Vinita

    2014-01-01

    Context: Thoracic trauma causes significant morbidity; however, many deaths are preventable and few patients require surgery. Intercostal chest drainage (ICD) for hemo/pneumothorax is simple and effective; the main problem is residual hemothorax, which can cause lung collapse and empyema. Aims: Our study aimed to analyze the relationship between radiological chest tube parameters (position and intrathoracic length) and the frequency of residual hemothorax. Settings and Design: This prospective analytical study was conducted in a large tertiary care hospital in north India over 2 years till March 2013. Materials and Methods: Patients of chest trauma aged 18-60 years, with hemothorax or hemopneumothorax requiring ICD insertion were included in the study. Bedside ICD insertion was performed as per current standards. Immediate post-ICD chest radiographs were used to record lung status and ICD position (chest tube zone and intrapleural length). Residual hemothorax was defined as any collection identified on radiological investigations after 48 hours of ICD placement. Statistical Analysis: Univariate analysis was performed with the chi-square test or Student's t-test as appropriate, while multivariate analysis using stepwise logistic regression; a P-value < 0.05 was significant. Results: Out of 170 patients of chest trauma, 154 underwent ICD insertion. Most patients were young (mean age: 31.7 ± 12 years) males (M:F = 14:1). Ninety-seven patients (57.1%) had isolated chest injuries. Blunt trauma (n = 119; 77.3%) and motor vehicle accidents (n = 72; 46.7%) were the commonest causes. Mean hospital stay was 9 ± 3.94 days, and mortality 2/154 (1.1%). Residual hemothorax was seen in 48 (31%). No ICD zone or length was significantly associated with residual hemothorax on univariate or multivariate analysis. Conclusion: Intrapleural ICD zone or length does not affect the frequency of residual hemothorax. PMID:25400388

  19. Non-intubated thoracic surgery—A survey from the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Sorge, Roberto; Akopov, Andrej; Congregado, Miguel; Grodzki, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Background A survey amongst the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) members has been performed to investigate the currents trends, rates of adoption as well as potential for future expansion of non-intubated thoracic surgery (NITS) performed under spontaneous ventilation. Methods A 14-question-based questionnaire has been e-mailed to ESTS members. To facilitate the completion of the questionnaire, questions entailed either quantitative or multiple-choice answers. Investigated issues included previous experience with NITS and number of procedures performed, preferred types of anesthesia protocols (i.e., thoracic epidural anesthesia, intercostal or paravertebral blocks, laryngeal mask, use of additional sedation), type of procedures, ideal candidates for NITS, main advantages and technical disadvantages. Non-univocal answer to multiple-choice questions was permitted. Results Out of 105 responders, 62 reported an experience with NITS. The preferred types of anesthesia were intercostal blocks with (59%) or without (50%) sedation, followed by laryngeal mask with sedation (43%) and thoracic epidural anesthesia with sedation (20%). The most frequently performed procedures included thoracoscopic management of recurrent pleural effusion (98%), pleural decortication for empyema thoracis and lung biopsy for interstitial lung disease (26% each); pericardial window and mediastinal biopsy (20% each). More complex procedures such as lobectomy, lung volume reduction surgery and thymectomy have been performed by a minority of responders (2% each). Poor-risk patients due to co-morbidities (70%) and patients with poor pulmonary function (43%) were considered the ideal candidates. Main advantages included faster, recovery (67%), reduced morbidity (59%) and shorter hospital stay with decreased costs (43% each). Reported technical disadvantages included coughing (59%) and poor maneuverability due to diaphragmatic and lung movements (56%). Overall, 69% of responders indicated

  20. Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus necrotizing pneumonia without evidence of antecedent viral upper respiratory infection

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Cristina Moran; Janvier, Jack; Zhang, Kunyan; Fonseca, Kevin; Gregson, Dan; Church, Deirdre; Laupland, Kevin; Rabin, Harvey; Elsayed, Sameer; Conly, John

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: USA300 community-associated (CA) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains causing necrotizing pneumonia have been reported in association with antecedent viral upper respiratory tract infections (URI). METHODS: A case series of necrotizing pneumonia presenting as a primary or coprimary infection, secondary to CA-MRSA without evidence of antecedent viral URI, is presented. Cases were identified through the infectious diseases consultation service records. Clinical and radiographic data were collected by chart review and electronic records. MRSA strains were isolated from sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage, pleural fluid or blood cultures and confirmed using standard laboratory procedures. MRSA strains were characterized by susceptibility testing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, spa typing, agr typing and multilocus sequence typing. Testing for respiratory viruses was performed by appropriate serological testing of banked sera, or nucleic acid testing of nasopharyngeal or bronchoalveloar lavage specimens. RESULTS: Ten patients who presented or copresented with CA necrotizing pneumonia secondary to CA-MRSA from April 2004 to October 2011 were identified. The median length of stay was 22.5 days. Mortality was 20.0%. Classical risk factors for CA-MRSA were identified in seven of 10 (70.0%) cases. Chest tube placement occurred in seven of 10 patients with empyema. None of the patients had historical evidence of antecedent URI. In eight of 10 patients, serological or nucleic acid testing testing revealed no evidence of acute viral coinfection. Eight strains were CMRSA-10 (USA300). The remaining two strains were a USA300 genetically related strain and a USA1100 strain. CONCLUSION: Pneumonia secondary to CA-MRSA can occur in the absence of an antecedent URI. Infections due to CA-MRSA are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Clinicians need to have an awareness of this clinical entity, particularly in patients who are in risk

