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Sample records for emulsified zero-valent iron

  1. Application of Emulsified Zero-Valent Iron to Marine Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Kathleen B.; Quinn, Jacqueline W.; Clausen, Christian A.; Geiger, Cherie L.

    2005-01-01

    Contamination of marine waters and sediments with heavy metals and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) including chlorinated solvents, pesticides and PCBs pose ecological and human health risks through the contaminant's potential bioaccumulation in fish, shellfish and avian populations. The contaminants enter marine environments through improper disposal techniques and storm water run-off. Current remediation technologies for application to marine environments include costly dredging and off-site treatment of the contaminated media. Emulsified zero-valent iron (EZVI) has been proven to effectively degrade dissolved-phase and DNAPL-phase contaminants in freshwater environments on both the laboratory and field-scale level. However, the application to marine environments is only just being explored. This paper discusses the potential use of EZVI in brackish and saltwater environments, with supporting laboratory data detailed. Laboratory studies were performed in 2005 to establish the effectiveness of EZVI to degrade trichloroethylene (TCE) in saltwater. Headspace vials were setup to determine the kinetic rate of TCE degradation using EZVI in seawater. The reaction vials were analyzed by Gas Chromatographic/Flame Ionization Detection (GC/FID) for ethene production after a 48 day period using a GC/FID Purge and Trap system. Analytical results showed that EZVI was very effective at degrading TCE. The reaction by-products (ethene, acetylene and ethane) were produced at 71% of the rate in seawater as in the fresh water controls. Additionally, iron within the EZVI particles was protected from oxidation of the corrosive seawater, allowing EZVI to perform in an environment where zero-valent iron alone could not compete. Laboratory studies were also performed to establish the effectiveness of emulsified zero-valent metal (EZVM) to remove dissolved-phase cadmium and lead found in seawater. EZVM is comprised of a combination of magnesium and iron metal surrounded by the same oil/surfactant membrane used in EZVI. The removal of cadmium and lead from a seawater matrix is a unique challenge. It requires a system that is resistant to the corrosive nature of seawater while removing specific ions that are in a relatively low concentration compared to naturally occurring seawater salts. Laboratory studies conducted show greater than 99% removal of lead and 96% removal of cadmium from a seawater solution spiked at 5 mg/L that was treated with an Emulsified Zero-Valent Metal (EZVM). The cadmium and lead are removed from the solution as they transport across the emulsion membrane and plate out onto the zero-valent metal surface.

  2. Application of Emulsified Zero-Valent Iron to Marine Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Jacqueline W.; Brooks, Kathleen B.; Geiger, Cherie L.; Clausen, Christian A.; Milum, Kristen M.

    2006-01-01

    Contamination of marine waters and sediments with heavy metals and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) including chlorinated solvents, pesticides and PCBs pose ecological and human health risks through the potential of the contaminant to bioaccumulate in fish, shellfish and avian populations. The contaminants enter marine environments through improper disposal techniques and storm water runoff. Current remediation technologies for application to marine environments include costly dredging and off-site treatment of the contaminated media. Emulsified zero-valent iron (EZVI) has been proven to effectively degrade dissolved-phase and DNAPL-phase contaminants in freshwater environments on both the laboratory and field-scale level. Emulsified Zero-Valent Metal (EZVM) using metals such as iron and/or magnesium have been shown in the laboratory and on the bench scale to be effective at removing metals contamination in freshwater environments. The application to marine environments, however, is only just being explored. This paper discusses. the potential use of EZVI or EZVM in brackish and saltwater environments, with supporting laboratory data detailing its effectiveness on trichloroethylene, lead, copper, nickel and cadmium.

  3. FIELD EVALUATION OF THE TREATMENT OF DNAPL USING EMULSIFIED ZERO-VALENT IRON (BATTELLE PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot scale field demonstration of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) treatment using emulsified zero-valent iron (EZVI) is being conducted at Parris Island Marine Corps Recruit Depot (MCRD), Parris Island SC. The EZVI technology was developed at the University of Central ...

  4. FIELD EVALUATION OF THE TREATMENT OF DNAPL USING EMULSIFIED ZERO-VALENT IRON (Battelle Conference)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot scale field demonstration of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) treatment using emulsified zero-valent iron (EZVI) was conducted at Parris Island Marine Corps Recruit Depot (MCRD), Parris Island, SC. The EZVI technology was developed at the University of Central Fl...

  5. FIELD EVALUATION OF THE TREATMENT OF DNAPL USING EMULSIFIED ZERO-VALENT IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot scale field demonstration of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) treatment using emulsified zero-valent iron (EZVI) is being conducted at Parris Island Marine Corps Recruit Depot (MCRD), Parris Island SC. The demonstration is being conducted by Geosyntec, the Nationa...

  6. FIELD EVALUATION OF THE TREATMENT OF DNAPL USING EMULSIFIED ZERO-VALENT IRON (DNAPL CONFERENCE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot scale field demonstration of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) treatment using emulsified zero-valent iron (EZVI) is being conducted at Parris Island Marine Corps Recruit Depot (MCRD), Parris Island SC. The demonstration is being conducted by Geosyntec, the Nationa...

  7. Field demonstration of DNAPL dehalogenation using emulsified zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Jacqueline; Geiger, Cherie; Clausen, Chris; Brooks, Kathleen; Coon, Christina; O'Hara, Suzanne; Krug, Thomas; Major, David; Yoon, Woong-Sang; Gavaskar, Arun; Holdsworth, Thomas

    2005-03-01

    This paper describes the results of the first field-scale demonstration conducted to evaluate the performance of nanoscale emulsified zero-valent iron (EZVI) injected into the saturated zone to enhance in situ dehalogenation of dense, nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) containing trichloroethene (TCE). EZVI is an innovative and emerging remediation technology. EZVI is a surfactant-stabilized, biodegradable emulsion that forms emulsion droplets consisting of an oil-liquid membrane surrounding zero-valent iron (ZVI) particles in water. EZVI was injected over a five day period into eight wells in a demonstration test area within a larger DNAPL source area at NASA's Launch Complex 34 (LC34) using a pressure pulse injection method. Soil and groundwater samples were collected before and after treatment and analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to evaluate the changes in VOC mass, concentration and mass flux. Significant reductions in TCE soil concentrations (>80%) were observed at four of the six soil sampling locations within 90 days of EZVI injection. Somewhat lower reductions were observed at the other two soil sampling locations where visual observations suggest that most of the EZVI migrated up above the target treatment depth. Significant reductions in TCE groundwater concentrations (57 to 100%) were observed at all depths targeted with EZVI. Groundwater samples from the treatment area also showed significant increases in the concentrations of cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene. The decrease in concentrations of TCE in soil and groundwater samples following treatment with EZVI is believed to be due to abiotic degradation associated with the ZVI as well as biodegradation enhanced by the presence of the oil and surfactant in the EZVI emulsion. PMID:15787371

  8. Field Demonstration of DNAPL Dehalogenation Using Emulsified Zero-Valent Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Jacqueline; Geiger, Cherie; Clausen, Chris; Brooks, Kathleen; Coon, Christina; O'Hara, Suzanne; Krug, Thomas; Major, David; Yoon, Sam; Gavaskar, Arun; Holdsworth, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the results of the first field-scale demonstration conducted to evaluate the performance of nano-scale emulsified zero-valent iron (EZVI) injected into the saturated zone to enhance in situ dehalogenation of dense, non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) containing trichloroethene (TCE). EZVI is an innovative and emerging remediation technology. EZVI is a surfactant-stabilized, biodegradable emulsion that forms emulsion droplets consisting of an oil-liquid membrane surrounding zero-valent iron (ZVI) particles in water. EZVI was injected over a five day period into eight wells in a demonstration test area within a larger DNAPL source area at NASA's Launch Complex 34 (LC34) using a pressure pulse injection method. Soil and groundwater samples were collected before and after treatment and analyzed for volatile organic compounds (V005) to evaluate the changes in VOC mass, concentration and mass flux. Significant reductions in TCE soil concentrations (>80%) were observed at four of the six soil sampling locations within 90 days of EZVI injection. Somewhat lower reductions were observed at the other two soil sampling locations where visual observations suggest that most of the EZVI migrated up above the target treatment depth. Significant reductions in TCE groundwater concentrations (57 to 100%) were observed at all depths targeted with EZVI. Groundwater samples from the treatment area also showed significant increases in the concentrations of cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene. The decrease in concentrations of TCE in soil and groundwater samples following treatment with EZVI is believed to be due to abiotic degradation associated with the ZVI as well as biodegradation enhanced by the presence of the oil and surfactant in the EZVI emulsion.

  9. Field demonstration of DNAPL dehalogenation using emulsified zero-valent iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Jacqueline; Geiger, Cherie; Clausen, Chris; Brooks, Kathleen; Coon, Christina; O'Hara, Suzanne; Krug, Thomas; Major, David; Yoon, Woong-Sang; Gavaskar, Arun; Holdsworth, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the results of the first field-scale demonstration conducted to evaluate the performance of nanoscale emulsified zero-valent iron (EZVI) injected into the saturated zone to enhance in situ dehalogenation of dense, nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) containing trichloroethene (TCE). EZVI is an innovative and emerging remediation technology. EZVI is a surfactant-stabilized, biodegradable emulsion that forms emulsion droplets consisting of an oil-liquid membrane surrounding zero-valent iron (ZVI) particles in water. EZVI was injected over a five day period into eight wells in a demonstration test area within a larger DNAPL source area at NASA's Launch Complex 34 (LC34) using a pressure pulse injection method. Soil and groundwater samples were collected before and after treatment and analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to evaluate the changes in VOC mass, concentration and mass flux. Significant reductions in TCE soil concentrations (>80%) were observed at four of the six soil sampling locations within 90 days of EZVI injection. Somewhat lower reductions were observed at the other two soil sampling locations where visual observations suggest that most of the EZVI migrated up above the target treatment depth. Significant reductions in TCE groundwater concentrations (57 to 100%) were observed at all depths targeted with EZVI. Groundwater samples from the treatment area also showed significant increases in the concentrations of cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene. The decrease in concentrations of TCE in soil and groundwater samples following treatment with EZVI is believed to be due to abiotic degradation associated with the ZVI as well as biodegradation enhanced by the presence of the oil and surfactant in the EZVI emulsion.

  10. Zero-valent iron nanoparticles preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Oropeza, S.; Corea, M.; Gómez-Yáñez, C.; Cruz-Rivera, J.J.; Navarro-Clemente, M.E.

    2012-06-15

    Graphical abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}] at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and had diameters less than 5 nm. Highlights: ? Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}]. ? The conditions of reaction were at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. ? The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and had diameters less than 5 nm. -- Abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}] at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. To monitor the reaction, a stainless steel pressure reactor lined with PTFE and mechanically stirred was designed. This design allowed the extraction of samples at different times, minimizing the perturbation in the system. In this way, the shape and the diameter of the nanoparticles produced during the reaction were also monitored. The results showed the production of zero-valent iron nanoparticles that were approximately 5 nm in diameter arranged in agglomerates. The agglomerates grew to 900 nm when the reaction time increased up to 12 h; however, the diameter of the individual nanoparticles remained almost the same. During the reaction, some byproducts constituted by amino species acted as surfactants; therefore, no other surfactants were necessary.

  11. TREATMENT OF GROUND WATER WITH ZERO VALENT IRON (ZVI)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A presentation on the use of zero valent iron (ZVI) for groundwater remediation at the Memphis Defense Depot Site in Memphis, TN, will be given at a public meeting in Memphis on February 24. The presentation is being given in response to a request by a citizen's group associated...

  12. ZERO-VALENT IRON FOR HIGH-LEVEL ARSENITE REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study conducted by flow through column systems was aimed at investigating the feasibility of using zero-valent iron for arsenic remediation in groundwater. A high concentration arsenic solution (50 mg l-1) was prepared by using sodium arsenite (arsenic (III)) to simulate gr...

  13. Degradation of organic and inorganic contaminants by zero valent iron 

    E-print Network

    Malla, Deepak Babu

    1997-01-01

    resulting from CR(VI) reduction may coat iron surfaces, which may ultimately slow the whole zero valent metals (ZVMS) treatment process in remediating mixed waste sites. The 20 mg/L of CR(VI) was reduced below detection limits in 10 hours by Fe' and in 1...

  14. DDT, DDD, AND DDE DECHLORINATION BY ZERO-VALENT IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditionally, destruction of DDT [1,1,1-trichIoro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane] for environmental remediation required high-energy processes such as incineration. Here, the capability of powdered zero-valent iron to dechlorinate DDT and related compounds at room tempera...

  15. Assessing Arsenic Removal By Zero-Valent Iron Under

    E-print Network

    Assessing Arsenic Removal By Zero-Valent Iron Under Various Water Quality Conditions Paul Pepler Advisor: Dr. M.R. Collins February 11, 2008 #12;2 Background #12;3 US Arsenic Distribution #12;4 0 2 4 6 8 Dell Tue Feb 05 2008 DiagramAs(OH)4 - ,T=20°C,P=1bars,a[main]=10 ­4.578 ,a[H2O]=1 Arsenic Speciation

  16. Magnetic memory effect in chelated zero valent iron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, N.; Mandal, B. K.; Mohan Kumar, K.

    2012-11-01

    We report the study of nonequilibrium magnetic behavior of air stable zero valent iron nanoparticles synthesized in presence of N-cetyl-N,N,N-trimethyl ammonium bromide chelating agent. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study has suggested the presence of iron oxides on nZVI surfaces. Zero-field-cooled and field-cooled magnetization measurements have been carried out at 20-300 K and 100 Oe. For field-cooled measurements with 1 h stops at 200, 100 and 50 K when compared with the warming cycle, we found the signature of magnetic memory effect. A study of magnetic relaxation at the same temperatures shows the existence of two relaxation times.

  17. Kinetics of reductive denitrification by nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Choe, S; Chang, Y Y; Hwang, K Y; Khim, J

    2000-10-01

    Zero-valent iron powder (Fe0) has been determined to be potentially useful for the removal of nitrate in the water environment. This research is aimed at subjecting the kinetics of denitrification by nanoscale Fe0 to an analysis of factors affecting the chemical denitrification of nitrate. Nanoscale iron particles with a diameter in the range of 1-100 nm, which are characterized by the large BET specific surface area to mass ratio (31.4 m2/g), removed mostly 50, 100, 200, and 400 mg/l of nitrate within a period of 30 min with little intermediates. Compared with microscale (75-150 microm) Fe0, end product is not ammonia but N2 gas. Kinetics analysis from batch studies revealed that the denitrification reaction with nanoscale Fe0 appeared to be a pseudo first-order with respect to substrate and the observed reaction rate constant (k(obs)) varied with iron content at a relatively low degree of application. The effects of mixing intensity (rpm) on the denitrification rate suggest that the denitrification appears to be coupled with oxidative dissolution of iron through a largely mass transport-limited surface reaction (<40 rpm). PMID:10901263

  18. Electrokinetics Enhanced Delivery of Nano-scale Zero Valent Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, A. I.; O'Carroll, D. M.; Xu, Y.; Sleep, B. E.

    2010-12-01

    Nano-scale zero valent iron (NZVI) has shown promising results for remediation of a wide range of chlorinated hydrocarbons in the subsurface. Although rapid aggregation and subsequent sedimentation limit bare NZVI migration in subsurface systems, surface modifications have improved the colloidal stability of NZVI, enhancing NZVI migration through porous media in lab-scale experiments. However, delivery of NZVI through low permeability soil is still an unresolved challenge. Electrokinetics (EK) has been used extensively in low permeability porous media for the remediation of a variety of hazardous wastes and in particular heavy metals. Since NZVI has a net negative surface charge electrokinetics has been proposed to enhance NZVI transport in the subsurface. However, increased dissolved oxygen and lower pH, due to electrolysis of water at the anode, oxidizes Fe0 particles to Fe2+/Fe3+ and thus affects the remediation potential. This study focuses on minimization of NZVI oxidation and quantification of NZVI migration enhancement due to the EK application. Application of 50 and 100 mA currents delivered 6.0 and 4.8 times more NZVI through coarse sand, respectively, when compared to no EK application. This ratio increased to 21 and 31 at 50 and 100 mA currents when finer sand was used. In addition, a numerical model based on traditional colloidal filtration theory (CFT) fit the experimental results well.

  19. Electrophoresis enhanced transport of nano-scale zero valent iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Ahmed I. A.; O'Carroll, Denis M.; Xu, Yanqing; Sleep, Brent E.

    2012-05-01

    Electrokinetics (EK) has been used extensively to remove heavy metals from low permeability porous media. Electrokinetics (EK) or more specifically electrophoresis (EP) has also been proposed to enhance transport of nanoscale zero valent iron (NZVI) in fine grained porous media in the subsurface. However, increased dissolved oxygen and lower pH, due to electrolysis of water at the anode oxidizes NZVI particles and thus affects the remediation potential of EP with NZVI. This study focuses on minimization of NZVI oxidation and quantification of NZVI migration enhancement through the application of EP. Application of 50 and 100 mA currents under constant current conditions with an oxygen scavenger enhanced NZVI transport from the cathode to the anode. The enhancement in transport compared to diffusion was proportional to the applied current. Predictions of a numerical model, based on traditional colloidal filtration theory (CFT), were consistent with experimental results. In developing the model, the traditional CFT based mass balance equation was modified for the case of no advection. This study suggests that EP has the potential to deliver NZVI in low permeability porous media and that the numerical simulator can be used to predict NZVI mobility with EP.

  20. Microbiological characteristics in a zero-valent iron reactive barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Baohua; Watson, David B; Wu, Liyou; Phillips, Debra Helen; White, David C.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2002-01-01

    Zero-valent iron (Fe{sup 0})-based permeable reactive barrier treatment has been generating great interest for passive groundwater remediation, yet few studies have paid particular attention to the microbial activity and characteristics within and in the vicinity of the Fe{sup 0}-barrier matrix. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the microbial population and community composition in the reducing zone of influence by Fe{sup 0} corrosion in the barrier at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant site. Both phospholipid fatty acids and DNA analyses were used to determine the total microbial population and microbial functional groups, including sulfate-reducing bacteria, denitrifying bacteria, and methanogens, in groundwater and soil/iron core samples. A diverse microbial community was identified in the strongly reducing Fe{sup 0} environment despite a relatively high pH condition within the Fe{sup 0} barrier (up to pH {approx} 10). In comparison with those found in the background soil/groundwater samples, the enhanced microbial population ranged from {approx} 1 to 3 orders of magnitude and appeared to increase from upgradient of the barrier to downgradient soil. In addition, microbial community composition appeared to change overtime, and the bacterial types of microorganisms increased consistently as the barrier aged. DNA analysis indicated the presence of sulfate-reducing and denitrifying bacteria in the barrier and its surrounding soil. However, the activity of methanogens was found to be relatively low, presumably as a result of the competition by sulfate/metal-reducing bacteria and denitrifying bacteria because of the unlimited availability of sulfate and nitrate in the site groundwater. Results of this study provide evidence of a diverse microbial population within and in the vicinity of the iron barrier, although the important roles of microbial activity, either beneficially or detrimentally, on the longevity and enduring efficiency of the Fe{sup 0} barriers are yet to be evaluated.

  1. Reduction of Aromatic Hydrocarbons by Zero-Valent Iron and Palladium Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Hun; Shin, Won Sik; Ko, Seok-Oh; Kim, Myung-Chul

    2004-03-31

    Permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is an alternative technology for soil and groundwater remediation. Zero valent iron, which is the most popular PRB material, is only applicable to halogenated aliphatic organics and some heavy metals. The objective of this study was to investigate reductive dechlorination of halogenated compounds and reduction of non-halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons using zero valent metals (ZVMs) and catalysts as reactive materials for PRBs. A group of small aromatic hydrocarbons such as monochlorophenols, phenol and benzene were readily reduced with palladium catalyst and zero valent iron. Poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also tested with the catalysts and zero valent metal combinations. The aromatic rings were reduced and partly reduced PAHs were found as the daughter compounds. The current study demonstrates reduction of aromatic compounds by ZVMs and modified catalysts and implicates that PRB is applicable not only for halogenated organic compounds but nonhalogenated aromatic compounds such as PAHs.

  2. Effect of Zero-Valent Iron on Removal of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from Agricultural Waters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel water filtration system using zero-valent iron (ZVI) is being investigated as a simple and inexpensive approach to reducing E. coli O157:H7 in water for both pre- and post-harvest processes. Purpose: This study was initiated to determine the effectiveness of zero-valent iron in the removal ...

  3. Partial oxidation (“aging”) and surface modification decrease the toxicity of nano-sized zero valent iron.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanosize zero-valent iron (nZVI) is used as a redox-active catalyst for in situ remediation of contaminated ground waters. In aqueous environments, nZVI oxidizes over time (i.e., “ages”) to magnetite and other oxides. For remediation, hi...

  4. GROUND WATER REMEDIATION OF CHROMIUM USING ZERO-VALENT IRON IN A PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of laboratory experiments were performed to elucidate the chromium transformation and precipitation reactions caused by the corrosion of zero-valent iron in water-based systems. Reaction rates were determined for chromate reduction in the presence of different types of ...

  5. REDUCTION OF AZO DYES WITH ZERO-VALENT IRON. (R827117)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reduction of azo dyes by zero-valent iron metal (Fe0) at pH 7.0 in 10 mM HEPES buffer was studied in aqueous, anaerobic batch systems. Orange II was reduced by cleavage of the azo linkage, as evidenced by the production of sulfanilic acid (a substituted ani...

  6. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF ZERO-VALENT IRON TO TREAT WATER IMPACTED BY ACID MINE DRAINAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines the applicability and limitations of granular zero-valent iron for the treatment of water impacted by mine wastes. Rates of acid neutralization and of metal (Cu, Cd, Ni, Zn, Hg, Al, and Mn) and metalloid (As) uptake were determined in batch systems using simu...

  7. HIGH-LEVEL ARSENITE REMOVAL FROM GROUNDWATER BY ZERO-VALENT IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this study were to conduct batch and column studies to (i) assess the effectiveness of zero-valent iron for arsenic remediation in groundwater, (ii) determine removal mechanisms of arsenic, and (iii) evaluate implications of these processes with regard to the st...

  8. REMOVAL OF HIGH-LEVEL ARSENIC BY ZERO-VALENT IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this study were to conduct batch and column studies to (i) assess the effectiveness of zero-valent iron for arsenic remediation in groundwater, (ii) determine removal mechanisms of arsenic, and (iii) evaluate implications of these processes with regard to the st...

  9. ZERO VALENT IRON AND PYRITE SYSTEM USED TO DE-CHLORINATE TOXAPHENE-CONTAMINATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project consisted of a preliminary laboratory study; an outdoor bench scale study and an in situ field Pilot Study to which the zero valent iron and pyrite system (ZVI system) was applied. Several beakers were filled with contaminated soil, the ZVI system and a solvent then...

  10. Partial oxidation (“aging”) and surface modification decrease the toxicity of nano-sized zero valent iron?????

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zero-valent iron (nZVI) is a redox-active nanomaterial used for in situ remediation of contaminated groundwater. To assess the effect of “aging” and surface modification on its potential neurotoxicity, cultured rodent microglia and neurons were exposed to fresh nZVI, “aged” (>11...

  11. Fabrication of zero valent iron (ZVI) nanotube film via potentiostatic anodization and electroreduction.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jun-Won; Jun, Jung-Eui; Park, Jae-Woo

    2009-01-01

    Zero valent iron has been successfully used for the degradation of a wide range of contaminants. However, this reaction of using ZVI particle produces a large quantity of iron sludge. To solve the problem, we report the synthesis of self-organized nanoporous zero valent iron film treated with anodization and electro-reduction of iron foil. The iron nanotubes were fabricated in 1 M Na(2)SO(4) + 0.5 wt% NaF electrolyte by supplying constant electric currents of 50 mV/s, and holding the potential at 20, 40 and 60 V for 20 min. Nanoporous shape was produced by anodic oxidation of iron film. After anodizing process, electro-reduction of nanoporous iron film converted crystallization iron oxide to zero valent iron. Electro-reduction process was carried out by electro-reducing with powersupply to and holding the potential at 20 V for 20 min. The surface of iron nanotube film was examined by BET and the thickness of the oxidized films was evaluated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The crystalline structures of the fabricated films were evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD). PMID:19542657

  12. Zero Valent Iron: Impact of Anions Present during Synthesis on Subsequent Nanoparticle Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Kirsten; Forsberg, Brady; Baer, Donald R.; Arnold, William A.; Penn, R. Lee

    2011-10-01

    Zero-valent iron particles are an effective remediation technology for groundwater contaminated with halogenated organic compounds. In particular, nano-scale zero-valent iron is a promising material for remediation due to its high specific surface area, which results in faster rate constants and more effective use of the iron. An aspect of iron nanoparticle reactivity that has not been explored is the impact of anions present during iron metal nanoparticle synthesis. Solutions containing chloride, phosphate, sulfate, and nitrate anions and ferric ions were used to generate iron oxide nanoparticles. The resulting materials were dialyzed to remove dissolved byproducts and then dried and reduced by hydrogen gas at high temperature. The reactivity of the resulting zero valent iron nanoparticles was quantified by monitoring the kinetics as well as products of carbon tetrachloride reduction, and significant differences in reactivity and chloroform yield were observed. The reactivity of nanoparticles prepared in the presence of sulfate and phosphate demonstrated the highest reactivity and chloroform yield. Furthermore, substantial variations in the solid-state products of oxidation (magnetite, iron sulfide, and goethite, among others) were also observed.

  13. FINAL REPORT. REDUCTION AND IMMOBILIZATION OF RADIONUCLIDES AND TOXIC METAL IONS USING COMBINED ZERO VALENT IRON AND ANAEROBIC BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of zero valent iron, permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for groundwater remediation continues to increase. An exciting variation of this technology involves introducing anaerobic bacteria into these barriers so that both biological and abiotic pollutant removal processes ...

  14. Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity of cellulose modified nano zero-valent iron for dye discoloration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangyu; Wang, Pei; Ma, Jun; Liu, Huiling; Ning, Ping

    2015-08-01

    Nano zero-valent iron (NZVI) was innovatively and successfully modified by using hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) and hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC) as dispersants. The systematic characterization observations (including XRD, SEM and TEM) illustrate that, compared with bare nano zero-valent iron particles (BNZVI), the particle sizes of hydroxyethyl cellulose modified (ENZVI) and hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose modified (PNZVI) were decreased, while the dispersity and antioxidizability of ENZVI and PNZVI particles were increased. The discoloration efficiencies of ENZVI, PNZVI, and BNZVI were compared by using dyes (including orange II, methyl orange, methyl blue, and methylene blue) as target pollutant. The results show that both the discoloration efficiency and reaction rate of ENZVI and PNZVI are higher than that of BNZVI. In addition, effects of dispersant content, dye type, pH value, initial dye concentration, iron dosage, and reaction temperature on discoloration efficiencies were studied. The results show that discoloration efficiency was decreased by increasing initial pH value and dye concentration, and it was increased with the increase the iron dosage and reaction temperature. Under optimized NZVI addition of 0.7 g L-1, the discoloration efficiencies of ENZVI and PNZVI were increased to 96.33% and 98.62%, respectively. And the possible discoloration pathway and dispersant modification mechanism of NZVI were discussed. This study suggests hydroxyethyl cellulose and hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose dispersed NZVI can be utilized as a promising modified nano-material for degradation of dye wastewater.

  15. Zero-Valent Metal Emulsion for Reductive Dehalogenation of DNAPLs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Debra R. (Inventor); Clausen, Christian (Inventor); Gelger, Cherie L. (Inventor); Quinn, Jacqueline (Inventor); Brooks, Kathleen (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A zero-valent metal emulsion is used to dehalogenate solvents, such as pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), including trichloroethylene (TCE). The zero-valent metal emulsion contains zero-valent metal particles, a surfactant, oil and water, The preferred zero-valent metal particles are nanoscale and microscale zero-valent iron particles.

  16. Zero-Valent Metal Emulsion for Reductive Dehalogenation of DNAPLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Debra R. (Inventor); Clausen, Christian (Inventor); Geiger, Cherie L. (Inventor); Quinn, Jacqueline (Inventor); Brooks, Kathleen (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A zero-valent metal emulsion is used to dehalogenate solvents, such as pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), including trichloroethylene (TCE). The zero-valent metal emulsion contains zero-valent metal particles, a surfactant, oil and water. The preferred zero-valent metal particles are nanoscale and microscale zero-valent iron particles

  17. Reduction and Immobilization of Radionuclides and Toxic Metal Ions Using Combined Zero Valent Iron and Anaerobic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Lenly J. Weathers; Lynn E. Katz

    2002-05-29

    The use of zero valent iron, permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for groundwater remediation continues to increase. AN exciting variation of this technology involves introducing anaerobic bacteria into these barriers so that both biological and abiotic pollutant removal processes are functional. This work evaluated the hypothesis that a system combining a mixed culture of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) with zero valent iron would have a greater cr(VI) removal efficiency and a greater total Cr(VI) removal capacity than a zero valent iron system without the microorganisms. Hence, the overall goal of this research was to compare the performance of these types of systems with regard to their Cr(VI) removal efficiency and total Cr(VI) removal capacity. Both batch and continuous flow reactor systems were evaluated.

  18. Applicability of nano zero valent iron (nZVI) in sono - Fenton process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, M. R.; Ibrahim, A. H.; Amat, R. C.; Azhari, A. W.

    2014-04-01

    Fenton process is one of the advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) used to remove complex organic pollutants in wastewater. In this study, instead of iron sulfate (FeSO4), nano zero valent iron (nZVI) was used as a major source of ferrous iron (Fe2+). In order to enhance the process, ultrasound was utilized in this study. Results show that, with the aid of ultrasound, nZVI produced more Fe2+ compared to FeSO4 at pH 2. Furthermore, combination of higher intensity and longer sonication time in Fenton process acceleratde the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal from palm oil mill effluent (POME). Through the process, 80% of COD content was removed within 2 hours instead of 24 hours of silent degradation.

  19. Sulfur-Modified Zero-Valent Iron for Remediation Applications at DOE Sites - 13600

    SciTech Connect

    Fogwell, Thomas W.; Santina, Pete

    2013-07-01

    Many DOE remediation sites have chemicals of concern that are compounds in higher oxidation states, which make them both more mobile and more toxic. The chemical reduction of these compounds both prevents the migration of these chemicals and in some cases reduces the toxicity. It has also been shown that zero-valent iron is a very effective substance to use in reducing oxygenated compounds in various treatment processes. These have included the treatment of halogenated hydrocarbons in the form volatile organic compounds used as solvents and pesticides. Zero-valent iron has also been used to reduce various oxidized metals such as chromium, arsenic, and mercury in order to immobilize them, decrease their toxicity, and prevent further transport. In addition, it has been used to immobilize or break down other non-metallic species such as selenium compounds and nitrates. Of particular interest at several DOE remediation sites is the fact that zero-valent iron is very effective in immobilizing several radioactive metals which are mobile in their oxidized states. These include both technetium and uranium. The main difficulty in using zero-valent iron has been its tendency to become inactive after relatively short periods of time. While it is advantageous to have the zero-valent iron particles as porous as possible in order to provide maximum surface area for reactions to take place, these pores can become clogged when the iron is oxidized. This is due to the fact that ferric oxide has a greater volume for a given mass than metallic iron. When the surfaces of the iron particles oxidize to ferric oxide, the pores become narrower and will eventually shut. In order to minimize the degradation of the chemical activity of the iron due to this process, a modification of zero-valent iron has been developed which prevents or slows this process, which decreases its effectiveness. It is called sulfur-modified iron, and it has been produced in high purity for applications in municipal water treatment applications. Sulfur-modified iron has been found to not only be an extremely economical treatment technology for municipal water supplies, where very large quantities of water must be treated economically, but it has also been demonstrated to immobilize technetium. It has the added benefit of eliminating several other harmful chemicals in water supplies. These include arsenic and selenium. In one large-scale evaluation study an integrated system implemented chemical reduction of nitrate with sulfur-modified iron followed by filtration for arsenic removal. The sulfur-modified iron that was used was an iron-based granular medium that has been commercially developed for the removal of nitrate, co-contaminants including uranium, vanadium and chromium, and other compounds from water. The independent study concluded that 'It is foreseen that the greatest benefit of this technology (sulfur-modified iron) is that it does not produce a costly brine stream as do the currently accepted nitrate removal technologies of ion exchange and reverse osmosis. This investigation confirmed that nitrate reduction via sulfur-modified iron is independent of the hydraulic loading rate. Future sulfur-modified iron treatment systems can be designed without restriction of the reactor vessel dimensions. Future vessels can be adapted to existing site constraints without being limited to height-to-width ratios that would exist if nitrate reduction were to depend on hydraulic loading rate'. Sulfur-modified iron was studied by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for its effectiveness in the reduction and permanent sequestration of technetium. The testing was done using Hanford Site groundwater together with sediment. The report stated, 'Under reducing conditions, TcO{sub 4} is readily reduced to TcIV, which forms highly insoluble oxides such at TcO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O. However, (re)oxidation of TcIV oxides can lead to remobilization. Under sulfidogenic conditions, most TcIV will be reduced and immobilized as Tc{sub 2}S{sub 7}, which is less readily re-mobilized, ev

  20. Zero-valent iron-promoted dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Fei-Wen; Larson, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    Zero-valent iron promoted the dechlorination of PCBs (Aroclors 1221 and 1254) at elevated temperatures in an oxygen-limited environment. At temperatures higher than 300{degrees}C, dechlorination of Aroclor 1221 began to occur; at 400{degrees}C, the major reaction product, biphenyl, was observed in highest yield. (At this temperature most of the PCBs were dechlorinated to biphenyl within 10 min.) At temperatures of 500{degrees}C or higher, dechlorination and other reactions of PCBs took place. At 600{degrees}C, almost all PCBs were destroyed by reactions other than hydrogenolytic dechlorination. Similar reactions were observed with the more highly chlorinated Aroclor 1254. Water or other impurities associated with the iron surface may donate protons or hydrogen atoms to the PCBs and take part in other reactions.

  1. Remediating RDX-contaminated water and soil using zero-valent iron

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.; Comfort, S.D.; Shea, P.J.

    1998-09-01

    Soil and water contaminated with RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine) pose a serious threat to the environment and human health. The objective was to determine the potential for using zero-valent iron (Fe{sup 0}) to remediate RDX-contaminated water and soil. Mixing an aqueous solution of 32 mg RDX L{sup {minus}1} (spiked with {sup 14}C-labeled RDX) with 10 g Fe{sup 0} L{sup {minus}1} resulted in complete RDX destruction within 72 h. Nitroso derivatives of RDX accounted for approximately 26% of the RDX transformed during the first 24 h; these intermediates disappeared within 96 h ad the remaining {sup 14}C products were water soluble and not strongly sorbed by iron surfaces. When RDX-contaminated soil was treated with a single amendment of Fe{sup 0} in a static soil microcosm, more than 60% of the initial {sup 14}C-RDX was recovered as {sup 14}CO{sub 2} after 112 d. Treating surface and subsurface soils containing 3,600 mg RDX kg{sup {minus}1} with 50 g Fe{sup 0} kg{sup {minus}1} at a constant soil water content resulted in a 52% reduction in extractable RDX following 12 mo of static incubation. A second Fe{sup 0} addition at 12 mo further reduced the initial extractable RDX by 71% after 15 mo. These results support the use of zero-valent iron for in situ remediation of RDX-contaminated soil.

  2. The use of zero-valent iron filtration to reduce Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua in irrigation water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Irrigation water can be a source of contamination in outbreaks associated with produce. Zero-valent iron (ZVI) filtration has been effective in E. coli O157:H12 in irrigation water, but has not been evaluated against Listeria spp. Purpose: To 1) determine effectiveness of ZVI filters...

  3. LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS USING ZERO-VALENT IRON: GEOCHEMICAL AND MICROBIOLOGICAL EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geochemical and microbiological factors that control long-term performance of subsurface permeable reactive barriers were evaluated at the Elizabeth City, NC and the Denver Federal Center, CO sites. These ground water treatment systems use zero-valent iron filings (Peerless Meta...

  4. Microbial reduction of nitrate in the presence of zero-valent iron and biochar.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seok-Young; Seo, Yong-Deuk; Kim, Beomseok; Kim, In Young; Cha, Daniel K

    2016-01-01

    The denitrification of nitrate (NO3(-)) by mixed cultures in the presence of zero-valent iron [Fe(0)] and biochar was investigated through a series of batch experiments. It was hypothesized that biochar may provide microbes with additional electrons to enhance the anaerobic biotransformation of nitrate in the presence of Fe(0) by facilitating electron transfer. When compared to the anaerobic transformation of nitrate by microbes in the presence of Fe(0) alone, the presence of biochar significantly enhanced anaerobic denitrification by microbes with Fe(0). Graphite also promoted the anaerobic microbial transformation of nitrate with Fe(0), and it was speculated that electron-conducting graphene moieties were responsible for the improvement. The results obtained in this work suggest that nitrate can be effectively denitrified by microbes with Fe(0) and biochar in natural and engineered systems. PMID:26600458

  5. Demonstration of combined zero-valent iron and electrical resistance heating for in situ trichloroethene remediation.

    PubMed

    Truex, M J; Macbeth, T W; Vermeul, V R; Fritz, B G; Mendoza, D P; Mackley, R D; Wietsma, T W; Sandberg, G; Powell, T; Powers, J; Pitre, E; Michalsen, M; Ballock-Dixon, S J; Zhong, L; Oostrom, M

    2011-06-15

    The effectiveness of in situ treatment using zero-valent iron (ZVI) for nonaqueous phase or significant sediment-associated contaminant mass can be limited by relatively low rates of mass transfer to bring contaminants in contact with the reactive media. For a field test in a trichloroethene (TCE) source area, combining moderate-temperature subsurface electrical resistance heating with in situ ZVI treatment was shown to accelerate TCE treatment by a factor of about 4 based on organic daughter products and a factor about 8 based on chloride concentrations. A mass-discharge-based analysis was used to evaluate reaction, dissolution, and volatilization processes at ambient groundwater temperature (~10 °C) and as temperature was increased up to about 50 °C. Increased reaction and contaminant dissolution were observed with increased temperature, but vapor- or aqueous-phase migration of TCE out of the treatment zone was minimal during the test because reactions maintained low aqueous-phase TCE concentrations. PMID:21591672

  6. Reduction of Cr(VI) by Urea-Dispersed Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Guilong; Zheng, Kang; Cai, Dongqing; Wu, Zhengyan

    2015-08-01

    Urea was used to disperse nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) for reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in aqueous solution. Scanning electron microscope and fourier transform-infrared spectra investigations demonstrated that urea could effectively increase the dispersion of NZVI resulting in more effective reduction sites (ERS) for Cr(VI) ions. Batch reduction experiments indicated that the reductive capacity of urea dispersed NZVI (UNZVI) was significantly improved, as the reductive efficiency reached 96.8% under optimal condition compared with the raw NZVI (72.14%). Additionally, the NZVI was stable for at least 28 days after urea treatment. The dispersion mechanism was proposed that the steric hindrance effect of the urea coating on the surface might play a key role in dispersing the NZVI particles. PMID:26369206

  7. Nanoscale zero valent iron and bimetallic particles for contaminated site remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Carroll, Denis; Sleep, Brent; Krol, Magdalena; Boparai, Hardiljeet; Kocur, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Since the late 1990s, the use of nano zero valent iron (nZVI) for groundwater remediation has been investigated for its potential to reduce subsurface contaminants such as PCBs, chlorinated solvents, and heavy metals. nZVI shows tremendous promise in the environmental sector due to its high reactivity and as such, numerous laboratory and field studies have been performed to assess its effectiveness. This paper reviews the current knowledge of nZVI/bimetallic technology as it pertains to subsurface remediation of chlorinated solvents and heavy metals. The manuscript provides background on the technology, summarizing nZVI reactions with chlorinated solvents and metals, and examines the factors affecting nZVI reactivity. Studies on subsurface transport of bare and coated nZVI particles are also reviewed and challenges with field implementation are discussed. This manuscript offers a comprehensive review of nZVI technology and highlights the work still needed to optimize it for subsurface remediation.

  8. Trichloroethene Reduction within a Nonaqueous Phase Liquid using Zero Valent Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, N. D.; Ramsburg, C. A.

    2008-12-01

    The application of reactive slurries or suspensions (usually of reactive zero valent iron particles) is being considered for treatment of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones. Effective treatment of NAPL source zones with reactive particles requires delivery of particles within the vicinity of the NAPL. To date, iron-mediated remediation technologies rely on the use of aqueous-based particle suspensions. When utilizing these aqueous-based suspensions of reactive iron particles, contaminant transformation is dependent on dissolution of contaminants from the DNAPL prior to reaction. The reliance upon dissolution kinetics may introduce a rate limitation during treatment of DNAPL source zones with aqueous-based reactive slurries. Incorporation of the reactive particles into the NAPL (i.e., reduction occurring within the NAPL) may alleviate any dissolution limitation associated with aqueous-based reactive slurries. This exploratory research evaluated the feasibility of creating iron-mediated TCE reduction within a NAPL. Emphasis was placed on elucidating the role of water in the reductive dechlorination process when it occurs within a NAPL. Batch experiments were conducted in 125 mL reactors containing iron particles and NAPLs of various composition under an argon atmosphere. For these proof-of-concept experiments, NAPL mixtures were designed to ensure initial TCE concentration was constant. Results suggest that iron-mediated reactions within chlorinated ethene DNAPLs are feasible, though the viability of controlling both the iron content and chemistry of DNAPL located within the subsurface remains unknown.

  9. Calcite precipitation dominates the electrical signatures of zero valent iron columns under simulated field conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yuxin; Versteeg, R.; Slater, L.; LaBrecque, D.

    2009-06-01

    Calcium carbonate is a secondary mineral precipitate influencing zero valent iron (ZVI) barrier reactivity and hydraulic performance. We conducted column experiments to investigate electrical signatures resulting from concurrent CaCO{sub 3} and iron oxides precipitation under simulated field geochemical conditions. We identified CaCO{sub 3} as a major mineral phase throughout the columns, with magnetite present primarily close to the influent based on XRD analysis. Electrical measurements revealed decreases in conductivity and polarization of both columns, suggesting that electrically insulating CaCO{sub 3} dominates the electrical response despite the presence of electrically conductive iron oxides. SEM/EDX imaging suggests that the electrical signal reflects the geometrical arrangement of the mineral phases. CaCO{sub 3} forms insulating films on ZVI/magnetite surfaces, restricting charge transfer between the pore electrolyte and ZVI particles, as well as across interconnected ZVI particles. As surface reactivity also depends on the ability of the surface to engage in redox reactions via charge transfer, electrical measurements may provide a minimally invasive technology for monitoring reactivity loss due to CaCO{sub 3} precipitation. Comparison between laboratory and field data shows consistent changes in electrical signatures due to iron corrosion and secondary mineral precipitation.

  10. Enhanced perchloroethylene reduction in column systems using surfactant-modified zeolite/zero-valent iron pellets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengfei; Tao, Xian; Li, Zhaohui; Bowman, Robert S

    2002-08-15

    Surfactant- (hexadecyltrimethylammonium, HDTMA) modified zeolite (SMZ)/zero-valent iron (ZVI) pellets having high hydraulic conductivity (9.7 cm s(-1)), high surface area (28.2 m2 g(-1)), and excellent mechanical strength were developed. Laboratory column experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of the pellets for perchloroethylene (PCE) sorption/reduction under dynamic flow-through conditions. PCE reduction rates with the surfactant-modified pellets (SMZ/ZVI) were three times higher than the reduction rates with the unmodified pellets (zeolite/ZVI). We speculate that enhanced sorption of PCE directly onto iron surface by iron-bound HDTMA and/or an increased local PCE concentration in the vicinity of iron surface due to sorption of PCE by SMZ contributed to the enhanced PCE reduction by the SMZ/ZVI pellets. Trichloroethylene and cis-dichloroethylene production during PCE reduction increased with the surfactant-modified pellets, indicating that the surfactant modification may have favored hydrogenolysis over beta-elimination. PCE reduction rate constants increased as the travel velocity increased from 0.5 to 1.9 m d(-1), suggesting that the reduction of PCE in the column systems was mass transfer limited. PMID:12214654

  11. Use of agar agar stabilized milled zero-valent iron particles for in situ groundwater remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Doris; Velimirovi?, Milica; Wagner, Stephan; Mici? Batka, Vesna; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo

    2015-04-01

    A major obstacle for use of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles as a nontoxic material for effective in situ degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) is the high production cost. For that reason, submicro-scale milled zero-valent iron particles were recently developed (milled ZVI, UVR-FIA, Germany) by grinding macroscopic raw materials of elementary iron as a cheaper alternative to products produced by solid-state reduction. However, milled ZVI particles tend to aggregate and due to the rather large particle size (d50= 11.9 µm) also rapidly sediment. To prevent aggregation and consequently sedimentation of milled ZVI particles and therefore improve the mobility after in situ application, the use of a stabilizer is considered in literature as a most promising option. In this study, milled ZVI particles (1 g L-1 of particle concentration) were stabilized by environmentally friendly polymer agar agar (>0.5 g L-1), which had a positive impact on the milled ZVI stability. Sedimentation rate was significantly decreased by increasing the suspension viscosity. Column transport experiments were performed for bare and agar agar stabilized milled ZVI particles in commercially available fine grained quartz sand (DORSILIT® Nr.8, Gebrüder Dorfner GmbH Co, Germany) and different porous media collected from brownfields. The experiments were carried out under field relevant injection conditions of 100 m d-1. The maximal travel distance (LT) of less than 10 cm was determined for non-stabilized suspension in fine grained quartz sand, while agar agar (1 g L-1) stabilized milled ZVI suspension revealed LT of 12 m. Similar results were observed for porous media from brownfields showing that mobility of agar agar stabilized particle suspensions was significantly improved compared to bare particles. Based on the mobility data, agar agar stabilized milled zero-valent iron particles could be used for in situ application. Finally, lab-scale batch degradation experiments were performed to determine the impact of agar agar on the reactivity of milled ZVI and investigate the apparent corrosion rate of particles by quantifying the hydrogen gas generated by anaerobic corrosion of milled ZVI. The results indicate that agar agar had a positive impact on the milled ZVI stability and mobility, however adverse impact on the reactivity towards trichloroethene (TCE) was observed compared to the non-stabilized material. On the other hand, this study shows that the apparent corrosion rate of non-stabilized and agar agar stabilized milled ZVI particles is in the same order of magnitude. These data indicate that the dechlorination pathway of TCE by agar agar stabilized milled ZVI particles is possibly impacted by blocking of the reactive sites and not hydrogen revealed during particles corrosion. Finally, calculated longevity of the particles based on the apparent corrosion rate is significantly prolonged compared to the longevity of the nZVI particles reported in previous studies. This research receives funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme FP7/2007-2013 under grant agreement n°309517.

  12. Microbial reduction of nitrate in the presence of nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyung-Hee; Cha, Daniel K

    2008-05-01

    Microbial reduction of nitrate in the presence of nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) was evaluated to assess the feasibility of employing NZVI in the biological nitrate treatment. Nitrate was completely reduced within 3d in a nanoscale Fe(0)-cell reactor, while only 50% of the nitrate was abiotically reduced over 7d at 25 degrees C. The removal rate of nitrate in the integrated NZVI-cell system was unaffected by the presence of high amounts of sulfate. Efficient removal of nitrate by Fe(II)-supported anaerobic culture in 14 d indicated that Fe(II), which is produced during anaerobic iron corrosion in the Fe(0)-cell system, might act as an electron donor for nitrate. Unlike abiotic reduction, microbial reduction of nitrate was not significantly affected by low temperature conditions. This study demonstrated the potential applicability of employing NZVI iron as a source of electrons for biological nitrate reduction. Use of NZVI for microbial nitrate reduction can obviate the disadvantages associated with traditional biological denitrification, that relies on the use of organic substrates or explosive hydrogen gas, and maintain the advantages offered by nano-particle technology such as higher surface reactivity and functionality in suspensions. PMID:18331753

  13. Remediation of soil contaminated with pyrene using ground nanoscale zero-valent iron

    SciTech Connect

    Ming-Chin Chang; Hung-Yee Shu; Wen-Pin Hsieh; Min-Chao Wang

    2007-02-15

    The sites contaminated with recalcitrant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are serious environmental problems ubiquitously. Some PAHs have proven to be carcinogenic and hazardous. Therefore, the innovative PAH in situ remediation technologies have to be developed instantaneously. Recently, the nanoscale zero-valent iron (ZVI) particles have been successfully applied for dechlorination of organic pollutants in water, yet little research has investigated for the soil remediation so far. The objective in this work was to take advantage of nanoscale ZVI particles to remove PAHs in soil. The experimental factors such as reaction time, particle diameter and iron dosage and surface area were considered and optimized. From the results, both microscale and nanoscale ZVI were capable to remove the target compound. The higher removal efficiencies of nanoscale ZVI particles were obtained because the specific surface areas were about several dozens larger than that of commercially microscale ZVI particles. The optimal parameters were observed as 0.2 g iron/2 mL water in 60 min and 150 rpm by nanoscale ZVI. Additionally, the results proved that nanoscale ZVI particles are a promising technology for soil remediation and are encouraged in the near future environmental applications. Additionally, the empirical equation developed for pyrene removal efficiency provided the good explanation of reaction behavior. Ultimately, the calculated values by this equation were in a good agreement with the experimental data. 19 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barriers: A Review of Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Korte, NE

    2001-06-11

    This report briefly reviews issues regarding the implementation of the zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology at sites managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Initially, the PRB technology, using zero-valent iron for the reactive media, was received with great enthusiasm, and DOE invested millions of dollars testing and implementing PRBs. Recently, a negative perception of the technology has been building. This perception is based on the failure of some deployments to satisfy goals for treatment and operating expenses. The purpose of this report, therefore, is to suggest reasons for the problems that have been encountered and to recommend whether DOE should invest in additional research and deployments. The principal conclusion of this review is that the most significant problems have been the result of insufficient characterization, which resulted in poor engineering implementation. Although there are legitimate concerns regarding the longevity of the reactive media, the ability of zero-valent iron to reduce certain chlorinated hydrocarbons and to immobilize certain metals and radionuclides is well documented. The primary problem encountered at some DOE full-scale deployments has been an inadequate assessment of site hydrology, which resulted in misapplication of the technology. The result is PRBs with higher than expected flow velocities and/or incomplete plume capture. A review of the literature reveals that cautions regarding subsurface heterogeneity were published several years prior to the full-scale implementations. Nevertheless, design and construction have typically been undertaken as if the subsurface was homogeneous. More recently published literature has demonstrated that hydraulic heterogeneity can cause so much uncertainty in performance that use of a passive PRB is precluded. Thus, the primary conclusion of this review is that more attention must be given to site-specific issues. Indeed, the use of a passive PRB requires an unusually comprehensive hydrologic characterization so that the design can be based on a thorough understanding of subsurface heterogeneity rather than on average values for hydraulic parameters. Scientists and engineers are capable of conducting the level of investigation required. However, design costs will increase, and the pre-design field work may demonstrate that a passive PRB is not suitable for a particular site. In such cases, an option to consider is hydraulic augmentation, such as pumping (in which the system is no longer passive) or gravity flow from drains. In these circumstances, operation of the treatment media is under known hydraulic conditions. These systems typically contain the treatment media in a vault or in drums. Most of the media problems in such systems have been related to the exclusion of air and can be addressed by better engineering design or by frequent maintenance. Finally, a number of outstanding issues require resolution for further application of this technology. Of particular interest to DOE is resolving the removal mechanisms for uranium and technetium. Few data are available for the latter, and for the former, the technical literature is contradictory. Determining the mechanisms has long-term cost implications; engineers must consider whether it is appropriate to remove or simply abandon a barrier that is no longer functioning. Other issues that are unresolved include determining how hydraulic performance is affected by the emplacement method and quantifying the effects of varying groundwater types on barrier longevity.

  15. Mobility and Deposition of pre-Synthesis Stabilized Nano-scale Zero Valent Iron in Long Column Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, C. V.; O'Carroll, D. M.; Sleep, B. E.

    2013-12-01

    Reactive zero-valent iron is currently being used for remediation of contaminated groundwater. Permeable reactive barriers are the current state-of-the-art method for using zero-valent iron. Instead of an excavated trench filled with granular zero-valent iron, a relatively new and promising method is the injection of a nano -scale zero-valent iron colloid suspension (nZVI) into the subsurface using injection wells. One goal of nZVI injection can be to deposit the iron in the aquifer and form a reactive permeable zone which is no longer bound to limited depths and plume treatment, but can also be used for source zone remediation. A good understanding of the transport behavior of nZVI is necessary to design a field application. So far transport was mainly tested using commercially available nZVI, however these studies suggest that further work is required as commercial nZVI was prone to aggregation, resulting in low physical stability of the suspension and very short travel distances in the subsurface. In the presented work, nZVI is stabilized during synthesis to significantly increase the physical suspension stability. To improve our understanding of nZVI transport, the feasibility for injection into various types of porous media and controlled nZVI deposition, a suite of column experiments are conducted. The column experiments are performed using a long 1.5m column and a novel nZVI measuring technique. The measuring technique was developed to non-destructively determine the concentration of nano-scale iron during the injection. It records the magnetic susceptibility, which makes it possible to get transient nZVI retention profiles along the column. These transient nZVI retention profiles of long columns provide unique insights in the transport behavior of nZVI which cannot be obtained using short columns or effluent breakthrough curves.

  16. Polyelectrolyte multilayer film-assisted formation of zero-valent iron nanoparticles onto polymer nanofibrous mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shili; Wu, Siqi; Shen, Mingwu; Guo, Rui; Wang, Shanyuan; Shi, Xiangyang

    2009-09-01

    A facile approach that combines the electrospinning technique and layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly method has been developed to synthesize and immobilize zero-valent iron nanoparticles (ZVI NPs) onto the surface of nanofibers for potential environmental applications. In this approach, negatively charged cellulose acetate (CA) nanofibers fabricated by electrospinning CA solution were modified with bilayers composed of positively charged poly(diallyl-dimethyl-ammoniumchloride) (PDADMAC) and negatively charged poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) through electrostatic LbL assembly approach to form composite nanofibrous mats. The composite nanofibrous mats were immersed into the ferrous iron solution to allow Fe(II) ions to complex with the free carboxyl groups of PAA, and then ZVI NPs were immobilized onto the composite nanofibrous mats instantly by reducing the ferrous cations. Combined scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and thermogravimetry analysis demonstrated that the ZVI NPs are successfully synthesized and uniformly distributed into the polyelectrolyte (PE) multilayer films assembled onto the CA nanofibers. The present approach to synthesis ZVI NPs opens a new avenue to fabricating various materials with high surface area for environmental, catalytic, and sensing applications.

  17. Toxicity of Nano-Zero Valent Iron to Freshwater and Marine Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Arturo A.; Garner, Kendra; Miller, Robert J.; Lenihan, Hunter S.

    2012-01-01

    We tested whether three commercial forms (uncoated, organic coating, and iron oxide coating) of nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) are toxic to freshwater and marine organisms, specifically three species of marine phytoplankton, one species of freshwater phytoplankton, and a freshwater zooplankton species (Daphnia magna), because these organisms may be exposed downstream of where nZVI is applied to remediate polluted soil. The aggregation and reactivity of the three types of nZVI varied considerably, which was reflected in their toxicity. Since levels of Fe2+ and Fe3+ increase as the nZVI react, we also evaluated their toxicity independently. All four phytoplankton species displayed decreasing population growth rates, and Daphnia magna showed increasing mortality, in response to increasing levels of nZVI, and to a lesser degree with increasing Fe2+ and Fe3+. All forms of nZVI aggregated in soil and water, especially in the presence of a high concentration of calcium ions in groundwater, thus reducing their transports through the environment. However, uncoated nZVI aggregated extremely rapidly, thus vastly reducing the probability of environmental transport and potential for toxicity. This information can be used to design a risk management strategy to arrest the transport of injected nZVI beyond the intended remediation area, by injecting inert calcium salts as a barrier to transport. PMID:22952836

  18. Remediation of alachlor and atrazine contaminated water with zero-valent iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bezbaruah, Achintya N; Thompson, Jay M; Chisholm, Bret J

    2009-08-01

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI, diameter < 90 nm, specific surface area = 25 m(2) g(-1)) have been used under anoxic conditions for the remediation of pesticides alachlor and atrazine in water. While alachlor (10, 20, 40 mg L(-1)) was reduced by 92-96% within 72 h, no degradation of atrazine was observed. The alachlor degradation reaction was found to obey first-order kinetics very closely. The reaction rate (35.5 x 10(-3)-43.0 x 10(-3) h(-1)) increased with increasing alachlor concentration. The results are in conformity with other researchers who worked on these pesticides but mostly with micro ZVI and iron filings. This is for the first time that alachlor has been degraded under reductive environment using nZVI. The authors contend that nZVI may prove to be a simple method for on-site treatment of high concentration pesticide rinse water (100 mg L(-1)) and for use in flooring materials in pesticide filling and storage stations. PMID:20183057

  19. Evaluation on the Nanoscale Zero Valent Iron Based Microbial Denitrification for Nitrate Removal from Groundwater.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lai; Liu, Yiwen; Gao, Shu-Hong; Chen, Xueming; Xin, Pei; Dai, Xiaohu; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale zero valent iron (NZVI) based microbial denitrification has been demonstrated to be a promising technology for nitrate removal from groundwater. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to evaluate the performance of this new technology and to provide insights into the chemical and microbial interactions in the system in terms of nitrate reduction, ammonium accumulation and hydrogen turnover. The developed model integrates NZVI-based abiotic reduction of nitrate, NZVI corrosion for hydrogen production and hydrogen-based microbial denitrification and satisfactorily describes all of the nitrate and ammonium dynamics from two systems with highly different conditions. The high NZVI corrosion rate revealed by the model indicates the high reaction rate of NZVI with water due to their large specific surface area and high surface reactivity, leading to an effective microbial nitrate reduction by utilizing the produced hydrogen. The simulation results further suggest a NZVI dosing strategy (3-6?mmol/L in temperature range of 30-40?°C, 6-10?mmol/L in temperature range of 15-30?°C and 10-14?mmol/L in temperature range of 5-15?°C) during groundwater remediation to make sure a low ammonium yield and a high nitrogen removal efficiency. PMID:26199053

  20. Characterization of green zero-valent iron nanoparticles produced with tree leaf extracts.

    PubMed

    Machado, S; Pacheco, J G; Nouws, H P A; Albergaria, J T; Delerue-Matos, C

    2015-11-15

    In the last decades nanotechnology has become increasingly important because it offers indisputable advantages to almost every area of expertise, including environmental remediation. In this area the synthesis of highly reactive nanomaterials (e.g. zero-valent iron nanoparticles, nZVI) is gaining the attention of the scientific community, service providers and other stakeholders. The synthesis of nZVI by the recently developed green bottom-up method is extremely promising. However, the lack of information about the characteristics of the synthetized particles hinders a wider and more extensive application. This work aims to evaluate the characteristics of nZVI synthesized through the green method using leaves from different trees. Considering the requirements of a product for environmental remediation the following characteristics were studied: size, shape, reactivity and agglomeration tendency. The mulberry and pomegranate leaf extracts produced the smallest nZVIs (5-10 nm), the peach, pear and vine leaf extracts produced the most reactive nZVIs while the ones produced with passion fruit, medlar and cherry extracts did not settle at high nZVI concentrations (931 and 266 ppm). Considering all tests, the nZVIs obtained from medlar and vine leaf extracts are the ones that could present better performances in the environmental remediation. The information gathered in this paper will be useful to choose the most appropriate leaf extracts and operational conditions for the application of the green nZVIs in environmental remediation. PMID:26151651

  1. Degradation of carbon tetrachloride in the presence of zero-valent iron.

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, J. S.; Rose, C.; LaFreniere, L.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-01-01

    Efforts to achieve the decomposition of carbon tetrachloride through anaerobic and aerobic bioremediation and chemical transformation have met with limited success because of the conditions required and the formation of hazardous intermediates. Recently, particles of zero-valent iron (ZVI) have been used with limited success for in situ remediation of carbon tetrachloride. We studied a modified microparticulate product that combines controlled-release carbon with ZVI for stimulation of in situ chemical reduction of persistent organic compounds in groundwater. With this product, a number of physical, chemical, and microbiological processes were combined to create very strongly reducing conditions that stimulate rapid, complete dechlorination of organic solvents. In principle, the organic component of ZVI microparticles is nutrient rich and hydrophilic and has high surface area capable of supporting the growth of bacteria in the groundwater environment. In our experiments, we found that as the bacteria grew, oxygen was consumed, and the redox potential decreased to values reaching -600 mV. The small modified ZVI particles provide substantial reactive surface area that, in these conditions, directly stimulates chemical dechlorination and cleanup of the contaminated area without accumulation of undesirable breakdown products. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of ZVI microparticles in reducing carbon tetrachloride under laboratory and field conditions. Changes in concentrations and in chemical and physical parameters were monitored to determine the role of the organic products in the reductive dechlorination reaction. Laboratory and field studies are presented.

  2. Evaluation on the Nanoscale Zero Valent Iron Based Microbial Denitrification for Nitrate Removal from Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Lai; Liu, Yiwen; Gao, Shu-Hong; Chen, Xueming; Xin, Pei; Dai, Xiaohu; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-07-01

    Nanoscale zero valent iron (NZVI) based microbial denitrification has been demonstrated to be a promising technology for nitrate removal from groundwater. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to evaluate the performance of this new technology and to provide insights into the chemical and microbial interactions in the system in terms of nitrate reduction, ammonium accumulation and hydrogen turnover. The developed model integrates NZVI-based abiotic reduction of nitrate, NZVI corrosion for hydrogen production and hydrogen-based microbial denitrification and satisfactorily describes all of the nitrate and ammonium dynamics from two systems with highly different conditions. The high NZVI corrosion rate revealed by the model indicates the high reaction rate of NZVI with water due to their large specific surface area and high surface reactivity, leading to an effective microbial nitrate reduction by utilizing the produced hydrogen. The simulation results further suggest a NZVI dosing strategy (3-6?mmol/L in temperature range of 30-40?°C, 6-10?mmol/L in temperature range of 15-30?°C and 10-14?mmol/L in temperature range of 5-15?°C) during groundwater remediation to make sure a low ammonium yield and a high nitrogen removal efficiency.

  3. Effective removal of nemacide fosthiazate from an aqueous solution using zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junxue; Shen, Chongyang; Zhang, Hongyan; Lu, Weilan; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Chengju

    2015-09-15

    In this study, the removal of fosthiazate in an aqueous solution using zero valent iron (ZVI) and the related removal reaction mechanism were investigated. The results indicate that the dissipation of fosthiazate adheres to a pseudo-first order reaction law. The apparent rate constant of fosthiazate removal could be improved by increasing the ZVI dosage, control temperature and initial pH. The observed pseudo-first-order degradation rate constants (Kobs) of fosthiazate removal using ZVI were varied in the different electrolyte solutions, and were determined as follows: Kobs (MgSO4) < Kobs (KCl) < Kobs (Control)

  4. Potential environmental implications of nanoscale zero-valent iron particles for environmental remediation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Min-Hee; Lim, Myunghee; Hwang, Yu Sik

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles are widely used in the field of various environmental contaminant remediation. Although the potential benefits of nZVI are considerable, there is a distinct need to identify any potential risks after environmental exposure. In this respect, we review recent studies on the environmental applications and implications of nZVI, highlighting research gaps and suggesting future research directions. Methods Environmental application of nZVI is briefly summarized, focusing on its unique properties. Ecotoxicity of nZVI is reviewed according to type of organism, including bacteria, terrestrial organisms, and aquatic organisms. The environmental fate and transport of nZVI are also summarized with regards to exposure scenarios. Finally, the current limitations of risk determination are thoroughly provided. Results The ecotoxicity of nZVI depends on the composition, concentration, size and surface properties of the nanoparticles and the experimental method used, including the species investigated. In addition, the environmental fate and transport of nZVI appear to be complex and depend on the exposure duration and the exposure conditions. To date, field-scale data are limited and only short-term studies using simple exposure methods have been conducted. Conclusions In this regard, the primary focus of future study should be on 1) the development of an appropriate and valid testing method of the environmental fate and ecotoxicity of reactive nanoparticles used in environmental applications and 2) assessing their potential environmental risks using in situ field scale applications. PMID:25518840

  5. Impact of nanoscale zero valent iron on bacteria is growth phase dependent.

    PubMed

    Chaithawiwat, Krittanut; Vangnai, Alisa; McEvoy, John M; Pruess, Birgit; Krajangpan, Sita; Khan, Eakalak

    2016-02-01

    The toxic effect of nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) particles on bacteria from different growth phases was studied. Four bacterial strains namely Escherichia coli strains JM109 and BW25113, and Pseudomonas putida strains KT2440 and F1 were experimented. The growth curves of these strains were determined. Bacterial cells were harvested based on the predetermined time points, and exposed to nZVI. Cell viability was determined by the plate count method. Bacterial cells in lag and stationary phases showed higher resistance to nZVI for all four bacterial strains, whereas cells in exponential and decline phases were less resistant to nZVI and were rapidly inactivated when exposed to nZVI. Bacterial inactivation increased with the concentration of nZVI. Furthermore, less than 14% bacterial inactivation was observed when bacterial cells were exposed to the filtrate of nZVI suspension suggesting that the physical interaction between nZVI and cell is necessary for bacterial inactivation. PMID:26378872

  6. Demonstration of Combined Zero-Valent Iron and Electrical Resistance Heating for In Situ Trichloroethene Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Macbeth, Tamzen; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Mackley, Rob D.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Sandberg, Greg; Powell, Thomas; Powers, Jeff; Pitre, Emile; Michalsen, Mandy M.; Ballock-Dixon, Sage; Zhong, Lirong; Oostrom, Martinus

    2011-06-27

    The effectiveness of in situ treatment using zero-valent iron to remediate sites with non-aqueous phase or significant sediment-associated contaminant mass can be limited by relatively low rates of mass transfer to bring contaminants in contact with the reactive media. For a field test in a trichloroethene source area, combining moderate-temperature (maximum 50oC) subsurface electrical resistance heating with in situ ZVI treatment was shown to accelerate dechlorination and dissolution rates by a factor of 4 to 6 based on organic daughter products and a factor 8-16 using a chloride concentrations. A mass-discharge-based analysis was used to evaluate reaction, dissolution, and volatilization at ambient groundwater temperature (~10oC) and as temperature was increased up to about 50oC. Increased reaction and contaminant dissolution were observed with increased temperature, but volatilization was minimal during the test because in situ reactions maintained low aqueous-phase TCE concentrations.