  1. Mesomesenchymal transition of pleural mesothelial cells is PI3K and NF-κB dependent.

    PubMed

    Owens, Shuzi; Jeffers, Ann; Boren, Jake; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Koenig, Kathleen; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Idell, Steven; Tucker, Torry A

    2015-06-15

    Pleural organization follows acute injury and is characterized by pleural fibrosis, which may involve the visceral and parietal pleural surfaces. This process affects patients with complicated parapneumonic pleural effusions, empyema, and other pleural diseases prone to pleural fibrosis and loculation. Pleural mesothelial cells (PMCs) undergo a process called mesothelial mesenchymal transition (MesoMT), by which PMCs acquire a profibrotic phenotype characterized by cellular enlargement and elongation, increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and matrix proteins including collagen-1. Although MesoMT contributes to pleural fibrosis and lung restriction in mice with carbon black/bleomycin-induced pleural injury and procoagulants and fibrinolytic proteases strongly induce MesoMT in vitro, the mechanism by which this transition occurs remains unclear. We found that thrombin and plasmin potently induce MesoMT in vitro as does TGF-β. Furthermore, these mediators of MesoMT activate phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and NF-κB signaling pathways. Inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling prevented TGF-β-, thrombin-, and plasmin-mediated induction of the MesoMT phenotype exhibited by primary human PMCs. Similar effects were demonstrated through blockade of the NF-κB signaling cascade using two distinctly different NF-κB inhibitors, SN50 and Bay-11 7085. Conversely, expression of constitutively active Akt-induced mesenchymal transition in human PMCs whereas the process was blocked by PX866 and AKT8. Furthermore, thrombin-mediated MesoMT is dependent on PAR-1 expression, which is linked to PI3K/Akt signaling downstream. These are the first studies to demonstrate that PI3K/Akt and/or NF-κB signaling is critical for induction of MesoMT. PMID:25888576

  2. Update on pleural diseases - 2007

    PubMed Central

    Bishay, Ayman; Raoof, Suhail; Esan, Adebayo; Sung, Arthur; Wali, Siraj; Lee, Leonard Y.; George, Liziamma; Saleh, Anthony; Baumann, Michael

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: New information is available on pleural diseases. The authors selected articles to make recommendations on diagnostic and treatment aspects of pleural diseases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eleven articles published in the English language between 2004 and 2007 were chosen. The basis of selection of the articles was the impact on daily practice, change in prior thinking of a disease process or specific treatment modality, as well as proper design and execution of the study. 5-amino-laevulinic acid with fluorescent light combined with white light may allow further diagnostic yield in undiagnosed pleural disease. FDG-PET may allow prognostication of patients with pleural tumors. Utilizing ultrasound by trained Emergency Department physicians is a rapid and effective technique to evaluate non-traumatic pleural effusions in symptomatic patients. Serum osteopontin levels may distinguish patients exposed to asbestos with benign disease from those with pleural mesothelioma. Administration of streptokinase in patients with empyema does not need for surgical drainage, length of hospital stay, or mortality as compared to conventional treatment with chest tube drainage and intravenous antibiotics. Silver nitrate may be an alternative agent to talc for producing pleurodesis. Routine use of graded talc (50% particles greater than 25 microns) is recommended to reduce the morbidity associated with talc pleurodesis. Study design does not permit us to conclude that aspiration of spontaneous pneumothorax is as effective as chest tube drainage. Pleural catheter may prove to be an important palliative modality in treating debilitated patients or patients with trapped lung who show symptomatic improvement with drainage; however, at the present time, these catheters cannot be considered a first line treatment option for patients with malignant pleural effusion. One of the studies reviewed showed no significant difference in tract metastasis in patients with malignant mesothelioma

  3. High extracellular levels of potassium and trace metals in human brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, Daniel; Ivanovic, Jugoslav; Mariussen, Espen; Hassel, Bjørnar

    2015-03-01

    Brain abscesses frequently cause symptoms such as seizures, delirium, paresis and sensory deficits that could reflect brain edema, increased intracranial pressure, or tissue destruction. However, it is also possible that pus constituents could disturb neuronal function in the surrounding brain tissue. In pus from 16 human brain abscesses, extracellular potassium ([K(+)]o) was 10.6 ± 4.8 mmol/L (mean ± SD; maximum value 22.0 mmol/L). In cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), [K(+)]o was 2.7 ± 0.6 mmol/L (N = 14; difference from pus p < 0.001), which is similar to previous control values for [K(+)]o in CSF and brain parenchyma. Zinc and iron were >40-fold higher in pus than in CSF; calcium, copper, manganese, and chromium were also higher, whereas sodium and magnesium were similar. Pus from 10 extracerebral abscesses (empyemas) also had higher [K(+)]o, zinc, iron, calcium, copper, manganese, and chromium than did CSF. Brain abscess [K(+)]o was significantly higher than serum potassium (3.8 ± 0.5 mmol/L; p = 0.0001), indicating that the elevated abscess [K(+)]o originated from damaged cells (e.g. brain cells and leukocytes), not from serum. High [K(+)]o could depolarize neurons, high levels of zinc could inhibit glutamate and GABA receptors, and high levels of iron and copper could cause oxidative damage, all of which could contribute to neuronal dysfunction in brain abscess patients. PMID:25684071

  4. Neurological Complications after Neonatal Bacteremia: The Clinical Characteristics, Risk Factors, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Shih-Ming; Hsu, Jen-Fu; Lee, Chiang-Wen; Lien, Reyin; Huang, Hsuan-Rong; Chiang, Ming-Chou; Fu, Ren-Huei; Tsai, Ming-Horng

    2014-01-01

    Background Neonates with bacteremia are at risk of neurologic complications. Relevant information warrants further elucidation. Study Design This was a retrospective cohort study of neonates with bacteremia-related neurologic complications (BNCs) in a tertiary-level neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). A systemic chart review was performed conducted to identify clinical characteristics and outcomes. A cohort of related conditions was constructed as the control group. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent risk factors for BNC. Results Of 1037 bacteremia episodes, 36 (3.5%) had BNCs. Twenty-four cases of BNCs were related to meningitis, five were presumed meningitis, and seven occurred after septic shock. The most common causative pathogens were Group B streptococcus (41.7%) and E. coli (16.7%). The major BNCs consisted of seizures (28), hydrocephalus (20), encephalomalacia (11), cerebral infarction (7), subdural empyema (6), ventriculitis (8), and abscess (4). Eight (22.8%) neonates died and six (16.7%) were discharged in critical condition when the family withdrew life-sustaining treatment. Among the 22 survivors, eight had neurologic sequelae upon discharge. After multivariate logistic regression analysis, neonates with meningitis caused by Group B streptococcus (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 8.90, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.20–36.08; p = 0.002) and combined meningitis and septic shock (OR, 5.94; 95% CI: 1.53–23.15; p = 0.010) were independently associated with BNCs. Conclusions Neonates with bacteremia-related neurologic complications are associated with adverse outcomes or sequelae. Better strategies aimed at early detection and reducing the emergence of neurologic complications and aggressive treatment of Group B streptococcus sepsis are needed in neonates with meningitis and septic shock. PMID:25364821

  5. [Suppurative intracranial infections in Africa].

    PubMed

    Loembe, P M; Okome-Kouakou, M; Alliez, B

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review recent African literature on suppurative intracranial infection and its implications for neurosurgery. In order of decreasing frequency the main lesions are brain abscess, subdural empyema, and epidural abscess. Despite progress in diagnostic imaging and availability of antibiotic therapy, these lesions still cause disturbingly high morbidity and mortality especially in sub-Saharan Africa where diagnosis is often delayed. The male-to-female ratio was 3.6:1 and 70 to 80% of patients were under the age of 20 years. Spread from the paranasal sinus or ear was the most common mechanism of infection. Hematogenous processes accounted for 22% of cases and the origin was undetermined in 11% to 26% of cases. Staphylococcus aureus and enteric gram-negative bacilli were the most common bacteria identified but cultures were reported as sterile in 30% to 50% of cases. While ultrasonography can be useful in newborns with an open fontanelle, arteriography is often the only feasible procedure for diagnosis in Black Africa. The diagnostic modality of choice is computed tomography which allows precise mapping prior to neurosurgery. Introduction of computed tomography in some African cities has led to a decrease in mortality ranging from 4.7% to 43%. The most effective treatment is a combination of appropriate antimicrobial therapy and surgical decompression of expanding lesions. The main procedures are aspiration through burr holes and craniotomy. Use of this combined strategy requires close cooperation between the neurosurgeon, infectious disease specialist, and microbiologist. Therapeutic indications are discussed within the context of Black Africa. PMID:9304016

  6. Phytochemical Analysis on Quantification and the Inhibitory Effects on Inflammatory Responses from the Fruit of Xanthii fructus

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Sae-Rom; Seo, Chang-Seob; Lee, Na-Ri; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo; Jeong, Soo-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Xanthii fructus (Compositae) is a traditional herbal medicine used for treating headache, toothache, pruritus, empyema, and rhinitis. In this study of the quality control of X. fructus, we performed simultaneous analysis of nine marker compounds: Protocatechuic acid (1), chlorogenic acid (2), caffeic acid (3), 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (4), ferulic acid (5), 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (6), 1,3-dicaffeoylquinic acid (7), 1,4-dicaffeoylquinic acid (8), and 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (9). Materials and Methods: Nine components were separated using reversed-phase SunFire™ C18 analytical column and analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography. We examined the biological effects of the nine marker compounds by determining their anti-inflammatory activities in the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Results: Among the nine marker compounds, eight significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) production. 1, 3, 5 had significant inhibitory effects on LPS-induced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in RAW 264.7 cells. None of the tested marker compounds had a significant effect on interleukin-6 production in LPS-treated RAW 264.7 cells. Our data demonstrated that each marker compound from X. fructus exerts anti-inflammatory activity by targeting different inflammation-related pathways such as the TNF-α or PGE2 pathway. Conclusion: Further experiments using in vitro and in vivo models are needed to identify the mechanisms responsible for the anti-inflammatory properties of each marker compound. SUMMARY Simultaneous analysis of nine phenylpropanoids in the Xanthii fructus was established using HPLC-PDA system.1,4-dicaffeoylquinic acid significantly inhibited LPS-stimulated TNF-a production.Protocatechuic acid, caffeic acid and ferulic acid had significant inhibitory effects on LPS-induced PGE2 production in RAW 264.7 cells. PMID:27013799