  7. Evaluation on the Nanoscale Zero Valent Iron Based Microbial Denitrification for Nitrate Removal from Groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Lai; Liu, Yiwen; Gao, Shu-Hong; Chen, Xueming; Xin, Pei; Dai, Xiaohu; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale zero valent iron (NZVI) based microbial denitrification has been demonstrated to be a promising technology for nitrate removal from groundwater. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to evaluate the performance of this new technology and to provide insights into the chemical and microbial interactions in the system in terms of nitrate reduction, ammonium accumulation and hydrogen turnover. The developed model integrates NZVI-based abiotic reduction of nitrate, NZVI corrosion for hydrogen production and hydrogen-based microbial denitrification and satisfactorily describes all of the nitrate and ammonium dynamics from two systems with highly different conditions. The high NZVI corrosion rate revealed by the model indicates the high reaction rate of NZVI with water due to their large specific surface area and high surface reactivity, leading to an effective microbial nitrate reduction by utilizing the produced hydrogen. The simulation results further suggest a NZVI dosing strategy (3–6?mmol/L in temperature range of 30–40?°C, 6–10?mmol/L in temperature range of 15–30?°C and 10–14?mmol/L in temperature range of 5–15?°C) during groundwater remediation to make sure a low ammonium yield and a high nitrogen removal efficiency. PMID:26199053

  8. Enhanced degradation of carbon tetrachloride by surfactant-modified zero-valent iron*

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Ya-feng; Guan, Bao-hong; Wu, Zhong-biao; Wang, Da-hui

    2006-01-01

    Sorption of carbon tetrachloride (CT) by zero-valent iron (ZVI) is the rate-limiting step in the degradation of CT, so the sorption capacity of ZVI is of great importance. This experiment was aimed at enhancing the sorption of CT by ZVI and the degradation rate of CT by modification of surfactants. This study showed that ZVI modified by cationic surfactants has favorable synergistic effect on the degradation of CT. The CT degradation rate of ZVI modified by cetyl pyridinium bromide (CPB) was higher than that of the unmodified ZVI by 130%, and the CT degradation rate of ZVI modified by cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) was higher than that of the unmodified ZVI by 81%. This study also showed that the best degradation effect is obtained at the near critical micelle concentrations (CMC) and that high loaded cationic surfactant does not have good synergistic effect on the degradation due to its hydrophilicity and the block in surface reduction sites. Furthermore degradation of CT by ZVI modified by nonionic surfactant has not positive effect on the degradation as the ionic surfactant and the ZVI modified by anionic surfactant has hardly any obvious effects on the degradation. PMID:16909470

  9. Chromate transport through columns packed with surfactant-modified zeolite/zero valent iron pellets.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaohui; Kirk Jones, H; Zhang, Pengfei; Bowman, Robert S

    2007-08-01

    Chromate transport through columns packed with zeolite/zero valent iron (Z/ZVI) pellets, either untreated or treated with the cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA), was studied at different flow rates. In the presence of sorbed HDTMA, the chromate retardation factor increased by a factor of five and the pseudo first-order rate constant for chromate reduction increased by 1.5-5 times. The increase in rate constant from the column studies was comparable to a six-fold increase in the rate constant determined in a batch study. At a fast flow rate, the apparent delay in chromate breakthrough from the HDTMA modified Z/ZVI columns was primarily caused by the increase in chromate reduction rate constant. In contrast, at a slower flow rate, the retardation in chromate transport from the HDTMA modified Z/ZVI columns mainly originated from chromate sorption onto the HDTMA modified Z/ZVI pellets. Due to dual porosity, the presence of immobile water was responsible for the earlier breakthrough of chromate in columns packed with zeolite and Z/ZVI pellets. The results from this study further confirm the role of HDTMA in enhancing sorption and reduction efficiency of contaminants in groundwater remediation. PMID:17448519

  10. Analytical characterisation of nanoscale zero-valent iron: A methodological review.

    PubMed

    Chekli, L; Bayatsarmadi, B; Sekine, R; Sarkar, B; Shen, A Maoz; Scheckel, K G; Skinner, W; Naidu, R; Shon, H K; Lombi, E; Donner, E

    2016-01-15

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) have been widely tested as they are showing significant promise for environmental remediation. However, many recent studies have demonstrated that their mobility and reactivity in subsurface environments are significantly affected by their tendency to aggregate. Both the mobility and reactivity of nZVI mainly depends on properties such as particle size, surface chemistry and bulk composition. In order to ensure efficient remediation, it is crucial to accurately assess and understand the implications of these properties before deploying these materials into contaminated environments. Many analytical techniques are now available to determine these parameters and this paper provides a critical review of their usefulness and limitations for nZVI characterisation. These analytical techniques include microscopy and light scattering techniques for the determination of particle size, size distribution and aggregation state, and X-ray techniques for the characterisation of surface chemistry and bulk composition. Example characterisation data derived from commercial nZVI materials is used to further illustrate method strengths and limitations. Finally, some important challenges with respect to the characterisation of nZVI in groundwater samples are discussed. PMID:26709296

  11. -encapsulated zero-valent iron nanoparticles for degradation of organic dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Zhou; Wu, Qingzhi; Wang, Min; Yang, Yushi; Long, Jia; Chen, Xiaohui

    2014-09-01

    A series of nanocomposites consisting of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (ZVI NPs) encapsulated in SiO2 microspheres were successfully synthesized through a successive two-step method, i.e., the wet chemical reduction by borohydride followed by a modified Stöber method. The as-synthesized nanocomposites were characterized using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer, and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer. The catalytic performance of SiO2-encapsulated ZVI nanocomposites for the degradation of organic dyes was investigated using methylene blue (MB) as the model dye in the presence of H2O2. The results showed that the degradation efficiency and apparent rate constant of the degradation reaction were significantly enhanced with increased ZVI NPs encapsulated in SiO2 microspheres, whereas the dosage of H2O2 remarkably promoted degradation rate without affecting degradation efficiency. The content-dependent magnetic property ensured the excellent magnetic separation of degradation products under an external magnet. This strategy for the synthesis of SiO2-encapsulated ZVI NPs nanocomposites was low cost and easy to scale-up for industrial production, thereby enabling promising applications in environmental remediation.

  12. Detoxification of PAX-21 ammunitions wastewater by zero-valent iron for microbial reduction of perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Se Chang; Cha, Daniel K; Kim, Byung J; Oh, Seok-Young

    2011-08-30

    US Army and the Department of Defense (DoD) facilities generate perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)) from munitions manufacturing and demilitarization processes. Ammonium perchlorate is one of the main constituents in Army's new main charge melt-pour energetic, PAX-21. In addition to ammonium perchlorate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) are the major constituents of PAX-21. In order to evaluate microbial perchlorate reduction as a practical option for the treatment of perchlorate in PAX-21 wastewater, we conducted biodegradation experiments using glucose as the primary sources of electrons and carbon. Batch experiments showed that negligible perchlorate was removed in microbial reactors containing PAX-21 wastewater while control bottles containing seed bacteria and glucose rapidly and completely removed perchlorate. These results suggested that the constituents in PAX-21 wastewater may be toxic to perchlorate reducing bacteria. A series of batch toxicity test was conducted to identify the toxic constituents in PAX-21 and DNAN was identified as the primary toxicant responsible for inhibiting the activity of perchlorate reducing bacteria. It was hypothesized that pretreatment of PAX-21 by zero-valent iron granules will transform toxic constituents in PAX-21 wastewater to non-toxic products. We observed complete reduction of DNAN to 2,4-diaminoanisole (DAAN) and RDX to formaldehyde in abiotic iron reduction study. After a 3-day acclimation period, perchlorate in iron-treated PAX-21 wastewater was rapidly decreased to an undetectable level in 2 days. This result demonstrated that iron treatment not only removed energetic compounds but also eliminated the toxic constituents that inhibited the subsequent microbial process. PMID:21700387

  13. Mobility, Deposition and Remobilization of pre-Synthesis Stabilized Nano-scale Zero Valent Iron in Long Column Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, C. V.; O'Carroll, D. M.; Sleep, B.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive zero-valent iron is currently being used for remediation of contaminated groundwater. Permeable reactive barriers are the current state-of-the-practice method for using zero-valent iron. Instead of an excavated trench filled with granular zero-valent iron, a relatively new and promising method is the injection of a nano-scale zero-valent iron colloid suspension (nZVI) into the subsurface using injection wells. One goal of nZVI injection can be to deposit zero valent iron in the aquifer and form a reactive permeable zone which is no longer bound to limited depths and plume treatment, but can also be used directly at the source. It is very important to have a good understanding of the transport behavior of nZVI during injection as well as the fate of nZVI after injection due to changes in the flow regime or water chemistry changes. So far transport was mainly tested using commercially available nZVI, however these studies suggest that further work is required as commercial nZVI was prone to aggregation, resulting in low physical stability of the suspension and very short travel distances in the subsurface. In the presented work, nZVI is stabilized during synthesis to significantly increase the physical suspension stability. To improve our understanding of nZVI transport, the feasibility for injection into various porous media materials and controlled deposition, a suite of column experiments are conducted. The column experiments are performed using a long 1.5m column and a novel nZVI measuring technique. The measuring technique was developed to non-destructively determine the concentration of nano-scale iron during the injection. It records the magnetic susceptibility, which makes it possible to get transient nZVI retention profiles along the column. These transient nZVI retention profiles of long columns provide unique insights in the transport behavior of nZVI which cannot be obtained using short columns or effluent breakthrough curves.

  14. Oxygen controlled product formation in CCl{sub 4} dechlorination using zero-valent iron

    SciTech Connect

    Helland, B.R.; Alvarez, P.J.J.; Schnoor, J.L.

    1995-12-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) was abiotically dechlorinated using zero-valent iron powder (Fe{sup o}) to yield chloroform (CHCl{sub 3}) and methylene chloride (CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}), which did not undergo further dechlorination. Dechlorination was rapid and approximated first-order kinetics in the range of concentrations tested (CCl{sub 4}: 1.5 to 5.5 {mu}M; Fe{sup o}: 1 to 10 g per 265 mL distilled deionized water). Initial dechlorination rate coefficients for anoxic batch reactors (0.290 {plus_minus} 0.009 hr{sup -1} for 1 g Fe{sup o}; 1.723 {plus_minus} 0.078 hr{sup -1} for 10 g Fe{sup o}) increased with iron surface area (initially 2.4 {plus_minus} 0.2 m{sup 2}/g). Dechlorination also occurred under oxic conditions, although rates were significantly slower (e.g., 0.085 {plus_minus} 0.041 hr{sup -1} for 1 g Fe{sup o} and 7.4 mg/L initial dissolved oxygen). Rate coefficients increased with time, probably due to an increase in reactive surface area from pitting and dissolution of the iron surface. A rapid pH increase was synchronous to dissolved oxygen consumption, and the pH remained constant after oxygen depletion. This was attributed to the proton and oxygen consuming aerobic corrosion of the Fe{sup o} surface. Recalcitrant CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} was decreased in the presence of dissolved oxygen, which reacted with dechlorinated intermediates to yield less environmentally onerous products such as formic acid and carbon monoxide.

  15. Mechanism of Co(II) adsorption by zero valent iron/graphene nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Xing, Min; Xu, Lejin; Wang, Jianlong

    2016-01-15

    Nanoscale zero valent iron (ZVI)/graphene (GF) composite was prepared and characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurement and zeta potential determination. The adsorption isotherm of Co(II) in aqueous solution, as well as the influence of pH values and ionic strengths was studied. The mechanism of Co(II) adsorption by GF was investigated through analyzing the sorption products at initial pH of 3.0, 6.0 and 9.0 using high-resolution transmission electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray detector (HRTEM-EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating-sample magnetometer (VSM), Raman spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurement. The results indicated that Langmuir isotherm model fitted well and the adsorption capacity was 131.58mgg(-1) at 30°C. Adsorption capacity was not significantly influenced by ionic strength and kept high at pH 4.0?9.0. The detail information of GF-Co interaction at different initial pH values was obtained using XAFS analysis combined with other characterization methods. Coordination numbers (CN) and interatomic distances (R) of both Fe and Co were given. At pH 3.0 and pH 6.0, the Co-substituted iron oxides transformed to CoFe2O4-like structure, while at pH 9.0 they changed to green rust-like phases. Co occupied preferentially in the octahedral sites in acid solution. The adsorption mechanism of Co(II) was attributed to inner-sphere complexation and dissolution/re-precipitation of the substituted metal oxides. PMID:26368802

  16. Polymeric coatings eliminate the bactericidal effects of Nanoscale zero-valent iron to Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, G. V.; Gregory, K.; Li, Z.

    2009-12-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles that are used in aquifer remediation may come in contact with subsurface bacteria, and may adversely affect subsurface bacteria. Studies showed that NZVI is toxic toward E. coli at concentrations as low as a few mg/L. However, NZVI particles used in remediation are coated with polymers or natural organic matter (NOM). It is unclear how these surface coatings may affect the bactericidal properties of NZVI. The objectives of this study were to assess the effect that (i) coatings (both anthropogenic and natural) and (ii) particle oxidative state have on the bactericidal properties of NZVI on a gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli. Bacteria (106 cells/L) were exposed to 100 mg/L of bare or coated NZVI for 60 minutes under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Bacteria were plated at specified times over 60 minutes to determine the number of viable bacteria in the reactor. Bare NZVI was cytotoxic at only 100 mg/L NZVI with over 5 log kill after 60 minutes of exposure. Exposure under aerobic conditions resulted in less than 1 log kill. The lower bactericidal effects were due to rapid oxidation of the iron to Fe(II) and Fe(III) mineral phases that are not toxic. All organic coatings on NZVI decreased or eliminated NZVI cytotoxicity when exposed at the same NZVI concentrations as in the bare case. The decrease in bactericidal effects of coated NZVI over bare NZVI was due to electrosteric repulsions afforded by the coatings that inhibited contact of NZVI with the bacteria. The inhibition of attachment to bacteria was confirmed with TEM and with NZVI sedimentation studies. Application of coatings may be considered as a means of decreasing the effects of NZVI on subsurface bacteria in field application.

  17. Zero-valent Iron Emplacement in Permeable Porous Media Using Polymer Additions

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Mart; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Covert, Matthew A.; Vermeul, Vince R.

    2007-02-15

    At the Hanford Site in Washington, an extensive In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) permeable reactive barrier was installed to prevent chromate from reaching the Columbia River. However, chromium has been detected in several wells, indicating a premature loss of the reductive capacity in the aquifer. One possible cause for premature chromate breakthrough is associated with the presence of high-permeability zones in the aquifer. The potential emplacement of zero-valent iron (Fe0) into high-permeability Hanford sediments to enhance the barrier’s reductive capacity using shear-thinning fluids containing polymers was investigated in three-dimensional wedge-shaped aquifer models. Porous media were packed in the wedge-shaped flow cell to create either a heterogeneous layered system with a high-permeability zone between two low-permeability zones or a high-permeability channel surrounded by low-permeability materials. The injection flow rate, polymer type, polymer concentration, and injected pore volumes were determined based on preliminary short- and long-column experiments. The flow cell experiments indicated that iron concentration enhancements of at least 0.6% (w/w) could be obtained using moderate flow rates and injection of 30 pore volumes. The aqueous pressure increased by a maximum of 25 KPa during infiltration, but a decrease in permeability was not observed. Under optimal conditions, the 0.6% amended Fe0 concentration would provide approximately 20 times the average reductive capacity that is provided by the dithionite-reduced Fe (II) in the ISRM barrier.

  18. Transport of carbon colloid supported nanoscale zero-valent iron in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, Jan; Oswald, Sascha

    2013-04-01

    The use of nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) for environmental remediation is an emerging technology for in situ remediation of contaminated groundwater. Due to its high surface area and high reactivity nZVI is able to dechlorinate organic contaminants and render them to less harmful substances. Carbo-Iron is a newly developed material consisting of activated carbon particles (d50 = 0.6 - 2.4 µm) that are doted with nZVI particles. These particles combine the sorption capacity of activated carbon and the reactivity of nZVI. Additionally the main limitation for nZVI delivery, a limited mobility due to fast aggregation and sedimentation of nZVI in dispersions and soils, might be solved. According to transport theory, particles with a diameter of approximately 1 µm are more mobile than unsupported nZVI particles in sandy aquifer systems. Results from column tests and a two dimensional laboratory aquifer test system are presented: Column tests using columns of 40 cm length were filled with sand. A particle suspension was pumped against gravity through the system. Results show, addition of a polyanionic stabilizer such as Carboxymethylcellulouse (CMC) is required to enhancing mobility. Ionic strength and pH concentrations in an environmental relevant range do not interfere significantly with transport, but particle size was found to be crucial. Another experiment was performed in a two dimensional aquifer test system. The test system contains a sand filled container with a inner size of 40 x 5 x 110 cm and seven ports on each side. A constant flow of water was applied from the left to the right side through all ports and the middle port was fed with a Carbo-Iron suspension. Results show a transport through the laboratory aquifer within few exchanged pore volumes, and breakthrough of Carbo-Iron at the outlet. Deposits of immobile Carbo-Iron were found to be decreasing with distance from the injection port. No gravity effects were observed. Results suggest high mobility of carbon supported nZVI under environmental relevant conditions. Carbo-Iron might be helpful to deliver nZVI into contaminated aquifers. There 1D and 2D results support the design of a field test and application of Carbo-Iron for nZVI delivery.

  19. Assessment of transport of two polyelectrolyte-stabilized zero-valent iron nanoparticles in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raychoudhury, Trishikhi; Naja, Ghinwa; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2010-11-01

    This study investigated the breakthrough patterns of carboxymethyl cellulose- and polyacrylic acid-stabilized zero-valent iron (Fe 0) nanoparticles (NZVI) from packed sand columns under a range of pore water velocities of 0.02, 0.2 and 1 cm min - 1 and NZVI influent concentrations of 0.1, 0.5 and 3 g L - 1 . The NZVI effluent relative concentrations of both types of particles decreased with slower flow velocities and increasing particle concentrations. PAA-NZVI exhibited slower elution from the columns than CMC-NZVI under identical experimental conditions, and this is attributed to more rapid aggregation kinetics of PAA-NZVI. The elution patterns of PAA-NZVI showed a stronger trend of gradually increasing effluent concentrations with flushing of additional pore volumes, especially at low flushing velocities and higher influent particle concentrations and this phenomenon too can be attributed to increasing aggregate sizes with time which caused decreases in the values of the single collector efficiency and thus the deposition rate constant. A 7 nm increase in CMC-NZVI aggregate size over 60 min was observed using nanoparticle tracking analysis. The reduction in colloidal stability due to aggregation of CMC- and PAA-NZVI was verified using sedimentation tests, and it was found that PAA-NZVI were less stable than CMC-NZVI. There were also notable inherent differences in the two NZVI particles. The CMC-NZVI were monodisperse with a mean diameter of 5.7 ± 0.9 nm, whereas PAA-NZVI had a bimodal particle size distribution with a small sub-population of particles with mean size of 30 ± 21 nm and a more abundant population of 4.6 ± 0.8 nm diameter particles. Furthermore, PAA-NZVI had a lower surface potential. These characteristics are also responsible for the different elution patterns CMC- and PAA-NZVI.

  20. Foam-assisted delivery of nanoscale zero valent iron in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yuanzhao; Liu, Bo; Shen, Xin; Zhong, Lirong; Li, Xiqing

    2013-09-01

    Foam is potentially a promising vehicle to deliver nanoparticles for vadose zone remediation as foam can overcome the intrinsic problems associated with solution-based delivery, such as preferential flow and contaminant mobilization. In this work, the feasibility of using foam to deliver nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) in unsaturated porous media was investigated. Foams generated using surfactant sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES) showed excellent ability to carry nZVI. SLES and nZVI concentrations in the foaming solutions did not affect the percentages of nZVI concentrations in foams relative to nZVI concentrations in the solutions. When foams carrying nZVI were injected through the unsaturated columns, the fractions of nZVI exiting the column were much higher than those when nZVI was injected in liquid. The enhanced nZVI transport implies that foam delivery could significantly increase the radius of influence of injected nZVI. The type and concentrations of surfactants and the influent nZVI concentrations did not noticeably affect nZVI transport during foam delivery. In contrast, nZVI retention increased considerably as the grain size of porous media decreased. Oxidation of foam-delivered nZVI due to oxygen diffusion into unsaturated porous media was visually examined using a flow cell. It was demonstrated that if foams are injected to cover a deep vadose zone layer, oxidation would only cause a small fraction of foam-delivered nZVI to be oxidized before it reacts with contaminants.

  1. Hydrogen production from the dissolution of nano zero valent iron and its effect on anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Xi; Guo, Jialiang; Zhang, Chunyang; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Nano zero valent iron (NZVI) has shown inhibition on methanogenesis in anaerobic digestion due to its reductive decomposition of cell membrane. The inhibition was accompanied by the accumulation of hydrogen gas due to rapid NZVI dissolution. It is not clear whether and how rapid hydrogen release from NZVI dissolution directly affects anaerobic digestion. In this study, the hydrogen release kinetics from NZVI (average size = 55 ± 11 nm) dissolution in deionized water under anaerobic conditions was first evaluated. The first-order NZVI dissolution rate constant was 2.62 ± 0.26 h(-1) with its half-life of 0.26 ± 0.03 h. Two sets of anaerobic digestion experiments (i.e., in the presence of glucose or without any substrate but at different anaerobic sludge concentrations) were performed to study the impact of H2 release from rapid NZVI dissolution, in which H2 was generated in a separate water bottle containing NZVI (i.e., ex situ H2 or externally supplied from NZVI dissolution) before hydrogen gas was introduced to anaerobic digestion. The results showed that the H2 partial pressure in the headspace of the digestion bottle reached as high as 0.27 atm due to rapid NZVI dissolution, resulting in temporary inhibition of methane production. Nevertheless, the 5-d cumulative methane volume in the group with ex situ H2 production due to NZVI dissolution was actually higher than that of control, suggesting NZVI inhibition on methanogenesis is solely due to the reductive decomposition of cell membrane after direct contact with NZVI. PMID:26521217

  2. Impact of Subsurface Heterogeneities on nano-Scale Zero Valent Iron Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, M. M.; Sleep, B. E.; O'Carroll, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    Nano-scale zero valent iron (nZVI) has been applied as a remediation technology at sites contaminated with chlorinated compounds and heavy metals. Although laboratory studies have demonstrated high reactivity for the degradation of target contaminants, the success of nZVI in the field has been limited due to poor subsurface mobility. When injected into the subsurface, nZVI tends to aggregate and be retained by subsurface soils. As such nZVI suspensions need to be stabilized for increased mobility. However, even with stabilization, soil heterogeneities can still lead to non-uniform nZVI transport, resulting in poor distribution and consequently decreased degradation of target compounds. Understanding how nZVI transport can be affected by subsurface heterogeneities can aid in improving the technology. This can be done with the use of a numerical model which can simulate nZVI transport. In this study CompSim, a finite difference groundwater model, is used to simulate the movement of nZVI in a two-dimensional domain. CompSim has been shown in previous studies to accurately predict nZVI movement in the subsurface, and is used in this study to examine the impact of soil heterogeneity on nZVI transport. This work also explores the impact of different viscosities of the injected nZVI suspensions (corresponding to different stabilizing polymers) and injection rates on nZVI mobility. Analysis metrics include travel time, travel distance, and average nZVI concentrations. Improving our understanding of the influence of soil heterogeneity on nZVI transport will lead to improved field scale implementation and, potentially, to more effective remediation of contaminated sites.

  3. Straining of polyelectrolyte-stabilized nanoscale zero valent iron particles during transport through granular porous media.

    PubMed

    Raychoudhury, Trishikhi; Tufenkji, Nathalie; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the relevance of straining of nano-sized particles of zero valent iron coated with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-NZVI) during transport in model subsurface porous media is assessed. Although deposition of polyelectrolyte stabilized-NZVI on granular subsurface media due to physicochemical attachment processes has been reported previously, there is limited knowledge on the significance of the collector (sand) diameter on the deposition and spatial distribution of the retention of such nanoparticles. Experiments were conducted to assess the transport of CMC-NZVI in columns packed with four different-sized sands of mean diameter of 775 ?m, 510 ?m, 250 ?m and 150 ?m and at three different particle concentrations of 0.085 g L(-1), 0.35 g L(-1) and 1.70 g L(-1). CMC-NZVI effluent concentrations decreased with smaller sand diameters. High CMC-NZVI particle retention near the inlet, particularly for the finer sands was observed, even with a low ionic strength of 0.1 mM for the electrolyte medium. These observations are consistent with particle retention in porous media due to straining and/or wedging. Two colloid transport models, one considering particle retention by physicochemical deposition and detachment of those deposited particles, and the other considering particle retention by straining along with particle deposition and detachment, were fitted to the experimental data. The model accounting for straining shows a better fit, especially to the CMC-NZVI retention data along the length of the column. The straining rate coefficients decreased with larger sand diameters. This study demonstrates that CMC-NZVI particles, despite of their small size (hydrodynamic diameters of 167-185 nm and transmission electron microscopy imaged diameters of approximately 85 nm), may be removed by straining during transport, especially through fine granular subsurface media. The tailing effect, observed in the particle breakthrough curves, is attributed to detachment of deposited particles. PMID:24361705

  4. Effects of alcohols, anionic and nonionic surfactants on the reduction of PCE and TCE by zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Loraine, G A

    2001-04-01

    The effects of surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and Triton X-a00 (TX), and alcohols (methanol, ethanol, and propanol) on the dehalogenation of TCE and PCE by zero-valent iron were examined. Surface concentrations of PCE and TCE on the iron were dependent on aqueous surfactant concentrations. At concentrations above the CMC, sorbed halocarbon concentrations declined and concentrations associated with solution phase micelles increased. The anionic surfactant SDS ([SDS] < CMC) did not affect reduction rates, until the CMC was exceeded after which reactivity decreased, possibly due to sequestering of the TCE and PCE in mobile micelles. The nonionic TX showed a mixed effect on reactivity, increasing the PCE reduction rate, but not affecting TCE removal. Production of TCE from PCE increased in the presence of TX. Similar experiments showed that methanol, ethanol, and propanol inhibited reduction of TCE and PCE by metallic iron. Zero-valent iron may be useful in recycling soil washing effluents contaminated with TCE and PCE. PMID:11317892

  5. Removal of Arsenic(III) from Groundwater with Nano Scale Zero-Valent Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, B. A.; Kiser, J.; Kanel, S. R.; Choi, H.

    2004-12-01

    Arsenite (As(III)) is a highly toxic, soluble species that is a naturally occurring groundwater contaminant of environmental concern. There is a need for detailed information about the natural geochemical cycling of As(III), including the fundamental chemical mechanisms of the reactions of As(III) with a variety of surfaces, both natural and engineered. In this paper we focus on the development of ultra-fine, synthetic nanoscale zero-valent iron (nano-Fe(0)) material as both a potential candidate for As(III) remediation and a high surface area model compound to study the remediation of groundwater containing As(III) with larger Fe(0) particles. A variety of techniques were used including SEM, AFM, XRD, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to characterize particle size, surface morphology, corrosion layers formed, and As(III)-nano-Fe(0) surface complexation chemistry. Results from AFM showed particle size ranged from 1-120 nm. XRD and SEM results revealed that nano-Fe(0) gradually converted to magnetite/maghemite corrosion products mixed with lepidocrocite over 60 d. Arsenic(III) batch adsorption kinetics were rapid following a pseudo-first-order rate expression with observed reaction rate constants (kobs) of up to 1.3 per min (at varying Fe(0) densities). These values are about 1000 times higher than kobs literature values for As(III) adsorption on micron size Fe(0). Results from laser light scattering (electrophoretic mobility) and XAS confirmed that inner-sphere surface complexation occurred on nano-Fe(0) corrosion products. In addition, oxidation of As(III) to As(V) was evident in batch experiments. Addition of 10 mM anions (bicarbonate, sulfate, nitrate, and arsenate) had no effect on the uptake of As(III) whereas 10 mM silicic acid and phosphate reduced the uptake of As(III) from 99.9% to 44.9 and 66.3%, respectively. Our results suggest that nano-Fe(0) is an appropriate material for further investigation of the feasibility of using Fe(0) for As(III) remediation.

  6. Degradation of Perchloroethene by zero-valent iron evaluated by carbon isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Simon; Watzinger, Andrea; Reichenauer, Thomas G.

    2014-05-01

    Perchloroethene (PCE) is a widely spread groundwater contaminant in formally used industrial sites. Zero valent iron (ZVI) is used for in situ chemical reduction (ISCR) of PCE contaminants in the groundwater. A key factor in the application of in situ remediation technologies is a proper monitoring of contaminant reduction. The measurement of the stable isotope ratio is a promising method that is already used for quantifying microbial degradation of chlorinated contaminants. The carbon isotope ratio of PCE, measured by - isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled to a gas chromatograph via a combustion interface (GC-C-IRMS), increases during degradation of PCE and can be directly related to the degree of degradation. It can be used to directly quantify chemical degradation and thus serves as a useful monitoring tool for groundwater remediation. An experiment to determine the carbon isotopic fractionation factor was performed as a lab experiment using Nanofer Star (NANOIRON). Two different PCE concentrations (c1: 220mgL-1, c2: 110mgL-1) mixed with 0.5 g of ZVI were sealed under deoxygenated conditions in 250 ml glas bottles locked with mininert caps. The bottles were incubated on a shaker for 865 h. Samples were taken weekly to measure the change in the carbon isotopic ratio of PCE as well as its concentration. Results showed a strong increase in the carbon isotope ratio (?-value) of PCE (start: -27 o end: -4 ), which indicates a significant dechlorination process of PCE. Beside PCE also one degradation product (Trichloroethylene - TCE) was measured. TCE was further dechlorinated as indicated by the ?-value change of TCE from -26 o to -4 oȦn unexpected intermediate value of -45 o for TCE was observed in the experiment. This fluctuation could be induced by the time depending concentration due to degradation and conversation processes. Furthermore, it seems that the progress of the ?-value is affected by the starting concentration of PCE (?-value of c1 < c2) as there is a higher ratio of PCE to ZVI.

  7. Enhanced Perchloroethylene Reduction Using Surfactant-Modified Zeolite/Zero-Valent Iron Pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P.; Tao, X.; Bowman, R. S.

    2001-12-01

    We determined the effect of surfactant modification on perchloroethylene (PCE) reduction by zeolite/zero-valent iron (ZVI) pellets. We packed the pellets into four columns (30-cm long, 4.8-cm diameter) and modified two of the columns by sorbing the cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (HDTMA-Cl) onto the pellets. We then continuously injected 11.0 ? M PCE into the columns and monitored the effluent concentrations of PCE, trichloroethylene (TCE), cis-, trans-, and 1,1-dichloroethylene (DCE), and vinyl chloride. The effluent PCE concentrations for the surfactant-modified columns were significantly lower than those for the unmodified columns (i.e., by factors of 6, 4, and 3 at pore water velocities of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 m/day, respectively). PCE reduction rate constants were three times higher for the modified columns relative to the unmodified columns at the three velocities. For a given column, the PCE reduction rate constant did not decrease as the pore water velocity increased from 0.5 m/day to 2.0 m/day. TCE was observed in the effluent of the modified and unmodified columns, with the concentrations for the modified columns (0.2, 0.4, and 0.7 ? M at 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 m/day, respectively) roughly 10 times higher than those for the unmodified columns. No cis-DCE was detected in the effluent of the unmodified columns, whereas noticeable amounts (0.01-0.03 ? M) of cis-DCE were observed in the effluent of the modified columns. No trans-DCE, 1,1-DCE, or vinyl chloride was detected in the effluents of the modified or unmodified columns. Our results clearly demonstrate that the modification of zeolite/ZVI pellets with HDTMA significantly enhances PCE reduction. The enhanced PCE reduction may be due to an increased local PCE concentration in the vicinity of ZVI surface as a result of PCE sorption by the modified pellets. Our data also suggest that the PCE reduction mechanism for the modified pellets differs from that for the unmodified pellets, as seen by the much higher TCE and cis-DCE generation with the modified pellets.

  8. Degradation of simazine from aqueous solutions by diatomite-supported nanosized zero-valent iron composite materials.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiming; Zheng, Shuilin; Ayoko, Godwin A; Frost, Ray L; Xi, Yunfei

    2013-12-15

    A novel composite material based on deposition of nanosized zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles on acid-leached diatomite was synthesised for the removal of a chlorinated contaminant in water. The nZVI/diatomite composites were characterised by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, elemental analysis, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Compared with the pure nZVI particles, better dispersion of nZVI particles on the surface or inside the pores of diatom shells was observed. The herbicide simazine was selected as the model chlorinated contaminant and the removal efficiency by nZVI/diatomite composite was compared with that of the pristine nZVI and commercial iron powder. It was found that the diatomite supported nZVI composite material prepared by centrifugation exhibits relatively better efficient activity in decomposition of simazine than commercial Fe, lab synthesised nZVI and composite material prepared via rotary evaporation, and the optimum experimental conditions were obtained based on a series of batch experiments. This study on immobilising nZVI particles onto diatomite opens a new avenue for the practical application of nZVI and the diatomite-supported nanosized zero-valent iron composite materials have potential applications in environmental remediation. PMID:24231330

  9. Removing pentachlorophenol from water using a nanoscale zero-valent iron/H2O2 system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Rong; Cheng, Can; Liu, Guo-Hua; Zheng, Xiang; Li, Guanqing; Li, Jie

    2015-12-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) is an environmentally benign material that has been widely used as a reducing agent to treat environmental pollutants. In this study, nZVI was used as a heterogeneous Fenton catalyst in an nZVI/H2O2 system to remove pentachlorophenol (PCP) from water. The PCP degradation process in the nZVI/H2O2 system was completed within 1h. The relative Cl(-) concentration increased throughout the test period (6h), indicating that the performance of the oxidative system in terms of dechlorination was excellent. The initial H2O2 concentration significantly influenced the PCP removal rate, and nZVI performed better than commercial zero-valent iron as a catalyst. Moreover, magnetite (Fe3O4), which was the main product of the corrosion of nZVI, was found to perform well as an adsorbent and catalyst, so it allowed the nZVI to be effectively reused. PMID:26184790

  10. Transport characteristics of nanoscale zero-valent iron carried by three different "vehicles" in porous media.

    PubMed

    Su, Yan; Zhao, Yong S; Li, Lu L; Qin, Chuan Y; Wu, Fan; Geng, Nan N; Lei, Jian S

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the transport properties of nanoscale zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) (nZVI) carried by three vehicles: water, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution, and SDS foam. Batch experiments were conducted to assess the sedimentation capability of nZVI particles in these three vehicles. Column experiments were conducted to investigate the transport properties of nZVI in porous media formed with different sizes of sand (0.25 mm to 0.5 mm, 0.5 mm to 0.9 mm, and 0.9 mm to 1.4 mm). Three main results were obtained. First, the batch experiments revealed that the stabilities of nZVI particles in SDS solution and SDS foam were improved, compared with that of nZVI particles in water. Moreover, the sedimentation of nZVI in foam was closely associated with the foam drainage volume. The nZVI content in foam was similar to that in the original foaming suspension, and the nZVI particle distribution in foam became significantly more uniform at a stirring speed of 3000 r/min. Second, the transport of nZVI was enhanced by foam compared with water and SDS solution for 0.25 mm to 0.5 mm diameter sand. For sand with diameters of 0.5 mm to 0.9 mm and 0.9 mm to 1.4 mm, the mobility of nZVI carried by SDS solution was optimal, followed by that of nZVI carried by foam and water. Thus, the mobility of nZVI in finer sand was significantly enhanced by foam, compared with that in coarse sand. In contrast, compared with the bare nZVI suspension and nZVI-laden foam, the spatial distribution of nZVI particles carried by SDS solution was significantly uniform along the column length. Third, the SDS concentration significantly influenced the migration of nZVI in porous media. The enhancement in the migration of nZVI carried by SDS solution was greater at an SDS dose of 0.25% compared with that at the other three doses (0.2%, 0.5%, and 1%) for sand with a 0.25 mm to 0.5 mm diameter. Increased SDS concentrations positively affected the transport of nZVI by foam for sand with a 0.25 mm to 0.5 mm diameter, and the SDS concentrations for enhancing the mobility of nZVI carried by SDS foam satisfied the following order: 1% > 0.5% > 0.25% > 0.2%. Thus, SDS solution and SDS foam were better vehicles than water for delivering nZVI particles to porous media for contamination remediation. PMID:25320851

  11. A field investigation on transport of carbon-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Busch, J; Meißner, T; Potthoff, A; Bleyl, S; Georgi, A; Mackenzie, K; Trabitzsch, R; Werban, U; Oswald, S E

    2015-10-01

    The application of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) for subsurface remediation of groundwater contaminants is a promising new technology, which can be understood as alternative to the permeable reactive barrier technique using granular iron. Dechlorination of organic contaminants by zero-valent iron seems promising. Currently, one limitation to widespread deployment is the fast agglomeration and sedimentation of nZVI in colloidal suspensions, even more so when in soils and sediments, which limits the applicability for the treatment of sources and plumes of contamination. Colloid-supported nZVI shows promising characteristics to overcome these limitations. Mobility of Carbo-Iron Colloids (CIC) - a newly developed composite material based on finely ground activated carbon as a carrier for nZVI - was tested in a field application: In this study, a horizontal dipole flow field was established between two wells separated by 5.3m in a confined, natural aquifer. The injection/extraction rate was 500L/h. Approximately 1.2kg of CIC was suspended with the polyanionic stabilizer carboxymethyl cellulose. The suspension was introduced into the aquifer at the injection well. Breakthrough of CIC was observed visually and based on total particle and iron concentrations detected in samples from the extraction well. Filtration of water samples revealed a particle breakthrough of about 12% of the amount introduced. This demonstrates high mobility of CIC particles and we suggest that nZVI carried on CIC can be used for contaminant plume remediation by in-situ formation of reactive barriers. PMID:25864966

  12. Nanoscale zero-valent iron/AC as heterogeneous Fenton catalysts in three-dimensional electrode system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Zhou, Lei; Yang, Jie; Yu, Xinmin; Jiang, Yonghai; Zhou, Minghua

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, nanoscale zero-valent iron/activated carbon (NZVI/AC) was investigated as heterogeneous Fenton catalyst in three-dimensional (3D) electrode system for methyl orange (MO) degradation. Some important operating parameters such as cathodic potential, pH, and O? flow rate were investigated, exhibiting good decolorization. The mineralization of MO was significantly improved by 20-35% compared to two-dimensional (2D) AC system at the optimum conditions. Although the TOC removal of AC was higher than NZVI/AC due to its good adsorption capacity initially, heterogeneous Fenton catalysis played a more and more important roles in the following test. After eight runs, NZVI/AC still exhibited excellent catalytic properties with low iron leaching. Further, a relatively comprehensive mechanism of NZVI/AC as particle electrodes in 3D system was proposed. PMID:24677061

  13. Hydraulic and geochemical performance of a permeable reactive barrier containing zero-valent iron, Denver Federal Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, P.B.; Dennehy, K.F.; Sandstrom, M.W.

    1999-01-01

    The hydraulic and geochemical performance of a 366 m long permeable reactive barrier (PRB) at the Denver Federal Center; Denver, Colorado, was evaluated. The funnel and gate system, which was installed in 1996 to intercept and remediate ground water contaminated with chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs), contained four 12.2 m wide gates filled with zero-valent iron. Ground water mounding on the upgradient side of the PRB resulted in a tenfold increase in the hydraulic gradient and ground water velocity through the gates compared to areas of the aquifer unaffected by the PRB. Water balance calculations for April 1997 indicate that about 75% of the ground water moving toward the PRB from upgradient areas moved through the gates. The rest of the water either accumulated on the upgradient side of the PRB or bypassed the PRB. Chemical data from monitoring wells screened down-gradient, beneath, and at the ends of the PRB indicate that contaminants had not bypassed the PRB, except in a few isolated areas. Greater than 99% of the CAH mass entering the gates was retained by the iron. Fifty-one percent of the CAH carbon entering one gate was accounted for in dissolved C1 and C2 hydrocarbons, primarily ethane and ethene, which indicates that CAHs may adsorb to the iron prior to being dehalogenated. Treated water exiting the gates displaced contaminated ground water at a distance of at least 3 m downgradient from the PRB by the end of 1997. Measurements of dissolved inorganic ions in one gate indicate that calcite and siderite precipitation in the gate could reduce gate porosity by about 0.35% per year. Results from this study indicate that funnel and gate systems containing zero-valent iron can effectively treat ground water contaminated with CAHs. However, the hydrologic impacts of the PRB on the flow system need to be fully understood to prevent contaminants from bypassing the PRB.

  14. Modelling the long-term performance of zero-valent iron using a spatio-temporal approach for iron aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouznetsova, Irina; Bayer, Peter; Ebert, Markus; Finkel, Michael

    2007-02-01

    Zero-valent iron (ZVI) permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) have become popular for the degradation of chlorinated ethenes (CEs) in groundwater. However, a knowledge gap exists pertaining to the longevity of ZVI. The present investigation addresses this situation by suggesting a numerical simulation model that is intended to be used in conjunction with field or column tests in order to describe long-term ZVI performance at individual sites. As ZVI aging processes are not yet completely understood and are still subject to research, we propose a phenomenological modelling technique instead of a common process-based approach. We describe ZVI aging by parameters that characterise the extent and rate of ZVI reactivity change depending on the propagation of the precipitation front through ZVI. We approximate degradation of CEs by pseudo-first order kinetics accounting for the formation of partially dechlorinated products, and describe ZVI reactivity change by scaling the degradation rate constants. Three independent modelling studies were carried out to test the suitability of the conceptual and numerical model to describe the observations of accelerated column tests. All three tests indicated that ZVI reactivity declined with an increasing number of exchanged pore volumes. Measured and modelled concentrations showed good agreement, thereby proving that resolving spatial as well as temporal changes in ZVI reactivity is reasonable.

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH BRIEF: LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS USING ZERO-VALENT IRON: AN EVALUATION AT TWO SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geochemical and microbiological factors that control long-term performance of subsurface permeable reactive barriers were evaluated at the Elizabeth City, NC and the Denver Federal Center, CO sites. These groundwater treatment systems use zero-valent iron filings to intercept an...

  16. The use of Zero-valent iron biosand filters to reduce E. coli O157:H12 in irrigation water applied to spinach plants in a field setting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contaminated irrigation water is a potential source for the introduction of foodborne pathogens on to produce commodities. Zero-valent iron (ZVI) may provide a simple cheap method to mitigate the contamination of produce groups through irrigation water. A small field scale system was utilized to e...

  17. Zero-valent iron/biotic treatment system for perchlorate-contaminated water: lab-scale performance, modeling, and full-scale implications

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computer program AQUASIM was used to model biological treatment of perchlorate-contaminated water using zero-valent iron corrosion as the hydrogen gas source. The laboratory-scale column was seeded with an autohydrogenotrophic microbial consortium previously shown to degrade ...

  18. Use of zero-valent iron biosand filters to reduce E. coli O157:H12 in irrigation water applied to spinach plants in a field setting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Zero-valent iron (ZVI) filters may provide an efficient method to mitigate the contamination of produce crops through irrigation water. Purpose: To evaluate the use of ZVI-filtration in decontaminating E. coli O157:H12 in irrigation water and on spinach plants in a small, field-scale...

  19. Reduction of aqueous Crvi using nanoscale zero-valent iron dispersed by high energy electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Guilong; Wang, Min; Zheng, Kang; Cai, Dongqing; Wu, Zhengyan

    2013-09-01

    High energy electron beam (HEEB) irradiation was used to disperse nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) for reduction of Crvi to Criii in aqueous solution. Pore size distribution, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction characterizations demonstrated that HEEB irradiation could effectively increase the dispersion of NZVI resulting in more active reduction sites of Crvi on NZVI. Batch reduction experiments indicated that the reductive capacity of HEEB irradiation-modified NZVI (IMNZVI) was significantly improved, as the reductive efficiency reached 99.79% under the optimal conditions (electron beam dose of 30 kGy at 10 MeV, pH 2.0 and 313 K) compared with that of raw NZVI (72.14%). Additionally, the NZVI was stable for at least two months after irradiation. The modification mechanism of NZVI by HEEB irradiation was investigated and the results indicated that charge and thermal effects might play key roles in dispersing the NZVI particles.

  20. Zero Valent Iron Significantly Enhances Methane Production from Waste Activated Sludge by Improving Biochemical Methane Potential Rather Than Hydrolysis Rate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiwen; Wang, Qilin; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion has been widely applied for waste activated sludge (WAS) treatment. However, methane production from anaerobic digestion of WAS is usually limited by the slow hydrolysis rate and/or poor biochemical methane potential of WAS. This work systematically studied the effects of three different types of zero valent iron (i.e., iron powder, clean scrap and rusty scrap) on methane production from WAS in anaerobic digestion, by using both experimental and mathematical approaches. The results demonstrated that both the clean and the rusty iron scrap were more effective than the iron powder for improving methane production from WAS. Model-based analysis showed that ZVI addition significantly enhanced methane production from WAS through improving the biochemical methane potential of WAS rather than its hydrolysis rate. Economic analysis indicated that the ZVI-based technology for enhancing methane production from WAS is economically attractive, particularly considering that iron scrap can be freely acquired from industrial waste. Based on these results, the ZVI-based anaerobic digestion process of this work could be easily integrated with the conventional chemical phosphorus removal process in wastewater treatment plant to form a cost-effective and environment-friendly approach, enabling maximum resource recovery/reuse while achieving enhanced methane production in wastewater treatment system. PMID:25652244

  1. Zero Valent Iron Significantly Enhances Methane Production from Waste Activated Sludge by Improving Biochemical Methane Potential Rather Than Hydrolysis Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yiwen; Wang, Qilin; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion has been widely applied for waste activated sludge (WAS) treatment. However, methane production from anaerobic digestion of WAS is usually limited by the slow hydrolysis rate and/or poor biochemical methane potential of WAS. This work systematically studied the effects of three different types of zero valent iron (i.e., iron powder, clean scrap and rusty scrap) on methane production from WAS in anaerobic digestion, by using both experimental and mathematical approaches. The results demonstrated that both the clean and the rusty iron scrap were more effective than the iron powder for improving methane production from WAS. Model-based analysis showed that ZVI addition significantly enhanced methane production from WAS through improving the biochemical methane potential of WAS rather than its hydrolysis rate. Economic analysis indicated that the ZVI-based technology for enhancing methane production from WAS is economically attractive, particularly considering that iron scrap can be freely acquired from industrial waste. Based on these results, the ZVI-based anaerobic digestion process of this work could be easily integrated with the conventional chemical phosphorus removal process in wastewater treatment plant to form a cost-effective and environment-friendly approach, enabling maximum resource recovery/reuse while achieving enhanced methane production in wastewater treatment system.

  2. Zero valent iron significantly enhances methane production from waste activated sludge by improving biochemical methane potential rather than hydrolysis rate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Wang, Qilin; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion has been widely applied for waste activated sludge (WAS) treatment. However, methane production from anaerobic digestion of WAS is usually limited by the slow hydrolysis rate and/or poor biochemical methane potential of WAS. This work systematically studied the effects of three different types of zero valent iron (i.e., iron powder, clean scrap and rusty scrap) on methane production from WAS in anaerobic digestion, by using both experimental and mathematical approaches. The results demonstrated that both the clean and the rusty iron scrap were more effective than the iron powder for improving methane production from WAS. Model-based analysis showed that ZVI addition significantly enhanced methane production from WAS through improving the biochemical methane potential of WAS rather than its hydrolysis rate. Economic analysis indicated that the ZVI-based technology for enhancing methane production from WAS is economically attractive, particularly considering that iron scrap can be freely acquired from industrial waste. Based on these results, the ZVI-based anaerobic digestion process of this work could be easily integrated with the conventional chemical phosphorus removal process in wastewater treatment plant to form a cost-effective and environment-friendly approach, enabling maximum resource recovery/reuse while achieving enhanced methane production in wastewater treatment system. PMID:25652244

  3. Comparisons of the reactivity, reusability and stability of four different zero-valent iron-based nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yingying; Fang, Zhanqiang; Qiu, Xinhong; Tsang, Eric Pokeung; Liang, Bin

    2014-08-01

    Our previous reports showed that nano zero-valent iron (nZVI), steel pickle liquor for the synthesis of nZVI (S-nZVI), nZVI immobilised in mesoporous silica microspheres (SiO2@FeOOH@Fe) and nano Ni/Fe bimetallic particles (Ni/Fe) have been proved to show good property for elimination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). However, it is necessary to compare their reactivity, reusability and stability when applied to in situ remediation. In this study, the performances of different iron-based nanoparticles were compared through reusability, sedimentation and iron dissolution experiments. The SiO2@FeOOH@Fe and Ni/Fe nanoparticles were shown to have higher reusability and stability, as they could be reused more than seven times, and that the SiO2@FeOOH@Fe can effectively avoid leaching iron ions into the solution and causing secondary pollution in the reaction. This study may serve as a reference for PBDE remediation in the future. PMID:24582360

  4. Hexavalent chromium reduction in contaminated soil: A comparison between ferrous sulphate and nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Di Palma, L; Gueye, M T; Petrucci, E

    2015-01-01

    Iron sulphate (FeSO4) and colloidal nano zero-valent iron (nZVI) as reducing agents were compared, with the aim of assessing their effectiveness in hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] removal from a contaminated industrial soil. Experiments were performed on soil samples collected from an industrial site where a nickel contamination, caused by a long-term productive activity, was also verified. The influence of reducing agents amount with respect to chromium content and the effectiveness of deoxygenation of the slurry were discussed. The soil was fully characterized before and after each test, and sequential extractions were performed to assess chemico-physical modifications and evaluate metals mobility induced by washing. Results show that both the reducing agents successfully lowered the amount of Cr(VI) in the soil below the threshold allowed by Italian Environmental Regulation for industrial reuse. Cr(VI) reduction by colloidal nZVI proved to be faster and more effective: the civil reuse of soil [Cr(VI)<2mg/kg] was only achieved using colloidal nZVI within 60min adopting a nZVI/Cr(VI) molar ratio of 30. The reducing treatment resulted in an increase in the amount of chromium in the oxide-hydroxide fraction, thus confirming a mechanism of chromium-iron hydroxides precipitation. In addition, a decrease of nickel (Ni) and lead (Pb) content in soil was also observed when acidic conditions were established. PMID:25139286

  5. Efficient removal of uranium from aqueous solution by zero-valent iron nanoparticle and its graphene composite.

    PubMed

    Li, Zi-Jie; Wang, Lin; Yuan, Li-Yong; Xiao, Cheng-Liang; Mei, Lei; Zheng, Li-Rong; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Ju-Hua; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Zhu, Zhen-Tai; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2015-06-15

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticle (ZVI-np) and its graphene composites were prepared and applied in the removal of uranium under anoxic conditions. It was found that solutions containing 24 ppm U(VI) could be completely cleaned up by ZVI-nps, regardless of the presence of NaHCO3, humic acid, mimic groundwater constituents or the change of solution pH from 5 to 9, manifesting the promising potential of this reactive material in permeable reactive barrier (PRB) to remediate uranium-contaminated groundwater. In the measurement of maximum sorption capacity, removal efficiency of uranium kept at 100% until C0(U) = 643 ppm, and the saturation sorption of 8173 mg U/g ZVI-nps was achieved at C0(U) = 714 ppm. In addition, reaction mechanisms were clarified based on the results of SEM, XRD, XANES, and chemical leaching in (NH4)2CO3 solution. Partially reductive precipitation of U(VI) as U3O7 was prevalent when sufficient iron was available; nevertheless, hydrolysis precipitation of U(VI) on surface would be predominant as iron got insufficient, characterized by releases of Fe(2+) ions. The dissolution of Fe(0) cores was assigned to be the driving force of continuous formation of U(VI) (hydr)oxide. The incorporation of graphene supporting matrix was found to facilitate faster removal rate and higher U(VI) reduction ratio, thus benefitting the long-term immobilization of uranium in geochemical environment. PMID:25734531

  6. A combined process of adsorption and Fenton-like oxidation for furfural removal using zero-valent iron residue.

    PubMed

    Li, Furong; Bao, Jianguo; Zhang, Tian C; Lei, Yutian

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the feasibility of using a combined adsorption and Fenton-like oxidation process (with zero-valent iron (ZVI) residue from heat wraps as an absorbent and catalyst) to remove furfural in the solution was evaluated. The influencing parameters (e.g. pH, H2O2 concentration, initial furfural concentration) and the reusability of ZVI residue (to replace the iron powder) were estimated. The ZVI residue was found to have much better adsorption effect on furfural at pH 2.0 compared with pH 6.7. For Fenton-like reaction alone with ZVI residue, the highest furfural removal of 97.5% was observed at the concentration of 0.176 mol/L H2O2, and all of the samples had >80% removal efficiency at different initial furfural concentrations of 2, 10, 20, 30 and 40 mmol/L. However, with a combined adsorption and Fenton-like oxidation, the removal efficiency of furfural was nearly 100% for all treatments. The ZVI residue used for furfural removal was much better than that of iron powder in the Fenton-like reaction at a seven-cycle experiment. This study suggests the combined process of adsorption and Fenton-like oxidation using ZVI residue is effective for the treatment of furfural in the liquid. PMID:26006292

  7. Degradation of organic dye using zero-valent iron prepared from by-product of pickling line.

    PubMed

    Jung, S C; Cho, H C; Ra, D G; Park, S H; Yoon, H S; Kim, S C; Kim, S J

    2011-01-01

    In this study, zero-valent iron (ZVI) was produced using iron oxide that is a by-product of a pickling line at a steel works. The reaction activity of the produced ZVI was evaluated through a series of decomposition experiments of Orange II aqueous solution. The size of ZVI particles increased with reduction temperature due to coalescence. Correspondingly, the specific surface area of ZVI decreased with increasing reduction temperature. The decomposition efficiency of synthesized ZVI particles was higher at a lower pH. In particular, no significant decomposition reaction was observed at pH of 4 and higher. The rate of the ZVI-assisted decomposition of Orange II was increased by addition of H2O2 at pH of 3, whereas it was reduced by addition of H2O2 at a higher pH of 6. Nevertheless, simultaneous use of ZVI, UV and H2O2 led to a considerable increase in the decomposition rate even at a high pH condition (pH = 6). PMID:22097085

  8. Simultaneous removal of perchlorate and energetic compounds in munitions wastewater by zero-valent iron and perchlorate-respiring bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Se Chang; Hubbard, Brian; Cha, Daniel K; Kim, Byung J

    2014-01-01

    Ammonium perchlorate is one of the main constituents in Army's insensitive melt-pour explosive, PAX-21 in addition to RDX and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN). The objective of this study is to develop an innovative treatment process to remove both perchlorate and energetic compounds simultaneously from PAX-21 production wastewater. It was hypothesized that the pretreatment of PAX-21 wastewater with zero-valent iron (ZVI) would convert energetic compounds to products that are more amenable for biological oxidation and that these products serve as electron donors for perchlorate-reducing bacteria. Results of batch ZVI reduction experiments showed that DNAN was completely reduced to 2,4-diaminoanisole and RDX was completely reduced to formaldehyde. Anaerobic batch biodegradation experiments showed that perchlorate (30 mg L(-1)) in ZVI-treated PAX-21 wastewater was decreased to an undetectable level after 5 days. Batch biodegradation experiments also confirmed that formaldehyde in ZVI-treated wastewater was the primary electron donor for perchlorate-respiring bacteria. The integrated iron-anaerobic bioreactor system was effective in completely removing energetic compounds and perchlorate from the PAX-21 wastewater without adding an exogenous electron donor. This study demonstrated that ZVI pretreatment not only removed energetic compounds, but also transformed energetic compounds to products that can serve as the source of electrons for perchlorate-respiring bacteria. PMID:24410688

  9. Mechanism insights into enhanced trichloroethylene removal using xanthan gum-modified microscale zero-valent iron particles.

    PubMed

    Xin, Jia; Han, Jun; Zheng, Xilai; Shao, Haibing; Kolditz, Olaf

    2015-03-01

    This report focuses on the enhancement in trichloroethylene (TCE) removal from contaminated groundwater using xanthan gum (XG)-modified, microscale, zero-valent iron (mZVI). Compared with bare mZVI, XG-coated mZVI increased the TCE removal efficiency by 30.37% over a 480-h experimental period. Because the TCE removal is attributed to both sorption and reduction processes, the contributions from sorption and reduction were separately investigated to determine the mechanism of XG on TCE removal using mZVI. The results showed that the TCE sorption capacity of mZVI was lower in the presence of XG, whereas the TCE reduction capacity was significantly increased. The FTIR spectra confirmed that XG, which is rich in hydrophilic functional groups, was adsorbed onto the iron surface through intermolecular hydrogen bonds, which competitively repelled the sorption and mass transfer of TCE toward reactive sites. The variations in the pH, Eh, and Fe(2+) concentration as functions of the reaction time were recorded and indicated that XG buffered the solution pH, inhibited surface passivation, and promoted TCE reduction by mZVI. Overall, the XG-modified mZVI was considered to be potentially effective for the in-situ remediation of TCE contaminated groundwater due to its high stability and dechlorination reactivity. PMID:25556871

  10. The specific reactive surface area of granular zero-valent iron in metal contaminant removal: Column experiments and modelling.

    PubMed

    Statham, Tom M; Mason, Lachlan R; Mumford, Kathryn A; Stevens, Geoffrey W

    2015-06-15

    A series of dynamic-flow kinetic experiments were conducted to assess the removal rates of aqueous Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions by zero-valent iron (ZVI), a promising material for inclusion in cold-climate remediation applications. The influence of experimental parameters on contaminant removal rates, including aqueous flow rate, operating temperature, and the concentrations of ZVI, salt and dissolved oxygen, was investigated. A mass transport model has been developed that accounts (i) aqueous-phase dispersion processes, (ii) film diffusion of contaminant ions to the reactive ZVI surface and (iii) the reactive removal mechanism itself. Regression to the experimental data indicated that when oxygen is present in the solution feed Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) removal processes were limited by film diffusion. In de-aerated solutions film diffusion still controls Cu(2+) removal but a first-order surface reaction provides a better model for Zn(2+) kinetics. Using air as the equilibrium feed gas, the reactive proportion of the total surface area for contaminant removal was calculated to be 97% and 64% of the active spherically-assumed geometric area associated with ZVI media for Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), respectively. Relative to a gas absorption area, determined in previous studies, the reactive proportion is less than 0.41% of the unreacted ZVI total surface area. These findings suggest that only part of the iron oxyhydroxide surface is reacting during ZVI based metal contaminant removal. PMID:25839833

  11. Enhanced ultrasound-assisted degradation of methyl orange and metronidazole by rectorite-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Na; Zhang, Gaoke; Guo, Sheng; Wan, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the rectorite-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI/R) was synthesized through a reduction method. X-ray diffraction analysis showed the existence of the nZVI in the nZVI/R composite and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated that the nZVI particles were partly oxidized into iron oxide. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed that the nZVI particles were highly dispersed on the surface of the rectorite. The specific surface area of the nZVI/R composite is 21.43 m(2)/g, which was higher than that of rectorite (4.30 m(2)/g) and nZVI (17.97 m(2)/g). In the presence of ultrasound (US), the degradation of methyl orange and metronidazole by the nZVI/R composite was over 93% and 97% within 20 min, respectively, which is much higher than that by the rectorite and the nZVI. The degradation ratio of methyl orange and metronidazole by the nZVI/R composite under US was 1.7 and 1.8 times as high as that by the nZVI/R composite without US, respectively. The mechanism of the enhanced degradation of methyl orange and metronidazole under US irradiation was studied. These results indicate that the US/nZVI/R process has great potential application value for treatment of dye wastewater and medicine wastewater. PMID:26384884

  12. Reduction of chromate from electroplating wastewater from pH 1 to 2 using fluidized zero valent iron process.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiao-Shing; Cheng, Chih-Yu; Li, Chi-Wang; Chai, Pao-Hsuan; Chang, Yu-Min

    2007-04-01

    Fluidized zero valent iron (ZVI) process was conducted to reduce hexavalent chromium (chromate, CrO(4)(2-)) to trivalent chromium (Cr(3+)) from electroplating wastewater due to the following reasons: (1) Extremely low pH (1-2) for the electroplating wastewater favoring the ZVI reaction. (2) The ferric ion, produced from the reaction of Cr(VI) and ZVI, can act as a coagulant to assist the precipitation of Cr(OH)(3(s)) to save the coagulant cost. (3) Higher ZVI utilization for fluidized process due to abrasive motion of the ZVI. For influent chromate concentration of 418 mg/L as Cr(6+), pH 2 and ZVI dosage of 3g (41 g/L), chromate removal was only 29% with hydraulic detention time (HRT) of 1.2 min, but was increased to 99.9% by either increasing HRT to 5.6 min or adjusting pH to 1.5. For iron species at pH 2 and HRT of 1.2 min, Fe(3+) was more thermodynamically stable since oxidizing agent chromate was present. However, if pH was adjusted to 1.5 or 1, where chromate was completely removed, high Fe(2+) but very low Fe(3+) was present. It can be explained that ZVI reacted with chromate to produce Fe(2+) first and the presence of chromate would keep converting Fe(2+) to Fe(3+). Therefore, Fe(2+) is an indicator for complete reduction from Cr(VI) to Cr(III). X-ray diffraction (XRD) was conducted to exam the remained species at pH 2. ZVI, iron oxide and iron sulfide were observed, indicating the formation of iron oxide or iron sulfide could stop the chromate reduction reaction. PMID:16987595

  13. Inhibition or promotion of biodegradation of nitrate by Paracoccus sp. in the presence of nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chenghong; Xu, Xuping; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravendra; Chen, Zuliang

    2015-10-15

    To investigate the effect of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) on the growth of Paracoccus sp. strain and biodenitrification under aerobic conditions, specific factors were studied, pH, concentration of nitrate, Fe (II) and carbon dioxide. Low concentration of nZVI (50mg/L) promoted both cell growth and biodegradation of nitrate which rose from 69.91% to 76.16%, while nitrate removal fell to 67.10% in the presence of high nZVI concentration (1000 mg/L). This may be attributed to the ions produced in nZVI corrosion being used as an electron source for the biodegradation of nitrate. However, the excess uptake of Fe (II) causes oxidative damage to the cells. To confirm this, nitrate was completely removed after 20 h when 100mg/L Fe (II) was added to the solution, which is much faster than the control (86.05%, without adding Fe (II)). However, nitrate removal reached only 45.64% after 20 h, with low cell density (OD 600=0.62) in the presence of 300 mg/L Fe (II). Characterization techniques indicated that nZVI adhered to microorganism cell membranes. These findings confirmed that nZVI could affect the activity of the strain and consequently change the biodenitrification. PMID:26047857

  14. Effect of anions and humic acid on the performance of nanoscale zero-valent iron particles coated with polyacrylic acid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Seok; Ahn, Jun-Young; Kim, Cheolyong; Lee, Seockheon; Hwang, Inseong

    2014-10-01

    Effects of anions (NO3(-), HCO3(-), Cl(-), SO4(2-)) and humic acid on the reactivity and core/shell chemistries of polyacrylic acid-coated nanoscale zero-valent iron (PAA-NZVI) and inorganically modified NZVI (INORG-NZVI) particles were investigated. The reactivity tests under various ion concentrations (0.2-30mN) revealed the existence of a favorable molar ratio of anion/NZVI that increased the reactivity of NZVI particles. The presence of a relatively small amount of humic acid (0.5mgL(-1)) substantially decreased the INORG-NZVI reactivity by 76%, whereas the reactivity of PAA-NZVI decreased only by 12%. The XRD and TEM results supported the role of the PAA coating of PAA-NZVI in impeding the oxidation of the Fe(0) core by groundwater solutes. This protective role provided by the organic coating also resulted in a 2.3-fold increase in the trichloroethylene (TCE) reduction capacity of PAA-NZVI compared to that of INORG-NZVI in the presence of anions/humic acid. Ethylene and ethane were simultaneously produced as the major reduction products of TCE in both NZVI systems, suggesting that a hydrodechlorination occurred without the aid of metallic catalysts. The PAA coating, originally designed to improve the mobility of NZVI, enhanced TCE degradation performances of NZVI in the presence of anions and humic acid. PMID:25065795

  15. Remediation and phytotoxicity of decabromodiphenyl ether contaminated soil by zero valent iron nanoparticles immobilized in mesoporous silica microspheres.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yingying; Cheng, Wen; Tsang, Pokeung Eric; Fang, Zhanqiang

    2016-01-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a new class of environmental pollutants which easily accumulated in the soil, especially at e-waste sites. However, knowledge about their phytotoxicity after degradation is not well understood. Nano zero valent iron (nZVI) immobilized in mesoporous silica microspheres covered with FeOOH (SiO2@FeOOH@Fe) synthesized in this study was utilized to remove decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209) from soil. Results revealed that the removal efficiency of BDE209 can be achieved 78% within 120 h using a dosage of 0.165 g g(-1) and a pH of 5.42. Furthermore, the removal efficiency enhanced with increasing soil moisture content and the decreasing of initial BDE209 concentration. Phytotoxicity assays (biomass and germination rate, shoots and roots elongation of Chinese cabbage) were carried out to provide a preliminary risk assessment of treated soil for the application of SiO2@FeOOH@Fe. PMID:26560640

  16. Ecotoxicological effects on earthworms of fresh and aged nano-sized zero-valent iron (nZVI) in soil.

    PubMed

    El-Temsah, Yehia S; Joner, Erik J

    2012-09-01

    Although nano-sized zero-valent iron (nZVI) has been used for several years for remediation of contaminated soils and aquifers, only a limited number of studies have investigated secondary environmental effects and ecotoxicity of nZVI to soil organisms. In this study we therefore measured the ecotoxicological effects of nZVI coated with carboxymethyl cellulose on two species of earthworms, Eisenia fetida and Lumbricus rubellus, using standard OECD methods with sandy loam and artificial OECD soil. Earthworms were exposed to nZVI concentrations ranging from 0 to 2000 mg nZVI kg soil(-1) added freshly to soil or aged in non-saturated soil for 30 d prior to exposure. Regarding avoidance, weight changes and mortality, both earthworm species were significantly affected by nZVI concentrations ?500 mg kg(-1)soil. Reproduction was affected also at 100 mg nZVI kg(-1). Toxicity effects of nZVI were reduced after aging with larger differences between soils compared to non-aged soils. We conclude that doses ?500 mg nZVI kg(-1) are likely to give acute adverse effects on soil organisms, and that effects on reproduction may occur at significantly lower concentrations. PMID:22595530

  17. The role of clay minerals in the reduction of nitrate in groundwater by zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Cho, Dong-Wan; Chon, Chul-Min; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Kim, Yongje; Khan, Moonis Ali; Song, Hocheol

    2010-10-01

    Bench-scale batch experiments were performed to investigate the feasibility of using different types of clay minerals (bentonite, fuller's earth, and biotite) with zero-valent iron for their potential utility in enhancing nitrate reduction and ammonium control. Kinetics experiments performed with deionized water (DW) and groundwater (GW) revealed nitrate reduction by Fe(0) proceeded at significantly faster rate in GW than in DW, and such a difference was attributed to the formation of green rust in GW. The amendment of the minerals at the dose of 25 g L(-1) in Fe(0) reaction in GW resulted in approximately 41%, 43%, and 33% more removal of nitrate in 64 h reaction for bentonite, fuller's earth, and biotite, respectively, compared to Fe(0) alone reaction. The presumed role of the minerals in the rate enhancement was to provide sites for the formation of surface bound green rust. Bentonite and fuller's earth also effectively removed ammonium produced from nitrate reduction by adsorption, with the removal efficiencies significantly increased with the increase in mineral dose above 5:1 Fe(0) to mineral mass ratio. Such a removal of ammonium was not observed for biotite, presumably due to its lack of swelling property. Equilibrium adsorption experiments indicated bentonite and fuller's earth had maximum ammonium adsorption capacity of 5.6 and 2.1 mg g(-1), respectively. PMID:20797759

  18. Structural Evolution of Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron (nZVI) in Anoxic Co2+ Solution: Interactional Performance and Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yalei; Chen, Wen; Dai, Chaomeng; Zhou, Chuanlong; Zhou, Xuefei

    2015-01-01

    The structures of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles evolving during reactions, and the reactions are influenced by the evolved structures. To understand the removal process in detail, it is important to investigate the relationships between the reactions and structural evolution. Using high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), typical evolved structures (sheet coprecipitation and cavity corrosion) of nZVI in anoxic Co2+ solutions were revealed. The system pH (pH measured in mixture), which controls the stability of coprecipitation and the nZVI corrosion rate, were found to be the determining factors of structural evolutions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results indicated that the formation and dissolution of sheet structure impacts on the ratio of Fe(0) on the nZVI surface and the surface Co2+ reduction. The cavity structure provides the possibility of Co migration from the surface to the bulk of nZVI, leading to continuous removal. Subacidity conditions could accelerate the evolution and improve the removal; the results of structurally controlled reactions further indicated that the removal was suspended by the sheet structure and enhanced by cavity structure. The results and discussion in this paper revealed the “structural influence” crucial for the full and dynamical understanding of nZVI reactions. PMID:26355955

  19. Coupled effects of aging and weak magnetic fields on sequestration of selenite by zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Liang, Liping; Guan, Xiaohong; Shi, Zhong; Li, Jialing; Wu, Yinan; Tratnyek, Paul G

    2014-06-01

    The sequestration of Se(IV) by zero-valent iron (ZVI) is strongly influenced by the coupled effects of aging ZVI and the presence of a weak magnetic field (WMF). ZVI aged at pH 6.0 with MES as buffer between 6 and 60 h gave nearly constant rates of Se(IV) removal with WMF but with rate constants that are 10- to 100-fold greater than without. XANES analysis showed that applying WMF changes the mechanism of Se(IV) removal by ZVI aged for 6-60 h from adsorption followed by reduction to direct reduction. The strong correlation between Se(IV) removal and Fe2+ release suggests direct reduction of Se(IV) to Se(0) by Fe0, in agreement with the XANES analysis. The numerical simulation of ZVI magnetization revealed that the WMF influence on Se(IV) sequestration is associated mainly with the ferromagnetism of ZVI and the paramagnetism of Fe2+. In the presence of the WMF, the Lorentz force gives rise to convection in the solution, which narrows the diffusion layer, and the field gradient force, which tends to move paramagnetic ions (esp. Fe2+) along the higher field gradient at the ZVI particle surface, thereby inducing nonuniform depassivation and eventually localized corrosion of the ZVI surface. PMID:24804570

  20. Nonionic surfactant greatly enhances the reductive debromination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers by nanoscale zero-valent iron: mechanism and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Liang, Da-wei; Yang, Yu-han; Xu, Wei-wei; Peng, Si-kan; Lu, Shan-fu; Xiang, Yan

    2014-08-15

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) has been considered as an effective agent for reductive debromination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). But the high lipophilicity of PBDEs will hinder their debromination owing to the inefficient contact of PBDEs with nZVI. In this study, different ionic forms of surfactants were investigated aiming to promote PBDE debromination, and the beneficial effects of surfactant were found to be: nonionic polyethylene glycol octylphenol ether (Triton X-100, TX)>cationic cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC)>anionic sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDDBS). Except for with SDDBS, the promotion effect for PBDE debromination was positively related to the surfactant concentrations until a critical micelle concentration (CMC). The debromination process of octa-BDE and its intermediates could be described as a consecutive reaction. The corresponding rate constants (k) for the debromination of parent octa-BDE (including nona- to hepta-BDEs), the intermediates hexa-, penta-, and tetra-BDEs are 1.24 × 10(-1) h(-1), 8.97 × 10(-2) h(-1), 6.50 × 10(-2) h(-1) and 2.37 × 10(-3) h(-1), respectively. PMID:25019577

  1. Electromagnetic Borehole Flowmeter Surveys at Selected In Situ Redox Manipulation Barrier Wells, Zero-Valent Iron Site, Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2009-02-09

    Ambient (i.e., static) and dynamic (i.e., pumping-induced) electromagnetic borehole flowmeter (EBF) surveys were performed in 10 selected In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) barrier wells to characterize the distribution of in-well vertical flow conditions and to infer the relative hydraulic conductivity distribution in the upper-part of the unconfined aquifer. These wells are located in two areas where the aquifer is targeted for testing of zero-valent iron injection to mend a failed portion of the ISRM barrier at the 100 D Area, Hanford Site. Each of these two areas consists of a group of five wells, one group to the southwest and one group to the northeast. The upper ~15 to 20 ft (~4.6 to 6.1 m) of the unconfined aquifer was characterized for in-well vertical flow conditions and vertical profile information regarding relative hydraulic conductivity. At some well site locations, the upper ~2 to 3 ft (~0.6 to 1 m) of the well-screen interval could not be characterized under pumping (dynamic) conditions because of the presence of the pump.