  7. Rapid and Sensitive Identification of Bacterial Infection and Bacteria Gram Types in Pleural Fluid of Children

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi-Dong; Li, Wei; Gao, Hui-Hui; Shang, Shi-Qiang; Du, Li-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) techniques have been increasingly used to detect microbial DNA in clinic for the diagnosis of bacterial infection. This study aims to developing an RT-PCR method to detect bacteria in pleural fluid (PF). We performed a method to simultaneously detect and classify the clinically relevant bacterial pathogens in hydrothorax with Gram probe RT-PCR (GRT-PCR), which targets the conserved region of the 16S rRNA gene. Our results showed this method could specifically and correctly identify 14 clinically important bacterial strains in hydrothorax including 7 gram-positive and 7 gram-negative bacteria. And the sensitivity of this GRT-PCR method in serial dilution can reach 10 CFU/mL. In clinical trial, 180 PF samples from children who were clinically suspected to suffer from bacterial pneumonia and empyema were collected. These samples were detected by GRT-PCR, standard culture, and biochemical routine analysis. The positive rate of the GRT-PCR array was 17.78% (32/180), significantly higher than that of PF culture (11.67%; 21/180; P = .003). When PF culture was used as control, the sensitivity of GRT-PCR was 95.24% (95% confidence interval = 74.13-99.75), and the specificity was 92.45% (95% confidence interval = 86.89-95.86). Our study showed that GRT-PCR is a more effective method for rapid, sensitive, and specific diagnosis of bacterial infection in hydrothorax compared with other traditional methods. PMID:27335942

  8. The Forgotten One: Lemierre’s Syndrome Due to Gram-Negative Rods Prevotella Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Priyanka; Antony, Nishaal; Wardi, Miraie; Rodriguez-Castro, Carlos E.; Teleb, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 22 Final Diagnosis: Lemierre’s syndrome Symptoms: Dyspnea • chest pain • swelling Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Thoracentesis Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Lemierre’s syndrome (LS) is a rare syndrome caused by an acute oropharyngeal infection with metastatic spreading. It was described in 1939 as jugular vein septic thrombophlebitis associated with retropharyngeal infection. Different organisms can cause LS, such as Fusobacterium species, Peptostreptococcus, group B and C, Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and Enterococcus species, but the most commonly isolated pathogen is Fusobacterium necrophorum, a common oral flora. Management depends on the initial presentation, type of pathogen isolated, and proper selection of antibiotics. Case Report: We report a case of a 22-year-old man with no past medical history, who presented with left jaw pain and progressive left facial area swelling associated with dyspnea. A final diagnosis of LS was made based on criteria of computed tomography (CT) of the neck and the clinical symptoms. The patient was started on broad-spectrum antibiotics. Subsequent imaging of the chest showed pleural effusion with septic emboli. He underwent thoracentesis and chest tube placement. Final blood cultures were remarkable for gram-negative rods – Prevotella anaerobes – which supported the diagnosis of LS. His condition improved, including the dyspnea, and he was discharged on the proper antibiotics coverage with outpatient follow-up. Conclusions: LS is a rare condition associated with metastatic infection spreading. This syndrome can be associated with further complications, such as pleural effusions and/or empyemas. Early recognition is important to prevent fatal complications and provide adequate antibiotics coverage. We report only the third case in the medical literature of Prevotella-induced LS with a secondary complication of pleural effusion

  9. Clinical characteristics and outcome of complicated pneumococcal pneumonia in a pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Isaiah D; Knoll, Sharon; Picard, Eli; Villa, Yael; Shoseyov, David; Engelhard, Dan; Kerem, Eitan

    2006-08-01

    The incidence of complicated pneumonia caused by S. pneumoniae is reported to be increasing. This increase may be related to host susceptibility and/or pathogen virulence. The objective of this study was to evaluate clinical and laboratory characteristics associated with complicated pneumococcal pneumonia, and to identify risk factors associated with prolonged fever and hospitalization. The study involved reviewing the records of all children who were hospitalized in four major hospitals in Jerusalem with a confirmed diagnosis of pneumococcal pneumonia during a 12-year period (1986-1997). Demographic, clinical, laboratory, and outcome variables were compared between those with uncomplicated and complicated pneumonia. One hundred and eleven children (median age, 2.2 years) were hospitalized with pneumococcal pneumonia during the study period. Forty-four (39%) of them had complicated pneumonia, characterized by pleural effusion, empyema, pneumothorax, pneumatocele, and/or atelectasis. There was no correlation between the isolation of penicillin-resistant S. pneumonia (16% of cases) and complicated pneumonia. Factors that were significantly associated with complicated pneumonia included weight

  10. Spinal Subdural Abscess Following Laminectomy for Symptomatic Stenosis: A Report of 2 Cases and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alexander D; Rolston, John D; Gauger, Grant E; Larson, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Spinal subdural abscesses, also known as empyemas, are rare infectious lesions, the exact incidence of which is unknown. Presentation is typically dramatic, with back pain, fever, motor, and sensory deficits. Rapid identification and surgical intervention with laminectomy, durotomy, and washout provides the best outcomes. While hematogenous spread of an extra-spinal infection is the most common cause of this condition, a significant number of cases result from iatrogenic mechanisms, including lumbar punctures, epidural injections, and surgery. CASE REPORT Here we present 2 cases: 1) an 87-year-old man with type 2 diabetes, schizophrenia, mild cognitive impairment, and symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis and 2) a 62-year-old man with a prior L3-4 spinal fusion with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. In both cases, patients underwent laminectomy for spinal stenosis and developed epidural abscess. Following successful drainage of the epidural abscess, they continued to be symptomatic, and repeat imaging revealed the presence of a subdural abscess that was subsequently evacuated. Case 1 had significant improvement with residual lower-extremity weakness, while Case 2 made a complete neurological recovery. CONCLUSIONS These cases illustrate patients at increased risk for developing this rare spinal infection, and demonstrate that rapid recognition and surgical treatment is key to cure and recovery. Review of the literature highlights pertinent risk factors and demonstrates nearly one-third of reported cases have an iatrogenic etiology. The cases presented here demonstrate that a subdural process should be suspected in any patient with intractable pain following treatment of an epidural abscess. PMID:27402228