  2. Reduction of aqueous CrVI using nanoscale zero-valent iron dispersed by high energy electron beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Guilong; Wang, Min; Zheng, Kang; Cai, Dongqing; Wu, Zhengyan

    2013-10-21

    High energy electron beam (HEEB) irradiation was used to disperse nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) for reduction of CrVI to CrIII in aqueous solution. Pore size distribution, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction characterizations demonstrated that HEEB irradiation could effectively increase the dispersion of NZVI resulting in more active reduction sites of Crvi on NZVI. Batch reduction experiments indicated that the reductive capacity of HEEB irradiation-modified NZVI (IMNZVI) was significantly improved, as the reductive efficiency reached 99.79% under the optimal conditions (electron beam dose of 30 kGy at 10 MeV, pH 2.0 and 313 K) compared with that of raw NZVI (72.14%). Additionally, the NZVI was stable for at least two months after irradiation. The modification mechanism of NZVI by HEEB irradiation was investigated and the results indicated that charge and thermal effects might play key roles in dispersing the NZVI particles. PMID:23982295

  3. Targeted removal of trichlorophenol in water by oleic acid-coated nanoscale palladium/zero-valent iron alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jaewon; Woo, Heesoo; Ko, Myoung-Soo; Lee, Jaesang; Lee, Seockheon; Yun, Seong-Taek; Lee, Seunghak

    2015-08-15

    A new material was developed and evaluated for the targeted removal of trichlorophenol (TCP) from among potential interferents which are known to degrade removal activity. To achieve TCP-targeted activity, an alginate bead containing nanoscale palladium/zero-valent iron (Pd/nZVI) was coated with a highly hydrophobic oleic acid layer. The new material (Pd/nZVI-A-O) preferentially sorbed TCP from a mixture of chlorinated phenols into the oleic acid cover layer and subsequently dechlorinated it to phenol. The removal efficacy of TCP by Pd/nZVI-A-O was not affected by co-existing organic substances such as Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA), whereas the material without the oleic acid layer (Pd/nZVI-A) became less effective with increasing SRHA concentration. The inorganic substances nitrate and phosphate significantly reduced the reactivity of Pd/nZVI-A, however, Pd/nZVI-A-O showed similar TCP removal efficacies regardless of the initial inorganic ion concentrations. The influence of bicarbonate on the TCP removal efficacies of both Pd/nZVI-A and Pd/nZVI-A-O was not significant. The findings from this study suggest that Pd/nZVI-A-O, with its targeted, constant reactivity for TCP, would be effective for treating this contaminant in surface water or groundwater containing various competitive substrates. PMID:25819991

  4. Effect of zero-valent iron on the start-up performance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process.

    PubMed

    Ren, Long-Fei; Ni, Shou-Qing; Liu, Cui; Liang, Shuang; Zhang, Bo; Kong, Qiang; Guo, Ning

    2015-02-01

    The long start-up time of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process hinders the widespread application of anammox technology in practical wastewater treatment when anammox seed sludge is not available. Meanwhile, the production of nitrate cannot meet the increasingly more strict discharge standards. To combine the chemical nitrate reduction to ammonium with biological nitrogen removal, two anammox upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors packed with different types of zero-valent iron (ZVI), microscale ZVI (mZVI) and nanoscale ZVI (nZVI), were developed to accelerate the start-up of anammox process. The results revealed that anammox start-up time shortened from 126 to 105 and 84 days with the addition of mZVI and nZVI. The nitrogen removal performance was also improved remarkably by adding ZVI, especially in the start-up stage. The value of dissolved oxygen showed that ZVI could be regarded as a useful deoxidant to create anaerobic condition for the proliferation of anammox bacteria. ZVI was favorable for the secretion of EPS, which would represent the activity of anammox bacteria. The result of real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) further confirmed that the proliferation of anammox bacteria was enhanced by ZVI. PMID:25226835

  5. Tunable synthesis of SiO2-encapsulated zero-valent iron nanoparticles for degradation of organic dyes.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhou; Wu, Qingzhi; Wang, Min; Yang, Yushi; Long, Jia; Chen, Xiaohui

    2014-01-01

    A series of nanocomposites consisting of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (ZVI NPs) encapsulated in SiO2 microspheres were successfully synthesized through a successive two-step method, i.e., the wet chemical reduction by borohydride followed by a modified Stöber method. The as-synthesized nanocomposites were characterized using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer, and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer. The catalytic performance of SiO2-encapsulated ZVI nanocomposites for the degradation of organic dyes was investigated using methylene blue (MB) as the model dye in the presence of H2O2. The results showed that the degradation efficiency and apparent rate constant of the degradation reaction were significantly enhanced with increased ZVI NPs encapsulated in SiO2 microspheres, whereas the dosage of H2O2 remarkably promoted degradation rate without affecting degradation efficiency. The content-dependent magnetic property ensured the excellent magnetic separation of degradation products under an external magnet. This strategy for the synthesis of SiO2-encapsulated ZVI NPs nanocomposites was low cost and easy to scale-up for industrial production, thereby enabling promising applications in environmental remediation. PMID:25258615

  6. Reductive transformation and detoxification mechanism of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene in combined zero valent iron and anaerobic-aerobic process.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jinyou; Zhou, Zongyuan; Ou, Changjin; Sun, Xiuyun; Li, Jiansheng; Han, Weiqing; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Lianjun

    2012-01-01

    A combined zero valent iron (ZVI) and anaerobic-aerobic process was adopted for the treatment of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB)-containing wastewater. The transformation pathway, reduction of acute toxicity and enhancement of biodegradability were investigated. After pretreatment by ZVI, DNCB in wastewater could be completely converted into 2,4-diaminochlorobenzene (DACB). The ratio of BOD5/COD increased from 0.005 +/- 0.001 to 0.168 +/- 0.007, while EC(50, 48 hr) (V/V) increased from 0.65% to 5.20%, indicating the enhancement of biodegradability and reduction of acute toxicity with the pretreatment by ZVI. DACB was further dechlorinated to m-phenylenediamine during the anaerobic process using methanol as electron donor, with EC(50, 48 hr) increasing from 5.20% to 48.2%. After the subsequent anaerobic-aerobic process, m-phenylenediamine was degraded completely, with effluent COD of 67.5 +/- 10.8 mg/L. This effluent of the subsequent anaerobic-aerobic process was not toxic to zebrafish. The combined ZVI and anaerobic-aerobic process offers bright prospects for the treatment of chlorinated nitroaromatic compound-containing wastewater. PMID:23534221

  7. Tunable synthesis of SiO2-encapsulated zero-valent iron nanoparticles for degradation of organic dyes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A series of nanocomposites consisting of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (ZVI NPs) encapsulated in SiO2 microspheres were successfully synthesized through a successive two-step method, i.e., the wet chemical reduction by borohydride followed by a modified Stöber method. The as-synthesized nanocomposites were characterized using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer, and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer. The catalytic performance of SiO2-encapsulated ZVI nanocomposites for the degradation of organic dyes was investigated using methylene blue (MB) as the model dye in the presence of H2O2. The results showed that the degradation efficiency and apparent rate constant of the degradation reaction were significantly enhanced with increased ZVI NPs encapsulated in SiO2 microspheres, whereas the dosage of H2O2 remarkably promoted degradation rate without affecting degradation efficiency. The content-dependent magnetic property ensured the excellent magnetic separation of degradation products under an external magnet. This strategy for the synthesis of SiO2-encapsulated ZVI NPs nanocomposites was low cost and easy to scale-up for industrial production, thereby enabling promising applications in environmental remediation. PMID:25258615

  8. Functional chitosan-stabilized nanoscale zero-valent iron used to remove acid fuchsine with the assistance of ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoying; Zhuang, Zechao; Yu, Bing; Chen, Zhengxian; Chen, Zuliang

    2016-01-20

    Chitosan-stabilized nanoscale zero-valent iron (CS-nZVI) was prepared and used for the removal of acid fuchsine (AF) from aqueous solution with the assistance of ultrasound. More than 98.9% of AF was removed using CS-nZVI, aged CS-nZVI (exposed to air for 2 months), while only 14.6% removal efficiency was achieved after 15min by chitosan alone with the assistance of ultrasound. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed that chitosan polymers were arranged in a homocentric layered structure. Thus, the polymer can prevent the aggregation of nZVI and increase their anti-oxidation capacity. X-ray diffraction (XRD) also suggested that the chitosan used in synthesis may protect nZVI nanoparticles from air oxidation. Different factors impacting on the removal of AF using CS-nZVI showed that the reduction increased when dosage and temperature increased, but decreased when pH and initial concentration rose. Kinetic studies revealed that the removal of AF fitted well to the pseudo-first-order model. The apparent activation energy was 55.34kJ/mol, indicating a chemically controlled reaction. Finally, the application of CS-nZVI in dyeing wastewater led to a removal efficiency of 99% of AF, while the reuse test confirmed that AF's removal efficiency declined from 99.6 to 39.3% after seven cycles. PMID:26572450

  9. 2.2 Zero-valent Iron Nanoparticles 2.2.1 Background

    E-print Network

    is the use of iron nanoparticles as a reductant for the remediation of chlorinated organics in water of chlorinated organics in water. In addition, one company (Pars Environmental Inc.) has successfully used iron)--leading to complete dechlorination. Eventually, ferric or ferrous iron may precipitate as a solid or remain

  10. The dual effects of carboxymethyl cellulose on the colloidal stability and toxicity of nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Dong, Haoran; Xie, Yankai; Zeng, Guangming; Tang, Lin; Liang, Jie; He, Qi; Zhao, Feng; Zeng, Yalan; Wu, Yanan

    2016-02-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles are usually modified with surface coating to mitigate the particle stability in water during the environmental application. However, the surface coating may not only influence the particle stabilization but also the particle cytotoxicity. In this study, we investigated the dual effects of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) on the colloidal stability and cytotoxicity of NZVI towards gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) and discussed the interrelation between particle stability and cytotoxicity. The effect of CMC concentration, ionic strength (Ca(2+)) and aging treatment on the particle cytotoxicity were also examined. Specifically, the aqueous stability of NZVI suspensions with CMC ratio dose-dependently strengthened within 1 h. The inactivation of E. coli by bare NZVI was significant and concentration- and time-dependent. On the contrary, an increasing reduction in cytotoxicity of NZVI with CMC ratio increasing was observed, even though the particles became more dispersed. TEM analysis demonstrates the membrane disruption and the cellular internalization of nanoparticles after exposure of E. coli to NZVI. However, in the case of CMC-modified NZVI (CNZVI), the bacterial cell wall displays an outer shell of a layer of nanoparticles attached around the outer membrane, but the cell membrane was kept intact. The presence of Ca(2+) can either increase or decrease the cytotoxicity of NZVI and CNZVI, depending on the concentration. The aged NZVI and CNZVI particles did not seem to present obvious bactericidal effect due to the transformation of Fe(0) to the less toxic or non-toxic iron oxides, as indicated by the XRD analysis. PMID:26519799

  11. Applying an electric field in a built-in zero valent iron--anaerobic reactor for enhancement of sludge granulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Zhang, Yaobin; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo; Zhao, Huimin

    2011-01-01

    A zero valent iron (ZVI) bed with a pair of electrodes was installed in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor to create an enhanced condition to increase the rate of anaerobic granulation. The effects of an electric field and ZVI on granulation were investigated in three UASB reactors operated in parallel: an electric field enhanced ZVI-UASB reactor (reactor R1), a ZVI-UASB reactor (reactor R2) and a common UASB reactor (reactor R3). When a voltage of 1.4 V was supplied to reactor R1, COD removal dramatically increased from 60.3% to 90.7% over the following four days, while the mean granule size rapidly grew from 151.4 ?m to 695.1 ?m over the following 38 days. Comparatively, COD removal was lower and the increase in granule size was slower in the other two reactors (in the order: R1 > R2 > R3). The electric field caused the ZVI to more effectively buffer acidity and maintain a relatively low oxidation-reduction potential in the reactor. In addition, the electric field resulted in a significant increase in ferrous ion leaching and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) production. These changes benefited methanogenesis and granulation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that different microorganisms were dominant in the external and internal layers of the reactor R1 granules. Additionally, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis indicated that the relative abundance of methanogens in reactor R1 was significantly greater than in the other two reactors. Taken together, these results suggested that the use of ZVI combined with an electric field in an UASB reactor could effectively enhance the sludge granulation. PMID:20965541

  12. Comparative studies on montmorillonite-supported zero-valent iron nanoparticles produced by different methods: reactivity and stability.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hanzhong; Wang, Chuanyi

    2013-01-01

    To mitigate the aggregation and enhance the reactivity of nanosized zero-valent iron (nZVI), montmorillonite is employed as a template-supporting matrix to prepare nZVI through two different pathways: heterogeneous nucleation and homogeneous nucleation processes. Dispersed sub-nanosized ZVI clusters with an average size around 0.5 nm (perpendicular to the clay layers) are intercalated in clay interlayers when using montmorillonite as a template in preparation via heterogeneous nucleation process. However, the particle sizes spanned from 0.62 nm (perpendicular to the clay layers) for the ZV1 intercalated in montmorillonite interlayers to 1-50 nm for the ZVI residing on an external surface when using montmorillonite as a dispersion agent in the preparation via homogeneous nucleation. Furthermore, parallel batch experiments have been conducted with nZVIs synthesized by the two different methods in solutions of nitrobenzene and their reactivity is evaluated via response of nZVI to nitrobenzene remediation. As a result, the reactivity of ZVI synthesized by heterogeneous nucleation is greater than that by homogeneous nucleation, which is inversely correlated to the size of ZVI supported by montmorillonite clay. Evaluation of the stability of montmorillonite-supported ZVI showed that ZVI intercalated in the interlayers of montmorillonite is more stable than that located on the external surface, which can be attributed to the protective effect of montmorillonite layers on ZVI from oxidation. These results suggest that the great reactivity and high stability of montmorillonite-intercalated ZVI synthesized through heterogeneous nucleation process warrants its significant potential in developing in situ remediation and treatment technologies for organic contaminants. PMID:23530312

  13. Nano-scale zero valent iron transport in a variable aperture dolomite fracture and a glass fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, P.; Sleep, B. E.; Cui, Z.; Zhou, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations are being performed to understand the transport behavior of carboxymethyl cellulose polymer stabilized nano-scale zero valent iron (nZVI) in a variable aperture dolomite rock fracture and a variable aperture glass replica of a fractured slate. The rock fracture was prepared by artificially inducing a fracture in a dolomite block along a stylolite, and the glass fracture was prepared by creating molds with melted glass on two opposing sides of a fractured slate rock block. Both of the fractures were 0.28 m in length and 0.21 m in width. Equivalent hydraulic apertures are about 110 microns for the rock fracture and 250 microns for the glass replica fracture. Sodium bromide and lissamine green B (LGB) serve as conservative tracers in the rock fracture and glass replica fracture, respectively. A dark box set-up with a light source and digital camera is being used to visualize the LGB and CMC-nZVI movement in the glass fracture. Experiments are being performed to determine the effects of water specific discharge and CMC concentration on nZVI transport in the fractures. Transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and UV-visual spectrophotometry were performed to determine the stability and characteristics of the CMC-nZVI mixture. The transport of bromide, LGB, CMC, and CMC-nZVI in both fractures is being evaluated through analysis of the effluent concentrations. Time-lapse images are also being captured for the glass fracture. Bromide, LGB, and CMC recoveries have exceeded 95% in both fractures. Significant channeling has been observed in the fractures for CMC transport due to viscous effects.

  14. Deployment of an innovative thermally enhanced soil mixing process augmented with zero-valent iron.

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, P. L.

    1999-01-15

    An innovative in-situ soil treatment process, referred to as soil mixing/thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction (SM/TESVE), was used to remediate the 317 Area of Argonne National Laboratory-East (i.e., Argonne), which is contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Following the initial soil treatment, polishing was required to reduce residual concentrations of contaminants. A study of polishing methods was conducted. It determined that injecting metallic iron particles into the soil, in conjunction with soil mixing, would reduce residual VOC concentrations more effectively than the original conventional soil ventilation approach. After the effectiveness of iron injection was verified, it replaced the soil ventilation step. The modified process involved mixing the soil while hot air and steam were injected into it. Off-gases were captured in a hood over the treatment area. During this process, an iron slurry, consisting of up to 50% iron particles in water with guar gum added as a thickening agent, was injected and mixed into the soil by the mixing equipment. Approximately 6,246 m{sup 3} (8, 170 yd{sup 3}) of soil was treated during this project. Confirmatory samples were then collected. In these samples, VOC concentrations were usually reduced by more than 80%.

  15. Stimulation of Peanut Seedling Development and Growth by Zero-Valent Iron Nanoparticles at Low Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuan; Yang, Yuechao; Gao, Bin; Zhang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Because of its strong pollutant degradation ability, nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) has been introduced to soils and groundwater for remediation purposes, but its impacts on plants are still not very clear. In this work, the effects of low concentration (10–320 ?mol/L) NZVI particles on seed germination and growth of peanut plants were evaluated. The exposure of peanut seeds to NZVI at all the tested concentrations altered the seed germination activity, especially the development of seedlings. In comparison with the deionized water treated controls (CK), all of the NZVI treatments had significantly larger average lengths. Further investigations with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) suggested that NZVI particles may penetrate the peanut seed coats to increase the water uptake to stimulate seed germination. The growth experiments showed that although NZVI at a relatively high concentration (320?mol/L) showed phytotoxicity to the peanut plants, the lower concentrations of NZVI particles stimulated the growth and root development of the plants. At certain concentrations (e.g., 40 and 80 ?mol/L), the NZVI treated samples were even better than the ethylenediaminetetraacetate-iron (EDTA-Fe) solution, a commonly used iron nutrient solution, in stimulating the plant growth. This positive effect was probably due to the uptake of NZVI by the plants, as indicated in the TEM analyses. Because low concentrations of NZVI particles stimulated both the seedling development and growth of peanut, they might be used to benefit the growth of peanuts in large-scale agricultural settings. PMID:25901959

  16. Stimulation of peanut seedling development and growth by zero-valent iron nanoparticles at low concentrations.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Yang, Yuechao; Gao, Bin; Zhang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Because of its strong pollutant degradation ability, nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) has been introduced to soils and groundwater for remediation purposes, but its impacts on plants are still not very clear. In this work, the effects of low concentration (10-320 ?mol/L) NZVI particles on seed germination and growth of peanut plants were evaluated. The exposure of peanut seeds to NZVI at all the tested concentrations altered the seed germination activity, especially the development of seedlings. In comparison with the deionized water treated controls (CK), all of the NZVI treatments had significantly larger average lengths. Further investigations with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) suggested that NZVI particles may penetrate the peanut seed coats to increase the water uptake to stimulate seed germination. The growth experiments showed that although NZVI at a relatively high concentration (320 ?mol/L) showed phytotoxicity to the peanut plants, the lower concentrations of NZVI particles stimulated the growth and root development of the plants. At certain concentrations (e.g., 40 and 80 ?mol/L), the NZVI treated samples were even better than the ethylenediaminetetraacetate-iron (EDTA-Fe) solution, a commonly used iron nutrient solution, in stimulating the plant growth. This positive effect was probably due to the uptake of NZVI by the plants, as indicated in the TEM analyses. Because low concentrations of NZVI particles stimulated both the seedling development and growth of peanut, they might be used to benefit the growth of peanuts in large-scale agricultural settings. PMID:25901959

  17. Calcite precipitation dominates the electrical signatures of zero valent iron columns under simulated field conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yuxin Wu; Roelof Versteeg; Lee Slater; Doug Labrecque

    2009-05-01

    Calcium carbonate is a major secondary mineral precipitate that influences PRB reactivity and hydraulic performance. In this study, we conducted column experiments to investigate electrical signatures resulting from concurrent CaCO3 and iron oxides precipitation in two simulated PRB media. Solid phase analysis identified CaCO3 (calcite and aragonite) as a major mineral phase throughout the columns, with magnetite being another major phase present close to the influent. Electrical measurements revealed a consistent decrease in conductivity and polarization magnitude of both columns, suggesting that the electrically insulating CaCO3 dominates the electrical response despite the presence of both electrically conductive iron oxides and CaCO3 precipitates. SEM/EDX imaging suggests that the electrical properties result from the geometrical arrangement of the mineral phases. The CaCO3 forms an insulating film on ZVI/magnetite surfaces, which we assume restricts redox-driven transfer of electric charge between the pore electrolyte and ZVI particles, as well as across interconnected ZVI particles. As surface reactivity also depends on the ability of the surface to engage in redox reactions, electrical measurements may provide a minimally invasive technology for monitoring reactivity loss.

  18. Field-scale transport and transformation of carboxymethylcellulose-stabilized nano zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Richard L; Nurmi, James T; O'Brien Johnson, Graham S; Fan, Dimin; O'Brien Johnson, Reid L; Shi, Zhenqing; Salter-Blanc, Alexandra J; Tratnyek, Paul G; Lowry, Gregory V

    2013-02-01

    The fate of nano zerovalent iron (nZVI) during subsurface injection was examined using carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) stabilized nZVI in a very large three-dimensional physical model aquifer with detailed monitoring using multiple, complementary detection methods. A fluorescein tracer test in the aquifer plus laboratory column data suggested that the very-aggressive flow conditions necessary to achieve 2.5 m of nZVI transport could be obtained using a hydraulically constrained flow path between injection and extraction wells. However, total unoxidized nZVI was transported only about 1 m and <2% of the injected nZVI concentration reached that distance. The experimental data also indicated that groundwater flow changed during injection, likely due to hydrogen bubble formation, which diverted the nZVI away from the targeted flow path. The leading edge of the iron plume became fully oxidized during transport. However, within the plume, oxidation of nZVI decreased in a fashion consistent with progressive depletion of aquifer "reductant demand". To directly quantify the extent of nZVI transport, a spectrophotometric method was developed, and the results indicated that deployment of unoxidized nZVI for groundwater remediation will likely be difficult. PMID:23311327

  19. Performance evaluation of a zero-valent iron reactive barrier: mineralogical characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Debra Helen; Gu, Baohua; Watson, David B; Roh, Yul; Liang, Liyuan; Lee, S. Y.

    2000-08-01

    There is a limited amount of information about the effects of mineral precipitates and corrosion on the lifespan and long-term performance of in situ Fe{sup 0} reactive barriers. The objectives of this paper are (1) to investigate mineral precipitates through an in situ permeable Fe{sup 0} reactive barrier and (2) to examine the cementation and corrosion of Fe{sup 0} filings in order to estimate the lifespan of this barrier. This field scale barrier (225-ft long x 2-ft wide x 31-ft deep) has been installed in order to remove uranium from contaminated groundwater at the Y-12 plant site, Oak Ridge, TN. According to XRD and SEM-EDX analysis of core samples recovered from the Fe{sup 0} portion of the barrier, iron oxyhydroxides were found throughout, while aragonite, siderite, and FeS occurred predominantly in the shallow portion. Additionally, aragonite and FeS were present in up-gradient deeper zone where groundwater first enters the Fe{sup 0} section of the barrier. After 15 months in the barrier, most of the Fe{sup 0} filings in the core samples were loose, and a little corrosion of Fe{sup 0} filings was observed in most of the barrier. However, larger amounts of corrosion (10-150 {micro}m thick corrosion rinds) occurred on cemented iron particles where groundwater first enters the barrier. Bicarbonate/carbonate concentrations were high in this section of the barrier. Byproducts of this corrosion, iron oxyhydroxides, were the primary binding material in the cementation. Also, aragonite acted as a binding material to a lesser extent, while amorphous FeS occurred as coatings and infilings. Thin corrosion rinds (2-50 {micro}m thick) were also found on the uncemented individual Fe{sup 0} filings in the same area of the cementation. If corrosion continues, the estimated lifespan of Fe{sup 0} filings in the more corroded sections is 5 to 10 years, while the Fe{sup 0} filings in the rest of the barrier perhaps would last longer than 15 years. The mineral precipitates on the Fe{sup 0} filing surfaces may hinder this corrosion but they may also decrease reactive surfaces. This research shows that precipitation will vary across a single reactive barrier and that greater corrosion and subsequent cementation of the filings may occur where groundwater first enters the Fe{sup 0} section of the barrier.

  20. Monitoring of Zero-Valent Iron Permeable Reactive Barriers: Electrical Properties and Barrier Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrecque, D. J.; Adkins, P. L.; Slater, L. D.; Versteeg, R.; Sharpe, R.

    2007-12-01

    An innovative method of groundwater remediation invented in the 1990"s, Permeable Reactive Barriers, use sand-sized grains of scrap iron placed in trenches or injected under pressure to remediate a number of organic and inorganic contaminants. Monitoring the aging of these barriers becomes increasingly important as many of these barriers approach their predicted life spans. In-situ resistivity and induced polarization studies have been conducted at six barriers at four different sites: Monticello, Utah; the Denver Federal Center; Kansas City, Missouri; and East Helena, Montana. As some barriers tend to age dramatically faster than others, for this study we consider low permeability barriers as of greater age, as "old" barriers tend to loose permeability rather than exhaust reactive materials. One complicating factor is that two of the barriers studied appear to have issues related to installation. One site, the former Asarco Smelter Site near East Helena, Montana, has been instrumented with an autonomous monitoring system allowing continuous monitoring of the evolution of a relatively new (less than three years old) barrier. The barrier showed surprisingly rapid evolution over the first year of monitoring with changes in both resistivity and chargeability of tens of percent per month. In general, the electrical properties of all of the barriers studied follow a pattern. New barriers are fairly resistive with in-situ conductivity only a few times background (outside the barrier) values. Older barriers get increasingly conductive, with failed barriers showing values of over 100 S/m. The induced polarization response is more complicated. Chargeability values increase over time for young barriers, are largest for healthy barriers in the middle of their lifespan, and decrease as the barrier ages.

  1. DEMONSTRATION OF IN SITU DEHALOGENATION OF DNAPL THROUGH INJECTION OF EMULSIFIED ZERO-VALIENT IRON AT LAUNCH COMPLEX 34 IN CAPE CANAVERAL AIR FORCE STATION, FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate the technical and cost performance of emulsified zero-valent iron (EZVI) technology when applied to DNAPL contaminants in the saturated zone. This demonstration was conducted at Launch Complex 34, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL, w...

  2. Degradation of soil-sorbed trichloroethylene by stabilized zero valent iron nanoparticles: Effects of sorption, surfactants, and natural organic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Man; He, Feng; Zhao, Dongye; Hao, Xiaodi

    2011-01-01

    Zero valent iron (ZVI) nanoparticles have been studied extensively for degradation of chlorinated solvents in the aqueous phase, and have been tested for in-situ remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater. However, little is known about its effectiveness for degrading soil-sorbed contaminants. This work studied reductive dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) sorbed in two model soils (a potting soil and Smith Farm soil) using carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) stabilized Fe-Pd bimetallic nanoparticles. Effects of sorption, surfactants and dissolved organic matter (DOC) were determined through batch kinetic experiments. While the nanoparticles can effectively degrade soil-sorbed TCE, the TCE degradation rate was strongly limited by desorption kinetics, especially for the potting soil which has a higher organic matter content of 8.2%. Under otherwise identical conditions, {approx}44% of TCE sorbed in the potting soil was degraded in 30 h, compared to {approx}82% for Smith Farm soil (organic matter content = 0.7%). DOC from the potting soil was found to inhibit TCE degradation. The presence of the extracted SOM at 40 ppm and 350 ppm as TOC reduced the degradation rate by 34% and 67%, respectively. Four prototype surfactants were tested for their effects on TCE desorption and degradation rates, including two anionic surfactants known as SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate) and SDBS (sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate), a cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) bromide, and a non-ionic surfactant Tween 80. All four surfactants were observed to enhance TCE desorption at concentrations below or above the critical micelle concentration (cmc), with the anionic surfactant SDS being most effective. Based on the pseudo-first-order reaction rate law, the presence of 1 x cmc SDS increased the reaction rate by a factor of 2.5 when the nanoparticles were used for degrading TCE in a water solution. SDS was effective for enhancing degradation of TCE sorbed in Smith Farm soil, the presence of SDS at sub-cmc increased TCE degraded by {approx}10%. However, effect of SDS on degradation of TCE in the potting soil was more complex. The presence of SDS at sub-cmc decreased TCE degradation by 5%, but increased degradation by 5% when SDS dosage was raised to 5 x cmc. The opposing effects were attributed to combined effects of SDS on TCE desorption and degradation, release of soil organic matter and nanoparticle aggregation. The findings strongly suggest that effect of soil sorption on the effectiveness of Fe-Pd nanoparticles must be taken into account in process design, and soil organic content plays an important role in the overall degradation rate and in the effectiveness of surfactant uses.

  3. Measuring the reactivity of commercially available zero-valent iron nanoparticles used for environmental remediation with iopromide.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Doris; Mici?, Vesna; Laumann, Susanne; Hofmann, Thilo

    2015-10-01

    The high specific surface area and high reactivity of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles have led to much research on their application to environmental remediation. The reactivity of nZVI is affected by both the water chemistry and the properties of the particular type of nZVI particle used. We have investigated the reactivity of three types of commercially available Nanofer particles (from Nanoiron, s.r.o., Czech Republic) that are currently either used in, or proposed for use in full scale environmental remediation projects. The performance of one of these, the air-stable and thus easy-to-handle Nanofer Star particle, has not previously been reported. Experiments were carried out first in batch shaking reactors in order to derive maximum reactivity rates and provide a rapid estimate of the Nanofer particle's reactivity. The experiments were performed under near-natural environmental conditions with respect to the pH value of water and solute concentrations, and results were compared with those obtained using synthetic water. Thereafter, the polyelectrolyte-coated Nanofer 25S particles (having the highest potential for transport within porous media) were chosen for the experiments in column reactors, in order to elucidate nanoparticle reactivity under a more field-site realistic setting. Iopromide was rapidly dehalogenated by the investigated nZVI particles, following pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics that was independent of the experimental conditions. The specific surface area normalized reaction rate constant (kSA) value in the batch reactors ranged between 0.12 and 0.53Lm(-2)h(-1); it was highest for the uncoated Nanofer 25 particles, followed by the polyacrylic acid-coated Nanofer 25S and air-stable Nanofer Star particles. In the batch reactors all particles were less reactive in natural water than in synthetic water. The kSA values derived from the column reactor experiments were about 1000 times lower than those from the batch reactors, ranging between 2.6×10(-4) and 5.7×10(-4)Lm(-2)h(-1). Our results revealed that the easy-to-handle and air-stable Nanofer Star particles are the least reactive of all the Nanofer products tested. The reaction kinetics predicted by column experiments were more realistic than those predicted by batch experiments and these should therefore be used when designing a full-scale field application of nanomaterials for environmental remediation. PMID:25708601

  4. Incorporation of nanoscale zero-valent iron particles inside the channels of SBA-15 silica rods by a “two solvents” reduction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xia; Yu, Hongxia; Zheng, Da; Wang, Xuesong; Li, Jiansheng; Wang, Lianjun

    2013-08-01

    A new reduction method named a “two solvents” reduction technique was developed for incorporation of nanoscale zero-valent iron particles (NZVIs) inside the channels of SBA-15 silica rods under mild conditions. The resulting NZVIs/SBA-15 composites were compared with the ones prepared by the conventional liquid phase reduction method in structure, morphology and reactivity. All the samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and all-direct-reading plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Results showed that abundant ultrasmall zero-valent iron particles were synthesized and well dispersed in the mesopores of SBA-15 silica rods by the new reduction technique, whereas larger iron particles were supported and aggregated on the surface of the silica rods by conventional reduction method. Batch experiment demonstrated that NZVIs incorporated inside the silica channels had higher reactivity for the removal of Cr(VI) in aqueous solution than those supported on the surface.

  5. [Preparation of nano zero-valent iron/Sargassum horneri based activated carbon for removal of Cr (VI) from aqueous solution].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Gan-Ning; Wu, Xiao; Zheng, Lin; Wu, Xi; Tu, Mei-Ling; Wang, Tie-Gan; Ai, Ning

    2015-02-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron supported on Sargassum horneri activated carbon (NZVI/SAC) was synthesized by zinc chloride activation and incipient wetness method, and characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XRD confirmed the existence of nano zero-valent iron, and SEM revealed that the material consisted of mainly 30-150 nm spherical particles aggregated into chains of individual units. The valence state of iron conformed with the nuclear-shell model. The effects of NZVI loading on AC, pH and the initial concentration of Cr(VI) on the removal of Cr(VI) were investigated. The final Cr(VI) removal percentage was up to 100% under the following conditions: 30 degrees C, pH = 2, NZVI/SAC dosage of 2 g x L(-1) and the amounts of NZVI loaded on SAC of 30%. And the equilibrium time was 10 minutes. These results showed that NZVI/SAC could be potentially applied for removal of high concentration Cr(VI). By analyzing the chemical change of NZVI/ SAC, we demonstrated that Cr(VI) was mainly reduced to insoluble Cr (III) compound in the reaction when pH was less than 4, and adsorbed by NZVI and SAC when pH was over 4. PMID:26031079

  6. Injection of Nano Zero-Valent Iron for Subsurface Remediation: Evaluation of Methods for Assessment of Nanoparticle Delivery (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tratnyek, P. G.; Shi, Z.; Nurmi, J. T.; Johnson, R. L.

    2010-12-01

    Among emerging technologies for in situ remediation of subsurface contamination, injection of nano-sized zero-valent iron (nZVI) stands out for the sudden growth in interest it has attracted. Field scale applications of this technology exist for a variety of types of sites, and most of these projects have been described as being successful. None of these sites have been extensively characterized, however, and there is not yet a critical mass of field data on which to make generalizations about the performance of nZVI-based remediation technologies. Furthermore, some aspects of the reported field results are not easily reconciled with results of laboratory and modeling studies of nZVI properties and behavior. Clearly, a more thorough and rigorous understanding of this system is needed to ensure that applications of this technology are successful. Among the critical issues to be addressed, detection of iron nanoparticles remains a challenge, and there is no established protocol for detecting iron nanoparticles in the field upon nZVI injection. Oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) measurements have been widely used to assess the results of injection of nZVI for groundwater remediation. However, the significance of such measurements is unclear because the complex interaction between the target materials (e.g. suspensions of highly reactive and variably aggregated nanoparticles) and the electrode has never been characterized. In recent work, we have investigated the effect of nZVI on ORP measurements under various reaction conditions. The electrochemical techniques used include chronopotentiometry and linear-sweep voltammetry with traditional stationary disc electrodes (SDEs), rotating disc electrodes (RDEs), and flow-through cell disc electrodes (FDEs). From ORP measurements in suspensions of nZVI, we found the electrode response to be highly complex, but also a very sensitive probe for a range of fundamentally significant processes. The ORP measurements of nZVI suspensions with both SDEs and RDEs indicate that the interaction of iron nanoparticles with the working electrode significantly contributed to the working electrode response, which is complicated by the solution chemistry and particle properties. The time dependence of the electrode response reflects both a primary effect (sorption of nZVI on the electrode surface) and secondary effects (via Fe oxidation and dissolved H2) of nZVI on ORP. Organic coatings on nZVI particles reduced the primary effect of nZVI by protecting the particle and electrode surfaces. Oxidation of nZVI resulted in rebound of the ORP, as indicated by a progressive shift of the corrosion potential (Ecorr) to more positive values obtained from LSV measurements. Combinations of electrochemical and other methods will be needed to differentiate particle concentration, composition, and reactivity after nZVI injection into the subsurface environment.

  7. Rapid reductive degradation of aqueous p-nitrophenol using nanoscale zero-valent iron particles immobilized on mesoporous silica with enhanced antioxidation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lin; Tang, Jing; Zeng, Guangming; Yang, Guide; Xie, Xia; Zhou, Yaoyu; Pang, Ya; Fang, Yan; Wang, Jiajia; Xiong, Weiping

    2015-04-01

    In this study, nanoscale zero-valent iron particles immobilized on mesoporous silica (nZVI/SBA-15) were successfully prepared for effective degradation of p-nitrophenol (PNP). The nZVI/SBA-15 composites were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis spectrum and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results showed that abundant ultrasmall nanoscale zero-valent iron particles were formed and well dispersed on mesoporous silica (SBA-15). Batch experiments revealed that PNP removal declined from 96.70% to 16.14% as solution pH increased from 3.0 to 9.0. Besides, degradation equilibrium was reached within 5 min, which was independent of initial PNP concentration. Furthermore, only a little PNP elimination on SBA-15 indicated that nZVI immobilized on mesoporous silica was mainly responsible for the target contaminant removal. The UV-vis spectrum and XPS measurement confirmed that the PNP removal was a reductive degradation process, which was further proved by the detected intermediates using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The excellent antioxidation ability had been discovered with more than 80% of PNP being removed by nZVI/SBA-15 treated with 30 days' exposure to air. These results demonstrated the feasible and potential application of nZVI/SBA-15 composites in organic wastewater treatment.

  8. Batch-test study on the dechlorination of 1,1,1-trichloroethane in contaminated aquifer material by zero-valent iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lookman, Richard; Bastiaens, Leen; Borremans, Brigitte; Maesen, Miranda; Gemoets, Johan; Diels, Ludo

    2004-10-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons are common groundwater contaminants. One possible remediation option is in-situ reductive dechlorination by zero-valent iron, either by direct injection or as reactive barriers. Chlorinated ethenes (tetrachloroethene: PCE; trichloroethene: TCE) have received extensive attention in this context. However, another common groundwater pollutant, 1,1,1-trichlorethane (TCA), has attracted much less attention. We studied TCA reduction by three types of granular zero-valent irons in a series of batch experiments using polluted groundwater, with and without added aquifer material. Two types of iron were able to reduce TCA completely with no daughter product concentration increases (1,1-dichloroethane: DCA; chloroethane: CA). One type of iron showed slower reduction, with intermediate rise of DCA and CA concentrations. When evaluating the formation of daughter products, the tests on the groundwater alone showed different results than the groundwater plus aquifer batches: DCA did not temporarily accumulate in the batches with added aquifer material, contrary to the batches without added aquifer material. 1,1-dichloroethene (DCE, also present in the groundwater as an abiotic degradation product of TCA) was also reduced slower in the batches without added aquifer material than in the batches with aquifer material. Redox potentials gradually decreased to low values in batches with aquifer material without iron, while the batches with groundwater alone maintained a constant higher redox potential. Either adsorption processes or microbiological activity in the samples could explain these phenomena. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR: a targeted gene probe technique) for chlorinated aliphatic compound (CAH)-degrading bacteria confirmed the presence of Dehalococcoides sp. (chloroethene-degraders) but was negative for Desulfobacterium autotrophicum (a known co-metabolic TCA degrader). DCA reduction was rate determining: first-order half-lives of 300-350 h were observed. TCA was fully removed within hours. CA is resistant to reduction by zero-valent iron but it is known to hydrolyze easily. Since CA did not accumulate in our batches, it may have disappeared by the latter mechanism or it may not have formed as a major daughter product.

  9. Carboxymethyl Cellulose Stabilized Nano-scale Zero Valent Iron Transport in Porous Media: An Experimental and Modeling Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, P.; Rrokaj, E.; Sleep, B. E.

    2013-12-01

    An experimental and modeling study is being conducted to evaluate carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) stabilized nano-scale zero valent iron (nZVI) transport in porous media. A two-dimensional water-saturated glass-walled sandbox (55 cm x 45 cm x 1.3 cm in size) is being used for the study. The sandbox was packed uniformly with silica sand (600 ?m to 425 ?m grain diameter) under water-saturated conditions. From a series of hydraulic tests permeability of the system was calculated to be 1.0 x 10-12 m2. The transport tests are being conducted at pore-water velocities of 3, 5, and 10 m.d-1 to identify any shear-thinning effects associated with the CMC (MW = 90,000) solution, and effects of velocity on nZVI attachment to the porous media. A set of transport tests is being carried out using LissamineTM Green B (LGB) dye and CMC mixtures to characterize the CMC transport without nZVI. The transport tests are being conducted at various CMC concentrations ranging from 0.2% to 0.8% (w/v) to determine the effect of CMC concentration on nZVI transport under flowing conditions. For the CMC stabilized nZVI transport tests, nZVI is synthesized freshly in CMC solution before each experiment using sodium borohydride and ferrous sulfate. The synthesized nZVI concentrations range from 0.1 to 2.5 g.L-1. While higher nZVI concentration is desired for higher contaminant degradation, the higher nZVI concentration may cause greater aggregation and attachment to the porous media limiting the delivery distance for nZVI. In each transport experiment, the LGB-CMC solution or nZVI-CMC solution is injected into the sandbox as a pulse of 0.25 pore volume (PV). For LGB, the mass recovery was calculated to be ~ 96.5% indicating non-reactive transport in silica sand. The preliminary results also show that increased concentration of CMC (from 0.2% to 0.4 %) causes higher pressure drop across the sandbox, indicating that use of high CMC concentrations will limit injection rates with a corresponding effect on velocity and nZVI attachment. The transport experiments are being modeled using a two-dimensional multiphase flow and transport model. The sandbox is being discretized into 55 by 45 grid blocks (1 cm x 1 cm x 1.3 cm in size). LGB and CMC are modeled as soluble components, while nZVI is being considered as a colloid. In case of nZVI transport, attachment coefficients are being fitted to match the experimental breakthrough curves. The estimated attachment coefficients can be used to predict the CMC stabilized nZVI transport in field scale applications.

  10. An Experimental Study of Micron-Size Zero-Valent Iron Emplacement in Permeable Porous Media Using Polymer-Enhanced Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Mart; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Covert, Matthew A.; Vermeul, Vince R.

    2005-12-22

    At the Hanford Site, an extensive In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) permeable reactive barrier was installed to prevent chromate from reaching the Columbia River. However, chromium has been detected in several wells, indicating a premature loss of the reductive capacity in the aquifer. One possible cause for premature chromate breakthrough is associated with the presence of high-permeability zones in the aquifer. In these zones, groundwater moves relatively fast and is able to oxidize iron more rapidly. There is also a possibility that the high-permeability flow paths are deficient in reducing equivalents (e.g. reactive iron), required for barrier performance. One way enhancement of the current barrier reductive capacity can be achieved is by the addition of micron-scale zero-valent iron to the high-permeability zones within the aquifer. The potential emplacement of zero-valent iron (Fe0) into high-permeability Hanford sediments (Ringold Unit E gravels) using shear-thinning fluids containing polymers was investigated in three-dimensional wedge-shaped aquifer models. Polymers were used to create a suspension viscous enough to keep the Fe0 in solution for extended time periods to improve colloid movement into the porous media without causing a permanent detrimental decrease in hydraulic conductivity. Porous media were packed in the wedge-shaped flow cell to create either a heterogeneous layered system with a high-permeability zone in between two low-permeability zones or a high-permeability channel surrounded by low-permeability materials. The injection flow rate, polymer type, polymer concentration, and injected pore volumes were determined based on preliminary short- and long-column experiments.

  11. TREATMENT OF 1,2-DIBROMO-3-CHLOROPROPANE AND NITRATE-CONTAMINATED WATER WITH ZERO-VALENT IRON OR HYDROGEN/PALLADIUM CATALYSTS. (R825689C054,R825689C078)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The abilities of zero-valent iron powder and hydrogen with a palladium catalyst (H2/Pd-alumina) to hydrodehalogenate 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) to propane under water treatment conditions (ambient temperature and circumneutral pH) were compa...

  12. Removal of selenite by zero-valent iron combined with ultrasound: Se(IV) concentration changes, Se(VI) generation, and reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Fu, Fenglian; Lu, Jianwei; Cheng, Zihang; Tang, Bing

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the performance and application of zero-valent iron (ZVI) assisted by ultrasonic irradiation for the removal of selenite (Se(IV)) in wastewater was evaluated and reaction mechanism of Se(IV) with ZVI in such systems was investigated. A series of batch experiments were conducted to determine the effects of ultrasound power, pH, ZVI concentration, N2 and air on Se(IV) removal. ZVI before and after reaction with Se(IV) was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results indicated that ultrasound can lead to a significant synergy in the removal of Se(IV) by ZVI because ultrasound can promote the generation of OH and accelerate the advanced Fenton process. The primary reaction products of ZVI and Se(IV) were Se(0), ferrihydrite, and Fe2O3. PMID:26585013

  13. A Two and Half-Year-Performance Evaluation of a Field Test on Treatment of Source Zone Tetrachloroethene and Its Chlorinated Daughter Products Using Emulsified Zaro Valent Iron Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field test of emulsified zero valent iron (EZVI) nanoparticles was conducted at Parris Island, SC, USA and was monitored for two and half years to assess the treatment of subsurface-source zone chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) dominated by tetrachloroethene (PCE) ...

  14. Inhibition of nitrate reduction by NaCl adsorption on a nano-zero-valent iron surface during a concentrate treatment for water reuse.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yuhoon; Kim, Dogun; Shin, Hang-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) has been considered as a possible material to treat water and wastewater. However, it is necessary to verify the effect of the matrix components in different types of target water. In this study, different effects depending on the sodium chloride (NaCl) concentration on reductions of nitrates and on the characteristics of NZVI were investigated. Although NaCl is known as a promoter of iron corrosion, a high concentration of NaCl (>3?g/L) has a significant inhibition effect on the degree of NZVI reactivity towards nitrate. The experimental results were interpreted by a Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson reaction in terms of inhibition, and the decreased NZVI reactivity could be explained by the increase in the inhibition constant. As a result of a chloride concentration analysis, it was verified that 7.7-26.5% of chloride was adsorbed onto the surface of NZVI. Moreover, the change of the iron corrosion product under different NaCl concentrations was investigated by a surface analysis of spent NZVI. Magnetite was the main product, with a low NaCl concentration (0.5?g/L), whereas amorphous iron hydroxide was observed at a high concentration (12?g/L). Though the surface was changed to permeable iron hydroxide, the Fe(0) in the core was not completely oxidized. Therefore, the inhibition effect of NaCl could be explained as the competitive adsorption of chloride and nitrate. PMID:25358487

  15. SCANNING ELECTRON ANALYSIS OF IRON FILINGS FROM A ZERO-VALENT IRON PERMEABLE BARRIER USED FOR GROUND WATER RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable iron reactive barriers have become a popular way to remediate contaminated ground water. Although this technology has been in use for about a decade, there is still little knowledge about long-term performance issues (l). One of the biggest concerns is the corrosion of ...

  16. Micron-Size Zero-Valent Iron Emplacement in Porous Media Using Polymer Additives: Column and Flow Cell Ex-periments

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Mart; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Covert, Matthew A.; Vermeul, Vince R.

    2006-03-20

    At the Hanford Site, an extensive In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) permeable reactive barrier was installed to prevent chromate from reaching the Columbia River. However, chromium has been detected in several wells, indicating a premature loss of the reductive capacity in the aquifer. Laboratory experiments have been conducted to investigate whether barrier reductive capacity can be enhanced by adding micron-scale zero-valent iron to the high-permeability zones within the aquifer using shear-thinning fluids containing polymers. Porous media were packed in a wedge-shaped flow cell to create either a heterogeneous layered system with a high-permeability zone between two low-permeability zones or a high-permeability channel sur-rounded by low-permeability materials. The injection flow rate, polymer type, polymer concentration, and injected pore volumes were determined based on preliminary short- and long-column experiments. The flow cell experiments indicated that iron concentration enhancements of at least 0.6% (w/w) could be obtained using moderate flow rates and injection of 30 pore volumes. The 0.6% amended Fe0 concentration would provide approximately 20 times the average reductive capacity that is provided by the dithionite-reduced iron in the ISRM barrier. Calculations show that a 1-m-long Fe0 amended zone with an average concentration of 0.6% w/w iron subject to a groundwater velocity of 1 m/day will have an estimated longevity of 7.2 years.

  17. Reductive removal of selenate by zero-valent iron: The roles of aqueous Fe(2+) and corrosion products, and selenate removal mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tang, Cilai; Huang, Yong H; Zeng, Hui; Zhang, Zengqiang

    2014-12-15

    Batch tests were conducted to investigate the roles of dissolved Fe(2+) and corrosion products, and the involved mechanisms in selenate (Se(VI)) removal by zero-valent iron (ZVI). The results showed that insignificant Se(VI) removal (4-7.5%) was observed in the presence of ZVI or Fe(2+) alone. However, external supply of dissolved ferrous ion dramatically enhanced Se(VI) removal in the presence of ZVI. Selenate removal efficiency increased with increasing Fe(2+) concentration. Selenate removal sustained only if Fe(2+) was supplied continuously. Both sequential extraction experiments and XPS analysis showed that selenate was reduced step by step, with elemental selenium and adsorbed selenite as the dominant reductive products. Selenite and elemental selenium could be further reduced to selenide, with continuous Fe(2+) supply and sufficient reaction time. In the ZVI-Se(VI)-Fe(2+) system, ZVI was the major electron donor for selenate reduction. Fe(2+) functioned as electron donor as well and was consumed with a Fe(2+):Se stoichiometry of ?1:1. It also facilitated the transformation of the passive layer of iron coatings to a medium (e.g., magnetite) favoring electron transfer and thus enhanced selenate reduction. Iron corrosion products were media for electron transfer and reactive interfaces for selenium adsorption and reduction. These findings provided a new approach to overcome ZVI surface passivation for long-term application. PMID:25269108

  18. Polyphosphate-enhanced production of reactive oxidants by nanoparticulate zero-valent iron and ferrous ion in the presence of oxygen: Yield and nature of oxidants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak-Hyeon; Lee, Hongshin; Kim, Hyung-Eun; Seo, Jiwon; Hong, Seok Won; Lee, Jeong-Yong; Lee, Changha

    2015-12-01

    The production of reactive oxidants from nanoparticulate zero-valent iron (nZVI) and ferrous ion (Fe(II)) in the presence of oxygen was greatly enhanced by the addition of tetrapolyphosphate (TPP) as an iron-chelating agent. Compared to other ligands, TPP exhibited superior activity in improving the oxidant yields. The nZVI/TPP/O2 and the Fe(II)/TPP/O2 systems showed similar oxidant yields with respect to the iron consumed, indicating that nZVI only serves as a source of Fe(II). The degradation efficacies of selected organic compounds were also similar in the two systems. It appeared that both hydroxyl radical (OH) and ferryl ion (Fe(IV)) are produced, and OH dominates at acidic pH. However, at pH > 6, little occurrence of hydroxylated oxidation products suggests that Fe(IV) is a dominant oxidant. The degradation rates of selected organic compounds by the Fe(II)/TPP/O2 system had two optimum points at pH 6 and 9, and these pH-dependent trends are likely attributed to the speciation of Fe(IV) with different reactivities. PMID:26093796

  19. Effect of nanoscale zero-valent iron and magnetite (Fe3O4) on the fate of metals during anaerobic digestion of sludge.

    PubMed

    Suanon, Fidèle; Sun, Qian; Mama, Daouda; Li, Jiangwei; Dimon, Biaou; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the most widely used processes to stabilize waste sewage sludge and produce biogas renewable energy. In this study, two different iron nanoparticles [nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) and magnetite (Fe3O4)] were used in the mesophilic AD processes (37 ± 1 °C) to improve biogas production. In addition, changes of heavy metal (Cd, Co, Cu, Zn, Ni and Cr) speciation during AD of sludge with and without iron nanoparticles have been investigated. Concentrations of metals in the initial sludge were as follows: 63.1, 73.4, 1102.2, 2060.3, 483.9 and 604.1 mg kg(-1) (dry sludge basis) for Cd, Co, Cu, Zn, Ni and Cr, respectively. Sequential fractionation showed that metals were predominantly bonded to organic matter and carbonates in the initial sludge. Compared with AD without iron nanoparticles, the application of iron nanoparticles (at dose of 0.5% in this study) showed positive impact not only on biogas production, but also on improvement of metals stabilization in the digestate. Metals were found concentrated in Fe-Mn bound and residual fractions and little was accumulated in the liquid digestate and most mobile fractions of solid digestate (water soluble, exchangeable and carbonates bound). Therefore, iron nanoparticles when properly used, could improve not only biogas yield, but also regulate and control the mobilization of metals during AD process. However, our study also observed that iron nanoparticles could promote the immobilization of phosphorus within the sludge during AD, and more research is needed to fully address the mechanism behind this phenomenon and the impact on future phosphorus reuse. PMID:26613183

  20. DDT degradation efficiency and ecotoxicological effects of two types of nano-sized zero-valent iron (nZVI) in water and soil.

    PubMed

    El-Temsah, Yehia S; Sevcu, Alena; Bobcikova, Katerina; Cernik, Miroslav; Joner, Erik J

    2016-02-01

    Nano-scale zero-valent iron (nZVI) has been conceived for cost-efficient degradation of chlorinated pollutants in soil as an alternative to e.g permeable reactive barriers or excavation. Little is however known about its efficiency in degradation of the ubiquitous environmental pollutant DDT and its secondary effects on organisms. Here, two types of nZVI (type B made using precipitation with borohydride, and type T produced by gas phase reduction of iron oxides under H2) were compared for efficiency in degradation of DDT in water and in a historically (>45 years) contaminated soil (24 mg kg(-1) DDT). Further, the ecotoxicity of soil and water was tested on plants (barley and flax), earthworms (Eisenia fetida), ostracods (Heterocypris incongruens), and bacteria (Escherichia coli). Both types of nZVI effectively degraded DDT in water, but showed lower degradation of aged DDT in soil. Both types of nZVI had negative impact on the tested organisms, with nZVI-T giving least adverse effects. Negative effects were mostly due to oxidation of nZVI, resulting in O2 consumption and excess Fe(II) in water and soil. PMID:26598990

  1. Decomplexation and subsequent reductive removal of EDTA-chelated Cu(II) by zero-valent iron coupled with a weak magnetic field: Performances and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiaohong; Jiang, Xiao; Qiao, Junlian; Zhou, Gongming

    2015-12-30

    The feasibility of EDTA-chelated Cu(II) (Cu(II)-EDTA) removal by zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) in the presence of a weak magnetic field (WMF) and the involved mechanisms were systematically investigated. Fe(0) combined with WMF (Fe(0)/WMF) was very effective for removing Cu(II)-EDTA at pH 4.0-6.0 with the rate constants ranging from 0.1190min(-1) to 0.0704min(-1). Little passivation of Fe(0) was observed during Cu(II)-EDTA removal by Fe(0)/WMF in 8 consecutive runs when 10.0mgL(-1) Cu(II)-EDTA was dosed before the initiation of each run. The evidences presented in this study verified that Cu(II)-EDTA was removed by decomplexation followed by reduction/adsorption. In brief, Fe(II) released from Fe(0) corrosion was rapidly oxidized by oxygen to Fe(III) to chelate with EDTA and release free Cu(II), and the detached Cu(II) ions were subsequently reduced/removed by Fe(0)/Fe(II) and co-precipitated by the generated iron (hydr)-oxides. To advance the application of Fe(0)/WMF technology in real practice, a magnetic propeller agitator was designed to offer WMF inside the reactor, which could greatly improve Cu(II)-EDTA removal by Fe(0) and be easily amplified. PMID:26296073

  2. Interaction between Cu2+ and different types of surface-modified nanoscale zero-valent iron during their transport in porous media.

    PubMed

    Dong, Haoran; Zeng, Guangming; Zhang, Chang; Liang, Jie; Ahmad, Kito; Xu, Piao; He, Xiaoxiao; Lai, Mingyong

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the interaction between Cu2+ and nano zero-valent iron (NZVI) coated with three types of stabilizers (i.e., polyacrylic acid [PAA], Tween-20 and starch) by examining the Cu2+ uptake, colloidal stability and mobility of surface-modified NZVI (SM-NZVI) in the presence of Cu2+. The uptake of Cu2+ by SM-NZVI and the colloidal stability of the Cu-bearing SM-NZVI were examined in batch tests. The results showed that NZVI coated with different modifiers exhibited different affinities for Cu2+, which resulted in varying colloidal stability of different SM-NZVI in the presence of Cu2+. The presence of Cu2+ exerted a slight influence on the aggregation and settling of NZVI modified with PAA or Tween-20. However, the presence of Cu2+ caused significant aggregation and sedimentation of starch-modified NZVI, which is due to Cu2+ complexation with the starch molecules coated on the surface of the particles. Column experiments were conducted to investigate the co-transport of Cu2+ in association with SM-NZVI in water-saturated quartz sand. It was presumed that a physical straining mechanism accounted for the retention of Cu-bearing SM-NZVI in the porous media. Moreover, the enhanced aggregation of SM-NZVI in the presence of Cu2+ may be contributing to this straining effect. PMID:26040744

  3. Pretreatment of 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) producing wastewater using a combined zero-valent iron (ZVI) reduction and Fenton oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jinyou; Ou, Changjin; Zhou, Zongyuan; Chen, Jun; Fang, Kexiong; Sun, Xiuyun; Li, Jiansheng; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Lianjun

    2013-09-15

    A combined zero-valent iron (ZVI) reduction and Fenton oxidation process was tested for the pretreatment of 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) producing wastewater. Operating conditions were optimized and overall performance of the combined process was evaluated. For ZVI process, almost complete reduction of nitroaromatic compounds was observed at empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 8h. For Fenton process, the optimal pH, H?O? to Fe(II) molar ratio, H?O? dosage and hydraulic retention time (HRT) were found to be 3.0, 15, 0.216 mol/L and 5h, respectively. After pretreatment by the combined ZVI-Fenton process under the optimal conditions, aromatic organic compound removal was as high as 77.2%, while the majority of COD remained to be further treated by sequent biological process. The combined anaerobic-aerobic process consisted of an anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) and a moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) was operated for 3 months, fed with ZVI-Fenton effluent. The results revealed that the coupled ZVI-Fenton-ABR-MBBR system was significantly efficient in terms of correcting the effluent's main parameters of relevance, mainly aromatic compounds concentration, COD concentration, color and acute toxicity. These results indicate that the combined ZVI-Fenton process offers bright prospects for the pretreatment of wastewater containing nitroaromatic compounds. PMID:23892166

  4. Degradation of 4-Chloro-3,5-Dimethylphenol by a Heterogeneous Fenton-Like Reaction Using Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lejin; Wang, Jianlong

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Degradation of 4-chloro-3,5-dimethylphenol (PCMX) by a heterogeneous Fenton-like process using nanoparticulate zero-valent iron (nZVI) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) at pH 6.3 was investigated. Interactive effects of three factors—initial PCMX concentration, nZVI dosage, and H2O2 concentration—were investigated using the response surface method based on the Box–Behnken design. Experimental results showed that complete decomposition of PCMX and 65% of total organic carbon removal were observed after 30?min of reaction at neutral pH under recommended reaction conditions: nZVI, 1.0?g/L; H2O2, 18?mM; and initial PCMX concentration, 0.15?g/L. Based on the effects of scavengers n-butanol and KI, removal of PCMX was mainly attributed to the attack of •OH, especially the surface-bonded •OH. A possible degradation pathway of PCMX was proposed. PMID:23781127

  5. Are reproduction impairments of free spawning marine invertebrates exposed to zero-valent nano-iron associated with dissolution of nanoparticles?

    PubMed

    Kadar, Eniko; Dyson, Oliver; Handy, Richard D; Al-Subiai, Sherain N

    2013-03-01

    Studies were carried out to assess the effects of coating applied to zero-valent nano-iron (nZVI) on early life stage development of three key marine invertebrate species Mytilus galloprovincialis, Ciona intestinalis and Psammechinus milliaris. Embryo development was assessed following a 2-h exposure of the sperm to concentrations of two nZVIs of up to 10 mg l(-1) followed by in vitro fertilisation. Disruption of embryo development was most severe in sea squirts followed by mussel, while the urchin embryos were not significantly affected as compared with controls. An over twofold decrease in fertilisation success alongside significant delay in the embryo development was observed, and the effect was more severe with the coated form, possibly owing to its better colloidal stability. We provide in vitro evidence for the rapid dissolution (within 2 h) of nZVI in seawater to a degree that concentration of total solute Fe released from the coated ZVI particles exceeds safe limits of NOECs established for dissolved Fe. PMID:22263896

  6. The use of the core-shell structure of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (NZVI) for long-term removal of sulphide in sludge during anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Su, Lianghu; Zhen, Guangyin; Zhang, Longjiang; Zhao, Youcai; Niu, Dongjie; Chai, Xiaoli

    2015-12-01

    A core-shell structure results in zero-valent iron nanoparticles (NZVI) with manifold functional properties. In this study, the long-term effects of NZVI on hydrogen sulphide removal in an anaerobic sludge digester were investigated. Within 20 days, the average hydrogen sulphide content in the biogas was successfully reduced from 300 (or 3620 of sulphate-rich sludge) mg Nm(-3) to 6.1 (121), 0.9 (3.3) and 0.5 (1.3) mg Nm(-3) in the presence of 0.05, 0.10 and 0.20% (wt) NZVI, respectively. Methane yield was enhanced at the low NZVI dose (0.05-0.10%) but decreased at the elevated dose (0.20%). Methane production and volatile solid degradation analyses implied that doses of 0.5-0.10% NZVI could accelerate sludge stabilization during anaerobic digestion. The phosphorus fractionation profile suggested that methane production could be inhibited at the elevated NZVI dose, partly due to the limited availability of soluble phosphorus due to the immobilization of bioavailable-P through the formation of vivianite. An analysis of the reducible inorganic sulphur species revealed that the elimination of hydrogen sulphide occurred via the reaction between hydrogen sulphide and the oxide shell of NZVI, which mainly formed FeS and some FeS2 and S(0). PMID:26565792

  7. The enhancement effect of pre-reduction using zero-valent iron on the solidification of chromite ore processing residue by blast furnace slag and calcium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinchunzi; Chen, Zhonglin; Shen, Jimin; Wang, Binyuan; Fan, Leitao

    2015-09-01

    A bench scale study was performed to assess the effectiveness of the solidification of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) by blast furnace slag and calcium hydroxide, and investigate the enhancement effect of pre-reduction using zero-valent iron (ZVI) on the solidification treatment. The degree of Cr immobilization was evaluated using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) as well as the solid waste-extraction procedure for leaching toxicity-sulfuric acid & nitric acid method (Chinese standard HJ/T299-2007). Strength tests and semi-dynamic leaching tests were implemented to investigate the potential for reusing the final treatment product as a readily available construction material. The experimental results showed that the performance of pre-reduction/solidification (S/S) was superior to that of solidification alone. After pre-reduction, all of the S/S treated COPR samples met the TCLP limit for total Cr (5 mg L(-1)), whereas the samples with a COPR content below 40% met the pollution control limit of bricks and building block products (Chinese standard HJ/T 301-2007) produced with COPR for total Cr (0.3 mg L(-1)). At the same time, all of the S/S treated specimens tested were suitable for utilization at certain levels. PMID:25929874

  8. Determination of rate constants and branching ratios for TCE degradation by zero-valent iron using a chain decay multispecies model.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Sudicky, Edward A; Illman, Walter A

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of a newly-developed chain-decay multispecies model (CMM) was validated by obtaining kinetic rate constants and branching ratios along the reaction pathways of trichloroethene (TCE) reduction by zero-valent iron (ZVI) from column experiments. Changes in rate constants and branching ratios for individual reactions for degradation products over time for two columns under different geochemical conditions were examined to provide ranges of those parameters expected over the long-term. As compared to the column receiving deionized water, the column receiving dissolved CaCO3 showed higher mean degradation rates for TCE and all of its degradation products. However, the column experienced faster reactivity loss toward TCE degradation due to precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals, as indicated by a higher value for the ratio of maximum to minimum TCE degradation rate observed over time. From the calculated branching ratios, it was found that TCE and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) were dominantly dechlorinated to chloroacetylene and acetylene, respectively, through reductive elimination for both columns. The CMM model, validated by the column test data in this study, provides a convenient tool to determine simultaneously the critical design parameters for permeable reactive barriers and natural attenuation such as rate constants and branching ratios. PMID:25827100

  9. Determination of rate constants and branching ratios for TCE degradation by zero-valent iron using a chain decay multispecies model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Sudicky, Edward A.; Illman, Walter A.

    2015-06-01

    The applicability of a newly-developed chain-decay multispecies model (CMM) was validated by obtaining kinetic rate constants and branching ratios along the reaction pathways of trichloroethene (TCE) reduction by zero-valent iron (ZVI) from column experiments. Changes in rate constants and branching ratios for individual reactions for degradation products over time for two columns under different geochemical conditions were examined to provide ranges of those parameters expected over the long-term. As compared to the column receiving deionized water, the column receiving dissolved CaCO3 showed higher mean degradation rates for TCE and all of its degradation products. However, the column experienced faster reactivity loss toward TCE degradation due to precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals, as indicated by a higher value for the ratio of maximum to minimum TCE degradation rate observed over time. From the calculated branching ratios, it was found that TCE and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) were dominantly dechlorinated to chloroacetylene and acetylene, respectively, through reductive elimination for both columns. The CMM model, validated by the column test data in this study, provides a convenient tool to determine simultaneously the critical design parameters for permeable reactive barriers and natural attenuation such as rate constants and branching ratios.

  10. Transport of sucrose-modified nanoscale zero-valent iron in saturated porous media: role of media size, injection rate and input concentration.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhao, Yong-sheng; Han, Zhan-tao; Hong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) in the remediation of contaminated groundwater raises concerns regarding its transport in aquifers. Laboratory-scale sand-packed column experiments were conducted with bare and sucrose-modified NZVI (SM-NZVI) to improve our understanding of the transport of the nanoparticles in saturated porous media, as well as the role of media size, suspension injection rate and concentration on the nanoparticle behavior. As the main indicative parameters, the normalized effluent concentration was measured and the deposition rate coefficient (k) was calculated for different simulated conditions. Overall, compared to the high retention of bare NZVI in the saturated silica column, SM-NZVI suspension could travel through the coarse sand column easily. However, the transport of SM-NZVI particles was not very satisfactory in a smaller size granular matrix especially in fine silica sand. Furthermore, the value of k regularly decreased with the increasing injection rate of suspension but increased with suspension concentration, which could reflect the role of these factors in the SM-NZVI travel process. The calculation of k-value at the tests condition adequately described the experimental results from the point of deposition dynamics, which meant the assumption of first-order deposition kinetics for the transport of NZVI particles was reasonable and feasible. PMID:26524436

  11. Molecular Stress Responses to Nano-Sized Zero-Valent Iron (nZVI) Particles in the Soil Bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri

    PubMed Central

    Saccà, Maria Ludovica; Fajardo, Carmen; Martinez-Gomariz, Montserrat; Costa, Gonzalo; Nande, Mar; Martin, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    Nanotoxicological studies were performed in vitro using the common soil bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri to assess the potentially toxic impact of commercial nano-sized zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles, which are currently used for environmental remediation projects. The phenotypic response of P. stutzeri to nZVI toxicity includes an initial insult to the cell wall, as evidenced by TEM micrographs. Transcriptional analyses using genes of particular relevance in cellular activity revealed that no significant changes occurred among the relative expression ratios of narG, nirS, pykA or gyrA following nZVI exposure; however, a significant increase in katB expression was indicative of nZVI-induced oxidative stress in P. stutzeri. A proteomic approach identified two major defence mechanisms that occurred in response to nZVI exposure: a downregulation of membrane proteins and an upregulation of proteins involved in reducing intracellular oxidative stress. These biomarkers served as early indicators of nZVI response in this soil bacterium, and may provide relevant information for environmental hazard assessment. PMID:24586957

  12. [Solidification/Stabilization of Chromite Ore Processing Residue (COPR) Using Zero-Valent Iron and Lime-Activated Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong-lin; Li, Jin-chunzi; Wang, Bin-yuan; Fan, Lei-tao; Shen, Ji-min

    2015-08-01

    The solidification/stabilization (S/S) of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) was performed using zero-valent iron (ZVI) and lime-activated ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS). The degree of Cr immobilization was evaluated using the leaching procedure, mineral composition analysis and morphology analysis. Semi-dynamic leaching tests were implemented to investigate the potential for reusing the final treatment product as a readily available construction material. The results showed that after reduction, all of the S/S treated COPR samples met the pollution control limit of bricks and building block products (Chinese standard HJ/T 301-2007) produced with COPR for total Cr (0.3 mg x L(-1)), the compressive strength of all the S/S samples could meet the compressive strength standard (15 MPa) for producing clay bricks, and Cr existed as the specie that bound to Fe/Mn oxides in the S/S samples. At the same time, all of the S/S treated specimens tested were suitable for utilization at certain levels. PMID:26592036

  13. Synthesis of kaolin supported nanoscale zero-valent iron and its degradation mechanism of Direct Fast Black G in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Xiaoying; Chen, Zhengxian; Zhou, Rongbing; Chen, Zuliang

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: UV–visible spectra of DFBG solution using K-nZVI (1:1) nanoparticles. (a) Before reaction; (b) during reaction; (c) after reaction. - Highlights: • Kaolin-supported Fe{sup 0} nanoparticle (K-nZVI) was synthesized. • Degradation of Direct Fast Black by K-nZVI was studied. • K-nZVI was characterized by SEM, XRD, UV and FIIR. • Degradation mechanism of Direct Fast Black was proposed. - Abstract: Calcinated kaolin supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (K-nZVI) was synthesized and used for the removal of tetrad azo-group dye-Direct Fast Black G (DFBG) from aqueous solution. The results demonstrated that after reacting for 10 min with an initial concentration of DFBG 100 mg L{sup ?1} (pH 9.49), 78.60% of DFBG was removed using K-nZVI, while only 41.39% and 12.56% of DFBG were removed using nZVI and kaolin, respectively. K-nZVI with a mass ratio of nZVI nanoparticles versus kaolin at 1:1 was found to have a high degree of reactivity. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed that nZVI was better dispersed when kaolin was present. XRD patterns indicated that iron oxides were formed after reaction. Fourier transforms infrared spectra (FTIR) and UV–visible demonstrated that the peak in the visible light region of DFBG was degraded and new bands were observed. Kinetics studies showed that the degradation of DFBG fitted well to the pseudo first-order model. The degradation of DFBG by K-nZVI was based on its adsorption onto kaolin and iron oxides, and subsequently reduction using nZVI was proposed. A significant outcome emerged in that 99.84% of DFBG in wastewater was removed using K-nZVI after reacting for 60 min.

  14. A column study of geochemical factors affecting reductive dechlorination of chlorinated solvents by zero-valent iron

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T.L.; Tratnyek, P.G.

    1994-12-31

    Laboratory and field studies have shown that fillings of metal that are predominantly Fe{sup 0} can rapidly dehalogenate a variety of chlorinated solvents, and several technologies have recently been proposed to use this reaction in remediation of contaminated ground water. This report describes results from a laboratory column designed to model the spatial distribution of chemical conditions when iron is applied as part of an in-situ permeable reactive barrier. The column contains a zone of granular iron located between up-gradient and down-gradient zones of sand, and has received deionized water with varying concentrations of CCl{sub 4} for over 6 months. Aerobic corrosion results in complete consumption of dissolved oxygen and precipitation of ferric hydroxides at the interface where water enters the iron-bearing zone. Within the iron-bearing zone, corrosion continues due to oxidation of the iron by water and carbon tetrachloride, resulting in increased pH and concentration of dissolved iron in the pore water. At the down-gradient interface, pH decreased as the result of precipitation of iron-bearing minerals. Carbon tetrachloride (up to 1.6 mM) was fully dehalogenated by the first sample port within the iron-bearing zone. The chloroform produced was further dechlorinated to dichloromethane, but at a slower rate. First-order disappearance kinetics for chloroform applied across the zone of iron, and k{sub obs} has changed little over several months. No evidence has been found so far for unusual reactivity of the chlorinated solvents at either the up-gradient or down-gradient interfaces.

  15. Potential artifacts in interpretation of differential breakthrough of colloids and dissolved tracers in the context of transport in a zero-valent iron permeable reactive barrier

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, P.; Johnson, W.P.; Piana, M.J.; Fuller, C.C.; Naftz, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Many published studies have used visual comparison of the timing of peak breakthrough of colloids versus conservative dissolved tracers (hereafter referred to as dissolved tracers or tracers) in subsurface media to determine whether they are advected differently, and to elucidate the mechanisms of differential advection. This purely visual approach of determining differential advection may have artifacts, however, due to the attachment of colloids to subsurface media. The attachment of colloids to subsurface media may shift the colloidal peak breakthrough to earlier times, causing an apparent "faster" peak breakthrough of colloids relative to dissolve tracers even though the transport velocities for the colloids and the dissolved tracers may actually be equivalent. In this paper, a peak shift analysis was presented to illustrate the artifacts associated with the purely visual approach in determining differential advection, and to quantify the peak shift due to colloid attachment. This peak shift analysis was described within the context of microsphere and bromide transport within a zero-valent iron (ZVI) permeable reactive barrier (PRB) located in Fry Canyon, Utah. Application of the peak shift analysis to the field microsphere and bromide breakthrough data indicated that differential advection of the microspheres relative to the bromide occurred in the monitoring wells closest to the injection well in the PRB. It was hypothesized that the physical heterogeneity at the grain scale, presumably arising from differences in inter- versus intra-particle porosity, contributed to the differential advection of the microspheres versus the bromide in the PRB. The relative breakthrough (RB) of microspheres at different wells was inversely related to the ionic strength of ground water at these wells, in agreement with numerous studies showing that colloid attachment is directly related to solution ionic strength.

  16. Enhanced As(III) oxidation and removal by combined use of zero valent iron and hydrogen peroxide in aerated waters at neutral pH values.

    PubMed

    Katsoyiannis, Ioannis A; Voegelin, Andreas; Zouboulis, Anastasios I; Hug, Stephan J

    2015-10-30

    The oxidation and removal of As(III) by commercially available micro-scale zero-valent iron (mZVI) was studied in aerated synthetic groundwater with initially 6.7 ?M As(III) at neutral pH values. Batch experiments were performed to investigate the influence of ZVI and H2O2 concentrations on As(III) oxidation and removal. Oxidation and removal kinetics was significantly increased by increasing ZVI concentration or by adding H2O2 in micromolar concentrations slightly higher than that of initial As(III). Observed half-lifes for arsenic removal without added H2O2 were 81-17 min at ZVI concentrations of 0.15-2.5 g/L, respectively. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) confirmed that almost all As(III) was converted to As(V) after 2 h of reaction in the pH range 5-9. Addition of 9.6 ?M H2O2 to 0.15 g/L ZVI suspensions diminished half-lifes for arsenic removal from 81 to 32 min and for As(III) oxidation from 77 to 8 min, i.e., by approximately a factor of 10. The increased rate of As(III) oxidation is attributable to enhanced formation of oxidants by the Fenton reaction with higher initial concentrations of H2O2. In practice, results of this study suggest that addition of small amounts (<1 mg/L) of H2O2 in various forms (e.g. stable and widely available Na-percarbonate) to water prior to treatment could significantly enhance As(III) oxidation and removal with ZVI. PMID:25935405

  17. Pilot-scale demonstration of the hybrid zero-valent iron process for treating flue-gas-desulfurization wastewater: part II.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong H; Peddi, Phani K; Zeng, Hui; Tang, Ci-Lai; Teng, Xinjun

    2013-01-01

    The hybrid zero-valent-iron (hZVI) process is a novel chemical treatment process that has shown promise for removing heavy metals and nutrients from industrial wastewaters. In this study, a pilot-scale demonstration was conducted to continuously treat 3.8-7.6 L/min (1-2 gpm) of the flue-gas-desulfurization (FGD) wastewater at a coal-fired power plant for 5 months. In this paper, a spike test was conducted to evaluate performance of the hZVI process for removing selected toxic metals at artificially elevated concentrations. The results showed that a multiple-stage hZVI process could decrease selenate-Se from 22 mg/L to ~10 ?g/L and dissolved Hg(2+) from 1.15 mg/L to ~10 ng/L. In addition, the process simultaneously removed a broad spectrum of heavy metals such as As(III), As(V), Cr(VI), Cd(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) from mg/L to near or sub-ppb (?g/L) level after a single-stage treatment. The process consumed about 0.3 kg ZVI per 1 m(3) FGD wastewater treated at a cost of about US$0.6/m(3). Solid waste production and energy consumption were reasonably low. The successful pilot study demonstrated that the hZVI technology can be a low-cost, high-performance treatment platform for solving some of the toughest heavy metal water problems. PMID:23168619

  18. Exploring the Role of Nanoscale Zero Valent Iron and Bacteria on the Degradation of a Multi-component Chlorinated Solvent at the Field Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocur, C. M.; Lomheim, L.; Boparai, H.; Chowdhury, A. I.; Weber, K.; Austrins, L. M.; Sleep, B. E.; Edwards, E.; O'Carroll, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) has advanced as a technology for the remediation of priority source zone contaminants in response to early laboratory studies that showed rapid rates of compound degradation. The challenges associated with the delivery of nZVI particles (eg. rapid aggregation and settling) were partially resolved with the addition of a polyelectrolyte polymers, like Carboxymethyl cellulose, that significantly improves the colloidal stability of particles allowing for more controlled injection and transport in the subsurface. Following nZVI application and abiotic contaminant degradation nZVI oxidizes and yields reducing conditions. These reducing conditions are ideal for many dechlorinating bacteria. Given this, application of nZVI for abiotic contaminant degradation followed by bioremediation has become an area of active research interest. In this study nZVI was injected into a contaminated sandy subsurface area. Concentrations of a range of chlorinated compounds, including chlorinated ethenes, ethanes, and methanes were monitored in detail following nano-particle injection in order to access short term abiotic degradation. Monitoring continued over a 2 year period to evaluate the long term effects of nZVI injection on the bacterial communities and the biotic degradation of targeted chlorinated compounds. The study focusses on the degradation and evolution of intermediate compounds from reaction with targeted contaminant compounds along the nZVI flow path. Bacterial populations were quantified before injection to confirm that beneficial chloride reducing bacteria were present on site. The microbiological response to the injection of nZVI was studied and the performance of bacteria along the nZVI flow path and outside the nZVI affected area will be compared.

  19. Degradation of bromothymol blue by 'greener' nano-scale zero-valent iron synthesized using tea polyphenols

    EPA Science Inventory

    A green single-step synthesis of iron nanoparticles using tea (Camellia sinensis) polyphenols is described that uses no added surfactants/polymers as a capping or reducing agents. The expeditious reaction between polyphenols and ferric nitrate occurs within few minutes at room te...

  20. THE APPLICATION OF IN SITU PERMEABLE REACTIVE (ZERO-VALENT IRON) BARRIER TECHNOLOGY FOR THE REMEDIATION OF CHROMATE-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER: A FIELD TEST

    EPA Science Inventory

    A small-scale field test was initiated in September 1994 to evaluate the in situ remediation of groundwater contaminated with chromate using a permeable reactive barrier composed of a mixture of zero-valent Fe, sand and aquifer sediment. The site used was an old chrome-plating f...

  1. ARSENATE AND ARSENITE REMOVAL BY ZERO-VALENT IRON: KINETICS, REDOX TRANSFORMATION, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR IN SITU GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Batch tests were performed utilizing four zerovalent iron (Fe0) filings (Fisher, Peerless, Master Builders, and Aldrich) to remove As(V) and As(III) from water. One gram of metal was reacted headspace-free at 23 °C for up to 5 days in the dark with 41.5 mL of 2 mg L-1 As(V), or A...

  2. Removal of Arsenic (III, V) from aqueous solution by nanoscale zero-valent iron stabilized with starch and carboxymethyl cellulose

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, synthetic nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) stabilized with two polymers, Starch and Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were examined and compared for their ability in removing As (III) and As (V) from aqueous solutions as the most promising iron nanoparticles form for arsenic removal. Batch operations were conducted with different process parameters such as contact time, nanoparticles concentration, initial arsenic concentration and pH. Results revealed that starch stabilized particles (S-nZVI) presented an outstanding ability to remove both arsenate and arsenite and displayed?~?36.5% greater removal for As (V) and 30% for As (III) in comparison with CMC-stabilized nanoparticles (C-nZVI). However, from the particle stabilization viewpoint, there is a clear trade off to choosing the best stabilized nanoparticles form. Removal efficiency was enhanced with increasing the contact time and iron loading but reduced with increasing initial As (III, V) concentrations and pH. Almost complete removal of arsenic (up to 500 ?g/L) was achieved in just 5 min when the S-nZVI mass concentration was 0.3 g/L and initial solution pH of 7?±?0.1. The maximum removal efficiency of both arsenic species was obtained at pH?=?5?±?0.1 and starched nanoparticles was effective in slightly acidic and natural pH values. The adsorption kinetics fitted well with pseudo-second-order model and the adsorption data obeyed the Langmuir equation with a maximum adsorption capacity of 14 mg/g for arsenic (V), and 12.2 mg/g for arsenic (III). It could be concluded that starch stabilized Fe0 nanoparticles showed remarkable potential for As (III, V) removal from aqueous solution e.g. contaminated water. PMID:24860660

  3. Zero-valent iron doped carbons readily developed from sewage sludge for lead removal from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Su, Yiming; Sun, Xiaoya; Zhou, Xuefei; Dai, Chaomeng; Zhang, Yalei

    2015-10-01

    Low-cost but high-efficiency composites of iron-containing porous carbons were prepared using sewage sludge and ferric salts as raw materials. Unlike previous time- and energy-consuming manufacturing procedures, this study shows that pyrolyzing a mixture of sludge and ferric salt can produce suitable composites for lead adsorption. The specific surface area, the total pore volume and the average pore width of the optimal composite were 321m(2)/g, 0.25cm(3)/g, and 3.17nm, respectively. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that ferric salt favored the formation of metallic iron, while Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the formation of hydroxyl and carboxylic groups. The result of batch tests indicated that the adsorption capacity of carbons activated with ferric salt could be as high as 128.9mg/g, while that of carbons without activation was 79.1mg/g. The new manufacturing procedure used in this study could save at least 19.5kJ of energy per gram of activated carbon. PMID:26456600

  4. Simple combination of oxidants with zero-valent-iron (ZVI) achieved very rapid and highly efficient removal of heavy metals from water.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuejun; Yang, Zhe; Dong, Haiyang; Guan, Xiaohong; Ren, Qidong; Lv, Xiaofang; Jin, Xin

    2016-01-01

    This study, for the first time, demonstrated a continuously accelerated Fe(0) corrosion driven by common oxidants (i.e., NaClO, KMnO4 or H2O2) and thereby the rapid and efficient removal of heavy metals (HMs) by zero-valent iron (ZVI) under the experimental conditions of jar tests and column running. ZVI simply coupled with NaClO, KMnO4 or H2O2 (0.5 mM) resulted in almost complete As(V) removal within only 10 min with 1000 ?g/L of initial As(V) at initial pH of 7.5(±0.1) and liquid solid ratio of 200:1. Simultaneous removal of 200 ?g/L of initial Cd(II) and Hg(II) to 2.4-4.4 ?g/L for Cd(II) and to 4.0-5.0 ?g/L for Hg(II) were achieved within 30 min. No deterioration of HM removal was observed during the ten recycles of jar tests. The ZVI columns activated by 0.1 mM of oxidants had stably treated 40,200 (NaClO), 20,295 (KMnO4) and 40,200 (H2O2) bed volumes (BV) of HM-contaminated drinking water, but with no any indication of As breakthrough (<10 ?g/L) even at short empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 8.0 min. The high efficiency of HMs removal from both the jar tests and column running implied a continuous and stable activation (overcoming of iron passivation) of Fe(0) surface by the oxidants. Via the proper increase in oxidant dosing, the ZVI/oxidant combination was applicable to treat highly As(V)-contaminated wastewater. During Fe(0) surface corrosion accelerated by oxidants, a large amount of fresh and reactive iron oxides and oxyhydroxides were continuously generated, which were responsible for the rapid and efficient removal of HMs through multiple mechanisms including adsorption and co-precipitation. A steady state of Fe(0) surface activation and HM removal enabled this simply coupled system to remove HMs with high speed, efficiency and perdurability. PMID:26575476

  5. Linkage of iron elution and dissolved oxygen consumption with removal of organic pollutants by nanoscale zero-valent iron: Effects of pH on iron dissolution and formation of iron oxide/hydroxide layer.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Nanae; Suzuki, Moe; Kurosu, Shunji; Kawase, Yoshinori

    2016-02-01

    The iron elution and dissolved oxygen (DO) consumption in organic pollutant removal by nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) was examined in the range of solution pH from 3.0 to 9.0. Their behaviors were linked with the removal of organic pollutant through the dissolution of iron and the formation of iron oxide/hydroxide layer affected strongly by solution pH and DO. As an example of organic pollutants, azo-dye Orange II was chosen in this study. The chemical composition analyses before and after reaction confirmed the corrosion of nZVI into ions, the formation of iron oxide/hydroxide layer on nZVI surface and the adsorption of the pollutant and its intermediates. The complete decolorization of Orange II with nZVI was accomplished very quickly. On the other hand, the total organic carbon (TOC) removal was considerably slow and the maximum TOC removal was around 40% obtained at pH 9.0. The reductive cleavage of azo-bond by emitted electrons more readily took place as compared with the cleavage of aromatic rings of Orange II leading to the degradation to smaller molecules and subsequently the mineralization. A reaction kinetic model based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood/Eley-Rideal approach was developed to elucidate mechanisms for organic pollutant removal controlled by the formation of iron oxide/hydroxide layer, the progress of which could be characterized by considering the dynamic concentration changes in Fe(2+) and DO. The dynamic profiles of Orange II removal linked with Fe(2+) and DO could be reasonably simulated in the range of pH from 3.0 to 9.0. PMID:26519806

  6. Biogenic nano-magnetite and nano-zero valent iron treatment of alkaline Cr(VI) leachate and chromite ore processing residue

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Mathew P.; Coker, Victoria S.; Parry, Stephen A.; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Thomas, Russell A.P.; Kalin, Robert; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Highly reactive nano-scale biogenic magnetite (BnM), synthesized by the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens, was tested for the potential to remediate alkaline Cr(VI) contaminated waters associated with chromite ore processing residue (COPR). The performance of this biomaterial, targeting aqueous Cr(VI) removal, was compared to a synthetic alternative, nano-scale zero valent iron (nZVI). Samples of highly contaminated alkaline groundwater and COPR solid waste were obtained from a contaminated site in Glasgow, UK. During batch reactivity tests, Cr(VI) removal from groundwater was inhibited by ?25% (BnM) and ?50% (nZVI) when compared to the treatment of less chemically complex model pH 12 Cr(VI) solutions. In both the model Cr(VI) solutions and contaminated groundwater experiments the surface of the nanoparticles became passivated, preventing complete coupling of their available electrons to Cr(VI) reduction. To investigate this process, the surfaces of the reacted samples were analyzed by TEM-EDX, XAS and XPS, confirming Cr(VI) reduction to the less soluble Cr(III) on the nanoparticle surface. In groundwater reacted samples the presence of Ca, Si and S was also noted on the surface of the nanoparticles, and is likely responsible for earlier onset of passivation. Treatment of the solid COPR material in contact with water, by addition of increasing weight % of the nanoparticles, resulted in a decrease in aqueous Cr(VI) concentrations to below detection limits, via the addition of ?5% w/w BnM or ?1% w/w nZVI. XANES analysis of the Cr K edge, showed that the % Cr(VI) in the COPR dropped from 26% to a minimum of 4–7% by the addition of 5% w/w BnM or 2% w/w nZVI, with higher additions unable to reduce the remaining Cr(VI). The treated materials exhibited minimal re-mobilization of soluble Cr(VI) by re-equilibration with atmospheric oxygen, with the bulk of the Cr remaining in the solid fraction. Both nanoparticles exhibited a considerable capacity for the remediation of COPR related Cr(VI) contamination, with the synthetic nZVI demonstrating greater reactivity than the BnM. However, the biosynthesized BnM was also capable of significant Cr(VI) reduction and demonstrated a greater efficiency for the coupling of its electrons towards Cr(VI) reduction than the nZVI. PMID:26109747

  7. Aquifer modification: an approach to improve the mobility of nanoscale zero-valent iron particles used for in situ groundwater remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MicicBatka, Vesna; Schmid, Doris; Marko, Florian; Velimirovic, Milica; Wagner, Stephan; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo

    2015-04-01

    Successful emplacement of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) within the contaminated source zone is a prerequisite for the use of nZVI technology in groundwater remediation. Emplacement of nZVI is influenced i.e., by the injection technique and the injection velocity applied, as well as by the mobility of nZVI in the subsurface. Whereas processes linked to the injection can be controlled by the remediation practitioners, the mobility of nZVI in the subsurface remains limited. Even though mobility of nZVI is somewhat improved by surface coating with polyelectrolytes, it is still greatly affected by the groundwater composition and physical and chemical heterogeneities of aquifer grains. In order to promote mobility of nZVI it is needed to alter the surface charge heterogeneities of aquifer grains. Modifying the aquifer grain's surfaces by means of polyelectrolyte coating is an approach proposed to increase the overall negative surface charge of the aquifer grain surfaces, hinder deposition of nZVI onto aquifer grains, and finally promote nZVI mobility. In this study the effect of different polyelectrolytes on the nZVI mobility is tested in natural sands deriving from real brownfield sites that are proposed to be remediated using the nZVI technology. Sands collected from brownfield sites were characterized in terms of grain size distribution, mineralogical and chemical composition, and organic carbon content. Furthermore, surface charge of these sands was determined in both, low- and high ionic strength background solutions. Finally, changes of the sand's surface charges were examined after addition of the proposed aquifer modifiers, lignin sulfonate and humic acid. Surface charge of brownfield sands in low ionic strength background solution is more negative compared to that in high ionic strength background solution. An increase in negative surface potential of brownfield sand was recorded when aquifer modifiers were applied in a background solution with low ionic strength, indicating their potential to improve nZVI mobility under comparable environmental conditions. In contrast, no significant change of the surface potential of brownfield sand was observed when aquifer modifiers were applied in a background solution with high ionic strength. The potential of the aquifer modifiers to promote the mobility of nZVI was furthermore tested in flow-through columns, starting with the one filled with natural quartz sand with rough surface, low ionic strength background solutions and pre-injecting lignin sulfonate in concentration of 50 mg/L. The preliminary results showed that the pre-injection of lignin sulfonate does increase mobility of nZVI under this experimental condition. Further mobility tests will be carried out in order to elucidate the potential of the aquifer modifiers to promote the mobility of nZVI in sands with a complex mineralogy and in the background solutions with varying ionic strength, in order to account for the condition that resemble those at polluted sites. This research receives funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme FP7/2007-2013 under grant agreement n°309517.

  8. Studies on the optimum conditions using acid-washed zero-valent iron/aluminum mixtures in permeable reactive barriers for the removal of different heavy metal ions from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Han, Weijiang; Fu, Fenglian; Cheng, Zihang; Tang, Bing; Wu, Shijiao

    2016-01-25

    The method of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) is considered as one of the most practicable approaches in treating heavy metals contaminated surface and groundwater. The mixture of acid-washed zero-valent iron (ZVI) and zero-valent aluminum (ZVAl) as reactive medium in PRBs to treat heavy metal wastewater containing Cr(VI), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+) was investigated. The performance of column filled with the mixture of acid-washed ZVI and ZVAl was much better than the column filled with ZVI or ZVAl alone. At initial pH 5.4 and flow rates of 1.0mL/min, the time that the removal efficiencies of Cr(VI), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+) were all above 99.5% can keep about 300h using 80g/40g acid-washed ZVI/ZVAl when treating wastewater containing each heavy metal ions (Cr(VI), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Zn(2+)) concentration of 20.0mg/L. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize ZVI/ZVAl before and after reaction and the reaction mechanism of the heavy metal ions with ZVI/ZVAl was discussed. PMID:26521089

  9. Comparison of U(VI) adsorption onto nanoscale zero-valent iron and red soil in the presence of U(VI)-CO3/Ca-U(VI)-CO3 complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhibin; Liu, Jun; Cao, Xiaohong; Luo, Xuanping; Hua, Rong; Liu, Yan; Yu, Xiaofeng; He, Likai; Liu, Yunhai

    2015-12-30

    The influence of U(VI)-CO3 and Ca-U(VI)-CO3 complexes on U(VI) adsorption onto red soil and nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) was investigated using batch adsorption and fixed-bed column experiments to simulate the feasibility of NZVI as the reactive medium in permeable- reactive barriers (PRB) for in situ remediation of uranium-contaminated red soils. The adsorption capacity (qe) and distribution constant (Kd) of NZVI and red soil decreased with increasing pH, dissolved carbonate and calcium concentrations, but the qe and Kd values of NZVI were 5-10 times higher than those of red soil. The breakthrough pore volume (PV) values increased with the decrease of pH, dissolved carbonate and calcium concentration; however, the breakthrough PV values of the PRB column filled with 5% NZVI were 2.0-3.5 times higher than the 100% red soil column. The U(VI)-CO3 complexes adsorbed onto the surface of red soil/NZVI (SOH) to form SO-UO2CO3(-) or SO-UO2 (CO3)2(3-). XPS and XRD analysis further confirmed the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) and the formation of FeOOH on NZVI surfaces. The findings of this study are significant to the remediation of uranium-contaminated red soils and the consideration of practical U(VI) species in the natural environment. PMID:26280584

  10. Uranium(VI) reduction by nanoscale zero-valent iron in anoxic batch systems: The role of Fe(II) and Fe(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Sen; Chen, Yongheng; Xiang, Wu; Bao, Zhengyu; Liu, Chongxuan; Deng, Baolin

    2014-12-01

    The role of Fe(II) and Fe(III) on U(VI) reduction by nanoscale zerovalent iron (nanoFe0) was investigated using two iron chelators 1,10-phenanthroline and triethanolamine (TEA) under a CO2-free anoxic condition. The results showed U(VI) reduction was strongly inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline and TEA in a pH range from 6.92 to 9.03. For instance, at pH 6.92 the observed U(VI) reduction rates decreased by 80.7% and 82.3% in the presence of 1,10-phenanthroline and TEA, respectively. The inhibition was attributed to the formation of stable complexes between 1,10-phenanthroline and Fe(II) or TEA and Fe(III). In the absence of iron chelators, U(VI) reduction can be enhanced by surface-bound Fe(II) on nanoFe0. Our results suggested that Fe(III) and Fe(II) probably acted as an electron shuttle to mediate the transfer of electrons from nanoFe0 to U(VI), therefore a combined system with Fe(II), Fe(III) and nanoFe0 can facilitate the U(VI) reductive immobilization in the contaminated groundwater.

  11. Reduction and immobilization of radionuclides and toxic metal ions using combined zero valent iron and anaerobic bacteria. Year one technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Weathers, L.J.; Katz, L.E.

    1997-10-01

    'The objective of this project is to design a combined abiotic/microbial, reactive, permeable, in-situ barrier with sufficient reductive potential to prevent downgradient migration of toxic metal ions. The field-scale application of this technology would utilize anaerobic digester sludge, Fe(O) particles for supporting anaerobic biofilms, and suitable aquifer material for construction of the barrier. The major goals for Year 1 were to establish the sulfate reducing mixed culture, to obtain sources of iron metal, and to conduct background experiments which will establish baseline rates for abiotic chromium reduction rates. Research completed to date is described.'

  12. Effect of kaolinite, silica fines and pH on transport of polymer-modified zero valent iron nano-particles in heterogeneous porous media.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Phenrat, Tanapon; Tilton, Robert D; Lowry, Gregory V

    2012-03-15

    Polymer coatings on nano-sized remediation agents and subsurface heterogeneity will affect their transport, likely in a pH-dependent manner. The effect of pH on the aggregation of polymer-coated nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) and its deposition onto sand and clay (kaolinite) surfaces was studied. nZVI coatings included a high molecular weight (90 kg/mol) strong polyanion, poly(methacrylic acid)-b-(methy methacrylate)-b-(styrenesulfonate) (PMAA-PMMA-PSS) and a low molecular weight (2.5 kg/mol) weak polyanion, polyaspartate. Aggregation and deposition increased with decreasing pH for both polyelectrolytes. The extent was greater for the low MW polyaspartate coated nZVI. Enhanced deposition at lower pH was indicated because the elutability of polyaspartate-modified hematite (which did not aggregate) also decreased at lower pH. The greater deposition onto clay minerals compared to similar sized silica fines is attributed to charge heterogeneity on clay mineral surfaces, which is sensitive to pH. Heteroaggregation between kaolinite particles and nZVI over the pH range 6-8 confirmed this assertion. Excess unadsorbed polyelectrolyte in solution (100mg/L) enhanced the transport of modified nZVI by minimizing aggregation and deposition onto sand and clay. These results indicate that site physical and chemical heterogeneity must be considered when designing an nZVI emplacement strategy. PMID:22284571

  13. USING ZERO-VALENT METAL NANOPARTICLES TO REMEDIATE ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transport of organic contaminants down the soil profile constitutes a serious threat to the quality of ground water. Zero-valent metals are considered innocuous abiotic agents capable of mediating decontamination processes in terrestrial systems. In this investigation, ze...

  14. Oxidative degradation of organic pollutants in aqueous solution using zero valent copper under aerobic atmosphere condition.

    PubMed

    Wen, Gang; Wang, Sheng-Jun; Ma, Jun; Huang, Ting-Lin; Liu, Zheng-Qian; Zhao, Lei; Xu, Jin-Lan

    2014-06-30

    Oxidative degradation of organic pollutants and its mechanism were investigated in aqueous solution using zero valent copper (ZVC) under aerobic atmosphere condition. Diethyl phthalate (DEP) was completely oxidized after 120 min reaction by ZVC at initial pH 2.5 open to the air. DEP degradation followed the pseudo-first-order kinetics after the lag period, and the degradation rate of DEP increased gradually with the increase of ZVC dosage, and the decrease of initial pH from 5.8 to 2.0. ZVC required a shorter induction time and exhibited persistent oxidation capacity compared to that of zero valent iron and zero valent aluminium. The mechanism investigation showed that remarkable amount of Cu(+)/Cu(2+) and H2O2 were formed in ZVC acidic system, which was due to the corrosive dissolution of ZVC and the concurrent reduction of oxygen. The addition of tert-butanol completely inhibited the degradation of DEP and the addition of Fe(2+) greatly enhanced the degradation rate, which demonstrated that hydroxyl radical was mainly responsible for the degradation of DEP in ZVC acidic system under aerobic atmosphere condition, and the formation of hydroxyl radical was attributed to the Fenton-like reaction of in situ formed Cu(+) with H2O2. PMID:24857902

  15. FINAL REPORT. FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES OF THE REMOVAL OF CONTAMINANTS FROM GROUND AND WASTE WATER VIA REDUCTION BY ZERO-VALENT METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxyanions of uranium, selenium, chromium, arsenic, technetium, and chlorine (as perchlorate) are frequently found as contaminants on many DOE sites, and in other areas of the U.S. A potential remediation method is to react the contaminated water with zero-valent iron (ZVI). We ar...

  16. Fundamental Studies of The Removal of Contaminants from Ground and Waste Waters Via Reduction By Zero-Valent metals

    SciTech Connect

    Jory A. Yarmoff; Christopher Amrhein

    2002-04-23

    Oxyanions of uranium, selenium, chromium, arsenic, technetium, and chlorine (as perchlorate) are frequently found as contaminants on many DOE sites, and in other areas of the U.S.. A potential remediation method is to react the contaminated water with zero-valent iron (ZVI). We are performing fundamental investigations of the interactions of the relevant compounds with Fe filings and single- and poly-crystalline surfaces. The aim of this work is to develop the physical and chemical understanding that is necessary for the development of cleanup techniques and procedures.

  17. Applications of zero-valent silicon nanostructures in biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Kafshgari, Morteza Hasanzadeh; Voelcker, Nicolas H; Harding, Frances J

    2015-08-01

    Zero-valent, or elemental, silicon nanostructures exhibit a number of properties that render them attractive for applications in nanomedicine. These materials hold significant promise for improving existing diagnostic and therapeutic techniques. This review summarizes some of the essential aspects of the fabrication techniques used to generate these fascinating nanostructures, comparing their material properties and suitability for biomedical applications. We examine the literature in regards to toxicity, biocompatibility and biodistribution of silicon nanoparticles, nanowires and nanotubes, with an emphasis on surface modification and its influence on cell adhesion and endocytosis. In the final part of this review, our attention is focused on current applications of the fabricated silicon nanostructures in nanomedicine, specifically examining drug and gene delivery, bioimaging and biosensing. PMID:26295171

  18. Electrochemical deposition of green rust on zero-valent iron 

    E-print Network

    Kulkarni, Dhananjay Vijay

    2006-08-16

    Perchloroethylene (PCE) is a toxic contaminant that has been introduced into the environment over many years through industrial and agricultural wastes. Research has been done in the past to investigate PCE degradation by ...

  19. Mitigation of Irrigation Water Using Zero-Valent Iron Treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Significant problems have occurred in the U.S. with regard to the contamination of produce by pathogenic bacteria. Minimally processed produce lacks the processing and preparation hurdles, such as cooking, to aid in reduction or elimination of the occasional and incidental contamination that can le...

  20. Catalytic transformation of persistent contaminants using a new composite material based on nanosized zero-valent metal - field experiment results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dror, I.; Merom Jacov, O.; Berkowitz, B.

    2010-12-01

    A new composite material based on deposition of nanosized zero valent iron (ZVI) particles and cyanocobalamine (vitamin B12) on a diatomite matrix is presented. Cyanocobalamine is known to be an effective electron mediator, having strong synergistic effects with ZVI for reductive dehalogenation reactions. This composite material also improves the reducing capacity of nanosized ZVI by preventing agglomeration of iron particles, thus increasing their active surface area. The porous structure of the diatomite matrix allows high hydraulic conductivity, which favors channeling of contaminated water to the reactive surface of the composite material and in turn faster rates of remediation. The ability of the material to degrade or transform rapidly and completely a large spectrum of water pollutants will be demonstrated, based on results from two field site experiments where polluted groundwater containing a mixture of industrial and agricultural persistent pollutants was treated. In addition a set of laboratory experiments using individual contaminant solutions to analyze chemical transformations under controlled conditions will be presented.

  1. The experimental study of Cr6+ contaminated water remediation by zero-valent nano-Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. N.; Liu, A. P.; Chen, Q. F.; Wang, X.

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, researchers have developed a number of new types of zero-valent nano-Fe remediation materials applied in the remediation of contaminated soil and water, which has attracted wide attentions. This paper selected soil leaching wastewater severely contaminated by chromium as target of the study and chose zero-valent nano-Fe, Na2SO3 and NaHSO3 for comparison experiments to study the effects on removing Cr6+ under experimental conditions of different pH values, dosages and reaction times. As is shown in the experiments, zero-valent nano-Fe has the highest removal rates for Cr6+, while the reaction of Na2SO3 is the slowest under the same conditions. However, both removal rates are prone to be stable after 10 min. Dosages do not make a distinct difference and the pH value has the least effect on the repair of zero-valent nano-Fe.

  2. Zero-Valent Metallic Treatment System and Its Application for Removal and Remediation of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (Pcbs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Jacqueline W. (Inventor); Clausen, Christian A. (Inventor); Geiger, Cherie L. (Inventor); Brooks, Kathleen B. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    PCBs are removed from contaminated media using a treatment system including zero-valent metal particles and an organic hydrogen donating solvent. The treatment system may include a weak acid in order to eliminate the need for a coating of catalytic noble metal on the zero-valent metal particles. If catalyzed zero-valent metal particles are used, the treatment system may include an organic hydrogen donating solvent that is a non-water solvent. The treatment system may be provided as a "paste-like" system that is preferably applied to natural media and ex-situ structures to eliminate PCBs.

  3. Fundamental Studies of the Removal of Contaminants from Ground and Waste Waters via Reduction by Zero-Valent Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Yarmoff, Jory A.; Amrhein, Christopher

    1999-06-01

    Contaminated groundwater and surface waters are a problem throughout the United States and the world. In many instances, the types of contamination can be directly attributed to man's actions. For instance, the burial of chemical wastes, casual disposal of solvents in unlined pits, and the development of irrigated agriculture have all contributed to groundwater and surface water contamination. The kinds of contaminants include chlorinated solvents and toxic trace elements (including radioisotopes) that are soluble and mobile in soils and aquifers. Oxyanions of uranium, selenium, chromium, arsenic, technetium, and chlorine (as perchlorate) are frequently found as contaminants on many DOE sites. Uranium is a particularly widespread contaminant at most DOE sites including Oak Ridge, Rocky Flats, Hanford, Idaho (INEEL), and Fernald. The uranium contamination is associated with mining and milling of uranium ore (UMTRA sites), isotope separation and enrichment, and mixed waste and TRU waste burial. In addition, the careless disposal of halogenated solvents, such as carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene, has further contaminated many groundwaters at these sites. A potential remediation method for many of these oxyanions and chlorinated-solvents is to react the contaminated water with zero-valent iron. In this reaction, the iron serves as both an electron source and as a catalyst. Elemental iron is already being used on an experimental basis at many DOE sites. Both in situ reactive barriers and above-ground reactors are being developed for this purpose. However, the design and operation of these treatment systems requires a detailed process-level understanding of the interactions between the contaminants and the iron surfaces. We are performing fundamental investigations of the interactions of the relevant chlorinated solvents and trace element-containing compounds with single- and poly-crystalline Fe surfaces. The aim of this work is to develop th e fundamental physical and chemical understanding that is necessary for the development of cleanup techniques and procedures.

  4. Enhanced decolorization of methyl orange using zero-valent copper nanoparticles under assistance of hydrodynamic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Li, Pan; Song, Yuan; Wang, Shuai; Tao, Zheng; Yu, Shuili; Liu, Yanan

    2015-01-01

    The rate of reduction reactions of zero-valent metal nanoparticles is restricted by their agglomeration. Hydrodynamic cavitation was used to overcome the disadvantage in this study. Experiments for decolorization of methyl orange azo dye by zero-valent copper nanoparticles were carried out in aqueous solution with and without hydrodynamic cavitation. The results showed that hydrodynamic cavitation greatly accelerated the decolorization rate of methyl orange. The size of nanoparticles was decreased after hydrodynamic cavitation treatment. The effects of important operating parameters such as discharge pressure, initial solution pH, and copper nanoparticle concentration on the degradation rates were studied. It was observed that there was an optimum discharge pressure to get best decolorization performance. Lower solution pH were favorable for the decolorization. The pseudo-first-order kinetic constant for the degradation of methyl orange increased linearly with the copper dose. UV-vis spectroscopic and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analyses confirmed that many degradation intermediates were formed. The results indicated hydroxyl radicals played a key role in the decolorization process. Therefore, the enhancement of decolorization by hydrodynamic cavitation could due to the deagglomeration of nanoparticles as well as the oxidation by the in situ generated hydroxyl radicals. These findings greatly increase the potential of the Cu(0)/hydrodynamic cavitation technique for use in the field of treatment of wastewater containing hazardous materials. PMID:24948487

  5. Nanoscale zero valent supported by Zeolite and Montmorillonite: Template effect of the removal of lead ion from an aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Arancibia-Miranda, Nicolás; Baltazar, Samuel E; García, Alejandra; Muñoz-Lira, Daniela; Sepúlveda, Pamela; Rubio, María A; Altbir, Dora

    2016-01-15

    In this work, we have studied the Pb(2+) sorption capacity of Zeolite (Z) and Montmorillonite (Mt) functionalized with nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI), at 50% w/w, obtained by means of an impregnating process with a solvent excess. The composites were characterized by several techniques including X-ray diffraction; scanning electron microscopy (SEM); BET area; isoelectric point (IEP); and, finally a magnetic response. Comparatively significant differences in terms of electrophoretic and magnetic characteristics were found between the pristine materials and the composites. Both structures show a high efficiency and velocity in the removal of Pb(2+) up to 99.0% (200.0ppm) after 40min of reaction time. The removal kinetics of Pb(2+) is adequately described by the pseudo second-order kinetic model, and the maximum adsorbed amounts (qe) of this analyte are in close accordance with the experimental results. The intraparticle diffusion model shows that this is not the only rate-limiting step, this being the Langmuir model which was well adjusted to our experimental data. Therefore, maximum sorption capacities were found to be 115.1±11.0, 105.5±9.0, 68.3±1.3, 54.2±1.3, and 50.3±4.2mgg(-1), for Mt-nZVI, Z-nZVI, Zeolite, Mt, and nZVI, respectively. The higher sorption capacities can be attributed to the synergetic behavior between the clay and iron nanoparticles, as a consequence of the clay coating process with nZVI. These results suggest that both composites could be used as an efficient adsorbent for the removal of lead from contaminated water sources. PMID:26384998

  6. Cryptic Role of Zero-Valent Sulfur in Metal and Metalloid Geochemistry in Euxinic Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helz, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    Natural waters that are isolated from the atmosphere in confined aquifers, euxinic basins and sediment pore waters often become sulfidic. These waters are conventionally described simply as reducing environments. But because nature does not constrain their exposure to reducing equivalents (e.g. from organic matter) and oxidizing equivalents (e.g. from Fe,Mn oxides), these reducing environments in fact vary cryptically in their redox characteristics. The implications for trace metal and metalloid cycles are only beginning to be explored. The activity of zero-valent sulfur (aS0), a virtual thermodynamic property, is a potentially useful index for describing this variation. At a particular temperature and ionic strength, aS0 can be quantified from knowledge of pH and the total S(0) to total S(-II) ratio. Although data are incomplete, the deep waters of the Black Sea (aS0 ca. 0.3) appear to be more reducing than the deep waters of the Cariaco Basin (aS0 ca. 0.5) even though both are perennially sulfidic. An apparent manifestation is a greater preponderance of greigite relative to mackinawite in the Cariaco Basin. Interestingly, greigite is stable relative to mackinawite in both basins but predominates only at the higher aS0. Values of aS0 in sulfidic natural waters span the range over which Hg-polysulfide complexes gain predominance over Hg sulfide complexes. Competition between these ligands is thought to influence biological methylation, mercury's route into aquatic and human food chains. In sulfidic deep ground waters, the redox state and consequent mobility of As, a global human hazard, will depend on aS0. At intermediate sulfide concentrations, higher aS0 favors more highly charged and thus less mobile As(V) species relative to As(III) species despite the overall reducing characteristics of such waters. Helz, G.R. (2014) Activity of zero-valent sulfur in sulfidic natural waters. Geochem. Trans. In press.

  7. Reaction of zero-valent magnesium with water: Potential applications in environmental remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Giehyeon; Park, Jaeseon

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the dissolution kinetics of granular zero-valent Mg (ZVMg) at pH 7 in water that was open to the atmosphere and buffered with 50 mM Na-MOPS. The oxidative dissolution of ZVMg was rapid; the initial amount of ZVMg (10-50 mg/L) dissolved completely within 200 min. The rate and extent of ZVMg dissolution was not affected by atmospheric oxygen. Although the oxidation of ZVMg is thermodynamically more feasible by dissolved oxygen or proton ions (H+), the primary oxidants are water molecules. The initial rate of ZVMg dissolution obeys first order kinetics with respect to ZVMg concentration with an observed rate constant, kMg,7 = 1.05 ± 0.06 × 10-2 min-1. Model calculations using the rate constant perfectly predict the extent of ZVMg dissolution for an extended time period at lower [Mg0]0 but underestimate at 50 mg/L [Mg0]0. The offset is likely attributed to the rapid dissolution of ZVMg particles, which could cause a substantial increase in the specific surface area. As to the reactivity of Mg-water system, we suggest that the hydrated electron (eaq-), the most powerful reducing agent, would probably be the major reactive entity under neutral and alkaline conditions. In addition, we discuss briefly the factors affecting the rate and extent of the Mg-water reaction such as background electrolytes, ZVMg impurities, surface passivation, solution pH and temperature based on literature review.

  8. Stabilization of engineered zero-valent nanoiron with Na-acrylic copolymer enhances spermiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kadar, Eniko; Tarran, Glenn A; Jha, Awadhesh N; Al-Subiai, Sherain N

    2011-04-15

    Studies were carried out to assess the effects of stabilized (i.e., coated with organic polyacrylic stabilizer) and nonstabilized forms of zero-valent nanoiron (nZVI) on the development of Mytilus galloprovincialis embryos following 2 h exposure of the sperm prior to in vitro fertilization. Both forms of nZVI caused serious disruption of development, consisting of 30% mortality among spermatozoa with subsequent 20% decline in fertilization success, and delay in development, i.e., over 50% of the larvae were suspended in the trochophore stage. Significant DNA damage was also detected in sperm exposed to the highest exposure concentrations (10 mg L(-1)). Distinct dose response to the two different types of nZVI observed are linked to aggregation behavior that is controlled by the surface stabilizers. This work reports on conventional biomarkers (for membrane integrity, genotoxicity, and developmental toxicity) applied for the rapid assessment of toxicity of nZVI, which are able to detect surface property-related effects to meet the requirements of risk assessments for nanotechnology. The study highlights the potential ecotoxicological impact of an environmentally relevant engineered nanoparticle. Implications of the NOM-nZVI interactions regarding soil and groundwater remediation and wastewater treatment are discussed. PMID:21291273

  9. Aerosol synthesis of nano and micro-scale zero valent metal particles from oxide precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Jonathan; Luhrs, Claudia; Lesman, Zayd; Soliman, Haytham; Zea, Hugo

    2010-01-01

    In this work a novel aerosol method, derived form the batch Reduction/Expansion Synthesis (RES) method, for production of nano / micro-scale metal particles from oxides and hydroxides is presented. In the Aerosol-RES (A-RES) method, an aerosol, consisting of a physical mixture of urea and metal oxide or hydroxides, is passed through a heated oven (1000 C) with a residence time of the order of 1 second, producing pure (zero valent) metal particles. It appears that the process is flexible regarding metal or alloy identity, allows control of particle size and can be readily scaled to very large throughput. Current work is focused on creating nanoparticles of metal and metal alloy using this method. Although this is primarily a report on observations, some key elements of the chemistry are clear. In particular, the reducing species produced by urea decomposition are the primary agents responsible for reduction of oxides and hydroxides to metal. It is also likely that the rapid expansion that takes place when solid/liquid urea decomposes to form gas species influences the final morphology of the particles.

  10. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF ZERO-VALENT IRON TO TREAT GROUNDWATER IMPACTED BY ACID MINE DRAINAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The generation and release of acidic, metal-rich water from mine wastes continues to be an intractable environmental problem. Although the effects of acid mine drainage (AMD) are most evident in surface waters, there is an obvious need for developing cost-effective approaches fo...

  11. MINERAL PARAGENESIS OF FINE-GRAINED PRECIPITATES IN PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS OF ZERO-VALENT IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) staff developed a field procedure to measure hydraulic conductivity using a direct-push system to obtain vertical profiles of hydraulic conductivity. Vertical profiles were obtained using an in situ field device-composed of a
    Geopr...

  12. Chemical Reduction of PCE by Zero Valent Iron Colloids Batch and Column Experiments

    E-print Network

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    [-] PCE - Inflow PCE - Outflow TCE - Inflow TCE - Outflow Chloride - Outflow Blank Value Chloride pH Value 34 39 43 48 Pore-Volume [-] pH[-] PCE - Outflow TCE - Outflow Chloride - Outflow Blank Value Chloride pH Value nZVI-reinjection NAPASAN Particle - nZVI & Ca(OH)2 / PCE-DNAPL 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 0

  13. Assessment of polyphenol coated nano zero valent iron for hexavalent chromium removal from contaminated waters.

    PubMed

    Mystrioti, C; Sparis, D; Papasiopi, N; Xenidis, A; Dermatas, D; Chrysochoou, M

    2015-03-01

    Alternative plant extracts were examined as raw materials for the synthesis of nZVI from ferric solutions. Four plants were selected for evaluation, i.e. Camellia sinensis (green tea, GT), Syzygium aromaticum (clove, CL), Mentha spicata (spearmint, SM) and Punica granatum (pomegranate, PG). Based on the results obtained, it was concluded that the reduction of Fe(III) with the herb extracts is not complete. Using the GT extract, approximately 28 mM of the initial 66 mM of Fe (42.4 %) are reduced to the elemental state Fe(0). The highest reduction of Fe(III), about 53 %, was achieved with PG and the lowest, only 15.6 %, with the SM extract. Additional batch experiments have been carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of nZVI, synthesized with GT, CL, SM and PG, for the removal of hexavalent chromium from a 0.96 mM solution. The highest reduction of Cr(VI) (96 %) was obtained using the nZVI suspension produced with PG juice. The other three nZVI suspensions, i.e. CL-nZVI, GT-nZVI, and SM-nZVI, had a comparable effectiveness corresponding to 70 % reduction of chromate. PMID:25512186

  14. Influence of hydrogeochemical processes on zero-valent iron reactive barrier performance: A field investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Liyuan; Moline, Gerilynn R.; Kamolpornwijit, Wiwat; West, Olivia R.

    2005-08-01

    Geochemical and mineralogical changes were evaluated at a field Fe 0-PRB at the Oak Ridge Y-12 site concerning operation performance during the treatment of U in high NO 3- groundwater. In the 5-year study period, the Fe 0 remained reactive as shown in pore-water monitoring data, where increases in pH and the removal of certain ionic species persisted. However, coring revealed varying degrees of cementation. After 3.8-year treatment, porosity reduction of up to 41.7% was obtained from mineralogical analysis on core samples collected at the upgradient gravel-Fe 0 interface. Elsewhere, Fe 0 filings were loose with some cementation. Fe 0 corrosion and pore volume reduction at this site are more severe due to the presence of NO 3- at a high level. Tracer tests indicate that hydraulic performance deteriorated: the flow distribution was heterogeneous and under the influence of interfacial cementation a large portion of water was diverted around the Fe 0 and transported outside the PRB. Based on the equilibrium reductions of NO 3- and SO 42- by Fe 0 and mineral precipitation, geochemical modeling predicted a maximum of 49% porosity loss for 5 years of operation. Additionally, modeling showed a spatial distribution of mineral precipitate volumes, with the maximum advancing from the interface toward downgradient with time. This study suggests that water quality monitoring, coupled with hydraulic monitoring and geochemical modeling, can provide a low-cost method for assessing PRB performance.

  15. Influence of hydrogeochemical processes on zero-valent iron reactive barrier performance: a field investigation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Liyuan; Moline, Gerilynn R; Kamolpornwijit, Wiwat; West, Olivia R

    2005-11-01

    Geochemical and mineralogical changes were evaluated at a field Fe0-PRB at the Oak Ridge Y-12 site concerning operation performance during the treatment of U in high NO3- groundwater. In the 5-yr study period, the Fe0 remained reactive as shown in pore water monitoring data, where increases in pH and the removal of certain ionic species persisted. However, coring revealed varying degrees of cementation. After 3.8-yr treatment, porosity reduction of up to 41.7% was obtained from mineralogical analysis on core samples collected at the upgradient gravel-Fe0 interface. Elsewhere, Fe0 filings were loose with some cementation. Fe0 corrosion and pore volume reduction at this site are more severe due to the presence of NO3- at a high level. Tracer tests indicate that hydraulic performance deteriorated: the flow distribution was heterogeneous and under the influence of interfacial cementation a large portion of water was diverted around the Fe0 and transported outside the PRB. Based on the equilibrium reductions of NO3- and SO4(2-) by Fe0 and mineral precipitation, geochemical modeling predicted a maximum of 49% porosity loss for 5 yr of operation. Additionally, modeling showed a spatial distribution of mineral precipitate volumes, with the maximum advancing from the interface toward downgradient with time. This study suggests that water quality monitoring, coupled with hydraulic monitoring and geochemical modeling, can provide a low-cost method for assessing PRB performance. PMID:16126304

  16. Effects of zero-valent metals together with quartz sand on the mechanochemical destruction of dechlorane plus coground in a planetary ball mill.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haizhu; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Kunlun; Yu, Yunfei; Liu, Kai; Yu, Gang; Deng, Shubo; Wang, Bin

    2014-01-15

    Mechanochemical destruction by grinding with additives in high energy ball milling has been identified as a good alternative to traditional incineration for the disposal of wastes containing halogenated organic pollutants. Despite CaO normally used as an additive, recently Fe+SiO2 has been used to replace CaO for a faster destruction. In the present study, zero-valent metals (Al, Zn, besides Fe) together with SiO2 were investigated for their efficiencies of prompting the destruction of dechlorane plus (DP). Aluminum was found of be the best with a destruction percentage of nearly 99% for either syn- or anti-DP after 2.5h milling. In comparison, only 88/85% and 37/32% of syn-/anti-DP were destroyed when using zinc and iron after the same time, respectively. The detected water soluble chloride was lower than the stoichiometric amount containing in the original DP samples, due to the Si-Cl bond formed during the process. The potential fate of C and Cl present in DP is in the form of inorganic carbon, inorganic Cl and formation of Si-Cl bonds, respectively. The results suggested that Al+SiO2 is promising in the mechanochemical destruction of chlorinated organic pollutants like DP. PMID:24295775

  17. Field test on the treatment of source zone chloroethenes using emulsified zerovalent iron

    EPA Science Inventory

    This talk summarizes the research activities currently underway at the Solid Waste Management Unit 45 (Site 45), Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, South Carolina. A pilot field test was initiated in 2005 at this site to evaluate the effectiveness of nanoscale emulsified...

  18. Evaluating Trichloroethylene Degradation Using Differing Nano- and Micro-Scale Iron Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Cristina M.; Geiger, Cherie L.; Clausen, Christian A.; Billow, Alexa M.; Quinn, Jacqueline W.; Brooks, Kathleen B.

    2006-01-01

    Trichioroethylene, or TCE, is a central nervous system depressant and possible carcinogen, as well as a persistent groundwater pollutant. TCE exists in the aquifer either as free product in the form of a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) or as a dissolved-phase constituent. It is only slightly soluble in water, so dissolution of the contaminant is a long-term process and in-situ remediation is difficult. To remedy this, NASA and the University of Central Florida developed Emulsified Zero-Valent Iron, or EZVI. The emulsion droplet contains ZVI particles and water encapsulated by an oil/surfactant membrane, and effectively penetrates to degrade DNAPL-phase TCE. To maximize the efficiency of this process, several commercially available ZVIs of radically different particle sizes and morphologies both in emulsion and as neat (unemulsified) metal were evaluated for relative effectiveness at TCE degradation.

  19. In situ treatment of groundwater using zero-valent metal and permeable treatment walls: Fundamentals and approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, S.D.; Gallinatti, J.D.; Yamane, C.L.; Szerdy, F.S.; Hankins, D.A.

    1996-12-31

    The remediation of groundwater affected by volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and metals continues to be one of the primary challenges facing the environmental industry. With documented evidence that the traditional pump-and-treat method of remediating contaminated groundwater is highly inefficient in most cases, efforts have focused on developing innovative techniques for treating groundwater in situ. One innovative treatment technology that has been applied to in situ treatment of groundwater and has received a great deal of attention in the past two years, can be referred to as zero-valent metal-enhanced treatment (ZMET) of organic compounds and dissolved metals. The ZMET method actually includes two treatment process groups: metal-enhanced reductive dehalogenation for VOCs and metal-enhanced reductive immobilization for metals. Theorized as a two-step reaction involving the oxidation of zero-valent metal and the reduction of water, the metal-enhanced reductive dehalogenation process has been shown to be successful in degrading chlorinated VOCs. The metal immobilization process has been demonstrated to significantly reduce the mobility of oxidized metals through reduction and precipitation of low-solubility compounds.

  20. Fundamental studies of the removal of contaminants from ground and waste waters via reduction by zero-valent metals. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Yarmoff, J.A.; Amrhein, C.

    1998-06-01

    'Contaminated groundwater and surface waters are a problem throughout the US and the world. In many instances, the types of contamination can be directly attributed to man''s actions. For instance, the burial of wastes, casual disposal of solvents in unlined pits, and the development of irrigated agriculture have all contributed to groundwater and surface water contamination. The kinds of contaminants include chlorinated solvents and toxic trace elements that are soluble and mobile in soils and aquifers. Oxyanions of selenium, chromium, uranium, arsenic, and chlorine (as perchlorate) are frequently found as contaminants on many DOE sites. In addition, the careless disposal of cleaning solvents, such as carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene, has further contaminated many groundwaters at these sites. Oxyanions of selenium, nitrogen, arsenic, vanadium, uranium, chromium, and molybdenum are contaminants in agricultural areas of the Western US. The management of these waters requires treatment to remove the contaminants before reuse or surface water disposal. In one instance in the Central Valley of California, the discharge of selenate-contaminated shallow groundwater to a wildlife refuge caused catastrophic bird deaths and deformities of embryos. A potential remediation method for many of these oxyanions and chlorinated-solvents is to react the contaminated water with zero-valent iron. In this reaction, the iron serves as both an electron source and as a catalyst. Elemental iron is already being used on an experimental basis. Both in-situ reactive barriers and above-ground reactors are being developed for this purpose. However, the design and operation of these treatment systems requires a detailed process-level understanding of the interactions between the contaminants and the iron surfaces. Only limited success has been achieved in the field, partly because the basic surface chemical reactions are not well understood. The authors are performing fundamental investigations of the interactions of the relevant chlorinated solvents, and trace element-containing compounds with single- and poly-crystalline Fe surfaces. The aim of this work is to develop the fundamental physical and chemical understanding that is necessary for the development of cleanup techniques and procedures. As of May 1998, they have performed both bulk chemical measurements of the reduction reactions and surface science studies of model chemical systems. During these first two years of funding, the authors have made significant progress in both areas. Initially, they focused primarily on the reduction of selenate by elemental iron. They also performed some work with chromate, perchlorate, uranyl, and carbon tetrachloride. In the following sections some of the progress is described.'

  1. Laboratory comparison of four iron-based filter materials for water treatment of trace element contaminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory investigation was conducted to evaluate four iron-based filter materials for trace element contaminant water treatment. The iron-based filter materials evaluated were zero valent iron (ZVI), porous iron composite (PIC), sulfur modified iron (SMI), and iron oxide/hydroxide (IOH). Only fi...

  2. Formation of ferrihydrite and associated iron corrosion products in permeable reactive barriers of zero-valent iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furukawa, Yoko; Kim, Jin-Wook; Watkins, Janet; Wilkin, Richard T.

    2002-01-01

    Ferrihydrite, which is known to form in the presence of oxygen and to be stabilized by the adsorption of Si, PO4 and SO4, is ubiquitous in the fine-grained fractions of permeable reactive barrier (PRB) samples from the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center (Elizabeth City, NC) and the Denver Federal Center (Lakewood, CO) studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. The concurrent energy-dispersive X-ray data indicate a strong association between ferrihydrite and metals such as Si, Ca, and Cr. Magnetite, green rust 1, aragonite, calcite, mackinawite, greigite and lepidocrocite were also present, indicative of a geochemical environment that is temporally and spatially heterogeneous. Whereas magnetite, which is known to form due to anaerobic Fe0 corrosion, passivates the Fe0 surface, ferrihydrite precipitation occurs away from the immediate Fe0 surface, forming small (<0.1 microm) discrete clusters. Consequently, Fe0-PRBs may remain effective for a longer period of time in slightly oxidized groundwater systems where ferrihydrite formation occurs compared to oxygen-depleted systems where magnetite passivation occurs. The ubiquitous presence of ferrihydrite suggests that the use of Fe0-PRBs may be extended to applications that require contaminant adsorption rather than, or in addition to, redox-promoted contaminant degradation.

  3. Laboratory evaluation of zero valent iron and sulfur modified iron filter materials for agricultural drainage water treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    On site filter treatment systems have the potential to remove nutrients and pesticides from agricultural subsurface drainage waters. The effectiveness and efficiency of this type of drainage water treatment will depend on the actual filter materials utilized. Two promising filter materials that coul...

  4. Travel distance and transformation of injected emulsified zerovalent iron nanoparticles in the subsurface during two and half years.

    PubMed

    Su, Chunming; Puls, Robert W; Krug, Thomas A; Watling, Mark T; O'Hara, Suzanne K; Quinn, Jacqueline W; Ruiz, Nancy E

    2013-08-01

    Nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) such as Toda Kogyo RNIP-10DS has been used for site remediation, yet information is lacking regarding how far injected NZVI can travel, how long it lasts, and how it transforms to other minerals in a groundwater system. Previously we reported effective mass destruction of chlorinated ethenes dominated by tetrachloroethene (PCE) using emulsified zerovalent iron (EZVI) nanoparticles of RNIP-10DS in a shallow aquifer (1-6 m below ground surface, BGS) at Site 45, Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, South Carolina, USA. Here we report test results on transport and transformation of injected EZVI in the subsurface. We employed two EZVI delivery methods: pneumatic injection and direct injection. Effective delivery of EZVI to the targeted zone was achieved with pneumatic injection showing a travel distance from injection points of up to 2.1 m and direct injection showing a travel distance up to 0.89 m. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy studies on particles harvested from well purge waters indicated that injected black colored NZVI (?-Fe(0)) was transformed largely to black colored cube-like and plate-like magnetites (Fe3O4, 0.1-1 ?m, 0-9 months), then to orange colored irregularly shaped lepidocrocite (?-FeOOH, 0.1-1 ?m, 9 months to 2.5 years), then to yellowish lath-like goethite (?-FeOOH, 2-5 ?m, 2.5 years) and ferrihydrite-like spherical particles (0.05-0.1 ?m) in the top portion of the aquifer (1-2 m BGS). No ?-Fe(0) was found in most monitoring wells three months after injection. The formed iron oxides appeared to have a wider range of particle size (submicron to 5 ?m) than the pristine NZVI (35-140 nm). Injected NZVI was largely transformed to magnetite (0.1-1 ?m) during two and half years in the lower portion of the aquifer (3-6 m). PMID:23562563

  5. Enhanced ozonation degradation of di-n-butyl phthalate by zero-valent zinc in aqueous solution: performance and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wen, Gang; Wang, Sheng-Jun; Ma, Jun; Huang, Ting-Lin; Liu, Zheng-Qian; Zhao, Lei; Su, Jun-Feng

    2014-01-30

    Enhanced ozonation degradation of di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) by zero-valent zinc (ZVZ) has been investigated using a semi-continuous reactor in aqueous solution. The results indicated that the combination of ozone (O3) and ZVZ showed an obvious synergetic effect, i.e. an improvement of 54.8% on DBP degradation was obtained by the O3/ZVZ process after 10min reaction compared to the cumulative effect of O3 alone and O2/ZVZ. The degradation efficiency of DBP increased gradually with the increase of ZVZ dosage, enhanced as solution pH increasing from 2.0 to 10.0, and more amount of DBP was degraded with the initial concentration of DBP arising from 0.5 to 2.0mgL(-1). Recycling use of ZVZ resulted in the enhancement of DBP degradation, because the newly formed zinc oxide took part in the reaction. The mechanism investigation demonstrated that the enhancement effect was attributed to the introduction of ZVZ, which could promote the utilization of O3, enhance the formation of superoxide radical by reducing O2 via one-electron transfer, accelerate the production of hydrogen peroxide and the generation of hydroxyl radical. Additionally, the newly formed zinc oxide on ZVZ surface also contributed to the enhancement of DBP degradation in the recycling use of ZVZ. Most importantly, the O3/ZVZ process was also effective in enhanced ozonation degradation of DBP under the background of actual waters. PMID:24333716

  6. Fundamental studies of the removal of contaminants from ground and waste waters via reduction by zero-valent metals. Annual progress report, September 1, 1996--August 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Yarmoff, J.A.; Amrhein, C.

    1997-01-01

    'Contaminated groundwater is a problem throughout the US and the world. In many instances the tvpes of contamination can be directly attributed to man''s actions. For instance, the burial of wastes, casual disposal of solvents in unlined pits, and the development of irrigated agriculture have all contributed to groundwater contamination. The kinds of contaminants include chlorinated solvents and toxic trace elements that are soluble and mobile in soils and aquifers. Oxyanions of selenium. chromium. uranium. arsenic. and chlorine (as perchlorate) are frequently found as contaminants on many DOE sites. In addition. the careless disposal of cleaning solvents. such as carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene. has further contaminated many groundwaters at these sites. In agricultural areas of the western US, shallow groundwaters have become contaminated with high levels of selenate, chromate, and uranyl. The management of these waters requires treatment to remove the contaminants before reuse or surface water disposal. In one instance in the Central Valley of California. the discharge of selenate-contaminated shallow groundwater to a wildlife refuge caused catastrophic bird deaths and deformities of embryos. At sites where solid-propellant rocket motors were tested or disposed of, high concentrations of perchlorate and trichloroethylene are being found in the groundwater. A potential remediation method for many of these oxyanions and chlorinated-solvents is to react the contaminated water with zero-valent iron. In this reaction, the iron serves as both an electron source and as a catalyst. Elemental iron is already being used, on an experimental basis, for the reductive dechlorination of solvents and the removal of toxic trace elements. Both in situ reactive barriers and above-ground reactors are being developed for this purpose. However, the design and operation of these treatment systems requires a detailed process-level understanding of the interactions between the contaminants and the iron surfaces. Only limited success has been achieved in the field, partly because the basic surface chemical reactions are not well understood. The authors are performing fundamental investigations of the interactions of the relevant chlorinated solvents, trace elements, and trace element-containing compounds with single- and poly-crystalline Fe surfaces. The aim of this work is to develop the fundamental physical and chemical understanding that is necessary for the development of cleanup techniques and procedures. The authors are perforrming both bulk chemical measurements of the reduction reactions and surface science studies of model chemical systems. During this first year of funding, the authors have already made significant progress in both areas. Initially, they have focused primarily on the reduction of selenate by elemental iron. They have also performed some work with chromate, perchlorate, uranyl, and carbon tetrachloride, as well. In the following sections, some of the progress is described.'

  7. Effects of precipitation on the low-frequency electrical properties of zero valent iron: implications for monitoring PRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Ji, Won-Hyun; Yang, Jung-Seok; Um, Jeong-Gi; Woo, Ik; Lee, Ju-Young; Park, Young-Tae

    2010-05-01

    The relatively recent development of permeable reactive barrier (PRB) has provided a potentially viable alternative to established pump-and-treat systems for remediation of chlorinated solvent contaminated groundwater. Non-invasive methods for the assessment and monitoring of PRB have been required for evaluating long-term PRB performance and allowing effective management decisions regarding in situ site cleanup. The presence of metal in the subsurface results in the following additional charge transfer mechanisms (a) electronic conduction in the metal (b) polarization of charges at the interface between a metal and the pore-filling electrolyte. Both these mechanisms profoundly modify the measured electrical properties of the subsurface and support the utilization of electrical measurements for investigating PRB. Low frequency (0.1-1000 Hz) electrical properties are sensitive to the surface chemistry of metals in subsurface environment. In this range, electrical properties are controlled by ionic conduction through the electrolyte, surface electronic or ionic conduction, as well as diffusion mechanisms that occur at the mineral surface-pore fluid interface. Oxidation-reduction reactions may transfer electrons between mineral and fluid. The magnitude of polarization is directly related to the amount of metallic mineral surface available for charge transfer. The frequency dependence of the low frequency electrical response is indicative of the nature of electrochemical reactions occurring at the grain-fluid interface. Numerous experimental studies confirm that the frequency at which imaginary conductivity peaks inversely correlates with the grain size of the metallic particles. It is thus possible that the numerous complex surface chemical reactions involved in chlorinated solvent degradation may have distinct frequency dependent electrical signatures. In addition to the polarization term, the conduction term may also contain valuable information on PRB performance.

  8. DIRECT PUSH METHODS FOR LOCATING AND COLLECTING CORES OF AQUIFER SEDIMENT AND ZERO-VALENT IRON FROM PERMEABLE REACYTIVE BARRIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is often necessary to collect core samples that do not fit the normal sampling protocol. This Field Innovation Forum submission describes new methodology that enables researchers to collect soil samples in situations where the normal vertical sampling techniques will deliver ...

  9. Bench Scale Application of the Hybridized Zero Valent Iron Process for the Removal of Dissolved Silica From Water 

    E-print Network

    Morar, Nilesh Mohan

    2014-11-12

    ^2+. The hZVI system was shown to reduce dissolved silica from 70 mg/L to below 5 mg/L in a pilot scale demonstration for treating flue-gas desulfurization wastewater. In this study bench scale tests were performed using a single stage, continuously...

  10. Experimental Determination of the Dissolution Kinetics of Zero-Valent Iron in the Presence of Organic Complexants

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Eric M.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Lodge, Alex M.; Rodriguez, Elsa A.

    2007-08-17

    Single-pass flow-through tests were conducted under conditions of relatively constant dissolved O2 [O2 (aq)] over the pH(23°C) range (from 7 to 12) and temperature (23° to 90°C) in the presence of EDTA and EDDHA to maintain dilute conditions and minimize the formation of a partially oxidized surface film and Fe-bearing secondary phase(s) during testing. These results indicate that the corrosion of Fe(0) is relatively insensitive to pH and temperature and the forward rate is 3 to 4 orders of magnitude higher than when a passive film and corrosion products are present. Tests conducted with Amasteel (a low carbon steel) and 99Tc-bearing Fe(0) metal indicated that the forward dissolution rates for both metals were similar, if not identical. In other words, under these test conditions the presence of P and 99Tc in the 99Tc-bearing Fe(0) metal appeared to have little effect on the forward dissolution rate and subsequent release of 99Tc.

  11. A MD Simulation and Analysis for Aggregation Behaviors of Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron Particles in Water via MS

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongmei; Tang, Huan; Lu, Jing; Cui, Fuyi

    2014-01-01

    With the development of nanotechnology, more nanomaterials will enter into water environment system. Studying the existing form of nanomaterials in water environment will help people benefit from the correct use of them and to reduce the harm to human caused by them for some nanomaterials can bring polluting effect. Aggregation is a main behavior for nanoparticle in water environment. NZVI are used widely in many fields resulting in more NZVI in water environment. Molecular dynamics simulations and Materials Studio software are used to investigate the microaggregation behaviors of NZVI particles. Two scenes are involved: (1) particle size of NZVI in each simulation system is the same, but initial distance of two NZVI particles is different; (2) initial distance of two NZVI particles in each simulation system is the same, but particle size of NZVI is different. Atomistic trajectory, NP activity, total energy, and adsorption of H2O are analyzed with MS. The method provides new quantitative insight into the structure, energy, and dynamics of the aggregation behaviors of NZVI particles in water. It is necessary to understand microchange of NPs in water because it can provide theoretical research that is used to reduce polluting effect of NPs on water environment. PMID:25250388

  12. Travel Distance and Transformation of Injected Emulsified Zerovalent Iron Nanoparticles in the Subsurface During Two and Half Years

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) such as Toda Kogyo RNIP-10DS has been used for site remediation, yet information is lacking regarding how far injected NZVI can travel, how long it lasts, and how it transforms to other minerals in a groundwater system. Previously we reported effe...

  13. REMOVAL OF TNT AND RDX FROM WATER AND SOIL USING IRON METAL. (R825549C043)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contaminated water and soil at active or abandoned munitions plants is a serious problem since these compounds pose risks to human health and can be toxic to aquatic and terrestrial life. Our objective was to determine if zero-valent iron (Fe0) could be used to p...

  14. Use of Electrophoresis for Transporting Nano-Iron in Porous Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research was conducted to evaluate if electrophoresis could transport surface stabilized nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) through fine grained sand with the intent of remediating a contaminant in situ. The experimental procedure involved determining the transport rates of poly...