  11. A 10 years audit of cardiothoracic referrals from a pulmonology service in a developing country: impact of patient human immunodeficiency virus status

    PubMed Central

    Nyale, George Mwamnemo; Anderson, Ronald; Patel, Atulkumar Ramanlal

    2016-01-01

    Background There are few studies that have documented the clinical presentation, complication rate and outcome of cardiothoracic referrals from a Pulmonology Service, particularly in developing countries. Furthermore, the impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status on such referrals and their outcomes is not well documented. Methods This was a retrospective audit of combined pulmonologist/cardiothoracic consultations, undertaken among the tertiary academic hospitals attached to the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa, over a 10 years period (2001–2010) in order to document the clinical features of these referrals and to determine any impact of HIV status on trends in disease presentations, complications and outcome. Results A total of 847 patients were evaluated on whom a variety of surgical procedures was performed, 50.4% being therapeutic, 32.8% diagnostic and 16.9% both therapeutic and diagnostic. HIV status was known in 488 cases. Of these 229 (46.9%) were HIV-seropositive and 259 (53.1%) -seronegative. The main reasons for referral were for infective conditions, including tuberculosis (TB), pleural disease/effusion/empyema, and other bacterial infections, with significantly more of the TB patients being HIV-seropositive (P<0.0001).There was a trend for increasing presentations for TB and pleural conditions, particularly during the last 4–5 years of the audit, coinciding with an increase in the numbers of HIV-positive referrals. HIV status had no impact on the frequency of surgical complications or mortality. Conclusions The audit indicates an increasing referral rate of HIV-seropositive patients to cardiothoracic services in Johannesburg, particularly in association with TB and pleural diseases. However with careful cardiothoracic/pulmonologist evaluation of the cases the frequency of complications and mortality appear to be no different from that of HIV-seronegative cases. PMID:27162782

  12. [A case of cerebral abscess due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus which is treated with linezolid + rifampin combination].

    PubMed

    Sipahi, Oğuz Reşat; Cağıran, Inanç; Yurtseven, Taşkın; Işıkgöz Taşbakan, Meltem; Arda, Bilgin; Tünger, Alper; Ulusoy, Sercan

    2010-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a rare cause of cerebral abscesses, however it is a relatively more common etiologic agent in post-neurosurgical abscesses and the main antibacterial therapy option is vancomycin. In this report, a case of brain abscess due to MRSA which did not respond neither to moxifloxacin + vancomycin nor vancomycin + rifampin combination therapies, and merely treated by linezolid + rifampin combination, has been presented. Fifty-one years old female patient who was operated 40 days ago for subarachnoid bleeding and aneurysm in middle cerebral artery bifurcation, was hospitalized due to purulent leakage from the operation area. She did not have fever and her physical examination, including the neurologic system, was normal. Computerized tomography revealed an approximately 1 cm lesion compatible with subdural empyema and cerebral abscess in the right frontoparietal area in supratentorial sections. The patient was operated for wound revision and moxifloxacin was initiated. Since the operation materials revealed MRSA growth, vancomycin (4 x 500 mg, IV) was added to the treatment. The isolate was identified by conventional methods, and antibiotic susceptibility test performed by disk diffusion method showed that it was susceptible to levofloxacin, linezolid, rifampin, vancomycin and teicoplanin. Since no clinical response was obtained in two weeks, moxifloxacin was switched to rifampin (300 mg 1 x 2). On the 10th day of vancomycin + rifampin therapy, radiological findings showed development of cerebritis and therefore vancomycin was changed with linezolid (2 x 600 mg, IV). The control CT of the patient revealed regression of the brain lesion and linezolid + rifampin treatment continued for six weeks. The patient did not develop any hematological, liver or renal toxicity during the therapy and the radiological findings regressed. No relapse were detected in the one year follow-up period. This case suggested that linezolid might

  13. A long-term study assessing the factors influencing survival and morbidity in the surgical management of bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although the prevalence of bronchiectasis decreased significantly in developed countries, in less developed and in developing countries, it still represents a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this retrospective study is to present our surgical experiences, the morbidity and mortality rates and outcome of surgical treatment for bronchiectasis. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 129 patients who underwent surgical resection for bronchiectasis between April 2002 and April 2010, at Van Training and Research Hospital, Thoracic Surgery Department. Variables of age, sex, symptoms, etiology, and surgical procedures, mortality, morbidity and the result of surgical therapy were analyzed retrospectively. Results Mean age was 21.8 year (the eldest was 67 year, the youngest was 4 years-old). Male/female ratio was 1.86 and 75% of all patients were young population under the age of 40. Bilateral involvement was 14.7%, left/right side ratio according to localization was 2.1/1. The most common reason for bronchiectasis was recurrent infection. Surgical indications were as follows: recurrent infection (54%), hemoptysis (35%), empyema (6%), and lung abscess (5%). There was no operative mortality. Complications occurred in 29 patients and the morbidity rate was 22.4%. Complete resection was achieved in 110 (85.2%) patients. Follow-up data were obtained for 123 (95%) of the patients. One patient died during follow-up. The mean follow-up of this patient was 9 months. Mean postoperative hospitalization time was 9.15 ± 6.25 days. Significantly better results were obtained in patients who had undergone a complete resection. Conclusions Surgical treatment of bronchiectasis can be performed with acceptable morbidity and mortality at any age. The involved bronchiectatic sites should be resected completely for the optimum control of symptoms. PMID:22152759

  14. Community-associated Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia among Greek children: epidemiology, molecular characteristics, treatment, and outcome.

    PubMed

    Doudoulakakis, A G; Bouras, D; Drougka, E; Kazantzi, M; Michos, A; Charisiadou, A; Spiliopoulou, I; Lebessi, E; Tsolia, M

    2016-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an infrequent cause of community-associated (CA-SA) pneumonia in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical, epidemiological, microbiological, and molecular characteristics of CA-SA pneumonia among children hospitalized in two large tertiary care referral centers during an 8-year period. Cases of CA-SA pneumonia admitted between 2007 and 2014 were retrospectively examined through medical record review. Molecular investigation was performed for available strains; mecA, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) (lukS-lukF-PV), and fibronectin binding protein A (fnbA) genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Clones were assigned by agr groups, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), SCCmec, and multilocus sequencing typing (MLST). In total, 41 cases were recorded (boys, 61 %), with a median age of 4.3 months (range, 1-175). Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) accounted for 31 cases (75.6 %). Complications included empyema (25/41, 61 %), pneumatoceles (7/41, 17 %), and lung abscess (1/41, 2.5 %). Intensive care unit (ICU) admission was required in 58.5 %. Two deaths occurred (4.9 %). Definitive therapy was based on vancomycin with or without other antibiotics (55.9 %), followed by clindamycin and linezolid (26.5 % each). All isolates were susceptible to vancomycin (MIC90 2 mg/L, range 1-2), teicoplanin, and linezolid, whereas 26.8 % were resistant to clindamycin. Among the 25 studied strains, 20 were mecA-positive (MRSA), carrying also the fnbA gene. Of these, 90 % belonged to the ST80-IV/agr3/PVL-positive clone. Methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) strains showed polyclonality, 3/5 were PVL-positive, and 3/5 were fnbA-positive. MRSA and particularly the ST80-IV clone predominated among staphylococcal pneumonia cases in children. Treatment provided was effective in all but two patients, despite the relatively high minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of vancomycin and a high resistance to

  15. Efficacy and Safety of Procalcitonin-Guided Antibiotic Therapy in Lower Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Drozdov, Daniel; Dusemund, Frank; Müller, Beat; Albrich, Werner C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In 14 randomized controlled studies to date, a procalcitonin (PCT)-based algorithm has been proven to markedly reduce the use of antibiotics along with an unimpaired high safety and low complication rates in patients with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). However, compliance with the algorithm and safety out of controlled study conditions has not yet been sufficiently investigated. Methods: We performed a prospective international multicenter observational post-study surveillance of consecutive adults with community-acquired LRTI in 14 centers (Switzerland (n = 10), France (n = 3) and the United States (n = 1)). Results: Between September 2009 and November 2010, 1,759 patients were enrolled (median age 71; female sex 44.4%). 1,520 (86.4%) patients had a final diagnosis of LRTI (community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), 53.7%; acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD), 17.1%; and acute bronchitis, 14.4%). Compliance with the PCT-guided therapy (overall 68.2%) was highest in patients with bronchitis (81.0% vs. AECOPD, 70.1%; CAP, 63.7%; p < 0.001), outpatients (86.1% vs. inpatients, 65.9%; p < 0.001) and algorithm-experienced centers (82.5% vs. algorithm-naive, 60.1%; p < 0.001) and showed significant geographical differences. The initial decision about the antibiotic therapy was based on PCT value in 72.4%. In another 8.6% of patients, antibiotics were administered despite low PCT values but according to predefined criteria. Thus, the algorithm was followed in 81.0% of patients. In a multivariable Cox hazard ratio model, longer antibiotic therapy duration was associated with algorithm-non-compliance, country, hospitalization, CAP vs. bronchitis, renal failure and algorithm-naïvety of the study center. In a multivariable logistic regression complications (death, empyema, ICU treatment, mechanical ventilation, relapse, and antibiotic-associated side effects) were significantly associated with increasing CURB65-Score, CAP vs