  15. Iron(II,III)-polyphenol complex nanoparticles derived from green tea with remarkable ecotoxicological impact

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are several greener methods exist to synthesize zero–valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) using different bio-based reducing agents. Although their useful properties in degradation of organic dyes, chlorinated organics, or arsenic have been described earlier, their characteriza...

  16. FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES OF THE REMOVAL OF CONTAMINANTS FROM GROUND AND WASTE WATERS VIA REDUCTION BY ZERO-VALENT METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In an effort to remove trace contaminants from wastewaters and groundwaters, elemental iron is being used for the reductive dechlorination of solvents and the removal of toxic trace elements, such as Se, Cr, and U. Both in situ reactive barriers and above-ground reactors are bein...

  17. APPLICATIONS OF SURFACE ANALYSIS IN THE ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES: DEHALOGENATION OF CHLOROCARBONS WITH ZERO-VALENT IRON AND IRON-CONTAINING MINERAL SURFACES. (R828164)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Halogenated organic compounds are common pollutants in groundwater. Consequently, there is widespread interest in understanding the reactions of these compounds in the environment and developing remediation strategies. One area of ongoing research involves the reductive dechlo...

  18. Oxidative removal of arsenite by Fe(II)- and polyoxometalate (POM)-amended zero-valent aluminum (ZVAl) under oxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, C C; Hus, L C; Chiang, P N; Liu, J C; Kuan, W H; Chen, C C; Tzou, Y M; Wang, M K; Hwang, C E

    2013-05-01

    Abiotic transformation of As(III) to As(V) is possible which would decrease As toxicity. This study investigated the potential applications of zero-valent Al (ZVAl) or Al wastes, such as Al beverage cans, for converting As(III) to As(V) in an acidic solution under aerobic conditions. Results showed that As(III) could not be oxidized by ZVAl within 150 min reaction at pH 1 because of the presence of an oxide layer on ZVAl. However, 85 ?M As(III) could be completely oxidized with the addition of Fe(II) or POM due to the generation of a Fenton reaction or the enhancement of H2O2 production, respectively, on the ZVAl surfaces. Because Fe(II) or polyoxometalate (POM) exhibited more stable at low pH and scavenged rapidly the H2O2 produced on the aerated ZVAl surfaces, OH radical productions were more efficient and As(III) was rapidly oxidized in the ZVAl/O2 system with theses two catalysts. The catalytic oxidation kinetics of As(III) in the presence of Fe(II) or POM were best described by zero-order reaction, and the rate constants increased with a decrease of pH from 2 to 1. Following the oxidative conversion of As(III) to As(V) in the ZVAl/Fe/O2 system, As(V) was removed by the newly formed hydrous Al/Fe precipitates by increasing the solution pH to 6. Nonetheless, the As(V) removal was incomplete in the ZVAl/POM/O2 system because the hydrolyzed products of POM, e.g., PO4(3-), inhibited As(V) removal due to the competitive adsorption of the oxyanion on Al precipitates. Discarded Al-based beverage cans exhibit a higher efficiency for As(III) oxidation and final As removal compared with that of ZVAl, and thus, the potential application of Al beverage cans to scavenge As in solutions is feasible. PMID:23497977

  19. INFLUENCE OF GROUNDWATER GEOCHEMISTRY ON THE LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF IN-SITU PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS CONTAINING ZERO-VALENT IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive barriers that couple subsurface fluid flow with a passive chemical treatment zone are emerging, cost effective approaches for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater. Factors such as the build-up of surface precipitates, bio-fouling, and changes in subsurface tr...

  20. IN SITU REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINANTS IN GROUND WATER & SOILS USING PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS (PHASE I, CHROMIUM, CHLORINATED ORGANICS & ZERO-VALENT IRON) RSRP3

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objective of this research is to select an effective reductant for detoxification and immobilization of hexavalent chromium present in the soils/sediments collected from the old plating shop of the U.S. Coast Guard Air Support Center, Elizabeth City, North Carolina. ...

  1. Comparative study on the reactivity of Fe/Cu bimetallic particles and zero valent iron (ZVI) under different conditions of N2, air or without aeration.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhaokun; Lai, Bo; Yang, Ping; Zhou, Yuexi; Wang, Juling; Fang, Shuping

    2015-10-30

    In order to further compare the degradation capacity of Fe(0) and Fe/Cu bimetallic system under different aeration conditions, the mineralization of PNP under different aeration conditions has been investigated thoroughly. The results show that the removal of PNP by Fe(0) or Fe/Cu system followed the pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics. Under the optimal conditions, the COD removal efficiencies obtained through Fe(0) or Fe/Cu system under different aeration conditions followed the trend that Fe/Cu (air)>Fe/Cu (N2: 0-30 min, air: 30-120 min)>control-Fe (air)>Fe/Cu (without aeration)>Fe/Cu (N2)>control-Fe (N2). It revealed that dissolved oxygen (DO) could improve the mineralization of PNP, and Cu could enhance the reactivity of Fe(0). In addition, the degradation of PNP was further analyzed by using UV-vis, FTIR and GC/MS, and the results suggest that Fe/Cu bimetallic system with air aeration could completely break the benzene ring and NO2 structure of PNP and could generate the nontoxic and biodegradable intermediate products. Meanwhile, most of these intermediate products were further mineralized into CO2 and H2O, which brought about a high COD removal efficiency (83.8%). Therefore, Fe/Cu bimetallic system with air aeration would be a promising process for toxic refractory industry wastewater. PMID:25978189

  2. Effect of pH on the dissolution kinetics of zero-valent iron in the presence of EDDHA and EDTA

    SciTech Connect

    Lodge, Alexander M.; Pierce, Eric M.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2007-03-25

    The effect of environmental factors (e.g., pH, solution composition, and temperature) that affect the longevity of Fe(0) barriers in the subsurface are difficult to quantify independently from changes that occur to the passivating layer. Therefore, to quantify the rate of Fe(0) dissolution under conditions which maintain the pO2 at a relatively constant level and minimize the formation of a passivating layer on the metal surface, a series of experiments have been conducted with the single-pass flow-through (SPFT) apparatus. These experiments were conducted over the pH range from 7.0 to 12.0 at 90°C in the presence of 5 mM EDDHA or 5 mM EDTA. The organic acids, EDDHA and EDTA, helped to maintain the aqueous Fe concentration below saturation with respect to Fe-bearing alteration phases and minimize the formation of a partially oxidized surface film. Results suggest the corrosion of Fe(0) is relatively insensitive to pH and the forward or maximum dissolution rate is 3 to 4 orders of magnitude higher than when a passive film and corrosion products are present.

  3. EZVI Injection Field Test Leads to Pilot-Scale Application

    EPA Science Inventory

    Testing and monitoring of emulsified zero-valent ironTM (EZVI) injections was conducted at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Launch Complex 34, FL, in 2002 to 2005 to evaluate the technology’s efficacy in enhancing in situ dehalogenation of dense nonaqueous-phase liquid (DNAPL) ...

  4. THE EFFECT OF SMECTITE ON THE CORROSION OF IRON METAL

    SciTech Connect

    Balko, Barbara A.; Bosse, Stephanie A.; Cade, Anne E.; Jones-Landry, Elise F.; Amonette, James E.; Daschbach, John L.

    2012-04-24

    The combination of zero-valent iron and a clay-type amendment is often observed to have a synergistic effect on the rate of reduction reactions. In this paper, electrochemical techniques are used to determine the mechanism of interaction between the iron and smectite clay minerals. Iron electrodes coated with an evaporated smectite suspension (clay-modified iron electrodes, CMIEs) were prepared using five different smectites: SAz-1, SWa-1, STx-1, SWy-1, and SHCa-1. All the smectites were exchanged with Na+ and one sample of SWy-1 was also exchanged with Mg2+. Potentiodynamic potential scans and cyclic voltammograms were taken using the CMIEs and uncoated but passivated iron electrodes. These electrochemical experiments, along with measurements of the amount of Fe2+ and Fe3+ sorbed in the smectite coating, suggested that the smectite removed the passive layer of the underlying iron electrode during the evaporation process. Cyclic voltammograms taken after the CMIEs were biased at the active-passive transition potential for varying amounts of time suggested that the smectite limited growth of a passive layer, preventing passivation. These results are attributed to the Broensted acidity of the smectite as well as to its ability to sorb iron cations. Oxides that did form on the surface of the iron in the presence of the smectite when it was biased anodically seemed to be different than those that form on the surface of an uncoated iron electrode under otherwise similar conditions; this difference suggested that the smectite reacted with the Fe2+ formed from the oxidation of the underlying iron. No significant correlation could be found between the ability of the smectite to remove the iron passive film and the smectite type. The results have implications for the mixing of sediments and iron particles in permeable reactive barriers, underground storage of radioactive waste in steel canisters, and the use of smectite supports in preventing aggregation of nano-sized zero-valent iron.

  5. RCRA corrective measures using a permeable reactive iron wall US Coast Guard Support Center, Elizabeth City, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Schmithors, W.L.; Vardy, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    A chromic acid release was discovered at a former electroplating shop at the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. Initial investigative activities indicated that chromic acid had migrated into the subsurface soils and groundwater. In addition, trichloroethylene (TCE) was also discovered in groundwater during subsequent investigations of the hexavalent chromium (Cr VI) plume. Corrective measures were required under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The in-situ remediation method, proposed under RCRA Interim Measures to passively treat the groundwater contaminants, uses reactive zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate the chlorinated compounds and to mineralize the hexavalent chromium. A 47 meter by 0.6 meter subsurface permeable iron wall was installed downgradient of the source area to a depth of 7 meters using a direct trenching machine. The iron filings were placed in the ground as the soils were excavated from the subsurface. This is the first time that direct trenching was used to install reactive zero-valent iron filings. Over 250 metric tons of iron filings were used as the reactive material in the barrier wall. Installation of the iron filings took one full day. Extensive negotiations with regulatory agencies were required to use this technology under the current facility Hazardous Waste Management Permit. All waste soils generated during the excavation activities were contained and treated on site. Once contaminant concentrations were reduced the waste soils were used as fill material.

  6. Changing the Action of Iron from Stoichiometric to Electrocatalytic in the Hydrogenation of Ketones in Aqueous Acidic Media.

    PubMed

    Gottardo, Marina; Easton, Max; Fabos, Viktoria; Guo, Si-Xuan; Zhang, Jie; Perosa, Alvise; Selva, Maurizio; Bond, Alan M; Masters, Anthony F; Maschmeyer, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Cyclohexanone, a model compound chosen to conveniently represent small oxygenates present in the aqueous phase of biomass hydrothermal upgrading streams, was hydrogenated in the presence of electrodeposited iron(0) using aqueous formic or sulfuric acid as a hydrogen donor. Under these conditions, zero-valent iron is consumed stoichiometrically and serves as both a formic acid decomposition site and a hydrogen transfer agent. However, the resulting iron(II) can be used to continuously regenerate iron(0) when a potential is applied to the glassy carbon working electrode. Controlled potential electrolysis experiments show a 17?% conversion of cyclohexanone (over 1000?seconds) to cyclohexanol with >80?% efficiency of iron deposition from an iron(II) sulfate solution containing formic or sulfuric acid. In the absence of electrodeposited iron, formation of cyclohexanol could not be detected. PMID:26382111

  7. Iron

    MedlinePLUS

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  8. Iron

    MedlinePLUS

    ... are available? Iron is available in many multivitamin-mineral supplements and in supplements that contain only iron. Iron in supplements is often in the form of ferrous sulfate, ferrous gluconate, ferric citrate, or ferric sulfate. Dietary ...

  9. Degradation of trichloroethylene using iron, bimetals and trimetals.

    PubMed

    Chao, Keh-Ping; Ong, Say Kee; Fryzek, Todd; Yuan, Wanchun; Braida, Washington

    2012-01-01

    A cold, electrodeless method was used to prepare bimetals (Fe/Cu, Fe/Ni) and trimetals (Fe/Cu/Ni) for the treatment of trichloroethylene (TCE). With Fe/Cu, the degradation of TCE was observed to increase with increasing copper content up to 9.26 % (w/w) with a first-order degradation rate constant approximately 10 times faster than that of zero-valent iron (ZVI) alone. For copper content greater than 9.26 %, the TCE degradation rate decreased. Dechlorinated compounds were initially observed but they were transitory and accounted for no more than 9 % of initial TCE mass on a carbon molar basis. Ethylene was the primary end product of TCE reduction. Similarly for Fe/Ni, increasing rates of degradation were observed with increasing amounts of nickel with a maximum degradation rate constant of about 30 times higher than that of ZVI alone. However, the amount of nickel needed to reach the maximum rate was only 0.25 %. When copper and nickel were plated onto iron, the maximum reaction rate constant was approximately 50 times higher than that of ZVI. The maximum degradation of TCE was observed for a copper and nickel content of 4.17 % and 0.40 %, respectively. The experimental results indicated that TCE degradation was enhanced by more than one order of magnitude when copper and/or nickel was plated onto the zero-valent iron. However, copper or nickel plated onto iron by the elctrodeless process was found to leach out during the reaction which may, in turn, impact the contaminated water. PMID:22702813

  10. Iron

    MedlinePLUS

    ... avoid taking it with foods containing dairy products, coffee, tea, or cereals. There are many forms of ... Coffee and teaTaking iron supplements with coffee or tea can reduce the amount of iron the body ...

  11. IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document surveys the effects of organic and inorganic iron that are relevant to humans and their environment. The biology and chemistry of iron are complex and only partially understood. Iron participates in oxidation reduction processes that not only affect its geochemical m...

  12. Application of a montmorillonite clay modified with iron in photo-Fenton process. Comparison with goethite and nZVI.

    PubMed

    De León, María A; Sergio, Marta; Bussi, Juan; Ortiz de la Plata, Guadalupe B; Cassano, Alberto E; Alfano, Orlando M

    2015-01-01

    Iron pillared clay (Fe-PILC) was prepared from a montmorillonite and was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray fluorescence. Fe-PILC catalytic activity was evaluated in photo-Fenton processes applied to the degradation of 2-clorophenol. Different catalyst loads were assayed. The Fe-PILC allowed almost complete degradation of the contaminant. An increase in the contaminant degradation rate was observed, following leaching of iron during catalytic assays, which suggest the existence of a homogeneous photo-Fenton mechanism. The catalytic performance of the Fe-PILC was compared with that for goethite and zero valent iron nanoparticles. Differences were found regarding the achieved degradation levels, the efficiency in oxidant consumption, and the extension of iron leaching. PMID:24604272

  13. Heterogeneous Fenton oxidation of Direct Black G in dye effluent using functional kaolin-supported nanoscale zero iron.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinwen; Wang, Feifeng; Chen, Zuliang; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravendra

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated kaolin-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI/K) as a heterogeneous Fenton-like catalyst for the adsorption and oxidation of an azo dye, Direct Black G (DBG). New findings suggest that kaolin as a support material not only reduced the aggregation of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) but also improved the adsorption of DBG. It consequently improved Fenton oxidation by increasing the local concentration of DBG in the vicinity of nZVI. This was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction for the surface morphology of nZVI/K before and after the Fenton-like reaction. Furthermore, nZVI/K proved to be a catalyst for the heterogeneous Fenton-like oxidation of the DBG process in the neutral pH range. More than 87.22 % of DBG was degraded, and 54.60 % of total organic carbon was removed in the optimal conditions: 0.6 g/L dosage of nZVI/K, 33 mM H2O2, 100 mg/L initial DBG concentration, temperature of 303 K and pH of 7.06. Finally, it was demonstrated that nZVI/K removed DBG from dye wastewater through the processes of adsorption and oxidation. PMID:24014200

  14. Iron

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Guidelines for Americans and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's food guidance system, ChooseMyPlate . Where can I find ... on food sources of iron: U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Nutrient Database Nutrient List for Iron ( ...

  15. Laboratory Evaluation of Sulfur Modified Iron for Use as a Filter Material to Treat Agricultural Drainage Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, B. J.

    2009-12-01

    Where subsurface drainage practices are employed, fertilizer nutrients and pesticides applied on farm fields and municipal locations are commonly intercepted by the buried drainage pipes and then discharged into local streams and lakes, oftentimes producing adverse environmental impacts on these surface water bodies. On-site water filter treatment systems can be employed to prevent the release of agricultural nutrients/pesticides into adjacent waterways. Sulfur modified iron is a relatively unknown industrial product that may have promise for use as a filter material to remove contaminants from subsurface drainage waters. Sulfur modified iron (SMI) is a high surface area iron powder (zero valent iron) that has been altered via chemical reaction with pure sulfur to produce a sulfur/iron surface coating on the iron particles. A laboratory investigation was conducted with contaminant removal batch tests, saturated falling-head hydraulic conductivity tests, and saturated solute transport column experiments to evaluate the feasibility for using SMI to treat subsurface drainage waters. Contaminant removal batch tests showed that three SMI samples were much more effective removing nitrate (> 94% nitrate removed) than three zero valent iron samples (< 10% nitrate removed). Batch test results additionally showed that SMI removed greater that 94% of dissolved phosphate, but was not particularly effective removing the pesticide, atrazine (< 37% atrazine removed). Hydraulic conductivity tests indicated that all three SMI samples that were evaluated had sufficient hydraulic conductivity, much greater than the 1 x 10-3 cm/s standard used for stormwater sand filters. The saturated solute transport tests confirmed that SMI can be effective removing nitrate and phosphate from drainage waters. Analysis of column effluent also showed that the large majority of nitrate removed by SMI was converted to ammonium. Consequently, these laboratory findings support the use of SMI in agricultural drainage water filter treatment systems, particularly when nitrate and phosphate pollution are major environmental concerns.

  16. 7 CFR 58.631 - Emulsifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Emulsifiers. 58.631 Section 58.631 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE...

  17. 7 CFR 58.631 - Emulsifiers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Emulsifiers. 58.631 Section 58.631 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE...

  18. Iron

    MedlinePLUS

    ... also used for improving athletic performance and treating attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and canker sores. Some people also use ... body when taken by women who are pregnant.Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Developing research shows that taking iron sulfate ( ...

  19. Electroremediation of PCB contaminated soil combined with iron nanoparticles: Effect of the soil type.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Helena I; Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Ottosen, Lisbeth M; Ribeiro, Alexandra B

    2015-07-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) are carcinogenic and persistent organic pollutants that accumulate in soils and sediments. Currently, there is no cost-effective and sustainable remediation technology for these contaminants. In this work, a new combination of electrodialytic remediation and zero valent iron particles in a two-compartment cell is tested and compared to a more conventional combination of electrokinetic remediation and nZVI in a three-compartment cell. In the new two-compartment cell, the soil is suspended and stirred simultaneously with the addition of zero valent iron nanoparticles. Remediation experiments are made with two different historically PCB contaminated soils, which differ in both soil composition and contamination source. Soil 1 is a mix of soils with spills of transformer oils, while Soil 2 is a superficial soil from a decommissioned school where PCB were used as windows sealants. Saponin, a natural surfactant, was also tested to increase the PCB desorption from soils and enhance dechlorination. Remediation of Soil 1 (with highest pH, carbonate content, organic matter and PCB concentrations) obtained the maximum 83% and 60% PCB removal with the two-compartment and the three-compartment cell, respectively. The highest removal with Soil 2 were 58% and 45%, in the two-compartment and the three-compartment cell, respectively, in the experiments without direct current. The pH of the soil suspension in the two-compartment treatment appears to be a determining factor for the PCB dechlorination, and this cell allowed a uniform distribution of the nanoparticles in the soil, while there was iron accumulation in the injection reservoir in the three-compartment cell. PMID:25841071

  20. The removal of nitrate by nanoscale iron particles produced using the sodium borohydride method.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyoung-Chan; Park, Sung Hoon; Ahn, Ho-Geun; Chung, Minchul; Kim, Byungwhan; Kim, Sun-Jae; Seo, Seong-Gyu; Jung, Sang-Chul

    2011-02-01

    This study was conducted to investigate removal of nitrate by nanoscale zero-valent iron (ZVI) particles in aqueous solution. ZVI particles was produced from wasted acid that is by-products of a pickling line at a steel work. The reaction activity of ZVI particles was evaluated through decomposition experiments of NO3-N aqueous solution. Addition of a larger amount of ZVI particles resulted in a higher decomposition rate. ZVI particles showed higher decomposition efficiencies than commercially purchased ZVI particles at all pH values. Both ZVIs showed a higher decomposition rate at a lower pH. Virtually no decomposition reaction was observed at pH of 4 or higher for purchased ZVI. The ZVI particles produced directly from wasted acid by the sodium borohydride method were not easy to handle because they were very small (10-200 nm) and were oxidized easily in the air. PMID:21456267

  1. Efficient degradation of trichloroethylene in water using persulfate activated by reduced graphene oxide-iron nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ayyaz; Gu, Xiaogang; Li, Li; Lv, Shuguang; Xu, Yisheng; Guo, Xuhong

    2015-11-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) and nano-sized zero-valent iron-reduced graphene oxide (nZVI-rGO) composite were prepared. The GO and nZVI-rGO composite were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and Raman spectroscopy. The size of nZVI was about 6 nm as observed by TEM. The system of nZVI-rGO and persulfate (PS) was used for the degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in water, and showed 26.5 % more efficiency as compared to nZVI/PS system. The different parameters were studied to determine the efficiency of nZVI-rGO to activate the PS system for the TCE degradation. By increasing the PS amount, TCE removal was also improved while no obvious effect was observed by varying the catalyst loading. Degradation was decreased as the TCE initial concentration was increased from 20 to 100 mg/L. Moreover, when initial solution pH was increased, efficiency deteriorated to 80 %. Bicarbonate showed more negative effect on TCE removal among the solution matrix. To better understand the effects of radical species in the system, the scavenger tests were performed. The •SO4 (-) and •O2 (-) were predominant species responsible for TCE removal. The nZVI-rGO-activated PS process shows potential applications in remediation of highly toxic organic contaminants such as TCE present in the groundwater. Graphical abstract Persulfate activated by reduced graphene oxide and nano-sized zero-valent iron composite can be used for efficient degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in water. PMID:26162447

  2. Stimulation of Carbonate Reservoirs Using a New Emulsified Acid System 

    E-print Network

    Sayed, Mohammed Ali Ibrahim

    2013-05-15

    The scope of work can be divided into; the measurement of the rheological properties of a new emulsified acid system that can be suitable for high temperature applications, a study of the performance of the new emulsified acid in stimulating both...

  3. Valiant 'Zero-Valent' Effort Restores Contaminated Grounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) are chemical compounds that can contaminate soil and groundwater to the point of irreparability. These substances are only slightly soluble in water, and are much denser than water. Because of their solubility, DNAPLs form separate liquid phases in groundwater, and because of their density, DNAPLs sink in aquifers instead of floating at the water table, making it extremely difficult to detect their presence. If left untreated in the ground, they can taint fresh water sources. Common DNAPLs include chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds such as carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, tetrachloroethylene, and trichloroethylene. Trichloroethylene was used during the early days of the Space Program, as a solvent for flushing rocket engines, and for metal cleaning and degreasing of equipment, electronics, and heavy machinery. As a result, areas of Cape Canaveral s Launch Complex 34, the site of several historic Saturn rocket launches occurring from 1959 to 1968, were polluted with chlorinated DNAPLs. Through the direction and guidance of Dr. Jacqueline Quinn, an environmental engineer in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at NASA s Kennedy Space Center, a biodegradable environmental cleanup technology was developed to reductively dechlorinate DNAPL sources in polluted water at Launch Complex 34. It was important for Kennedy to nip this problem in the bud, in light of the fact that the Space Center is also a National Wildlife Refuge, home to thousands of shorebirds, endangered sea turtles and eagles, manatees, alligators, and diverse habitats that include brackish marshes and salt water estuaries. The success in remediating this historic launch site has led to numerous commercial applications that are restoring the health of our environmental surroundings.

  4. Effects of antioxidants and additional emulsifiers on the stability of emulsified milk fat in the photo/radical oxidation system.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yukihiro; Hiyama, Shinichiro; Takase, Yoshihiko; Kadowaki, Akio; Hara, Setsuko

    2014-01-01

    The effects of antioxidants on the oxidative deterioration of emulsified oils and fats differ depending on the oxidation conditions, oils and fats used, and type of emulsifier. In this study, milk fat was emulsified to obtain water-oil (O/W) emulsion using Tween20 as emulsifier. The antioxidative effects of several antioxidants with various lipophilic properties, such as ?-tocopherol (Toc), epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg), quercetin (Qu), green tea extract (GTE), and rooibos tea extract (RTE) were investigated, the effects of additional emulsifiers such as polyglycerol and sucrose esters of fatty acids on the oxidation stability of the emulsion were also investigated. Under oxidative conditions of 30°C in 650 lx, Toc was more effective than GTE in suppressing the increase of the peroxide value (PV, meq/kg) of the emulsified milk fat. Under these oxidative conditions, the antioxidative effect of GTE was enhanced by the addition of polyglycerol and sucrose esters of fatty acids. Under the oxidative conditions at 40°C in dark with 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) or 2,2'-azobis (2,4-dimethylvaleronitrile) (AMVN), Toc showed the most antioxidative effect on suppression of the increase of PV and anisidine value (AnV) of the emulsified milk fat. Furthermore, additional emulsifiers also showed suppressive effects on the increase of the PV and AnV of the emulsified milk fat even without any antioxidants. The effects of additional emulsifiers on the oxidative stability of O/W emulsions were enhanced with antioxidants such as Toc, EGCg, and Qu. PMID:25174675

  5. Formulation design for target delivery of iron nanoparticles to TCE zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ziheng; Acosta, Edgar

    2013-12-01

    Nanoparticles of zero-valent iron (NZVI) are effective reducing agents for some dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminants such as trichloroethylene (TCE). However, target delivery of iron nanoparticles to DNAPL zones in the aquifer remains an elusive feature for NZVI technologies. This work discusses three strategies to deliver iron nanoparticles to DNAPL zones. To this end, iron oxide nanoparticles coated with oleate (OL) ions were used as stable analogs for NZVI. The OL-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are rendered lipophilic via (a) the addition of CaCl2, (b) acidification, or (c) the addition of a cationic surfactant, benzethonium chloride (BC). Mixtures of OL and BC show promise as a target delivery strategy due to the high stability of the nanoparticles in water, and their preferential partition into TCE in batch experiments. Column tests show that while the OL-BC coated iron oxide nanoparticles remain largely mobile in TCE-free columns, a large fraction of these particles are retained in TCE-contaminated columns, confirming the effectiveness of this target delivery strategy.

  6. Influence of emulsifier concentration on nanoemulsion gelation.

    PubMed

    Erramreddy, Vivek Vardhan; Ghosh, Supratim

    2014-09-23

    Nanoemulsion gels are a new class of soft materials that manifest stronger elasticity even at lower dispersed phase volume fraction. In this work, gelation in 40 wt % canola oil-in-water nanoemulsions was investigated as a function of emulsifier type (anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) or nonionic Tween 20) and concentration. It was observed that the liquid nanoemulsions transformed into viscoelastic gels at a specific concentration range of SDS, whereas no gelation was observed for Tween 20. The apparent viscosity, yield stress, and storage modulus of the nanogels increased with SDS concentration until 15 times critical micelle concentration (CMC), thereafter decreased steadily as the gelation weakened beginning 20 CMC. Three regimes of colloidal interactions in the presence of emulsifier were proposed. (1) Repulsive gelation: at low SDS concentration (0.5-2 times CMC) the repulsive charge cloud around the nanodroplets acted as interfacial shell layer that significantly increased the effective volume fraction of the dispersed phase (?(eff)). When ?(eff) became comparable to the volume fraction required for maximal random jamming, nanoemulsions formed elastic gels. (2) Attractive gelation: as the SDS concentration increased to 5-15 times CMC, ?(eff) dropped due to charge screening by more counterions from SDS, but depletion attractions generated by micelles in the continuous phase led to extensive droplet aggregation which immobilized the continuous phase leading to stronger gel formation. (3) Decline in gelation due to oscillatory structural forces (OSF): at very high SDS concentration (20-30 time CMC), structural forces were manifested due to the layered-structuring of excess micelles in the interdroplet regions resulting in loss of droplet aggregation. Tween 20 nanoemulsions, on the other hand, did not show repulsive gelation due to lack of charge cloud, while weak depletion attraction and early commencement of OSF regime leading to liquid-like behavior at all concentrations. The nanogels possess great potential for use in low-fat foods, pharmaceuticals and cosmetic products. PMID:25137632

  7. Occupational asthma due to an emulsified oil mist.

    PubMed Central

    Hendy, M S; Beattie, B E; Burge, P S

    1985-01-01

    A toolsetter developed occupational asthma due to the oil mist generated by his lathe on which it was used as a coolant. The diagnosis was confirmed by serial measurements of peak expiratory flow at home and work, including a prolonged period away from work. Occupational type bronchial provocation tests were performed using the whole emulsified oil and its components separately. He reacted specifically to the whole emulsified oil and to the reodorant, a pine oil preparation. He also reacted to colophony, a constituent of the emulsifier. PMID:3965015

  8. Removal of contaminants from aqueous solution by reaction with iron surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, S.R.; Lai, H.F.; Roberson, M.J.; Hunt, M.L.; Amrhein, C.; Giancarlo, L.C.; Flynn, G.W.; Yarmoff, J.A.

    2000-03-07

    Irrigation drainage and industrial wastewaters often contain elevated levels of toxic oxyanions and oxycations such as selenate, chromate, and uranyl. A potential remediation method is to react contaminated water with zero-valent iron, which transforms the mobile contaminants into immobile forms. In this work, iron foil was exposed to aqueous solutions containing the relevant ions, and the reacted surfaces were characterized by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). STM images collected in situ show that the protrusions on the foil surface associated with iron oxides are smoothed out by the reaction. XPS indicates that partially reduced Se(IV) and Cr(III) are adsorbed on the surface, while uranium is deposited as U(VI), i.e., without reduction. More Se and Cr are deposited when the atmospheric gases are removed from solution because of the elimination of a competing process in which dissolved O{sub 2} increases the thickness of the iron oxide overlayer to the point where the reduction reaction is quenched. The amount of U deposited is greatly increased when the atmospheric gases are removed because of the elimination of dissolved CO{sub 2}, which can form carbonate complexes with uranium.

  9. Solutions Remediate Contaminated Groundwater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    During the Apollo Program, NASA workers used chlorinated solvents to clean rocket engine components at launch sites. These solvents, known as dense non-aqueous phase liquids, had contaminated launch facilities to the point of near-irreparability. Dr. Jacqueline Quinn and Dr. Kathleen Brooks Loftin of Kennedy Space Center partnered with researchers from the University of Central Florida's chemistry and engineering programs to develop technology capable of remediating the area without great cost or further environmental damage. They called the new invention Emulsified Zero-Valent Iron (EZVI). The groundwater remediation compound is cleaning up polluted areas all around the world and is, to date, NASA's most licensed technology.

  10. Effect of droplet size on the behavior and characteristics of emulsified acid 

    E-print Network

    Almutairi, Saleh Haif

    2008-10-10

    Emulsified acids have been extensively used in the oil industry since 1933. Most of the available research and publications discussed mainly the application of emulsified acid in the field. A fair number of the published work also discussed in depth...

  11. Role of Iron Anode Oxidation on Transformation of Chromium by Electrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Sarahney, Hussam; Mao, Xuhui; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2012-01-01

    The potential for chemical reduction of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) in contaminated water and formation of a stable precipitate by Zero Valent Iron (ZVI) anode electrolysis is evaluated in separated electrodes system. Oxidation of iron electrodes produces ferrous ions causing the development of a reducing environment in the anolyte, chemical reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and formation of stable iron-chromium precipitates. Cr(VI) transformation rates are dependent on the applied electric current density. Increasing the electric current increases the transformation rates; however, the process is more efficient under lower volumetric current density (for example 1.5 mA L?1 in this study). The transformation follows a zero order rate that is dependent on the electric current density. Cr(VI) transformation occurs in the anolyte when the electrodes are separated as well as when the electrolytes (anolyte/catholyte) are mixed, as used in electrocoagulation. The study shows that the transformation occurs in the anolyte as a result of ferrous ion formation and the product is a stable Fe15Cr5(OH)60 precipitate. PMID:23284182

  12. Antibacterial activity and cytocompatibility of titanium oxide coating modified by iron ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yaxin; Cao, Huiliang; Qiao, Yuqin; Meng, Fanhao; Liu, Xuanyong

    2014-10-01

    In this work, zero valent iron nanoparticles (Fezero-NPs) and iron oxide nanoparticles (Feox-NPs) were synthesized at the subsurface and surface regions of titanium oxide coatings (TOCs) by plasma immersion ion implantation. This novel Fe-NPs/TOC system showed negligible iron releasing, great electron storage capability and excellent cytocompatibility in vitro. Importantly, the system showed selective antibacterial ability which can kill Staphylococcus aureus under dark conditions but has no obvious antibacterial effect against Escherichia coli. Owing to a bipolar Schottky barrier between Fezero-NPs/TOC and Fezero-NPs/Feox-NPs, electrons could be captured by the Fezero-NPs bounded at the subsurface region of the coating. This electron storage capability of the Fe-NPs/TOC system induced extracellular electron transportation and accumulation of adequate valence-band holes (h(+)) at the external side, which caused oxidation damage to S. aureus cells in the dark. No obvious biocide effect against E. coli resulted from lack of electron transfer ability between E. coli and substrate materials. This work may open up a novel and controlled strategy to design coatings of implants with antibacterial ability and cytocompatibility for medical applications. PMID:24914826

  13. Inhibition of bacterial growth by iron oxide nanoparticles with and without attached drug: Have we conquered the antibiotic resistance problem?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armijo, Leisha M.; Jain, Priyanka; Malagodi, Angelina; Fornelli, F. Zuly; Hayat, Allison; Rivera, Antonio C.; French, Michael; Smyth, Hugh D. C.; Osi?ski, Marek

    2015-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among the top three leading causative opportunistic human pathogens, possessing one of the largest bacterial genomes and an exceptionally large proportion of regulatory genes therein. It has been known for more than a decade that the size and complexity of the P. aeruginosa genome is responsible for the adaptability and resilience of the bacteria to include its ability to resist many disinfectants and antibiotics. We have investigated the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa bacterial biofilms to iron oxide (magnetite) nanoparticles (NPs) with and without attached drug (tobramycin). We also characterized the susceptibility of zero-valent iron NPs, which are known to inactivate microbes. The particles, having an average diameter of 16 nm were capped with natural alginate, thus doubling the hydrodynamic size. Nanoparticle-drug conjugates were produced via cross-linking drug and alginate functional groups. Drug conjugates were investigated in the interest of determining dosage, during these dosage-curve experiments, NPs unbound to drug were tested in cultures as a negative control. Surprisingly, we found that the iron oxide NPs inhibited bacterial growth, and thus, biofilm formation without the addition of antibiotic drug. The inhibitory dosages of iron oxide NPs were investigated and the minimum inhibitory concentrations are presented. These findings suggest that NP-drug conjugates may overcome the antibiotic drug resistance common in P. aeruginosa infections.

  14. Environmental application of millimetre-scale sponge iron (s-Fe(0)) particles (III): The effect of surface silver.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yongming; Yu, Yunjiang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Sukun; Liu, Runlong; Fu, Jianping; Han, Jinglei; Fang, Jiande; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2015-12-15

    To enhance the dechlorination reactivity of millimetric sponge iron (s-Fe(0)), a facile one-pot method was used to decorate s-Fe(0) with Ag(+) ions under ambient conditions. The results recorded by X-ray diffraction patterns, X-ray photoelectron spectra and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the growth of Ag(0) was dominated primarily by (111) plane with a mean length of ?20nm. The roles of Ag(0) loading, catalyst dosage, particle size, initial pH and contaminant concentration were assessed during the removal of pentachlorophenol (PCP). Catalyst recyclability was also studied. The results revealed that 3-5mm s-Fe(0) particles with 5wt% Ag(0) loading exhibited the best performance with a dose of 3.0g per 60mL PCP solution. In addition, the dechlorination of PCP followed two-step, pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics, and Ag(0)-s-Fe(0) was advantageous compared with bimetals of nanoscale zero-valent iron, iron power and iron flakes. The dechlorination mechanism of PCP over Ag(0)-s-Fe(0) was attributed to the surface Ag(0) decoration, which catalyzed the formation of reactive hydrogen atoms for indirect reaction, and the direct electron transfer via Fe-Ag(0) galvanic cells for direct reaction. This suggests that Ag-based bimetals of s-Fe(0) have great potential in the pretreatment of organic halogen compounds in aqueous solution. PMID:26276702

  15. Boronic Acid Linear Homopolymers as Effective Emulsifiers and Gelators.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qijing; Hill, Megan R; Brooks, William L A; Zhu, Anqi; Sumerlin, Brent S; An, Zesheng

    2015-10-01

    We report emulsion studies using poly(vinylphenyl boronic acid) (PVPBA) linear homopolymer as an effective emulsifier and gelator. Two stabilizing regimes were identified depending on the pH of PVPBA aqueous solutions, i.e., emulsions stabilized by the hompolymer nanoparticles (Pickering emulsions) at pH < pKa and emulsions stabilized by the homopolymer unimers at pH > pKa. In both cases, gelled emulsions were obtained from medium to high internal phase volume fractions with the unimers exhibiting more effective emulsification and gelling properties. Hydrogen bonding between the boronic acid units is proposed to account for the high strength of the emulsions. The emulsions were shown to be pH- and sugar-responsive. Finally, the stable emulsions were used as templates to directly prepare PVPBA macroporous materials and to fabricate multilayered capsules. This remarkable observation that a simple homopolymer can serve as an effective emulsifier and gelator may dramatically extend the scope of potential emulsifiers and inspire further research in the design of new types of efficient emulsifying agents. PMID:26402568

  16. Design of Hard Water Stable Emulsifier Systems for Petroleum-

    E-print Network

    Clarens, Andres

    Design of Hard Water Stable Emulsifier Systems for Petroleum- and Bio-based Semi for petroleum and bio-based MWFs that improve fluid lifetime by providing emulsion stability under hard water. The newly developed petroleum and bio-based formulations with improved hard water stability are competitive

  17. Laboratory comparison of four iron-based filter materials for water treatment of trace element contaminants.

    PubMed

    Allred, Barry J; Tost, Brian C

    2014-11-01

    A laboratory investigation provided preliminary comparison of trace element contaminant water treatment capabilities for four iron-based filter materials. The iron-based filter materials tested were zero-valent iron (ZVI), porous iron composite (PIC), sulfur modified iron (SMI), and iron oxide/hydroxide (IOH). Two types of trace element contaminant solutions were tested, one combined As, Cr, and Se (added as AsO4(3-), CrO4(2-), and SeO4(2-), respectively), while the second combined Cd2+, Cu2+, and Pb2+. The laboratory investigation included saturated falling-head hydraulic conductivity tests, contaminant removal-desorption/dissolution batch tests, and low-to-high flow rate saturated solute transport column tests. Hydraulic conductivity test results indicate that all four iron-based filter materials have sufficient water flow capacity as indicated by saturated hydraulic conductivity values greater than 1 x 10(-2) cm/s. Essentially, 100% of each trace element (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Se) was removed by SMI during the contaminant removal portion of the batch tests and during the column tests, while IOH exhibited good removal of each trace element except Se. Results from the contaminant removal portion of the batch tests and from the column tests showed ZVI and PIC were effective in treating Cd, Cr, Cu, and Pb. With the exception of Se adsorption/precipitation onto IOH, the desorption/dissolution portion of the batch tests showed that once As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, or Se are adsorbed/precipitated onto ZVI, PIC, SMI, or IOH particle surfaces, these trace elements are then not readily desorbed or dissolved back into solution. PMID:25509527

  18. Influence of electrolyte and voltage on the direct current enhanced transport of iron nanoparticles in clay.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Helena I; Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Ribeiro, Alexandra B; Pamukcu, Sibel

    2014-03-01

    Zero valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) transport for soil and groundwater remediation is slowed down or halted by aggregation or fast depletion in the soil pores. Direct electric current can enhance the transport of nZVI in low permeability soils. However operational factors, including pH, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), voltage and ionic strength of the electrolyte can play an important role in the treatment effectiveness. Experiments were conducted to enhance polymer coated nZVI mobility in a model low permeability soil medium (kaolin clay) using low direct current. Different electrolytes of varying ionic strengths and initial pH and high nZVI concentrations were applied. Results showed that the nZVI transport is enhanced by direct current, even considering concentrations typical of field application that favor nanoparticle aggregation. However, the factors considered (pH, ORP, voltage and electrolyte) failed to explain the iron concentration variation. The electrolyte and its ionic strength proved to be significant for pH and ORP measured during the experiments, and therefore will affect aggregation and fast oxidation of the particles. PMID:24252496

  19. Evaluating the Mobility of Arsenic in Synthetic Iron-containing Solids Using a Modified Sequential Extraction Method

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jilei; Sáez, A. Eduardo; Ela, Wendell P.

    2013-01-01

    Many water treatment technologies for arsenic removal that are used today produce arsenic-bearing residuals which are disposed in non-hazardous landfills. Previous works have established that many of these residuals will release arsenic to a much greater extent than predicted by standard regulatory leaching tests (e.g. the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure, TCLP) and, consequently, require stabilization to ensure benign behavior after disposal. In this work, a four-step sequential extraction method was developed in an effort to determine the proportion of arsenic in various phases in untreated as well as stabilized iron-based solid matrices. The solids synthesized using various potential stabilization techniques included: amorphous arsenic-iron sludge (ASL), reduced ASL via reaction with zero valent iron (RASL), amorphous ferrous arsenate (PFA), a mixture of PFA and SL (M1), crystalline ferrous arsenate (HPFA), and a mixture of HPFA and SL (M2). The overall arsenic mobility of the tested samples increased in the following order: ASL > RASL > PFA > M1 > HPFA > M2. PMID:23459695

  20. Preparation and characterization of antibacterial Senegalia (Acacia) senegal/iron-silica bio-nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ?i?mano?lu, Tuba; Karaku?, Selcan; Birer, Özgür; Soylu, Gülin Selda Pozan; Kolan, Ay?en; Tan, Ezgi; Ürk, Öykü; Akdut, Gizem; Kilislioglu, Ayben

    2015-11-01

    Many studies that research bio-nanocomposites utilize techniques that involve the dispersion of strengthening components like silica, metal and metal oxides through a host biopolymer matrix. The biggest success factor for the bio-nanocomposite is having a smooth integration of organic and inorganic phases. This interattraction between the surfaces of inorganic particles and organic molecules are vital for good dispersion. In this study, a novel biodegradable antibacterial material was developed using gum arabic from Senegalia senegal (stabilizer), silica (structure reinforcer) and zero valent iron particles. Silica particles work to not only strengthen the mechanical properties of the Senegalia senegal but also prevent the accumulation of ZVI nanoparticles due to attraction between hydroxyl groups and FeO. The gum arabic/Fe-SiO2 bio-nanocomposite showed effective antibacterial property against the Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Using Scanning electron microscopy, homogeneous dispersion and uniform particle size was viewed in the biopolymer. X-ray diffraction studies of iron particles organization in Senegalia senegal also showed that the main portion of iron was crystalline and in the form of FeO and Fe0. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to evaluate the chemical composition of the surface but no appreciable peak was measured for the iron before Ar etching. These results suggest that the surface of iron nanoparticles consist mainly of a layer of iron oxides in the form of FeO. Thermal gravimetric analysis was used to determine the thermal stability and absorbed moisture content.

  1. Low-Frequency Electrical Properties of Zero Vvalent Iron-Sand Columns: Implications for Monitoring the Performance of Reactive Iron Wall Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Slater, L. D.; Wu, Y.

    2003-12-01

    The reactive iron barrier is an in-situ technology for passive remediation of chlorinated solvents and heavy metals. Redox reactions occurring on the iron surface effectively remove these contaminants from groundwater. The effectiveness of this redox reaction diminishes with time due to oxidation and precipitation occurring on the metal surface, such that the long-term performance of reactive barriers is uncertain. Non-invasive measurement methods for evaluating reactive barrier performance are thus required to support remedial strategies at reactive barrier installations. Low-frequency (0.1-1000 Hz) electrical measurements are sensitive to the electrochemistry of the metal surface-pore fluid interface. We are conducting a series of laboratory experiments to assess the sensitivity of electrical methods (induced polarization and resistivity) to changes in the physicochemical properties of the metal-fluid interface that occur over time. In this paper we present the results of baseline studies on zero-valent iron-sand columns as a function of (a) reactive iron concentration (b) saturating fluid chemistry, and (c) degree of surface oxidation. The sensitivity of low-frequency electrical parameters to total zero-valent iron (Fe0) surface area was investigated by synthesizing Fe-Ottawa sand samples with varying Fe0 concentration from 0-10 percent. The dependence on ionic strength and electrolyte activity was investigated by making measurements on samples saturated with 0.001-1.0 for NaNO3, NaCl and CaCl2 solutions. The effect of pH was evaluated at constant electrolyte activity. As a first step towards evaluating the sensitivity of electrical measurements to reduction in reactive iron performance, measurements were made over a three month period of ageing and correlated with geochemical indicators (pH, Eh, electrical conductivity, iron concentrations) of Fe surface oxidation and precipitation. We find that induced polarization (IP) parameters are highly sensitive to Fe0 surface area whereas conduction parameters measured with the resistivity method are insensitive to Fe0 concentration over the investigated range. Polarization at the iron-electrolyte interface shows a power law relationship with electrolyte activity for all solutions and is consistent with Warburg impedance theory. Power-law exponents are slightly higher than that predicted for the active ion species based on Warburg impedance theory. Polarization magnitude depends on ionic composition of the electrolyte with the magnitude following the order CaCl2: NaCl: NaNO3. Conduction parameters are insensitive to ionic composition at constant electrolyte activity. Electrolyte activity exerts a strong control on the polarization relaxation length-scale, with time constant of the relaxation decreasing with increasing electrolyte activity. Polarization parameters measured during three months of ageing are clearly correlated with time and suggest that electrical measurements are sensitive to reduction in reactive iron performance.

  2. Calculation of optimum emulsifier mixtures for phase inversion emulsification*.

    PubMed

    Förster, T; Rybinski, W V; Tesmann, H; Wadle, A

    1994-04-01

    Synopsis The phase inversion emulsification is a convenient method of preparing fine-disperse and long-term stable oil-in-water emulsions, which are stabilized with nonionic emulsifiers. On the basis of EACN-values (equivalent alkane carbon numbers) the calculation of phase inversion in concentrates (CAPICO) is possible, which yields emulsifier and oil mixing ratios corresponding to a given phase inversion temperature (PIT). The CAPICO-method is illustrated for the example of a cosmetic oil-in-water lotion containing an oil mixture, glyceryl monostearate and a fatty alcohol ethoxylate. Of special interest is the influence of silicone oils on the PIT. At a constant emulsifier oil ratio the complete phase behaviour of this emulsion system is represented in a temperature/water content graph. Optimum emulsification results are obtained if during PIT emulsification a microemulsion or a lamellar phase is passed. The emulsions were characterized by particle sizing, and emulsion stability against sedimentation was evaluated by ultrasonic velocity changes. A fine-disperse and long-term stable oil-in-water emulsion was prepared by a time and energy-saving two-step hot-cold process. PMID:19250499

  3. Studies on gum of Moringa oleifera for its emulsifying properties

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Dibya Sundar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Emulsion has been a form of presenting water insoluble substances for a long period of time. Now a day, it has been a way of presenting various intravenous additives and diagnostic agents in X-ray examinations. Various substances can be used as emulsifying agent, which can be operationally defined as a stabilizer of the droplets formed of the internal phase. Materials and Methods: Gum from Moringa oleifera was evaluated for its emulsifying properties. Castor oil emulsions 30 percent (o/w), containing 2 to 4% Moringa oleifera gum was prepared. Emulsions containing equivalent concentration of acacia were also prepared for comparison. All the emulsions prepared were stored at room temperature and studied for stability at various time intervals for 8 weeks. The prepared emulsions were evaluated for creaming rate, globule size and rate of coalescence. 23 factorial design was chosen to investigate the effects of centrifugation, pH, temperature changes and electrolytes on the creaming rate and globule size. Results: The results of the investigations show that the gum of Moringa oleifera possesses better emulsifying properties as compared to gum acacia. Conclusion: Gum of Moringa oleifera could be used in pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical preparation. PMID:24741276

  4. Nanosynthesis of Iron Based Material for Green Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkeminde, Alec W.

    In this work, nanosynthesis of multiple iron-based materials are explored to further their use in green renewable-energy applications. First, the nanosynthesis of the abundant, non-toxic semi-conductor Iron Disulfide (Iron Pyrite, Fool's Gold, FeS2) is investigated. Within these studies, it became possible to tune the shape of the FeS2 nanoparticles easily by modifying injection temperatures and iron precursors. From here, the growth mechanisms of the different shapes were elucidated by examining different time points within the synthesis. It was discovered that the FeS2 did not grow by Ostwald Ripening, but instead by Oriented Attachment. Knowing this, it was possible to not only further the shapes of FeS2 nanoparticles, but also manipulate the size and crystallinity. Focus was then shifted to creating larger micron sized FeS2 crystals. Larger crystals where achieved by a unique FeS nanowire precursor followed by sulfurization. The dominant crystal surface of these crystals could be regulated simply by the time and temperature of the sulfurization. Second, synthetic control of magnetic nanoparticles was examined. A novel synthesis of Iron Palladium (FePd) made possible by interdiffusion of iron into palladium nanocores was identified. Furthermore, a shell of Iron oxide (Fe2O3) could facilely be grown on the FePd nanoparticles, generating a FePd/Fe2O3 core/shell nanoparticle. These FePd/Fe2O3 core/shell particles provided an excellent foundation to create an L10- FePd/?-Fe exchange-coupled nanocomposite that exhibited improved magnetic properties compared to its single phase FePd counterpart. However, the stabilizing ligand used within this FePd synthesis doped into the final nanoparticles, degraded the magnetic properties. iii To overcome the dopant ligand problem, a novel nanoalloy synthetic strategy of Metal Redox was developed. The Metal Redox strategy utilized the inherent reducing power of zero-valent metal sources to create a vast sampling of metal nanoalloys without the need of ligands or excess reducing agents. Stoichiometry of these nanoalloys could be readily adjusted by temperature and explained by simple chemical equilibrium concepts. The Metal Redox methodology was then expanded to shape control and tri-metallic alloys. Finally, the unique MnBi nanoalloy system was created using Metal Redox, making it the first ever reported solution processed formation of this material.

  5. Chemical stabilization of metals in mine wastes by transformed red mud and other iron compounds: laboratory tests.

    PubMed

    Ardau, C; Lattanzi, P; Peretti, R; Zucca, A

    2014-01-01

    A series of static and kinetic laboratory-scale tests were designed in order to evaluate the efficacy of transformed red mud (TRM) from bauxite refining residues, commercial zero-valent iron, and synthetic iron (III) hydroxides as sorbents/reagents to minimize the generation of acid drainage and the release of toxic elements from multi-contaminant-laden mine wastes. In particular, in some column experiments the percolation of meteoric water through a waste pile, alternated with periods of dryness, was simulated. Wastes were placed in columns together with sorbents/reagents in three different set-ups: as blended amendment (mixing method), as a bed at the bottom of the column (filtration method), or as a combination of the two previous methods. The filtration methods, which simulate the creation of a permeable reactive barrier downstream of a waste pile, are the most effective, while the use of sorbents/reagents as amendments leads to unsatisfactory results, because of the selective removal of only some contaminants. The efficacy of the filtration method is not significantly affected by the periods of dryness, except for a temporary rise of metal contents in the leachates due to dissolution of soluble salts formed upon evaporation in the dry periods. These results offer original information on advantages/limits in the use of TRM for the treatment of multi-contaminant-laden mine wastes, and represent the starting point for experimentation at larger scale. PMID:25244134

  6. Performance Evaluation of In-Situ Iron Reactive Barriers at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Site

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D.B.

    2003-12-30

    In November 1997, a permeable iron reactive barrier trench was installed at the S-3 Ponds Pathway 2 Site located at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The overall goal of the project is to evaluate the ability of permeable reactive barrier technology to remove uranium, nitrate, and other inorganic contaminants in groundwater and to assess impacts of biogeochemical interactions on long-term performance of the treatment system. Zero-valent iron (Fe0) was used as the reactive medium, which creates a localized zone of reduction or low oxidation reduction potential (ORP), elevated pH, and dissolved H{sub 2} as Fe{sup 0} corrodes in groundwater. These conditions favor the removal of metals and radionuclides (such as uranium and technetium) through redox-driven precipitation and/or sorption to iron corrosion byproducts, such as iron oxyhydroxides. The technology is anticipated to be economical and low in maintenance as compared with conventional pump-and-treat technology. Groundwater monitoring results indicate that the iron barrier is effectively removing uranium and technetium, the primary contaminants of concern, as anticipated from our previous laboratory studies. In addition to uranium and technetium, nitrate, sulfate, bicarbonate, calcium, and magnesium are also found to be removed, either partially or completely by the iron barrier. Elevated concentrations of ferrous ions and sulfide, and pH were observed within the iron barrier. Although ferrous iron concentrations were initially very high after barrier installation, ferrous ion concentrations have decreased to low to non-detectable levels as the pH within the iron has increased over time (as high as 9 or 10). Iron and soil core samples were taken in February 1999 and May 2000 in order to evaluate the iron surface passivation, morphology, mineral precipitation and cementation, and microbial activity within and in the vicinity of the iron barrier. Results indicate that most of the iron filings collected in cores were still loose and not clogged after approximately 2.5 years of barrier installation. However, significant amounts of cemented iron filings were observed in the upgradient portion of the iron. In particular, the cementation appeared to have increased significantly over time from the 1999 to 2000 coring events in both the upgradient and downgradient portions of the iron. Minerals identified by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray (EDX), and x-ray diffraction (XRD) that have precipitated in the iron include iron sulfide, calcium carbonate (aragonite), iron oxyhydroxides (goethite, akagneite, amorphous), siderite (iron carbonate), makinawite, and green rusts. These mineral precipitants are responsible for the cementation observed within the iron barrier. Elevated microbial activity and increased diversity within and in the vicinity of the iron barrier were also observed, particularly denitrifiers and sulfate-reducers, which may have been responsible or partially responsible for the removal of nitrate and sulfate in groundwater and the formation of ferrous sulfide minerals within the iron barrier. Hydraulic gradients across the Pathway 2 site have remained relatively stable and consistent from east to west. Increases and decreases in the gradients across the site observed over the past 2.5 years appear to be primarily related to recharge during precipitation events and seasonal fluctuations. However, closer inspection of gradient fluctuations within the iron appear to indicate that cementation within the iron may be starting to impact groundwater flow through the iron. Since the spring of 1999, recharge events have had a more pronounced impact on hydraulic gradients observed between wells located upgradient, within, and downgradient of the iron. This data suggests that the connectivity of the iron and gravel in the upgradient portion of the trench to the iron and gravel in the downgradient portion of the trench may be decreasing over time due to cementation in the iron.

  7. Iron nanoparticles decoration onto three-dimensional graphene for rapid and efficient degradation of azo dye.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Cheng, Yilin; Kong, Tao; Cheng, Guosheng

    2015-12-15

    Porous three-dimensional graphene (3DG) prepared by chemical vapor deposition, was utilized as a matrix to support nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles. The strategies to manipulate the morphology, distribution and size of nZVI particles on the 3DG support were demonstrated. The immobilized nZVI particles with a size of 100nm and dense deposition were achieved. A 94.5% of orange IV azo dye was removed in 60min using nZVI particles immobilized 3DG (3DG-Fe), whereas only 70.9% was removed by free Fe nanoparticles in aqueous solution. Meanwhile, a reaction rate with orange IV of 3DG-Fe was approximately 5-fold faster than that of free Fe nanoparticles. The effects of 3DG-Fe dosage, dye concentration, reaction pH and temperature on dye degradation were also addressed. Those results imply that both lowering pH and increasing temperature led to higher reaction efficiency and rate. The kinetic data reveal that the degradation process of orange IV dye, modeled by the pseudo-first-order kinetics, might involve adsorption and redox reaction with an activation energy of 39.2kJ/mol. PMID:26091894

  8. Biochar Supported Nanoscale Iron Particles for the Efficient Removal of Methyl Orange Dye in Aqueous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shichen; Yan, Jingchun; Qian, Linbo; Chen, Mengfang

    2015-01-01

    The presence of organic contaminants in industrial effluents is an environmental concern of increasing global importance. One innovative technology for treating contaminated industrial effluents is nanoscale zero-valent iron supported on biochar (nZVI/BC). Based on Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller characterizations, the nZVI was well dispersed on the biochar and aggregation was dramatically reduced. Methyl orange (MO) served as the representative organic contaminant for verifying the effectiveness of the composite. Using decolorization efficiency as an indicator of treatment effectiveness, increasing doses of nZVI/BC yielded progressively better results with 98.51% of MO decolorized by 0.6 g/L of composite at an nZVI/BC mass ratio of 1:5. The superior decolorization efficiency of the nZVI/BC was attributed to the increase in the dispersion and reactivity of nZVI while biochar increasing the contact area with contaminant and the adsorption of composites. Additionally, the buffering function of acid-washed biochar could be in favor of maintaining the reactivity of nZVI. Furthermore, the aging nZVI/BC for 30 day was able to maintain the removal efficiency indicating that the oxidation of nZVI may be delayed in the presence of biochar. Therefore, the composite of nZVI/BC could represent an effective functional material for treating wastewater containing organic dyes in the future. PMID:26204523

  9. The preparation of magnetically guided lipid based nanoemulsions using self-emulsifying technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakandritsos, Aristides; Zboril, Radek; Bouropoulos, Nikolaos; Kallinteri, Paraskevi; Favretto, Marco E.; Parker, Terry L.; Mullertz, Anette; Fatouros, Dimitrios G.

    2010-02-01

    This paper reports an easy and highly reproducible preparation route, using self-emulsifying technology, for an orally administered high quality magnetically responsive drug delivery system. Hydrophobic iron oxide nanoparticles of about 5 nm in diameter were prepared and incorporated into the lipid core of the produced oil droplets of a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (MagC18/SNEDDS). The produced nanoemulsion exhibits colloidal stability at high ionic strengths and temperatures. The observed value of the saturation magnetization at 2 K is ?4.1 emu g-1. The nanoemulsion displayed the magnetic properties of a non-interacting assembly of superparamagnetic particles and a low blocking temperature. Moreover the effect of MagC18/SNEDDS on biological systems in vitro was investigated in rodent fibroblasts (3T3 cells). The cytotoxicity studies show that none of the formulations tested affected cell activity significantly over the 24 h incubation. Such systems might have a potential use for oral delivery of poorly soluble compounds by extending the residence time of the formulation in the small intestine resulting in increased drug absorption values.

  10. Emulsifiers and thickeners on extrusion-cooked instant rice product.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin Peng; An, Hong Zhou; Jin, Zheng Yu; Xie, Zheng Jun; Zhuang, Hai Ning; Kim, Jin Moon

    2013-08-01

    Extrusion-cooked instant rice was prepared by optimizing the formulation with emulsifiers, glycerol monostearate (GMS), soybean lecithin (LC), and sodiumstearoyl lactylate (SSL), and thickeners, gum Arabic (GA), sodium alginate (SA), and sticky rice (SR). The emulsifiers addition caused increase of degree of gelatinization (DG), and decrease of water soluble carbohydrate (WSC), ?-amylase sensitivity, water soluble index (WAI) and adhesive for extrudates, while the thickeners addition increased extrudates DG, bulk density (BD), WSC, ?-amylase sensitivity, WAI, hydration rate (HR) and adhesiveness. Based on the data generated by a single additive at various levels, optimum formulation was obtained employing orthogonal matrix system with combination of the selected additives for extrusion cooking. Extrudates were evaluated for optimum hydration time followed by drying to prepare the finished product. Texture profile analysis and sensory evaluation indicate that quality of the finished product is equivalent to that of the round shaped rice and superior to a commercial instant rice product. This study also demonstrates possibility of value-added and versatile instant rice product development using broken rice. PMID:24425967

  11. Environmental application of millimeter-scale sponge iron (s-Fe(0)) particles (II): the effect of surface copper.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yongming; Liu, Xiaowen; Liu, Runlong; Li, Guohua; Wang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yanyan; Wei, Dongyang; Fang, Jiande; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2015-04-28

    To enhance the catalytic reactivity of millimeter-scale particles of sponge iron (s-Fe(0)), Cu(2+) ions were deposited on the surface of s-Fe(0) using a simple direct reduction reaction, and the catalytic properties of the bimetallic system was tested for removal of rhodamine B (RhB) from an aqueous solution. The influence of Cu(0) loading, catalyst dosage, particle size, initial RhB concentration, and initial pH were investigated, and the recyclability of the catalyst was also assessed. The results demonstrate that the 3?5 millimeter s-Fe(0) particles (s-Fe(0)(3?5mm)) with 5wt% Cu loading gave the best results. The removal of RhB followed two-step, pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics. Cu(0)-s-Fe(0) showed excellent stability after five reuse cycles. Cu(0)-s-Fe(0) possesses great advantages compared to nanoscale zero-valent iron, iron power, and iron flakes as well as its bimetals. The surface Cu(0) apparently catalyzes the production of reactive hydrogen atoms for indirect reaction and generates Fe-Cu galvanic cells that enhance electron transfer for direct reaction. This bimetallic catalyst shows great potential for the pre-treatment of recalcitrant wastewaters. Additionally, some oxides containing iron element are selected to simulate the adsorption process. The results prove that the adsorption process of FeOOH, Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 played minor role for the removal of RhB. PMID:25668301

  12. Heterobimetallic Complexes That Bond Vanadium to Iron, Cobalt, and Nickel.

    PubMed

    Clouston, Laura J; Bernales, Varinia; Cammarota, Ryan C; Carlson, Rebecca K; Bill, Eckhard; Gagliardi, Laura; Lu, Connie C

    2015-12-21

    Zero-valent iron, cobalt, and nickel were installed into the metalloligand V[N(o-(NCH2P((i)Pr)2)C6H4)3] (1, VL), generating the heterobimetallic trio FeVL (2), CoVL (3), and NiVL (4), respectively. In addition, the one-electron-oxidized analogues [FeVL]X ([2(ox)]X, where X(-) = BPh4 or PF6) and [CoVL]BPh4 ([3(ox)]BPh4) were prepared. The complexes were characterized by a host of physical methods, including cyclic voltammetry, X-ray crystallography, magnetic susceptibility, electronic absorption, NMR, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and Mössbauer spectroscopies. The CoV and FeV heterobimetallic compounds have short M-V bond lengths that are consistent with M-M multiple bonding. As revealed by theoretical calculations, the M-V bond is triple in 2, 2(ox), and 3(ox), double in 3, and dative (Ni ? V) in 4. The (d-d)(10) species, 2 and 3(ox), are diamagnetic and exhibit large diamagnetic anisotropies of -4700 × 10(-36) m(3)/molecule. Complexes 2 and 3(ox) are also characterized by intense visible bands at 760 and 610 nm (? > 1000 M(-1) cm(-1)), respectively, which correspond to an intermetal (M ? V) charge-transfer transition. Magnetic susceptibility measurements and EPR characterization establish S = (1)/2 ground states for (d-d)(9) 2(ox) and (d-d)(11) 3, while (d-d)(12) 4 is S = 1 based on Evans' method. PMID:26636345

  13. Advances in the generation of a new emulsified fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chávez, A.; Ramírez, M.; Medina, E.; Bolado, R.; Mora, J.

    2011-08-01

    The development of a new emulsified fuel is described, from the conceptual idea to the semi-industrial tests of the final product. The starting point was the necessity to lower the particulate matter (PM) emissions produced by the combustion of more than 200 MBD of heavy fuel oil (HFO) used for electric power conversion. The major component of HFO is a vacuum residue of the oil refining process mixed with light cycle oils to make it pumpable. An alternative to handle and burn the high viscosity residue (solid at room temperature) is by converting it in an oil-in-water emulsion. The best emulsions resulted of 70% residue in 30% water, Sauter Mean Diameter of 10-20 ?m and a stability of more than 90 days. Spray burning tests of the emulsion against HFO in a semi-industrial 500 kW furnace showed a reduction in PM emissions of 24-36%.

  14. Efficiency of the EPS emulsifier produced by Ochrobactrum anthropi in different hydrocarbon bioremediation assays.

    PubMed

    Calvo, C; Silva-Castro, G A; Uad, I; García Fandiño, C; Laguna, J; González-López, J

    2008-11-01

    Ochrobactrum anthropi strain AD2 was isolated from the waste water treatment plant of an oil refinery and was identified by analysis of the sequence of the gene encoding 16S rDNA. This bacterium produced exopolysaccharides in glucose nutrient broth media supplemented with various hydrocarbons (n-octane, mineral light and heavy oils and crude oils). The exopolysaccharide AD2 (EPS emulsifier) synthesized showed a wide range of emulsifying activity but none of them had surfactant activity. Yield production varied from 0.47 to 0.94 g of EPS l(-1) depending on the hydrocarbon added. In the same way, chemical composition and emulsification activity of EPS emulsifier varied with the culture conditions. Efficiency of the EPS emulsifier as biostimulating agent was assayed in soil microcosms and experimental biopiles. The AD2 biopolymer was added alone or combined with commercial products frequently used in oil bioremediation such as inorganic NPK fertilizer and oleophilic fertilizer (S200 C). Also, its efficiency was tested in mixture with activated sludge from an oil refinery. In soil microcosms supplemented with S200 C+EPS emulsifier as combined treatment, indigenous microbial populations as well as hydrocarbon degradation was enhanced when compared with microcosms treated with NPK fertilizer or EPS emulsifier alone. In the same way EPS emulsifier stimulated the bioremediation effect of S200 C product, increasing the number of bacteria and decreasing the amount of hydrocarbon remained. Finally, similar effects were obtained in biopile assays amended with EPS emulsifier plus activated sludge. Our results suggest that the bioemulsifier EPS emulsifier has interesting properties for its application in environment polluted with oil hydrocarbon compounds and may be useful for bioremediation purposes. PMID:18784947

  15. Laboratory comparison of four iron-based filter materials for drainage water phosphate treatment.

    PubMed

    Allred, Barry J; Racharaks, Ratanachat

    2014-09-01

    A laboratory investigation evaluated phosphate (PO4(3-)) drainage water treatment capabilities of four iron-based filter materials. The iron-based filter materials tested were zero-valent iron (ZVI), porous iron composite (PIC), sulfur modified iron (SMI), and iron oxide/ hydroxide (IOH). Only filter material retained on a 60-mesh sieve (> 0.25 mm) was used for evaluation. The laboratory investigation included saturated falling-head hydraulic conductivity tests, contaminant removal or desorption/dissolution batch tests, and low-to-high flow rate saturated solute transport column tests. Each of the four iron-based filter materials have sufficient water flow capacity as indicated by saturated hydraulic conductivity values that in most cases were greater than 1 x 10(-2) cm/s. For the 1, 10, and 100 ppm PO4(3-)-P contaminant removal batch tests, each of the four iron-based filter materials removed at least 95% of the PO4(3-)-P originally present. However, for the 1000 ppm PO4(3-)-P contaminant removal batch tests, IOH by far exhibited the greatest removal effectiveness (99% PO4(3-)-P removal), followed by SMI (72% PO4(3-)-P removal), then ZVI (62% PO4(3-)-P removal), and finally PIC (15% PO4(3-)-P removal). The desorption/dissolution batch test results, especially with respect to SMI and IOH, indicate that once PO4(3-) is adsorbed/precipitated onto surfaces of iron-based filter material particles, this PO4(3-) becomes fixed and is then not readily desorbed/dissolved back into solution. The results from the column tests showed that regardless of low or high flow rate (contact time ranged from a few hours to a few minutes) and PO4(3-) concentration (1 ppm or 10 ppm PO4(3-)-P), PIC, SMI, and IOH reduced PO4(3-)-P concentrations to below detection limits, while ZVI removed at least 90% of the influent PO4(3-)-P. Consequently, these laboratory results indicate that the ZVI, PIC, SMI, and IOH filter materials all exhibit promise for phosphate drainage water treatment. PMID:25327026

  16. Iron Test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... detect and help diagnose iron deficiency or iron overload. In people with anemia , these tests can help ... also be ordered when iron deficiency or iron overload is suspected. Early iron deficiency often goes unnoticed. ...

  17. Nanoscale and Microscale Iron Emulsions for Treating DNAPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiger, Cherie L.

    2002-01-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using emulsified nanoscale and microscale iron particles to enhance dehalogenation of (Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid) DNAPL free-phase. The emulsified system consisted of a surfactant-stabilized, biodegradable oil-in-water emulsion with nanoscale or microscale iron particles contained within the emulsion droplets. It was demonstrated that DNAPLs, such as trichloroethene (TCE), diffuse through the oil membrane of the emulsion particle whereupon they reach an aqueous interior and the surface of an iron particle where dehalogenation takes place. The hydrocarbon reaction by-products of the dehalogenation reaction, primarily ethene (no chlorinated products detected), diffuse out of the emulsion droplet. This study also demonstrated that an iron-emulsion system could be delivered in-situ to the DNAPL pool in a soil matrix by using a simulated push well technique. Iron emulsions degraded pure TCE at a rate comparable to the degradation of dissolved phase TCE by iron particles, while pure iron had a very low degradation rate for free-phase TCE. The iron-emulsion systems can be injected into a sand matrix where they become immobilized and are not moved by flowing water. It has been documented that surfactant micelles possess the ability to pull pooled TCE into emulsion droplets where degradation of TCE takes place.

  18. Relationship between the chemical components of taro rhizome mucilage and its emulsifying property.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Luan Alberto; Nunes, Cleiton Antônio; Pereira, Joelma

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the chemical composition of taro mucilage (TM) and explain its emulsification properties using different commercial emulsifiers and gums as benchmarks. The following analyses were performed: moisture, ether extract, protein, fiber, ash, sugar fraction, starch content, infrared spectroscopy and determination of monosaccharides and amino acids using HPLC. The analyses showed that TM has a high carbohydrate content and small protein fraction, similar to commercial gums. Commercial emulsifiers have a high content of lipids compared to TM. Therefore, it can be concluded that the emulsifying power of the studied mucilage is primarily caused by the protein content along with weakly polar amino acids, which occur in gums. The methyl group (CH3), which was observed in the infrared spectrum, and the lipid content may also contribute to the emulsifying activity by providing a hydrophobic moiety. PMID:25704720

  19. Effects of Vegetable Oil Type and Lipophilic Emulsifiers on the Induction Period of Fat Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Yayoi; Ogawa, Takenobu; Nakagawa, Kyuya; Adachi, Shuji

    2015-11-01

    The induction period of crystallization, which is defined as the time required for oil to start to crystallize, is useful indicator of the freeze-thaw stability of food emulsions such as mayonnaise. We investigated the induction period of vegetable oils with low melting points, such as rapeseed and soybean oils, which are commonly employed for mayonnaise production. The induction period was measured by monitoring the temperature of a specimen during storage at low temperature. The induction period depended on the type of oil and lipophilic emulsifier, emulsifier concentration, and storage temperature. The effect of the oil type on the induction period depended on the composition of the oil. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analyses of the lipophilic emulsifiers suggested that the melting trend of the emulsifier is strongly related to the induction period. PMID:26468233

  20. Effect of homogenization pressure, lipid content, and emulsifier content on the rheological properties of yogurt 

    E-print Network

    Jaar Sansur, Patricia Mary

    1998-01-01

    The interaction of high pressure homogenization lipid hics. content, and surfactant on the rheological properties of yogurt were evaluated. NFDM, cream, and a nontoxic emulsifier (Tween 20) were combined to obtain samples with of 0% and 2% fat...

  1. Changes in Ground-Water Quality near Two Granular-Iron Permeable Reactive Barriers in a Sand and Gravel Aquifer, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 1997-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savoie, Jennifer G.; Kent, Douglas B.; Smith, Richard L.; LeBlanc, Denis R.; Hubble, David W.

    2004-01-01

    Two experimental permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) of granular zero-valent iron were emplaced in the path of a tetrachloroethene plume (the Chemical Spill-10 plume) at the Massachusetts Military Reservation, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, in June 1998. The goal of the field experiment was to achieve emplacement of a granular-iron PRB deeper than attempted before. The PRBs were expected to create a reducing environment and degrade the tetrachloroethene by reductive dechlorination. The goal of the work presented in this report was to observe temporary and sustained changes to the ground-water chemistry downgradient from the PRBs. A hydraulic-fracturing method involving injection of the granular iron with a guar-biopolymer and enzyme slurry was used to install the parallel 30- to 33-foot-wide wall-shaped barriers at a depth of 82 to 113 feet below land surface. An acetic acid and enzyme mixture was subsequently injected in wells near the barriers to degrade the guar biopolymer. Prior to the emplacement, tetrachloroethene concentrations in the Chemical Spill-10 plume at the study area were as high as 250 micrograms per liter. Other water properties in the plume generally were similar to the properties of uncontaminated ground water in the area, which typically has dissolved oxygen concentrations of 250 to 375 micromoles per liter, pH of 5.5 to 6.0, and specific conductance of 60 to 90 microsiemens per centimeter. Water-quality samples were collected periodically from monitoring wells near the PRBs to determine how the emplacement of the granular-iron walls altered the ground-water quality. In addition, an automated well-sampling device measured temperature, specific conductance, pH, and dissolved oxygen every 1?4 days for 16 months in a well downgradient from the two parallel PRBs. Temporary increases (lasting about 5 to 6 months) in specific conductance were observed downgradient from the PRBs as a result of the sodium chloride, potassium carbonate, and other salts included in the slurry and the acetic acid and enzyme mixture that was subsequently injected to degrade the guar biopolymer. Temporary increases in the concentrations of major cations (sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium) were observed downgradient from the PRBs, as were temporary but substantial increases in the dissolved and total organic carbon concentrations. Methane was detected, sulfate concentrations decreased temporarily, and concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon increased in samples from wells downgradient from the PRBs. A sustained (longer than 12 months) reducing environment, in which dissolved oxygen concentrations decreased to zero, the pH increased to about 6.8, and dissolved iron concentrations increased substantially, developed as a result of the oxidation (corrosion) of the granular iron; this zone persisted at least 65 feet downgradient from the PRBs. The pH and dissolved iron concentrations increased with distance from the granular-iron walls. Concentrations of arsenic, cobalt, manganese, and phosphorus increased, and nitrate concentrations were reduced to below the detection limit downgradient from the walls. A sustained decrease of tetrachloroethene concentrations was not observed; however, reductive dechlorination products were observed at wells downgradient from the PRBs during several rounds of sampling. The emplacement of zero-valent iron in the aquifer to remove tetrachloroethene from the ground water caused changes in the water chemistry that persisted farther downgradient from the PRBs than has been observed at other sites because of the low chemical reactivity of the quartz-dominated aquifer sediments and the low ambient dissolved chemical concentrations in the ground water. The small transverse dispersion in the aquifer and the probable long-term persistence of the iron indicate that the chemically altered zone probably will extend a substantial distance downgradient from the PRBs for a substantial period of time (years); fur

  2. Rapid determination of cholesterol in milk containing emulsified foods.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jang-Hyuk; Jeong, In-Seek; Kwak, Byung-Man; Leem, Donggil; Yoon, Taehyung; Yoon, Changyong; Jeong, Jayoung; Park, Jung-Min; Kim, Jin-Man

    2012-12-15

    In this study, a rapid and easy sample preparation method that involved no-heating saponification and dSPE (dispersive solid phase extraction) clean-up was developed to determine the level of cholesterol in milk containing emulsified foods (infant formula, baby food, cheese). The developed method utilised high performance liquid chromatography with an ultraviolet detector (HPLC-UVD) as a separation instrument. The optimum extraction conditions were determined as 10 mL isopropyl alcohol with 8.0 g (NH(4))(2)SO(4) per 1g sample, and saponification was achieved using 25mg KOH, 1.6g NaCl and 100mg of a silica based NH(2). Cholesterol levels determined using CRMs (NIST SRM 1849 and 1544) were in the range of the certificated value and the recovery test using spiked materials ranged from 94.34% to 102.34% with a RSD of 0.63-4.10%. This method enables the accurate determination of cholesterol with reduced sample preparation time. PMID:22980821

  3. Changes in secondary structure of gluten proteins due to emulsifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Analía V.; Ferrer, Evelina G.; Añón, María C.; Puppo, María C.

    2013-02-01

    Changes in the secondary structure of gluten proteins due to emulsifiers were analyzed by Raman Spectroscopy. The protein folding induced by 0.25% SSL (Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate) (GS0.25, Gluten + 0.25% SSL) included an increase in ?-helix conformation and a decrease in ?-sheet, turns and random coil. The same behavior, although in a less degree, was observed for 0.5% gluten-DATEM (Diacetyl Tartaric Acid Esters of Monoglycerides) system. The low burial of Tryptophan residues to a more hydrophobic environment and the low percentage area of the C-H stretching band for GS0.25 (Gluten + 0.25% SSL), could be related to the increased in ?-helix conformation. This behavior was also confirmed by changes in stretching vibrational modes of disulfide bridges (S-S) and the low exposure of Tyrosine residues. High levels of SSL (0.5% and 1.0%) and DATEM (1.0%) led to more disordered protein structures, with different gluten networks. SSL (1.0%) formed a more disordered and opened gluten matrix than DATEM, the last one being laminar and homogeneous.

  4. Diesel cogeneration plant using oxygen enriched air and emulsified fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Marciniak, T.J.; Cole, R.L.; Sekar, R.R.; Stodolsky, F. ); Eustis, J.N. )

    1990-01-01

    The investigation of oxygen-enriched combustion of alternative fuels in diesel engines at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is based on information gathered from two previous Department of Energy programs. The first was the slow-speed diesel engine program which used fuels such as coal-water slurry and coal derived liquid fuels in a slow speed diesel engine. The second was the development of membrane oxygen separation equipment. The results of these programs indicated that using the new membrane oxygen enrichment technology with medium- and high-speed diesel engines would do two things. First, oxygen enrichment could reduce some emissions from stationary diesel engines, particularly smoke, particulates and hydrocarbons while significantly increasing power output. The second, was that it might be possible to use less expensive liquid fuels such as No. 4, No. 6 and residual oil emulsified with water in medium- to high-speed diesel engines. The water would (1) help to eliminate the undesirable increase in nitrogen oxide production when enriched oxygen is used, and (2) by reducing the viscosity of the heavier liquid fuels, make them easier to use in smaller industrial cogeneration applications. This program consists of four steps: preliminary feasibility study, exploratory experiments, system development, and demonstration and commercialization of an industrial cogeneration system. 3 refs., 13 figs.

  5. Modeling the injection of non-Newtonian shear-thinning dispersions of iron particles in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    sethi, R.; Tosco, T.; Gastone, F.

    2013-12-01

    In the context of groundwater remediation, an increasing interest has been devoted to the use of nanoscale and microscale zero-valent iron particles (NZVI and MZVI, respectively). MZVI and NZVI are not stable when dispersed in water, due to the occurrence of fast aggregation and sedimentation. Consequently, the use of shear thinning solutions of green biopolymers has been recently studied as kinetic stabilizers and viscous carrier for the delivery of MZVI and NZVI in the subsurface. Shear thinning fluids exhibit high viscosity in static conditions, improving the colloidal stability, and lower viscosity at high flow rates enabling the injection at limited pressures. In this work, co-funded by European Union project AQUAREHAB (FP7 - Grant Agreement Nr. 226565), a modeling approach is described, and implemented in E-MNM1D software (www.polito.it/groundwater/software), to simulate the transport in porous media of nanoscale iron slurries. Colloid transport mechanisms are controlled by particle-collector and particle-particle interactions, usually modeled using a non equilibrium kinetic model accounting for deposition and release processes. The key aspects included in the E-MNM1D are clogging phenomena (i.e. reduction of porosity and permeability due to particles deposition), and the rheological properties of the carrier fluid (in this project, guar gum solution). The influence of colloid transport on porosity, permeability, and fluid viscosity is explicitly lumped into the model and the shear-thinning nature of the iron slurries is described by a modified Darcy law generalized for non Newtonian fluids. Since during the injection in wells the velocity field is not constant over the distance, E-MNM1D was modified in order to account for variable colloidal transport coefficients, thus allowing the estimation of the radius of influence during a full scale intervention.

  6. Safe, in situ methodologies for the destruction of triacetone triperoxide and other explosive peroxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clausen, III, Christian (Inventor); Geiger, Cherie L. (Inventor); Sigman, Michael (Inventor); Fidler, Rebecca (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and other explosives of the peroxide family are safely degraded in situ. Nano and micron size metal particles in an elemental state include pure iron and magnesium or iron and magnesium particles that are mechanically alloyed with palladium and nickel. The metal particles are used in both the elemental state and in emulsions that are made from water, a hydrophobic solvent, such as corn oil, and a food-grade nonionic surfactant. The neat metals and emulsified zero valent metals (EZVM) safely degrade TATP with the major degradation product being acetone. The EZVM system absorbs and dissolves the TATP into the emulsion droplets where TATP degradation occurs. EZVM systems are ideal for degrading dry TATP crystals that may be present on a carpet or door entrance. Both the neat metal system and the emulsion system (EZVM) degrade TATP in an aqueous slurry.

  7. Iron Sulfide as a Sustainable Reactive Material for Permeable Reactive Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, A. D.; Demond, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) are gaining acceptance for groundwater remediation, as they operate in situ and do not require continuous energy input. The majority of PRBs use zero-valent iron (ZVI). However, some ZVI PRBs have hydraulically failed [1,2], due to the fact that ZVI may reduce not only contaminants but also water and non-contaminant solutes. These reactions may form precipitates or gas phases that reduce permeability. Therefore, there is a need to assess the hydraulic suitability of possible alternatives, such as iron sulfide (FeS). The capability of FeS to remove both metals and halogenated organics from aqueous systems has been demonstrated previously [3,4], and FeS formed in situ within a ZVI PRB has been linked to contaminant removal [5]. These results suggest possible applications in groundwater remediation as a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) material. However, the propensity of FeS for permeability loss, due to solids and gas production, must be evaluated in order to address its suitability for PRBs. The reduction in permeability for FeS-coated sands under the anoxic conditions often encountered at contaminated groundwater sites was examined through column experiments and geochemical modeling under conditions of high calcium and nitrate, which have been previously shown to cause significant permeability reduction in zero-valent iron (ZVI) systems [6]. The column experiments showed negligible production of both solids and gases. The geochemical model was used to estimate solid and gas volumes generated under conditions of varying FeS concentration. Then, the Kozeny-Carman equation and a power-law relationship was used to predict permeability reduction, with a maximum reduction in permeability of 1% due to solids and about 30% due to gas formation under conditions for which a complete loss of permeability was predicted for ZVI systems. This difference in permeability reduction is driven by the differences in thermodynamic stability of ZVI and FeS in aqueous solutions. The results suggest that geochemical conditions that result in high permeability losses for ZVI systems will necessarily not be problematic, from a permeability perspective, for FeS-based reactive materials. Therefore, this research represents an important advance for sustainable groundwater remediation. References: [1] Mushovic, P., Bartlett, T. R., Morrison, S. (2006) Tech. News & Trends 23, 1-3. [2] Kiilerich, O., Larsen, J. W., Nielsen, C., Deigaard, L. D. (2000) In: Wickramanayake, G.B., et al. (Eds.), Chemical Oxidation and Reactive Barriers: Remediation of Chlorinated and Recalcitrant Compounds, Battelle Press, Columbus, OH, 377-384. [3] Han, Y., Gallegos, T. J., Demond, A. H., Hayes, K. F. (2011) Water Res. 45(2), 593-604. [4] Jeong, H. Y. and Hayes, K. F. (2007) Environ. Sci. Technol. 41(18), 6390-6396. [5] Beak, D. G. and Wilkin, R. T. (2009) J. Contam. Hydrol. 106(1-2), 15-28. [6] Henderson, A. D. and Demond, A. H. (2007) Environ. Eng. Sci. 24(4), 401-423.

  8. Perchlorate reduction using electrochemically induced pitting corrosion of zero-valent titanium 

    E-print Network

    Lee, Chun Woo

    2009-05-15

    were developed based surface coverage of aggressive anions on bare Ti(0) and Ti(II) oxidation by chlorine. These kinetic models supported the perchlorate concentration change in the solution, but Ti(II) consumption model was not able to predict chloride...

  9. Effect of a single dose of emulsified versus capsular fish oils on plasma phospholipid fatty acids over 48 hours

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emulsified fish oil supplements provide an alternative to encapsulated fish oils. Oil-in-water emulsions may offer an advantage in digestion and absorption thereby increasing the bioavailability of fatty acids. We evaluated the effect of three oil-in-water emulsified fish oils (Emulsion B, Emulsion ...

  10. Simultaneous adsorption and reduction of U(VI) on reduced graphene oxide-supported nanoscale zerovalent iron.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yubing; Ding, Congcong; Cheng, Wencai; Wang, Xiangke

    2014-09-15

    The reduced graphene oxide-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI/rGO) composites were synthesized by chemical deposition method and were characterized by SEM, high resolution TEM, Raman and potentiometric acid-base titrations. The characteristic results showed that the nZVI nanoparticles can be uniformly dispersed on the surface of rGO. The removal of U(VI) on nZVI/rGO composites as a function of contact time, pH and U(VI) initial concentration was investigated by batch technique. The removal kinetics of U(VI) on nZVI and nZVI/rGO were well simulated by a pseudo-first-order kinetic model and pseudo-second-order kinetic model, respectively. The presence of rGO on nZVI nanoparticles increased the reaction rate and removal capacity of U(VI) significantly, which was attributed to the chemisorbed OH(-) groups of rGO and the massive enrichment of Fe(2+) on rGO surface by XPS analysis. The XRD analysis revealed that the presence of rGO retarded the transformation of iron corrosion products from magnetite/maghemite to lepidocrocite. According to the fitting of EXAFS spectra, the UC (at ?2.9?) and UFe (at ?3.2?) shells were observed, indicating the formation of inner-sphere surface complexes on nZVI/rGO composites. Therefore, the nZVI/rGO composites can be suitable as efficient materials for the in-situ remediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater in the environmental pollution management. PMID:25194557

  11. The influence of humic acid and clay content on the transport of polymer-coated iron nanoparticles through sand.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bahngmi; O'Carroll, Denis; Sleep, Brent

    2014-10-15

    The introduction of nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) into the subsurface has recently received significant attention as a potentially effective method for remediation of source zones of chlorinated solvents present as dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPL). One of the challenges in the deployment of nZVI is to achieve good subsurface nZVI mobility to permit delivery of the nZVI to the target treatment zone. Stabilization of nZVI with various polymers has shown promise for enhancing nZVI subsurface mobility, but the impact of subsurface conditions on nZVI mobility has not been fully explored. In this study, the effect of humic acid and kaolinite on the transport of polymer-stabilized nZVI (carboxylmethyl cellulose-surface modified nZVI, CMC90K-RNIP) in sand was investigated using column experiments. In addition, effects of electrolytes on the stability of CMC90K-RNIP in the presence of humic acid, and the stability of humic acid-coated reactive nanoscale iron particles (HA-RNIP) at various humic acid concentrations were investigated. Humic acid enhanced the mobility of bare RNIP, whereas the transport of CMC90K-RNIP was not significantly affected by humic acid injected as a background solution, except at the highest concentration of 500mg/L. At lower pore water velocity, the effect of humic acid on the transport of CMC90K-RNIP was greater than that at high water velocity. Adding kaolinite up to 2% by weight to the sand column reduced the retention of CMC90K-RNIP, but further increases in kaolinite content (to 5%) did not significantly affect nZVI retention. The impact of kaolinite on nZVI retention was more pronounced at lower pore water velocities. PMID:25079234

  12. Improving halva quality with dietary fibres of sesame seed coats and date pulp, enriched with emulsifier.

    PubMed

    Elleuch, Mohamed; Bedigian, Dorothea; Maazoun, Bouthaina; Besbes, Souhail; Blecker, Christophe; Attia, Hamadi

    2014-02-15

    Supplementation of halva with waste products of manufacturing, for example defatted sesame seed coats (testae) and date fibre concentrate, can improve its nutritional and organoleptic qualities. These constituents provide high fibre content and technological potential for retaining water and fat. Standard halva supplemented with date fibre concentrate, defatted sesame testae and emulsifier was evaluated for oil separation, texture and colour changes, sensory qualities and acceptability to a taste panel. Addition of both fibres with an emulsifier, improved emulsion stability and increased the hardness of halva significantly. The functional properties of sesame testae and date fibres promote nutrition and health, supplying polyphenol antioxidants and laxative benefits. PMID:24128542

  13. Application of emulsifiers/stabilizers in dairy products of high rheology.

    PubMed

    Lal, Shane N D; O'Connor, Charmian J; Eyres, Laurence

    2006-11-16

    The role played by low molecular weight emulsifiers (mono- and di-glycerides) and non-dairy stabilizers (alginates, carrageenans, gums and gelatins) in the formation and stabilization of liquid milk (and specifically a functionalized milk containing omega-3), yoghurt and ice cream has been reviewed. Attention is given to the interactions that may occur between the reactive sites on polysaccharide stabilizers and milk proteins and other milk components, and to the desirable characteristics, e.g., viscosity/consistency, appearance and mouthfeel, body and texture, imparted to yoghurt and ice cream by addition of emulsifiers and gums. PMID:16806031

  14. The effect of engineered iron nanoparticles on growth and metabolic status of marine microalgae cultures.

    PubMed

    Kadar, Eniko; Rooks, Paul; Lakey, Cara; White, Daniel A

    2012-11-15

    Synthetic zero-valent nano-iron (nZVI) compounds are finding numerous applications in environmental remediation owing to their high chemical reactivity and versatile catalytic properties. Studies were carried out to assess the effects of three types of industrially relevant engineered nZVI on phytoplankton growth, cellular micromorphology and metabolic status. Three marine microalgae (Pavlova lutheri, Isochrysis galbana and Tetraselmis suecica) were grown on culture medium fortified with the nano-Fe compounds for 23 days and subsequent alterations in their growth rate, size distribution, lipid profiles and cellular ultrastructure were assessed. The added nano Fe concentrations were either equimolar with the EDTA-Fe conventionally added to the generic f/2 medium (i.e. 1.17 × 10(-5)M), or factor 10 lower and higher, respectively. We provide evidence for the: (1) broad size distribution of nZVI particles when added to the nutrient rich f/2 media with the higher relative percentage of the smallest particles with the coated forms; (2) normal algal growth in the presence of all three types of nZVIs with standard growth rates, cellular morphology and lipid content comparable or improved when compared to algae grown on f/2 with EDTA-Fe; (3) sustained algal growth and normal physiology at nZVI levels 10 fold below that in f/2, indicating preference to nanoparticles over EDTA-Fe; (4) increased total cellular lipid content in T. suecica grown on media enriched with uncoated nZVI25, and in P. lutheri with inorganically coated nZVI(powder), when compared at equimolar exposures; (5) significant change in fatty acid composition complementing the nZVI(powder)-mediated increase in lipid content of P. lutheri; (6) a putative NP uptake mechanism is proposed for I. galbana via secretion of an extracellular matrix that binds nZVIs which then become bioavailable via phagocytotic membrane processes. PMID:23059967

  15. Inhibition of sulfate reducing bacteria in aquifer sediment by iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Naresh; Omoregie, Enoma O; Rose, Jerome; Masion, Armand; Lloyd, Jonathan R; Diels, Ludo; Bastiaens, Leen

    2014-03-15

    Batch microcosms were setup to determine the impact of different sized zero valent iron (Fe(0)) particles on microbial sulfate reduction during the in situ bio-precipitation of metals. The microcosms were constructed with aquifer sediment and groundwater from a low pH (3.1), heavy-metal contaminated aquifer. Nano (nFe(0)), micro (mFe(0)) and granular (gFe(0)) sized Fe(0) particles were added to separate microcosms. Additionally, selected microcosms were also amended with glycerol as a C-source for sulfate-reducing bacteria. In addition to metal removal, Fe(0) in microcosms also raised the pH from 3.1 to 6.5, and decreased the oxidation redox potential from initial values of 249 to -226 mV, providing more favorable conditions for microbial sulfate reduction. mFe(0) and gFe(0) in combination with glycerol were found to enhance microbial sulfate reduction. However, no sulfate reduction occurred in the controls without Fe(0) or in the microcosm amended with nFe(0). A separate dose test confirmed the inhibition for sulfate reduction in presence of nFe(0). Hydrogen produced by Fe(0) was not capable of supporting microbial sulfate reduction as a lone electron donor in this study. Microbial analysis revealed that the addition of Fe(0) and glycerol shifted the microbial community towards Desulfosporosinus sp. from a population initially dominated by low pH and metal-resisting Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. PMID:24388832

  16. Forming a lutein nanodispersion via solvent displacement method: The effects of processing parameters and emulsifiers with different stabilizing mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tai Boon; Yussof, Nor Shariffa; Abas, Faridah; Mirhosseini, Hamed; Nehdi, Imededdine Arbi; Tan, Chin Ping

    2016-03-01

    A solvent displacement method was used to prepare lutein nanodispersions. The effects of processing parameters (addition method, addition rate, stirring time and stirring speed) and emulsifiers with different stabilizing mechanisms (steric, electrostatic, electrosteric and combined electrostatic-steric) on the particle size and particle size distribution (PSD) of the nanodispersions were investigated. Among the processing parameters, only the addition method and stirring time had significant effects (p<0.05) on the particle size and PSD. For steric emulsifiers, Tween 20, 40, 60 and 80 were used to produce nanodispersions successfully with particle sizes below 100nm. Tween 80 (steric) was then chosen for further comparison against sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) (electrostatic), sodium caseinate (electrosteric) and SDS-Tween 80 (combined electrostatic-steric) emulsifiers. At the lowest emulsifier concentration of 0.1%, all the emulsifiers invariably produced stable nanodispersions with small particle sizes (72.88-142.85nm) and narrow PSDs (polydispersity index<0.40). PMID:26471574

  17. Pilot-Scale Demonstration of hZVI Process for Treating Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater at Plant Wansley, Carrollton, GA 

    E-print Network

    Peddi, Phani 1987-

    2011-12-06

    The hybrid Zero Valent Iron (hZVI) process is a novel chemical treatment platform that has shown great potential in our previous bench-scale tests for removing selenium, mercury and other pollutants from Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) wastewater...

  18. Improved Pd-on-Au bimetallic nanoparticle catalysts for aqueous-phase trichloroethene hydrodechlorination

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    effects. Immobilization of the NPs on alumina, magnesia, and silica supports yielded active oxide involves the reactive remediation using zero-valent iron nanoparticles as a reagent shown by Zhang and co

  19. Molecular characteristics of corn fiber gum and their influence on its emulsifying properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular characteristics of two purified arabinoxylan fractions derived from corn kernels, corn fiber gum-1 and 2 (CFG-1 and 2), have been studied and correlated with their emulsifying properties. CFG-1 and 2 fractions were isolated from different corn fiber sources by (a) a sequential alkali...

  20. An Experimental Investigation of Microexplosion in Emulsified Vegetable-Methanol Blend 

    E-print Network

    Nam, Hyungseok

    2012-07-16

    in emulsions causes a high probability of microexplosion event due to the sudden expansion of the emulsified fluid. Also, the effect of size on microexplosion was evident in the greater probability of explosion. Methanol-in-canola oil emulsion with 15...

  1. HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF AN EMULSIFIED HEAVY FUEL OIL IN A FIRETUBE BOILER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of measuring emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from the combustion flue gases of a No. 6 fuel oil, both with and without an emulsifying agent, in a 2.5 million Btu/hr (732 kW) firetube boiler with the purpose of determining the impacts of the e...

  2. Formation of Highly Monodispersed Emulsifier-Free Cationic Poly(methylstyrene) Latex Particles

    E-print Network

    Wu, Chi

    particles were prepared via an emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization in the presence of 2,2 -azobis-(2 distribution studies revealed that the polymer- ization followed the micellization nucleation mechanism John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Polym Sci A: Polym Chem 37: 2069­2074, 1999 Keywords: poly

  3. 21 CFR 178.3400 - Emulsifiers and/or surface-active agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... citations affecting § 178.3400, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Emulsifiers and/or surface-active agents. 178.3400 Section 178.3400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  4. 21 CFR 178.3400 - Emulsifiers and/or surface-active agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... citations affecting § 178.3400, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Emulsifiers and/or surface-active agents. 178.3400 Section 178.3400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  5. 21 CFR 178.3400 - Emulsifiers and/or surface-active agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... citations affecting § 178.3400, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Emulsifiers and/or surface-active agents. 178.3400 Section 178.3400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  6. THE INFLUENCE OF CARBON BURNOUT ON SUBMICRON PARTICLE FORMATION FROM EMULSIFIED FUEL OIL COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an examination of particle behavior and particle size distributions from the combustion of different fuel oils and emulsified fuels in three experimental combusators. Results indicate that improved carbon (C) burnout from fule oil combustion, either by...

  7. Peroxidase mediated conjugation of corn fibeer gum and bovine serum albumin to improve emulsifying properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The emulsifying properties of corn fiber gum (CFG), a naturally-occurring polysaccharide protein complex, were improved by kinetically controlled formation of hetero-covalent linkages with bovine serum albumin (BSA), using horseradish peroxidase. The formation of hetero-crosslinked CFG-BSA conjugate...

  8. Evaluation of soy based heavy fuel oil emulsifiers for energy efficiency and environmental improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, P.K.; Szuhaj, B.F.; Diego, A.

    1996-12-31

    It is known that the emulsification of water into heavy fuel oil (No. 6) can result in improved atomization of the fuel in a combustion chamber, which results in several benefits. In this study, two soybean lecithin based emulsifiers were evaluated. The emulsifiers were added to the No. 6 fuel at 0.5% and 1 % levels and emulsions of 10% and 15% water were prepared and burned in a pilot scale combustion chamber. The results showed a significant decrease in NO{sub x} emissions, and a reduction in carbon particulates, as well as a decrease in the excess oxygen requirement when the emulsions were burned when compared to fuel oil alone and a fuel oil/water mixture without the emulsifier. It was concluded that the use of a soybean lecithin based emulsifier may be used to increase the burning efficiency of heavy fuel oils, reduce emissions and particulates, and reduce down time for cleaning. This can be very important in utility plants which burn large volumes of heavy fuel oil and are located near urban areas.

  9. Effects of water-emulsified fuel on a diesel engine generator's thermal efficiency and exhaust.

    PubMed

    Syu, Jin-Yuan; Chang, Yuan-Yi; Tseng, Chao-Heng; Yan, Yeou-Lih; Chang, Yu-Min; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Lin, Wen-Yinn

    2014-08-01

    Water-emulsified diesel has proven itself as a technically sufficient improvement fuel to improve diesel engine fuel combustion emissions and engine performance. However, it has seldom been used in light-duty diesel engines. Therefore, this paper focuses on an investigation into the thermal efficiency and pollution emission analysis of a light-duty diesel engine generator fueled with different water content emulsified diesel fuels (WD, including WD-0, WD-5, WD-10, and WD-15). In this study, nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide were analyzed by a vehicle emission gas analyzer and the particle size and number concentration were measured by an electrical low-pressure impactor. In addition, engine loading and fuel consumption were also measured to calculate the thermal efficiency. Measurement results suggested that water-emulsified diesel was useful to improve the thermal efficiency and the exhaust emission of a diesel engine. Obviously, the thermal efficiency was increased about 1.2 to 19.9%. In addition, water-emulsified diesel leads to a significant reduction of nitric oxide emission (less by about 18.3 to 45.4%). However the particle number concentration emission might be increased if the loading of the generator becomes lower than or equal to 1800 W. In addition, exhaust particle size distributions were shifted toward larger particles at high loading. The consequence of this research proposed that the water-emulsified diesel was useful to improve the engine performance and some of exhaust emissions, especially the NO emission reduction. Implications: The accumulated test results provide a good basis to resolve the corresponding pollutants emitted from a light-duty diesel engine generator. By measuring and analyzing transforms of exhaust pollutant from this engine generator, the effects of water-emulsified diesel fuel and loading on emission characteristics might be more clear. Understanding reduction of pollutant emissions during the use of water-emulsified diesel helps improve the effectiveness of the testing program. The analyzed consequences provide useful information to the government for setting policies to curb pollutant emissions from a light-duty diesel engine generator more effectively. PMID:25185398

  10. Amphiphilic Pickering Emulsifiers Based on Mushroom-Type Janus Particles.

    PubMed

    Passas-Lagos, E; Schüth, F

    2015-07-21

    Iron-based mushroom-type Janus particles consisting of a poly(sytrene-co-divinylbenzene) and a silica moiety both with controllable morphologies were successfully synthesized on the gram scale and investigated as surfactants for Pickering emulsions. Two oil-water model systems, namely toluene-water and vegetable oil-water, were stabilized, giving mainly water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions. By varying several parameters, including Janus particle morphologies and the oil-water ratio, fine-tuning of the emulsion systems was possible; it was even possible to invert the continuous phase to an oil-in-water (o/w) system. Furthermore, the emulsions were stable against coalescence and sedimentation and could be easily separated by centrifugation or a strong magnet. The synthesized mushroom-type Janus particles are suitable for creating Pickering emulsions and can be used as building blocks for creating nanostructures with tailored properties for specific applications. PMID:26152905

  11. Iron-mediated remediation of RDX-contaminated water and soil under controlled Eh/pH

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.; Comfort, S.D.; Shea, P.J.

    1999-05-01

    Soil and water contaminated with hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is a serious environmental problem at several active and abandoned munitions production facilities. Zero-valent iron (Fe{sup 0}) can effectively remediate RDX-contaminated soil and water. The objective of this study was to manipulate Eh and pH for enhanced Fe{sup 0}-mediated destruction of RDX. This was accomplished by monitoring RDX destruction under controlled Eh-pH conditions (Eh: {minus}300 to +150 mV; pH: 2--10). Decreasing Eh and pH increased RDX destruction in aqueous solution. Treating 20 mg of RDX L{sup {minus}1} (90 {micro}M) under a static Eh of {minus}150 mV and pH 7 with 20 g of Fe{sup 0} L{sup {minus}1} removed 95% of the RDX within 4 h; no RDX was detected after 8 h. Treating a soil slurry (20% solids; 510 mg RDX kg{sup {minus}1} soil) with 20 g of Fe{sup 0} L{sup {minus}1} at an Eh of {minus}150 mV and pH 7 increased RDX destruction by 24% over the unbuffered control and resulted in 99% RDX destruction within 24 h. Adding 4.2 mM sodium sulfide (in lieu of a static Eh) under similar conditions resulted in 93% RDX loss within 24 h. Results indicated that lowering Eh and maintaining neutral pH during Fe{sup 0} treatment can increase RDX destruction in contaminated soil and water.

  12. Self-emulsifying drug delivery systems: an approach to enhance oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Kanchan; Chopra, Sunny; Dhar, Deepika; Arora, Saurabh; Khar, Roop K

    2010-11-01

    Self-emulsifying drug delivery systems are a vital tool in solving low bioavailability issues of poorly soluble drugs. Hydrophobic drugs can be dissolved in these systems, enabling them to be administered as a unit dosage form for per-oral administration. When such a system is released in the lumen of the gastrointestinal tract, it disperses to form a fine emulsion (micro/nano) with the aid of GI fluid. This leads to in situ solubilization of drug that can subsequently be absorbed by lymphatic pathways, bypassing the hepatic first-pass effect. This article presents an exhaustive account of various literature reports on diverse types of self-emulsifying formulations with emphasis on their formulation, characterization and in vitro analysis, with examples of currently marketed preparations. PMID:20727418

  13. Enhanced antitumor efficacy of vitamin E TPGS-emulsified PLGA nanoparticles for delivery of paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanbin; Yu, Bo; Wang, Guoying; Wu, Yongsheng; Zhang, Xiaomin; Chen, Yanmin; Tang, Suoqing; Yuan, Yuan; Lee, Robert J; Teng, Lesheng; Xu, Shun

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles are efficient delivery vehicles for cancer therapy such as paclitaxel (PTX). In this study, we formulated PTX into PLGA polymeric nanoparticles. Vitamin E TPGS was used as an emulsifier to stabilize the nanoparticle formulation. PTX was encapsulated in TPGS-emulsified polymeric nanoparticles (TENPs) by a nanoprecipitation method in ethanol-water system. The resultant PTX-TENPs showed a very uniform particle size (?100 nm) and high drug encapsulation (>80%). The cytotoxicity of PTX-TENPs was examined in A549 lung cancer cell line. Preferential tumor accumulation of TENPs was observed in the A549 lung cancer xenograft model. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited by intravenous injection of PTX-TENPs. Our results suggested that the modified nanoprecipitation method holds great potential for the fabrication of the PTX loaded polymeric nanoparticles. TPGS can be used in the manufacture of polymeric nanoparticles for the controlled release of PTX and other anti-cancer drugs. PMID:25456995

  14. Changes in interfacial behaviour, emulsifying and foaming properties of faba bean legumin after modification with dimethylsuberimidate.

    PubMed

    Krause, J P; Dudek, S; Schwenke, K D

    2000-12-01

    The effect of a rising rigidity and surface hydrophobicity of the 11S storage protein from faba beans--legumin--induced by chemical modification with dimethylsuberimidate (DMS) on some surface functional properties was studied. Short-time adsorption kinetics using a droplet-volume tensiometer, pressure transformation and desorption behaviour of monolayer using a film balance, and emulsifying and foaming properties were determined to characterize surface activity and interfacial film forming behaviour. Tensio-active properties at the air-water interface, i.e. decay in surface tension and pressure transformation in monolayer, were improved by modification. However, a decrease in emulsifying activity, foam capacity and foam expansion after modification of the legumin points to an overall deterioration of energy-induced film forming behaviour. The results support the view that surface activity is generally governed more by molecular flexibility than by surface hydrophobicity. PMID:11190833

  15. Physico-chemical studies and emulsifying properties of N-propyl-N-methylene phosphonic chitosan.

    PubMed

    Albertengo, Liliana; Farenzena, Sonia; Debbaudt, Adriana; Zuñiga, Adriana; Schulz, Pablo; Rodriguez, Maria Susana

    2013-02-15

    Chitosan is a modified, natural carbohydrate polymer derived by deacetylation of chitin. Due to the presence of two functional groups can undergo many chemical modifications. In a previous work we described the synthetic strategy and characterization of a novel soluble derivative: N-propyl-N-methylene phosphonic chitosan (PNMPC). In the study of some physicochemical properties, results showed that this modified chitosan aggregates in several steps when the concentration is increased. By addition of NaOH the initially coiled molecules stretch exposing more phosphonic acid groups to neutralization and finally give a cooperative reaction with OH((). PNMPC has emulsifying properties and gives O/W emulsions with quasi-monodisperse small droplets. Emulsions with 0.18% PNMPC and 30:70 o:w ratio exhibited the best emulsifying properties within the test range. This emulsion ratio showed high stability to long time storage and several successive freeze/thaw and heating/cooling cycles. PMID:23399201

  16. Emulsifying and foaming properties of ultraviolet-irradiated egg white protein and sodium caseinate.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yau-Hoong; Bhat, Rajeev; Karim, Alias A

    2011-04-27

    The physicochemical and functional properties of ultraviolet (UV)-treated egg white protein (EW) and sodium caseinate (SC) were investigated. UV irradiation of the proteins was carried out for 30, 60, 90, and 120 min. However, the SC samples were subjected to extended UV irradiation for 4 and 6 h as no difference was found on the initial UV exposure time. Formol titration, SDS-PAGE, and FTIR analyses indicated that UV irradiation could induce cross-linking on proteins and led to improved emulsifying and foaming properties (P < 0.05). These results indicated that the UV-irradiated EW and SC could be used as novel emulsifier and foaming agents in broad food systems for stabilizing and foaming purposes. PMID:21401213

  17. Dietary emulsifiers impact the mouse gut microbiota promoting colitis and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chassaing, Benoit; Koren, Omry; Goodrich, Julia K; Poole, Angela C; Srinivasan, Shanthi; Ley, Ruth E; Gewirtz, Andrew T

    2015-03-01

    The intestinal tract is inhabited by a large and diverse community of microbes collectively referred to as the gut microbiota. While the gut microbiota provides important benefits to its host, especially in metabolism and immune development, disturbance of the microbiota-host relationship is associated with numerous chronic inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease and the group of obesity-associated diseases collectively referred to as metabolic syndrome. A primary means by which the intestine is protected from its microbiota is via multi-layered mucus structures that cover the intestinal surface, thereby allowing the vast majority of gut bacteria to be kept at a safe distance from epithelial cells that line the intestine. Thus, agents that disrupt mucus-bacterial interactions might have the potential to promote diseases associated with gut inflammation. Consequently, it has been hypothesized that emulsifiers, detergent-like molecules that are a ubiquitous component of processed foods and that can increase bacterial translocation across epithelia in vitro, might be promoting the increase in inflammatory bowel disease observed since the mid-twentieth century. Here we report that, in mice, relatively low concentrations of two commonly used emulsifiers, namely carboxymethylcellulose and polysorbate-80, induced low-grade inflammation and obesity/metabolic syndrome in wild-type hosts and promoted robust colitis in mice predisposed to this disorder. Emulsifier-induced metabolic syndrome was associated with microbiota encroachment, altered species composition and increased pro-inflammatory potential. Use of germ-free mice and faecal transplants indicated that such changes in microbiota were necessary and sufficient for both low-grade inflammation and metabolic syndrome. These results support the emerging concept that perturbed host-microbiota interactions resulting in low-grade inflammation can promote adiposity and its associated metabolic effects. Moreover, they suggest that the broad use of emulsifying agents might be contributing to an increased societal incidence of obesity/metabolic syndrome and other chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25731162

  18. Effect of antioxidant properties of lecithin emulsifier on oxidative stability of encapsulated bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuanjie; Tikekar, Rohan V; Nitin, N

    2013-06-25

    Oxidation of encapsulated bioactive compounds in emulsions is one of the key challenges that limit shelf life of emulsion containing products. Oxidation in these emulsions is triggered by permeation of free radicals generated at the emulsion interface. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of antioxidant properties of common emulsifiers (lecithin and Tween 20) in reducing permeation of free radicals across the emulsion interface. Radical permeation rates were correlated with oxidative stability of a model bioactive compound (curcumin) encapsulated in these emulsions. Rate of permeation of peroxyl radicals from the aqueous phase to the oil phase of emulsion was inversely proportional to the antioxidant properties of emulsifiers. The rate of radical permeation was significantly higher (p<0.05) for emulsions stabilized using Tween 20 and oxidized lecithin compared to native lecithin that showed higher antioxidant activity. Free radical permeation rate correlated with stability of curcumin in emulsions and was significantly higher (p<0.05) in lecithin stabilized emulsions as compared to Tween 20 emulsions. Overall, this study demonstrates that antioxidant activity of emulsifiers significantly influences permeation of free radicals across the emulsion interface and the rate of oxidation of bioactive encapsulant. PMID:23618963

  19. Charge modifications to improve the emulsifying properties of whey protein isolate.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hairan; Forssell, Pirkko; Partanen, Riitta; Buchert, Johanna; Boer, Harry

    2011-12-28

    Whey protein isolate was modified by ethylene diamine in order to shift its isoelectric point to an alkaline pH. The extent of the modification was studied using SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The modified whey proteins were used as an emulsifier to stabilize oil-in-water emulsions at acidic and neutral pH ranges, and their emulsifying properties were compared with that of the unmodified whey proteins and with the previously studied ethylene diamine modified sodium caseinate. The emulsifying activity of the modified whey proteins was similar to that of the unmodified ones, but the stability of an emulsion at pH 5 was significantly improved after the modification. Charge and coverage of droplet surface and the displacement of the interfacial proteins by surfactant Tween 20 were further studied as a function of pH. As compared with the unmodified whey proteins, the modified ones were proven to cover the interface more efficiently with extensive surface charge at pH 5, although the interfacial layer was less resistant to the surfactant displacement. PMID:22060038

  20. Removal of emulsified food and mineral oils from wastewater using surfactant modified barley straw.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Shariff; Ang, Ha-Ming; Wang, Shaobin

    2009-12-01

    Barley straw, an agricultural waste, was chemically modified and evaluated for the removal of emulsified oils from aqueous solution. The chemical modification was performed using NaOH and a cationic surfactant, hexadecylpyridinium chloride monohydrate (CPC). The surface textural and chemical properties of the surfactant modified barley straw (BMBS) were characterized by N(2) adsorption, FT-IR, SEM and water soluble mineral content. The adsorption tests were carried out in batch adsorption system for removal of standard mineral oil (SMO) and canola oil (CO) from water. For both emulsified oils in wastewater, adsorption was found to be strongly related with solution pH. The isotherm study indicated that emulsified oil adsorption on BMBS could be fitted well with the Langmuir model other than Freundlich model. The maximum adsorption capacity for CO and SMO at 25 degrees C determined from the Langmuir isotherm is 613.3 and 584.2 mg g(-1), respectively. Desorption tests in water solution show that oil is strongly bonded with adsorbent and desorption is only about 1-2% in 24 h. PMID:19625183

  1. Acacia gum as modifier of thermal stability, solubility and emulsifying properties of ?-lactalbumin.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Fabíola Cristina; Dos Reis Coimbra, Jane Sélia; de Oliveira, Eduardo Basílio; Rodrigues, Marina Quadrio Raposo Branco; Sabioni, Rachel Campos; de Souza, Bartolomeu Warlene Silva; Santos, Igor José Boggione

    2015-03-30

    Protein-polysaccharide conjugates often display improved techno-functional properties when compared to their individual involved biomolecules. ?-Lactalbumin:acacia gum (?-la:AG) conjugates were prepared via Maillard reaction by the dry-heating method. Conjugate formation was confirmed using results of absorbance, o-phthalaldehyde test, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and size exclusion chromatography. Techno-functional properties (emulsifying characteristics, solubility, and thermal stability) were evaluated for ?-la, ?-la/AG mixtures and ?-la:AG conjugates. Conjugate thermal stability was improved compared to pure ?-la treated at the same conditions of conjugate formation. Response surface methodology was used to establish models to predict solubility and emulsifying activity as functions of the salt concentration, pH and reaction time. ?-la:AG conjugate solubility is affected in a complex manner by the three factors analyzed. Emulsifying activity index (EAI) of ?-la is significantly affected by pH, while the ?-la:AG EAI is affected by the three analyzed factors. Both solubility and EAI are maximized with pH 8.0, NaCl concentration of 0.3 mol L(-1) and two days of Maillard reaction. PMID:25563962

  2. Interfacial and emulsifying properties of soybean peptides with different degrees of hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Imura, Tomohiro; Nakayama, Mio; Taira, Toshiaki; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Kitamoto, Dai

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effects of the degree of hydrolysis on the interfacial and emulsifying properties of soybean peptides were evaluated based on surface and interfacial tension, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy (FF-TEM) analyses. Of the five evaluated soybean peptides (SP95, SP87, SP75, SP49, and SP23), those with higher degrees of hydrolysis (SP95 and SP87) did not exhibit noticeable surface-active properties in water, whereas those with relatively low degrees of hydrolysis (SP75, SP49, and SP23) exhibited remarkable surface tension-lowering activity. The latter set (SP75, SP49, and SP23) also formed giant associates with average sizes ranging from 64.5 nm to 82.6 nm above their critical association concentration (CAC). Moreover, SP23 with the lowest degree of hydrolysis exhibited excellent emulsifying activity for soybean oil, and FF-TEM analysis demonstrated that the emulsions were stabilized by a lamella-like multilayer peptide structure on the oil droplets that prevented coagulation. The peptide with the lowest degree of hydrolysis (SP23) was effective not only for soybean oil emulsification, but also for the emulsification of liquid paraffin and silicon oil that are generally difficult to emulsify. PMID:25476545

  3. New emulsifying and cryoprotective exopolysaccharide from Antarctic Pseudomonas sp. ID1.

    PubMed

    Carrión, Ornella; Delgado, Lidia; Mercade, Elena

    2015-03-01

    Pseudomonas sp. ID1 is a cold-adapted bacterium isolated from a marine sediment sample collected from South Shetland Islands (Antarctica) that is noted for the highly mucous appearance of its colonies. In this work, we have characterized an exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by this strain, which is mainly composed of glucose, galactose and fucose, and has a molecular mass higher than 2×10(6) Da. We have also studied its potential biotechnological applications as an emulsifier and cryoprotectant agent. The EPS emulsifying activity against different food and cosmetic oils was much higher than commercial gums such as xanthan gum and arabic gum, and surfarctants such as Span 20. It formed highly stable emulsions against the cosmetic oil cetiol V, exhibiting pseudoplastic flow behavior, low thixotrophy and yield stress. The EPS of Pseudomonas sp. ID1 conferred significant cryoprotection for the strain itself as well as for other bacteria, including Escherichia coli, suggesting a universal cryoprotectant role. The cryoprotective activity of the EPS showed a clear dose-response relation at -20 °C and -80 °C and was significantly higher than that observed for the membrane stabilizer fetal bovine serum (FBS). These properties make the EPS of Pseudomonas sp. ID1 a promising alternative to commercial polysaccharides as an emulsifier and cryoprotectant agent for food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. PMID:25498731

  4. Iron overdose

    MedlinePLUS

    Iron is an ingredient in many mineral and vitamin supplements. Iron supplements are also sold by themselves. Types include: Ferrous sulfate (Feosol, Slow Fe) Ferrous gluconate (Fergon) Ferrous fumarate (Femiron, Feostat) Note: This list may not be all-inclusive.

  5. Competitive displacement of sodium caseinate by low-molecular-weight emulsifiers and the effects on emulsion texture and rheology.

    PubMed

    Munk, M B; Larsen, F H; van den Berg, F W J; Knudsen, J C; Andersen, M L

    2014-07-29

    Low-molecular-weight (LMW) emulsifiers are used to promote controlled destabilization in many dairy-type emulsions in order to obtain stable foams in whippable products. The relation between fat globule aggregation induced by three LMW emulsifiers, lactic acid ester of monoglyceride (LACTEM), saturated monoglyceride (GMS), and unsaturated monoglyceride (GMU) and their effect on interfacial protein displacement was investigated. It was found that protein displacement by LMW emulsifiers was not necessary for fat globule aggregation in emulsions, and conversely fat globule aggregation was not necessarily accompanied by protein displacement. The three LMW emulsifiers had very different effects on emulsions. LACTEM induced shear instability of emulsions, which was accompanied by protein displacement. High stability was characteristic for emulsions with GMS where protein was displaced from the interface. Emulsions containing GMU were semisolid, but only low concentrations of protein were detected in the separated serum phase. The effects of LACTEM, GMS, and GMU may be explained by three different mechanisms involving formation of interfacial ?-gel, pickering stabilization and increased exposure of bound casein to the water phase. The latter may facilitate partial coalescence. Stabilizing hydrocolloids did not have any effect on the LMW emulsifiers' ability to induce protein displacement. PMID:25026245

  6. Formulation Strategies to Improve the Bioavailability of Poorly Absorbed Drugs with Special Emphasis on Self-Emulsifying Systems

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shweta; Kesarla, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Poorly water-soluble drug candidates are becoming more prevalent. It has been estimated that approximately 60–70% of the drug molecules are insufficiently soluble in aqueous media and/or have very low permeability to allow for their adequate and reproducible absorption from the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) following oral administration. Formulation scientists have to adopt various strategies to enhance their absorption. Lipidic formulations are found to be a promising approach to combat the challenges. In this review article, potential advantages and drawbacks of various conventional techniques and the newer approaches specifically the self-emulsifying systems are discussed. Various components of the self-emulsifying systems and their selection criteria are critically reviewed. The attempts of various scientists to transform the liquid self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS) to solid-SEDDS by adsorption, spray drying, lyophilization, melt granulation, extrusion, and so forth to formulate various dosage forms like self emulsifying capsules, tablets, controlled release pellets, beads, microspheres, nanoparticles, suppositories, implants, and so forth have also been included. Formulation of SEDDS is a potential strategy to deliver new drug molecules with enhanced bioavailability mostly exhibiting poor aqueous solubility. The self-emulsifying system offers various advantages over other drug delivery systems having potential to solve various problems associated with drugs of all the classes of biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS). PMID:24459591

  7. Guar gum solutions for improved delivery of iron particles in porous media (part 1): porous medium rheology and guar gum-induced clogging.

    PubMed

    Gastone, Francesca; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-10-01

    The present work is the first part of a comprehensive study on the use of guar gum to improve delivery of microscale zero-valent iron particles in contaminated aquifers. Guar gum solutions exhibit peculiar shear thinning properties, with high viscosity in static conditions and lower viscosity in dynamic conditions: this is beneficial both for the storage of MZVI dispersions, and also for the injection in porous media. In the present paper, the processes associated with guar gum injection in porous media are studied performing single-step and multi-step filtration tests in sand-packed columns. The experimental results of single-step tests performed by injecting guar gum solutions prepared at several concentrations and applying different dissolution procedures evidenced that the presence of residual undissolved polymeric particles in the guar gum solution may have a relevant negative impact on the permeability of the porous medium, resulting in evident clogging. The most effective preparation procedure which minimizes the presence of residual particles is dissolution in warm water (60°C) followed by centrifugation (procedure T60C). The multi-step tests (i.e. injection of guar gum at constant concentration with a step increase of flow velocity), performed at three polymer concentrations (1.5, 3 and 4g/l) provided information on the rheological properties of guar gum solutions when flowing through a porous medium at variable discharge rates, which mimic the injection in radial geometry. An experimental protocol was defined for the rheological characterization of the fluids in porous media, and empirical relationships were derived for the quantification of rheological properties and clogging with variable injection rate. These relationships will be implemented in the second companion paper (Part II) in a radial transport model for the simulation of large-scale injection of MZVI-guar gum slurries. PMID:25065767

  8. Guar gum solutions for improved delivery of iron particles in porous media (Part 1): Porous medium rheology and guar gum-induced clogging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastone, Francesca; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-10-01

    The present work is the first part of a comprehensive study on the use of guar gum to improve delivery of microscale zero-valent iron particles in contaminated aquifers. Guar gum solutions exhibit peculiar shear thinning properties, with high viscosity in static conditions and lower viscosity in dynamic conditions: this is beneficial both for the storage of MZVI dispersions, and also for the injection in porous media. In the present paper, the processes associated with guar gum injection in porous media are studied performing single-step and multi-step filtration tests in sand-packed columns. The experimental results of single-step tests performed by injecting guar gum solutions prepared at several concentrations and applying different dissolution procedures evidenced that the presence of residual undissolved polymeric particles in the guar gum solution may have a relevant negative impact on the permeability of the porous medium, resulting in evident clogging. The most effective preparation procedure which minimizes the presence of residual particles is dissolution in warm water (60 °C) followed by centrifugation (procedure T60C). The multi-step tests (i.e. injection of guar gum at constant concentration with a step increase of flow velocity), performed at three polymer concentrations (1.5, 3 and 4 g/l) provided information on the rheological properties of guar gum solutions when flowing through a porous medium at variable discharge rates, which mimic the injection in radial geometry. An experimental protocol was defined for the rheological characterization of the fluids in porous media, and empirical relationships were derived for the quantification of rheological properties and clogging with variable injection rate. These relationships will be implemented in the second companion paper (Part II) in a radial transport model for the simulation of large-scale injection of MZVI-guar gum slurries.

  9. Investigating the potential for long-term permeable reactive barrier (PRB) monitoring from the electrical signatures associated with the reduction in reactive iron performance

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Lee D.; Korte, N.; Baker, J.

    2005-12-14

    The objective of this work was to conduct laboratory and field experiments to determine the sensitivity of low frequency electrical measurements (resistivity and induced polarization) to the processes of corrosion and precipitation that are believed to limit permeable reactive barrier (PRB) performance. The research was divided into four sets of experiments that were each written up and submitted to a peer-reviewed journal: [1] A laboratory experiment to define the controls of aqueous chemistry (electrolyte activity; pH; valence) and total zero valent iron (Fe0) available surface area on the electrical properties of Fe0 columns. [2] A laboratory experiment to determine the impact of corrosion and precipitation on the electrical response of synthetic Fe0 columns as a result of geochemical reactions with NaSO4 and NaCO3 electrolytes. [3] Laboratory experiments on a sequence of cores retrieved from the Kansas City PRB to determine the magnitude of electrical and geochemical changes within a field active PRB after eight years of operation [4] Field-scale cross borehole resistivity and induced polarization monitoring of the Kansas City PRB to evaluate the potential of electrical imaging as a technology for non-invasive, long-term monitoring of indicators of reduced PRB performance This report first summarizes the findings of the four major experiments conducted under this research. The reader is referred to the four papers in Appendices 1-4 for a full description of each experiment, including motivation and significance, technical details, findings and implications. The deliverables of the project, including the publications, conference papers and new collaborative arrangements that have resulted are then described. Appendices 5-6 contain two technical reports written by co-PI Korte describing (1) supporting geochemical measurements, and (2) the coring procedure, conducted at the Kansas City PRB as part of this project.

  10. Biogeochemical Reactions and Mineralogical Characteristics in an Iron Reactive Barrier at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, B.; Watson, D.; Phillips, D.

    2001-12-01

    A permeable iron reactive barrier was installed in late November, 1997 at the U.S. Department of Energy's Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The biogeochemical reactions and mineralogical and hydrological characteristics in the barrier were investigated over an extended field operation ( ~3 years). Results indicated that zero-valent iron (Fe0) reacts with a number of groundwater constituents such as bicarbonates, nitrate, and sulfate in addition to its effectiveness in removing contaminant metals or radionuclides such as uranium and technetium. Both nitrate and sulfate were reduced within or in the influence zone of the Fe0 with a low redox potential (i.e., low Eh). An increased anaerobic microbial population was also observed within and in the vicinity of the Fe0 barrier, and these microorganisms were at least partially responsible for the reduction of nitrate and sulfate in groundwater. Decreased concentrations of Ca2+ and bicarbonate in groundwater occurred as a result of the formation of minerals such as aragonite (CaCO3) and siderite (FeCO3), which coincided with the Fe0 corrosion and an increased groundwater pH. A suite of mineral precipitates was identified in the Fe0 barrier system, including amorphous iron oxyhydroxides, goethite, ferrous carbonates and sulfides, aragonite, and green rusts. These minerals were found to be responsible for the cementation and possibly clogging of Fe0 filings observed in a number of core samples from the barrier. Significant increases in cementation of the Fe0 occurred between two coring events conducted at ~1 year apart and appeared to correspond to the changes in an apparent decrease in hydraulic connectivity. The present study concludes that, while Fe0 may be used as an effective reactive medium for the retention or degradation of many redox-sensitive contaminants, its long-term reactivity and performance could be severely hindered by its reactions with other groundwater constituents; and groundwater flow may be restricted because of the build up of mineral precipitates at the soil/Fe0 interface. Depending on the site biogeochemical conditions, the rate of Fe0 corrosion may increase; therefore, the life span of the Fe0 barrier could be shorter than predicted in previous studies (i.e., <15 years instead of ~15-30 years).

  11. Adelphi-Goddard emulsified fuel project. [using water/oil emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Thermal efficiency and particle emissions were studied using water/oil emulsions. These studies were done using number 2 and number 6 fuel oil. The number 6 oil had a sulfur content greater than one percent and experiments were conducted to remove the sulfur dioxide from the stack gases. Test findings include: (1) emulsion effected a reduction in soot at a low excess air levels; (2) a steam atomizing system will produce a water/oil emulsion. The fuel in the study was emulsified in the steam atomization process, hence, pre-emulsification did not yield a dramatic reduction in soot or an increase in thermal efficiency.

  12. Guar gum solutions for improved delivery of iron particles in porous media (Part 2): Iron transport tests and modeling in radial geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosco, Tiziana; Gastone, Francesca; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-10-01

    In the present work column transport tests were performed in order to study the mobility of guar-gum suspensions of microscale zero-valent iron particles (MZVI) in porous media. The results were analyzed with the purpose of implementing a radial model for the design of full scale interventions. The transport tests were performed using several concentrations of shear thinning guar gum solutions as stabilizer (1.5, 3 and 4 g/l) and applying different flow rates (Darcy velocity in the range 1 · 10- 4 to 2 · 10- 3 m/s), representative of different distances from the injection point in the radial domain. Empirical relationships, expressing the dependence of the deposition and release parameters on the flow velocity, were derived by inverse fitting of the column transport tests using a modified version of E-MNM1D (Tosco and Sethi, 2010) and the user interface MNMs (www.polito.it/groundwater/software). They were used to develop a comprehensive transport model of MZVI suspensions in radial coordinates, called E-MNM1R, which takes into account the non Newtonian (shear thinning) rheological properties of the dispersant fluid and the porous medium clogging associated with filtration and sedimentation in the porous medium of both MZVI and guar gum residual undissolved particles. The radial model was run in forward mode to simulate the injection of MZVI dispersed in guar gum in conditions similar to those applied in the column transport tests. In a second stage, we demonstrated how the model can be used as a valid tool for the design and the optimization of a full scale intervention. The simulation results indicated that several concurrent aspects are to be taken into account for the design of a successful delivery of MZVI/guar gum slurries via permeation injection, and a compromise is necessary between maximizing the radius of influence of the injection and minimizing the injection pressure, to guarantee a sufficiently homogeneous distribution of the particles around the injection point and to prevent preferential flow paths.

  13. Transport of Iron Particles in the Silica Aquifers: Effect of Water Chemistry and Carboxy-Methyl Cellulose Polymer Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pensini, E.; Sleep, B. E.; Yip, C.

    2011-12-01

    Zero-valent iron particles are employed to remediate subsurface areas contaminated by chlorinated compounds, degrading them into less harmful substances. An aspect of major importance when assessing the viability of the technology is the ability of the particles to migrate in the subsurface reaching the contaminant source zone. Particle transport is influenced by particle adhesion onto geological substrates, since in the presence of strong adhesion particles are retained and their transport is hindered. Iron particles are generally coated with polymeric materials to prevent their rapid aggregation, and such coatings are expected to affect the surface properties and thus iron particle transport. This study investigates the forces of interaction between bare and carboxy-methyl cellulose CMC coated iron particles and silica (SiO2), to assess the influence of CMC coatings on iron particle adhesion. Atomic force spectroscopy experiments were conducted to measure the interactions between uncoated iron particles and silica in ultra pure water, NaCl and CaCl2 solutions at concentrations of 100 mM, as well as in solutions buffered with acetate and NaHCO3 (pH= 4 and 8 respectively). At pH values below 8 attractive interactions were observed, suggesting that silica could effectively retain the particles due to electrostatic attraction between negatively charged silica and positively charged iron particles. In contrast, at pH values of 8 the forces of interactions were repulsive, possibly because at this pH the positive charge on the iron surface is neutralized and repulsive hydration forces dominate. The interactions between SiO2 and CMC coated iron particles were repulsive in ultra pure water, as well as in solutions buffered with acetate or NaHCO3, and neutral in 100 mM NaCl solutions. In 100 mM CaCl2 solutions the forces of interaction were either neutral or attractive, suggesting that the presence of Ca2+ ions favors attachment of CMC to SiO2. Similar observations were previously reported with regard to the sorption of CMC onto talc in the presence of Ca2+ ions (1). CMC adhesion onto SiO2 was further investigated with the aid of a quartz-crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. Under the conditions studied CMC sorption onto SiO2 was reversible, as can be explained due to the electrostatic repulsion between silica and CMC. The point of zero charge for silica is about 3, while CMC completely dissociates, becoming negatively charged at pH values greater than 5.5, and partly dissociated bearing a smaller negative charge at lower pH values. The lack and/or the weakness of CMC adhesion in SiO2 indicates that CMC coatings promote iron particle migration, while uncoated iron particles would be more strongly retained at pH values below 8. (1) Khraisheh M., Holland C., Creany C., Harris P., Parolis L.. Effect of molecular weight and concentration on the adsorption of CMC onto talc at different ionic strengths. Int. J. Miner. Process. (2005) 75.

  14. The effect of emulsifying wax on the physical properties of CTAB-based solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN).

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Akhtar; Alayoubi, Alaadin; Nazzal, Sami

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of cetyl alcohol (CA) and Tween® 60 (polysorbate), the primary components of emulsifying wax, on the size, zeta potential and stability of cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB)-based solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) by D-optimal mixture design. A binary CTAB/polysorbate surfactant blend did not offer an advantage over a simple CTAB-stabilized SLN. This led to the conclusion that emulsifying wax could be readily substituted with CA in simple SLNs based on binary CTAB/CA blends. Polysorbate, however, may be added as a co-emulsifier to adjust the physical properties of the nanoparticles, as dictated by the formulator. PMID:23294366

  15. Design and Evaluation of Self-Emulsifying Drug Delivery System (SEDDS) Of Carvedilol to Improve the Oral Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Salimi, Anayatollah; Sharif Makhmal Zadeh, Behzad; Hemati, Ali asghar; Akbari Birgani, Sanaz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Self-emulsifying drug delivery system is an isotropic mixture of natural or synthetic oils, non-ionic surfactants or, one or more hydrophilic solvent and co-solvents/surfactant and polymer that improve bioavailability and increase solubility of poorly-soluble drugs. Objectives: This study was aimed to prepare and develop a stable formulation for self-emulsifying drug delivery system to enhance the solubility, release rate, and oral absorption of the poorly-soluble drug, carvedilol. Materials and Methods: The prepared self-emulsifying drug delivery system formulations were evaluated regarding their particle size, refractory index (RI), emulsifying efficiency, drug release, and rat intestine permeability. Results: The results showed oleic acid as oil with Labrafil as surfactant and Labrafac PG (propylene glycol dicaprylocapraye) as co-surfactant with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and Poloxamer as polymer prepared stable emulsions with a refractive index higher than acidic medium and water. The particle size of formulations was influenced by the type of polymer so that the mean particle size in the self-emulsifying drug delivery system formulations containing hydroxypropyl methylcellulose have a higher particle size compared to Poloxamer formulations. The percentage of drug release after 24 hours (R24) for Poloxamer and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose formulations were 61.24-70.61% and to 74.26-91.11%, respectively. The correlation between percentages of drug released after 24 hours with type of polymer was significant. In permeation studies, a significant and direct correlation existed between P4 and surfactant/co-surfactant ratio. The self-emulsifying drug delivery system formulations showed drug permeability through the rat intestine 2.76 times more, compared with the control. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that physicochemical properties, in vitro release and rat intestine permeability were dependent upon the contents of S/C, water and oil percentage in formulations. PMID:25237644

  16. Approach for energy saving and pollution reducing by fueling diesel engines with emulsified biosolution/ biodiesel/diesel blends.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan-Chung; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Chao, How-Ran; Wang, Shu-Li; Tsou, Tsui-Chun; Chang-Chien, Guo-Ping; Tsai, Perng-Jy

    2008-05-15

    The developments of both biodiesel and emulsified diesel are being driven by the need for reducing emissions from diesel engines and saving energy. Artificial chemical additives are also being used in diesel engines for increasing their combustion efficiencies. But the effects associated with the use of emulsified additive/biodiesel/diesel blends in diesel engines have never been assessed. In this research, the premium diesel fuel (PDF) was used as the reference fuel. A soy-biodiesel was selected as the test biodiesel. A biosolution made of 96.5 wt % natural organic enzyme-7F (NOE-7F) and 3.5 wt % water (NOE-7F water) was used as the fuel additive. By adding additional 1 vol % of surfactant into the fuel blend, a nanotechnology was used to form emulsified biosolution/soy-biodiesel/PDF blends for fueling the diesel engine. We found that the emulsified biosolution/soy-biodiesel/PDF blends did not separate after being kept motionless for 30 days. The above stability suggests that the above combinations are suitable for diesel engines as alternative fuels. Particularly, we found that the emulsified biosolution/soy-biodiesel/PDF blends did have the advantage in saving energy and reducing the emissions of both particulate matters (PM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from diesel engines as compared with PDF, soy-biodiesel/PDF blends, and emulsified soy-biodiesel/ PDF blends. The results obtained from this study will provide useful approaches for reducing the petroleum reliance, pollution, and global warming. However, it should be noted that NO(x) emissions were not measured in the present study which warrants the need for future investigation. PMID:18546733

  17. Development and Evaluation of Liquid and Solid Self-Emulsifying Drug Delivery Systems for Atorvastatin.

    PubMed

    Czajkowska-Ko?nik, Anna; Szekalska, Marta; Amelian, Aleksandra; Szyma?ska, Emilia; Winnicka, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to design and characterize liquid and solid self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS) for poorly soluble atorvastatin. To optimize the composition of liquid atorvastatin-SEDDS, solubility tests, pseudoternary phase diagrams, emulsification studies and other in vitro examinations (thermodynamic stability, droplet size and zeta potential analysis) were performed. Due to the disadvantages of liquid SEDDS (few choices for dosage forms, low stability and portability during the manufacturing process), attempts were also made to obtain solid SEDDS. Solid SEDDS were successfully obtained using the spray drying technique from two optimized liquid formulations, CF3 and OF2. Despite liquid SEDDS formulation, CF3 was characterized by lower turbidity, higher percentage transmittance and better self-emulsifying properties, and based on the in vitro dissolution study it can be concluded that better solubilization properties were exhibited by solid formulation OF2. Overall, the studies demonstrated the possibility of formulating liquid and solid SEEDS as promising carriers of atorvastatin. SEDDS, with their unique solubilization properties, provide the opportunity to deliver lipophilic drugs to the gastrointestinal tract in a solubilized state, avoiding dissolution-a restricting factor in absorption rate of BCS Class 2 drugs, including atorvastatin. PMID:26610464

  18. Soy milk as an emulsifier in mayonnaise: physico-chemical, stability and sensory evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rahmati, Kobra; Mazaheri Tehrani, Mostafa; Daneshvar, Kazem

    2014-11-01

    Mayonnaise is an oil in water emulsion and egg components are its emulsifier. In this research application of soy milk to stabilize mayonnaise was studied. Egg was replaced with full fat soy flour-prepared soy milk at levels of 25, 50, 75, and 100 % and microstructure, stability, color, viscosity and sensory analysis were performed and results were compared with those of control samples containing yolk and whole egg as emulsifier. Results showed that yolk-prepared control (YC) had higher stability and viscosity values and the value of these two attributes decreased as more amounts of soy milk was used. In the case of viscosity there was no statistical difference between soy milk-prepared samples and egg-prepared control (EC) up to 75 % replacement. Color factors changed, which were affected by different proportions of soy milk. Sensory evaluation showed no statistical difference in acceptability of EC and samples with substitution levels up to 50 %. So it can be concluded that egg can be substituted with soy milk in mayonnaise. PMID:26396329

  19. Development and in vitro characterisation of an oral self-emulsifying delivery system for daptomycin.

    PubMed

    Zupan?i?, Ožbej; Partenhauser, Alexandra; Lam, Hung Thanh; Rohrer, Julia; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to develop an oral self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) for the peptide drug daptomycin exhibiting an anionic net charge. Drug lipophilicity was increased by hydrophobic ion pairing with cationic surfactant dodecylamine hydrochloride in molar ratio of surfactant to peptide 5:1. Log P (octanol/water) of -5.0 was even raised to +4.8 due to complexation with dodecylamine hydrochloride. Various SEDDS formulations were developed and characterised regarding emulsification properties, droplet size, polydispersity index and zeta potential. When the daptomycin dodecylamine complex (DAP/DOA) was dissolved in a formulation containing 35% Dermofeel MCT, 30% Capmul MCM and 35% Cremophor RH40, a maximum payload of even 8.0% (w/w) corresponding to 5.5% pure daptomycin was achieved. The formulation was degraded by lipase within 90min. Release studies of daptomycin from this formulation emulsified in 50mM phosphate buffer pH6.8 demonstrated a sustained drug release for at least six hours. Moreover, SEDDS exhibited also mucus permeating properties as well as a protective effect towards drug degradation by ?-chymotrypsin. According to these results, SEDDS containing 8% DAP/DOA complex may be considered as a new potential oral delivery system for daptomycin. PMID:26485536

  20. Characterization of film formation from direct mini-emulsified polystyrene latex particles via SANS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.D. . Polymer Interfaces Center and Center for Polymer Science and Engineering Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA . Materials Research Center Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Sperling, L.H. . Polymer Interfaces Center and Center for Polymer Science and Engineering Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA . Materials Research Center Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA . Dept. of Chemical Engineering Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Klein, A. . Polymer Interfaces Center and Center for Polymer Science and Engineering Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA . Dept. of Chemical Engineering Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA . Emulsion Polymer Inst.); Wignall, G.D. . Solid State Div

    1993-08-16

    Mini-emulsified latexes of anionically polymerized deuterated and protonated polystyrene (DPS = 185,000,HPS = 200,000) were prepared by direct mini-emulsification. Films containing 6% deuterated particles were annealed at 144 C for various periods of time. The average depth of penetration of the deuterated polystyrene chains and tensile strength buildup were characterized during the course of annealing. When the present results were compared with those of the conventional emulsion polymerized system, the directly mini-emulsified latex had greater interdiffusion rates and higher tensile strength than the emulsion polymerized latex system at similar annealing times. This difference may be due to the polydisperse nature of the molecular weight distribution and/or to the large and polar chain end groups of the emulsion polymerized system. The present system shows a minimum depth of penetration for full tensile strength of around 105-115 [angstrom], comparable to 0.81 times the weight-average radius of gyration, R[sub g][sup w], of the whole polystyrene chain, while the tensile strength buildup was dependent on the annealing time to the 0.51 [plus minus] 0.05 power. The tensile strength curve as a function of annealing time goes through a maximum and then levels off. Finally, the diffusion coefficient from the SANS data was (4.7 [plus minus] 1.0) X 10[sup [minus]16] cm[sup 2]/s at the scattering vector Q = 0.0067 [angstrom][sup [minus]1].