  16. Proteomic Analyses of Chlorhexidine Tolerance Mechanisms in Delftia acidovorans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Rema, Tara; Medihala, Prabhakara; Lawrence, John R.; Vidovic, Sinisa; Leppard, Gary G.; Reid, Marcia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Protein expression and fatty acid profiles of biofilm cells of chlorhexidine-tolerant Delftia acidovorans (MIC = 15 µg/ml) and its chlorhexidine-susceptible mutant (MIC = 1 µg/ml) were investigated. The chlorhexidine-susceptible mutant (MT51) was derived from the parental strain (WT15) using Tn5 transposon mutagenesis. The disrupted gene was identified as tolQ, a component of the tolQRAB gene cluster known to be involved in outer membrane stability. Proteomic responses of biofilm cells were compared by differential in-gel electrophoresis following exposure to chlorhexidine at sub-MIC (10 µg/ml) and above-MIC (30 µg/ml) concentrations. Numerous changes in protein abundance were observed in biofilm cells following chlorhexidine exposure, suggesting that molecular changes occurred during adaptation to chlorhexidine. Forty proteins showing significant differences (≥1.5-fold; P < 0.05) were identified by mass spectrometry and were associated with various functions, including amino acid and lipid biosynthesis, protein translation, energy metabolism, and stress-related functions (e.g., GroEL, aspartyl/glutamyl-tRNA amidotransferase, elongation factor Tu, Clp protease, and hydroxymyristoyl-ACP dehydratase). Several proteins involved in fatty acid synthesis were affected by chlorhexidine, in agreement with fatty acid analysis, wherein chlorhexidine-induced shifts in the fatty acid profile were observed in the chlorhexidine-tolerant cells, primarily the cyclic fatty acids. Transmission electron microscopy revealed more prominent changes in the cell envelope of chlorhexidine-susceptible MT51 cells. This study suggests that multiple mechanisms involving both the cell envelope (and likely TolQ) and panmetabolic regulation play roles in chlorhexidine tolerance in D. acidovorans. IMPORTANCE Delftia acidovorans has been associated with a number of serious infections, including bacteremia, empyema, bacterial endocarditis, and ocular and urinary tract infections

  17. Therapeutic strategies for complications secondary to hydatid cyst rupture

    PubMed Central

    Cobanoglu, Ufuk; Sayır, Fuat; Şehitoğlu, Abidin; Bilici, Salim; Melek, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Clinical approach and therapeutic methods are important in cases with complicated hydatid cysts of the lung. This study was designed to retrospectively investigate cases with hydatid cysts, thereby discussing diagnostic methods, treatment modalities, and rates of morbidity and mortality in line with the literature. Methods: 176 cases with perforated hydatid cysts, who presented to our clinic and underwent surgery between 2003 and 2011, were included in the study. There were 71 (40.34%) females and 105 males (59.66%) with a mean age of 27.80±14.07. The most common symptom was dyspnea (44.31%) and the most common radiological finding was the water lily sign (21.02%). 88.06% of the cases were surgically treated by Cystotomy+closure of bronchial opening+ capitonnage, 3.97% by wedge resection, 4.54% by segmentectomy and 3.40% by lobectomy. Results: The cysts exhibited multiple localization in 24 cases (13.63%), bilateral localization in 14 cases (7.95%), with the most common localization (43.75%) being the right lower lobe. While the hydatid cyst rupture occurred due to delivery in three (1.70%), trauma in 11 (6.25%), and iatrogenic causes in seven (3.97%) cases, it occurred spontaneously in the rest of the cases (88.08%). Fourteen of the cases with spontaneously occurring rupture (7.95%) were detected to have received anthelmintic treatment for hydatid cyst during the preoperative period (albendazole). The rate of morbidity was 27.27% and the rate of mortality was 1.13% in our study. Two cases recurred during a one-year follow-up (1.13%). Conclusion: Hydatid cyst rupture should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cases with pleural effusion, empyema, pneumothorax and pneumonia occurring in endemic regions. Symptoms occurring during and after perforation lead to errors in differential diagnosis. Performing the surgery without delay favorably affects postoperative morbidity and mortality. While parenchyma-preserving surgery is preferential, there

  18. US Pneumonia Hospitalizations, a Decade of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Use

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Marie R.; Zhu, Yuwei; Moore, Matthew R.; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Grijalva, Carlos G.

    2016-01-01

    Background The introduction of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) into the US childhood immunization schedule in 2000 has substantially reduced vaccine-serotype invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in both young children and unvaccinated older children and adults. All-cause pneumonia hospitalizations also markedly declined in young children by 2004. Because of concern about increases in disease caused by non-vaccine serotypes, we assessed whether the pneumonia reduction in young children was sustained through 2009 and whether pneumonia hospitalizations in older age groups also declined. Methods Annual all-cause pneumonia hospitalization rates were estimated using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Pneumonia hospitalizations were defined by pneumonia listed first or listed in another position if sepsis, meningitis or empyema was the first listed diagnosis. Average annual rates in pre-PCV7 (1997–1999) and late PCV7 years (2007–2009) were used to estimate annual declines in pneumonia hospitalizations. Results Annual pneumonia hospitalization rates declined by 551.1 (95% confidence interval 445.1–657.1) per 100,000 children aged <2 years, translating to 47,172 fewer hospitalizations annually compared to expected based on pre-PCV7 rates. The decline of 1300.8 (984.0–1617.6) pneumonia hospitalizations per 100,000 adults aged ≥85 years translated to 73,243 fewer hospitalizations annually. Pneumonia hospitalizations declined by 8.4 (0.6–16.2), 85.3 (7.0–163.6), and 359.8 (199.6–520.0) per 100,000 adults aged 18–39, 65–74 and 75–84 years, respectively. Overall, we estimated an age-adjusted annual reduction of 54.8 (41.1–68.5) per 100,000 or 168,182 fewer pneumonia hospitalizations annually. Conclusions Declines in childhood pneumonia were sustained during the decade since PCV7 introduction. Substantial reductions in pneumonia hospitalizations in adults were also observed. PMID:23841730

  19. Enteral versus parenteral feeding. Effects on septic morbidity after blunt and penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Kudsk, K A; Croce, M A; Fabian, T C; Minard, G; Tolley, E A; Poret, H A; Kuhl, M R; Brown, R O