  1. Iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    Treatment may include taking iron supplements and eating iron-rich foods . Iron supplements (most often ferrous sulfate) are needed ... the body's iron stores in the bone marrow. Iron-rich foods include: Chicken and turkey Dried lentils, peas, and ...

  2. Application of a long-lasting colloidal substrate with pH and hydrogen sulfide control capabilities to remediate TCE-contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Y T; Chen, S C; Chien, C C; Chen, C C; Kao, C M

    2015-03-01

    A long-lasting emulsified colloidal substrate (LECS) was developed for continuous carbon and nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) release to remediate trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated groundwater under reductive dechlorinating conditions. The developed LECS contained nZVI, vegetable oil, surfactants (Simple Green™ and lecithin), molasses, lactate, and minerals. An emulsification study was performed to evaluate the globule droplet size and stability of LECS. The results show that a stable oil-in-water emulsion with uniformly small droplets (0.7 ?m) was produced, which could continuously release the primary substrates. The emulsified solution could serve as the dispensing agent, and nZVI particles (with diameter 100-200 nm) were distributed in the emulsion evenly without aggregation. Microcosm results showed that the LECS caused a rapid increase in the total organic carbon concentration (up to 488 mg/L), and reductive dechlorination of TCE was significantly enhanced. Up to 99% of TCE (with initial concentration of 7.4 mg/L) was removed after 130 days of operation. Acidification was prevented by the production of hydroxide ion by the oxidation of nZVI. The formation of iron sulfide reduced the odor from produced hydrogen sulfide. Microbial analyses reveal that dechlorinating bacteria existed in soils, which might contribute to TCE dechlorination. PMID:25463237

  3. Iron chelators and iron toxicity.

    PubMed

    Brittenham, Gary M

    2003-06-01

    Iron chelation may offer new approaches to the treatment and prevention of alcoholic liver disease. With chronic excess, either iron or alcohol alone may individually injure the liver and other organs. In combination, each exaggerates the adverse effects of the other. In alcoholic liver disease, both iron and alcohol contribute to the production of hepatic fibrosis through their effects on damaged hepatocytes, hepatic macrophages, hepatic stellate cells, and the extracellular matrix. The pivotal role of iron in these processes suggests that chelating iron may offer a new approach to arresting or ameliorating liver injury. For the past four decades, deferoxamine B mesylate has been the only iron-chelating agent generally available for clinical use. Clinical experience with deferoxamine has demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of iron chelation for the prevention and treatment of iron overload. Determined efforts to develop alternative agents have at last resulted in the development of a variety of candidate iron chelators that are now in or near clinical trial, including (a) the hexadentate phenolic aminocarboxylate HBED [N,N'-bis(2-hydroxybenzyl)ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid], (b) the tridentate desferrithiocin derivative 4'-OH-dadmDFT [4'-hydroxy-(S)-desazadesmethyl-desferrithiocin; (S)-4,5-dihydro-2-(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-4-thiazolecarboxylic acid], (c) the tridentate triazole ICL670A [CGP72 670A; 4-[3,5-bis-(hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl]-benzoic acid], and (d) the bidentate hydroxypyridin-4-one deferiprone [L1, CP20; 1,2-dimethyl-3-hydroxypyridin-4-one]. These agents may provide new pharmacological means of averting or ameliorating liver damage in alcoholic liver disease by binding, inactivating, and eliminating the reactive forms of iron that contribute to oxidative injury of cellular components, are involved in signal transduction, or both. PMID:12957300

  4. The Effect of the Concentration of Oxidant, Cr(VI), on the Iron Oxidation in Saline Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, H.; Jo, H. Y.; Ryu, J. H.; Koh, Y. K.

    2014-12-01

    Deep geological disposal is currently considered as the most appropriate method to isolate high level radioactive wastes (HLRWs) from the ecosystem. If groundwater seeps into underground disposal facilities, water molecules can be dissociated to radicals or peroxides, which can oxidize metal canisters and HLRWs. The oxidized radionuclides with a high solubility can be dissolved in the groundwater. Some dissolved radionuclides can act as oxidants. The continuous radiolysis of water molecules, which results from continuous seepage of groundwater, can enable the continuous production of the radioactive oxidants, resulting in an increase in concentration of oxidants. In this study, the effect of oxidant concentration on iron oxidation in the presence of salt was evaluated. Zero valent iron (ZVI) particles were reacted with Cr(VI) solutions with initial Cr(VI) concentrations ranged from 50 to 300 mg/L in reactors. The initial pH and NaCl concentration were fixed at 3 and 0.5 M, respectively. An increase in the initial Cr(VI) concentration caused an increase in the rate and extend of H2 gas production. The decrement of Cr(VI) was increased as the initial Cr(VI) concentration was increased. The penetration of H+ ions in the presence Cl- ions through the passive film on the ZVI particles caused the reaction between H+ ions and ZVI particles, producing H2 gas and Fe2+ ions. The passive film was damaged during the reaction due to the eruption of H2 gas or peptization by Cl- ions. The Fe2+ ions were reacted with Cr(VI) ions in the solution, producing Fe(III)-Cr(III) (oxy)hydroxides on the passive film of ZVI particles or in the solution as colloidal particles. The Fe(III)-Cr(III) (oxy)hydroxides tends to be precipitated as colloidal particles at a high Cr(VI) concentration and precipitated on the passive film at a low Cr(VI) concentration. The passive film was repaired or thickened by additional formation of Fe(III)-Cr(III) (oxy)hydroxides at a lower Cr(VI) concentration.

  5. A single dose of emulsified versus capsular fish oils has equivalent effects on chylomicron fatty acids over 8 hours

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long chain omega-3 fatty acids are important in nutrition and disease management. Flavored emulsified fish oil supplements provide an alternative to encapsulated fish oils. Oil in water emulsions may offer an advantage in bio-availability of the fatty acids. Chylomicrons transport triglyceride from...

  6. UPTAKE AND EFFECTS OF DISPERSED OIL DROPLETS AND EMULSIFIED OIL BY ESTUARINE CRUSTACEANS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results from this project will provide information on the extent of uptake of dispersed petroleum from the seawater and uptake of emulsified oil from the sediment by blue crabs and grass shrimp of different life history stages. The primary focus of the study will be eff...

  7. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography of emulsified subretinal silicone oil presenting as a macular inverted pseudohypopyon.

    PubMed

    Karth, Peter A; Moshfeghi, Darius M

    2014-01-01

    The authors present a rare case of an inverted pseudohypopyon due to subretinal emulsified silicone oil in the macula of a patient who underwent pars plana vitrectomy surgery for repair of retinal detachment with proliferative vitreoretinopathy 1 year prior to presentation of this finding. The patient’s predisposing diagnosis is pathologic myopia. PMID:25215873

  8. Season-long mating disruption of citrus leafminer, Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton, with an emulsified wax formulation of pheromone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus leafminer, Phyllocnistis citrella, is a major world wide pest of citrus. Mating disruption has proven effective against this pest in small plot investigations. We achieved season-long disruption of P. citrella with a newly developed, flowable emulsified wax dispenser of pheromone (SPLAT-CLM™...

  9. Cross-hole radar scanning of two vertical, permeable, reactive-iron walls at the Massachusetts Military Reservation, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, J.W., Jr.; Joesten, P.K.; Savoie, J.G.

    2001-01-01

    A pilot-scale study was conducted by the U.S. Army National Guard (USANG) at the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR) on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to assess the use of a hydraulic-fracturing method to create vertical, permeable walls of zero-valent iron to passively remediate ground water contaminated with chlorinated solvents. The study was conducted near the source area of the Chemical Spill-10 (CS-10) plume, a plume containing chlorinated solvents that underlies the MMR. Ground-water contamination near the source area extends from about 24 m (meters) to 35 m below land surface. The USANG designed two reactive-iron walls to be 12 m long and positioned 24 to 37 m below land surface to intersect and remediate part of the CS-10 plume.Because iron, as an electrical conductor, absorbs electromagnetic energy, the US Geological Survey used a cross-hole common-depth, radar scanning method to assess the continuity and to estimate the lateral and vertical extent of the two reactive-iron walls. The cross-hole radar surveys were conducted in boreholes on opposite sides of the iron injection zones using electric-dipole antennas with dominant center frequencies of 100 and 250 MHz. Significant decreases in the radar-pulse amplitudes observed in scans that traversed the injection zones were interpreted by comparing field data to results of two-dimensional finite-difference time-domain numerical models and laboratory-scale physical models.The numerical and physical models simulate a wall of perfectly conducting material embedded in saturated sand. Results from the numerical and physical models show that the amplitude of the radar pulse transmitted across the edge of a conductive wall is about 43 percent of the amplitude of a radar pulse transmitted across background material. The amplitude of a radar pulse transmitted through a hole in a conductive wall increases as the aperture of the hole increases. The modeling results indicate that holes with an aperture of less than 40 percent of the dominant wavelength of the radar pulse are not likely to be detected.Based on the results of the numerical and physical modeling, the decreases in radar-pulse amplitudes observed in scans traversing the injection zones are interpreted as electrically conductive zones that outline the distribution of iron. The area interpreted as iron in the northern A-wall contains two zones -- an upper zone about 10 m wide, extending from about 25 to 31 m below land surface, and a lower zone about 8 m wide, extending from 31.5 to 34.5 m below land surface. The area interpreted as iron in the southern B-wall is about 9 m wide, extending from about 27 to 34.5 m below land surface. No discrete holes were interpreted in either the A- or B-wall zones.The interpretation of the field data suggests that (1) the hydraulic-fracturing method introduced iron into the subsurface, but not in the dimensions originally proposed; (2) the iron within the treatment zones is distributed in a generally continuous manner; and (3) excluding the discontinuity in the A-wall, holes within the iron treatment zone, if any, exist at scales smaller than about 10 cm, the resolution limit of the radar antennas and acquisition geometry used for this study. The cross-hole radar method appears to have been an effective method for delineating the distribution of iron in the two walls; however, the veracity of the results cannot be ascertained without excavation or drilling into the treatment zone.

  10. Rapid degradation of aniline in aqueous solution by ozone in the presence of zero-valent zinc.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Wu, Yao; Qin, Chao; Liu, Liping; Lan, Yeqing

    2015-12-01

    The effects of Zn(0) dosage from 0.1 to 1.3gL(-1), pH from 2 to 12 and temperature from 288 to 318K on the degradation of aniline in aqueous solution by ozone in the presence of Zn(0) were investigated through batch experiments. The results demonstrated that Zn(0) had a significantly synergistic role in the degradation of aniline by ozone. A complete decomposition of the initial aniline (10mgL(-1)) was achieved by ozone together with Zn(0) within 25min, and meanwhile nearly 70% of the total organic carbon in the solution was removed. The decomposition efficiency of aniline markedly increased with an increase of Zn(0) dosage. However, temperature exerted a slight impact on the degradation of aniline and the optimum removal efficiency of aniline was realized at 298K. Aniline was efficiently degraded at all the tested pHs except for 12. Free radicals were investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance technique and free radical scavengers. H2O2 concentration generated during the reactions was analyzed using a photometric method. Based on the results obtained in this study, it is proposed that O2(-) instead of OH is the dominant active species responsible for the degradation of aniline. It is concluded that ozone combined with Zn(0) is an effective and promising approach to the degradation of organic pollutants. PMID:26291911

  11. Effects of Solution Chemistry on the Dechlorination of 1,2,3-Trichloropropane by Zero-Valent Zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Salter-Blanc, Alexandra; Tratnyek, Paul G.

    2011-04-12

    The reactivity of zerovalent zinc (ZVZ) toward 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP) was evaluated under a variety of solution conditions, including deionized water, groundwater, and artificial groundwater, over a pH range of about 6.5-12. In deionized water, first-order rate constants for TCP disappearance (kobs) exhibit a broad minimum between pH 8 and 10, with increasing kobs observed at lower and higher pH. The similarity between this trend and zinc oxide (ZnO) solubility behavior suggests pH related changes to the ZnO surface layer strongly influence ZVZ reactivity. Values of kobs measured in acidic groundwater are similar to those measured in DI water, whereas values measured in alkaline groundwater are much smaller (>1 order of magnitude at pH values >10). Characterization of the surfaces of ZVZ exposed to deionized water, acidic groundwater, and alkaline groundwater suggests that the slower rates obtained in alkaline groundwater are related to the presence of a morphologically distinct surface film that passivates the ZVZ surface. TCP degradation rates in artificial groundwater containing individual solutes present in groundwater suggest that silicate anions contribute to the formation of this passivating film.

  12. Isolation of barley hulls and straw constituents and study of emulsifying properties of their arabinoxylans.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Madhav P; Hicks, Kevin B

    2015-11-01

    Both barley hulls and straw contain valuable arabinoxylans and other useful carbohydrate and non-carbohydrate components. The functional water soluble non-caloric arabinoxylan (hemicellulose B) fraction was isolated from hot water-extracted and de-starched barley hulls and straws by an alkaline hydrogen peroxide extraction followed by ethanol precipitation. Barley hulls contained comparatively more Hemi. B (20.51%) than barley straws (7.41 to 12.94%). The sugar composition of Hemi. B showed that they were typical arabinoxylans containing (in addition to arabinose and xylose) some galactose, glucose and acidic sugars in the side chains. The hemicellulose B fractions from barley straws were superior oil-in-water emulsifiers than those from barley hulls. These Hemi. B fractions contain protein, which contributes to their emulsions stabilizing property. PMID:26256379

  13. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic determination of cypermethrin and deltamethrin in emulsifiable concentrate formulations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, K K; Gupta, S; Handa, S K

    1997-11-01

    Fourier tranform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic method has been developed for determination of cypermethrin and deltamethrin in emulsifiable concentrate formulations. The known concentration of formulation was subjected to preparative thin layer chromatography and the active ingradient zone was scrapped from the plate. Pyrethroids were eluted from the adsorbent with chloroform and estimated by measuring the ester carbonyl absorption band at 1749 cm(-1) in cypermethrin and at 1743 cm(-1) in deltamethrin using base line technique. Recoveries of cypermethrin and deltamethrin from commercial and laboratory prepared formulations were 90 to 97% in both the cases. The validity of FT-IR method was confirmed by comparing the results with standard HPLC method. PMID:18966955

  14. Effects of emulsifying components in the continuous phase of cream on the stability of fat globules and the physical properties of whipped cream.

    PubMed

    Ihara, K; Hirota, M; Akitsu, T; Urakawa, K; Abe, T; Sumi, M; Okawa, T; Fujii, T

    2015-05-01

    The emulsifying components in cream are very important in controlling the physical characteristics of whipped cream. The effects of those components on the stability of fat globules and the physical characteristics of whipped cream were investigated. A low-molecular-weight emulsifier, and protein ingredients such as sodium caseinate and a casein partial hydrolysate (casein peptides), were used as emulsifying components in this investigation. The viscosity of deaerated whipped cream (called the serum viscosity) was measured to evaluate the degree of fat-globule aggregation. Furthermore, the shape-retention ability, which is the degree of reduction in the firmness of whipped cream between immediately after whipping and after 1d of refrigeration, was explored. The addition of the low-molecular-weight emulsifier in the continuous phase of dairy cream, which does not contain added low-molecular-weight emulsifiers, increased the stability of the fat globules and reduced the shape-retention ability of the whipped cream. The addition of protein ingredients (sodium caseinate and casein peptides) to the continuous phase of dairy cream had little effect. However, the addition of casein peptide in the continuous phase of dairy cream together with the low-molecular-weight emulsifier reduced the effect of the low-molecular-weight emulsifier on the stabilization of fat globules and the shape-retention ability of the whipped cream. The addition of casein peptide did not recover the serum viscosity; thus, other mechanisms might underlie this phenomenon. PMID:25704969

  15. Are block copolymer worms more effective Pickering emulsifiers than block copolymer spheres?

    PubMed

    Thompson, K L; Mable, C J; Cockram, A; Warren, N J; Cunningham, V J; Jones, E R; Verber, R; Armes, S P

    2014-11-21

    RAFT-mediated polymerisation-induced self-assembly (PISA) is used to prepare six types of amphiphilic block copolymer nanoparticles which were subsequently evaluated as putative Pickering emulsifiers for the stabilisation of n-dodecane-in-water emulsions. It was found that linear poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)-poly(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate) (PGMA-PHPMA) diblock copolymer spheres and worms do not survive the high shear homogenisation conditions used for emulsification. Stable emulsions are obtained, but the copolymer acts as a polymeric surfactant; individual chains rather than particles are adsorbed at the oil-water interface. Particle dissociation during emulsification is attributed to the weakly hydrophobic character of the PHPMA block. Covalent stabilisation of these copolymer spheres or worms can be readily achieved by addition of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) during the PISA synthesis. TEM studies confirm that the resulting cross-linked spherical or worm-like nanoparticles survive emulsification and produce genuine Pickering emulsions. Alternatively, stabilisation can be achieved by either replacing or supplementing the PHPMA block with the more hydrophobic poly(benzyl methacrylate) (PBzMA). The resulting linear spheres or worms also survive emulsification and produce stable n-dodecane-in-water Pickering emulsions. The intrinsic advantages of anisotropic worms over isotropic spheres for the preparation of Pickering emulsions are highlighted. The former particles are more strongly adsorbed at similar efficiencies compared to spheres and also enable smaller oil droplets to be produced for a given copolymer concentration. The scalable nature of PISA formulations augurs well for potential applications of anisotropic block copolymer nanoparticles as Pickering emulsifiers. PMID:25254485

  16. Emulsified isoflurane protects rat heart in situ after regional ischemia and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhao-Yang; Peng, Xia-Ying; Liu, Fei; Liu, Jin

    2014-04-01

    Volatile anesthetic postconditioning reduces myocardial infarct size against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. We tested the hypothesis that emulsified isoflurane (EIso) administrated after ischemia exerts cardioprotection in a rat model of myocardial I/R. Male SD rats underwent 30-min coronary occlusion followed by 3-h reperfusion except for sham rats. All vehicles were administrated intravenously at reperfusion onset for 30 min. In the first study, 56 rats were given saline (CON), 30% intralipid (IL) and 1, 2, 4, 8 or 16 mL/kg EIso for infarct size measurement. In a second study, 32 rats were randomized to four groups and administrated saline in sham (sham) and control (CON) groups, 30% intralipid in IL group and 2 mL/kg emulsified isoflurane in EIso group. Cardiomyocytic enzyme activity was determined. Myocardial mitochondria and cytosol were isolated to determine mitochondrial energy metabolism, cytochrome c release, mitochondrial membrane potential (??m) and opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). Morphologic changes in mitochondria were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Compared with CON and IL, 2, 4 and 8 mL/kg EIso limited infarct size (P < 0.01). Serum levels of cardiac enzyme leakage were reduced in EIso-treated hearts compared with CON (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05). EIso preserved the ultrastructure of mitochondria, protected against mPTP opening, decreased cytochrome c release and preserved ATP production and ??m . In conclusion, EIso is effective in reducing infarct size and in preserving mitochondrial function after ischemia and reperfusion injury. PMID:23600699

  17. Iron Chelation Therapy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... iron overload. What actually happens to cause iron overload? With each red blood cell transfusion, your body ... is deposited. What are the symptoms of iron overload? Early on, iron overload can cause no symptoms, ...

  18. Iron and alloys of iron. [lunar resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastri, Sankar

    1992-01-01

    All lunar soil contains iron in the metallic form, mostly as an iron-nickel alloy in concentrations of a few tenths of 1 percent. Some of this free iron can be easily separated by magnetic means. It is estimated that the magnetic separation of 100,000 tons of lunar soil would yield 150-200 tons of iron. Agglutinates contain metallic iron which could be extracted by melting and made into powder metallurgy products. The characteristics and potential uses of the pure-iron and iron-alloy lunar products are discussed. Processes for working iron that might be used in a nonterrestrial facility are also addressed.

  19. Influence of high dose of phytase and an emulsifier on performance, apparent metabolisable energy and nitrogen retention in broilers fed on diets containing soy oil or tallow.

    PubMed

    Zaefarian, F; Romero, L F; Ravindran, V

    2015-10-01

    The effects of high dose of microbial phytase and an emulsifier on the performance, apparent metabolisable energy (AME) and nitrogen (N) retention in broilers fed on diets containing different fat sources were examined in a 5-week trial. Two fat sources (soy oil and tallow), two inclusion levels of E. coli phytase (500 or 1000 phytase units (FTU)/kg diet) and two inclusion levels of lysolecithin emulsifier (0 or 3.5 g/kg of diet) were evaluated in a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Throughout the 5-week trial, soy oil supplementation improved weight gain and feed per gain compared with tallow, but had no effect on feed intake. The high dose of phytase increased the weight gain and feed intake and lowered the feed per gain during d 1-21, but had no effect on performance parameters over the whole trial period. An effect of emulsifier was observed for feed intake during d 1-21 and over the whole trial period. Addition of emulsifier increased feed intake compared with diets without emulsifier. During weeks 1, 2, 3 and 5, birds fed on soy oil-based diets had higher nitrogen-corrected AME (AMEN) compared with those fed on tallow-based diets. During weeks 2, 3 and 5, the effect of phytase was significant for AMEN, with the high dose increasing the AMEN. During week 2, AMEN was increased with emulsifier addition. During weeks 1, 2, 3 and 5, birds fed on soy oil-based diets had higher fat retention compared with those fed on tallow-based diets. The high dose of phytase improved the retention of fat during week 5 and the addition of emulsifier resulted in higher fat retention during week 1. During weeks 2, 3 and 5, an interaction between fat source × phytase × emulsifier was observed for N retention. In soy oil-based diets, emulsifier plus 1000 FTU/kg phytase increased N retention compared with other groups, while in tallow-based diets, emulsifier addition increased N retention in diets with 500 FTU/kg, but not in 1000 FTU/kg diet. Overall, the present data suggest that the dietary fat source influenced performance, AMEN and fat retention in broiler chickens. There is opportunity to improve bird performance during d 1-21, AMEN and fat retention with higher doses of microbial phytase. Addition of the emulsifier increased the AMEN during week 2 and tract retention of fat during week 1, but this effect was not translated into improvements in performance. PMID:26132590

  20. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure on emulsifying properties of sweet potato protein in model protein-hydrocolloids system.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nasir Mehmood; Mu, Tai-Hua; Ali, Farman; Arogundade, Lawrence A; Khan, Zia Ullah; Zhang, Maio; Ahmad, Shujaat; Sun, Hong-Nan

    2015-02-15

    The effects of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on emulsifying properties of sweet potato protein (SPP) in presence of 0.1%, 0.3% and 0.5% (w/v) of guar gum (GG) and glycerol monostearate (GMS) were investigated. Emulsifying stability index (ESI) of the SPP with GG revealed significant increase (P<0.05) in ESI value at 600MPa treatment, while the stability of SPP-GMS emulsions significantly decreased with increase in GMS concentrations and HHP treatments (200-600MPa). HHP treatment considerably reduced the creaming rate for SPP-GG model while such case was not observed for SPP-GMS model. The flow index for SPP-GG emulsion model was found to decrease with increase in HHP treatment and had non-Newtonian behaviour. The SPP-GMS emulsion models with HHP treatments showed comparatively lower viscosities but had more Newtonian flow character. PMID:25236250

  1. The major proteins of the seed of the fruit of the date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.): Characterisation and emulsifying properties.

    PubMed

    Akasha, Ibrahim; Campbell, Lydia; Lonchamp, Julien; Euston, Stephen R

    2016-04-15

    Proteins were extracted from the seeds of the fruit of the date palm. Proteomic analysis and SDS-PAGE electrophoresis of the extracted proteome suggested it is composed predominantly of the storage proteins glycinin and ?-conglycinin, although over 300 proteins were detected, 91 of which were identified with confidence. In terms of protein type, the largest numbers of proteins were associated, not unexpectedly, with metabolism and energy functions, which reflected the requirements of the germinating and growing embryonic plant. The emulsifying properties of the extracted proteins were determined. Date seed protein exhibited a lower emulsifying activity than either whey protein concentrate or soy protein isolate, at each of the pH values tested. However, the stability of the emulsions produced with all three proteins was very similar at the different pH values. This combination of large emulsion droplet size and high emulsion stability properties suggested that the date proteins may adsorb as large protein oligomers. PMID:26617019

  2. A new route of emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization for the preparation of polymer coated magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. H.; Quyen, D. H.; Hoang, T. K. N.

    2014-06-01

    A new route of emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization based on the homogenous mechanism was investigated to prepare magnetic nanoparticles coated by poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The experimental results confirm the formation of PMMA thin and unique layers covering magnetite cores. The polymer layer thickness, determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, increases from 4.3 nm to 6.8 nm with increasing mass ratio of MMA to magnetite from 3:1 to 11:1. The increase of the polymer thickness results in the decrease in magnetization saturation of polymeric coated magnetic particles. However, this reduction, no more than 13 emu g-1, is much lower compared to that in other studies with the presence of surfactants or emulsifiers. Besides, the dispersion stability of the prepared particles is significantly improved.

  3. Effects of ultrasound pretreatment on the enzymatic hydrolysis of soy protein isolates and on the emulsifying properties of hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Chen, Jianshe; Ren, Jiaoyan; Zhao, Mouming

    2011-03-23

    Soy protein isolate (SPI) was modified by ultrasound pretreatment (200 W, 400 W, 600 W) and controlled papain hydrolysis, and the emulsifying properties of SPIH (SPI hydrolysates) and USPIH (ultrasound pretreated SPIH) were investigated. Analysis of mean droplet sizes and creaming indices of emulsions formed by SPIH and USPIH showed that some USPIH had markedly improved emulsifying capability and emulsion stabilization against creaming during quiescent storage. Compared with control SPI and SPIH-0.58% degree of hydrolysis (DH), USPIH-400W-1.25% (USPIH pretreated under 400W sonication and hydrolyzed to 1.25% DH) was capable of forming a stable fine emulsion (d43=1.79 ?m) at a lower concentration (3.0% w/v). A variety of physicochemical and interfacial properties of USPIH-400W products have been investigated in relation to DH and emulsifying properties. SDS-PAGE showed that ultrasound pretreatment could significantly improve the accessibility of some subunits (?-7S and A-11S) in soy proteins to papain hydrolysis, resulting in changes in DH, protein solubility (PS), surface hydrophobicity (H0), and secondary structure for USPIH-400W. Compared with control SPI and SPIH-0.58%, USPIH-400W-1.25% had a higher protein adsorption fraction (Fads) and a lower saturation surface load (?sat), which is mainly due to its higher PS and random coil content, and may explain its markedly improved emulsifying capability. This study demonstrated that combined ultrasound pretreatment and controlled enzymatic hydrolysis could be an effective method for the functionality modification of globular proteins. PMID:21329351

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of nano-SiO2 modified fluorine-containing polyacrylate emulsifier-free emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianhua; Chen, Xin; Duan, Hao; Ma, Jianzhong; Ma, Yurong

    2015-03-01

    Nano-SiO2 modified fluorine-containing polyacrylate emulsifier-free emulsion, consisting of methyl methacrylate, butyl acrylate, dodecafluoroheptyl methacrylate and ethyl silicate, was successfully synthesized by emulsion polymerization using surfmer and sol-gel process. When increasing ethyl silicate content, the latex centrifugal stability decreased, and the latex particle size increased. The contact angle results showed that the finished fabric had an excellent water and oil repellency. Furthermore, compared with fluorine-containing polyacrylate emulsifier-free emulsion, the obtained nano-SiO2 modified fluorine-containing polyacrylate emulsifier-free emulsion proved to be highly solvent-resistant and water-resistant. In addition, the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated that the nano-SiO2 presented on the surface of latex particles. The atomic force microscope (AFM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX) confirmed that the hybrid film had a rough surface and the organic fluorine segment could migrate onto the film-air interface.

  5. Highly permeable double-skinned forward osmosis membranes for anti-fouling in the emulsified oil-water separation process.

    PubMed

    Duong, Phuoc H H; Chung, Tai-Shung; Wei, Shawn; Irish, Lana

    2014-04-15

    Forward osmosis (FO) has attracted wide attention in recent years. However, the FO performance may be restricted due to internal concentration polarization (ICP) and fast fouling propensity that occurs in the membrane sublayer. Particularly, these problems significantly affect the membrane performance when treating highly contaminated oily wastewater. Recently, double-skinned flat sheet cellulose acetate (CA) membranes consisting of two selective skins via the phase inversion method have demonstrated less ICP and fouling propensity over typical single-skinned membranes. However, these membranes exhibit low water fluxes of <12 LMH under 2 M NaCl draw solution. Therefore, a novel double-skinned FO membrane with a high water flux has been aimed for in this study for emulsified oil-water treatment. The double-skinned FO membrane comprises a fully porous sublayer sandwiched between (i) a truly dense skin for salt rejection and (ii) a fairly loose dense skin for emulsified oil particle rejection. The former dense skin is a polyamide synthesized via interfacial polymerization, while the latter one is a self-assembled sulfonated pentablock copolymer (Nexar copolymer) layer. The resultant double-skinned membrane exhibits a high water flux of 17.2 LMH and a low reverse salt transport of 4.85 gMH using 0.5 M NaCl as the draw solution and DI water as the feed. The double-skinned membrane outperforms the single-skinned membrane with much lower fouling propensity for emulsified oil-water separation. PMID:24621207

  6. Development and Optimization of Polymeric Self-Emulsifying Nanocapsules for Localized Drug Delivery: Design of Experiment Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwa, Jyoti; Asthana, Abhay; Gupta, Sumeet; Shilkari Asthana, Gyati; Singh, Ranjit

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to formulate polymeric self-emulsifying curcumin nanocapsules with high encapsulation efficiency, good emulsification ability, and optimal globule size for localized targeting in the colon. Formulations were prepared using modified quasiemulsion solvent diffusion method. Concentration of formulation variables, namely, X1 (oil), X2 (polymeric emulsifier), and X3 (adsorbent), was optimized by design of experiments using Box-Behnken design, for its impact on mean globule size (Y1) and encapsulation efficiency (Y2) of the formulation. Polymeric nanocapsules with an average diameter of 100–180?nm and an encapsulation efficiency of 64.85 ± 0.12% were obtained. In vitro studies revealed that formulations released the drug after 5?h lag time corresponding to the time to reach the colonic region. Pronounced localized action was inferred from the plasma concentration profile (Cmax 200?ng/mL) that depicts limited systemic absorption. Roentgenography study confirms the localized presence of carrier (0–2?h in upper GIT; 2–4?h in small intestine; and 4–24?h in the lower intestine). Optimized formulation showed significantly higher cytotoxicity (IC50 value 20.32??M) in HT 29 colonic cancer cell line. The present study demonstrates systematic development of polymeric self-emulsifying nanocapsule formulation of curcumin for localized targeting in colon. PMID:25525620

  7. Switchable Pickering Emulsions Stabilized by Awakened TiO2 Nanoparticle Emulsifiers Using UV/Dark Actuation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Bai, Rui-Xue; Guo, Ting; Meng, Tao

    2015-08-26

    In this work, switchable Pickering emulsions that utilize UV/dark manipulation employ a type of smart TiO2 nanoparticle as emulsifiers. The emulsifiers can be awakened when needed via UV-induced degradation of grafted silanes on TiO2 nanoparticles. By tuning the surface wettability of TiO2 nanoparticles in situ via UV/dark actuation, emulsions stabilized by the nanoparticles can be reversibly switched between the water-in-oil (W/O) type and oil-in-water (O/W) type for several cycles. Due to the convertible wettability, the smart nanoparticle emulsifiers can be settled in either the oil phase or the water phase as desired during phase separation, making it convenient for recycling. The present work provides a facile and noninvasive method to freely manipulate the formation, breakage, and switching of the emulsion; this method has promising potential as a powerful technique for use in energy-efficient and environmentally friendly industries. PMID:26258618

  8. Development and evaluation of granule and emulsifiable concentrate formulations containing Derris elliptica extract for crop pest control.

    PubMed

    Wiwattanapatapee, Ruedeekorn; Sae-Yun, Attawadee; Petcharat, Jiraporn; Ovatlarnporn, Chitchamai; Itharat, Arunporn

    2009-12-01

    Derris elliptica Benth. extracts containing rotenone have long been used as natural insecticides, but time-consuming preparation processes and the short shelf life of the extract limit their use in pest control. In this study, stable water-dispersible granules and emulsifiable concentrate liquids containing Derris extract (equivalent to 5% w/w of rotenone) were developed with simple techniques. Accelerated degradation kinetics of rotenone in the Derris extract, and in both formulations, indicated that its degradation followed first-order kinetics. The predicted half-life (t(1/2)) and shelf life (t(90%)) at 30 degrees C of rotenone in Derris extract were 520 and 79 days, respectively. Derris granules and emulsifiable concentrate clearly prolong the stability of rotenone 8-fold (t(90%) = 633 days) and 1.4-fold (t(90%) = 110 days), respectively. The study of rotenone degradation after application onto plants indicated that both formulations would be effective for up to 3 days after spraying. Preliminary efficacy testing indicated that the Derris emulsifiable concentrate was clearly more effective than Derris water-dispersible granules in controlling Spodoptera litura (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). PMID:19904939

  9. Enhanced solubility and oral bioavailability of ?-tocotrienol using a self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS).

    PubMed

    Alqahtani, Saeed; Alayoubi, Alaadin; Nazzal, Sami; Sylvester, Paul W; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo performance of ?-tocotrienol (?-T3) incorporated in a self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) and to compare its enhanced performance to a commercially available product, namely Tocovid Suprabio™ (hereafter Tocovid), containing tocotrienols. The solubilization of ?-T3 was tested in a dynamic in vitro lipolysis model followed by in vitro cellular uptake study for the lipolysis products. In addition, in vitro uptake studies using Caco2 cells were conducted at different concentrations of ?-T3 prepared as SEDDS, Tocovid, or mixed micelles. ?-T3 incorporated in SEDDS or Tocovid was orally administered to rats at different doses and absolute oral bioavailability from both formulations were determined. The dynamic in vitro lipolysis experiment showed about two fold increase in the solubilization of ?-T3 prepared as SEDDS compared to Tocovid, which correlated with higher cellular uptake in the subsequent uptake studies. In vitro cellular uptake and in vivo oral bioavailability studies have shown a twofold increase in the cellular uptake and oral bioavailability of ?-T3 incorporated in SEDDS compared to Tocovid as a result of improvement in its solubility and passive uptake as confirmed by in vitro studies. In conclusion, incorporation of ?-T3 in SEDDS formulation enhanced ?-T3 solubilization and passive permeability, thus its cellular uptake and oral bioavailability when compared to Tocovid. PMID:24934591

  10. Microwave heating enhances antioxidant and emulsifying activities of ovalbumin glycated with glucose in solid-state.

    PubMed

    Tu, Zong-Cai; Hu, Yue-Ming; Wang, Hui; Huang, Xiao-Qin; Xia, Shi-Qi; Niu, Pei-Pei

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the properties of ovalbumin (OVA) after glycated with glucose under microwave heating. For this purpose, microwave at 480 and 640 W power levels were used for heating the OVA-glucose system in solid-state for 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 min, respectively. The results indicated that the protein molecular weight was increased after glycated with glucose under microwave treatment, the pH of the system was decreased with the increase of microwave treatment power and time, while the UV absorbance, browning intensity, antioxidant activities as well as the emulsifying activity and emulsion stability of the Maillard reaction products (MRPs) were increased in according with the raise of microwave treatment power and time. The reaction time of microwave treatment is much shorter than those using traditional methods, suggesting that microwave irradiation is a novel and efficient approach to promote Maillard reaction (MR) in dry state and improve protein antioxidant and functional properties. PMID:25745213

  11. Vitamin E bioaccessibility: influence of carrier oil type on digestion and release of emulsified ?-tocopherol acetate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; McClements, David Julian

    2013-11-01

    Vitamin E is an essential micronutrient for humans and animals due to its antioxidant and non-antioxidant biological activities. The ?-tocopherol acetate form is often used in foods and other products due to its high biological activity and chemical stability. In this study, we examined the influence of carrier oil type on the bioaccessibility and molecular form of emulsified vitamin E using a simulated gastrointestinal model. Oil-in-water emulsions containing ?-tocopherol acetate were prepared using quillaja saponin as a natural surfactant, and either long chain triacylglycerols (LCT) or medium chain triacylglycerols (MCT) as carrier oils. The rate and extent of lipid digestion was higher for MCT- than LCT-emulsions, which was attributed to differences in the water dispersibility of the free fatty acids formed during lipolysis. Conversely, the total bioaccessibility of vitamin E after digestion was higher for LCT- than MCT-emulsions, which was attributed to the greater solubilisation capacity of mixed micelles formed from long chain fatty acids. The conversion of ?-tocopherol acetate to ?-tocopherol after in vitro digestion was also considerably higher for LCT- than MCT-emulsions, which may impact the subsequent absorption of vitamin E. Overall, this research has important implications for the design and fabrication of effective emulsion-based delivery systems for increasing the bioavailability of vitamin E. PMID:23768382

  12. Production of metabolites with antioxidant and emulsifying properties by antarctic strain Sporobolomyces salmonicolor AL?.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Stela; Pavlova, Kostantsa; Lukanov, Ludmil; Korotkova, Elena; Petrova, Ekaterina; Zagorchev, Plamen; Kuncheva, Margarita

    2013-01-01

    The Sporobolomyces salmonicolor AL(1) Antarctic strain was cultivated and two bioproducts were obtained: exopolysaccharide and biomass. The biologically active substances ergosterol, torularhodin, torulene, ?-carotene and CoQ(10) were extracted from the biomass and were quantified as follows: ergosterol 5.2?±?0.2 mg/g, torularhodin 458.3?±?24.5 ?g/g, torulene 273.7?±?14.5 ?g/g, ?-carotene 129.2?±?7.3 ?g/g and coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) 236.1?±?12.1 ?g/g. Their antioxidant activity was estimated according to the cathode voltammetry method. The most pronounced antioxidant activity (according to trolox) was exhibited by ?-carotene 3.78, followed by CoQ(10) 3.60, both of them being the main contributors to the total extract activity of 3.19. The biologically active metabolites in combination with exoglucomannan as emulsifier were used for the creation of model emulsion systems characterised by great stability. The absorption of UVA rays by the model emulsions was studied. PMID:23179285

  13. Haematococcus pluvialis soluble proteins: Extraction, characterization, concentration/fractionation and emulsifying properties.

    PubMed

    Ba, Fatou; Ursu, Alina Violeta; Laroche, Céline; Djelveh, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    A water-soluble matrix was extracted from green vegetative Haematococcus pluvialis through high-pressure cell disruption either at native pH (5.7) or with pH shifting to neutral (7). The resulting supernatant is mainly composed of carbohydrates and proteins, with the highest yield of proteins obtained at neutral pH (73±2% of total biomass proteins). The key emulsification properties of the proteins isolated in neutral supernatant (emulsification capacity (EC): 534±41mLoilg(-1) protein, emulsification stability (ES): 94±3% and emulsification activity index (EAI): 80±1m(2)g(-1)) were comparable to the native supernatant values (EC: 589±21mLoilg(-1) protein, ES: 84±3% and EAI: 75±1m(2)g(-1)). Confronted to sodium caseinate (EC: 664±30mLoilg(-1) protein, ES: 63±4%, and EAI: 56±4m(2)g(-1)) these results highlighted the strong potential of proteins isolated from H. pluvialis as emulsifier agent. Moreover, experiments have shown that the stability of emulsions obtained from supernatants is due to the proteins rather than the carbohydrates. PMID:26476616

  14. Formulation, optimization, and evaluation of self-emulsifying drug delivery systems of nevirapine

    PubMed Central

    Chintalapudi, Ramprasad; Murthy, T. E. G. K.; Lakshmi, K. Rajya; Manohar, G. Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to formulate and optimize the self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS) of nevirapine (NVP) by use of 22 factorial designs to enhance the oral absorption of NVP by improving its solubility, dissolution rate, and diffusion profile. SEDDS are the isotropic mixtures of oil, surfactant, co-surfactant and drug that form oil in water microemulsion when introduced into the aqueous phase under gentle agitation. Materials and Methods: Solubility of NVP in different oils, surfactants, and co-surfactants was determined for the screening of excipients. Pseudo-ternary phase diagrams were constructed by the aqueous titration method, and formulations were developed based on the optimum excipient combinations with the help of data obtained through the maximum micro emulsion region containing combinations of oil, surfactant, and co-surfactant. The formulations of SEDDS were optimized by 22 factorial designs. Results: The optimum formulation of SEDDS contains 32.5% oleic acid, 44.16% tween 20, and 11.9% polyethylene glycol 600 as oil, surfactant, and co-surfactant respectively. The SEDDS was evaluated for the following drug content, self-emulsification time, rheological properties, zeta potential, in vitro diffusion studies, thermodynamic stability studies, and in vitro dissolution studies. An increase in dissolution was achieved by SEDDS compared to pure form of NVP. Conclusion: Overall, this study suggests that the dissolution and oral bioavailability of NVP could be improved by SEDDS technology. PMID:26682191

  15. Impact of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) on functional characteristics of emulsified sausages.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Valerie; Allard, Karin; Herrmann, Kurt; Gibis, Monika; Kohlus, Reinhard; Weiss, Jochen

    2013-02-01

    Inclusion of fibers, such as carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), at the expense of fat or protein in meat batters could be used to produce healthier sausages while lowering production costs. To study the impact of CMC/MCC on structural/functional characteristics of emulsified sausages, standard-fat Lyoner-style sausages were formulated with CMC/MCC at concentrations of 0.3-2.0%. Methods of analysis included rheology, water binding capacity (WBC), texture measurements, and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). WBC, texture measurements, and rheology all indicated that addition of CMC (>0.7%) led to destabilization of the batter, which upon heating could no longer be converted into a coherent protein network, a fact that was also revealed in CLSM images. In contrast, MCC was highly compatible with the matrix and improved firmness (1405-1651N/100g) with increasing concentration compared to control (1381N/100g) while keeping WBC (4.6-5.9%) with <2% MCC at the level of the control (4.8%). Results were discussed in terms of molecular interactions of meat proteins with celluloses. PMID:23036941

  16. Systematic Development of Self-Emulsifying Drug Delivery Systems of Atorvastatin with Improved Bioavailability Potential

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fariba; Islam, Md. Saiful; Roni, Monzurul Amin; Jalil, Reza-Ul

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare and characterize a self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) with a high drug load of poorly water-soluble atorvastatin for the enhancement of dissolution and oral bioavailability. Solubility of atorvastatin in oil, surfactant, and cosurfactant was determined. Pseudo-ternary phase diagrams were constructed by the aqueous titration method, and formulations were developed based on the optimum excipient combinations. A high drug load (10% w/w) was achieved with a combination of oleic acid, Tween 80, and polyethylene glycol 400, ensuring the maximum dissolution property (in the case of SES6). Effects of lipids and surfactants on physical properties of SEDDS such as in vitro emulsification efficiency in terms of self-emulsification time, emulsion droplet size, and percent transmittance were measured. Multiple regression analysis revealed that a higher amount of surfactants significantly increased dissolution of ATV while decreasing emulsion droplet size and emulsification time. About a four-fold increase in dissolution was achieved by SEDDS compared to pure ATV powder. Overall, this study suggests that dissolution and oral bioavailability of ATV could be improved by SEDDS technology. PMID:23264948

  17. Micrometer-sized gold-silica Janus particles as particulate emulsifiers.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Syuji; Yokoyama, Yuichi; Miyanari, Yuki; Shiono, Takafumi; Ito, Masanori; Yusa, Shin-ichi; Nakamura, Yoshinobu

    2013-05-01

    Micrometer-sized gold-silica Janus particles act as an effective stabilizer of emulsions by adsorption at the oil-water interface. The Janus particles were adsorbed at the oil-water interface as a monolayer and stabilized near-spherical and nonspherical oil droplets that remained stable without coalescence for longer than one year. Gold and silica surfaces have hydrophobic and hydrophilic features; these surfaces were exposed to oil and water phases, respectively. In contrast, bare silica particles cannot stabilize stable emulsion, and completed demulsification occurred within 2 h. Greater stability of the emulsion for the Janus particle system compared to the silica particle system was achieved by using the adsorption energy of the Janus particles at the oil-water interface; the adsorption energy of the Janus particles is more than 3 orders of magnitude greater than that of silica particles. Suspension polymerization of Janus particle-stabilized vinyl monomer droplets in the absence of any molecular-level emulsifier in aqueous media led to nonspherical microspheres with Janus particles on their surface. Furthermore, polymer microspheres carrying Au femtoliter cups on their surfaces were successfully fabricated by removal of the silica component from the Janus-particle stabilized microspheres. PMID:23617765

  18. Characterization of edible emulsified films with low affinity to water based on kefiran and oleic acid.

    PubMed

    Ghasemlou, Mehran; Khodaiyan, Faramarz; Oromiehie, Abdulrasoul; Yarmand, Mohammad Saeid

    2011-10-01

    New edible composite films based on kefiran and oleic acid (OA) at the ratio of 15, 25, and 35% (w/w) were prepared using emulsification with the aim of improving their water vapour barrier and mechanical properties. Film-forming solutions were characterized in terms of rheological properties and particle-size distribution. The impact of the incorporation of OA into the film matrix was studied by investigating the physical, mechanical, and thermal properties of the films. The water vapour permeability (WVP) of the emulsified films was reduced by approximately 33% by adding OA. The mechanical properties of kefiran films were also affected by adding OA: tensile strength was diminished, and elongation increased considerably. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of the kefiran film was -16°C and was not considerably affected by adding OA. Therefore, OA could be incorporated into these films for some food-technology applications that need a low affinity toward water. PMID:21640752

  19. Transport of carboxymethyl cellulose stabilized nanoscale zerovalent iron in porous media, an experimental and modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, Brent; Mondal, Pulin; Furbacher, Paul; Cui, Ziteng; Krol, Magdalena

    2015-04-01

    Nano-scale zero valent iron (nZVI) is capable of reacting with a wide variety of groundwater contaminants. Therefore, during the last decade nZVI has received significant attention for application in subsurface remediation, particularly for sites contaminated with chlorinated compounds and heavy metals. However, due to agglomeration of the nZVI, delivery into the contaminated subsurface zones is challenging. Polymer stabilization of nZVI can enhance the mobility of the iron particles in the subsurface. In this study, a set of laboratory-scale transport experiments and numerical simulations were performed to evaluate carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) polymer stabilized nZVI transport in porous media. Experiments were conducted in a two-dimensional water-saturated lab-scale glass-walled sandbox, uniformly packed with silica sand, to identify the effects of water specific discharge and CMC concentration on nZVI transport. Experiments were also performed using Lissamine Green B (LGB) dye as a non-reactive tracer to characterize the sand media. The CMC stabilized nZVI was synthesized freshly at a concentration of 1000 mg/L before each transport experiment. The synthesized CMC-nZVI mixture was characterized using transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and UV-visual spectrophotometry. The movement of the LGB dye and nZVI in the sandbox during the experiments was monitored using time-lapsed images captured using a light source and a dark box. The transport of LGB, CMC, and CMC-nZVI was evaluated through analysis of the breakthrough curves at the outlet and the retained nZVI in the sandbox. The LGB, CMC, and nZVI transport was also modeled using a multiphase flow and transport model considering LGB and CMC as solutes, and nZVI as a colloid. Analysis of the breakthrough data showed that the mass recovery of LGB and CMC was greater than 95 % indicating conservative transport in silica sand. However, the mean residence time of CMC was significantly higher than that of LGB due to CMC viscosity effects. Increasing the CMC concentration from 0.2 % to 0.8 % increased nZVI stability, but caused higher pressure drops in the sand box, indicating that use of high CMC concentration may limit the injection rates. The images captured during transport experiments and the total iron analysis of the sand after the transport experiments showed that a significant amount of nZVI was retained in the sandbox. The mass recovery of nZVI was lower than 40 % due to the attachment onto the sand surfaces. The simulation results of LGB, CMC, and nZVI matched the experimental observations and allowed estimation of transport parameters that could be used to predict CMC stabilized nZVI transport under a variety of conditions.

  20. [Iron dysregulation and anemias].

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Katsuya

    2015-10-01

    Most iron in the body is utilized as a component of hemoglobin that delivers oxygen to the entire body. Under normal conditions, the iron balance is tightly regulated. However, iron dysregulation does occasionally occur; total iron content reductions cause iron deficiency anemia and overexpression of the iron regulatory peptide hepcidin disturbs iron utilization resulting in anemia of chronic disease. Conversely, the presence of anemia may ultimately lead to iron overload; for example, thalassemia, a common hereditary anemia worldwide, often requires transfusion, but long-term transfusions cause iron accumulation that leads to organ damage and other poor outcomes. On the other hand, there is a possibility that iron overload itself can cause anemia; iron chelation therapy for the post-transfusion iron overload observed in myelodysplastic syndrome or aplastic anemia improves dependency on transfusions in some cases. These observations reflect the extremely close relationship between anemias and iron metabolism. PMID:26458428

  1. Iron and Prochlorococcus/

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Anne Williford

    2009-01-01

    Iron availability and primary productivity in the oceans are intricately linked through photosynthesis. At the global scale we understand how iron addition induces phytoplankton blooms through meso-scale iron-addition ...

  2. Iron Sucrose Injection

    MedlinePLUS

    Iron sucrose injection is used treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells ... and may cause the kidneys to stop working). Iron sucrose injection is in a class of medications called ...

  3. Iron metabolism and toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Papanikolaou, G.; Pantopoulos, K. . E-mail: kostas.pantopoulos@mcgill.ca

    2005-01-15

    Iron is an essential nutrient with limited bioavailability. When present in excess, iron poses a threat to cells and tissues, and therefore iron homeostasis has to be tightly controlled. Iron's toxicity is largely based on its ability to catalyze the generation of radicals, which attack and damage cellular macromolecules and promote cell death and tissue injury. This is lucidly illustrated in diseases of iron overload, such as hereditary hemochromatosis or transfusional siderosis, where excessive iron accumulation results in tissue damage and organ failure. Pathological iron accumulation in the liver has also been linked to the development of hepatocellular cancer. Here we provide a background on the biology and toxicity of iron and the basic concepts of iron homeostasis at the cellular and systemic level. In addition, we provide an overview of the various disorders of iron overload, which are directly linked to iron's toxicity. Finally, we discuss the potential role of iron in malignant transformation and cancer.

  4. Iron and Your Child

    MedlinePLUS

    ... an Everyday Diet Ever wonder why so many cereals and infant formulas are fortified with iron? Iron ... 4-6 months of age, when iron-fortified cereal is usually introduced (although breastfeeding moms should continue ...

  5. Saugus Iron Works Forge

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The Saugus Iron Works forge, which used a large hammer to compress the iron. Forging strenghened the iron, which, right out of the blast furnace, was brittle. The Saugus River, which powered the forge, can be seen in the background....

  6. AMELIORATION OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE USING REACTIVE MIXTURES IN PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The generation and release of acidic drainage from mine wastes is an environmental problem of international scale. The use of zero-valent iron and/or iron mixtures in subsurface Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRB) presents a possible passive alternative for remediating acidic grou...

  7. TRANSFORMATION OF HALOGENATED PBTS WITH NANOSCALE BIMETALLIC PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticle technology is becoming a popular option for treatment of a variety of hazardous and toxic wastes, and for remediation of contaminated sites. As a matter of fact, nano iron has quickly become the most widely used nanomaterial in environmental ...

  8. EFFECTIVE REMOVAL OF TCE IN A LABORATORY MODEL OF A PRB CONSTRUCTED WITH PLANT MULCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past ten years, passive reactive barriers (PRBs) have found widespread application to treat chlorinated solvent contamination in ground water. The traditional PRB commonly uses granular zero-valent iron and/or iron alloys as filling materials for treatment of chlorinated ...

  9. PLANT MULCH TO TREAT TCE IN GROUND WATER IN A PRB (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past ten years, passive reactive barriers (PRBs) have found widespread application to treat chlorinated solvent contamination in ground water. The traditional PRB commonly uses granular zero-valent iron and/or iron alloys as filling materials for treatment of chlorinated ...

  10. PLANT MULCH TO TREAT TCE IN GROUND WATER IN A PRB

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past ten years, passive reactive barriers (PRBs) have found widespread application to treat chlorinated solvent contamination in ground water. The traditional PRB commonly uses granular zero-valent iron and/or iron alloys as filling materials for treatment of chlorinated ...

  11. Geophysical Monitoring of Two types of Subsurface Injection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nano-scale particles of zero-valent iron (ZVI) were injected into the subsurface at the 100-D area of the DOE Hanford facility. The intent of this iron injection was to repair a gap in the existing in-situ redox manipulation barrier located at the site. A number of geophysical me...

  12. Use of emulsified vegetable oil to support bioremediation of TCE DNAPL in soil columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkness, Mark; Fisher, Angela

    2013-08-01

    The interaction between emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) and trichloroethylene (TCE) dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) was observed using two soil columns and subsequent reductive dechlorination of TCE was monitored over a three year period. Dyed TCE DNAPL (~ 75 g) was emplaced in one column (DNAPL column), while the second was DNAPL-free (plume column). EVO was added to both columns and partitioning of the EVO into the TCE DNAPL was measured and quantified. TCE (1.9 mM) was added to the influent of the plume column to simulate conditions down gradient of a DNAPL source area and the columns were operated independently for more than one year, after which they were connected in series. Initially limited dechlorination of TCE to cDCE was observed in the DNAPL column, while the plume column supported complete reductive dechlorination of TCE to ethene. Upon connection and reamendment of the plume column with EVO, near saturation levels of TCE from the effluent of the DNAPL column were rapidly dechlorinated to c-DCE and VC in the plume column; however, this high rate dechlorination produced hydrochloric acid which overwhelmed the buffering capacity of the system and caused the pH to drop below 6.0. Dechlorination efficiency in the columns subsequently deteriorated, as measured by the chloride production and Dehalococcoides counts, but was restored by adding sodium bicarbonate buffer to the influent groundwater. Robust dechlorination was eventually observed in the DNAPL column, such that the TCE DNAPL was largely removed by the end of the study. Partitioning of the EVO into the DNAPL provided significant operational benefits to the remediation system both in terms of electron donor placement and longevity.

  13. Use of emulsified vegetable oil to support bioremediation of TCE DNAPL in soil columns.

    PubMed

    Harkness, Mark; Fisher, Angela

    2013-08-01

    The interaction between emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) and trichloroethylene (TCE) dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) was observed using two soil columns and subsequent reductive dechlorination of TCE was monitored over a three year period. Dyed TCE DNAPL (~75 g) was emplaced in one column (DNAPL column), while the second was DNAPL-free (plume column). EVO was added to both columns and partitioning of the EVO into the TCE DNAPL was measured and quantified. TCE (1.9 mM) was added to the influent of the plume column to simulate conditions down gradient of a DNAPL source area and the columns were operated independently for more than one year, after which they were connected in series. Initially limited dechlorination of TCE to cDCE was observed in the DNAPL column, while the plume column supported complete reductive dechlorination of TCE to ethene. Upon connection and reamendment of the plume column with EVO, near saturation levels of TCE from the effluent of the DNAPL column were rapidly dechlorinated to c-DCE and VC in the plume column; however, this high rate dechlorination produced hydrochloric acid which overwhelmed the buffering capacity of the system and caused the pH to drop below 6.0. Dechlorination efficiency in the columns subsequently deteriorated, as measured by the chloride production and Dehalococcoides counts, but was restored by adding sodium bicarbonate buffer to the influent groundwater. Robust dechlorination was eventually observed in the DNAPL column, such that the TCE DNAPL was largely removed by the end of the study. Partitioning of the EVO into the DNAPL provided significant operational benefits to the remediation system both in terms of electron donor placement and longevity. PMID:23697993

  14. Intravenous pretreatment with emulsified isoflurane preconditioning protects kidneys against ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Emulsified isoflurane (EIso) is a novel intravenous general anesthetic, which can provide rapid anesthetic induction and recovery. EIso preconditioning could attenuate heart, lung and liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. We tested the hypothesis that intravenous pretreatment with EIso would protect kidneys against I/R injury by inhibiting systemic inflammatory responses and improving renal antioxidative ability. Methods Rats were randomly divided into these six groups: sham, I/R, intralipid, 1, 2 or 4 ml/kg EIso. Rats were subjected to 45 min left renal pedicle occlusion followed by 3 h reperfusion after right nephrectomy. Rat were treated with intravenous 8% EIso with 1, 2 or 4 ml/kg, or 30% intralipid with 2 ml/kg for 30 min before ischemia, respectively. After reperfusion, renal functional parameters, serum mediator concentrations and markers of oxidative stress in kidney tissues were determined, and renal histopathological analysis were performed. Results Serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, cystatin c, tumor necrosis factor-?, interleukin-6, and interleukin-10 concentrations were significantly increased after renal I/R as compared to the sham group. So was renal tissue MDA content and histological scores, but renal tissue SOD activity was decreased. Additionally, severe morphological damages were observed in these study groups. In contrast, 2 or 4 ml/kg EIso reduced serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, cystatin c, tumor necrosis factor-?, and interleukin-6 levels, decreased renal tissue MDA content and histological scores, increased serum interleukin-10 level and tissue SOD activity as compared to the I/R, intralipid and 1 ml/kg EIso groups. Renal morphological damages were alleviated after pretreatment of 2 or 4 ml/kg EIso. Conclusions Intravenous EIso produces preconditioning against renal I/R injury in rats, which might be mediated by attenuating inflammation and increasing antioxidation ability. PMID:24739487

  15. Efficient breaking of water/oil emulsions by a newly isolated de-emulsifying bacterium, Ochrobactrum anthropi strain RIPI5-1.

    PubMed

    Mohebali, Ghasemali; Kaytash, Ashk; Etemadi, Narges

    2012-10-01

    Water-oil emulsions occur throughout oil production, transportation, and processing. The breaking of the water/oil emulsion improves oil quality and as a consequence chemically synthesized de-emulsifiers are commonly used in the petroleum industries. Microbial de-emulsifiers represent potential alternatives to the chemicals and may become important products for petroleum industries. The main goal of this work was isolation, identification, and characterization of an efficient de-emulsifying bacterium. Following a multi-step enrichment programme a de-emulsifying bacterium, Ochrobactrum anthropi strain RIPI5-1was isolated from the oil-polluted sandy bank of Siri Island, Iran. The presence of an oil phase in growth medium was found to be unnecessary for production of the de-emulsifier. The de-emulsifying activity of both the whole culture and the cells of this strain was examined using a model multiple water-crude oil (w/o/w) emulsion. This w/o/w emulsion was used for the first time in microbial de-emulsification research. Whole cells of strain RIPI5-1 exhibited high de-emulsifying activity during the late-exponential growth and stationary phases; de-emulsifying activity of the whole culture was highest during the early-exponential growth phase. The time course of de-emulsification by whole culture and whole cells of strain RIPI5-1 was investigated; the initial rate (DeI(1)) of breaking of the multiple water-crude oil emulsion by whole culture and whole cells was calculated as 11% and 54%, respectively. However, overall de-emulsification (DeI(8.5)) for whole culture and whole cells was calculated as 63% and 72%, respectively. A clear correlation was observed between cell surface hydrophobicity and the de-emulsifying activity of whole cells. With the water/kerosene emulsion, emulsion half-life (t(1/2)) was found to be <0.5h. The potential activity of this strain was also explained using a complex oilfield emulsion. PMID:22698673

  16. The Assessment of Red Beet as a Natural Colorant, and Evaluation of Quality Properties of Emulsified Pork Sausage Containing Red Beet Powder during Cold Storage

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Sang-Keun; Choi, Jung-Seok; Moon, Sung-Sil; Jeong, Jin-Yeon

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess red beet as a natural colorant in emulsified pork sausage and to investigate the effect of red beet on quality characteristics of emulsified pork sausage during 20 d of cold storage. Red beet was prepared as a powder and a substitute with sodium nitrite at 0.5% and 1.0% levels in emulsified pork sausage. Red beet significantly increased the moisture content and pH (p<0.0001) and affected color traits. Lightness of emulsified pork sausage decreased by the addition of red beet powder (p<0.01), whereas lightness with red beet treatments slightly increased during 20 d of cold storage at 4? (p<0.05). Redness dramatically increased with red beet powder (p<0.0001). Color by sensory evaluation also showed a significant effect from red beet addition (p<0.05), whereas the other sensory properties such as flavor, tenderness, juiciness, and overall acceptability were not affected by the addition of red beet powder (p>0.05). Texture and 2-thiobabituric acid reactive substance were also not affected by red beet addition (p>0.05). Therefore, red beet could be a good natural colorant in emulsified pork sausage but it needs additional processing, such as betalain concentration and extraction as a juice, to be used as an antioxidant in meat products.

  17. Effects of the sugarcane dietary fiber and pre-emulsified sesame oil on low-fat meat batter physicochemical property, texture, and microstructure.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xinbo; Han, Minyi; Kang, Zhuang-Li; Wang, Kai; Bai, Yun; Xu, Xing-Lian; Zhou, Guang-Hong

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of sugarcane dietary fiber (SDF) and pre-emulsified sesame oil for pork fat replacement on batter characteristics. Replacing pork fat with SDF and pre-emulsified sesame oil significantly affected color, water- and fat-binding properties, texture, dynamic rheology, microstructure and sensory analysis. With SDF and pre-emulsified sesame oil, the batters had improved textures and gave good sensory scores. These batters containing SDF had reduced the cholesterol and fat contents. With increasing levels of SDF, the batters had higher water- and fat-binding properties, improved texture (hardness, gumminess and chewiness), dynamic rheology and a more balanced nutritional composition. However, when the level of SDF reached 3%, the pores formed by SDF in batter were too large to hinder aggregation and the hardness of batter was unacceptable, which result the allover acceptability to be unsatisfactory. The sample 2% SDF had comparable overall acceptability to the control batter. PMID:26641280

  18. Microbial Dynamics During a Temporal Sequence of Bioreduction Stimulated by Emulsified Vegetable Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schadt, C. W.; Gihring, T. M.; Yang, Z.; Wu, W.; Green, S.; Overholt, W.; Zhang, G.; Brandt, C. C.; Campbell, J. H.; Carroll, S. C.; Criddle, C.; Jardine, P. M.; Lowe, K.; Mehlhorn, T.; Kostka, J. E.; Watson, D. B.; Brooks, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    Amendments of slow-release substrates (e.g. emulsified vegetable oil; EVO) are potentially pragmatic alternatives to short-lived labile substrates for sustained uranium bioimmobilization within groundwater systems. The spatial and temporal dynamics of geochemical and microbial community changes during EVO amendment are likely to differ significantly from populations stimulated by readily utilizable soluble substrates (e.g. ethanol or acetate). We tracked dynamic changes in geochemistry and microbial communities for 270 days following a one-time EVO injection at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFRC) site that resulted in decreased groundwater U concentrations for ~4 months. Pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR of 16S rRNA and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrA) genes from monitoring well samples revealed a rapid decline in bacterial community richness and evenness after EVO injection, concurrent with increased 16S rRNA copy levels, indicating the selection of a narrow group consisting of 10-15 dominant OTUs, rather than a broad community stimulation. By association of the known physiology of close relatives identified in the pyrosequencing analysis, it is possible to infer a hypothesized sequence of microbial functions leading the major changes in electron donors and acceptors in the system. Members of the Firmicutes family Veillonellaceae dominated after injection and most likely catalyzed the initial oil decomposition and utilized the glycerol associated with the oils. Sulfate-reducing bacteria from the genus Desulforegula, known for LCFA oxidation to acetate, also dominated shortly after EVO amendment and are thought to catalyze this process. Acetate and H2 production during LCFA degradation appeared to stimulate NO3-, Fe(III), U(VI), and SO42- reduction by members of the Comamonadaceae, Geobacteriaceae, and Desulfobacterales. Methanogenic archaea flourished late in the experiment and in some samples constituted over 25 % of the total microbial community. Bacterial richness rebounded after nine months, although community composition remained distinct from the pre-amendment conditions. Subsequent to the experiment we have isolated several of these organisms into pure culture including representatives of probable new species of Geobacter, Desulforegula and Desulfovibrio. A hypothesized model for the functioning of these limited communities will be verified in the laboratory using defined combinations of isolates from the field where possible. These results demonstrated EVO serves as an effective electron donor source for in situ U(VI) bioreduction, and subsurface EVO degradation and metal reduction was likely mediated by successive identifiable guilds of organisms.

  19. Kinetic properties of turkey pancreatic lipase: a comparative study with emulsified tributyrin and monomolecular dicaprin.

    PubMed

    Fendri, Ahmed; Sayari, Adel; Gargouri, Youssef

    2005-01-01

    Using the classical emulsified system and the monomolecular film technique, we compared several interfacial properties of turkey pancreatic lipase (TPL) and human pancreatic lipase (HPL). TPL, like HPL, presented the interfacial activation phenomenon when vinyl ester was used as substrate. In the absence of colipase and bile salts, using tributyrin emulsion or monomolecular films of dicaprin at low surface pressure, TPL, unlike HPL, hydrolyzes pure tributyrin emulsion as well as dicaprin films maintained at low surface pressures. TPL was also able to hydrolyze triolein emulsion in the absence of any additive and despite the accumulation of long-chain free fatty acids at the interface. The difference of behaviors between TPL and HPL can be explained by the penetration power of each enzyme. The enzyme that presents the maximal pi(c) (TPL) interacts more efficiently with interfaces, and it is not denaturated at high interfacial energy. Turkey pancreatic lipase is more active on rac-dicaprin than HPL; a maximal ratio of 9 was found between the catalytic activities of the two lipases measured at their surface pressure optima (20 mN m(-1)). A kinetic study on the surface pressure dependency, stereospecificity, and regioselectivity of TPL was performed using enantiopure diglyceride (1,2-sn-dicaprin and 2,3-sn-dicaprin) and a prochiral isomer (1,3-dicaprin) that were spread as monomolecular films at the air-water interface. At low surface pressure (15 mN m(-1)), TPL acts preferentially on primary carboxylic ester groups of the diglyceride isomers (1,3-dicaprin), but at high surface pressure (23 mN m(-1)), this enzyme prefers both adjacent ester groups of the diglyceride isomers (1,2-sn-dicaprin and 2,3-sn-dicaprin). HPL prefers adjacent ester groups of the diglyceride isomers (1,2-sn-dicaprin and 2,3-sn-dicaprin). Furthermore, TPL was found to be markedly stereospecific for the sn-1 position of the 1,2-sn-enantiomer of dicaprin at low surface pressure (15 mN m(-1)), while at high surface pressure (23 mN m(-1)), this lipase presents a stereopreference for the sn-3 position of the 2,3-sn-enantiomer of dicaprin. HPL is stereospecific for the sn-1 position of the 1,2-sn-enantiomer of dicaprin both at 15 and 23 mN m(-1). PMID:15549712

  20. Tissue distribution of emulsified ?-tocotrienol and its long-term biological effects after subcutaneous administration

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background ?-tocotrienol (GT3), an analogue of vitamin E, has gained increasing scientific interest recently as it provides significant health benefits. It has been shown that emulsified GT3, after subcutaneous administration, has long-term biological effects. However, whether the effects are due to the increase of GT3 level in the early phase following administration or the persistent functions after accumulation in tissues is unknown. This study was conducted to determine the levels of GT3 in different tissues by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a fluorescence detector after a single-dose of GT3 with polyethylene glycol (PEG-400) emulsion via subcutaneous injection. Previous studies have explored that GT3 has favorable effects on bone and can inhibit osteoclast formation. To confirm the persistent biological activity of accumulated GT3 in tissues, receptor activator of NF-?B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) gene expressions, which have an important role in regulating osteoclast formation, were also evaluated in bone tissue on day 1, 3, 7 and 14 after a signal subcutaneous injection of GT3. Methods C57BL/6 female mice were administrated GT3 (100 mg/kg body weight) with PEG-400 emulsion by subcutaneous injection. GT3 levels in different tissues were determined by HPLC with a fluorescence detector. Gene expressions were measured by real-time PCR. Results GT3 predominantly accumulated in adipose and heart tissue, and was maintained at a relatively stable level in bone tissues after a single-dose administration. Accumulated GT3 in bone tissues significantly inhibited the increase in RANKL expression and the decrease in OPG expression induced by db-cAMP. Conclusions We investigated the tissue distribution of GT3 with PEG emulsion by subcutaneous administration, which has never been reported so far. Our results suggest that GT3 with PEG emulsion accumulated in tissues is able to carry out a long-term biological effect and has therapeutic value for treating and preventing osteoporosis. PMID:24712339

  1. Introduction of diffusing wave spectroscopy to study self-emulsifying drug delivery systems with respect to liquid filling of capsules.

    PubMed

    Niederquell, Andreas; Völker, Andreas Charles; Kuentz, Martin

    2012-04-15

    The rheology of self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS) is not thoroughly characterized these days. Since mechanical rheometers are often not well suited to study this kind of systems, there is need for novel physical methods. Several new optical techniques based on microrheology have recently made significant progress. We apply for the first time a specific microrheological technique called diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) to study different SEDDS. The obtained data were then correlated with the dosing precision of automated capsule filling. As a result, the dynamic viscosities obtained from microrheology were in accordance with data from capillary viscosimetry. The DWS measurements revealed that all formulations had a clearly measurable storage modulus at frequencies >200 rad/s. Thus, all samples were low-viscous, while exhibiting non-Newtonian flow behavior. Obtained values of storage and loss modulus were then successfully correlated with the weight variability of capsules that were filled on a machine. In conclusion, the DWS technique enabled rheological analysis of self-emulsifying systems in a broad frequency range. The good data correlation with a capsule quality attribute was especially promising, since microrheological techniques are typically contact-free. Thus, they have a high potential in a quality by design framework of formulation development and production. PMID:22310462

  2. Oil-in-water emulsion lotion providing controlled release using 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine n-butyl methacrylate copolymer as emulsifier

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Akiko; Fujii, Makiko; Morimoto, Kumi; Yamada, Tomomi; Koizumi, Naoya; Kondoh, Masuo; Watanabe, Yoshiteru

    2012-01-01

    Lotion is a useful vehicle for active ingredients used to treat skin disease because it can be applied to the scalp, can cover large areas of skin, and it is easy to spread due to low viscosity. An emulsion lotion (EL) containing 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine n-butyl methacrylate copolymer (PMB) as an emulsifier that provides controlled-release was developed. Diphenhydramine (DPH) was used as a model drug. Formulation with 5% DPH, 5% soybean oil, and 4% PMB in water was emulsified using a high-pressure homogenizer. Polysorbate 80 (TO) was used instead of PMB for comparison. They were applied in vitro to Yucatan micropig intact or stripped skin at a practical dose (2 ?L/cm2). For stripped skin, penetration of DPH from 4% PMB EL was slower than that from 1% TO EL; results for intact skin were similar. The same phenomenon was observed with application to rabbit skin in vivo. When 4% PMB EL dried on the skin, it made a thin film matrix incorporating the oil phase, which controlled the release of DPH. The release rate could be controlled by the ratio of oil phase to PMB. The EL with PMB shows promise as a vehicle for long-acting treatment of skin diseases. PMID:25755990

  3. Enhanced dissolution and oral bioavailability of nifedipine by spontaneous emulsifying powders: effect of solid carriers and dietary state.

    PubMed

    Weerapol, Yotsanan; Limmatvapirat, Sontaya; Jansakul, Chaweewan; Takeuchi, Hirofumi; Sriamornsak, Pornsak

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to prepare spontaneous emulsifying powder (SEP) for improving dissolution and enhancing oral bioavailability of a poorly water-soluble drug, nifedipine (NDP). In order to investigate the effects of solid carrier properties, such as surface area and pore size, and a concurrent food intake on absorption of NDP in rats, different SEP formulations were prepared by adsorbing liquid spontaneous emulsifying formulation (SEF), composing of polyoxyl 35 castor oil, caprylic/capric glyceride and diethylene glycol monoethyl ether at a ratio of 1:1:8, onto various solid carriers (i.e., silica (FS), porous calcium silicate (PCS) and porous silicon dioxide). The solid characterization by scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction revealed the absence of crystalline NDP in the formulations. SEP also demonstrated excellent spontaneous emulsification properties similar to SEF. The droplet size of emulsions formed after dilution was less than 200 nm. The solid carriers (particularly PCS) had significant and positive effect in drug dissolution; the mean dissolution time of SEP containing PCS was considerably improved. SEP also provided a good stability after storage in accelerated and long-term conditions for 6 months. The bioavailability study resulted in enhanced values of Cmax and AUC for SEP formulations, when tested in both fasted and fed rats. Furthermore, comparing the AUC in fasted and fed rats, NDP powder exhibited a significant food effect. The difference in bioavailability of NDP in fed compared to fasted state can be avoided by using SEP. PMID:25615879

  4. Comparison of emulsifying properties of milk fat globule membrane materials isolated from different dairy by-products.

    PubMed

    Phan, T T Q; Le, T T; Van der Meeren, P; Dewettinck, K

    2014-01-01

    Emulsifying properties of milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) materials isolated from reconstituted buttermilk (BM; i.e., BM-MFGM) and BM whey (i.e., whey-MFGM), individually or in mixtures with BM powder (BMP) were compared with those of a commercial dairy ingredient (Lacprodan PL-20; Arla Foods Ingredients Group P/S, Viby, Denmark), a material rich in milk polar lipids and proteins. The particle size distribution, viscosity, interfacial protein, and polar lipids load of oil-in-water emulsions prepared using soybean oil were examined. Pronounced droplet aggregation was observed with emulsions stabilized with whey-MFGM or with a mixture of whey-MFGM and BMP. No aggregation was observed for emulsions stabilized with BM-MFGM, Lacprodan PL-20, or a mixture of BM-MFGM and BMP. The surface protein load and polar lipids load were lowest in emulsions with BM-MFGM. The highest protein load and polar lipids load were observed for emulsions made with a mixture of whey-MFGM and BMP. The differences in composition of MFGM materials, such as in whey proteins, caseins, MFGM-specific proteins, polar lipids, minerals, and especially their possible interactions determine their emulsifying properties. PMID:24913653

  5. Identification of the wheat seed protein CM3 as a highly active emulsifier using a novel functional screen.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Simon M; Burnett, Gary R; Mills, E N Clare; Belton, Peter S; Shewry, Peter R; Tatham, Arthur S

    2003-03-26

    Lyophilized albumin protein fractions were prepared from flour of four varieties of wheat: Triticum aestivum cvs. Mercia and Riband, Triticum aestivum var. spelta, and Triticum turgidum var. durum (Kamut). The dry powders were redissolved in sodium phosphate buffers at pH 3.0, 6.5, or 8.0 and at ionic strengths of 0.1 or 1.0 M to a concentration of 0.1% (w/v). Emulsions formed by sonication of protein solutions with n-hexadecane were aged at room temperature and separated into aqueous, interstitial, and interfacial phases. The distinct emulsion components were lyophilized and analyzed by RP-HPLC. A protein was observed to be preferentially located in the interfacial component and subsequently purified from a total albumin fraction and identified by N-terminal sequencing as CM3, an alpha-amylase inhibitor subunit. Measurement of the equilibrium surface tension of CM3 as a function of protein concentration demonstrated that it was at least as active as bovine beta-lactoglobulin, an established protein emulsifier. Furthermore, measurement of the surface dilational elastic modulus at an air/water interface demonstrated the formation of a viscoelastic film, while fluorescence and FT-IR spectroscopic measurements on adsorbed and nonadsorbed CM3 suggest that the secondary structure is essentially unchanged upon adsorption to an oil/water interface. It is concluded that functional screening is a valid approach to identify novel protein emulsifiers in complex mixtures. PMID:12643668

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia? anemia ; autosomal ; autosomal recessive ; cell ; deficiency ; gene ; hemoglobin ; hereditary ; hypochromic ; inherited ; iron ; metabolism ; molecule ; oxygen ; ...

  7. Injection of Emulsified Vegetable Oil for Long-Term Bioreduction of Uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, S. C.; Watson, D. B.; Schadt, C. W.; Jardine, P. M.; Gihring, T. M.; Zhang, G.; Mehlhorn, T.; Lowe, K.; Phillips, J.; Earles, J.; Wu, W.; Criddle, C. S.; Kemner, K. M.; Boyanov, M.

    2011-12-01

    In situ bioremediation of a uranium and nitrate-contaminated aquifer with the slow-release electron donor, emulsified vegetable oil (EVO), was tested at the US DOE Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program (SBR) Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site, in Oak Ridge, TN. The EVO injection took place in Area 2 of the IFRC located about 300 m downgradient of the former S-3 disposal ponds. Liquid wastes, disposed in the ponds from 1951 to 1983, were primarily composed of nitric acid, plating wastes containing various metals (Cr, Ni) radionuclides (U, Tc), inorganics (nitrate, sulfate) and organic contaminants (tetrachloroethylene, acetone). Prior pond closure in 1987, large volumes of waste fluids migrated into the subsurface, down Bear Creek Valley and into Bear Creek. Contaminants detected at Area 2 were transported through a high permeability gravelly fill that is considered a preferred transport pathway for U to Bear Creek. Groundwater in the gravelly fill is contaminated with U (1-3 mg/L), sulfate (95-130 mg/L), and nitrate (20-40 mg/L) and 500 mg/kg or higher U has been detected on the solid phase of the fill material. The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility and long-term sustainability of U(VI) reduction and immobilization, and nitrate degradation in the high permeability, high flow gravel fill using EVO as the electron donor. A one-time EVO injection was conducted over a 2 hour period in the highly permeable gravel (hydraulic conductivity 0.08 cm/sec) in the well instrumented IFRC Area 2 field plot. Extensive monitoring of geochemical parameters, dissolved gases and microbial populations were conducted during the test. A bromide tracer test was conducted prior to the injection of the EVO to assess transport pathways and rates. Geochemical analysis of site groundwater demonstrated the sequential bioreduction of oxygen, nitrate, Mn(IV), Fe(III) and sulfate. Transient accumulation of acetate was observed as an intermediate in the oil degradation. Reduction and removal of U and nitrate from groundwater was observed in all wells in hydraulic connection to the injection wells after 2-4 weeks. U concentrations in groundwater were reduced to below 30 ppb (US EPA drinking water standard) at some well locations and nitrate was reduced to below detectable levels. Rebound of U in groundwater was observed together with the rebound of sulfate concentrations as the EVO was consumed. The flux of U and nitrate contamination from groundwater to the surface water receptor (Bear Creek) was significantly reduced by the EVO injection over a one year period. Uranium (VI) reduction to U(IV) in the field tests was confirmed by X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis. The reduced U(IV) was determined by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) to be in an Fe-U complex, not uraninite. The activities of major Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing bacteria with U(VI)-reducing capability as well as methanogens was stimulated after injection of the oil.

  8. Enhanced oral bioavailability of paclitaxel formulated in vitamin E-TPGS emulsified nanoparticles of biodegradable polymers: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lingyun; Feng, Si-Shen

    2010-08-01

    This work evaluates the effects of paclitaxel loaded polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) composed of poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) with vitamin E TPGS as emulsifier for oral chemotherapy. NPs prepared by a modified solvent extraction/evaporation technique were observed in spherical shape of 200-300 nm diameter with a high drug encapsulation efficiency (EE) of 80.9%. The TPGS-emulsified PLGA NPs formulation of paclitaxel was found of great advantages over that of Taxol. The in vitro viability experiment showed that the NP formulation could be 1.28, 1.38, 1.12 times more effective than Taxol(R) after 24, 48, 72 h incubation with MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line at 2.5 microg/mL paclitaxel concentration. In vivo evaluation confirmed the advantages of the TPGS-emulsified PLGA NP formulation versus Taxol in promoting oral bioavailability of paclitaxel. Such a NP formulation achieved more than 10 times higher oral bioavailability than Taxol, which resulted 9.74-fold higher therapeutic effect and 12.56-fold longer sustainable therapeutic time than Taxol. The present proof-of-concept experimental data proved that the formulation of vitamin E TPGS emulsified PLGA NPs is a promising approach for paclitaxel oral administration. Oral chemotherapy by NPs formulation is feasible. PMID:20564384

  9. Influence of different emulsifiers on characteristics of eggless cake containing soy milk: Modeling of physical and sensory properties by mixture experimental design.

    PubMed

    Rahmati, Nazanin Fatemeh; Mazaheri Tehrani, Mostafa

    2014-09-01

    Emulsifiers of different structures and functionalities are important ingredients usually used in baking cakes with satisfactory properties. In this study, three emulsifiers including distilled glycerol mono stearate (DGMS), lecithin and sorbitan mono stearate (SMS) were used to bake seven eggless cakes containing soy milk and optimization was performed by using mixture experimental design to produce an eggless cake sample with optimized properties. Physical properties of cake batters (viscosity, specific gravity and stability), cake quality parameters (moisture loss, density, specific volume, volume index, contour, symmetry, color and texture) and sensory attributes of eggless cakes were analyzed to investigate functional potential of the emulsifiers and results were compared with those of control cake containing egg. Almost in all cases emulsifiers, compared to the control cake, changed properties of eggless cakes significantly. Regarding models of different response variables (except for some properties) and their high R(2) (99.51-100), it could be concluded that models obtained by mixture design were significantly fitted for the studied responses. PMID:25190826

  10. Emulsified Nanoparticles Containing Inactivated Influenza Virus and CpG Oligodeoxynucleotides Critically Influences the Host Immune Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ming-Hsi; Lin, Su-Chen; Hsiao, Chia-Hsin; Chao, Hsin-Ju; Yang, Hung-Ren; Liao, Chien-Chun; Chuang, Po-Wei; Wu, Huang-Pi; Huang, Chiung-Yi; Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Chou, Ai-Hsiang; Hu, Alan Yung-Chih; Chong, Pele

    2010-01-01

    Background Antigen sparing and cross-protective immunity are regarded as crucial in pandemic influenza vaccine development. Both targets can be achieved by adjuvantation strategy to elicit a robust and broadened immune response. We assessed the immunogenicity of an inactivated H5N1 whole-virion vaccine (A/Vietnam/1194/2004 NIBRG-14, clade 1) formulated with emulsified nanoparticles and investigated whether it can induce cross-clade protecting immunity. Methodology/Principal Findings After formulation with PELC, a proprietary water-in-oil-in-water nanoemulsion comprising of bioresorbable polymer/Span®85/squalene, inactivated virus was intramuscularly administered to mice in either one-dose or two-dose schedule. We found that the antigen-specific serum antibody responses elicited after two doses of non-adjuvanted vaccine were lower than those observed after a single dose of adjuvanted vaccine, PELC and the conventional alum adjuvant as well. Moreover, 5 µg HA of PELC-formulated inactivated virus were capable of inducing higher antibodies than those obtained from alum-adjuvanted vaccine. In single-dose study, we found that encapsulating inactivated virus into emulsified PELC nanoparticles could induce better antibody responses than those formulated with PELC-adsorbed vaccine. However, the potency was rather reduced when the inactivated virus and CpG (an immunostimulatory oligodeoxynucleotide containing unmethylated cytosine-guanosine motifs) were co-encapsulated within the emulsion. Finally, the mice who received PELC/CpG(adsorption)-vaccine could easily and quickly reach 100% of seroprotection against a homologous virus strain and effective cross-protection against a heterologous virus strain (A/Whooper swan/Mongolia/244/2005, clade 2.2). Conclusions/Significance Encapsulating inactivated H5N1 influenza virus and CpG into emulsified nanoparticles critically influences the humoral responses against pandemic influenza. These results demonstrated that the use of PELC could be as antigen-sparing in preparation for a potential shortage of prophylactic vaccines against local infectious diseases, in particular pandemic influenza. Moreover, the cross-clade neutralizing antibody responses data verify the potential of such adjuvanted H5N1 candidate vaccine as an effective tool in pre-pandemic preparedness. PMID:20808862

  11. Iron and Stony-iron Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haack, H.; McCoy, T. J.

    2003-12-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids.Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar to that continuing on Earth - although on much smaller length- and timescales - with melting of the metal and silicates, differentiation into core, mantle, and crust, and probably extensive volcanism. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are our only available analogues to materials found in the deep interiors of Earth and other terrestrial planets. This fact has been recognized since the work of Chladni (1794), who argued that stony-iron meteorites must have originated in outer space and fallen during fireballs and that they provide our closest analogue to the material that comprises our own planet's core. This chapter deals with our current knowledge of these meteorites. How did they form? What can they tell us about the early evolution of the solar system and its solid bodies? How closely do they resemble the materials from planetary interiors? What do we know and don't we know?Iron and stony-iron meteorites constitute ˜6% of meteorite falls (Grady, 2000). Despite their scarcity among falls, iron meteorites are our only samples of ˜75 of the ˜135 asteroids from which meteorites originate ( Keil et al., 1994; Scott, 1979; Meibom and Clark, 1999; see also Chapter 1.05), suggesting that both differentiated asteroids and the geologic processes that produced them were common.Despite the highly evolved nature of iron and stony-iron meteorites, their chemistry provides important constraints on the processes operating in the solar nebula. Although most of them probably formed through similar mechanisms, their characteristics are diverse in terms of chemistry, mineralogy, and structure. Significant differences in bulk chemistry between iron meteorites from different cores as well as variations in chemistry between meteorites from the same core provide evidence of the complex chemical evolution of these evolved meteorites. Intergroup variations for volatile siderophile elements (e.g., gallium and germanium) extend more than three orders of magnitude, hinting that iron meteorite parent bodies formed under diverse conditions. These differences reflect both the nebular source material and geological processing in the parent bodies.Can we be sure that the iron meteorites are indeed fragments of cores? Since no differentiated asteroid has yet been visited by a spacecraft, we rely on circumstantial evidence. Some M-type asteroids have spectral characteristics expected from exposed metallic cores (Tholen, 1989), while others exhibit basaltic surfaces, a hallmark of global differentiation. Although olivine-rich mantles should dominate the volume of differentiated asteroids, there is an enigmatic lack of olivine-rich asteroids (and meteorites) that could represent mantle material ( Burbine et al., 1996). Until we visit an asteroid with parts of a core-mantle boundary exposed, our best evidence supporting a core origin is detailed studies of iron meteorites.Iron-nickel alloys are expected in the cores of differentiated asteroids, but what other evidence supports the notion that iron meteorites sample the metallic cores of differentiated asteroids? What suggests that these asteroids were sufficiently heated to trigger core formation, and that iron meteorites sample cores rather than isolated pods of once molten metal? First and foremost, trace-element compositional trends in most groups of iron meteorites are consistent with fractional crystallization of a metallic melt (Scott, 1972), thus constraining peak temperatures. The temperatures required to f

  12. Iron Fractionation During Microbial Reduction of Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Icopini, G. A.; Brantley, S. L.; Ruebush, S.; Tien, M.; Bullen, T. D.

    2002-12-01

    The isotopic fractionation of iron during the biological reduction of iron by microbes has received much attention due to the possible use of iron isotopes as an indicator of biological activity in ancient and extraterrestrial environments. However the mechanisms of dissimilatory iron reduction have not been fully characterized. We are investigating the mechanisms by which Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32 reduces ferric iron in the form of goethite, as well as, the resulting iron isotopic fractionation. In the experiments a PIPES buffered minimal media was used in an effort to eliminate or control the formation of secondary ferrous-iron solids. S. putrefaciens is thought to also produce an electron shuttle, which carries electrons from the cell to the iron solid. In one set of experiments, S. putrefaciens was cultured in minimal media containing goethite both with and without anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS, an artificial electron shuttle). Preliminary data indicates that the fractionation of iron in solution in the AQDS amended cultures is -1.57 per mil lighter than the starting goethite. This fractionation corresponds well with previously reported fractionations in similar systems. However, other researchers have shown that, in these systems, much of the reduced Fe(II) sorbs to the goethite. An acid extraction is often used to remove this sorbed Fe(II) and determine the total amount of reduced iron. This extraction was used to extract sorbed Fe(II) for isotopic analysis. Although the extraction itself may cause a fractionation effect, less than 1% of the total iron in the extraction can be attributed to this effect. Therefore, the observed fractionation should be primarily a function of the microbially reduced iron and not an artifact of the extraction. The isotope fractionation in the extraction, which includes both soluble and sorbed Fe(II), is -2.42 per mil relative to the starting goethite. We are currently combining parts of the cell involved in iron reduction (cell wall components) with an electron shuttle and goethite to accomplish in vitro Fe reduction. We will compare the in vitro iron isotope fractionations that occur without live cells to those with live cultures in an effort to elucidate iron reducing mechanisms and pathways.

  13. Iron Dextran Injection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... injections such as ferric carboxymaltose (Injectafer), ferumoxytol (Feraheme), iron sucrose (Venofer), or sodium ferric gluconate (Ferrlecit);any other medications; or any of the ingredients in iron dextran injection. Ask your pharmacist for a list ...

  14. Iron in diet

    MedlinePLUS

    The best sources of iron include: Dried beans Dried fruits Eggs (especially egg yolks) Iron-fortified cereals Liver Lean red meat (especially beef) Oysters Poultry, dark red meat Salmon Tuna Whole ...

  15. Iron supplements (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    The mineral iron is an essential nutrient for humans because it is part of blood cells, which carry oxygen to all body cells. There is no conclusive evidence that iron supplements contribute to heart attacks.

  16. Ferrous Sulfate (Iron)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the iron needed by the body to produce red blood cells. It is used to treat or prevent iron- ... that occurs when the body has too few red blood cells because of pregnancy, poor diet, excess bleeding, or ...

  17. Novel solid self-emulsifying drug delivery system of coenzyme Q?? with improved photochemical and pharmacokinetic behaviors.

    PubMed

    Onoue, Satomi; Uchida, Atushi; Kuriyama, Kazuki; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Seto, Yoshiki; Kato, Masashi; Hatanaka, Junya; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Shizuo

    2012-08-15

    The present study was undertaken to develop a solid self-emulsifying drug delivery system of coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)/s-SEDDS) with high photostability and oral bioavailability. The CoQ(10)/s-SEDDS was prepared by spray-drying an emulsion preconcentrate containing CoQ(10), medium-chain triglyceride, sucrose ester of fatty acid, and hydroxypropyl cellulose, and its physicochemical, photochemical, and pharmacokinetic properties were evaluated. The CoQ(10)/s-SEDDS powder with a diameter of ca. 15 ?m was obtained by spray-drying, in which the CoQ(10) was mostly amorphized. The CoQ(10)/s-SEDDS exhibited immediate self-emulsification when introduced to aqueous media under gentle agitation, forming uniform fine droplets with a mean diameter of ca. 280 nm. There was marked generation of reactive oxygen species, in particular superoxide, from CoQ(10) exposed to simulated sunlight (250W/m(2)), suggesting potent photoreactivity. Nano-emulsified solution of CoQ(10) under light exposure underwent photodegradation with 22-fold higher degradation kinetics than crystalline CoQ(10), although the CoQ(10)/s-SEDDS was less photoreactive. After the oral administration of CoQ(10)/s-SEDDS (100 mg-CoQ(10)/kg) in rats, enhanced exposure of CoQ(10) was observed with increases in both C(max) and AUC of ca. 5-fold in comparison with those of orally administered crystalline CoQ(10). From the improved physicochemical and pharmacokinetic data, the s-SEDDS approach upon spray-drying might be a suitable dosage option for enhancing nutraceutical and pharmaceutical values of CoQ(10). PMID:22498005

  18. Role of lipid-based excipients and their composition on the bioavailability of antiretroviral self-emulsifying formulations.

    PubMed

    Chudasama, Arpan; Patel, Vineetkumar; Nivsarkar, Manish; Vasu, Kamala; Shishoo, Chamanlal

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) to improve solubility and enhance the oral absorption of the poorly water-soluble drug, nevirapine. This lipid-based formulation may help to target the drug to lymphoid organs where HIV-1 virus resides mainly. The influence of the oil, surfactant and co-surfactant types on the drug solubility and their ratios on forming efficient and stable SEDDS were investigated in detail. Two SEDDS (F1 and F2) were prepared and characterized by morphological observation, droplet size and zeta potential determination, cloud point measurement and in vitro diffusion study. The influence of droplet size on the absorption from formulations with varying concentration of oil and surfactant was also evaluated from two self-emulsifying formulations. Oral bioavailability of nevirapine SEDDS was checked by using rat model. Results of diffusion rate and oral bioavailability of nevirapine SEDDS were compared with marketed suspension. The absorption of nevirapine from F1 and F2 showed 1.92 and 1.98-fold increase (p?

  19. GROUND WATER ARSENIC AND METALS TREATMENT USING A COMBINATION COMPOST-ZVI PRB (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot permeable reactive barrier (PRB) consisting of a mixture of leaf compost, zero-valent iron (ZVI), limestone and pea gravel was installed at a former phosphate fertilizer manufacturing facility in Charleston, S.C. in September 2002. The PRB is designed to treat arsenic an...

  20. GROUND WATER ARSENIC AND METALS TREATMENT USING A COMBINATION COMPOST-ZVI PRB

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot permeable reactive barrier (PRB) consisting of a mixture of leaf compost, zero-valent iron (ZVI), limestone and pea gravel was installed at a former phosphate fertilizer manufacturing facility in Charleston, S.C. in September 2002. The PRB is designed to treat arsenic an...

  1. TREATMENT OF ARSENIC AND METALS IN GROUND WATER USING A COMPOST-ZVI PRB

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot permeable reactive barrier (PRB) consisting of a mixture of leaf compost, zero-valent iron (ZVI), limestone and pea gravel was installed at a former phosphate fertilizer manufacturing facility in Charleston, S.C. in September 2002. The PRB is designed to treat arsenic an...

  2. Environmental Aspects of Two Volatile Organic Compound Groundwater Treatment Designs at the Rocky Flats Site - 13135

    SciTech Connect

    Michalski, Casey C.; DiSalvo, Rick; Boylan, John

    2013-07-01

    DOE's Rocky Flats Site in Colorado is a former nuclear weapons production facility that began operations in the early 1950's. Because of releases of hazardous substances to the environment, the federally owned property and adjacent offsite areas were placed on the CERCLA National Priorities List in 1989. The final remedy was selected in 2006. Engineered components of the remedy include four groundwater treatment systems that were installed before closure as CERCLA-accelerated actions. Two of the systems, the Mound Site Plume Treatment System and the East Trenches Plume Treatment System, remove low levels of volatile organic compounds using zero-valent iron media, thereby reducing the loading of volatile organic compounds in surface water resulting from the groundwater pathway. However, the zero-valent iron treatment does not reliably reduce all volatile organic compounds to consistently meet water quality goals. While adding additional zero-valent iron media capacity could improve volatile organic compound removal capability, installation of a solar powered air-stripper has proven an effective treatment optimization in further reducing volatile organic compound concentrations. A comparison of the air stripper to the alternative of adding additional zero-valent iron capacity to improve Mound Site Plume Treatment System and East Trenches Plume Treatment System treatment based on several key sustainable remediation aspects indicates the air stripper is also more 'environmentally friendly'. These key aspects include air pollutant emissions, water quality, waste management, transportation, and costs. (authors)

  3. Formation Processes and Impacts of Reactive and Nonreactive Minerals in Permeable Reactive Barriers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mineral precipitates in zero-valent iron PRBs can be classified by formation processes into three groups: 1) those that result from changes in chemical conditions (i.e., changes in pH, e.g., calcite); 2) those that are a consequence of microbial activity (i.e., sulfate reduction,...

  4. FORMATION PROCESSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF REACTIVE AND NON-REACTIVE MINERAL PRECIPITATES IN PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mineral precipitates in zero-valent iron PRBs can be classified by formation processes into three groups: 1) those that result from changes in chemical conditions (i.e., change in pH, e.g., calcite); 2) those that are a consequence of microbial activity (i.e., sulfate reduction, ...

  5. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H. (Evanston, IL); Tzou, Ming-Shin (Evanston, IL); Jiang, Hui-Jong (Evanston, IL)

    1987-01-01

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  6. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Sachtler, W.M.H.; Tzou, M.S.; Jiang, H.J.

    1987-03-31

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  7. PRB STRATEGIES AND PERFORMANCE MONITORING FOR REMEDIATION OF INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A combination of experimental and field investigations will be conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and long-term performance of zero-valent iron mixtures for treating inorganic contaminants. Long-term performance research will explore the geochemical and microbiological proce...

  8. This article was downloaded by: [University of Leeds] On: 30 September 2013, At: 08:03

    E-print Network

    Burke, Ian

    of toxic (e.g. Cr(VI)) and radioactive (e.g. U(VI)) species from alkaline and hyperalkaline (pH > 10) waste Immobilization of chromate in hyperalkaline waste streams by green rusts and zero-valent iron Christine M. Rogers.M. Ahmed & Samuel Shaw , Environmental Technology (2013): Immobilization of chromate in hyperalkaline waste

  9. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: METAL-ENHANCED ABIOTIC DEGRADATION TECHNOLOGY - ENVIROMETAL TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    EnviroMetal Technologies, Inc. (ETI), of Guelph, ON, Canada, has developed the metal-enhanced abiotic degradation technology to treat halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOC) in water. A reactive, zero-valent, granular iron medium causes reductive dehalogenation of VOCs yield...

  10. Treatment of Arsenic, Heavy Metals, and Acidity Using a Mixed ZVI-Compost PRB

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 30-month performance evaluation of a pilot permeable reactive barrier (PRB) consisting of a mixture of leaf compost, zero-valent iron (ZVI), limestone and pea gravel installed at a former phosphate fertilizer manufacturing facility was conducted. The PRB is designed to remove ...

  11. TREATMENT OF METALS IN GROUND WATER USING AN ORGANIC-BASED SULFATE-REDUCING PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot permeable reactive barrier (PRB) consisting of a mixture of leaf compost, zero-valent iron (ZVI) filings, limestone and pea gravel was evaluated at a former phosphate fertilizer manufacturing facility in Charleston, S.C. The PRB is designed to treat arsenic and heavy met...

  12. TREATMENT OF ARSENIC AND METALS IN GROUND WATER USING A COMPOST/ZVI PRB

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot permeable reactive barrier (PRB) consisting of a mixture of 30% yard waste compost, 20% zero-valent iron (ZVI), 5% limestone and 45% pea gravel by volume was installed at a former phosphate fertilizer manufacturing facility in Charleston, S.C. in September 2002. The pilo...

  13. ZVI-CLAY SOIL MIXING TREATS DNAPL SOURCE AREA AT 35-FOOT DEPTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The DuPont Company and Colorado State University (CSU) are collaborating in development and refinement of a technology that involves in-situ admixing of contaminated soil, granular zero valent iron (ZVI), and clay using conventional soil mixing equipment. A full-scale application...

  14. ACCUMULATION RATE OF MICROBIAL BIOMASS AT TWO PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accumulation of mineral precipitates and microbial biomass are key factors that impact the long-term performance of in-situ Permeable Reactive Barriers for treating contaminated groundwater. Both processes can impact remedial performance by decreasing zero-valent iron reactivity...

  15. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL TRENDS IN GROUNDWATER CHEMISTRY AND PRECIPITATE FORMATION AT THE ELIZABETH CITY PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accumulation of mineral precipitates and microbial biomass are key factors that impact the long-term performance of PRBs. Both processes can impact remedial performance by affecting zero-valent iron reactivity and permeability. Results will be presented from solid-phase and gro...

  16. PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER STRATEGIES FOR REMEDIATION OF ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results are presented from laboratory batch tests using zero-valent iron to treat arsenic-contaminated groundwater. The laboratory tests were conducted using near- neutral pH groundwater from a contaminated aquifer located adjacent to a custom smelting facility. Experiments we...

  17. Remediation of Cr(VI) and Pb(II) Aqueous Solutions Using Supported,

    E-print Network

    contamination is a significant environmental hazard to drinking water supplies. The U.S. EPA action level in the case of Pb (4). The EPA estimates that as many as 40 million U.S. residents may use water with Pb of aqueous Pb(II) (18, 19). Zero-valent iron removes aqueous contaminants by reductive dechlorination

  18. THE APPLICATION OF PRB TECHNOLOGY AT TWO SITES: LESSONS LEARNED AFTER 7 YEARS OF PERFORMANCE MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    In June of 1996, a 46 m long, 7.3 m deep, and 0.6 m wide permeable reactive barrier (continuous wall configuration) of zero-valent iron was installed at the USCG-SC site. The reactive wall was designed to remediate hexavalent chromium-contaminated groundwater, in addition to tre...

  19. Green synthesis of Fe0 and bimetallic Fe0 for oxidative catalysis and reduction applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single-step green approach to the synthesis of nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) and nanoscale bimetallic (Fe0/Pd) particles using tea (Camellia sinensis) polyphenols is described. The expedient reaction between polyphenols and ferric chloride (FeCl3) occurs within a minute at ...

  20. Environmental Research Group 2014 Spring Seminar Series

    E-print Network

    for enhanced remediation of stormwater runoff pollutants. Bio-Mix Osorb is an organosilica-zero valent iron-gel derived, hybrid organic-inorganic structures that have been nano-engineered to absorb organic molecules from air and water with high affinity and capacity. Osorb is hydrophobic and does not absorb water

  1. Taking iron supplements

    MedlinePLUS

    ... taking a vitamin C supplement or drinking orange juice with your iron pill. This can help the iron absorb into your body. Drinking 8 ounces of fluid with an iron pill is also okay. Tell your health care provider about all the medicines you are ...

  2. Environmental Remediation Technologies Derived from Space Industry Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Jacqueline; Sauser, Brian; Helminger, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Beginning in the 1950s and 1960s, an abundance of effort and initiative was focused on propelling the space industry outward for planetary exploration and habitation. During these early years, the push to take space science to new levels indirectly contributed to the evolution of another science field that would not fully surface until the early 1980s, environmental remediation. This field is associated with the remediation or cleanup of environmental resources such as groundwater, soil, and sediment. Because the space-exploration initiative began prior to the establishment of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in December of 1970, many NASA Centers as well as space-related support contractors allowed for the release of spent chemicals into the environment. Subsequently, these land owners have been directed by the EPA to responsibly initiate cleanup of their impacted sites. This paper will focus on the processes and lessons learned with the development, testing, and commercialization initiatives associated with four remediation technologies. The technologies include installation techniques for permeable reactive barriers (PRBs), the use of ultrasound to improve long-term performance of PRBs, emulsified zero-valent iron for product-level solvent degradation, and emulsion technologies for application to metal and polychlorinated biphenyl contaminated media. Details of the paper cover technology research, evaluation, and testing; contracts and grants; and technology transfer strategies including patenting, marketing, and licensing.

  3. Iron, radiation, and cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.G.; Kalkwarf, D.R. )

    1990-07-01

    Increased iron content of cells and tissue may increase the risk of cancer. In particular, high available iron status may increase the risk of a radiation-induced cancer. There are two possible mechanisms for this effect: iron can catalyze the production of oxygen radicals, and it may be a limiting nutrient to the growth and development of a transformed cell in vivo. Given the high available iron content of the western diet and the fact that the world is changing to the western model, it is important to determine if high iron increases the risk of cancer. 151 references.

  4. Iron, radiation, and cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, R G; Kalkwarf, D R

    1990-01-01

    Increased iron content of cells and tissue may increase the risk of cancer. In particular, high available iron status may increase the risk of a radiation-induced cancer. There are two possible mechanisms for this effect: iron can catalyze the production of oxygen radicals, and it may be a limiting nutrient to the growth and development of a transformed cell in vivo. Given the high available iron content of the western diet and the fact that the world is changing to the western model, it is important to determine if high iron increases the risk of cancer. PMID:2269234

  5. The ubiquity of iron.

    PubMed

    Frey, Perry A; Reed, George H

    2012-09-21

    The importance of iron in living systems can be traced to the many complexes within which it is found, to its chemical mobility in undergoing oxidation-reduction reactions, and to the abundance of iron in Earth's crust. Iron is the most abundant element, by mass, in the Earth, constituting about 80% of the inner and outer cores of Earth. The molten outer core is about 8000 km in diameter, and the solid inner core is about 2400 km in diameter. Iron is the fourth most abundant element in Earth's crust. It is the chemically functional component of mononuclear iron complexes, dinuclear iron complexes, [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters, [Fe-Ni-S] clusters, iron protophorphyrin IX, and many other complexes in protein biochemistry. Metals such as nickel, cobalt, copper, and manganese are present in the crust and could in principle function chemically in place of iron, but they are scarce in Earth's crust. Iron is plentiful because of its nuclear stability in stellar nuclear fusion reactions. It seems likely that other solid planets, formed by the same processes as Earth, would also foster the evolution of life and that iron would be similarly important to life on those planets as it is on Earth. PMID:22845493

  6. Effect of tartarate and citrate based food additives on the micellar properties of sodium dodecylsulfate for prospective use as food emulsifier.

    PubMed

    Banipal, Tarlok S; Kaur, Harjinder; Kaur, Amanpreet; Banipal, Parampaul K

    2016-01-01

    Citrate and tartarate based food preservatives can be used to enhance the emulsifying properties of sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) based micellar system and thus making it appropriate for food applications. Exploration of interactions between the two species is the key constraint for execution of such ideas. In this work various micellar and thermodynamic parameters of SDS like critical micellar concentration (CMC), standard Gibbs free energy of micellization (?G(0)mic.) etc. have been calculated in different concentrations of disodium tartarate (DST) and trisodium citrate (TSC) in the temperature range (288.15-318.15)K from the conductivity and surface tension measurements. The parameters obtained from these studies reveal the competitive nature of both the additives with SDS for available positions at the air/water interface. TSC is found to be more effective additive in order to make SDS micellar system better for its potential applications as food emulsifier. PMID:26213016

  7. Iron and transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Waldvogel-Abramovski, Sophie; Waeber, Gérard; Gassner, Christoph; Buser, Andreas; Frey, Beat M; Favrat, Bernard; Tissot, Jean-Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Blood bankers have focused their energy to secure blood transfusion, and only recently have studies been published on the effect of blood donation on iron metabolism. In many facilities, hemoglobin measurement is only performed just before or even during blood donation, but the determination of iron stores is largely ignored. The 2013 paradox of transfusion medicine is due to the fact that blood donation may be harmful and leads to iron deficiency with or without anemia, but for other individuals, it may be a healthy measure preventing type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this review is to discuss iron metabolism in the perspective of blood donation, notably regarding their possible genetic profiles that eventually will discriminate "good" iron absorbers from "bad" iron responders. PMID:24148756

  8. 35. GREY IRON TUMBLERS, IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY ROTATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. GREY IRON TUMBLERS, IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY ROTATE CASTINGS WITH SHOT TO REMOVE AND SURFACE OXIDES AND REMAINING EXCESS METALS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  9. Physics of iron

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, O.

    1993-10-01

    This volume comprises papers presented at the AIRAPT Conference, June 28 to July 1993. The iron sessions at the meeting were identified as the Second Ironworkers Convention. The renewal of interest stems from advances in technologies in both diamond-anvil cell (DAC) and shock wave studies as well as from controversies arising from a lack of consensus among both experimentalists and theoreticians. These advances have produced new data on iron in the pressure-temperature regime of interest for phase diagrams and for temperatures of the core/mantle and inner-core/outer-core boundaries. Particularly interesting is the iron phase diagram inferred from DAC studies. A new phase, {beta}, with a {gamma}-{beta}-{epsilon} triple point at about 30 GPa and 1190 K, and possible sixth phase, {omega}, with an {epsilon}-{Theta}-melt triple point at about 190 GPa and 4000 K are deemed possible. The importance of the equation of state of iron in consideration of Earth`s heat budget and the origin of its magnetic field invoke the interest of theoreticians who argue on the basis of molecular dynamics and other first principles methods. While the major thrust of both meetings was on the physics of pure iron, there was notable contributions on iron alloys. Hydrogen-iron alloys, iron-sulfur liquids, and the comparability to rhenium in phase diagram studies are discussed. The knowledge of the physical properties of iron were increased by several contributions.

  10. Physiology of iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Waldvogel-Abramowski, Sophie; Waeber, Gérard; Gassner, Christoph; Buser, Andreas; Frey, Beat M; Favrat, Bernard; Tissot, Jean-Daniel

    2014-06-01

    A revolution occurred during the last decade in the comprehension of the physiology as well as in the physiopathology of iron metabolism. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent knowledge that has accumulated, allowing a better comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in iron homeostasis. Iron metabolism is very fine tuned. The free molecule is very toxic; therefore, complex regulatory mechanisms have been developed in mammalian to insure adequate intestinal absorption, transportation, utilization, and elimination. 'Ironomics' certainly will be the future of the understanding of genes as well as of the protein-protein interactions involved in iron metabolism. PMID:25053935

  11. Physiology of Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Waldvogel-Abramowski, Sophie; Waeber, Gérard; Gassner, Christoph; Buser, Andreas; Frey, Beat M.; Favrat, Bernard; Tissot, Jean-Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary A revolution occurred during the last decade in the comprehension of the physiology as well as in the physiopathology of iron metabolism. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent knowledge that has accumulated, allowing a better comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in iron homeostasis. Iron metabolism is very fine tuned. The free molecule is very toxic; therefore, complex regulatory mechanisms have been developed in mammalian to insure adequate intestinal absorption, transportation, utilization, and elimination. ‘Ironomics’ certainly will be the future of the understanding of genes as well as of the protein-protein interactions involved in iron metabolism. PMID:25053935

  12. Plea for Iron Astrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Mostefaoui, T. A.; Benmerad, B.; Kerkar, M.

    2010-10-31

    Iron is a key element and compound in living bodies. It is the most abundant refractory element and has the most stable nucleus in the Universe. Also, elemental Iron has a relevant abundance in the interstellar medium and dense clouds, it can be in gas phase or included in dust particles. During this talk, I shall explain why this special interest in Iron and shall give a brief explanation about its origin and the interstellar nucleosynthesis. After this I'll detail the rich chemistry that Iron can be involved in the interstellar medium, dense clouds with several species.

  13. Emulsifying properties of legume proteins compared to ?-lactoglobulin and Tween 20 and the volatile release from oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, O; Silcock, P; Beauchamp, J; Buettner, A; Everett, D W

    2014-10-01

    The emulsifying properties of plant legume protein isolates (soy, pea, and lupin) were compared to a milk whey protein, ?-lactoglobulin (?-lg), and a nonionic surfactant (Tween 20). The protein fractional composition was characterized using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis. The following emulsion properties were measured: particle diameter, shear surface ?-potential, interfacial tension (IT), and creaming velocity. The effect of protein preheat treatment (90 °C for 10 min) on the emulsifying behavior and the release of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from emulsions under oral conditions was also investigated in real time using proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry. The legume proteins showed comparable results to ?-lg and Tween 20, forming stable, negatively charged emulsions with particle diameter d3,2 < 0.4 ?m, and maintained stability over 50 d. The relatively lower stability of lupin emulsions was significantly correlated with the low protein surface hydrophobicity and IT of the emulsion. After heating the proteins, the droplet size of pea and lupin emulsions decreased. The VOC release profile was similar between the protein-stabilized emulsions, and greater retention was observed for Tween 20-stabilized emulsions. This study demonstrates the potential application of legume proteins as alternative emulsifiers to milk proteins in emulsion products. PMID:25212592

  14. Effect of NaCl Concentration on the Emulsifying Properties of Myofibrilla Protein in the Soybean Oil and Fish Oil Emulsion

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Yeon-Ji; Kwon, Yun-Joong; Min, Sang-Gi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the effect of NaCl concentration on the emulsifying and rheological properties of porcine myofibrillar protein (MF)-stabilized soybean oil and fish oil emulsion (SO-EMs and FO-EMs). Emulsions (EMs) were prepared from 1% MF with 10% SO or FO at various NaCl concentration (0-0.5 M). The emulsifying ability index (EAI) of the EMs increased with increasing NaCl concentration for both oil types. Conversely, increasing NaCl manifested decrease in the emulsion stability index (ESI). In addition, creaming index (CI) also increased with NaCl concentration. From the microscopic observation, droplets of the EMs were more aggregated at relatively higher NaCl concentrations, especially for FO-EMs. All EMs had a gel-like structure owing to G' > G" from the rheological analysis. Comparing the oil types, the emulsifying capacity of SO-EMs was more stable than that of FO-EMs at all NaCl concentrations as determined from the CI value and microscopic observation. Therefore, it can be concluded that SO-EMs and FO-EMs are more stable at relatively lower concentrations of NaCl. In addition, the dispersed stability of SO-EMs was better than that of FO-EMs at the same concentration of NaCl.

  15. Nanohybrids from direct chemical self-assembly of poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride) as pH-responsive particulate emulsifiers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianhua; Yi, Chenglin; Wei, Wei; Zhao, Donghua; Hu, Qiong; Liu, Xiaoya

    2014-12-16

    The nanohybrid particulate emulsifiers based on poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride) (SMA) were facilely prepared via the direct chemical self-assembly triggered by the aminolysis of SMA with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and the in situ polycondensation of APTES under refluxing in acetone. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy confirmed the spherical-like morphology of the nanohybrids. Dynamic light scattering and electrophoresis revealed the structure transition of the nanohybrids in response to pH change. The emulsification study showed that the nanohybrids were effective particulate emulsifiers when homogenized with various oils including toluene, paraffin oil, silicone oil, isooctyl palmitate, dicaprylyl carbonate, and propylheptyl caprylate. The nanohybrid particulate emulsifiers exhibited pH-sensitivity, and the diameter of paraffin oil droplets remarkably increased with pH of the nanohybrid aqueous dispersion decrease. Also, the reduced dynamic interfacial tension predicted the thermodynamically unstable state of the emulsions prepared at high pH values. Most interesting, the paraffin oil-in-water high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) with a high oil volume fraction of 83.3% were formed when the nanohybrids were heavily flocculated by adding HCl. The HIPEs were pH-responsive and capable of demulsification with the addition of an alkaline solution showing a potential application in the oil industry. PMID:25423487

  16. Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation Information Page Synonym(s): Hallervorden-Spatz Disease, ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation? Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) ...

  17. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-Model application to a field test

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Guoping; Watson, David B; Wu, Wei-min; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Parker, Jack C; Brooks, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    A one-time 2-hour emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) injection in a fast flowing aquifer decreased U discharge to a stream for over a year. Using a comprehensive biogeochemical model developed in the companion article based on microcosm tests, we approximately matched the observed acetate, nitrate, Fe, U, and sulfate concentrations, and described the major evolution trends of multiple microbial functional groups in the field test. While the lab-determined parameters were generally applicable in the field-scale simulation, the EVO hydrolysis rate constant was estimated to be an order of magnitude greater in the field than in the microcosms. The model predicted substantial biomass (sulfate reducers) and U(IV) accumulation near the injection wells and along the side boundaries of the treatment zone where electron donors (long-chain fatty acids) from the injection wells met electron acceptors (sulfate) from the surrounding environment. While EVO retention and hydrolysis characteristics were expected to control treatment longevity, modeling results indicated that electron acceptors such as sulfate may not only compete for electrons but also play a conducive role in degrading complex substrates and enhancing U(VI) reduction and immobilization. As a result, the spacing of the injection wells could be optimized for effective sustainable bioremediation.

  18. Reexamination of pharmacokinetics of oral testosterone undecanoate in hypogonadal men with a new self-emulsifying formulation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Anthony Y; Htun, Michelle; Swerdloff, Ronald S; Diaz-Arjonilla, Maruja; Dudley, Robert E; Faulkner, Sandra; Bross, Rachelle; Leung, Andrew; Baravarian, Sima; Hull, Laura; Longstreth, James A; Kulback, Steven; Flippo, Gregory; Wang, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Many hypogonadal men prefer oral testosterone (T) treatment. Oral T undecanoate (TU) is available in many countries, but not in the United States. We aimed to assess the pharmacokinetics of oral TU in a new self-emulsifying drug delivery system formulation. Pharmacokinetics studies were conducted in 3 parts: 12 hypogonadal men were enrolled in 2 centers for a 1-day dosing study; 29 participants were enrolled from 3 centers for a 7-day dosing study; and 15 participants were enrolled from 1 center for a 28-day dosing study. Serial blood samples for serum sex hormone measurements by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry were drawn for up to 36 hours after oral TU administration. Mean serum T levels (C(avg)) after oral dosing of T 200 mg as TU twice daily with food were within the adult male range in most participants in the 1-, 7-, and 28-day dosing studies but were much lower in the fasting state. The dose-proportional increase in C(avg) of serum T after oral T 300 mg twice daily resulted in more participants with supraphysiologic serum T levels. In the 28-day study, trough serum T reached a steady state at day 7. Serum dihydrotestosterone and estradiol levels tracked serum T concentration. Dihydrotestosterone-testosterone ratios increased 3-fold after oral TU administration. Oral T 200 mg twice daily as TU in a new SEDDS formulation may be a viable therapy for hypogonadal men. PMID:21474786

  19. Reexamination of Pharmacokinetics of Oral Testosterone Undecanoate in Hypogonadal Men With a New Self-Emulsifying Formulation

    PubMed Central

    SWERDLOFF, RONALD S.; DIAZ-ARJONILLA, MARUJA; DUDLEY, ROBERT E.; FAULKNER, SANDRA; BROSS, RACHELLE; LEUNG, ANDREW; BARAVARIAN, SIMA; HULL, LAURA; LONGSTRETH, JAMES A.; KULBACK, STEVEN; FLIPPO, GREGORY; WANG, CHRISTINA

    2014-01-01

    Many hypogonadal men prefer oral testosterone (T) treatment. Oral T undecanoate (TU) is available in many countries, but not in the United States. We aimed to assess the pharmacokinetics of oral TU in a new self-emulsifying drug delivery system formulation. Pharmacokinetics studies were conducted in 3 parts: 12 hypogonadal men were enrolled in 2 centers for a 1-day dosing study; 29 participants were enrolled from 3 centers for a 7-day dosing study; and 15 participants were enrolled from 1 center for a 28-day dosing study. Serial blood samples for serum sex hormone measurements by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry were drawn for up to 36 hours after oral TU administration. Mean serum T levels (Cavg) after oral dosing of T 200 mg as TU twice daily with food were within the adult male range in most participants in the 1-, 7-, and 28-day dosing studies but were much lower in the fasting state. The dose-proportional increase in Cavg of serum T after oral T 300 mg twice daily resulted in more participants with supraphysiologic serum T levels. In the 28-day study, trough serum T reached a steady state at day 7. Serum dihydrotestosterone and estradiol levels tracked serum T concentration. Dihydrotestosterone-testosterone ratios increased 3-fold after oral TU administration. Oral T 200 mg twice daily as TU in a new SEDDS formulation may be a viable therapy for hypogonadal men. PMID:21474786

  20. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-- Microcosm tests and model development

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Guoping; Wu, Wei-min; Watson, David B; Parker, Jack C.; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Brooks, Scott C; Shi, Xiaoqing

    2013-01-01

    Microcosm tests were conducted to study U(VI) bioreduction in contaminated sediments with emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) as the electron donor. In the microcosms, EVO was degraded by indigenous microorganisms and stimulated Fe, U, and sulfate bioreduction, and methanogenesis. Removal of aqueous U occurred concurrently with sulfate reduction, with more reduction of total U in the case of higher initial sulfate concentrations. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis confirmed U(VI) reduction to U(IV). As the acetate concentration peaked in 10~20 days in oleate microcosms, the maximum was reached in 100~120 days in the EVO microcosms, indicating that EVO hydrolysis was rate-limiting. The acetate accumulation was sustained over 50 days longer in the oleate and EVO than in the ethanol microcosms, suggesting that acetate-utilizing methanogenesis was slower in the cases of oleate and EVO. Both slow hydrolysis and methanogenesis could contribute to potential sustained bioreduction in field application. Biogeochemical models were developed to couple degradation of EVO, production and oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, glycerol, acetate, and hydrogen, reduction of Fe(III), U(VI) and sulfate, and methanogenesis with growth and decay of microbial functional groups. The models were used to simulate the coupled processes in a field test in a companion article.

  1. Emulsifying Activity and Stability of a Non-Toxic Bioemulsifier Synthesized by Microbacterium sp. MC3B-10

    PubMed Central

    Camacho-Chab, Juan Carlos; Guézennec, Jean; Chan-Bacab, Manuel Jesús; Ríos-Leal, Elvira; Sinquin, Corinne; Muñiz-Salazar, Raquel; De la Rosa-García, Susana del C.; Reyes-Estebanez, Manuela; Ortega-Morales, Benjamín Otto

    2013-01-01

    A previously reported bacterial bioemulsifier, here termed microbactan, was further analyzed to characterize its lipid component, molecular weight, ionic character and toxicity, along with its bioemulsifying potential for hydrophobic substrates at a range of temperatures, salinities and pH values. Analyses showed that microbactan is a high molecular weight (700 kDa), non-ionic molecule. Gas chromatography of the lipid fraction revealed the presence of palmitic, stearic, and oleic acids; thus microbactan may be considered a glycolipoprotein. Microbactan emulsified aromatic hydrocarbons and oils to various extents; the highest emulsification index was recorded against motor oil (96%). The stability of the microbactan-motor oil emulsion model reached its highest level (94%) at 50 °C, pH 10 and 3.5% NaCl content. It was not toxic to Artemia salina nauplii. Microbactan is, therefore, a non-toxic and non-ionic bioemulsifier of high molecular weight with affinity for a range of oily substrates. Comparative phylogenetic assessment of the 16S rDNA gene of Microbacterium sp. MC3B-10 with genes derived from other marine Microbacterium species suggested that this genus is well represented in coastal zones. The chemical nature and stability of the bioemulsifier suggest its potential application in bioremediation of marine environments and in cosmetics. PMID:24065097

  2. Probing structure in submicronic aqueous assemblies of emulsified microemulsions and charged spherical colloids using SANS and cryo-TEM.

    PubMed

    Muller, François; Dégousée, Thibault; Degrouard, Jéril; Brûlet, Annie; Salonen, Anniina

    2015-05-15

    The spatial distribution of charged spherical colloids when used as stabilizers of phytantriol-based emulsified microemulsions (EME, L2 symmetry group) is investigated. The coverage of the lipid-based mesophases by the colloids is monitored using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) in contrast matching conditions and visualized using cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) imaging. The results demonstrate that, despite the stability of the emulsion droplets, very few colloids are ever found on the droplets. The stability of the EMEs is suggested to arise from the very slow ripening rates combined with punctual repulsion against coalescence from the isolated charged colloids on the bigger droplet surfaces. We show the possibility of creating a dense cover around the droplets by partially hydrophobizing the colloids by adsorbing a cationic surfactant on their surface. This opens up the possibilities for further modulation of the colloidal coverage in these systems. This is an interesting route for the design of new Colloid-ISAsome assemblies in which dense protective armors could be advantageous such as controlled delivery. PMID:25660711

  3. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  4. Hypersensitivity from intravenous iron products.

    PubMed

    Bircher, Andreas J; Auerbach, Michael

    2014-08-01

    In the last several years, intravenous therapy with iron products has been more widely used. Although it has been a standard procedure in dialysis-associated anemia since the early 1990s, its use is expanding to a host of conditions associated with iron deficiency, especially young women with heavy uterine bleeding and pregnancy. Free iron is associated with unacceptable high toxicity inducing severe, hemodynamically significant symptoms. Subsequently, formulations that contain the iron as an iron carbohydrate nanoparticle have been designed. With newer formulations, including low-molecular-weight iron dextran, iron sucrose, ferric gluconate, ferumoxytol, iron isomaltoside, and ferric carboxymaltose, serious adverse events are rare. PMID:25017687

  5. Microbes: mini iron factories.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Kumar Batuk

    2014-12-01

    Microbes have flourished in extreme habitats since beginning of the Earth and have played an important role in geological processes like weathering, mineralization, diagenesis, mineral formation and destruction. Biotic mineralization is one of the most fascinating examples of how microbes have been influencing geological processes. Iron oxidizing and reducing bacteria are capable of precipitating wide varieties of iron oxides (magnetite), carbonates (siderite) and sulphides (greigite) via controlled or induced mineralization processes. Microbes have also been considered to play an important role in the history of evolution of sedimentary rocks on Earth from the formation of banded iron formations during the Archean to modern biotic bog iron and ochre deposits. Here, we discuss the role that microbes have been playing in precipitation of iron and the role and importance of interdisciplinary studies in the field of geology and biology in solving some of the major geological mysteries. PMID:25320452

  6. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  7. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  8. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  9. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  10. Influence of emulsifying salts on the textural properties of nonfat process cheese made from direct acid cheese bases.

    PubMed

    Brickley, C A; Govindasamy-Lucey, S; Jaeggi, J J; Johnson, M E; McSweeney, P L H; Lucey, J A

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of several types of emulsifying salts (ES) on the texture of nonfat process cheese (NFPC). Improperly produced nonfat cheese tends to exhibit several problems upon baking including stickiness, insufficient or excessive melt, pale color upon cooling, formation of a dry skin (skinning) often leading to dark blistering, and chewy texture. These attributes are due to the strength and number of interactions between and among casein molecules. We propose to disrupt these interactions by using suitable emulsifying salts (ES). These ES chelate Ca and disperse caseins. Stirred curd cheese bases were made from skim milk using direct acidification with lactic acid to pH values 5.0, 5.2, and 5.4, and ripened for 1 d. Various levels of trisodium citrate (TSC; 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, and 5%), disodium phosphate (DSP; 1, 2, 3, and 4%), or trisodium phosphate (TSP; 1, 2, 3, and 4%) were blended with the nonfat cheese base. Cheese, ES, and water were weighed into a steel container, which was placed in a waterbath at 98 degrees C and then stirred using an overhead stirrer for 9 min. Molten cheese was poured into plastic containers, sealed, and stored at 4 degrees C for 7 d before analysis. Texture and melting properties were determined using texture profile analysis and the UW-Melt-profiler. The pH 5.2 and 5.4 cheese bases were sticky during manufacture and had a pale straw-like color, whereas the pH 5.0 curd was white. Total calcium contents were approximately 400, 185, and 139 mg/100 g for pH 5.4, 5.2, and 5.0 cheeses, respectively. Addition of DSP resulted in NFPC with the lowest extent of flow, and crystal formation was apparent at DSP levels above 2%. The NFPC manufactured from the pH 5.0 base and using TSP had reduced melt and increased stickiness, whereas melt was significantly increased and stickiness was reduced in NFPC made with pH 5.4 base and TSP. However, for NFPC made from the pH 5.4 cheese and with 1% TSP, the pH value was >6.20 and crystals were observed within a few days. Use of TSC increased extent of flow up to a maximum with the addition of 2% ES for all 3 types of cheese bases. Addition of high levels of TSC to the pH 5.2 and 5.4 cheese bases resulted in increased stickiness. Similar pH trends for attributes such as extent of flow, hardness, and adhesiveness were observed for both phosphate ES but no consistent pH trends were observed for the NFPC made with TSC. These initial trials suggest that the pH 5.0 cheese base was promising for further research and scale-up to pilot-scale process cheese making, because cheeses had a creamy color, reasonable melt, and did not have high adhesiveness when TSC was used as the ES. However, the acid whey produced from the pH 5.0 curd could be a concern. PMID:18096923

  11. In situ intestinal permeability and in vivo oral bioavailability of celecoxib in supersaturating self-emulsifying drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Song, Woo Heon; Yeom, Dong Woo; Lee, Dong Hoon; Lee, Kyung Min; Yoo, Hyun Joon; Chae, Bo Ram; Song, Seh Hyon; Choi, Young Wook

    2014-05-01

    In order to characterize the in situ intestinal permeability and in vivo oral bioavailability of celecoxib (CXB), a poorly water-soluble cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, various formulations including the self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) and supersaturating SEDDS (S-SEDDS) were compared. The S-SEDDS formulation was obtained by adding Soluplus as a precipitation inhibitor to SEDDS, composed of Capryol 90 as oil, Tween 20 as surfactant, and Tetraglycol as cosurfactant (1:4.5:4.5 in volume ratio). An in situ single pass intestinal perfusion study in rats was performed with CXB-dissolved solutions at a concentration of 40 ?g/mL. The effective permeability (Peff) of CXB in the control solution (2.5 v/v% Tween 20-containing PBS) was 6.39 × 10(-5) cm/s. The Peff value was significantly increased (P < 0.05) by the lipid-based formulation, yielding 1.5- and 2.9-fold increases for the SEDDS and S-SEDDS solutions, respectively, compared to the control solution. After oral administration of various formulations to rats at the equivalent dose of 100 mg/kg of CXB, the plasma drug level was measured by LC-MS/MS. The relative bioavailabilities of SEDDS and S-SEDDS were 263 and 355 %, respectively, compared to the CXB suspension as a reference. In particular, S-SEDDS revealed the highest Cmax and the smallest Tmax, indicating rapid and enhanced absorption with this formulation. This study illustrates the potential use of the S-SEDDS formulation in the oral delivery of poorly water-soluble compounds. PMID:23852645

  12. Relationships between the properties of self-emulsifying pellets and of the emulsions used as massing liquids for their preparation.

    PubMed

    Nikolakakis, Ioannis; Panagopoulou, Athanasia; Salis, Andrea; Malamataris, Stavros

    2015-02-01

    Self-emulsifying pellets were prepared using microcrystalline cellulose, emulsions of caprylic/capric triglyceride, and three Cremophors (ELP, RH40, and RH60) at 1.5 and 2.3 weight ratios, and two drugs (furosemide and propranolol) of different lipophilicity. Droplet size, zeta potential (?) and viscosity of emulsions, and pellet size, shape, friability, tensile strength, disintegration, and drug migration in pellets were determined. Evaluation of reconstituted emulsions was based on droplet size and ?. Factorial design and 3-way ANOVA was applied to estimate the significance of the effects of the drug, surfactant and oil/surfactant ratio. It was found that droplet size, viscosity and ? of emulsions, and size, shape, and friability of pellets were affected by the studied factors and were significant interactions between their effects on pellet size and friability. Migration of drug towards the pellet surface was higher for the less lipophilic furosemide and higher oil content. Linear relationships were found between the emulsion viscosity and the shape parameters of the pellets (for the aspect ratio R (2)?=?0.796 for furosemide and R (2)?=?0.885 for propranolol and for the shape factor, e R R (2)?=?0.740 and R (2)?=?0.960, respectively). For all the formulations examined, an exponential relationship was found between migration (M%) and the product of viscosity (?) and solubility of drug in oil/surfactant mixture (S) (M%?=?98.1e-0.016 [?•S], R (2)?=?0.856), which may be useful in formulation work. PMID:25212898

  13. Water reclamation from emulsified oily wastewater via effective forward osmosis hollow fiber membranes under the PRO mode.

    PubMed

    Han, Gang; de Wit, Jos S; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2015-09-15

    By using a novel hydrophilic cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) as the membrane material for the hollow fiber substrate and modifying its outer surface by polydopamine (PDA) coating and inner surface by interfacial polymerization, we have demonstrated that the thin-film composite (TFC) membranes can be effectively used for sustainable water reclamation from emulsified oil/water streams via forward osmosis (FO) under the pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) mode. The newly developed TFC-FO hollow fiber membrane shows characteristics of high water flux, outstanding salt and oil rejection, and low fouling propensity. Under the PRO mode, the newly developed TFC-FO membrane exhibits a water flux of 37.1 L m(-2) h(-1) with an oil rejection of 99.9% using a 2000 ppm soybean oil/water emulsion as the feed and 1 M NaCl as the draw solution. Remarkable anti-fouling behaviors have also been observed. Under the PRO mode, the water flux decline is only 10% of the initial value even after a 12 h test for oil/water separation. The water flux of the fouled membrane can be effectively restored to 97% of the original value by water rinses on the fiber outer surface without using any chemicals. Furthermore, the flux declines are only 25% and 52% when the water recovery of a 2000 ppm soybean oil/water emulsion and a 2000 ppm petroleum oil/water emulsion containing 0.04 M NaCl reaches 82%, respectively. This study may not only provide insightful guidelines for the fabrication of effective TFC-FO membranes with high performance and low fouling behaviors for oily wastewater under the PRO mode but also add an alternative perspective to the design of new materials for water purification purposes. PMID:26043371

  14. Iron age in oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coale, Kenneth H.; Worsfold, Paul; de Baar, Hein

    This last decade of the millennium could rightly be called the iron age in oceanography. The last quarter of this century has witnessed a revolution in our understanding of trace metal distributions in the world's oceans, and iron has changed more about how we think about ocean production and carbon cycling than any other element. The revolution has come about through the application of clean water sampling devices, stringent anticontamination methods, and the development of new analytical techniques. As detection limits have been reduced, the concentrations, distributions, and behavior of trace metals were revealed, like the curtain lifting on a geochemical drama. Iron plays a leading role.

  15. Coal desulfurization. [using iron pentacarbonyl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C. (inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Organic sulfur is removed from coal by treatment with an organic solution of iron pentacarbonyl. Organic sulfur compounds can be removed by reaction of the iron pentacarbonyl with coal to generate CO and COS off-gases. The CO gas separated from COS can be passed over hot iron fillings to generate iron pentacarbonyl.

  16. Saugus Iron Works Blast Furnace

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A view of the Saugus Iron Works blast furnace, which smelted the iron from limonite, an iron ore. The limonite formed in nearby bogs, and was heated in the blast furnace until the iron melted and ran out the bottom of the furnace....

  17. Limonite at Saugus Iron Works

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A specimen of limonite, used in the iron smelting process. Limonite is a well-known iron ore that has been mined for iron for many thousands of years. At the Saugus Iron Works, the limonite was found in nearby bogs....

  18. Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in women.

    PubMed

    Coad, Jane; Pedley, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional problems in the world and disproportionately affects women and children. Stages of iron deficiency can be characterized as mild deficiency where iron stores become depleted, marginal deficiency where the production of many iron-dependent proteins is compromised but hemoglobin levels are normal and iron deficiency anemia where synthesis of hemoglobin is decreased and oxygen transport to the tissues is reduced. Iron deficiency anemia is usually assessed by measuring hemoglobin levels but this approach lacks both specificity and sensitivity. Failure to identify and treat earlier stages of iron deficiency is concerning given the neurocognitive implications of iron deficiency without anemia. Most of the daily iron requirement is derived from recycling of senescent erythrocytes by macrophages; only 5-10 % comes from the diet. Iron absorption is affected by inhibitors and enhancers of iron absorption and by the physiological state. Inflammatory conditions, including obesity, can result in iron being retained in the enterocytes and macrophages causing hypoferremia as a strategic defense mechanism to restrict iron availability to pathogens. Premenopausal women usually have low iron status because of iron loss in menstrual blood. Conditions which further increase iron loss, compromise absorption or increase demand, such as frequent blood donation, gastrointestinal lesions, athletic activity and pregnancy, can exceed the capacity of the gastrointestinal tract to upregulate iron absorption. Women of reproductive age are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency and its consequences however there is a controversial argument that evolutionary pressures have resulted in an iron deficient phenotype which protects against infection. PMID:25083899

  19. Iron-Air Rechargeable Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, Sri R. (Inventor); Prakash, G.K. Surya (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments include an iron-air rechargeable battery having a composite electrode including an iron electrode and a hydrogen electrode integrated therewith. An air electrode is spaced from the iron electrode and an electrolyte is provided in contact with the air electrode and the iron electrodes. Various additives and catalysts are disclosed with respect to the iron electrode, air electrode, and electrolyte for increasing battery efficiency and cycle life.

  20. Effect of soybean lecithin on iron-catalyzed or chlorophyll-photosensitized oxidation of canola oil emulsion.

    PubMed

    Choe, Jeesu; Oh, Boyoung; Choe, Eunok

    2014-11-01

    The effect of soybean lecithin addition on the iron-catalyzed or chlorophyll-photosensitized oxidation of emulsions consisting of purified canola oil and water (1:1, w/w) was studied based on headspace oxygen consumption using gas chromatography and hydroperoxide production using the ferric thiocyanate method. Addition levels of iron sulfate, chlorophyll, and soybean lecithin were 5, 4, and 350 mg/kg, respectively. Phospholipids (PLs) during oxidation of the emulsions were monitored by high performance liquid chromatography. Addition of soybean lecithin to the emulsions significantly reduced and decelerated iron-catalyzed oil oxidation by lowering headspace oxygen consumption and hydroperoxide production. However, soybean lecithin had no significant antioxidant effect on chlorophyll-photosensitized oxidation of the emulsions. PLs in soybean lecithin added to the emulsions were degraded during both oxidation processes, although there was little change in PL composition. Among PLs in soybean lecithin, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol were degraded the fastest in the iron-catalyzed and the chlorophyll-photosensitized oxidation, respectively. The results suggest that addition of soybean lecithin as an emulsifier can also improve the oxidative stability of oil in an emulsion. PMID:25312008