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the importance of route of nutrient administration on septic complications after blunt and penetrating trauma, 98 patients with an abdominal trauma index of at least 15 were randomized to either enteral or parenteral feeding within 24 hours of injury. Septic morbidity was defined as pneumonia, intra-abdominal abscess, empyema, line sepsis, or fasciitis with wound dehiscence. Patients were fed formulas with almost identical amounts of fat, carbohydrate, and protein. Two patients died early in the study. The enteral group sustained significantly fewer pneumonias (11.8% versus total parenteral nutrition 31.%, p less than 0.02), intra-abdominal abscess (1.9% versus total parenteral nutrition 13.3%, p less than 0.04), and line sepsis (1.9% versus total parenteral nutrition 13.3%, p less than 0.04), and sustained significantly fewer infections per patient (p less than 0.03), as well as significantly fewer infections per infected patient (p less than 0.05). Although there were no differences in infection rates in patients with injury severity score less than 20 or abdominal trauma index less than or equal to 24, there were significantly fewer infections in patients with an injury severity score greater than 20 (p less than 0.002) and abdominal trauma index greater than 24 (p less than 0.005). Enteral feeding produced significantly fewer infections in the penetrating group (p less than 0.05) and barely missed the statistical significance in the blunt-injured patients (p = 0.08). In the subpopulation of patients requiring more than 20 units of blood, sustaining an abdominal trauma index greater than 40 or requiring reoperation within 72 hours, there were significantly fewer infections per patient (p = 0.03) and significantly fewer infections per infected patient (p less than 0.01). There is a significantly lower incidence of septic morbidity in patients fed enterally after blunt and penetrating trauma, with most of the significant changes occurring in the

  20. Anæsthesia in Chest Surgery, with Special Reference to Controlled Respiration and Cyclopropane

    PubMed Central

    Nosworthy, M. D.

    1941-01-01

    's modification of Frenkner's spiropulsator or by hand. Active respiration will cease (i) if the patient's CO2 is lowered sufficiently by hyperventilation, (ii) if the patient's respiratory centre is depressed sufficiently by sedative and anæsthetic drugs, and (iii) by a combination of (i) and (ii) of less degree. The author uses the second method, depressing the respiratory centre with omnoponscopolamine, pentothal sodium, and then cycloprȯpane. The CO2 absorption method is essential for this technique, and this and controlled respiration should be mastered by the anæsthetist with a familiar agent and used at first only in uncomplicated cases. The significance of cardiac arrhythmias occuring with cyclopropane is discussed. The place of the other available anæsthetic agents is discussed particularly on the advisability of using local anæsthesia for the drainage of empyema or lung abscess. Pharyngeal airway or endotracheal tube? Anæsthesia may be maintained with a pharyngeal airway in many cases but intubation must be used when tracheobronchial suction may be necessary and when there may be difficulty in maintaining an unobstructed airway. A one-lung anæsthesia is ideal for pneumonectomy. This may be obtained by endotracheal anæsthesia after bronchial tamponage of the affected side (Crafoord, v. fig. 6b) or by an endobronchial intubation of the sound side (v. figs. 9b and 9c). Endobronchial placing of the breathing tube may be performed “blind”. Before deciding on blind bronchial intubation, the anæsthetist must examine X-ray films for any abnormality deviating the trachea or bronchi. Though the right bronchus may be easily intubated blindly as a rule, there is the risk of occluding the orifice of the upper lobe bronchus (fig. 9d) when the patient will become cyanosed. If the tube bevel is facing its orifice the risk of occlusion will be decreased (fig. 9c). Greater accuracy in placing the tube can be effected by inserting it under direct vision. Instruments for

  1. [A 56-year-old man with fever, backache and tetraparesis].

    PubMed

    Hattori, T; Kitada, T; Suzuki, H; Imai, H; Mizuno, Y

    1996-02-01

    in all four limbs; manual muscle testing revealed 1 to 2/5 weakness in both upper and lower extremities bilaterally. Muscle stretch reflexes were decreased or lost in both upper and lower limbs, but the plantar response was extensor on the right. Sensation appeared to be diminished in legs, but detail was not clear because of disturbance of consciousness. Pertinent laboratory findings were as follows: WBC 12,800/microliter, GPT 58 IU/l, total bilirubin 2.65 mg/dl, and CRP 16.8 mg/dl. Cerebrospinal fluid contained 34 cells/microliter (approximately two thirds were neutrophils), RBC 1,110/microliter, 2,949 mg/dl of protein, and 119 mg/dl of glucose; stapylococcus aureus was cultured from the CSF. Myelogram showed a filling defect in the anterior epidural space between the low thoracic and the upper lumbar region. The patient was treated with cephotaxim, aminobenzyl penicillin, and chloramphenicol. On the second hospital day, his BT was still 39 degrees C and he was agitated His weakness was worse than the previous day. Spinal MRI was attempted; as he was agitated 5 mg of diazepam was given intravenously at 4 PM. His respiration was rapid and somewhat shallow. At 6 PM, gadolinium DTPA was injected intravenously; at that time, he was breathing and pupils were 3 mm on both sides. At 6:35 PM, an examiner noted that he stopped breathing; the left pupil was dilated to 5 mm. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was initiated immediately, and intubation was performed. He was placed on a respirator. His blood pressure did not reach 100 mmHg; he was in deep coma. Cardiac arrest occurred at 8:53 AM on the next morning. The patient was discussed in a neurological CPC. Most of the participants thought that the patient had either spinal epidural empyema or spinal subdural abscess. The question was what might be the original focus of infection. Three possibilities were considered, i.e., stellate ganglion block, teeth infection, and osteomyelitis... PMID:8962786